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Sample records for 1-3 brain metastases

  1. Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Hippocampal Avoidance and Simultaneous Integrated Boost for 1-3 Brain Metastases: A Feasibility Study Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Fred; Carolan, Hannah; Nichol, Alan; Cao, Fred; Nuraney, Nimet; Lee, Richard; Gete, Ermias; Wong, Frances; Schmuland, Moira; Heran, Manraj; Otto, Karl

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to deliver whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with hippocampal avoidance and a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for one to three brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Ten patients previously treated with stereotactic radiosurgery for one to three brain metastases underwent repeat planning using VMAT. The whole brain prescription dose was 32.25 Gy in 15 fractions, and SIB doses to brain metastases were 63 Gy to lesions >=2.0 cm and 70.8 Gy to lesions <2.0 cm in diameter. The mean dose to the hippocampus was kept at <6 Gy{sub 2}. Plans were optimized for conformity and target coverage while minimizing hippocampal and ocular doses. Plans were evaluated on target coverage, prescription isodose to target volume ratio, conformity number, homogeneity index, and maximum dose to prescription dose ratio. Results: Ten patients had 18 metastases. Mean values for the brain metastases were as follows: conformity number = 0.73 +- 0.10, target coverage = 0.98 +- 0.01, prescription isodose to target volume = 1.34 +- 0.19, maximum dose to prescription dose ratio = 1.09 +- 0.02, and homogeneity index = 0.07 +- 0.02. For the whole brain, the mean target coverage and homogeneity index were 0.960 +- 0.002 and 0.39 +- 0.06, respectively. The mean hippocampal dose was 5.23 +- 0.39 Gy{sub 2}. The mean treatment delivery time was 3.6 min (range, 3.3-4.1 min). Conclusions: VMAT was able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage with conformal hippocampal avoidance and radiosurgical quality dose distributions for one to three brain metastases. The mean delivery time was under 4 min.

  2. [Stereotactic radiotherapy in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Colin, P; Métellus, P; Mornex, F; Noël, G

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases is increasingly proposed after polydisciplinary debates among experts. Its definition and modalities of prescription, indications and clinical interest regarding the balance between efficacy versus toxicity need to be discussed. Stereotactic radiotherapy is a 'high precision' irradiation technique (within 1mm), using different machines (with invasive contention or frameless, photons X or gamma) delivering high doses (4 to 25Gy) in a limited number of fractions (usually 1 to 5, ten maximum) with a high dose gradient. Dose prescription will depend on materials, dose constraints to organs at risk varying with fractionation. Stereotactic radiotherapy may be proposed: (1) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy with the goal of increasing (modestly) overall survival of patients with a good performance status, 1 to 3 brain metastases and a controlled extracranial disease; (2) for recurrence of 1-3 brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy; (3) after complete resection of a large and/or symptomatic brain metastases; (4) after diagnosis of 3-5 asymptomatic new or progressing brain metastases during systemic therapy, with the aim of delaying whole brain radiotherapy (avoiding its potential neurotoxicity) and maintaining a high focal control rate. Only a strict follow-up with clinical and MRI every 3 months will permit to deliver iterative stereotactic radiotherapies without jeopardizing survival. Simultaneous delivering of stereotactic radiotherapy with targeted medicines should be carefully discussed. PMID:25640215

  3. [Epidemiology of brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Taillibert, S; Le Rhun, É

    2015-02-01

    The most frequent intracranial brain tumours are brain metastases. All types of cancer can develop brain metastases but two thirds of brain metastases occurring in adult patients are secondary to one of these three cancers: lung cancer, breast cancer and melanoma. In accordance with these data, this review is focusing on the epidemiology of these three types of cancer. We report here the incidence, risk factors, median time of brain metastases occurrence after diagnosis of the primary cancer, prognosis and median survival for these three types of cancer. We also discuss the clinical implications of these data. The second part of this review is focusing on the Graded Prognostic Assessment scores in all types of primary cancer with brain metastases, how they can be applied in clinical research for a better stratification of patients, and to some extent in clinical practice to guide decisions for personalized treatments. These scores provide a better understanding of the different profiles of clinical evolution that can be observed amongst patients suffering from brain metastases according to the type of primary cancer. We highlighted the most remarkable and useful clinical implications of these data. PMID:25636729

  4. [Surgery of brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Métellus, P; Reyns, N; Voirin, J; Menei, P; Bauchet, L; Faillot, T; Loiseau, H; Pallud, J; Guyotat, J; Mandonnet, E

    2015-02-01

    Surgical excision of brain metastases has been well evaluated in unique metastases. Two randomized phase III trial have shown that combined with adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy, it significantly improves overall survival. However, even in the presence of multiple brain metastases, surgery may be useful. Also, even in lesions amenable to radiosurgery, surgical resection is preferred when tumors displayed cystic or necrotic aspect with important edema or when located in highly eloquent areas or cortico-subcortically. Furthermore, surgery may have a diagnostic role, in the absence of histological documentation of the primary disease, to rule out a differential diagnosis (brain abscess, lymphoma, primary tumor of the central nervous system or radionecrosis). Finally, the biological documentation of brain metastatic disease might be useful in situations where a specific targeted therapy can be proposed. Selection of patients who will really benefit from surgery should take into account three factors, clinical and functional status of the patient, systemic disease status and characteristics of intracranial metastases. Given the improved overall survival of cancer patients partially due to the advent of effective targeted therapies on systemic disease, a renewed interest has been given to the local treatment of brain metastases. Surgical resection currently represents a valuable tool in the armamentarium of brain metastases but has also become a diagnostic and decision tool that can affect therapeutic strategies in these patients. PMID:25640217

  5. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. PMID:27523410

  6. [Melanoma brain metastases : Treatment options].

    PubMed

    Rauschenberg, R; Tabatabai, G; Troost, E G C; Garzarolli, M; Beissert, S; Meier, F

    2016-07-01

    The majority of patients with metastatic melanoma will develop brain metastases, which are the most common cause of death. Until recently, local therapies (e. g., neurosurgery, radiotherapy) were the only options for brain metastases; however, effective systemic treatment options are now available. Upon suspicion of brain metastases, diagnostic staging with brain MRI and a neurological investigation are indicated. Prognostic factors such as number of cerebral metastases and symptoms, serum lactate dehydrogenase and S‑100 levels, extracerebral metastases, and ECOG status are considered during therapeutic planning. Treatment planning and therapeutic interventions should be based on an interdisciplinary and multimodal approach. Established treatments for singular brain metastases are neurosurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy, which can prolong survival. In patients with asymptomatic BRAF V600E-mutant brain metastases, the BRAF inhibitors dabrafenib, vemurafenib, and immunotherapy with ipilimumab are used. In the case of multiple symptomatic brain metastases, palliative whole-brain radiotherapy is used for treatment, although it has failed to show an overall survival benefit. Increased intracranial pressure and epileptic seizures are addressed with corticosteroids and anticonvulsants. Current clinical studies for melanoma patients with brain metastases are investigating new treatment options such as PD-1 antibodies, combined ipilimumab and nivolumab, combined BRAF inhibitors and MEK inhibitors, and stereotactic radiation in combination with immunotherapy or targeted therapy. PMID:27206449

  7. [Brain metastases imaging].

    PubMed

    Delmaire, C; Savatovsky, J; Boulanger, T; Dhermain, F; Le Rhun, E; Météllus, P; Gerber, S; Carsin-Nicole, B; Petyt, G

    2015-02-01

    The therapeutic management of brain metastases depends upon their diagnosis and characteristics. It is therefore imperative that imaging provides accurate diagnosis, identification, size and localization information of intracranial lesions in patients with presumed cerebral metastatic disease. MRI exhibits superior sensitivity to CT for small lesions identification and to evaluate their precise anatomical location. The CT-scan will be made only in case of MRI's contraindication or if MRI cannot be obtained in an acceptable delay for the management of the patient. In clinical practice, the radiologic metastasis evaluation is based on visual image analyses. Thus, a particular attention is paid to the imaging protocol with the aim to optimize the diagnosis of small lesions and to evaluate their evolution. The MRI protocol must include: 1) non-contrast T1, 2) diffusion, 3) T2* or susceptibility-weighted imaging, 4) dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion, 5) FLAIR with contrast injection, 6) T1 with contrast injection preferentially using the 3D spin echo images. The role of the nuclear medicine imaging is still limited in the diagnosis of brain metastasis. The Tc-sestamibi brain imaging or PET with amino acid tracers can differentiate local brain metastasis recurrence from radionecrosis but still to be evaluated. PMID:25649387

  8. Brain metastases from ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Piura, Ettie; Piura, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on knowledge related to brain metastases from ovarian carcinoma. So far, less than 600 cases were documented in the literature with an incidence among ovarian carcinoma patients ranging from 0.29% to 11.6%. The ovarian carcinoma was usually an advanced-stage epithelial serous carcinoma, and the median interval between diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma and brain metastases was 2 years. Most often, brain metastases, affected the cerebrum, were multiple and part of a disseminated disease. Treatment of brain metastasis has evolved over the years from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) only to multimodal therapy including surgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery followed by WBRT and/or chemotherapy. The median survival after diagnosis of brain metastases was 6 months; nevertheless, a significantly better survival was achieved with multimodal therapy compared to WBRT only. It is suggested that brain imaging studies should be included in the followup of patients after treatment for ovarian carcinoma. PMID:22191058

  9. Brain metastases from endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Piura, Ettie; Piura, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This paper will focus on knowledge related to brain metastases from endometrial carcinoma. To date, 115 cases were documented in the literature with an incidence of 0.6% among endometrial carcinoma patients. The endometrial carcinoma was usually an advanced-stage and high-grade tumor. In most patients (~90%), brain metastasis was detected after diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma with a median interval from diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma to diagnosis of brain metastases of 17 months. Brain metastasis from endometrial carcinoma was either an isolated disease limited to the brain only (~50%) or part of a disseminated disease involving also other parts of the body (~50%). Most often, brain metastasis from endometrial carcinoma affected the cerebrum (~75%) and was solitary (~60%). The median survival after diagnosis of brain metastases from endometrial carcinoma was 5 months; however, a significantly better survival was achieved with multimodal therapy including surgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery followed by whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and/or chemotherapy compared to WBRT alone. It is suggested that brain imaging studies should be considered in the routine follow up of patients with endometrial carcinoma and that the search for a primary source in females with brain metastases of unknown primary should include endometrial biopsy. PMID:22523707

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Specht, Hanno M; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-09-01

    Brain metastases are a common problem in solid malignancies and still represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality. With the ongoing improvement in systemic therapies, the expectations on the efficacy of brain metastases directed treatment options are growing. As local therapies against brain metastases continue to evolve, treatment patterns have shifted from a palliative "one-treatment-fits-all" towards an individualized, patient adapted approach. In this article we review the evidence for stereotactic radiation treatment based on the current literature. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as a local high precision approach for the primary treatment of asymptomatic brain metastases has gained wide acceptance. It leads to lasting tumor control with only minor side effects compared to whole brain radiotherapy, since there is only little dose delivered to the healthy brain. The same holds true for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HFSRT) for large metastases or for lesions close to organs at risk (e.g. the brainstem). New treatment indications such as neoadjuvant SRS followed by surgical resection or postoperative local therapy to the resection cavity show promising data and are also highlighted in this manuscript. With the evolution of local treatment options, optimal patient selection becomes more and more crucial. This article aims to aid decision making by outlining prognostic factors, treatment techniques and indications and common dose prescriptions. PMID:27071010

  11. Brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Smith, Quentin R; Lockman, Paul R; Bronder, Julie; Gril, Brunilde; Chambers, Ann F; Weil, Robert J; Steeg, Patricia S

    Central nervous system or brain metastases traditionally occur in 10-16% of metastatic breast cancer patients and are associated with a dismal prognosis. The development of brain metastases has been associated with young age, and tumors that are estrogen receptor negative, Her-2+ or of the basal phenotype. Treatment typically includes whole brain irradiation, or either stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery with whole brain radiation, resulting in an approximately 20% one year survival. The blood-brain barrier is a formidable obstacle to the delivery of chemotherapeutics to the brain. Mouse experimental metastasis model systems have been developed for brain metastasis using selected sublines of human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. Using micron sized iron particles and MRI imaging, the fate of MDA-MB-231BR cells has been mapped: Approximately 2% of injected cells form larger macroscopic metastases, while 5% of cells remain as dormant cells in the brain. New therapies with permeability for the blood-brain barrier are needed to counteract both types of tumor cells. PMID:17473372

  12. Radiosurgery for Large Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Chul-Kee; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy and safety of radiosurgery in patients with large brain metastases treated with radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Eighty patients with large brain metastases (>14 cm{sup 3}) were treated with radiosurgery between 1998 and 2009. The mean age was 59 {+-} 11 years, and 49 (61.3%) were men. Neurologic symptoms were identified in 77 patients (96.3%), and 30 (37.5%) exhibited a dependent functional status. The primary disease was under control in 36 patients (45.0%), and 44 (55.0%) had a single lesion. The mean tumor volume was 22.4 {+-} 8.8 cm{sup 3}, and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 13.8 {+-} 2.2 Gy. Results: The median survival time from radiosurgery was 7.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.343-10.46), and the 1-year survival rate was 39.2%. Functional improvement within 1-4 months or the maintenance of the initial independent status was observed in 48 (60.0%) and 20 (25.0%) patients after radiosurgery, respectively. Control of the primary disease, a marginal dose of {>=}11 Gy, and a tumor volume {>=}26 cm{sup 3} were significantly associated with overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.479; p = .018; 95% CI, 0.261-0.880; hazard ratio, 0.350; p = .004; 95% CI, 0.171-0.718; hazard ratio, 2.307; p = .006; 95% CI, 1.274-4.180, respectively). Unacceptable radiation-related toxicities (Radiation Toxicity Oncology Group central nervous system toxicity Grade 3, 4, and 5 in 7, 6, and 2 patients, respectively) developed in 15 patients (18.8%). Conclusion: Radiosurgery seems to have a comparable efficacy with surgery for large brain metastases. However, the rate of radiation-related toxicities after radiosurgery should be considered when deciding on a treatment modality.

  13. Comparing Postoperative Radiation Therapies for Brain Metastases

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with one to four brain metastases who have had at least one of the metastatic tumors removed surgically will be randomly assigned to undergo whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery.

  14. Future directions in treatment of brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Barani, Igor J.; Larson, David A.; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases affect up to 30% of patients with cancer. Management of brain metastases continues to evolve with ever increasing focus on cognitive preservation and quality of life. This manuscript reviews current state of brain metastases management and discusses various treatment controversies with focus on future clinical trials. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) are discussed in context of multiple (4+ brain metastases) as well as new approaches combining radiation and targeted agents. A brief discussion of modified WBRT approaches, including hippocampal-avoidance WBRT (HA-WBRT) is included as well as a section on recently presented results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0614, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of menantine for prevention of neurocognitive injury after WBRT. Methods: A search of selected studies relevant to management of brain metastases was performed in PubMed as well as in various published meeting abstracts. This data was collated and analyzed in context of contemporary management and future clinical trial plans. This data is presented in tabular form and discussed extensively in the text. Results: The published data demonstrate continued evolution of clinical trials and management strategies designed to minimize and/or prevent cognitive decline following radiation therapy management of brain metastases. Hippocampal avoidance whole-brain radiation therapy (HA-WBRT) and radiosurgery treatments for multiple brain metastases are discussed along with preliminary results of RTOG 0614, a trial of memantine therapy to prevent cognitive decline following WBRT. Trial results appear to support the use of memantine for prevention of cognitive decline. Conclusions: Different management strategies for multiple brain metastases (>4 brain metastases) are currently being evaluated in prospective clinical trials to minimize the likelihood of cognitive decline following WBRT. PMID

  15. Secondary Analysis of RTOG 9508, a Phase 3 Randomized Trial of Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Versus WBRT Plus Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Patients With 1-3 Brain Metastases; Poststratified by the Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA)

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Andrews, David; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Valicenti, Richard; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Souhami, Luis; Won, Minhee; Mehta, Minesh

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9508 showed a survival advantage for patients with 1 but not 2 or 3 brain metastasis (BM) treated with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) versus WBRT alone. An improved prognostic index, the graded prognostic assessment (GPA) has been developed. Our hypothesis was that if the data from RTOG 9508 were poststratified by the GPA, the conclusions may vary. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 252 of the 331 patients were evaluable by GPA. Of those, 211 had lung cancer. Breast cancer patients were excluded because the components of the breast GPA are not in the RTOG database. Multiple Cox regression was used to compare survival between treatment groups, adjusting for GPA. Treatment comparisons within subgroups were performed with the log-rank test. A free online tool ( (brainmetgpa.com)) simplified GPA use. Results: The fundamental conclusions of the primary analysis were confirmed in that there was no survival benefit overall for patients with 1 to 3 metastases; however, there was a benefit for the subset of patients with GPA 3.5 to 4.0 (median survival time [MST] for WBRT + SRS vs WBRT alone was 21.0 versus 10.3 months, P=.05) regardless of the number of metastases. Among patients with GPA 3.5 to 4.0 treated with WBRT and SRS, the MST for patients with 1 versus 2 to 3 metastases was 21 and 14.1 months, respectively. Conclusions: This secondary analysis of predominantly lung cancer patients, consistent with the original analysis, shows no survival advantage for the group overall when treated with WBRT and SRS; however, in patients with high GPA (3.5-4), there is a survival advantage regardless of whether they have 1, 2, or 3 BM. This benefit did not extend to patients with lower GPA. Prospective validation of this survival benefit for patients with multiple BM and high GPA when treated with WBRT and SRS is warranted.

  16. Radiosurgery for brain metastases and cerebral edema.

    PubMed

    Gazit, Inbal; Har-Nof, Sagi; Cohen, Zvi R; Zibly, Zion; Nissim, Uzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess reduction in cerebral edema following linear accelerator radiosurgery (LINAC) as first line therapy for brain metastasis. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who underwent LINAC radiosurgery for brain metastasis at our institution during 2010-2012, and who had not previously undergone either surgery or whole brain radiotherapy. Data were analyzed for 55 brain metastases from 46 patients (24 males), mean age 59.9 years. During the 2 months following LINAC radiosurgery, the mean steroid dose decreased from 4.8 to 2.6 mg/day, the mean metastasis volume decreased from 3.79±4.12 cc to 2.8±4.48 cc (p=0.001), and the mean edema volume decreased from 16.91±30.15 cc to 12.85±24.47 cc (p=0.23). The 17 patients with reductions of more than 50% in brain edema volume had single metastases. Edema volume in the nine patients with two brain metastases remained stable in five patients (volume change <10%, 0-2 cc) and increased in four patients (by >10%, 2-14 cc). In a subanalysis of eight metastases with baseline edema volume greater than 40 cc, edema volume decreased from 77.27±37.21 cc to 24.84±35.6 cc (p=0.034). Reductions in brain edema were greater in metastases for which non-small-cell lung carcinoma and breast cancers were the primary diseases. Overall, symptoms improved in most patients. No patients who were without symptoms or who had no signs of increased intracranial pressure at baseline developed signs of intracranial pressure following LINAC radiosurgery. In this series, LINAC stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic brain lesions resulted in early reduction in brain edema volume in single metastasis patients and those with large edema volumes, and reduced the need for steroids. PMID:25533053

  17. [Systemic treatment of melanoma brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Mateus, C; Mortier, L; Dhermain, F; Guillot, B; Grob, J-J; Lebbe, C; Thomas, M; Jouary, T; Leccia, M-T; Robert, C

    2015-02-01

    Melanomas have a high rate of brain metastases. Both the functional prognosis and the overall survival are poor in these patients. Until now, surgery and radiotherapy represented the two main modalities of treatment. Nevertheless, due to the improvement in the management of the extracerebral melanoma, the systemic treatment may be an option in patients with brain metastases. Immunotherapy with anti-CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4) - ipilimumab - or BRAF (serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf) inhibitors - vemurafenib, dabrafenib - has shown efficacy in the management of brain metastases in a- or pauci-symptomatic patients. Studies are ongoing with anti-PD1 (programmed cell death 1) and combinations of targeted therapies associating anti-RAF (raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase) and anti-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase). PMID:25656856

  18. [Mangement of brain metastases based on EBM].

    PubMed

    Narita, Yoshitaka

    2005-04-01

    Some three hundred thousand of patients die of cancers yearly and at least 20-40%, i. e., 60,000-120,000 of them suffered from brain metastases. Those with such metastases have a generally poor outcome with a median survival of 1-2 months with steroids only, and approximately 6 months with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). The results of important and historical clinical trials including surgery, WBRT, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and chemotherapy are reviewed. Surgery with WBRT has been used in the treatment of a single brain metatasis with a diameter of more than 3 cm, while survival time of those patients is approximately 12 months. SRS including gamma knife is widely used for treatment of small and multiple brain metastases. However, many clinical studies have revealed that SRS+WBRT is superior to WBRT or SRS alone in survival time and local control rates. The accurate incident rates of radiation-induced dementia or neurological deficit are still unclear, so the problem and possible avoidance of an additional WBRT after surgery or SRS are discussed. To improve neurologic function and survival, the treatment for patients with brain metastases should be selected with accurate knowledge of EBM. PMID:15853211

  19. Evolving treatment options for melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankamma; Parkinson, Christine; Fife, Kate; Corrie, Pippa; Jefferies, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Melanoma is a leading cause of lost productivity due to premature cancer mortality. Melanoma frequently spreads to the brain and is associated with rapid deterioration in quality and quantity of life. Until now, treatment options have been restricted to surgery and radiotherapy, although neither modality has been well studied in clinical trials. However, the new immune checkpoint inhibitors and molecularly targeted agents that have been introduced for treatment of metastatic melanoma are active against brain metastases and offer new opportunities to improve disease outcomes. New challenges arise, including how to integrate or sequence multiple treatment modalities, and current practice varies widely. In this Review, we summarise evidence for the treatment of melanoma brain metastases, and discuss the rationale and evidence for combination modalities, highlighting areas for future research. PMID:26433822

  20. Outcomes After Whole Brain Reirradiation in Patients With Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Christina H.; Jimenez, Rachel; Niemierko, Andrzej; Loeffler, Jay S.; Oh, Kevin S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases are often treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for purposes of palliation. The treatment of those who experience subsequent intracranial disease progression can include a second course of WBRT, although there is controversy surrounding its safety and efficacy. This study examines the outcomes in patients at Massachusetts General Hospital who underwent reirradiation. Patients and Methods: We examined the medical records of 17 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital with brain metastases who were initially treated with WBRT between 2002 and 2008 and were subsequently retreated with a second course of WBRT. The median dose for the first course of WBRT was 35 Gy (range, 28-40 Gy), with a fraction size of 2 to 3 Gy (median, 2.5 Gy). The median dose at reirradiation was 21.6 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy), with a fraction size of 1.5 to 2 Gy (median, 1.8 Gy). Results: The second course of WBRT was administered upon radiographic disease progression in all patients. Of 10 patients with complete follow-up data, 8 patients experienced complete or partial symptom resolution, and 2 did not show clinical improvement. The time to radiographic progression was 5.2 months. The median overall survival for all patients after diagnosis of metastases was 24.7 months. The median survival time after initiation of reirradiation was 5.2 months (95% CI, 1.3-8.7). In 6 patients with stable extracranial disease, the median survival time after retreatment was 19.8 months (95% CI, 2.7-{infinity}), compared with 2.5 months (95% CI, 0.8-5.5) for those with extracranial disease progression (p = 0.05). Acute adverse reactions occurred in 70.5% of patients but were mild to moderate in severity. Conclusion: In select patients and especially those with stable extracranial disease, reirradiation may be an appropriate and effective intervention to provide symptomatic relief and slow intracranial disease progression. Side effects were minimal and did not

  1. Radiotherapy: Neurocognitive considerations in the treatment of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Marko, Nicholas F; Weil, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    The results of a randomized, controlled trial investigating the neurocognitive effects of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), with or without whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), to treat brain metastases demonstrated a significant reduction in learning and memory, associated with the addition of WBRT to SRS. the results indicate that SRS monotherapy is an effective and safe initial management strategy for brain metastases. PMID:20354539

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Halasz, Lia M; Rockhill, Jason K

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HFSRT) have become important treatment modalities for brain metastases. While effective, there are still areas of extensive debate on its appropriate use in patients with life-limiting diseases. This review provides an overview of the indications and challenges of SRS and HFSRT in the management of brain metastases. PMID:23717789

  3. Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Brain Metastases: From Biology to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Berghoff, Anna S; Venur, Vyshak A; Preusser, Matthias; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has been a subject of intense research over the last several years, leading to new approaches for modulation of the immune system to treat malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-CLTA-4 antibodies and anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies) potentiate the host's own antitumor immune response. These immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown impressive clinical efficacy in advanced melanoma, metastatic kidney cancer, and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)-all malignancies that frequently cause brain metastases. The immune response in the brain is highly regulated, challenging the treatment of brain metastases with immune-modulatory therapies. The immune microenvironment in brain metastases is active with a high density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in certain patients and, therefore, may serve as a potential treatment target. However, clinical data of the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors in brain metastases compared with extracranial metastases are limited, as most clinical trials with these new agents excluded patients with active brain metastases. In this article, we review the current scientific evidence of brain metastases biology with specific emphasis on inflammatory tumor microenvironment and the evolving state of clinical application of immune checkpoint inhibitors for patients with brain metastases. PMID:27249713

  4. Brain metastases from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia: review of pertinent literature.

    PubMed

    Piura, E; Piura, B

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastasis from gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is rare with about 222 cases documented in the literature and an incidence of about 11% in living GTN patients. Brain metastasis from GTN was part of a disseminated disease in 90% of patients, single metastases in the brain - 80% and located in the cerebrum - 90%. Brain metastasis was the only manifestation of metastatic GTN in 11.3% of patients, appeared synchronously with metastatic GTN in other sites of the body - 30.6% and was diagnosed from 0.3 to 60 months after diagnosis of metastatic GTN in other sites (most often in the lung) - 58.1%. Overall, 83.9% of patients with brain metastases from GTN had also lung metastases from GTN. Brain metastases from GTN showed a greater tendency to be hemorrhagic compared to brain metastases from other primaries. In patients with brain metastases from GTN, the best outcome was achieved with multimodal therapy including craniotomy, whole brain radiotherapy, and EP-EMA or EMA-CO chemotherapy. Nonetheless, brain metastasis from GTN is a grave disease with a median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis of about 12 months. PMID:25118474

  5. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from escalating the radiation dose was investigated. Methods Data from 220 patients were retrospectively analyzed for overall survival and local control. Nine potential prognostic factors were evaluated: tumor type, WBI schedule, age, gender, Karnofsky performance score, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, interval from diagnosis of cancer to WBI, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results Survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 32% and 19%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, WBI doses >30 Gy (p = 0.038), KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p = 0.007), no extracerebral metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved survival. Local control rates at 6 and 12 months were 37% and 15%, respectively. In the multivariate analyses, KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved local control. In RPA class 3 patients, survival rates at 6 months were 10% (35 of 39 patients) after 10 × 3 Gy and 9% (2 of 23 patients) after greater doses, respectively (p = 0.98). Conclusions Improved outcomes were associated with WBI doses >30 Gy, better performance status, fewer brain metastases, lack of extracerebral metastases, and lower RPA class. Patients receiving WBI alone appear to benefit from WBI doses >30 Gy. However, such a benefit is limited to RPA class 1 or 2 patients. PMID:20977700

  6. Updates in the management of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Arvold, Nils D; Lee, Eudocia Q; Mehta, Minesh P; Margolin, Kim; Alexander, Brian M; Lin, Nancy U; Anders, Carey K; Soffietti, Riccardo; Camidge, D Ross; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Dunn, Ian F; Wen, Patrick Y

    2016-08-01

    The clinical management/understanding of brain metastases (BM) has changed substantially in the last 5 years, with key advances and clinical trials highlighted in this review. Several of these changes stem from improvements in systemic therapy, which have led to better systemic control and longer overall patient survival, associated with increased time at risk for developing BM. Development of systemic therapies capable of preventing BM and controlling both intracranial and extracranial disease once BM are diagnosed is paramount. The increase in use of stereotactic radiosurgery alone for many patients with multiple BM is an outgrowth of the desire to employ treatments focused on local control while minimizing cognitive effects associated with whole brain radiotherapy. Complications from BM and their treatment must be considered in comprehensive patient management, especially with greater awareness that the majority of patients do not die from their BM. Being aware of significant heterogeneity in prognosis and therapeutic options for patients with BM is crucial for appropriate management, with greater attention to developing individual patient treatment plans based on predicted outcomes; in this context, recent prognostic models of survival have been extensively revised to incorporate molecular markers unique to different primary cancers. PMID:27382120

  7. Brain metastases from cervical carcinoma: overview of pertinent literature.

    PubMed

    Piura, E; Piura, B

    2012-01-01

    Brain metastasis from cervical carcinoma is rare with only about 100 cases documented in the literature and an incidence among cervical carcinoma patients of 0.6%. The median interval between diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and brain metastases is 18 months. The brain can be the only site of distant metastasis of cervical carcinoma ("isolated brain metastases") (46.8%) or brain metastasis can be part of a disseminated cervical carcinoma involving also other sites of the body (53.2%). Brain metastasis of cervical carcinoma affects most often the cerebrum (73%) and can be either single (one metastasis) (50.6%) or multiple (> or = two metastases) (49.4%). Treatment of brain metastases has evolved over the years from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone to multimodal therapy including surgical resection (craniotomy) or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) followed by WBRT +/- chemotherapy. The median overall survival after diagnosis of brain metastases is four months; however, a better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy (craniotomy followed by WBRT) compared to craniotomy alone or WBRT alone. The worst survival is observed in patients with no treatment. Although based on a very small number of patients, the best survival is noticed in patients having SRS either alone or in combination with other treatment modality. PMID:23327047

  8. [Systemic treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Taillibert, S; Conforti, R; Bonneterre, J; Bachelot, T; Le Rhun, E; Bernard-Marty, C

    2015-02-01

    An increase in the incidence of breast cancer patients with brain metastases has been observed over the last years, mainly because the recent development of new drugs including therapies targeting HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) resulted in an increased survival of these patients. With HER2+ patients living longer and the well-known neurotropism of HER2+ tumour cells, the resulting high incidence of brain metastases is not really surprising. Moreover, brain metastases more often occur within a context of existing extracranial metastases. These need to be treated at the same time in order to favourably impact patients' survival. Consequently, the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases clearly relies on a multidisciplinary approach, including systemic treatment. A working group including neuro-oncologists, neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists and oncologists was created in order to provide French national guidelines for the management of brain metastases within the "Association des neuro-oncologues d'expression française" (ANOCEF). The recommendations regarding the systemic treatment in breast cancer patients are reported here including key features of their management. PMID:25662600

  9. [ANOCEF guidelines for the management of brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Dhermain, F; Noël, G; Reyns, N; Carpentier, A; Mandonnet, E; Taillibert, S; Metellus, P

    2015-02-01

    The incidence of brain metastases is increasing because of the use of new therapeutic agents, which allow an improvement of overall survival, but with only a poor penetration into the central nervous system brain barriers. The management of brain metastases has changed due to a better knowledge of immunohistochemical data and molecular biological data, the development of new surgical, radiotherapeutic approaches and improvement of systemic treatments. Most of the time, the prognosis is still limited to several months, nevertheless, prolonged survival may be now observed in some sub-groups of patients. The main prognostic factors include the type and subtype of the primitive, age, general status of the patient, number and location of brain metastases, extracerebral disease. The multidisciplinary discussion should take into account all of these parameters. We should notice also that treatments including surgery or radiotherapy may be proposed in a symptomatic goal in advanced phases of the disease underlying the multidisciplinary approach until late in the evolution of the disease. This article reports on the ANOCEF (French neuro-oncology association) guidelines. The management of brain metastases of breast cancers and lung cancers are discussed in the same chapter, while the management of melanoma brain metastases is reported in a separate chapter due to different responses to the brain radiotherapy. PMID:25666314

  10. A Multi-institutional Study of Factors Influencing the Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, David C.; Charpentier, Anne-Marie; Cigsar, Candemir; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Ng, Angela; Bahl, Guarav; Zadeh, Gelareh; San Miguel, John; Menard, Cynthia

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases is a relatively well-studied technology with established guidelines regarding patient selection, although its implementation is technically complex. We evaluated the extent to which local availability of SRS affected the treatment of patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 3030 patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for brain metastases in 1 of 7 cancer centers in Ontario. Clinical data were abstracted for a random sample of 973 patients. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the use of SRS as a boost within 4 months following WBRT or at any time following WBRT. Results: Of 898 patients eligible for analysis, SRS was provided to 70 (7.8%) patients at some time during the course of their disease and to 34 (3.8%) patients as a boost following WBRT. In multivariable analyses, factors significantly associated with the use of SRS boost following WBRT were fewer brain metastases (odds ratio [OR] = 6.50), controlled extracranial disease (OR = 3.49), age (OR = 0.97 per year of advancing age), and the presence of an on-site SRS program at the hospital where WBRT was given (OR = 12.34; all P values were <.05). Similarly, availability of on-site SRS was the factor most predictive of the use of SRS at any time following WBRT (OR = 5.98). Among patients with 1-3 brain metastases, good/fair performance status, and no evidence of active extracranial disease, SRS was provided to 40.3% of patients who received WBRT in a hospital that had an on-site SRS program vs 3.0% of patients who received WBRT at a hospital without SRS (P<.01). Conclusions: The availability of on-site SRS is the factor most strongly associated with the provision of this treatment to patients with brain metastases and appears to be more influential than accepted clinical eligibility factors.

  11. [Complex treatment of breast cancer patients with brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, S V; Tkachev, S I; Moskvina, E A; Mikhina, Z P; Naskhletashvili, D R; Bulychkin, P V; Romanov, D S; Trofimova, O P; Berdnik, A V; Bykova, Yu B; Gutnik, R A; Yazhgunovich, I P; Fedoseenko, D I

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases in breast cancer develop for 24-32 months after the detection of the primary tumor. The study included patients with brain metastases who were divided into three groups: the first group--with early chemoradiotherapy (CRT) without induction chemotherapy (IC) by capecitabine; the second group--with delayed CRT with 4 or 8 courses of IC by capecitabine; the third group (a historical control) who received only whole brain radiation therapy. The median time to progression of intracranial metastases was 15.3, 12 and 5 months, respectively. The median time to the intracranial progression significantly less in the third group (5 months) compared with the first (15.3 months) (p = 0.0007) and the second (12 months) (p = 0.027) groups. The overall survival rate was 22.1, 15.1 and 6.8 months in three groups, respectively. PMID:26995988

  12. Novel treatment strategies for brain tumors and metastases

    PubMed Central

    El-Habashy, Salma E.; Nazief, Alaa M.; Adkins, Chris E.; Wen, Ming Ming; El-Kamel, Amal H.; Hamdan, Ahmed M.; Hanafy, Amira S.; Terrell, Tori O.; Mohammad, Afroz S.; Lockman, Paul R.; Nounou, Mohamed Ismail

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes patent applications in the past 5 years for the management of brain tumors and metastases. Most of the recent patents discuss one of the following strategies: the development of new drug entities that specifically target the brain cells, the blood–brain barrier and the tumor cells, tailor-designing a novel carrier system that is able to perform multitasks and multifunction as a drug carrier, targeting vehicle and even as a diagnostic tool, direct conjugation of a US FDA approved drug with a targeting moiety, diagnostic moiety or PK modifying moiety, or the use of innovative nontraditional approaches such as genetic engineering, stem cells and vaccinations. Until now, there has been no optimal strategy to deliver therapeutic agents to the CNS for the treatment of brain tumors and metastases. Intensive research efforts are actively ongoing to take brain tumor targeting, and novel and targeted CNS delivery systems to potential clinical application. PMID:24998288

  13. Novel treatment strategies for brain tumors and metastases.

    PubMed

    El-Habashy, Salma E; Nazief, Alaa M; Adkins, Chris E; Wen, Ming Ming; El-Kamel, Amal H; Hamdan, Ahmed M; Hanafy, Amira S; Terrell, Tori O; Mohammad, Afroz S; Lockman, Paul R; Nounou, Mohamed Ismail

    2014-05-01

    This review summarizes patent applications in the past 5 years for the management of brain tumors and metastases. Most of the recent patents discuss one of the following strategies: the development of new drug entities that specifically target the brain cells, the blood-brain barrier and the tumor cells, tailor-designing a novel carrier system that is able to perform multitasks and multifunction as a drug carrier, targeting vehicle and even as a diagnostic tool, direct conjugation of a US FDA approved drug with a targeting moiety, diagnostic moiety or PK modifying moiety, or the use of innovative nontraditional approaches such as genetic engineering, stem cells and vaccinations. Until now, there has been no optimal strategy to deliver therapeutic agents to the CNS for the treatment of brain tumors and metastases. Intensive research efforts are actively ongoing to take brain tumor targeting, and novel and targeted CNS delivery systems to potential clinical application. PMID:24998288

  14. Molecular MRI enables early and sensitive detection of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Hamilton, Alastair; McAteer, Martina A; Carbonell, W Shawn; Robson, Matthew D; Ansorge, Olaf; Khrapitchev, Alexandre; Bristow, Claire; Balathasan, Lukxmi; Weissensteiner, Thomas; Anthony, Daniel C; Choudhury, Robin P; Muschel, Ruth J; Sibson, Nicola R

    2012-04-24

    Metastasis to the brain is a leading cause of cancer mortality. The current diagnostic method of gadolinium-enhanced MRI is sensitive only to larger tumors, when therapeutic options are limited. Earlier detection of brain metastases is critical for improved treatment. We have developed a targeted MRI contrast agent based on microparticles of iron oxide that enables imaging of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our objectives here were to determine whether VCAM-1 is up-regulated on vessels associated with brain metastases, and if so, whether VCAM-1-targeted MRI enables early detection of these tumors. Early up-regulation of cerebrovascular VCAM-1 expression was evident on tumor-associated vessels in two separate murine models of brain metastasis. Metastases were detectable in vivo using VCAM-1-targeted MRI 5 d after induction (<1,000 cells). At clinical imaging resolutions, this finding is likely to translate to detection at tumor volumes two to three orders of magnitude smaller (0.3-3 × 10(5) cells) than those volumes detectable clinically (10(7)-10(8) cells). VCAM-1 expression detected by MRI increased significantly (P < 0.0001) with tumor progression, and tumors showed no gadolinium enhancement. Importantly, expression of VCAM-1 was shown in human brain tissue containing both established metastases and micrometastases. Translation of this approach to the clinic could increase therapeutic options and change clinical management in a substantial number of cancer patients. PMID:22451897

  15. Molecular MRI enables early and sensitive detection of brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Serres, Sébastien; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Hamilton, Alastair; McAteer, Martina A.; Carbonell, W. Shawn; Robson, Matthew D.; Ansorge, Olaf; Khrapitchev, Alexandre; Bristow, Claire; Balathasan, Lukxmi; Weissensteiner, Thomas; Anthony, Daniel C.; Choudhury, Robin P.; Muschel, Ruth J.; Sibson, Nicola R.

    2012-01-01

    Metastasis to the brain is a leading cause of cancer mortality. The current diagnostic method of gadolinium-enhanced MRI is sensitive only to larger tumors, when therapeutic options are limited. Earlier detection of brain metastases is critical for improved treatment. We have developed a targeted MRI contrast agent based on microparticles of iron oxide that enables imaging of endothelial vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). Our objectives here were to determine whether VCAM-1 is up-regulated on vessels associated with brain metastases, and if so, whether VCAM-1–targeted MRI enables early detection of these tumors. Early up-regulation of cerebrovascular VCAM-1 expression was evident on tumor-associated vessels in two separate murine models of brain metastasis. Metastases were detectable in vivo using VCAM-1–targeted MRI 5 d after induction (<1,000 cells). At clinical imaging resolutions, this finding is likely to translate to detection at tumor volumes two to three orders of magnitude smaller (0.3–3 × 105 cells) than those volumes detectable clinically (107–108 cells). VCAM-1 expression detected by MRI increased significantly (P < 0.0001) with tumor progression, and tumors showed no gadolinium enhancement. Importantly, expression of VCAM-1 was shown in human brain tissue containing both established metastases and micrometastases. Translation of this approach to the clinic could increase therapeutic options and change clinical management in a substantial number of cancer patients. PMID:22451897

  16. Unsanctifying the sanctuary: challenges and opportunities with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Puhalla, Shannon; Elmquist, William; Freyer, David; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Adkins, Chris; Lockman, Paul; McGregor, John; Muldoon, Leslie; Nesbit, Gary; Peereboom, David; Smith, Quentin; Walker, Sara; Neuwelt, Edward

    2015-01-01

    While the use of targeted therapies, particularly radiosurgery, has broadened therapeutic options for CNS metastases, patients respond minimally and prognosis remains poor. The inability of many systemic chemotherapeutic agents to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has limited their use and allowed brain metastases to become a burgeoning clinical challenge. Adequate preclinical models that appropriately mimic the metastatic process, the BBB, and blood-tumor barriers (BTB) are needed to better evaluate therapies that have the ability to enhance delivery through or penetrate into these barriers and to understand the mechanisms of resistance to therapy. The heterogeneity among and within different solid tumors and subtypes of solid tumors further adds to the difficulties in determining the most appropriate treatment approaches and methods of laboratory and clinical studies. This review article discusses therapies focused on prevention and treatment of CNS metastases, particularly regarding the BBB, and the challenges and opportunities these therapies present. PMID:25846288

  17. Ipilimumab and whole brain radiation therapy for melanoma brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Naamit K.; Young, Robert J.; Barker, Christopher A.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chan, Timothy A.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Friguglietti, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases (BM) frequently develop in patients with melanoma and are associated with a poor prognosis. Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is a standard intervention for intracranial disease, particularly in patients with multiple BM. Ipilimumab improves survival in patients with advanced melanoma. The purpose of this study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of concurrent WBRT and ipilimumab. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 13 consecutive patients treated with WBRT within 30 days of ipilimumab administration. Radiographic response, as measured by serial magnetic resonance imaging scans post-treatment, was graded by modified World Health Organization (mWHO) and immune-related response criteria (irRC) in the 9 patients with follow-up imaging. Treatment-related toxicity was prospectively assessed during treatment. Four of nine patients (44 %) experienced partial response or stable central nervous system (CNS) disease as measured by mWHO criteria. This number increased to 5 patients (56 %) when irRC criteria were used. Rates of treatment-related neurologic toxicity were low with only one patient experiencing grade 3–4 neurologic toxicity. There was a high rate of intratumoral hemorrhage in this patient population, with 10 of 10 patients with post-treatment imaging demonstrating new or increased intratumoral bleeding after WBRT. This retrospective study demonstrates that the primary pattern of CNS response to WBRT and ipilimumab is stable disease and not regression of BM. Furthermore, while the combination of WBRT and ipilimumab may offer promising efficacy, prospective studies are needed to further assess efficacy and toxicity. PMID:25273687

  18. [Advances in Bevacizumab Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Qu, Liyan; Geng, Rui; Song, Xia

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastases are frequently encountered in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Antiangiogenesis therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Bevacizumab have become the novel method for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapy. Recently, more and more studies and trials laid emphasis on the bevacizumab for NSCLC with brain metastases treatment. The key point is the efficacy and safety. In this review, bevacizumab therapy of NSCLC with brain metastases were summarized. PMID:27561800

  19. New insights and emerging therapies for breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Elgene; Lin, Nancy U

    2012-07-01

    Breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) are the second most frequent secondary central nervous system metastases following those associated with non-small-cell lung cancer. It is increasingly evident that BCBM arises as a function of the biology of the primary tumor and the metastatic niche, which combine to create a unique microenvironment in the brain impacting both metastatic colonization and therapeutic response. Clinical outcomes are improving for BCBM patients as a result of modern combinatorial therapies, challenging the traditionally nihilistic approach to this patient subgroup. This review will focus on the breast cancer subtypes with the highest incidence of BCBM-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer, and triple-negative (estrogen receptor [ER]-negative, progesterone receptor [PR]-negative, and HER2-negative) breast cancer (TNBC)-and will characterize differences in the clinical behavior of brain metastases that arise from these different subtypes. We will also highlight some of the recent preclinical studies that may shed light on the biological mechanisms and mediators underlying brain metastases. Finally, we will review published and current prospective trials of systemic therapies specifically for BCBM, including novel pathway-specific therapies. PMID:22888567

  20. The Current and Future Treatment of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial malignancy, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality in oncology patients. The current treatment paradigm for brain metastasis depends on the patient's overall health status, the primary tumor pathology, and the number and location of brain lesions. Herein, we review the modern management options for these tumors, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Recent operative advances, such as fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and brachytherapy, are highlighted. With an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of brain metastasis come increased future therapeutic options. Therapy targeted to specific tumor molecular pathways, such as those involved in blood-brain barrier transgression, cell-cell adhesion, and angiogenesis, are also reviewed. A personalized plan for each patient, based on molecular characterizations of the tumor that are used to better target radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is undoubtedly the future of brain metastasis treatment. PMID:27252942

  1. The Current and Future Treatment of Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hardesty, Douglas A.; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial malignancy, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality in oncology patients. The current treatment paradigm for brain metastasis depends on the patient’s overall health status, the primary tumor pathology, and the number and location of brain lesions. Herein, we review the modern management options for these tumors, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Recent operative advances, such as fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and brachytherapy, are highlighted. With an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of brain metastasis come increased future therapeutic options. Therapy targeted to specific tumor molecular pathways, such as those involved in blood–brain barrier transgression, cell–cell adhesion, and angiogenesis, are also reviewed. A personalized plan for each patient, based on molecular characterizations of the tumor that are used to better target radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is undoubtedly the future of brain metastasis treatment. PMID:27252942

  2. [Supportive care, cognition and quality of life in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Taillibert, S; Blonski, M; Jouniaux Delbez, N; Delgadillo, D; Taillia, H; Auquier, P; Belin, C; Bonnetain, F; Varin, D; Tallet, A; Taillandier, L

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases impact on the survival of the patients, but on their quality of life as well. The objective of the management of these patients is then double. Currently, due to medical advances, survivals tend to improve, especially for some tumor subtypes. During the course of the disease, different neurological signs and symptoms can be observed according to the location, the number and the volume of the metastase(s). Patients and caregivers are especially worried about the loss of autonomy and cognitive impairments. A permanent dialogue, during the course of the disease, is mandatory, in order to adapt the management to the objectives determined by the patients and the medical team. These objectives may vary according to the objective response rates of the disease to anticancer therapies, according to the impact of the disease and its management in daily living. Anticancer therapies and supportive care must be appreciated according to their impact on the survival, on the preservation of the functional independence and the quality of life of the patient, on their abilities to preserve the neurological status and delay the apparition of new neurological signs and symptoms, and their adverse events. Supportive care, cognition and quality of life should be regularly evaluated and adapted according to the objectives of the management of brain metastases patients. Different approaches are described in this paper. PMID:25640218

  3. [Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with multiple hemorrhagic brain metastases (case report)].

    PubMed

    Halefoğlu, Ahmet M; Ertürk, Mehmet; Ozel, Alper; Calişkan, K Can

    2004-06-01

    Intracranial metastases represent 7-17% of all brain tumors. Renal cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, choriocarcinoma, melanoma, retinoblastoma, lung cancer and breast cancer have a propensity for producing hemorrhagic brain metastases. Leukemias have also been rarely reported to cause hemorrhagic brain metastases. We describe an 18-year-old girl diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with multiple hemorrhagic brain metastases. MRI demonstrated high signal intensity lesions on both T1- and T2-weighted images which were characteristic for extracellular methemoglobin and consistent with hemorrhagic metastases. PMID:15236125

  4. The Blood-Brain Barrier Challenge for the Treatment of Brain Cancer, Secondary Brain Metastases, and Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Weidle, Ulrich H; Niewöhner, Jens; Tiefenthaler, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Formation of metastases from various tumor entities in the brain is a major problem for the treatment of advanced cancer. We describe target molecules and tools for the delivery of small molecules or proteins across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the treatment of brain tumors and metastases with antibody-related moieties. In addition, drugs preventing formation of metastases or interfering with the growth of established metastases are described, as well as pre-clinical metastasis models and corresponding clinical data. Furthermore, we discuss the delivery of effector proteins and antibody-based moieties fused with an antibody-based scaffold across the BBB in several model systems which might be applicable for the treatment of brain metastases. PMID:26136217

  5. Current and emerging treatments for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ba, Jenny Lin; Jandial, Rahul; Nesbit, Amanda; Badie, Behnam; Chen, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastasis in patients with cancer can be indicative of multisystem spread or lead to neurological demise if not locally controlled, and is associated with poor survival and high morbidity. Compared with metastasis to other areas of the body, brain metastasis possesses a unique biology that confers high resistance to systemic therapies. This phenomenon has been historically attributed to the inability of chemotherapeutic agents to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Recent studies challenge this premise, revealing other potentially targetable mechanism(s). Therapies that exploit recent advances in the understanding of brain metastasis are still in early stages of development. Encouragingly, and discovered by happenstance, some molecularly targeted drugs already appear to have efficacy against certain tumors and accompanying cerebral edema. In the meantime, conventional treatment modalities such as surgery and radiation have iteratively reached new levels of refinement. However, these achievements are somewhat muted by the emergence of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy, a minimally invasive neuroablative technique. On the horizon, MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery is similarly intriguing. Even in the absence of further advances, local control is frequently achieved with state-of-the-art therapies. Dramatic improvements will likely require sophisticated approaches that account for the particular effects of the microenvironment of the central nervous system on metastasis. PMID:25952487

  6. Radiation Therapy for the Management of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Matthew D; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Yanagihara, Ted K; Jani, Ashish; Wang, Tony J C

    2016-08-01

    Brain metastases are the most common malignant intracranial tumors and carry a poor prognosis. The management of brain metastases may include a variety of treatment modalities including surgical resection, radiation therapy, and/or systemic therapy. The traditional treatment for brain metastasis involved whole brain irradiation. However, improved systemic control of primary cancers has led to longer survival for some groups of patients and there is increasing need to consider the late effects of radiation to the entire brain. With advances in imaging and radiation treatment planning and delivery stereotactic radiosurgery has become more frequently utilized and may be delivered through Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery or linear accelerator-based systems. Furthermore, experience in treating thousands of patients on clinical trials has led to diagnosis-specific prognostic assessment systems that help guide our approach to the management of this common clinical scenario. This review provides an overview of the literature supporting radiotherapy for brain metastasis and an update on current radiotherapeutic options that is tailored for the nonradiation oncologist. PMID:27213494

  7. Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Khan, Aftab; Kim, In-Young; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the role of Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the multidisciplinary management of brain metastases from an undiagnosed primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients who had solitary or multiple brain metastases without a detectable primary site underwent stereotactic radiosurgery between January 1990 and March 2007 at the University of Pittsburgh. The median patient age was 61.7 years (range, 37.9-78.7 years). The median target volume was 1.0 cc (range, 0.02-23.6 cc), and the median margin radiosurgical dose was 16 Gy (range, 20-70 Gy). Results: After radiosurgery, the local tumor control rate was 88.5%. Twenty four patients died and 5 patients were living at the time of this analysis. The overall median survival was 12 months. Actuarial survival rates from stereotactic radiosurgery at 1 and 2 years were 57.2% and 36.8%, respectively. Factors associated with poor progression-free survival included large tumor volume (3 cc or more) and brainstem tumor location. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is an effective and safe minimally invasive option for patients with brain metastases from an unknown primary site.

  8. A case of brain and leptomeningeal metastases from urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Erhamamcı, S; Reyhan, M; Altinkaya, N

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastases are unusual from urethelial carcinoma of bladder and particularly the occurrence of leptomeningeal metastases is extremely rare, with few cases described in the literature. We present a case of a 45-year-old man with a rare brain metastases as the first metastatic manifestation secondary to urethelial carcinoma of bladder followed by leptomeningeal metastases without any other organ involvement. Eleven months after the diagnosis of high-grade urethelial carcinoma of bladder (T2N0M0), the patient was detected having brain metastases by MRI. FDG PET/CT images for the metastatic evaluation showed no abnormal FDG uptake elsewhere in the body except the brain. Histopathology examination from brain lesion demonstrated the cerebral lesion to be a metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Two months later, the patient was diagnosed to have leptomeningeal metastases by MRI. Our patient's condition gradually worsened, and he died 3 months after the diagnosis of leptomeningeal metastases. PMID:25043771

  9. Feasibility, safety, and outcome of frameless image-guided robotic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Muacevic, Alexander; Kufeld, Markus; Wowra, Berndt; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2010-04-01

    We prospectively analyzed the safety and outcome of frameless image-guided robotic stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for treatment of brain metastases in patients that would have otherwise been treated with frame-based techniques. During a three-year period, 333 patients with 783 brain metastases of various histologies underwent 391 outpatient SRS procedures. Fifty-five percent of patients had multiple brain metastases. The median (mean) tumor volume was 1.0 cc (2.7 cc). The mean prescribed tumor dose was 18.5 Gy (+/-1.3 Gy). Local/distant tumor recurrences were treated by additional SRS for patients with stable systemic disease. Survival and freedom from local tumor recurrence was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were obtained from the Cox proportional hazards model. System accuracy tests (end-to-end tests) were performed with a standard head phantom. Overall median survival was 12.2 months after SRS. The actuarial one-year local control rate was 95.2% (95% CI: 92.0-97.2); the distant brain tumor control rate was 67% (95% CI: 61.0-71.2). Most patients died from systemically progressing cancer (69%). A Karnofsky performance score (KPS) > 70 was related to prolonged survival in the univariate and multivariate analysis. Recursive partition analysis (RPA) classes I and II were related to prolonged survival in the univariate analysis. Twenty-one patients (6.3%) developed treatment-related neurotoxic effects; no patient died because of complications of SRS. Forty-five end-to-end tests documented a mean targeting accuracy of 0.48 +/- 0.22 mm. Single-session, frameless robotic SRS is feasible, accurate, and safe in selected patients with brain metastases of various primary tumors. There seems to be no difference in patient selection, adverse effects, treatment outcomes, or system accuracy compared with frame-based SRS. PMID:19802718

  10. Incipient Melanoma Brain Metastases Instigate Astrogliosis and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Hila; Blacher, Eran; Amer, Malak; Livneh, Nir; Abramovitz, Lilach; Klein, Anat; Ben-Shushan, Dikla; Soffer, Shelly; Blazquez, Raquel; Barrantes-Freer, Alonso; Müller, Meike; Müller-Decker, Karin; Stein, Reuven; Tsarfaty, Galia; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit; Umansky, Viktor; Pukrop, Tobias; Erez, Neta

    2016-08-01

    Malignant melanoma is the deadliest of skin cancers. Melanoma frequently metastasizes to the brain, resulting in dismal survival. Nevertheless, mechanisms that govern early metastatic growth and the interactions of disseminated metastatic cells with the brain microenvironment are largely unknown. To study the hallmarks of brain metastatic niche formation, we established a transplantable model of spontaneous melanoma brain metastasis in immunocompetent mice and developed molecular tools for quantitative detection of brain micrometastases. Here we demonstrate that micrometastases are associated with instigation of astrogliosis, neuroinflammation, and hyperpermeability of the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, we show a functional role for astrocytes in facilitating initial growth of melanoma cells. Our findings suggest that astrogliosis, physiologically instigated as a brain tissue damage response, is hijacked by tumor cells to support metastatic growth. Studying spontaneous melanoma brain metastasis in a clinically relevant setting is the key to developing therapeutic approaches that may prevent brain metastatic relapse. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4359-71. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27261506

  11. Brain metastases management paradigm shift: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    REFAAT, TAMER; SACHDEV, SEAN; DESAI, BRIJAL; BACCHUS, IAN; HATOUM, SALEH; LEE, PLATO; BLOCH, ORIN; CHANDLER, JAMES P.; KALAPURAKAL, JOHN; MARYMONT, MARYANNE HOFFMAN

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial tumors in adults, accounting for over half of all lesions. Whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) has been a cornerstone in the management of brain metastases for decades. Recently, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been considered as a definitive or postoperative approach instead of WBRT, to minimize the risk of cognitive impairment that may be associated with WBRT. This is the case report of a 74-year-old female patient who was diagnosed with lung cancer in November, 2002, and histopathologically confirmed brain metastases in January, 2005. The patient received 5 treatments with Gamma Knife SRS for recurring brain metastases between 2005 and 2014. The patient remains highly functional, with stable intracranial disease at 10 years since first developing brain metastases, and with stable lung disease. Therefore, Gamma Knife SRS is a safe and effective treatment modality for patients with recurrent intracranial metastases, with durable local control and minimal cognitive impairment. PMID:27073647

  12. Innovative therapeutic strategies in the treatment of brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Caffo, Maria; Barresi, Valeria; Caruso, Gerardo; Cutugno, Mariano; La Fata, Giuseppe; Venza, Mario; Alafaci, Concetta; Tomasello, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are the most common intracranial tumors and their incidence is increasing. Untreated brain metastases are associated with a poor prognosis and a poor performance status. Metastasis development involves the migration of a cancer cell from the bulk tumor into the surrounding tissue, extravasation from the blood into tissue elsewhere in the body, and formation of a secondary tumor. In the recent past, important results have been obtained in the management of patients affected by BM, using surgery, radiation therapy, or both. Conventional chemotherapies have generally produced disappointing results, possibly due to their limited ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier. The advent of new technologies has led to the discovery of novel molecules and pathways that have better depicted the metastatic process. Targeted therapies such as bevacizumab, erlotinib, gefitinib, sunitinib and sorafenib, are all licensed and have demonstrated improved survival in patients with metastatic disease. In this review, we will report current data on targeted therapies. A brief review about brain metastatic process will be also presented. PMID:23340652

  13. Dose Escalation of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases From Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Heisterkamp, Christine; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bohlen, Guenther; Dunst, Juergen; Haatanen, Tiina; Schild, Steven E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The majority of patients with brain metastases from melanoma receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). However, the results are poor. Hypofractionation regimens failed to improve the outcome of these patients. This study investigates a potential benefit from escalation of the WBRT dose beyond the 'standard' regimen 30 Gy in 10 fractions (10x3 Gy). Methods and Materials: Data from 51 melanoma patients receiving WBRT alone were retrospectively analyzed. A dosage of 10x3 Gy (n = 33) was compared with higher doses including 40 Gy/20 fractions (n = 11) and 45 Gy/15 fractions (n = 7) for survival (OS) and local (intracerebral) control (LC). Additional potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, performance status, number of metastases, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: At 6 months, OS rates were 27% after 10x3 Gy and 50% after higher doses (p = 0.009). The OS rates at 12 months were 4% and 20%. On multivariate analysis, higher WBRT doses (p = 0.010), fewer than four brain metastases (p = 0.012), no extracerebral metastases (p = 0.006), and RPA class 1 (p = 0.005) were associated with improved OS. The LC rates at 6 months were 23% after 10x3 Gy and 50% after higher doses (p = 0.021). The LC rates at 12 months were 0% and 13%. On multivariate analysis, higher WBRT doses (p = 0.020) and fewer than brain metastases (p = 0.002) were associated with better LC. Conclusions: Given the limitations of a retrospective study, the findings suggest that patients with brain metastases from melanoma receiving WBRT alone may benefit from dose escalation beyond 10x3 Gy. The hypothesis generated by this study must be confirmed in a randomized trial stratifying for significant prognostic factors.

  14. Health State Utilities for Patients with Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Dosoretz, Arie P; Hayman, James A; Yu, James B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Estimating the cost-effectiveness of whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), including Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS), requires the quantitative measurement of patients’ health states after treatment. We sought to quantify individuals’ preferences for the relevant health states after WBRT or GKRS for brain metastases on a 0 to 1 scale, where 1 is perfect health and 0 is death. Methods: We prospectively measured utilities in patients with brain metastases evaluated at Yale for consideration of WBRT and/or GKRS, as well as oncology nurses who had cared for patients with brain metastases before and after WBRT or GKRS, using the Standard Gamble (SG) technique. Demographic information was also collected. Nonparametric tests were used to compare potential differences in utility values and for subgroups based on demographic characteristics. Results: There were 24 patients and 31 nurses who completed the study between December 2013 and May 2015. Median utilities ranged from 0.85 for the status-post (S/P) GKRS state to 0.25 (for neurologic dying). The median utility of being S/P WBRT was 0.70 compared to 0.85 S/P GKRS (p < 0.001). The cognitive decline from WBRT was associated with a notably low utility score of 0.30. There were no statistically significant differences between patients’ and nurses’ median utility scores. Conclusions: These SG utilities provide unique insights into brain metastases-related health states from the patient and provider perspective. As perceived by individuals with direct knowledge of the health states in question, WBRT has a significantly lower utility compared to GKRS. Cognitive decline following WBRT is associated with significant perceived reduction in quality of life. Differences in the relative importance of overall survival and quality of life with treatment existed between patients with different stages of disease. These utilities can be used to calculate quality-adjusted life

  15. Pre-treatment factors associated with detecting additional brain metastases at stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Wardak, Zabi; Augustyn, Alexander; Zhu, Hong; Mickey, Bruce E; Whitworth, Louis A; Madden, Christopher J; Barnett, Samuel L; Abdulrahman, Ramzi E; Nedzi, Lucien A; Timmerman, Robert D; Choe, Kevin S

    2016-06-01

    The number of brain metastases identified on diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a key factor in consideration of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). However, additional lesions are often detected on high-resolution SRS-planning MRI. We investigated pre-treatment clinical characteristics that are associated with finding additional metastases at SRS. Patients treated with SRS for brain metastases between the years of 2009-2014 comprised the study cohort. All patients underwent frame-fixed, 1 mm thick MRI on the day of SRS. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed for an association with increase in number of metastases identified on SRS-planning MRI. 289 consecutive SRS cases were analyzed. 725 metastases were identified on pre-treatment MRI and 1062 metastases were identified on SRS-planning MRI. An increase in the number of metastases occurred in 34 % of the cases. On univariate analysis, more than four metastases and the diameter of the largest lesion were significantly associated with an increase in number of metastases on SRS-planning MRI. When stratified by the diameter of the largest lesion into <2, 2-3, or ≥3 cm, additional metastases were identified in 37, 29, and 18 %, respectively. While this increase in the number of metastases is largely due to the difference in imaging technique, the number and size of the metastases were also associated with finding additional lesions. These clinical factors may be considered when determining treatment options for brain metastases. PMID:26966096

  16. 18F-NaF PET/CT Imaging of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Salgarello, Matteo; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Inno, Alessandro; Pasetto, Stefano; Severi, Fabrizia; Gorgoni, Giancarlo; Gori, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    F-NaF is a radiopharmaceutical widely used in PET imaging to detect bone metastases. Several cases of F-NaF uptake from brain metastases have been described, but a specific protocol for the evaluation of brain metastases with F-NaF has not been developed yet. Here we report images of F-NaF PET/CT, standard CT, and MRI of a brain metastasis in a patient with non-small lung cancer. Through a dynamic acquisition procedure, we have identified the first minutes after injection as the preferable time point of imaging acquisition for the study of brain metastases with F-NaF. PMID:27163462

  17. Cabazitaxel in castration resistant prostate cancer with brain metastases: 3 case reports.

    PubMed

    De Placido, Sabino; Rescigno, Pasquale; Federico, Piera; Buonerba, Carlo; Bosso, Davide; Puglia, Livio; Izzo, Michela; Policastro, Tania; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2014-06-16

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy for men. The skeleton is the most common metastatic site but, following an improvement in survival, metastases in uncommon sites are being found more frequently in clinical practice, especially brain metastases. Despite the new drugs now available for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer, no clinical evidence exists about their effectiveness on brain metastases. We describe the clinical history of 3 patients treated with cabazitaxel plus whole brain radiotherapy. These case reports demonstrate that cabazitaxel is highly active and well tolerated in brain metastases. PMID:24945013

  18. Cabazitaxel in castration resistant prostate cancer with brain metastases: 3 case reports

    PubMed Central

    Placido, Sabino De; Rescigno, Pasquale; Federico, Piera; Buonerba, Carlo; Bosso, Davide; Puglia, Livio; Izzo, Michela; Policastro, Tania; Lorenzo, Giuseppe Di

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous malignancy for men. The skeleton is the most common metastatic site but, following an improvement in survival, metastases in uncommon sites are being found more frequently in clinical practice, especially brain metastases. Despite the new drugs now available for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer, no clinical evidence exists about their effectiveness on brain metastases. We describe the clinical history of 3 patients treated with cabazitaxel plus whole brain radiotherapy. These case reports demonstrate that cabazitaxel is highly active and well tolerated in brain metastases. PMID:24945013

  19. Tumor bed radiosurgery: an emerging treatment for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Amsbaugh, Mark J; Boling, Warren; Woo, Shiao

    2015-06-01

    While typically used for treating small intact brain metastases, an increasing body of literature examining tumor bed directed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is emerging. There are now over 1000 published cases treated with this approach, and the first prospective trial was recently published. The ideal sequencing of tumor bed SRS is unclear. Current approaches include, a neoadjuvant treatment before resection, alone as an adjuvant after resection, and following surgery combined with whole brain radiotherapy either as an adjuvant or salvage treatment. Based on available evidence, adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery improves local control following surgery, reduces the number of patients who require whole brain radiotherapy, and is well tolerated. While results from published series vary, heterogeneity in both patient populations and methods of reporting results make comparisons difficult. Additional prospective data, including randomized trials are needed to confirm equivalent outcomes to the current standard of care. We review the current literature, identify areas of ongoing contention, and highlight ongoing studies. PMID:25911296

  20. Current Perspectives in the Management of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Saria, Marlon G; Piccioni, David; Carter, Joshua; Orosco, Heather; Turpin, Tiffany; Kesari, Santosh

    2015-08-01

    Brain metastases (BMs) are diagnosed in 10%-40% of all patients with cancer, and the incidence continues to increase along with the number of long-term survivors. When BMs occur, they are often associated with a myriad of symptoms, including neurologic dysfunction and functional decline; both are difficult to manage and can be distressing for patients and their caregivers. Although clinically significant findings have not kept up with the rapid pace of scientific breakthroughs in understanding the mechanisms of BMs, novel approaches that affect the prognosis of patients with BMs have been introduced in clinical practice. At a Glance • Screening for brain metastases (BMs) is not routinely performed in patients with no neurologic symptoms. However, screening is indicated in lung cancer and possibly in the context of high-risk cancers. • Individual differences in patients warrant a personalized approach in the management of BMs. • Whole brain radiation therapy and steroids are considered to be the cornerstones of treatment for BMs. PMID:26207714

  1. Stereotactic radiosurgery in elderly patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Esposito, Vincenzo; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Bozzao, Alessandro; Lanzetta, Gaetano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Valeriani, Maurizio; Osti, Mattia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2013-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been increasingly employed as an alternative to whole brain radiation therapy in patients with brain metastases, with the aim to reduce its potential toxicity. We have evaluated clinical outcomes of SRS as initial treatment for brain metastases in patients 70 years and older. Between November 2007 and October 2011, 102 patients of 70 years and older with 1-4 metastases were treated with SRS. The primary end point of the study was overall survival. Secondary end points were local control and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. At a median follow-up of 11.0 months (range 1-48 months), median survival and median time to distant failure were 13.2 and 10 months, respectively. The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 63 and 28 %, and respective distant failure rates were 54 and 78 %. Forty-five patients succumbed to their extracranial disease and 14 patients died of progressive intracranial disease. Nine patients recurred locally after SRS. The 1- and 2-year local control rates were 90 and 84 %, respectively. Evaluation of neurocognitive function using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) showed no significant neurocognitive decline after SRS. MMSE score improved in 15 % of patients, worsened in 12 % of patients, and remained stable in the others. Severe neurological complications were reported in 7 (7 %) patients, requiring surgery or medical treatment. Initial treatment with SRS with close monitoring may represent a relatively safe treatment strategy associated with survival benefit, with outcomes similar to those reported in historical series of SRS for younger patients. PMID:23187817

  2. Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Evers, Jasmin N.; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lohynska, Radka; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

  3. GE-20GENOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF BREAST CANCER BRAIN METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Michelhaugh, Sharon; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of central nervous system metastasis from primary breast cancer has steadily increased with introduction of more effective molecular-targeted therapies resulting in improved long-term survival. Current standard-of-care treatment modalities for CNS metastases include microsurgical resection, whole-brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery, either alone or in combination. There are currently no FDA-approved drugs with an indication for breast cancer brain metastases. Clearly, there is a dire need to identify biomarkers permitting earlier and accurate diagnosis of CNS metastases, development of prevention strategies in high-risk individuals, and establishing more effective treatment options such as targeted systemic and intrathecal therapies. METHODS: Extracted DNA from metastatic brain tumors (MBTs) and matched tissues from primary breast tumors was quantified and array comparative genomic hybridizations (aCGH) were performed with Agilent SurePrint arrays (G3 ISCA CGH + SNP 180K) using a commercially-available, genetically-normal female DNA standard. Bioinformatics analysis was performed using Agilent CytoGenomics Edition 2.5.8.1. Data were filtered against the Cancer Gene Census (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) to identify genes with well-characterized roles in cancer. RESULTS: From genomic copy number data analysis tailored to uncover the most frequent gene aberrations in breast cancer MBTs, we identified that MYC oncogene amplification was among the most common. Pathway analysis of the analyzed gene set of recurring gene aberrations identified the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency pathway as being over-represented. The genes in this pathway showing copy number gain include NTRK1, PIK3CA and SOX2. Direct comparisons of MBTs with their matched primary tumor (n = 4) revealed a range of examples for highly similar and divergent patterns of gene aberrations. In one case ERBB2 was confirmed to be in the MBT, and not in the

  4. [Global brain metastases management strategy: a multidisciplinary-based approach].

    PubMed

    Métellus, P; Tallet, A; Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Carpentier, A; Spano, J-P; Azria, D; Noël, G; Barlési, F; Taillibert, S; Le Rhun, É

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases management has evolved over the last fifteen years and may use varying strategies, including more or less aggressive treatments, sometimes combined, leading to an improvement in patient's survival and quality of life. The therapeutic decision is subject to a multidisciplinary analysis, taking into account established prognostic factors including patient's general condition, extracerebral disease status and clinical and radiological presentation of lesions. In this article, we propose a management strategy based on the state of current knowledge and available therapeutic resources. PMID:25649388

  5. Genomic characterization of brain metastases reveals branched evolution and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Santagata, Sandro; Cahill, Daniel P.; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Jones, Robert T.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Ligon, Keith L.; Tabernero, Josep; Seoane, Joan; Martinez-Saez, Elena; Curry, William T.; Dunn, Ian F.; Paek, Sun Ha; Park, Sung-Hye; McKenna, Aaron; Chevalier, Aaron; Rosenberg, Mara; Barker, Frederick G.; Gill, Corey M.; Van Hummelen, Paul; Thorner, Aaron R.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hoang, Mai P.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Signoretti, Sabina; Sougnez, Carrie; Rabin, Michael S.; Lin, Nancy U.; Winer, Eric P.; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Meyerson, Matthew; Garraway, Levi; Gabriel, Stacey; Lander, Eric S.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Baselga, Jose; Louis, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are associated with a dismal prognosis. Whether brain metastases harbor distinct genetic alterations beyond those observed in primary tumors is unknown. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 86 matched brain metastases, primary tumors and normal tissue. In all clonally related cancer samples, we observed branched evolution, where all metastatic and primary sites shared a common ancestor yet continued to evolve independently. In 53% of cases, we found potentially clinically informative alterations in the brain metastases not detected in the matched primary-tumor sample. In contrast, spatially and temporally separated brain metastasis sites were genetically homogenous. Distal extracranial and regional lymph node metastases were highly divergent from brain metastases. We detected alterations associated with sensitivity to PI3K/AKT/mTOR, CDK, and HER2/EGFR inhibitors in the brain metastases. Genomic analysis of brain metastases provides an opportunity to identify potentially clinically informative alterations not detected in clinically sampled primary tumors, regional lymph nodes, or extracranial metastases. PMID:26410082

  6. Rationale for the Use of Upfront Whole Brain Irradiation in Patients with Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tallet, Agnes V.; Azria, David; Le Rhun, Emilie; Barlesi, Fabrice; Carpentier, Antoine F.; Gonçalves, Antony; Taillibert, Sophie; Dhermain, Frédéric; Spano, Jean-Philippe; Metellus, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastases and deserves particular attention in relation to current prolonged survival of patients with metastatic disease. Advances in both systemic therapies and brain local treatments (surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery) have led to a reappraisal of brain metastases management. With respect to this, the literature review presented here was conducted in an attempt to collect medical evidence-based data on the use of whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer. In addition, this study discusses here the potential differences in outcomes between patients with brain metastases from breast cancer and those with brain metastases from other primary malignancies and the potential implications within a treatment strategy. PMID:24815073

  7. Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Grit Fleckenstein, Katharina; Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p < 0.001) and to a lesser extent by WBRT. Acute (T1) radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

  8. ROS1 rearranged non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases respond to low dose radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Rimas V; Hasan, Yasmin; Nicholas, Martin K; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    We present a young woman with ROS1 gene rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastases. ROS is a proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase. The patient received a partial course of whole brain radiation therapy and experienced a sustained partial response in the brain. We hypothesize that ROS1 rearranged NSCLC brain metastases may be particularly sensitive to radiation therapy. PMID:26159887

  9. [Advances in diagnosis and treatment of brain metastases from the primary lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Chen, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer with brain metastasis was 23% to 65%, and is the most common type in brain metastasis tumors with the poor prognosis. At present, diagnosis and treatment of brain metastases from lung carcinoma and its molecular mechanism have become one hot spot of amount researches. Here, we made a systematic review of the progress of the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of brain metastases from lung and its molecular mechanism. PMID:23866671

  10. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J.; Neyman, Gennady; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with

  11. The treatment of recurrent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, J S; Kooy, H M; Wen, P Y; Fine, H A; Cheng, C W; Mannarino, E G; Tsai, J S; Alexander, E

    1990-04-01

    Between May 1986 and August 1989, we treated 18 patients with 21 recurrent or persistent brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery using a modified linear accelerator. To be eligible for radiosurgery, patients had to have a performance status of greater than or equal to 70% and have no evidence of (or stable) systemic disease. All but one patient had received prior radiotherapy, and were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery at the time of recurrence. Polar lesions were treated only if the patient had undergone and failed previous complete surgical resection (10 patients). Single doses of radiation (900 to 2,500 cGy) were delivered to limited volumes (less than 27 cm3) using a modified 6MV linear accelerator. The most common histology of the metastatic lesion was carcinoma of the lung (seven patients), followed by carcinoma of the breast (four patients), and melanoma (four patients). With median follow-up of 9 months (range, 1 to 39), all tumors have been controlled in the radiosurgery field. Two patients failed in the immediate margin of the treated volume and were subsequently treated with surgery and implantation of 125I to control the disease. Radiographic response was dramatic and rapid in the patients with adenocarcinoma, while slight reduction and stabilization occurred in those patients with melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. The majority of patients improved neurologically following treatment, and were able to be withdrawn from corticosteroid therapy. Complications were limited and transient in nature and no cases of symptomatic radiation necrosis occurred in any patient despite previous exposure to radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery is an effective and relatively safe treatment for recurrent solitary metastases and is an appealing technique for the initial management of deep-seated lesions as a boost to whole brain radiotherapy. PMID:2179476

  12. Single-Dose Versus Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yeon-Joo; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Joo-Young; Lim, Young Kyung; Min, Hye Sook; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ho Jin; Gwak, Ho Shin; Yoo, Heon; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with brain metastases by comparing two different treatment regimens, single-dose radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). Methods and Materials: Between November 2003 and December 2008, 98 patients with brain metastases were included. Fifty-eight patients were treated with SRS, and forty were treated with FSRT. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was used for large lesions or lesions located near critical structures. The median doses were 20 Gy for the SRS group and 36 Gy in 6 fractions for the FSRT group. Results: With a median follow-up period of 7 months, the median survival was 7 months for all patients, with a median of 6 months for the SRS group and 8 months for the FSRT group (p = 0.89). Local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates at 6 months and 1 year were 81% and 71%, respectively, for the SRS group and 97% and 69%, respectively, for the FSRT group (p = 0.31). Despite the fact that FSRT was used for large lesions and lesions in adverse locations, LPFS was not inferior to SRS. Toxicity was more frequently observed in the SRS group than in the FSRT group (17% vs. 5%, p = 0.05). Conclusions: Because patients treated with FSRT exhibited similar survival times and LPFS rates with a lower risk of toxicity in comparison to those treated with SRS, despite the fact that FSRT was used for large lesions and lesions in adverse locations, we find that FSRT can particularly be beneficial for patients with large lesions or lesions located near critical structures. Further investigation is warranted to determine the optimal dose/fractionation.

  13. [Systemic treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer: cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Thomas; Le Rhun, Emilie; Labidi-Gally, Intidar; Heudel, Pierre; Gilabert, Marine; Bonneterre, Jacques; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of brain metastases is increasing in breast cancer. Brain metastases represent a poor-prognosis disease for which local treatments continue to play a major role. In spite of the presence of a physiological blood-brain barrier limiting their activity, some systemic treatments may display a significant antitumor activity at the central nervous system level. In HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer with brain metastases not previously treated with whole brain radiotherapy, capecitabine and lapatinib combination obtains a volumetric reponse in two thirds of patients (LANDSCAPE study). If confirmed, these results could modify in selected patients the layout of therapeutic strategies. Promoting novel targeted approaches and innovative therapeutic combinations is a critical need to improve survival of breast cancer patients with brain metastases. PMID:23305997

  14. Brain Metastases in Gastrointestinal Cancers: Is there a Role for Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Johannes; Scheele, Jan; Kapapa, Thomas; von Karstedt, Silvia; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kornmann, Marko

    2014-01-01

    About 10% of all cancer patients will develop brain metastases during advanced disease progression. Interestingly, the vast majority of brain metastases occur in only three types of cancer: Melanoma, lung and breast cancer. In this review, we focus on summarizing the prognosis and impact of surgical resection of brain metastases originating from gastrointestinal cancers such as esophageal, gastric, pancreatic and colorectal cancer. The incidence of brain metastases is <1% in pancreatic and gastric cancer and <4% in esophageal and colorectal cancer. Overall, prognosis of these patients is very poor with a median survival in the range of only months. Interestingly, a substantial number of patients who had received surgical resection of brain metastases showed prolonged survival. However, it should be taken into account that all these studies were not randomized and it is likely that patients selected for surgical treatment presented with other important prognostic factors such as solitary brain metastases and exclusion of extra-cranial disease. Nevertheless, other reports have demonstrated long-term survival of patients upon resection of brain metastases originating from gastrointestinal cancers. Thus, it appears to be justified to consider aggressive surgical approaches for these patients. PMID:25247579

  15. The Brain Metastases Symptom Checklist as a novel tool for symptom measurement in patients with brain metastases undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rodin, D.; Banihashemi, B.; Wang, L.; Lau, A.; Harris, S.; Levin, W.; Dinniwell, R.; Millar, B.A.; Chung, C.; Laperriere, N.; Bezjak, A.; Wong, R.K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the feasibility, reliability, and validity of the Brain Metastases Symptom Checklist (bmsc), a novel self-report measure of common symptoms experienced by patients with brain metastases. Methods Patients with first-presentation symptomatic brain metastases (n = 137) referred for whole-brain radiotherapy (wbrt) completed the bmsc at time points before and after treatment. Their caregivers (n = 48) provided proxy ratings twice on the day of consultation to assess reliability, and at week 4 after wbrt to assess responsiveness to change. Correlations with 4 other validated assessment tools were evaluated. Results The symptoms reported on the bmsc were largely mild to moderate, with tiredness (71%) and difficulties with balance (61%) reported most commonly at baseline. Test–retest reliability for individual symptoms had a median intraclass correlation of 0.59 (range: 0.23–0.85). Caregiver proxy and patient responses had a median intraclass correlation of 0.52. Correlation of absolute scores on the bmsc and other symptom assessment tools was low, but consistency in the direction of symptom change was observed. At week 4, change in symptoms was variable, with improvements in weight gain and sleep of 42% and 41% respectively, and worsening of tiredness and drowsiness of 62% and 59% respectively. Conclusions The bmsc captures a wide range of symptoms experienced by patients with brain metastases, and it is sensitive to change. It demonstrated adequate test–retest reliability and face validity in terms of its responsiveness to change. Future research is needed to determine whether modifications to the bmsc itself or correlation with more symptom-specific measures will enhance validity. PMID:27330360

  16. Concurrent capecitabine and whole-brain radiotherapy for treatment of brain metastases in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chargari, Cyrus; Kirova, Youlia M; Diéras, Véronique; Castro Pena, Pablo; Pena, Pablo Castro; Campana, Francois; Cottu, Paul H; Pierga, JeanYves; Fourquet, Alain

    2009-07-01

    Preclinical data have demonstrated that ionizing radiation acts synergistically with capecitabine. This report retrospectively assessed the use of capecitabine concurrently with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases from breast cancer. From January 2003 to March 2005, five breast cancer patients with brain metastases were referred for WBRT with concurrent capecitabine. Median age was 44 years (range: 38-53). The median dose of capecitabine was 1,000 mg/m(2) twice daily for 14 days (day1-14). Treatment cycles were repeated every 21 days, concurrently with WBRT (30 Gy, 3 Gy per fraction, 5 days per week). Median survival after starting WBRT plus capecitabine was 6.5 months (range 1-34 months). One patient achieved a complete response. Two patients achieved partial response, including one with local control lasting until most recent follow-up. One patient had stable disease. The remaining patient was not assessable for response because of early death. Most commonly reported adverse events were nausea (n = 2) and headache (n = 2), always grade 1. Other toxicities were grade 3 hand/foot syndrome (n = 1), moderate anemia requiring transfusion and dose reduction of capecitabine (n = 1), and grade 1 mucositis (n = 1). Although promising, these preliminary data warrant further assessment of capecitabine-based chemoradiation in brain metastases from breast cancer and need to be further validated in the setting of a clinical trial. PMID:19169856

  17. Celsr1-3 cadherins in PCP and brain development.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Camille; Goffinet, André M; Tissir, Fadel

    2012-01-01

    Cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptors 1, 2, and 3 (Celsr1-3) form a family of three atypical cadherins with multiple functions in epithelia and in the nervous system. During the past decade, evidence has accumulated for important and distinct roles of Celsr1-3 in planar cell polarity (PCP) and brain development and maintenance. Although the role of Celsr in PCP is conserved from flies to mammals, other functions may be more distantly related, with Celsr working only with one or a subset of the classical PCP partners. Here, we review the literature on Celsr in PCP and neural development, point to several remaining questions, and consider future challenges and possible research trends. PMID:23140629

  18. BM-35CLINICAL FACTORS IMPACTING SURVIVAL IN BRAIN METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux, Olivier; Cottin, Sylvine; Michaud, Karine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Metastatic brain tumors are a common complication of systemic cancers. Good performance status, absence of extracranial metastases, age < 65 years and control of the primary tumor are the strongest predictors of survival. Controversy exists regarding best adjuvant treatment for patients. Therefore, careful evaluation of patient features and tumor characteristics must be considered when determining treatment modality. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess the treatment management and clinical features of metastatic brain neoplasms following a neurosurgical procedure and evaluate factors conditioning survival. METHODS: Between January 1st 2009 and January 1st 2013, medical files of patients who underwent a surgical procedure for metastatic brain tumors at Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus in Québec City were reviewed. Data on patient features, primary and metastatic neoplasm characteristics, procedure and survival were recorded. Wilcoxon rank sum test, Kruskal-Wallis test and Cox proportional-hazards regression for survival data were used to assess the impact of treatments and patient characteristics on survival. Efficacy of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and combined treatment in terms of patient survival were also evaluated. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty six patient files were reviewed and 109 were included for analysis. The mean survival time for patients was 537.9 days. Age below 65 years (p = 0.08) was a protective factor. WBRT combined with SRS (p < 0.0001), the use of WBRT alone (p = 0.002) or SRS alone (p = 0.004) all significantly improved survival. SRS, when compared to WBRT alone or to combined WBRT and SRS treatment, did not show significant difference in survival. CONCLUSION: Survival in our population is influenced by age and the use of adjuvant treatment. The choice of treatment modality after surgery remains somewhat controversial and our results support the need for further studies to compare

  19. Response assessment criteria for brain metastases: proposal from the RANO group.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Lee, Eudocia Q; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Barani, Igor J; Barboriak, Daniel P; Baumert, Brigitta G; Bendszus, Martin; Brown, Paul D; Camidge, D Ross; Chang, Susan M; Dancey, Janet; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Gaspar, Laurie E; Harris, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Kalkanis, Steven N; Linskey, Mark E; Macdonald, David R; Margolin, Kim; Mehta, Minesh P; Schiff, David; Soffietti, Riccardo; Suh, John H; van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Wen, Patrick Y

    2015-06-01

    CNS metastases are the most common cause of malignant brain tumours in adults. Historically, patients with brain metastases have been excluded from most clinical trials, but their inclusion is now becoming more common. The medical literature is difficult to interpret because of substantial variation in the response and progression criteria used across clinical trials. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Brain Metastases (RANO-BM) working group is an international, multidisciplinary effort to develop standard response and progression criteria for use in clinical trials of treatment for brain metastases. Previous efforts have focused on aspects of trial design, such as patient population, variations in existing response and progression criteria, and challenges when incorporating neurological, neuro-cognitive, and quality-of-life endpoints into trials of patients with brain metastases. Here, we present our recommendations for standard response and progression criteria for the assessment of brain metastases in clinical trials. The proposed criteria will hopefully facilitate the development of novel approaches to this difficult problem by providing more uniformity in the assessment of CNS metastases across trials. PMID:26065612

  20. Radiation-induced dementia in patients cured of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, L.M.; Delattre, J.Y.; Posner, J.B.

    1989-06-01

    When a patient with cancer develops a brain metastasis, death is usually imminent, but aggressive treatment in some patients with limited or no systemic disease yields long-term survival. In such patients, delayed deleterious effects of therapy are particularly tragic. We report 12 patients who developed delayed complications of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) given as sole treatment (4 patients) or in combination with surgical resection (8 patients). Within 5 to 36 months (median, 14) all patients developed progressive dementia, ataxia, and urinary incontinence causing severe disability in all and leading to death in 7. No patient had tumor recurrence when neurologic symptoms began. Cortical atrophy and hypodense white matter were identified by CT in all. Contrast-enhancing lesions were seen in 3 patients; 2 of the lesions yielded radionecrosis on biopsy. Autopsies on 2 patients revealed diffuse chronic edema of the hemispheric white matter in the absence of tumor recurrence. Corticosteroids and ventriculoperitoneal shunt offered significant but incomplete improvement in some patients. The total dose of WBRT was only 2,500 to 3,900 cGy, but daily fractions of 300 to 600 cGy were employed. We believe that these fractionation schedules, several of which are used commonly, predispose to delayed neurologic toxicity, and that more protracted schedules should be employed for the safe and efficacious treatment of good-risk patients with brain metastases. The incidence of WBRT-induced dementia was only 1.9 to 5.1% in the 2 populations reviewed here; however, this underestimates the incidence because only severely affected patients could be identified from chart review.

  1. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Prokic, Vesna; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne; Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 {+-} 0.62 Gy and 6.29 {+-} 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 {+-} 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 {+-} 0.7 Gy and 32.7 {+-} 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 {+-} 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  2. Prognostic Indexes for Brain Metastases: Which Is the Most Powerful?

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Bernardes da Silva, Lucas Godoi; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to compare the prognostic indexes (PIs) of patients with brain metastases (BMs) treated with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) using an artificial neural network. This analysis is important, because it evaluates the prognostic power of each PI to guide clinical decision-making and outcomes research. Methods and Materials: A retrospective prognostic study was conducted of 412 patients with BMs who underwent WBRT between April 1998 and March 2010. The eligibility criteria for patients included having undergone WBRT or WBRT plus neurosurgery. The data were analyzed using the artificial neural network. The input neural data consisted of all prognostic factors included in the 5 PIs (recursive partitioning analysis, graded prognostic assessment [GPA], basic score for BMs, Rotterdam score, and Germany score). The data set was randomly divided into 300 training and 112 testing examples for survival prediction. All 5 PIs were compared using our database of 412 patients with BMs. The sensibility of the 5 indexes to predict survival according to their input variables was determined statistically using receiver operating characteristic curves. The importance of each variable from each PI was subsequently evaluated. Results: The overall 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rate was 22%, 10.2%, and 5.1%, respectively. All classes of PIs were significantly associated with survival (recursive partitioning analysis, P < .0001; GPA, P < .0001; basic score for BMs, P = .002; Rotterdam score, P = .001; and Germany score, P < .0001). Comparing the areas under the curves, the GPA was statistically most sensitive in predicting survival (GPA, 86%; recursive partitioning analysis, 81%; basic score for BMs, 79%; Rotterdam, 73%; and Germany score, 77%; P < .001). Among the variables included in each PI, the performance status and presence of extracranial metastases were the most important factors. Conclusion: A variety of prognostic models describe the

  3. MicroRNAs Linked to Trastuzumab Resistance, Brain Metastases | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have tied increased levels of a microRNA (miRNA) to resistance to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) in women with HER2-positive breast cancer. Another research team has discovered a “signature” of miRNAs in brain metastases in patients with melanoma—a signature that is also present in the primary tumor and could identify melanoma patients at increased risk of brain metastases. |

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Bevacizumab in Active Brain Metastases from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Braganca, Kevin C.; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Azzoli, Christopher G.; Kris, Mark G.; Pietanza, Maria C.; Nolan, Craig P.; Omuro, Antonio M.; Holodny, Andrei I.; Lassman, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Bevacizumab is effective for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ongoing trials are exploring the safety of bevacizumab in patients with inactive, previously treated brain metastases. However, bevacizumab safety and efficacy in the treatment of active brain metastases is unknown. Bevacizumab received accelerated FDA approval for progressive glioblastoma, a primary brain tumor, because of high response rates and low incidence of intracranial hemorrhage. Methods We retrospectively identified patients treated with bevacizumab for active (treatment naïve or progressive) central nervous system (CNS) metastases from NSCLC. MRI scans performed at least 6 weeks after initiating bevacizumab were assessed for response. Results There were six patients, four women and two men with a median age of 60 years (range 59–77) at initiation of bevacizumab. Five patients had progressive CNS metastases despite prior treatment including surgery, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy; one patient had treatment-naïve brain metastases. Two patients had leptomeningeal metastases, isolated or coexistent with parenchymal brain metastases in one patient each. Bevacizumab was administered alone to one patient and in combination with various cytotoxic chemotherapies in the others. Toxicity included an asymptomatic (Grade 1) intra-tumoral hemorrhage which occurred in one of three patients receiving concurrent anticoagulation with bevacizumab. There was no recurrent CNS bleeding in two patients with a prior history of such hemorrhage. Best response (RECIST) was partial in two, stable disease in three, and progression in one. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.7 months and median overall survival (OS) was 14.1 months following initiation of bevacizumab. Clinical benefit was also observed in the form of improved symptoms and reduced corticosteroid requirements. Conclusions Bevacizumab should be used with caution in patients with active CNS metastases pending

  5. Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ebi, Junko; Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ≥6, ≥12, ≥24, and ≥36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (≥65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ≥6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

  6. Complete response of brain metastases from breast cancer overexpressing Her-2/neu to radiation and concurrent Lapatinib and Capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Mirna; Saghir, Nagi S El; Salame, Joseph; Geara, Fady B

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancers that overexpress the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) have a predilection to metastasize to the brain. Therapeutic options for brain metastases with systemic therapy remain a challenge in those patients since targeted and chemotherapeutic agents have limited penetration through the blood-brain barrier. Here we report the case of a patient with brain metastases from breast cancer overexpressing HER-2 who achieved a complete radiologic response after treatment by radiation and concurrent Lapatinib and Capecitabine. PMID:21070441

  7. A pathology-based substrate for target definition in radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Baumert, Brigitta G. . E-mail: brigitta.baumert@maastro.nl; Rutten, Isabelle; Dehing-Oberije, Cary M.Sc.; Twijnstra, Albert; Dirx, Miranda J.M.; Debougnoux-Huppertz, Ria M.T.L.; Lambin, Philippe; Kubat, Bela

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the need of a margin other than for accuracy reasons in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases by means of histopathology. Methods and Materials: Evaluation of 45 patients from two pathology departments having had brain metastases and an autopsy of the brain. Growth patterns were reviewed with a focus on infiltration beyond the metastases boundary and made visible with immunohistochemical staining: the metastasis itself with tumor-specific markers, surrounding normal brain tissue with a glial marker, and a possible capsule with a soft tissue marker. Measurements were corrected by a tissue-shrinkage correction factor taken from literature. Outcomes parameters for infiltration were mean and maximum depths of infiltration and number of measured infiltration sites. Results: In 48 of 76 metastases, an infiltration was present. The largest group of metastases was lung cancer. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and melanoma showed a maximum depth of infiltration of {>=}1 mm, and other histologies <1 mm. For non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), melanoma, and sarcoma, the highest number of infiltrative sites were observed (median, 2; range, 1-8). SCLC showed significantly larger infiltrative growth, compared with other diagnostic groups. In NSCLC, the highest percentage of infiltration was present (70%). Conclusions: Infiltrative growth beyond the border of the brain metastasis was demonstrated in 63% of the cases evaluated. Infiltrative growth, therefore, has an impact in defining the clinical target volume for SRS of brain metastases, and a margin of {approx}1 mm should be added to the visible lesion.

  8. Treatment of high numbers of brain metastases with Gamma Knife radiosurgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Hatiboglu, Mustafa Aziz; Tuzgen, Saffet; Akdur, Kerime; Chang, Eric L

    2016-04-01

    Effectiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been shown in patients with one to four brain metastases. Work has been done to evaluate the role of SRS alone treatment without whole-brain radiation therapy in patients with more than four metastases. A recent multiinstitutional JLGK 0901 prospective study revealed the class-2 evidence that SRS without whole-brain radiation therapy is an effective treatment for patients up to 10 metastatic lesions. Several retrospective studies exist to show the efficacy and safety of SRS for patients with even more than 10 lesions. However, patient selection is very critical for SRS alone treatment. The PubMed database was searched using combinations of search terms and synonyms for multiple brain metastases, Gamma Knife and SRS published between January 1, 2005 and January 1, 2015 in order to address the effectiveness of Gamma Knife for patients with multiple brain metastases. Good performance status, controlled primary disease, total treated tumor volume of 15 cm(3) or less have been found to be significant predictors for survival among patients with two or more brain lesions. The data suggest that SRS can be used and whole brain radiation therapy can be withheld in selected patients with multiple lesions to avoid acute or chronic adverse effects, especially neurocognitive decline, without causing survival disadvantage. In this review, we assessed the evidence for SRS treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. PMID:26811300

  9. Physician Expectations of Treatment Outcomes for Patients With Brain Metastases Referred for Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Chow, Edward; Tsao, May N.; Bradley, Nicole M.; Doyle, Meagan; Li, Kathy; Lam, Kelvin; Danjoux, Cyril

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cancer are referred to our Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program for quick access to palliative radiotherapy. The primary objective of this prospective study was to determine the physician expectations of the treatment outcomes for patients with brain metastases referred for whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). The secondary objectives were to determine the factors influencing the expectations and to examine the accuracy of the physician-estimated patient survival. Methods and Materials: Patients were identified during a 17-month period. The referring physicians were sent a survey by facsimile to be completed and returned before the patient consultation. Information was sought on the patient's disease status, the physician's expectations of WBRT, the estimated patient survival and performance status, and physician demographic data. Results: A total of 137 surveys were sent out, and the overall response rate was 57.7%. The median patient age was 66 years (range, 35-87), 78.5% had multiple brain metastases, 42.3% had a controlled primary tumor, and 62.3% had extracranial disease. WBRT was thought to stabilize neurologic symptoms, improve quality of life, and allow for a Decadron (dexamethasone) taper by >=94.9% of the referring physicians; 87.0% thought WBRT would improve performance status; 77.9% thought it would improve neurologic symptoms; and 40.8% thought it would improve survival. The referring physicians estimated patient survival as a median of 6.0 months; however, the actual survival was a median of 2.5 months, for a median individual difference of 1.9 months (p < .0001). Conclusion: Physicians referring patients with brain metastases for consideration of WBRT are often overly optimistic when estimating the clinical benefit of the treatment and overestimate patient survival. These findings highlight the need for education and additional research in this field.

  10. Multiple calcified brain metastases in a man with invasive ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ressl, Nadine; Oberndorfer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 52-year-old Caucasian man with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. One year after initial diagnosis, he developed a generalised epileptic seizure and neuroimaging showed multiple, calcified intracerebral lesions. Owing to these atypical cerebral imaging findings, comprehensive serological and cerebrospinal fluid analysis was conducted and a latent toxoplasmosis was suspected. In order to distinguish between metastases and an infectious disease, a cerebral biopsy was performed, which verified brain metastases. The patient received whole-brain radiotherapy. The last cerebral CT scan, 18 months later showed stable disease. Calcification of brain metastases in patients with breast cancer is very rare. Owing to their non-characteristic radiological appearance with a lack of contrast enhancement, diagnosis of metastases can be difficult. Infectious diseases should be considered within the diagnostic work up. Owing to possible pitfalls, we recommend a widespread differential diagnostic work up in similar cases, and even in cases with a confirmed primary tumour. PMID:26472289

  11. Assessment of prognostic scores in brain metastases from breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tabouret, Emeline; Metellus, Philippe; Gonçalves, Anthony; Esterni, Benjamin; Charaffe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Viens, Patrice; Tallet, Agnés

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is the second most common cause of brain metastases (BM). Optimal management of BM from BC is still debated. In an attempt to provide appropriate treatment and to assist with optimal patient selection, several specific prognostic classifications for BM from BC have been established. We evaluated the prognostic value and validity of the 6 proposed scoring systems in an independent population of BC patients with BM. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all consecutive BC patients referred to our institution for newly diagnosed BM between October 1995 and July 2011 (n = 149). Each of the 6 scores proposed for BM from BC (Sperduto, Niwinska, Park, Nieder, Le Scodan, and Claude) was applied to this population. The discriminative ability of each score was assessed using the Brier score and the C-index. Individual prognostic values of clinical and histological factors were analyzed using uni- and multivariate analyses. Results Median overall survival was 15.1 months (95% CI,11.5–18.7). Sperduto-GPA (P < .001), Nieder (P < .001), Park (P < .001), Claude (P < .001), Niwinska (P < .001), and Le Scodan (P = .034) scores all showed significant prognostic value. The Nieder score showed the best discriminative ability (C-index, 0.672; Brier score error reduction, 16.1%). Conclusion The majority of prognostic scores were relevant for patients with BM from BC in our independent population, and the Nieder score seems to present the best predictive value but showed a relatively low positive predictive value. Thus, these results remain insufficient and challenge the routine use of these scoring systems. PMID:24311640

  12. Non Tumor Perfusion Changes Following Stereotactic Radiosurgery to Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Jakubovic, Raphael; Sahgal, Arjun; Ruschin, Mark; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Milwid, Rachael; Aviv, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early perfusion changes in normal tissue following stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: Nineteen patients harboring twenty-two brain metastases treated with SRS were imaged with dynamic susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (DSC MRI) at baseline, 1 week and 1 month post SRS. Relative cerebral blood volume and flow (rCBV and rCBF) ratios were evaluated outside of tumor within a combined region of interest (ROI) and separately within gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) ROIs. Three-dimensional dose distribution from each SRS plan was divided into six regions: (1) <2 Gy; (2) 2-5 Gy; (3) 5-10 Gy; (4) 10-12 Gy; (5) 12-16 Gy; and (6) >16 Gy. rCBV and rCBF ratio differences between baseline, 1 week and 1 month were compared. Best linear fit plots quantified normal tissue dose-dependency. Results: Significant rCBV ratio increases were present between baseline and 1 month for all ROIs and dose ranges except for WM ROI receiving <2 Gy. rCBV ratio for all ROIs was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month with the greatest changes occurring within the 5-10 Gy dose range (53.1%). rCBF ratio was maximally increased from baseline to 1 month for all ROIs within the 5-10 Gy dose range (33.9-45.0%). Both rCBV and rCBF ratios were most elevated within GM ROIs. A weak, positive but not significant association between dose, rCBV and rCBF ratio was demonstrated. Progressive rCBV and rCBF ratio increased with dose up to 10 Gy at 1 month. Conclusion: Normal tissue response following SRS can be characterized by dose, tissue, and time specific increases in rCBV and rCBF ratio. PMID:26269612

  13. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the modern management of patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany; Das, Sunit; Larson, David A.; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established non-invasive ablative therapy for brain metastases. Early clinical trials with SRS proved that tumor control rates are superior to whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. As a result, WBRT plus SRS was widely adopted for patients with a limited number of brain metastases (“limited number” customarily means 1-4). Subsequent trials focused on answering whether WBRT upfront was necessary at all. Based on current randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses comparing SRS alone to SRS plus WBRT, adjuvant WBRT results in better intracranial control; however, at the expense of neurocognitive functioning and quality of life. These adverse effects of WBRT may also negatively impact on survival in younger patients. Based on the results of these studies, treatment has shifted to SRS alone in patients with a limited number of metastases. Additionally, RCTs are evaluating the role of SRS alone in patients with >4 brain metastases. New developments in SRS include fractionated SRS for large tumors and the integration of SRS with targeted systemic therapies that cross the blood brain barrier and/or stimulate an immune response. We present in this review the current high level evidence and rationale supporting SRS as the standard of care for patients with limited brain metastases, and emerging applications of SRS. PMID:26848525

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway activation in breast cancer brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Activation status of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBMs) is largely unknown. We examined expression of phospho(p)-AKT, p-S6, and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) in BCBMs and their implications for overall survival (OS) and survival after BCBMs. Secondary analyses included PI3K pathway activation status and associations with time to distant recurrence (TTDR) and time to BCBMs. Similar analyses were also conducted among the subset of patients with triple-negative BCBMs. Methods p-AKT, p-S6, and PTEN expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry in 52 BCBMs and 12 matched primary BCs. Subtypes were defined as hormone receptor (HR)+/HER2-, HER2+, and triple-negative (TNBC). Survival analyses were performed by using a Cox model, and survival curves were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Expression of p-AKT and p-S6 and lack of PTEN (PTEN-) was observed in 75%, 69%, and 25% of BCBMs. Concordance between primary BCs and matched BCBMs was 67% for p-AKT, 58% for p-S6, and 83% for PTEN. PTEN- was more common in TNBC compared with HR+/HER2- and HER2+. Expression of p-AKT, p-S6, and PTEN- was not associated with OS or survival after BCBMs (all, P > 0.06). Interestingly, among all patients, PTEN- correlated with shorter time to distant and brain recurrence. Among patients with TNBC, PTEN- in BCBMs was associated with poorer overall survival. Conclusions The PI3K pathway is active in most BCBMs regardless of subtype. Inhibition of this pathway represents a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with BCBMs, a group of patients with poor prognosis and limited systemic therapeutic options. Although expression of the PI3K pathway did not correlate with OS and survival after BCBM, PTEN- association with time to recurrence and OS (among patients with TNBC) is worthy of further study. PMID:22132754

  15. Whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases from breast cancer: estimation of survival using two stratification systems

    PubMed Central

    Viani, Gustavo A; Castilho, Marcus S; Salvajoli, João V; Pellizzon, Antonio Cassio A; Novaes, Paulo E; Guimarães, Flavio S; Conte, Maria A; Fogaroli, Ricardo C

    2007-01-01

    Background Brain metastases (BM) are the most common form of intracranial cancer. The incidence of BM seems to have increased over the past decade. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of data from three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials (1200 patients) has allowed three prognostic groups to be identified. More recently a simplified stratification system that uses the evaluation of three main prognostics factors for radiosurgery in BM was developed. Methods To analyze the overall survival rate (OS), prognostic factors affecting outcomes and to estimate the potential improvement in OS for patients with BM from breast cancer, stratified by RPA class and brain metastases score (BS-BM). From January 1996 to December 2004, 174 medical records of patients with diagnosis of BM from breast cancer, who received WBRT were analyzed. The surgery followed by WBRT was used in 15.5% of patients and 84.5% of others patients were submitted at WBRT alone; 108 patients (62.1%) received the fractionation schedule of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Solitary BM was present in 37.9 % of patients. The prognostic factors evaluated for OS were: age, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), number of lesions, localization of lesions, neurosurgery, chemotherapy, absence extracranial disease, RPA class, BS-BM and radiation doses and fractionation. Results The OS in 1, 2 and 3 years was 33.4 %, 16.7%, and 8.8 %, respectively. The RPA class analysis showed strong relation with OS (p < 0.0001). The median survival time by RPA class in months was: class I 11.7, class II 6.2 and class III 3.0. The significant prognostic factors associated with better OS were: higher KPS (p < 0.0001), neurosurgery (P < 0.0001), single metastases (p = 0.003), BS-BM (p < 0.0001), control primary tumor (p = 0.002) and absence of extracranial metastases (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the factors associated positively with OS were: neurosurgery (p < 0.0001), absence of extracranial metastases (p <0.0001) and RPA

  16. [Radiotherapy plus concomitant systemic therapies for patients with brain metastases from breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Cao, K I; Kirova, Y M

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of brain metastases from breast cancer is increasing with diagnosis and therapeutics progress, especially with systemic therapies. The occurrence of multiple brain metastases remains a delicate situation when surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery are not indicated, nor available. Treatment strategy is based on the patient's general condition and extracranial disease status. Whole brain radiation therapy remains the gold standard local treatment but its efficacy is limited with a median overall survival of 6 months. New strategies are needed for increasing survival and patients' quality of life. Combining radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been a subject of interest. This article sums up the different radiotherapy plus concomitant systemic therapies combinations for the treatment of brain metastases from breast cancer. PMID:24731405

  17. miR-20b is up-regulated in brain metastases from primary breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aamir; Ginnebaugh, Kevin R.; Sethi, Seema; Chen, Wei; Ali, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are frequent in patients with advanced breast cancer and are associated with poor prognosis. However, unique molecular biomarkers have not yet been established. We hypothesized that microRNA-20b (miR-20b) plays a role in breast cancer brain metastasis. Our study cohort comprised of eleven breast cancer patients with brain metastasis and nine control patients (age, stage, and follow-up matched) with breast cancer without brain metastasis. Cases were reviewed microscopically to select tumor blocks with >50% tumor cells, RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissue blocks and expression of miR-20b analyzed using qRT-PCR. We further tested the effect of miR-20b overexpression on colony formation and invasion in vitro using MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In the patient-derived samples, miR-20b expression was significantly higher in brain metastases of breast cancer patients, compared to primary breast tumors as well as the patients without brain metastasis. miR-20b also significantly induced the colony formation and invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Further, miR-20b levels were observed to be high in brain-metastasizing cells, compared to bone-metastasizing cells. Together, our findings suggest a novel role of miR-20b in breast cancer brain metastasis that warrants further investigation for its potential to be developed as prognostic and/or therapeutic target. PMID:25893380

  18. It is time to reevaluate the management of patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Kalkanis, Steven N; Mehta, Minesh P; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-07-01

    There are many elements to the science that drives the clinical care of patients with brain metastases. Although part of an understanding that continues to evolve, a number of key historical misconceptions remain that commonly drive physicians' and researchers' attitudes and approaches. By understanding how these relate to current practice, we can better comprehend our available science to provide both better research and care. These past misconceptions include: Misconception 1: Once a primary cancer spreads to the brain, the histology of that primary tumor does not have much impact on response to chemotherapy, sensitivity to radiation, risk of further brain relapse, development of additional metastatic lesions, or survival. All tumor primary histologies are the same once they spread to the brain. They are the same in terms of the number of tumors, radiosensitivity, chemoresponsiveness, risk of further brain relapse, and survival. Misconception 2: The number of brain metastases matters. This number matters in terms of subsequent brain relapse, survival, and cognitive dysfunction; the precise number of metastases can also be used as a limit in determining which patients might be eligible for a particular treatment option. Misconception 3: Cancer in the brain is always a diffuse problem due to the presence of micrometastases. Misconception 4: Whole-brain radiation therapy invariably causes disabling cognitive dysfunction if a patient lives long enough. Misconception 5: Most brain metastases are symptomatic. Thus, it is not worth screening patients for brain metastases, especially because the impact on survival is minimal. The conduct and findings of past clinical research have led to conceptions that affect clinical care yet appear limiting. PMID:24662510

  19. In-vivo longitudinal MRI study: an assessment of melanoma brain metastases in a clinically relevant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mariama N; Chen, Yuhua; McFadden, Catherine D; Simedrea, Felicia C; Foster, Paula J

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastases are an important clinical problem. Few animal models exist for melanoma brain metastases; many of which are not clinically relevant. Longitudinal MRI was implemented to examine the development of tumors in a clinically relevant mouse model of melanoma brain metastases. Fifty thousand human metastatic melanoma (A2058) cells were injected intracardially into nude mice. Three Tesla MRI was performed using a custom-built gradient insert coil and a mouse solenoid head coil. Imaging was performed on consecutive days at four time points. Tumor burden and volumes of metastases were measured from balanced steady-state free precession image data. Metastases with a disrupted blood-tumor barrier were identified from T1-weighted spin echo images acquired after administration of gadopentetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Metastases permeable to Gd-DTPA showed signal enhancement. The number of enhancing metastases was determined by comparing balanced steady-state free precession images with T1-weighted spin echo images. After the final imaging session, ex-vivo permeability and histological analyses were carried out. Imaging showed that both enhancing and nonenhancing brain metastases coexist in the brain, and that most metastases switched from the nonenhancing to the enhancing phenotype. Small numbers of brain metastases were enhancing when first detected by MRI and remained enhancing, whereas other metastases remained nonenhancing to Gd-DTPA throughout the experiment. No clear relationship existed between the permeability of brain metastases and size, brain location and age. Longitudinal in-vivo MRI is key to studying the complex and dynamic processes of metastasis and changes in the blood-tumor barrier permeability, which may lead to a better understanding of the variable responses of brain metastases to treatments. PMID:25513779

  20. Differential CD44 expression patterns in primary brain tumours and brain metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Li, H.; Liu, J.; Hofmann, M.; Hamou, M. F.; de Tribolet, N.

    1995-01-01

    Splicing variants of CD44 (CD44v) are increasingly recognised as metastasis-promoting factors in rodent and some human cancers. However, the frequency for CD44v expression in human cancers and their metastases and the status of CD44v expression in low or non-metastatic tumours is still uncertain. To address this issue, we investigated CD44 expression patterns in brain metastases (BMTs) spread from more than ten organs and five types of primary brain tumours (PBTs) by Northern blot, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemical analysis. The results demonstrated that all of the 56 PBTs examined express standard form of CD44 (CD44s) but none of them express CD44v. In contrast, 22 of 26 BMTs studied were found with CD44v expression. Our data thus present direct evidence of a general distribution of CD44 in BMTs but suggest that such expression is an extremely rare event in PBTs. Therefore, the presence or absence of CD44v expression may be related to high or low metastatic potential of human malignancies. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 PMID:7541233

  1. Differential Impact of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Added to Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Doo-Sik; Lee, Jung-Il; Im, Yong-Seok; Nam, Do-Hyun; Park, Kwan; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated whether the addition of whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) provided any therapeutic benefit according to recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Methods and Materials: Two hundred forty-five patients with 1 to 10 metastases who underwent SRS between January 2002 and December 2007 were included in the study. Of those, 168 patients were treated with SRS alone and 77 patients received SRS followed by WBRT. Actuarial curves were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method regarding overall survival (OS), distant brain control (DC), and local brain control (LC) stratified by RPA class. Analyses for known prognostic variables were performed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that control of the primary tumor, small number of brain metastases, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) > 70, and initial treatment modalities were significant predictors for survival. For RPA class 1, SRS plus WBRT was associated with a longer survival time compared with SRS alone (854 days vs. 426 days, p = 0.042). The SRS plus WBRT group also showed better LC rate than did the SRS-alone group (p = 0.021), although they did not show a better DC rate (p = 0.079). By contrast, for RPA class 2 or 3, no significant difference in OS, LC, or DC was found between the two groups. Conclusions: These results suggest that RPA classification should determine whether or not WBRT is added to SRS. WBRT may be recommended to be added to SRS for patients in whom long-term survival is expected on the basis of RPA classification.

  2. Identification of primary tumors of brain metastases by SIMCA classification of IR spectroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Shapoval, Larysa; Sobottka, Stephan B; Geiger, Kathrin D; Schackert, Gabriele; Salzer, Reiner

    2006-07-01

    Brain metastases are secondary intracranial lesions which occur more frequently than primary brain tumors. The four most abundant types of brain metastasis originate from primary tumors of lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma. As metastatic cells contain the molecular information of the primary tissue cells and IR spectroscopy probes the molecular fingerprint of cells, IR spectroscopy based methods constitute a new approach to determine the origin of brain metastases. IR spectroscopic images of 4 by 4 mm2 tissue areas were recorded in transmission mode by a FTIR imaging spectrometer coupled to a focal plane array detector. Unsupervised cluster analysis revealed variances within each cryosection. Selected clusters of five IR images with known diagnoses trained a supervised classification model based on the algorithm soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA). This model was applied to distinguish normal brain tissue from brain metastases and to identify the primary tumor of brain metastases in 15 independent IR images. All specimens were assigned to the correct tissue class. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that IR spectroscopy can complement established methods such as histopathology or immunohistochemistry for diagnosis. PMID:16787638

  3. Distribution of Brain Metastases in Relation to the Hippocampus: Implications for Neurocognitive Functional Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghia, Amol; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Thomas, Sayana; Cannon, George; Khuntia, Deepak; Kuo, John S.; Mehta, Minesh P. . E-mail: mehta@humonc.wisc.edu

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: With the advent of intensity-modulated radiotherapy, the ability to limit the radiation dose to normal tissue offers an avenue to limit side effects. This study attempted to delineate the distribution of brain metastases with relation to the hippocampus for the purpose of exploring the viability of tomotherapy-guided hippocampal sparing therapy potentially to reduce neurocognitive deficits from radiation. Methods and Materials: The pre-radiotherapy T1-weighted, postcontrast axial MR images of 100 patients who received whole brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, or a radiosurgical boost following whole brain radiotherapy between 2002 and 2006 were examined. We contoured brain metastases as well as hippocampi with 5-, 10-, and 15-mm expansion envelopes. Results: Of the 272 identified metastases, 3.3% (n = 9) were within 5 mm of the hippocampus, and 86.4% of metastases were greater than 15 mm from the hippocampus (n = 235). The most common location for metastatic disease was the frontal lobe (31.6%, n = 86). This was followed by the cerebellum (24.3%, n = 66), parietal lobe (16.9%, n = 46), temporal lobe (12.9%, n = 35), occipital lobe (7.7%, n = 21), deep brain nuclei (4.0%, n = 11), and brainstem (2.6%, n = 7). Conclusions: Of the 100 patients, 8 had metastases within 5 mm of the hippocampus. Hence, a 5-mm margin around the hippocampus for conformal avoidance whole brain radiotherapy represents an acceptable risk, especially because these patients in the absence of any other intracranial disease could be salvaged using stereotactic radiosurgery. Moreover, we developed a hippocampal sparing tomotherapy plan as proof of principle to verify the feasibility of this therapy in the setting of brain metastases.

  4. βIII-Tubulin Regulates Breast Cancer Metastases to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A.; Zhang, Lingjiao; Miska, Jason M.; Qiao, Jian; Kim, Julius W.; Pytel, Peter; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Ahmed, Atique U.

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in about 10–30% of breast cancer patients, which culminates in a poor prognosis. It is therefore critical to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain metastatic processes to identify relevant targets. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells must express brain-associated markers that would enable their invasion and survival in the brain microenvironment. We assessed a panel of brain-predominant markers and found an elevation of several neuronal markers (βIII tubulin, Nestin and AchE) in brain metastatic breast cancer cells. Among these neuronal predominant markers, in silico analysis revealed overexpression of βIII tubulin (TUBB3) in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) and its expression was significantly associated with distant metastases. TUBB3 knockdown studies were conducted in breast cancer models (MDA-Br, GLIM2 and MDA-MB-468) which revealed significant reduction in their invasive capabilities. MDA-Br cells with suppressed TUBB3 also demonstrated loss of key signaling molecules such as β3 integrin, pFAK, and pSrc in vitro. Furthermore, TUBB3 knockdown in a brain metastatic breast cancer cell line compromised its metastatic ability in vivo, and significantly improved survival in a brain metastasis model. These results implicate a critical role of TUBB3 in conferring brain metastatic potential to breast cancer cells. PMID:25724666

  5. βIII-Tubulin Regulates Breast Cancer Metastases to the Brain.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A; Zhang, Lingjiao; Miska, Jason M; Qiao, Jian; Kim, Julius W; Pytel, Peter; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-05-01

    Brain metastases occur in about 10% to 30% of breast cancer patients, which culminates in a poor prognosis. It is, therefore, critical to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain metastatic processes to identify relevant targets. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells must express brain-associated markers that would enable their invasion and survival in the brain microenvironment. We assessed a panel of brain-predominant markers and found an elevation of several neuronal markers (βIII-tubulin, Nestin, and AchE) in brain metastatic breast cancer cells. Among these neuronal predominant markers, in silico analysis revealed overexpression of βIII-tubulin (TUBB3) in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) and its expression was significantly associated with distant metastases. TUBB3 knockdown studies were conducted in breast cancer models (MDA-Br, GLIM2, and MDA-MB-468), which revealed significant reduction in their invasive capabilities. MDA-Br cells with suppressed TUBB3 also demonstrated loss of key signaling molecules such as β3 integrin, pFAK, and pSrc in vitro. Furthermore, TUBB3 knockdown in a brain metastatic breast cancer cell line compromised its metastatic ability in vivo, and significantly improved survival in a brain metastasis model. These results implicate a critical role of TUBB3 in conferring brain metastatic potential to breast cancer cells. PMID:25724666

  6. A Simple and Efficient Methodology To Improve Geometric Accuracy in Gamma Knife Radiation Surgery: Implementation in Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Karaiskos, Pantelis; Moutsatsos, Argyris; Pappas, Eleftherios; Georgiou, Evangelos; Roussakis, Arkadios; Torrens, Michael; Seimenis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To propose, verify, and implement a simple and efficient methodology for the improvement of total geometric accuracy in multiple brain metastases gamma knife (GK) radiation surgery. Methods and Materials: The proposed methodology exploits the directional dependence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-related spatial distortions stemming from background field inhomogeneities, also known as sequence-dependent distortions, with respect to the read-gradient polarity during MRI acquisition. First, an extra MRI pulse sequence is acquired with the same imaging parameters as those used for routine patient imaging, aside from a reversal in the read-gradient polarity. Then, “average” image data are compounded from data acquired from the 2 MRI sequences and are used for treatment planning purposes. The method was applied and verified in a polymer gel phantom irradiated with multiple shots in an extended region of the GK stereotactic space. Its clinical impact in dose delivery accuracy was assessed in 15 patients with a total of 96 relatively small (<2 cm) metastases treated with GK radiation surgery. Results: Phantom study results showed that use of average MR images eliminates the effect of sequence-dependent distortions, leading to a total spatial uncertainty of less than 0.3 mm, attributed mainly to gradient nonlinearities. In brain metastases patients, non-eliminated sequence-dependent distortions lead to target localization uncertainties of up to 1.3 mm (mean: 0.51 ± 0.37 mm) with respect to the corresponding target locations in the “average” MRI series. Due to these uncertainties, a considerable underdosage (5%-32% of the prescription dose) was found in 33% of the studied targets. Conclusions: The proposed methodology is simple and straightforward in its implementation. Regarding multiple brain metastases applications, the suggested approach may substantially improve total GK dose delivery accuracy in smaller, outlying targets.

  7. Whole brain reirradiation and concurrent temozolomide in patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Bozzao, Alessandro; Romano, Andrea; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Valeriani, Maurizio; Osti, Mattia; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2014-06-01

    A second course of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) has been employed in selected patients with progressive brain metastases providing favorable symptomatic palliation with acceptable toxicity, although its efficacy and safety remain matter of debate. In the present study we have evaluated the outcomes in patients with progressive intracranial disease treated with WBRT reirradiation and concurrent temozolomide between October 2010 and May 2013. Data were obtained from a prospectively maintained database including patients with brain tumors treated with radiotherapy at Sant'Andrea Hospital. We identified 27 patients (10 males and 17 females) with a median age of 54 years who received WBRT reirradiation at a dose of 25 Gy in ten fractions plus concomitant daily temozolomide administered orally at a dose of 75 mg/m(2). At the time of repeat WBRT all patients had a KPS ≥ 60. The primary disease sites were lung (n = 18) and breast (n = 9). The median overall survival after the second course of WBRT was 6.2 months and the median time to progression was 5.5 months. Eight patients experienced complete resolution of symptoms, 9 patients had a significant improvement, and 6 patients had no change in their neurologic function. Four patients had further deterioration after reirradiation. Overall, 85 % of patients improved or maintained their neurologic status. No severe acute toxicity during or after the second course of WBRT reirradiation was observed. On multivariate analysis with the Cox proportional hazards model, stable or absent extracranial metastases (p = 0.005) and response to treatment (p = 0.01) were independent favorable prognostic factors for survival. The median and 12-month survival rates were 12 months and 50 % in patients with stable or absent extracranial disease and 4.6 months and 7 % in those with progressive extracranial disease (p = 0.001). In conclusion, in the respect to the small number of treated patients, repeat WBRT plus concomitant

  8. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases: analysis of outcome and risk of brain radionecrosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose to investigate the factors affecting survival and toxicity in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), with special attention to volumes of brain receiving a specific dose (V10 - V16 Gy) as predictors for brain radionecrosis. Patients and Methods Two hundred six consecutive patients with 310 cerebral metastases less than 3.5 cm were treated with SRS as primary treatment and followed prospectively at University of Rome La Sapienza Sant'Andrea Hospital. Overall survival, brain control, and local control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method calculated from the time of SRS. Univariate and multivariate analysis using a Cox proportional hazards regression model were performed to determine the predictive value of prognostic factors for treatment outcome and SRS-related complications. Results Median overall survival and brain control were 14.1 months and 10 months, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 58% and 24%, and respective brain control were 43% and 22%. Sixteen patients recurred locally after SRS, with 1-year and 2-year local control rates of 92% and 84%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, stable extracranial disease and KPS >70 were associated with the most significant survival benefit. Neurological complications were recorded in 27 (13%) patients. Severe neurological complications (RTOG Grade 3 and 4) occurred in 5.8% of patients. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 24% of treated lesions, being symptomatic in 10% and asymptomatic in 14%. On multivariate analysis, V10 through V16 Gy were independent risk factors for radionecrosis, with V10 Gy and V12 Gy being the most predictive (p = 0.0001). For V10 Gy >12.6 cm3 and V12 Gy >10.9 cm3 the risk of radionecrosis was 47%. Conclusions SRS alone represents a feasible option as initial treatment for patients with brain metastases, however a significant subset of patients may develop neurological complications. Lesions with V12 Gy >8.5 cm3 carries a risk of radionecrosis

  9. Assessment of function and quality of life in a phase II multi-institutional clinical trial of fractionated simultaneous in-field boost radiotherapy for patients with 1-3 metastases.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav; Roberge, David; MacRae, Robert; Roa, Wilson; Panet-Raymond, Valerie; Masucci, Laura; Yaremko, Brian; D'Souza, David; Palma, David; Sexton, Tracy; Yu, Edward; Pantarotto, Jason R; Ahmad, Belal; Fisher, Barbara; Dar, A Rashid; Lambert, Carole; Pond, Gregory; Stitt, Larry; Tay, Keng Yeow; Rodrigues, George

    2016-07-01

    We examined functional outcomes and quality of life of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with integrated fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy boost (FSRT) for brain metastases treatment. Eighty seven people with 1-3 brain metastases (54/87 lung primary, 42/87 single brain metastases) were enrolled on this Phase II trial of WBRT (30 Gy/10) + simultaneous FSRT, (60 Gy/10). Median overall follow-up and survival was 5.4 months, 6 month actuarial intra-lesional control was 78 %; only 1 patient exhibited grade 4 toxicity (worsened seizures); most treatment related toxicity was grade 1 or 2; 2/87 patients demonstrated asymptomatic radiation necrosis on follow-up imaging. Mean (Min-Max) baseline KPS, Mini Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and FACT-BR quality of life were 83 (70-100), 28 (21-30) and 143 (98-153). Lower baseline MMSE (but not KPS or FACT-Br) was associated with worse survival after adjusting for age, number of metastases, primary and extra-cranial disease status. Crude rates of deterioration (>10 points decrease from baseline for KPS and FACT-Br, MMSE fall to <27) ranged from 26 to 38 % for KPS, 32-59 % for FACT-Br and 0-16 % for MMSE depending on the time-point assessed with higher rates generally noted at earlier time points (≤6 months post-treatment). Using a linear mixed models analysis, significant declines from baseline were noted for KPS and FACT-Br (largest effects at 6 weeks to 3 months) with no significant change in MMSE. The effects on function and quality of life of this integrated treatment of WBRT + simultaneous FSRT were similar to other published series combining WBRT + radiosurgery. PMID:27084705

  10. A planning study of simultaneous integrated boost with forward IMRT for multiple brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Xiaodong; Ni, Lingqin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Weijun; Ying, Shenpeng; Gong, Qiangjun; Liu, Yanmei

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose conformity and feasibility of whole-brain radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost by forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for 10 patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases on Pinnacle 6.2 Treatment Planning System. The prescribed dose was 30 Gy to the whole brain (planning target volume [PTV]{sub wbrt}) and 40 Gy to individual brain metastases (PTV{sub boost}) simultaneously, and both doses were given in 10 fractions. The maximum diameters of individual brain metastases ranged from 1.6 to 6 cm, and the summated PTVs per patient ranged from 1.62 to 69.81 cm{sup 3}. Conformity and feasibility were evaluated regarding conformation number and treatment delivery time. One hundred percent volume of the PTV{sub boost} received at least 95% of the prescribed dose in all cases. The maximum doses were less than 110% of the prescribed dose to the PTV{sub boost}, and all of the hot spots were within the PTV{sub boost}. The volume of the PTV{sub wbrt} that received at least 95% of the prescribed dose ranged from 99.2% to 100%. The mean values of conformation number were 0.682. The mean treatment delivery time was 2.79 minutes. Ten beams were used on an average in these plans. Whole-brain radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost by forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy in 1 to 3 brain metastases is feasible, and treatment delivery time is short.

  11. Unusual Adrenal and Brain Metastases From Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Revealed by 131I SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhen; Shen, Guo-hua; Liu, Bin; Kuang, An-ren

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is uncommon. Metastatic involvement of both adrenal and brain in the same patient from differentiated thyroid carcinoma is rare. Here, we described an unusual case with iodine-avid lung, bone, adrenal, liver, and brain metastases from follicular thyroid carcinoma confirmed by 131I SPECT/CT. The utilization of SPECT/CT in thyroid cancer patients can detect the presence of metastases and also exclude potential false-positive lesions. Our case demonstrates that SPECT/CT is helpful in localizing and confirming metastatic lesions from differentiated thyroid carcinoma in rare and unusual sites. PMID:26018699

  12. Malignant melanoma brain metastases. Review of Roswell Park Memorial Institute experience.

    PubMed

    Madajewicz, S; Karakousis, C; West, C R; Caracandas, J; Avellanosa, A M

    1984-06-01

    One-hundred twenty five of 700 patients with malignant melanoma treated at Roswell Park Memorial Institute from 1972 to 1978 were found to have brain metastases. Seventy-three percent of the patients had multiple brain metastases. Male to female ratio was 1.9:1. The median survival of the untreated group of patients was 3 weeks as compared with that of 6 weeks for the patients maintained on steroids only, 9 weeks for those who received radiotherapy, 11 weeks for the patients treated with intraarterial chemotherapy, and 26 weeks for the patients who underwent successful surgical excision of a solitary lesion. PMID:6713349

  13. Surgery and radiation therapy for brain metastases from classic biphasic pulmonary blastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Kenta; Yamamoto, Kuniatsu; Suzuki, Yoshio; Saito, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary blastoma, a rare malignant lung tumour, can metastasise to the brain. However, there is no evidence for any effective treatment. The aim of this report is to discuss the treatment options for pulmonary blastoma and confirm the necessity for a pathological diagnosis. A 75-year-old man was admitted with progressive right-sided hemiplegia and aphasia. MRI showed multiple brain tumours. A left frontal lobe lesion was surgically resected, after which he underwent whole brain radiation (30 Gy/10 fractions). He died of an acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia. On performing autopsy, partial responses in the brain metastases that had been irradiated were confirmed pathologically. Thus, we present pathological confirmation that surgery and radiation therapy have therapeutic effects on brain metastases from pulmonary blastoma. PMID:24895392

  14. Tumor Directed, Scalp Sparing Intensity Modulated Whole Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Kao, Johnny; Darakchiev, Boramir; Conboy, Linda; Ogurek, Sara; Sharma, Neha; Ren, Xuemin; Pettit, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Despite significant technical advances in radiation delivery, conventional whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) has not materially changed in the past 50 years. We hypothesized that IMRT can selectively spare uninvolved brain and scalp with the goal of reducing acute and late toxicity. MRI/CT simulation image registration was performed. We performed IMRT planning to simultaneously treat the brain tumor(s) on MRI + 5 mm margin to 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions while limiting the uninvolved brain + 2 mm margin to 30 Gy in 15 fractions and the mean scalp dose to #18 Gy. Three field IMRT plans were compared to conventional WBRT plans. Symptomatic patients were started on conventional WBRT for 2 to 3 fractions while IMRT planning was performed. Seventeen consecutive patients with brain metastases with RPA class I and II disease with no leptomeningeal spread were treated with IMRT WBRT. Compared to conventional WBRT, IMRT reduced the mean scalp dose (26.2 Gy vs. 16.4 Gy, p < 0.001) and the mean PTV30 dose (38.4 Gy vs. 32.0 Gy, p < 0.001) while achieving similar mean PTV37.5 doses (38.3 Gy vs. 38.0 Gy, p = 0.26). Using Olsen hair loss score criteria, 4 of 15 assessable patients preserved at least 50% of hair coverage at 1 to 3 months after treatment while 6 patients preserved between 25 and 50% hair coverage. At a median follow-up of 6.8 months (range: 5 to 15 months), the median overall survival was 5.4 months. Four patients relapsed within the brain, one within the PTV37.5 and three outside the PTV37.5. Tumor directed, scalp sparing IMRT is feasible, achieves rational dose distributions and preserves partial hair coverage in the majority of patients. Further studies are warranted to determine whether the increased utilization of resources needed for IMRT are appropriate in this setting. PMID:24750002

  15. New Breast Cancer Recursive Partitioning Analysis Prognostic Index in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Niwinska, Anna; Murawska, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present a new breast cancer recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) prognostic index for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases as a guide in clinical decision making. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of 441 consecutive patients with breast cancer and brain metastases treated between the years 2003 and 2009 was assessed. Prognostic factors significant for univariate analysis were included into RPA. Results: Three prognostic classes of a new breast cancer RPA prognostic index were selected. The median survival of patients within prognostic Classes I, II, and III was 29, 9, and 2.4 months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Class I included patients with one or two brain metastases, without extracranial disease or with controlled extracranial disease, and with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of 100. Class III included patients with multiple brain metastases with KPS of {<=}60. Class II included all other cases. Conclusions: The breast cancer RPA prognostic index is an easy and valuable tool for use in clinical practice. It can select patients who require aggressive treatment and those in whom whole-brain radiotherapy or symptomatic therapy is the most reasonable option. An individual approach is required for patients from prognostic Class II.

  16. Symptoms and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases Following Palliative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer; Hird, Amanda; Zhang Liying; Tsao, May; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth; Danjoux, Cyril; Chow, Edward

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To examine prospectively patient self-rated symptoms and quality of life (QOL) indicators in patients with brain metastases following whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with brain metastases referred for WBRT were approached for this study. Patients were asked to rate their symptoms and QOL using the Spitzer Quality of Life Index questionnaire. Follow-up was at 1, 2, and 3 months following WBRT. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the change in symptom severity over time. Results: Between August 2005 to October 2007, 129 patients with brain metastases were enrolled. The majority of patients (88%) received 20 Gy in five fractions. Median age was 64 years, and median Karnofsky Performance Status at baseline was 70. The most commonly experienced symptoms at baseline were headaches, weakness, balance problems, and fatigue. Thirty-five percent of patients rated neurological functional (NF) status as 1, indicating moderate neurological symptoms and need for assistance. Forty-three percent of patients had stable or decreased fatigue, and 47% had a stable or improved NF status over time (p = 0.0040). Although certain QOL domains improved over time, all other QOL domains and symptom items did not change significantly following WBRT. Conclusion: WBRT may have contributed to symptom stabilization in our study. An alternative goal of WBRT may be the prevention of symptom progression and QOL deterioration. Further research is required to select the most appropriate group of patients with brain metastases who would benefit most from WBRT.

  17. Predictors of Distant Brain Recurrence for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Sawrie, Stephen M. Guthrie, Barton L.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Nordal, Robert A.; Meredith, Ruby F.; Markert, James M.; Cloud, Gretchen A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain predictors of distant brain failure (DBF) in patients treated initially with stereotactic radiosurgery alone for newly diagnosed brain metastases. We hypothesize that these factors may be used to group patients according to risk of DBF. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed 100 patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases treated from 2003 to 2005 at our Gamma Knife radiosurgery facility. The primary endpoint was DBF. Potential predictors included number of metastases, tumor volume, histologic characteristics, extracranial disease, and use of temozolomide. Results: One-year actuarial risk of DBF was 61% for all patients. Significant predictors of DBF included more than three metastases (hazard ratio, 3.30; p = 0.004), stable or poorly controlled extracranial disease (hazard ratio, 2.16; p = 0.04), and melanoma histologic characteristics (hazard ratio, 2.14; p = 0.02). These were confirmed in multivariate analysis. Those with three or fewer metastases, no extracranial disease, and nonmelanoma histologic characteristics (N = 18) had a median time to DBF of 89 weeks vs. 33 weeks for all others. One-year actuarial freedom from DBF for this group was 83% vs. 26% for all others. Conclusions: Independent significant predictors of DBF in our series included number of metastases (more than three), present or uncontrolled extracranial disease, and melanoma histologic characteristics. These factors were combined to identify a lower risk subgroup with significantly longer time to DBF. These patients may be candidates for initial localized treatment, reserving whole-brain radiation therapy for salvage. Patients in the higher risk group may be candidates for initial whole-brain radiation therapy or should be considered for clinical trials.

  18. Isolated brain metastases as first site of recurrence in prostate cancer: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J.; Woulfe, J.; Sinclair, J.; Malone, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fewer than 2% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (pca) develop brain metastases. Autopsy series have confirmed the rarity of brain metastases. When present, brain metastases occur in end stage, once the pca is castrate-resistant and spread to other sites is extensive. Here, we present a rare case of a patient with pca who developed a solitary parenchymal brain metastasis as first site of relapse 9 years after radical therapy. The patient underwent craniotomy and excision of the tumour. A second recurrence was also isolated to the brain. In the literature, pca patients with brain metastases have a poor mean survival of 1–7.6 months. The patient in our case report experienced a relatively favourable outcome, surviving 19 months after his initial brain relapse. PMID:26715888

  19. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with vaginal and brain metastases: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Momah, Tobe; Dhanan, Etwaru; Xiao, Phillip; Kondamudi, Vasantha

    2009-01-01

    There are very few cases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma with metastases to the vagina and brain reported in the literature. Our case study highlights this rare clinical occurrence and its associated complications including pulmonary embolism. In addition we discuss current management guidelines for treating and diagnosing the disease, and how this management improves prognosis.

  20. Current treatment options of brain metastases and outcomes in patients with malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Sadzikowska, Jadwiga; Walasek, Tomasz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Blecharz, Paweł; Reinfuss, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis for patients with melanoma who have brain metastases is poor, a median survival does not exceed 4-6 months. There are no uniform standards of treatment for patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBMs). The most preferred treatment approaches include local therapy - surgical resection and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The role of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as an adjuvant to local therapy is controversial. WBRT remains a palliative approach for those patients who have multiple MBMs with contraindications for surgery or SRS, or/and poor performance status, or/and very widespread extracranial metastases. Corticosteroids have been used in palliative treatment of MBMs as relief from symptoms related to intracranial pressure and edema. In recent years, the development of new systemic therapeutic strategies has been observed. Various modalities of systemic treatment include chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted therapy. Also, multimodality management in different combinations is a common strategy. Decisions regarding the use of specific treatment modalities are dependent on patient's performance status, and the extent of both intracranial and extracranial disease. This review summarizes current treatment options, indications and outcomes in patients with brain metastases from melanoma. PMID:27601961

  1. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Ansa Maer; Scherwath, Angela; Ernst, Gundula; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Bremer, Michael; Steinmann, Diana

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in

  2. Identification of primary tumors of brain metastases by infrared spectroscopic imaging and linear discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Shapoval, Larysa; Sobottka, Stephan B; Schackert, Gabriele; Salzer, Reiner

    2006-06-01

    This study applies infrared (IR) spectroscopy to distinguish normal brain tissue from brain metastases and to determine the primary tumor of four frequent brain metastases such as lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. Standard methods sometimes fail to identify the origin of brain metastases. As metastatic cells contain the molecular information of the primary tissue cells and IR spectroscopy probes the molecular fingerprint of cells, IR spectroscopy based methods constitute a new approach to determine the primary tumor of a brain metastasis. IR spectroscopic images were recorded by a FTIR spectrometer equipped with a macro sample chamber and coupled to a focal plane array detector. Unsupervised cluster analysis of IR images revealed variances within each sample and between samples of the same tissue type. Cluster averaged IR spectra of tissue classes with known diagnoses were selected to develop a metric with eight variables. These data trained a supervised classification model based on linear discriminant analysis that was used to identify the origin of 20 cryosections including one brain metastasis with an unknown primary tumor. PMID:16700626

  3. Comparison of Two Therapeutic Strategies in Patients With Non-squamous Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) With Asymptomatic Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-29

    Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Metastatic; Non Epidermoid; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of Lung Metastatic to Brain; Cerebral Metastases; Cerebral Radiotherapy; Brain Radiotherapy; Bevacizumab

  4. Emerging strategies for treating brain metastases from breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kodack, David P.; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Ferraro, Gino B.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Brain metastasis is an end stage in breast cancer progression. Traditional treatment options have minimal efficacy, and overall survival is on the order of months. The incidence of brain metastatic disease is increasing with the improved management of systemic disease and prolongation of survival. Unfortunately, the targeted therapies that control systemic disease have diminished efficacy against brain lesions. There are reasons to be optimistic, however, as emerging therapies have shown promise in preclinical and early clinical settings. This review discusses recent advances in breast cancer brain metastasis therapy and potential approaches for successful treatment. PMID:25670078

  5. Lapatinib plus capecitabine resolved human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Glück, Stefan; Castrellon, Aurelio

    2009-01-01

    Brain metastases affect 25%-30% of women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer and are associated with a high burden of disease and poor prognosis. A 55-year-old woman presented with HER2-positive, hormone receptor-positive, locally advanced infiltrating ductal carcinoma. She received 4 cycles of neoadjuvant docetaxel (75 mg/m) plus trastuzumab (6 mg/kg) on a 21-day cycle, resulting in complete pathologic response at the time of surgery. Trastuzumab (6 mg/kg every 21 days) plus anastrozole (1 mg/d) was continued for 1 year. Two years later, the patient progressed with pulmonary nodules and a large pleural effusion. Computed tomography and positron emission tomography revealed multiple lesions in the liver and thoracic spine but no evidence of brain metastases. The patient received weekly trastuzumab (2 mg/kg), paclitaxel (80 mg/m), and carboplatin (area under the curve 2) for 6 months; her symptoms resolved and her disease stabilized. Seven months later, she developed diplopia and gait difficulties, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple brain lesions. Whole-brain radiotherapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) was delivered with excellent clinical results. The patient remained progression free without symptoms for approximately 3 months. When she developed central nervous system symptoms, she was treated with lapatinib (1250 mg/d continuously) plus capecitabine (2000 mg/m given on days 1-14 of a 21-day cycle). Four months later, a brain computed tomography performed shortly before her death from progressive systemic disease revealed near complete resolution of brain metastases. Lapatinib plus capecitabine seems to have clinical activity in HER2-positive brain metastases. PMID:19287304

  6. Long-term survival in a patient with brain metastases of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guelho, Daniela; Ribeiro, Cristina; Melo, Miguel; Carrilho, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old woman who underwent total thyroidectomy with bilateral lymphadenectomy for a papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), solid variant (T4bN1bMx), with V600E BRAF mutation. After ablative therapy, she presented undetectable thyroglobulin (Tg) but progressively increasing anti-Tg antibodies (TgAbs). During follow-up, nodal, lung and brain metastases were identified. She was submitted to surgical excision of lung lesions, radiosurgery of brain metastases and five radioiodine treatments. The latest brain MRI showed no lesions, pulmonary CT showed stable micronodules and there was progressive reduction in TgAbs. This is a peculiar case of a PTC with lung and brain metastatic lesions detected through TgAbs. Initial histological and molecular study suggested a more aggressive clinical behaviour, which was eventually confirmed. Although PTC brain metastases are extremely rare and present poor prognosis, our patient presented a good response to treatment and longer survival than usually reported for similar cases. PMID:26961557

  7. Profound prevention of experimental brain metastases of breast cancer by temozolomide in an MGMT-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Diane; Duchnowska, Renata; Woditschka, Stephan; Hua, Emily; Qian, Yongzhen; Biernat, Wojciech; Sosińska-Mielcarek, Katarzyna; Gril, Brunilde; Stark, Andreas; Hewitt, Stephen; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Jassem, Jacek; Steeg, Patricia S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Brain metastases of breast cancer cause neurocognitive damage and are incurable. We evaluated a role for temozolomide in the prevention of brain metastases of breast cancer in experimental brain metastasis models. Experimental Design Temozolomide was administered in mice following earlier injection of brain-tropic human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive Jimt1-BR3 and triple negative 231-BR-EGFP sublines, the latter with and without expression of 06-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). Additionally, the percentage of MGMT-positive tumor cells in 62 patient-matched sets of breast cancer primary tumors and resected brain metastases was determined immunohistochemically. Results Temozolomide, when dosed at 50, 25, 10 or 5 mg/kg, 5 days/week, beginning 3 days after inoculation, completely prevented the formation of experimental brain metastases from MGMT-negative 231-BR-EGFP cells. At a 1 mg/kg dose, temozolomide prevented 68% of large brain metastases, and was ineffective at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg. When the 50 mg/kg dose was administered beginning on days 18 or 24, temozolomide efficacy was reduced or absent. Temozolomide was ineffective at preventing brain metastases in MGMT-transduced 231-BR-EGFP and MGMT-expressing Jimt-1-BR3 sublines. In 62 patient-matched sets of primary breast tumors and resected brain metastases, 43.5% of the specimens had concordant low MGMT expression, while in another 14.5% of sets high MGMT staining in the primary tumor corresponded with low staining in the brain metastasis. Conclusions Temozolomide profoundly prevented the outgrowth of experimental brain metastases of breast cancer in an MGMT-dependent manner. These data provide compelling rationale for investigating the preventive efficacy of temozolomide in a clinical setting. PMID:24634373

  8. Brain metastases in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer responding to single-agent gefitinib: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stemmler, H J; Weigert, O; Krych, M; Schoenberg, S O; Ostermann, H; Hiddemann, W

    2005-08-01

    Brain metastases are a frequent finding in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The present case reports the clinical course of a patient who was treated with gefitinib alone for progressive brain metastases after whole-brain irradiation treatment (WBRT). A 50-year-old women with primary stage IV NSCLC (bone metastases) developed brain metastases after 3 cycles of chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin (CBDA). After completion of the WBRT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) indicated further progression. Two cycles of temozolomide and topotecan were applied; this was ineffective in preventing central nervous system progression. For symptomatic brain metastatic disease the patient received gefitinib as single-agent treatment. Within a few weeks of treatment there was an obvious clinical improvement. Follow-up of the brain 2 months after the start of treatment showed a decrease in both the size and number of brain metastases. Additional manifestations in the lungs and the skeletal system were re-assessed as stable disease during the treatment with gefitinib. Within 4 months of treatment there were no side-effects such as skin rash or any other systemic toxicity. Gefitinib may therefore have a role in the treatment of brain metastases from NSCLC. PMID:16027524

  9. Uptake of ANG1005, a Novel Paclitaxel Derivative, Through the Blood-Brain Barrier into Brain and Experimental Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Fancy C.; Taskar, Kunal; Rudraraju, Vinay; Goda, Satyanarayana; Thorsheim, Helen R.; Gaasch, Julie A.; Palmieri, Diane; Steeg, Patricia S.; Lockman, Paul R.; Smith, Quentin R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the uptake of angiopep-2 paclitaxel conjugate, ANG1005, into brain and brain metastases of breast cancer in rodents. Most anticancer drugs show poor delivery to brain tumors due to limited transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To overcome this, a 19-amino acid peptide (angiopep-2) was developed that binds to low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) receptors at the BBB and has the potential to deliver drugs to brain by receptor-mediated transport. Methods The transfer coefficient (Kin) for brain influx was measured by in situ rat brain perfusion. Drug distribution was determined at 30 min after i.v. injection in mice bearing intracerebral MDA-MB-231BR metastases of breast cancer. Results The BBB Kin for 125I-ANG1005 uptake (7.3 ± 0.2 × 10−3 mL/s/g) exceeded that for 3H-paclitaxel (8.5 ± 0.5 × 10−5) by 86 fold. Over 70% of 125I-ANG1005 tracer stayed in brain after capillary depletion or vascular washout. Brain 125I-ANG1005 uptake was reduced by unlabeled angiopep-2 vector and by LRP ligands, consistent with receptor transport. In vivo uptake of 125I-ANG1005 into vascularly corrected brain and brain metastases exceeded that of 14C-paclitaxel by 4–54 fold. Conclusions The results demonstrate that ANG1005 shows significantly improved delivery to brain and brain metastases of breast cancer compared to free paclitaxel. PMID:19774344

  10. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Pre-Irradiation Evaluation and Management of Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Elizabeth M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Buatti, John M.; Germano, Isabelle; Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Henderson, Mark A.; Murad, Gregory J.A.; Patchell, Roy A.; Patel, Samir H.; Robbins, Jared R.; Robins, H. Ian; Vassil, Andrew D.; Wippold, Franz J.; Yunes, Michael J.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Pretreatment evaluation is performed to determine the number, location, and size of the brain metastases and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the recommended imaging technique, particularly in patients being considered for surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery. A contiguous thin-cut volumetric MRI with gadolinium with newer gadolinium-based agents can improve detection of small brain metastases. A systemic workup and medical evaluation are important, given that subsequent treatment for the brain metastases will also depend on the extent of the extracranial disease and on the age and performance status of the patient. Patients with hydrocephalus or impending brain herniation should be started on high doses of corticosteroids and evaluated for possible neurosurgical intervention. Patients with moderate symptoms should receive approximately 4–8 mg/d of dexamethasone in divided doses. The routine use of corticosteroids in patients without neurologic symptoms is not necessary. There is no proven benefit of anticonvulsants in patient without seizures. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances where evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. PMID:24971478

  11. Stereotactic Radiosurgery in the Management of Brain Metastases: An Institutional Retrospective Analysis of Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, James L.; Batra, Sachin; Kapor, Sumit; Vellimana, Ananth; Gandhi, Rahul; Carson, Kathryn A.; Shokek, Ori; Lim, Michael; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to report our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery performed with the Gamma Knife (GK) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases and to compare survival for those treated with radiosurgery alone with survival for those treated with radiosurgery and whole-brain radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Prospectively collected demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment and survival data on 237 patients with intracranial metastases who underwent radiosurgery with the GK between 2003 and 2007 were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to compare survival by demographic and clinical characteristics and treatment. Results: The mean age of the patient population was 56 years. The most common tumor histologies were non-small-cell lung carcinoma (34.2%) and breast cancer (13.9%). The median overall survival time was 8.5 months from the time of treatment. The median survival times for patients with one, two/three, and four or more brain metastases were 8.5, 9.4, and 6.7 months, respectively. Patients aged 65 years or greater and those aged less than 65 years had median survival times of 7.8 and 9 months, respectively (p = 0.008). The Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) at the time of treatment was a significant predictor of survival: those patients with a KPS of 70 or less had a median survival of 2.9 months compared with 10.3 months (p = 0.034) for those with a KPS of 80 or greater. There was no statistically significant difference in survival between patients treated with radiosurgery alone and those treated with radiosurgery plus whole-brain radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiosurgery with the GK is an efficacious treatment modality for brain metastases. A KPS greater than 70, histology of breast cancer, smaller tumor volume, and age less than 65 years were associated with a longer median survival in our study.

  12. CyberKnife therapy of 24 multiple brain metastases from lung cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, GUIQING; WANG, YISHAN; WANG, YUANYUAN; LIN, SIXIANG; SUN, DONGNING

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and a critical complication of non-central nervous system primary carcinoma. The present study describes the clinical case of a 46-year-old male with lung cancer and life-threatening brain metastases. The patient was diagnosed with lung cancer with a clinical stage of T2N0M1 (stage IV). Six months after the initial diagnosis and administration of conformal radiotherapy combined with three cycles of chemotherapy, an enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed abnormalities with double-dosing of intravenous contrast. The CT scan identified >24 lesions scattered in the whole brain. The patient was treated with three-fraction Cyberknife radiotherapy at 22 Gy, delivered to the brain metastases at the Center for Tumor Treatment of People’s Liberation Army 107th Hospital. Following CyberKnife therapy, a CT scan of the brain revealed that most of the tumors had disappeared with almost no residual traces. The stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) conducted using CyberKnife, an image-guided frameless robotic technology for whole-body radiosurgery, had produced a marked response. The present case report demonstrates that CyberKnife therapy plays a significant role in the management of multiple meta-static brain tumors. PMID:24137362

  13. Surgical Brain Metastases: Management and Outcome Related to Prognostic Indexes: A Critical Review of a Ten-Year Series

    PubMed Central

    Caroli, Manuela; Di Cristofori, Andrea; Lucarella, Francesca; Raneri, Fabio Angelo; Portaluri, Francesco; Gaini, Sergio Maria

    2011-01-01

    Brain metastasis are the most common neoplastic lesions of the nervous system. Many cancer patients are diagnosed on the basis of a first clinical presentation of cancer on the basis of a single or multiple brain lesions. Brain metastases are manifestations of primary disease progression and often determine a poor prognosis. Not all patients with a brain metastases undergo surgery: many are submitted to alternative or palliative treatments. Management of patients with brain metastases is still controversial, and many studies have been developed to determine which is the best therapy. Furthermore, management of patients operated for a brain metastasis is often difficult. Chemotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, panencephalic radiation therapy, and surgery, in combination or alone, are the means most commonly used. We report our experience in the management of a ten-year series of surgical brain metastasis and discuss our results in the preoperative and postoperative management of this complex condition. PMID:22084749

  14. O7.02RADIOSURGERY AND BRAIN METASTASES: ADEQUATE SEQUENCE OF BRAIN MRI CAN SIGNIFICANTLY CHANGE THE INTRACRANIAL DISEASE STAGING

    PubMed Central

    Scoccianti, S.; Greto, D.; Bordi, L.; Bono, P.; Pecchioli, G.; Casati, M.; Vanzi, E.; Compagnucci, A.; Gadda, D.; Livi, L.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accurate assessment of the exact number of brain metastases is of utmost importance in the decision-making process for the appropriate treatment. The diagnostic efficacy in the detection of additional brain metastases of a double dose contrast three-dimensional, T1-Weighted Gradient-Echo Imaging was evaluated. METHODS: Before undergoing radiosurgical treatment, patients underwent a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan to be used during the treatment planning in order to contour the targets and to locate the brain lesions as they relate to the stereotactic frame. All the patients underwent a post-contrast study with T1-weighted, 3D Magnetization-Prepared Rapid Acquisition Gradient Echo (MP RAGE) sequence. We used a double dose of gadobenate dimeglumine and slice thickness of 0.9 mm. RESULTS: Starting from October 2012 to February 2014, we treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) 62 patients with brain metastases. On the diagnostic MRI, all the patients had a number of lesions ≤4. Median time interval between diagnostic MRI scan and the day of GKRS was 11 days (range 5-20) A total of 54 additional lesions were detected on MR imaging performed in the same day of the GKRS in twenty-two patients out of 62 (35.5%). A median number of 2 additional lesions were detected (range 1-8). Among these 22 patients only 14 patients had a number of lesions ≤4 on the day of treatment. Patients with a total number of lesions ≤10 were treated with GKRS. Two patients with a total number of lesions > 10 were treated with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). CONCLUSIONS: A double-contrast study with T1-weighted, volumetric MPRAGE sequence may offer better staging for patients with brain metastases. In our opinion, it should be recommended in all the patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases because the detection of the real number of lesions is crucial for an adequate treatment and it also may lead to choose different therapeutic strategies.

  15. Whole-Brain Radiotherapy With Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Multiple Brain Metastases Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J. Hoorn, Elles A.P. van der; Verbakel, Wilko; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) allows for the generation of intensity-modulated dose distributions by use of a single gantry rotation. We used RA to plan and deliver whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with a simultaneous integrated boost in patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Composite RA plans were generated for 8 patients, consisting of WBRT (20 Gy in 5 fractions) with an integrated boost, also 20 Gy in 5 fractions, to Brain metastases, and clinically delivered in 3 patients. Summated gross tumor volumes were 1.0 to 37.5 cm{sup 3}. RA plans were measured in a solid water phantom by use of Gafchromic films (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ). Results: Composite RA plans could be generated within 1 hour. Two arcs were needed to deliver the mean of 1,600 monitor units with a mean 'beam-on' time of 180 seconds. RA plans showed excellent coverage of planning target volume for WBRT and planning target volume for the boost, with mean volumes receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose of 100% and 99.8%, respectively. The mean conformity index was 1.36. Composite plans showed much steeper dose gradients outside Brain metastases than plans with a conventional summation of WBRT and radiosurgery. Comparison of calculated and measured doses showed a mean gamma for double-arc plans of 0.30, and the area with a gamma larger than 1 was 2%. In-room times for clinical RA sessions were approximately 20 minutes for each patient. Conclusions: RA treatment planning and delivery of integrated plans of WBRT and boosts to multiple brain metastases is a rapid and accurate technique that has a higher conformity index than conventional summation of WBRT and radiosurgery boost.

  16. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, David B.; Modlin, Leslie A.; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R.; Hancock, Steven L.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Results: Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Conclusion: Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial.

  17. Salvage Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Prognostic Factors to Consider in Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Goldie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gingras-Hill, Geneviève; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Laperriere, Normand J.; Bernstein, Mark; Jiang, Haiyan; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is offered to patients for recurrent brain metastases after prior brain radiation therapy (RT), but few studies have evaluated the efficacy of salvage SRS or factors to consider in selecting patients for this treatment. This study reports overall survival (OS), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) after salvage SRS, and factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of patients treated from 2009 to 2011 with salvage SRS after prior brain RT for brain metastases. Survival from salvage SRS and from initial brain metastases diagnosis (IBMD) was calculated. Univariate and multivariable (MVA) analyses included age, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial disease control, and time from initial RT to salvage SRS. Results: There were 106 patients included in the analysis with a median age of 56.9 years (range 32.5-82 years). A median of 2 metastases were treated per patient (range, 1-12) with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 12-24) prescribed to the 50% isodose. With a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range, 0.1-68.2), LC was 82.8%, 60.1%, and 46.8% at 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively. Median PFS was 6.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9-7.6). Median OS was 11.7 months (95% CI = 8.1-13) from salvage SRS, and 22.1 months from IBMD (95% CI = 18.4-26.8). On MVA, age (P=.01; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), extracranial disease control (P=.004; HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.78), and interval from initial RT to salvage SRS of at least 265 days (P=.001; HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.47-4.09) were predictive of OS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that patients can have durable local control and survival after salvage SRS for recurrent brain metastases. In particular, younger patients with controlled extracranial disease and a durable response to initial brain RT are likely to benefit from salvage SRS.

  18. Targeting SRC in glioblastoma tumors and brain metastases: rationale and preclinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Manmeet; de Groot, John; Liu, Wei (Michael)

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an extremely aggressive, infiltrative tumor with a poor prognosis. The regulatory approval of bevacizumab for recurrent GBM has confirmed that molecularly targeted agents have potential for GBM treatment. Preclinical data showing that SRC and SRC-family kinases (SFKs) mediate intracellular signaling pathways controlling key biologic/oncogenic processes provide a strong rationale for investigating SRC/SFK inhibitors, eg, dasatinib, in GBM and clinical studies are underway. The activity of these agents against solid tumors suggests that they may also be useful in treating brain metastases. This article reviews the potential for using SRC/SFK inhibitors to treat GBM and brain metastases. Word count =99/100 PMID:20947248

  19. Effect of prophylactic hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation-induced brain injury after stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ohguri, Takayuki . E-mail: ogurieye@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Imada, Hajime; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Kakeda, Shingo; Ohnari, Norihiro; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Konda, Nobuhide; Korogi, Yukunori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for radiation-induced brain injury in patients with brain metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: The data of 78 patients presenting with 101 brain metastases treated with SRS between October 1994 and September 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 32 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with prophylactic HBO (HBO group), which included all 21 patients who underwent subsequent or prior radiotherapy and 11 patients with common predictors of longer survival, such as inactive extracranial tumors and younger age. The other 46 patients with 54 brain metastases did not undergo HBO (non-HBO group). Radiation-induced brain injuries were divided into two categories, white matter injury (WMI) and radiation necrosis (RN), on the basis of imaging findings. Results: Radiation-induced brain injury occurred in 5 lesions (11%) in the HBO group (2 WMIs and 3 RNs) and in 11 (20%) in the non-HBO group (9 WMIs and 2 RNs). The WMI was less frequent for the HBO group than for the non-HBO group (p = 0.05), although multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that WMI was not significantly correlated with HBO (p = 0.07). The 1-year actuarial probability of WMI was significantly better for the HBO group (2%) than for the non-HBO group (36%) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed a potential value of prophylactic HBO for Radiation-induced WMIs, which justifies further evaluation to confirm its definite benefit.

  20. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of prognostic factors in three radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) brain metastases trials

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.; Gaspar, L.; Rotman, M.

    1995-12-31

    Promising results from new approaches such as radiosurgery or stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases have recently been reported. Are these results due to the therapy alone or can the results be attributed in part to patient selection? An analysis of tumor/patient characteristics and treatment variables in previous RTOG brain metastases studies was considered necessary to fully evaluate the benefit of these new interventions.

  1. Erlotinib plus concurrent whole-brain radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancers patients with multiple brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ulahannan, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene to identify mutations in lung adenocarcinomas is routine in clinical practice. The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has transformed the management of patients with brain metastases harboring EGFR mutations, with improved response rates (RR) and survival. We evaluate the role of concurrent TKI therapy and radiotherapy in this group of patients, considering this data in the context of emerging concepts in this advancing field. PMID:27186518

  2. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  3. Intracranial hemorrhage in patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic enoxaparin: a matched cohort study.

    PubMed

    Donato, Jessica; Campigotto, Federico; Uhlmann, Erik J; Coletti, Erika; Neuberg, Donna; Weber, Griffin M; Zwicker, Jeffrey I

    2015-07-23

    Venous thromboembolism occurs frequently in patients with cancer who have brain metastases, but there is limited evidence supporting the safety of therapeutic anticoagulation. To assess the risk for intracranial hemorrhage associated with the administration of therapeutic doses of low-molecular-weight heparin, we performed a matched, retrospective cohort study of 293 patients with cancer with brain metastases (104 with therapeutic enoxaparin and 189 controls). A blinded review of radiographic imaging was performed, and intracranial hemorrhages were categorized as trace, measurable, and significant. There were no differences observed in the cumulative incidence of intracranial hemorrhage at 1 year in the enoxaparin and control cohorts for measurable (19% vs 21%; Gray test, P = .97; hazard ratio, 1.02; 90% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-1.59), significant (21% vs 22%; P = .87), and total (44% vs 37%; P = .13) intracranial hemorrhages. The risk for intracranial hemorrhage was fourfold higher (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.98; 90% CI, 2.41-6.57; P < .001) in patients with melanoma or renal cell carcinoma (N = 60) than lung cancer (N = 153), but the risk was not influenced by the administration of enoxaparin. Overall survival was similar for the enoxaparin and control cohorts (8.4 vs 9.7 months; Log-rank, P = .65). We conclude that intracranial hemorrhage is frequently observed in patients with brain metastases, but that therapeutic anticoagulation does not increase the risk for intracranial hemorrhage. PMID:25987658

  4. [Whole Brain Irradiation and Hypo-fractionation Radiotherapy for the Metastases in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingting; Zhao, Yaqin; Xu, Feng

    2016-04-20

    Up to 40% non-small cell lung cancer patients developed brain metastasis during progression. Multiple brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. The prognosis of brain metastasis is poor with median survival of less than 1 year. Radio therapy for brain metastases has gradually developed from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to various radiation strategies. WBRT, surgery+WBRT, stereotactic radiotherapy+WBRT or WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), etc. have better overall survival than those untreated patients. The damage of the cognitive function from WBRT has been realized recently, however, options of radiation strategies for long expected survival patients remain controversial. This paper will discuss different WBRT strategies and treatment side effects of non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases. PMID:27118651

  5. Structural and functional effects of metastases in rat brain determined by multimodal MRI.

    PubMed

    Serres, Sébastien; Martin, Christopher J; Sarmiento Soto, Manuel; Bristow, Claire; O'Brien, Emma R; Connell, John J; Khrapitchev, Alexandre A; Sibson, Nicola R

    2014-02-15

    Metastasis to the brain results in significant impairment of brain function and poor patient survival. Currently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is under-utilised in monitoring brain metastases and their effects on brain function. Here, we sought to establish a model of focal brain metastasis in the rat that enables serial multimodal structural and functional MRI studies, and to assess the sensitivity of these approaches to metastatic growth. Female Berlin-Druckrey-IX rats were injected intracerebrally with metastatic ENU1564 cells in the ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPM) of the thalamus, a relay node of the whisker-to-barrel cortex pathway. Animals underwent multimodal structural and vascular MRI, as well as functional MRI of the cortical blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses to whisker pad stimulation. T2 , diffusion, magnetisation transfer and perfusion weighted MRI enabled differentiation between a central area of more advanced metastatic growth and penumbral regions of co-optive perivascular micrometastatic growth, with magnetisation transfer MRI being the most sensitive to micrometastatic growth. Areas of cortical BOLD activation in response to whisker pad stimulation were significantly reduced in the hemisphere containing metastases in the VPM. The reduction in BOLD response correlated with metastatic burden in the thalamus, and was sensitive to the presence of smaller metastases than currently detectable clinically. Our findings suggest that multimodal MRI provides greater sensitivity to tumour heterogeneity and micrometastatic growth than single modality contrast-enhanced MRI. Understanding the relationships between these MRI parameters and the underlying pathology may greatly enhance the utility of MRI in diagnosis, staging and monitoring of brain metastasis. PMID:23913394

  6. Preliminary Results of Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Concurrent Trastuzumab for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Idrissi, Hind Riahi; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bollet, Marc A.; Dieras, Veronique; Campana, Francois; Cottu, Paul; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the use of trastuzumab concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2001 and April 2007, 31 patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer were referred for WBRT with concurrent trastuzumab. At brain progression, the median age was 55 years (range, 38-73), and all patients had a performance status of 0-2. The patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly (n = 17) or 6 mg/kg repeated every 21 days (n = 14). In 26 patients, concurrent WBRT delivered 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. In 6 patients, other fractionations were chosen because of either poor performance status or patient convenience. Results: After WBRT, radiologic responses were observed in 23 patients (74.2%), including 6 (19.4%) with a complete radiologic response and 17 (54.8%) with a partial radiologic response. Clinical responses were observed in 27 patients (87.1%). The median survival time from the start of WBRT was 18 months (range, 2-65). The median interval to brain progression was 10.5 months (range, 2-27). No Grade 2 or greater acute toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The low toxicity of trastuzumab concurrently with WBRT should probably not justify delays. Although promising, these preliminary data warrant additional validation of trastuzumab as a potential radiosensitizer for WBRT in brain metastases from breast cancer in the setting of a clinical trial.

  7. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Cervical Spinal Intramedullary Metastasis and Multiple Brain Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Toshiki; Ohshima, Yukihiko; Takeuchi, Arisa; Mori, Toshie; Ishiguchi, Tuneo

    2016-01-01

    A case of cervical (C) spinal intramedullary metastasis and multiple small brain metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma was presented. Spinal metastasis caused posterior neck and left shoulder pain, dysesthesia in both legs, and motor weakness in both legs and left arm, though the brain metastases were asymptomatic. Both the spinal and brain metastases were successfully treated by frameless stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT)/stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The patient's symptoms were almost entirely relieved within two months. A 76-year-old woman was diagnosed as having a thyroid tumor and lung metastasis by roentgenography and computed tomography. Biopsy of the thyroid tumor extending into the mediastinum revealed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She underwent surgical resection of thyroid with dissection of the mediastinum lymph node area. Internal oral radioisotope therapy was not effective for the multiple small lung metastases. She did well for 15 months, but later developed posterior neck and left shoulder pain and dysesthesia in the right leg and then dysesthesia and motor weakness in both legs. Then she experienced weakness in the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed a small cervical spinal intramedullary mass lesion at the level of C6 and C7 on the left side as well as nine small brain lesions. The cervical spinal intramedullary metastatic tumor was treated by volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) SRT and the nine small brain metastatic tumors were treated by dynamic conformal arc (DCA) SRS uneventfully. A total dose of 39 Gy (100% dose) was delivered in 13 fractions for the spinal lesion (prescription, D95=95% dose; maximum dose=46.3 Gy). Single fraction SRS of 22 Gy (prescription, D95=100% dose) was performed for each of the nine small brain tumors. The spinal tumor was decreased in size on follow-up MRI two months after SRT. Three of the nine brain lesions had disappeared and six were decreased in size on

  8. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Cervical Spinal Intramedullary Metastasis and Multiple Brain Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Kawamura, Toshiki; Ohshima, Yukihiko; Takeuchi, Arisa; Mori, Toshie; Ishiguchi, Tuneo

    2016-01-01

    A case of cervical (C) spinal intramedullary metastasis and multiple small brain metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma was presented. Spinal metastasis caused posterior neck and left shoulder pain, dysesthesia in both legs, and motor weakness in both legs and left arm, though the brain metastases were asymptomatic. Both the spinal and brain metastases were successfully treated by frameless stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT)/stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The patient's symptoms were almost entirely relieved within two months. A 76-year-old woman was diagnosed as having a thyroid tumor and lung metastasis by roentgenography and computed tomography. Biopsy of the thyroid tumor extending into the mediastinum revealed papillary thyroid carcinoma. She underwent surgical resection of thyroid with dissection of the mediastinum lymph node area. Internal oral radioisotope therapy was not effective for the multiple small lung metastases. She did well for 15 months, but later developed posterior neck and left shoulder pain and dysesthesia in the right leg and then dysesthesia and motor weakness in both legs. Then she experienced weakness in the left upper extremity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed a small cervical spinal intramedullary mass lesion at the level of C6 and C7 on the left side as well as nine small brain lesions. The cervical spinal intramedullary metastatic tumor was treated by volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) SRT and the nine small brain metastatic tumors were treated by dynamic conformal arc (DCA) SRS uneventfully. A total dose of 39 Gy (100% dose) was delivered in 13 fractions for the spinal lesion (prescription, D95=95% dose; maximum dose=46.3 Gy). Single fraction SRS of 22 Gy (prescription, D95=100% dose) was performed for each of the nine small brain tumors. The spinal tumor was decreased in size on follow-up MRI two months after SRT. Three of the nine brain lesions had disappeared and six were decreased in size on

  9. Characterization of passive permeability at the blood-tumor barrier in five preclinical models of brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Chris E; Mohammad, Afroz S; Terrell-Hall, Tori B; Dolan, Emma L; Shah, Neal; Sechrest, Emily; Griffith, Jessica; Lockman, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised in brain metastases, allowing for enhanced drug permeation into brain. The extent and heterogeneity of BBB permeability in metastatic lesions is important when considering the administration of chemotherapeutics. Since permeability characteristics have been described in limited experimental models of brain metastases, we sought to define these changes in five brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231BR (triple negative), MDA-MB-231BR-HER2, JIMT-1-BR3, 4T1-BR5 (murine), and SUM190 (inflammatory HER2 expressing). Permeability was assessed using quantitative autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy by co-administration of the tracers (14)C-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and Texas red conjugated dextran prior to euthanasia. Each experimental brain metastases model produced variably increased permeability to both tracers; additionally, the magnitude of heterogeneity was different among each model with the highest ranges observed in the SUM190 (up to 45-fold increase in AIB) and MDA-MB-231BR-HER2 (up to 33-fold in AIB) models while the lowest range was observed in the JIMT-1-BR3 (up to 5.5-fold in AIB) model. There was no strong correlation observed between lesion size and permeability in any of these preclinical models of brain metastases. Interestingly, the experimental models resulting in smaller mean metastases size resulted in shorter median survival while models producing larger lesions had longer median survival. These findings strengthen the evidence of heterogeneity in brain metastases of breast cancer by utilizing five unique experimental models and simultaneously emphasize the challenges of chemotherapeutic approaches to treat brain metastases. PMID:26944053

  10. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Naritaka; Shitara, Yoshinori; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Takatomo; Kouga, Hideaki; Wakabayashi, Kazuki; Fukuchi, Minoru; Tsunoda, Yoshiyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT)/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV) was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX) were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy. PMID:27403125

  11. Ten-Year Survival of a Patient Treated with Stereotactic Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases from Colon Cancer with Ovarian and Lymph Node Metastases: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morinaga, Nobuhiro; Tanaka, Naritaka; Shitara, Yoshinori; Ishizaki, Masatoshi; Yoshida, Takatomo; Kouga, Hideaki; Wakabayashi, Kazuki; Fukuchi, Minoru; Tsunoda, Yoshiyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is infrequent and carries a poor prognosis. Herein, we present a patient alive 10 years after the identification of a first brain metastasis from sigmoid colon cancer. A 39-year-old woman underwent sigmoidectomy for sigmoid colon cancer during an emergency operation for pelvic peritonitis. The pathological finding was moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Eleven months after the sigmoidectomy, a metastatic lesion was identified in the left ovary. Despite local radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy, the left ovarian lesion grew, so resection of the uterus and bilateral ovaries was performed. Adjuvant chemotherapy with tegafur-uracil (UFT)/calcium folinate (leucovorin, LV) was initiated. Seven months after resection of the ovarian lesion, brain metastases appeared in the bilateral frontal lobes and were treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Cervical and mediastinal lymph node metastases were also diagnosed, and irradiation of these lesions was performed. After radiotherapy, 10 courses of oxaliplatin and infused fluorouracil plus leucovorin (FOLFOX) were administered. During FOLFOX administration, recurrent left frontal lobe brain metastasis was diagnosed and treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. In this case, the brain metastases were well treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery, and the systemic disease arising from sigmoid colon cancer has been kept under control with chemotherapies, surgical resection, and radiotherapy. PMID:27403125

  12. Impact of Triple-Negative Phenotype on Prognosis of Patients With Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyuan; Schlesinger, David; Toulmin, Sushila; Rich, Tyvin; Sheehan, Jason

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To elucidate survival times and identify potential prognostic factors in patients with triple-negative (TN) phenotype who harbored brain metastases arising from breast cancer and who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 breast cancer patients with brain metastases were treated with SRS and then studied retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (23.3%) were TN. Survival times were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with a log-rank test computing the survival time difference between groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses to predict potential prognostic factors were performed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results: The presence of TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times, including overall survival after the diagnosis of primary breast cancer (43 months vs. 82 months), neurologic survival after the diagnosis of intracranial metastases, and radiosurgical survival after SRS, with median survival times being 13 months vs. 25 months and 6 months vs. 16 months, respectively (p < 0.002 in all three comparisons). On multivariate analysis, radiosurgical survival benefit was associated with non-TN status and lower recursive partitioning analysis class at the initial SRS. Conclusion: The TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor with respect to overall survival, neurologic survival, and radiosurgical survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis. Recursive partitioning analysis class also served as an important and independent prognostic factor.

  13. Patterns of Practice of Palliative Radiotherapy in Africa, Part 1: Bone and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Vinay Gaye, Papa Macoumba M.Med.; Wahab, Sherif Abdel; Ndlovu, Ntokozo; Ngoma, Twalib; Vanderpuye, Verna; Sowunmi, Anthonia; Kigula-Mugambe, Joseph; Jeremic, Branislav

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To provide data on the pattern of practice of palliative radiotherapy (RT) on the African continent. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire was distributed to participants in a regional training course of the International Atomic Energy Agency in palliative cancer care and sent by e-mail to other institutions in Africa. Requested information included both infrastructure and human resources available and the pattern of RT practice for metastatic and locally advanced cancers. Results: Of 35 centers contacted, 24 (68%) completed the questionnaire. Although RT is used by most centers for most metastatic cancers, liver and lung metastases are treated with chemotherapy. Of 23 centers, 14 (61%) had a single RT regimen as an institutional policy for treating painful bone metastases, but only 5 centers (23%) of 23 used 8 Gy in 1 fraction. Brain metastases were being treated by RT to the whole brain to 30 Gy in 10 fractions, either exclusively (n = 13, 56%) or in addition to the use of 20 Gy in 5 fractions (n = 3, 14%). Conclusion: Radiotherapy is a major component of treatment of cancer patients in African countries. There is consensus among few centers for treatment schedules for almost all sites regarding time and dose-fractionation characteristics of RT regimens used and/or indications for the use of RT in this setting.

  14. Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer and Response to Treatment with Eribulin: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex Y; Ying, Xu Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common in patients with advanced breast cancer (BC), causing considerable morbidity and mortality. Eribulin is a microtubule dynamics inhibitor approved for treating certain patients with metastatic BC, previously treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. In the 301 phase 3 study in 1102 women with advanced BC, eribulin and capecitabine treatments did not differ for co-primary endpoints (overall survival [OS]: 15.9 vs 14.5 months, P = 0.056; progression-free survival [PFS]: 4.1 vs 4.2 months, P = 0.30). Here, we report outcomes for six patients (eribulin, n = 3; capecitabine, n = 3) who had received treatment for brain metastases from BC (BCBM) at baseline. All eribulin-treated patients experienced brain lesion shrinkage at some point during treatment, compared with one capecitabine-treated patient. Fewer patients in study 301 developed new BCBM with eribulin (13/544, 2.4%) compared with capecitabine (25/546, 4.6%). Eribulin does not cross the healthy blood-brain barrier (BBB), but could have the potential to do so after cranial radiation therapy. Capecitabine may cross the BBB and has demonstrated activity in BCBM. Data from these patients and previous cases suggest that further investigation of eribulin for BCBM may be warranted. PMID:26052228

  15. Long-term risk of radionecrosis and imaging changes after stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Kohutek, Zachary A; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A; Brennan, Cameron W; Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H; Yang, T Jonathan; Rosenblum, Marc K; Ballangrud, Åse; Young, Robert J; Zhang, Zhigang; Beal, Kathryn

    2015-10-01

    Radionecrosis is a well-characterized effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and is occasionally associated with serious neurologic sequelae. Here, we investigated the incidence of and clinical variables associated with the development of radionecrosis and related radiographic changes after SRS for brain metastases in a cohort of patients with long-term follow up. 271 brain metastases treated with single-fraction linear accelerator-based SRS were analyzed. Radionecrosis was diagnosed either pathologically or radiographically. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression was performed to determine the association between radionecrosis and clinical factors available prior to treatment planning. After median follow up of 17.2 months, radionecrosis was observed in 70 (25.8%) lesions, including 47 (17.3%) symptomatic cases. 22 of 70 cases (31.4%) were diagnosed pathologically and 48 (68.6%) were diagnosed radiographically. The actuarial incidence of radionecrosis was 5.2% at 6 months, 17.2% at 12 months and 34.0% at 24 months. On univariate analysis, radionecrosis was associated with maximum tumor diameter (HR 3.55, p < 0.001), prior whole brain radiotherapy (HR 2.21, p = 0.004), prescription dose (HR 0.56, p = 0.02) and histology other than non-small cell lung, breast or melanoma (HR 1.85, p = 0.04). On multivariate analysis, only maximum tumor diameter (HR 3.10, p < 0.001) was associated with radionecrosis risk. This data demonstrates that with close imaging follow-up, radionecrosis after single-fraction SRS for brain metastases is not uncommon. Maximum tumor diameter on pre-treatment MR imaging can provide a reliable estimate of radionecrosis risk prior to treatment planning, with the greatest risk among tumors measuring >1 cm. PMID:26307446

  16. Delayed Effects of Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor Patients With Central Nervous System Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Danielle M. Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are uncommon in patients with germ cell tumors, with an incidence of 2-3%. CNS metastases have been managed with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and concomitant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Our previous study did not observe serious CNS toxicity (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1991;22:17-22). We now report on 5 patients who developed delayed significant CNS toxicity. Patients and Methods: We observed 5 patients with delayed CNS toxicity. The initial diagnosis was between 1981 and 2003. All patients had poor-risk disease according to the International Germ Cell Consensus Collaborative Group criteria. Of the 5 patients, 3 had CNS metastases at diagnosis and 2 developed relapses with CNS metastases. These 5 patients underwent WBRT to 4,000-5,000 cGy in 18-28 fractions concurrently with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: All 5 patients developed delayed symptoms consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The symptoms included seizures, hemiparesis, cranial neuropathy, headaches, blindness, dementia, and ataxia. The median time from WBRT to CNS symptoms was 72 months (range, 9-228). Head imaging revealed multiple abnormalities consistent with gliosis and diffuse cerebral atrophy. Of the 5 patients, 3 had progressive and 2 stable symptoms. Treatment with surgery and/or steroids had modest benefit. The progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy resulted in significant debility in all 5 patients, resulting in death (3 patients), loss of work, steroid-induced morbidity, and recurrent hospitalizations. Conclusion: Whole brain radiotherapy is not innocuous in young patients with germ cell tumors and can cause late CNS toxicity.

  17. Metastasis-inducing proteins are widely expressed in human brain metastases and associated with intracranial progression and radiation response

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Rasheed; Platt-Higgins, Angela; Rathi, Nitika; Crooks, Daniel; Brodbelt, Andrew; Chavredakis, Emmanuel; Lawson, David; Jenkinson, Michael D; Rudland, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Understanding the factors that drive recurrence and radiosensitivity in brain metastases would improve prediction of outcomes, treatment planning and development of therapeutics. We investigated the expression of known metastasis-inducing proteins in human brain metastases. Methods: Immunohistochemistry on metastases removed at neurosurgery from 138 patients to determine the degree and pattern of expression of the proteins S100A4, S100P, AGR2, osteopontin (OPN) and the DNA repair marker FANCD2. Validation of significant findings in a separate prospective series with the investigation of intra-tumoral heterogeneity using image-guided sampling. Assessment of S100A4 expression in brain metastatic and non-metastatic primary breast carcinomas. Results: There was widespread staining for OPN, S100A4, S100P and AGR2 in human brain metastases. Positive staining for S100A4 was independently associated with a shorter time to intracranial progression after resection in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio for negative over positive staining=0.17, 95% CI: 0.04–0.74, P=0.018). S100A4 was expressed at the leading edge of brain metastases in image guided sampling and overexpressed in brain metastatic vs non-brain metastatic primary breast carcinomas. Staining for OPN was associated with a significant increase in survival time after post-operative whole-brain radiotherapy in retrospective (OPN negative 3.43 months, 95% CI: 1.36–5.51 vs OPN positive, 11.20 months 95% CI: 7.68–14.72, Log rank test, P<0.001) and validation populations. Conclusions: Proteins known to be involved in cellular adhesion and migration in vitro, and metastasis in vivo are significantly expressed in human brain metastases and may be useful biomarkers of intracranial progression and radiosensitivity. PMID:27100728

  18. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Patients With Brain Metastases From Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, Rodney E.; Olson, Adam C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay; Lundsford, L. Dade; Flickinger, John C.

    2011-11-01

    Background: Patients with small-cell lung cancer have a high likelihood of developing brain metastases. Many of these patients will have prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) or eventually undergo whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Despite these treatments, a large number of these patients will have progression of their intracranial disease and require additional local therapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important treatment option for such patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 44 patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with gamma knife SRS. Multivariate analysis was used to determine significant prognostic factors influencing survival. Results: The median follow-up from SRS in this patient population was 9 months (1-49 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 9 months after SRS. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and combined treatment involving WBRT and SRS within 4 weeks were the two factors identified as being significant predictors of increased OS (p = 0.033 and 0.040, respectively). When comparing all patients, patients treated with a combined approach had a median OS of 14 months compared to 6 months if SRS was delivered alone. We also compared the OS times from the first definitive radiation: WBRT, WBRT and SRS if combined therapy was used, and SRS if the patient never received WBRT. The median survival for those groups was 12, 14, and 13 months, respectively, p = 0.19. Seventy percent of patients had follow-up magnetic resonance imaging available for review. Actuarial local control at 6 months and 12 months was 90% and 86%, respectively. Only 1 patient (2.2%) had symptomatic intracranial swelling related to treatment, which responded to a short course of steroids. New brain metastases outside of the treated area developed in 61% of patients at a median time of 7 months; 81% of these patients had received previous WBRT. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery for small-cell lung carcinoma

  19. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Outcomes in Patients with Concurrent Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Henry S; Laurans, Maxwell S; Chiang, Veronica S; Yu, James B; Husain, Zain A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is an emerging technique for maximizing tumor and pain control in selected patients with spinal metastases. Outcomes for those with concurrent brain metastases (CBM) have not been well-described previously. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes for patients with or without CBM treated with spine SBRT. Methods: Records of all patients treated with SBRT for spine metastases at our institution from January 2008 to January 2014 were reviewed. Chi-square analyses and the Mann-Whitney test were used to assess the association of CBM (defined as brain metastasis present prior to or at the time of spinal SBRT) with potential covariates. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression were used to evaluate the impact of CBM on overall survival and local control from the time of the first course of spine SBRT. Results: Seventy-eight patients and a total of 86 SBRT lesions were treated. Median patient age was 60 years (range: 38-84 years); 28.2% had radioresistant histologies. A single fraction was used in 91.0% of treatments. One-year local control was 89.4%, and one-year overall survival was 45.8%. A total of 19 patients (24.4%) had CBM. Among these CBM patients, 18 (94.7%) underwent intracranial radiosurgery and nine (47.4%) were diagnosed synchronously with their spine metastases. Local control was not significantly different between patients with or without CBM on univariable (median: 58 months vs. not reached, p = 0.53) or multivariable analyses (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.06-4.33). Overall survival was also not significantly different between patients with or without CBM on univariable (median: 7 vs. 11 months, log-rank p = 0.12) or multivariable analyses (HR 1.62, 95% CI 0.87-3.03). Conclusions: Patients with CBM do not appear to have a statistically significant detriment in clinical outcomes, suggesting that CBM should not necessarily be considered a contraindication for spine SBRT. Although our

  20. Long-term follow-up for brain metastases treated by percutaneous stereotactic single high-dose irradiation.

    PubMed

    Engenhart, R; Kimmig, B N; Höver, K H; Wowra, B; Romahn, J; Lorenz, W J; van Kaick, G; Wannenmacher, M

    1993-02-15

    Surgery is considered the treatment of choice for solitary brain lesions, and radiation therapy is indicated for metastases only in vital or sensitive regions that cannot be excised without risk of disabling neurologic defects. In these cases, radiosurgery may be an alternative to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. At the Heidelberg linear accelerator-based radiosurgery facility, 69 patients were treated for 102 inoperable brain metastases. The primary tumor sites included non-small cell lung carcinoma (n = 24), renal cell carcinoma (n = 14), melanoma (skin) (n = 14), colorectal carcinoma (n = 6), carcinoma of unknown primary (n = 4), and others (n = 7). Eleven patients were treated for relapse after surgery or after conventional whole-brain irradiation. The doses at the isocenter varied from 15-50 Gy (mean, 21.5 Gy). Ten patients with multiple metastases received a planned combination of whole-brain irradiation plus a single boost of 15 Gy. The median survival time for the entire group was 6 months, with a 1-year-survival of 28.3%. Factors associated with significant improvement of survival were brain metastases without other metastatic disease and good response to radiation therapy. Five of 22 patients (22.9%) with metastases located only in the brain survived longer than 2 years. An improvement in neurologic function was found in 81% within a period of 3 months. With imaging techniques, complete remission was found in 20%, partial remission in 35%, stable disease in 40%, and relapse in 5%. The authors concluded that radiosurgery is an effective and safe therapy for brain metastases. It can be applied as primary treatment, as boost in combination with whole-brain irradiation, or as treatment for patients with relapse in a previously irradiated field. PMID:8435811

  1. Whole Brain Radiotherapy and RRx-001: Two Partial Responses in Radioresistant Melanoma Brain Metastases from a Phase I/II Clinical Trial12

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michelle M.; Parmar, Hemant; Cao, Yue; Pramanik, Priyanka; Schipper, Matthew; Hayman, James; Junck, Larry; Mammoser, Aaron; Heth, Jason; Carter, Corey A.; Oronsky, Arnold; Knox, Susan J.; Caroen, Scott; Oronsky, Bryan; Scicinski, Jan; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Lao, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with RRx-001 and whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. RRx-001 is an reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS)-dependent systemically nontoxic hypoxic cell radiosensitizer with vascular normalizing properties under investigation in patients with various solid tumors including those with brain metastases. SIGNIFICANCE: Metastatic melanoma to the brain is historically associated with poor outcomes and a median survival of 4 to 5 months. WBRT is a mainstay of treatment for patients with multiple brain metastases, but no significant therapeutic advances for these patients have been described in the literature. To date, candidate radiosensitizing agents have failed to demonstrate a survival benefit in patients with brain metastases, and in particular, no agent has demonstrated improved outcome in patients with metastatic melanoma. Kim et al. report two patients with melanoma metastases to the brain that responded to treatment with novel radiosensitizing agent RRx-001 and WBRT without neurologic or systemic toxicity in the context of a phase I/II clinical trial. PMID:27084426

  2. Treatment of brain metastases of renal cell cancer with combined hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing

    PubMed Central

    VRÁNA, DAVID; ŠTUDENTOVÁ, HANA; MATZENAUER, MARCEL; VLACHOVÁ, ZUZANA; CWIERTKA, KAREL; GREMLICA, DAVID; KALITA, ONDŘEJ

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer patients with brain metastatic disease generally have poor prognosis. Treatment options include surgery, radiotherapy, targeted therapy or best supportive care with respect to disease burden, patient preference and performance status. In the present case report the radiotherapy technique combining whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing (hippocampal avoidance whole brain radiotherapy HA-WBRT) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of the brain metastases is performed in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. HA-WBRT was administered to 30 Gy in 10 fractions with sparing of the hippocampal structures and SRT of 21 Gy in 3 fractions to brain metastases which has preceded the HA-WBRT. Two single arc volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) plans were prepared using Monaco planning software. The HA-WBRT treatment plan achieved the following results: D2=33.91 Gy, D98=25.20 Gy, D100=14.18 Gy, D50=31.26 Gy. The homogeneity index was calculated as a deduction of the minimum dose in 2% and 98% of the planning target volume (PTV), divided by the minimum dose in 50% of the PTV. The maximum dose to the hippocampus was 17.50 Gy and mean dose was 11.59 Gy. The following doses to organs at risk (OAR) were achieved: Right opticus Dmax, 31.96 Gy; left opticus Dmax, 30.96 Gy; chiasma D max, 32,76 Gy. The volume of PTV for stereotactic radiotherapy was 3,736 cm3, with coverage D100=20.95 Gy and with only 0.11% of the PTV being irradiated to dose below the prescribed dose. HA-WBRT with SRT represents a feasible technique for radiotherapy of brain metastatic disease, however this technique is considerably demanding on departmental equipment and staff time/experience. PMID:27313693

  3. Alveolar soft part sarcoma associated with lung and brain metastases: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingguang; Li, Jinxing; Huan, Linchun; Meng, Fanguo; Pang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The present case report aimed to improve the understanding of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) by investigating the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and therapeutic methods used to treat ASPS associated with lung and brain metastases. The clinical data of a single patient diagnosed with ASPS by postoperative pathology was studied retrospectively, and additional associated reports and previous studies of similar cases were reviewed. Clinical symptoms were markedly alleviated following surgical treatment, followed by a chemotherapy regime. During post-treatment follow-up, no tumor recurrence was observed.

  4. O7.01RESPONSE ASSESSMENT IN NEURO-ONCOLOGY (RANO) CRITERIA FOR BRAIN METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Wen, P.Y.; Lee, E.Q.; Van Den Bent, M.; Soffieti, R.; Bendszus, M.; Mehta, M.; Baumert, B.; Vogelbaum, M.; Chang, S.M.; Lin, N.U.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are no standard criteria for evaluating response to therapy in patients with brain metastases. An international multidisciplinary group, The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) Metastatic Working Group has proposed a RANO-Brain Metastases (RANO-BM) Criteria is based on a modification of RECIST 1.1 criteria and uses unidimensional measurements. Since the CNS is considered as a separate compartment. CNS response will be scored independent of extracranial response. Measurable disease is defined as a contrast enhancing lesion that can be accurately measured in at least one dimension with a minimum size of 10 mm, visible on two or more axial slices that are preferably at most 5 mm apart with no gap. In addition, although the longest diameter in the plane of measurement is to be recorded, the diameter perpendicular to the longest diameter in the plane of measurement should be at least 5 mm for the lesion to be considered measurable. Best overall CNS response represents a composite of radiographic CNS target and non-target response, corticosteroid use, and clinical status. In non-randomized trials where CNS response is the primary endpoint, confirmation of PR or CR at least 4 weeks later is required. The proposed criteria are: Complete response (CR): Disappearance of all CNS target lesions sustained for at least 4 weeks; no new lesions; no corticosteroids; stable or improved clinically. Partial response (PR): At least a 30% decrease in the sum longest diameter (LD) of CNS target lesions, taking as reference the baseline sum LD, sustained for at least 4 weeks; no new lesions; no corticosteroids; stable or improved clinically. Progressive disease (PD): At least a 20% increase in the sum LD of CNS target lesions, taking as reference the smallest sum on study (this includes the baseline sum if that is the smallest on study). Stable disease (SD): Neither sufficient shrinkage to qualify for PR nor sufficient increase to qualify for PD. The group is

  5. Comparison of erlotinib and pemetrexed as second-/third-line treatment for lung adenocarcinoma patients with asymptomatic brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    He, Yayi; Sun, Wenwen; Wang, Yan; Ren, Shengxiang; Li, Xuefei; Li, Jiayu; Rivard, Christopher J; Zhou, Caicun; Hirsch, Fred R

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain metastases occur in one-third of all non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Due to restrictive transport at the blood–brain barrier, many drugs provide poor control of metastases in the brain. The aim of this study was to compare erlotinib with pemetrexed as second-/third-line treatment in patients with lung adenocarcinoma with asymptomatic brain metastases. Methods From January 2012 to June 2014, all lung adenocarcinoma patients with asymptomatic brain metastases who received treatment with erlotinib or pemetrexed as second-/third-line treatment were retrospectively reviewed. Chi-square and log-rank tests were used to perform statistical analysis. Results The study enrolled 99 patients, of which 44 were positive for EGFR mutation. Median progression-free survival (PFS) in months was not significantly different between the erlotinib- and pemetrexed-treated groups (4.2 vs 3.4 months; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.01–6.40 vs 2.80–5.00, respectively; P=0.635). Median PFS was found to be significantly longer in EGFR mutation–positive patients in the erlotinib-treated group (8.0 months; 95% CI 5.85–10.15) compared to the pemetrexed group (3.9 months; 95% CI: 1.25–6.55; P=0.032). The most common treatment-related side effect was mild-to-moderate rash and the most common drug-related side effects in the pemetrexed-group were vomiting and nausea. Conclusion Erlotinib and pemetrexed may be used as second-/third-line treatment in lung adenocarcinoma patients with asymptomatic brain metastases, and detection of EGFR mutation status is very important in these patients. EGFR mutation–positive lung adenocarcinoma patients with asymptomatic brain metastases showed longer PFS when treated with erlotinib as opposed to pemetrexed. PMID:27143936

  6. What Is the Optimal Treatment of Large Brain Metastases? An Argument for a Multidisciplinary Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Atalar, Banu; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Single-modality treatment of large brain metastases (>2 cm) with whole-brain irradiation, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone, or surgery alone is not effective, with local failure (LF) rates of 50% to 90%. Our goal was to improve local control (LC) by using multimodality therapy of surgery and adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 97 patients with brain metastases >2 cm in diameter treated with surgery and cavity SRS. Local and distant brain failure (DF) rates were analyzed with competing risk analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival rate was calculated by the Kaplain-Meier product-limit method. Results: The median imaging follow-up duration for all patients was 10 months (range, 1-80 months). The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.5%-16.1%), and the median time to LF was 6 months (range, 3-17 months). The 12-month cumulative incidence rate of DF, with death as a competing risk, was 53% (95% CI, 43%-63%). The median survival time for all patients was 15.6 months. The median survival times for recursive partitioning analysis classes 1, 2, and 3 were 33.8, 13.7, and 9.0 months, respectively (p = 0.022). On multivariate analysis, Karnofsky Performance Status ({>=}80 vs. <80; hazard ratio 0.54; 95% CI 0.31-0.94; p = 0.029) and maximum preoperative tumor diameter (hazard ratio 1.41; 95% CI 1.08-1.85; p = 0.013) were associated with survival. Five patients (5%) required intervention for Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.02 grade 2 and 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Surgery and adjuvant resection cavity SRS yields excellent LC of large brain metastases. Compared with other multimodality treatment options, this approach allows patients to avoid or delay whole-brain irradiation without compromising LC.

  7. Methodology for fiber-optic Raman mapping and FTIR imaging of metastases in mouse brains.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Kirsch, Matthias; Beleites, Claudia; Schackert, Gabriele; Salzer, Reiner

    2007-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to optimize the preparation of pristine brain tissue to obtain reference information, to optimize the conditions for introducing a fiber-optic probe to acquire Raman maps, and to transfer previous results obtained from human brain tumors to an animal model. Brain metastases of malignant melanomas were induced by injecting tumor cells into the carotid artery of mice. The procedure mimicked hematogenous tumor spread in one brain hemisphere while the other hemisphere remained tumor free. Three series of sections were prepared consecutively from whole mouse brains: dried, thin sections for FTIR imaging, hematoxylin and eosin-stained thin sections for histopathological assessment, and pristine, 2-mm thick sections for Raman mapping. FTIR images were recorded using a spectrometer with a multi-channel detector. Raman maps were collected serially using a spectrometer coupled to a fiber-optic probe. The FTIR images and the Raman maps were segmented by cluster analysis. The color-coded cluster memberships coincided well with the morphology of mouse brains in stained tissue sections. More details in less time were resolved in FTIR images with a nominal resolution of 25 microm than in Raman maps collected with a laser focus 60 microm in diameter. The spectral contributions of melanin in tumor cells were resonance enhanced in Raman spectra on excitation at 785 nm which enabled their sensitive detection in Raman maps. Possible reasons why metastatic cells of malignant melanomas were not identified in FTIR images are discussed. PMID:17639353

  8. Acetate is a Bioenergetic Substrate for Human Glioblastoma and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Pichumani, Kumar; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara G.; Kovacs, Zoltan; Foong, Chan; Huang, Zhiguang; Barnett, Samuel; Mickey, Bruce E.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Tu, Benjamin P.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas and brain metastases are highly proliferative brain tumors with short survival times. Previously, using 13C-NMR analysis of brain tumors resected from patients during infusion of 13C-glucose, we demonstrated that there is robust oxidation of glucose in the citric acid cycle, yet glucose contributes less than 50% of the carbons to the acetyl-CoA pool. Here we show that primary and metastatic mouse orthotopic brain tumors have the capacity to oxidize [1,2-13C]acetate and can do so simultaneously with [1,6-13C]glucose oxidation. The tumors do not oxidize [U-13C]glutamine. In vivo oxidation of [1,2-13C]acetate was validated in brain tumor patients and was correlated with expression of acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme 2, ACSS2. Together the data demonstrate a strikingly common metabolic phenotype in diverse brain tumors that includes the ability to oxidize acetate in the citric acid cycle. This adaptation may be important for meeting the high biosynthetic and bioenergetic demands of malignant growth. PMID:25525878

  9. Early-onset brain metastases in a breast cancer patient after pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Takashi; Yoneyama, Shuko; Kita, Kumiko; Narui, Kazutaka; Sugae, Sadayoshi; Shimizu, Daisuke; Tanabe, Mikiko; Sasaki, Takeshi; Chishima, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Endo, Itaru

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer patients who achieve a pathological complete response (pCR) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) usually have a favourable prognosis. We report on a patient with early metastases to the brain after achieving pCR. The primary tumour was 7.0 cm in diameter with axillary lymph node metastases, hormone receptor-negative, human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive (3+), and histological grade 2 with 60% of cells positive for Ki-67. The patient underwent NAC followed by surgery, and achieved pCR. Five months after surgery, during adjuvant treatment with trastuzumab, she developed headache and dizziness. Brain imaging revealed multiple metastatic brain tumours. She received whole-brain radiotherapy followed by lapatinib and capecitabine therapy. At 7 months after surgery, she remains alive with a persistent mild headache. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of early brain metastases, and consider new treatment strategies to prevent brain metastases in high-risk patients who achieve pCR. PMID:24222158

  10. Treatment of brain metastases of lung cancer in the era of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Haughton, Michael E; Chan, Michael D; Watabe, Kounosuke; Bonomi, Marcelo; Debinski, Waldemar; Lesser, Glenn J; Ruiz, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Common and deadly complications of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are brain metastases (BM). BM portends a poorer prognosis with limited effective treatment options and current management strategies present several challenges from iatrogenic complications of supportive medications, optimal delivery of drug across the blood-brain barrier, and preservation of neurocognitive function. Long term side effects and survivorship issues have become more evident in the era of targeted therapy where a systemic disease is much better controlled. Targeted therapies and immunotherapy are beginning to provide improvements in responses and survival rates. With further advancements and experience, our knowledge in this era of precision medicine will likely lead to strides in improving the quality of life and overall survival of patients with BM from NSCLC. In this review, we present the most recent updates in treatment of BM in NSCLC in regards to targeted and immunotherapy. PMID:26709658

  11. Prognostic Factors for Survival in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent Brain Metastases After Prior Whole Brain Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Jorge A.; Sneed, Penny K.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Ma, Lijun; Denduluri, Sandeep; Nakamura, Jean L.; Barani, Igor J.; McDermott, Michael W.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prognostic factors for survival after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for new, progressive, or recurrent brain metastases (BM) after prior whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Patients treated between 1991 and 2007 with Gamma Knife SRS for BM after prior WBRT were retrospectively reviewed. Potential prognostic factors were analyzed overall and by primary site using univariate and stepwise multivariate analyses and recursive partitioning analysis, including age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), primary tumor control, extracranial metastases, number of BM treated, total SRS target volume, and interval from WBRT to SRS. Results: A total of 310 patients were analyzed, including 90 breast, 113 non-small-cell lung, 31 small-cell lung, 42 melanoma, and 34 miscellaneous patients. The median age was 56, KPS 80, number of BM treated 3, and interval from WBRT to SRS 8.1 months; 76% had controlled primary tumor and 60% had extracranial metastases. The median survival was 8.4 months overall and 12.0 vs. 7.9 months for single vs. multiple BM treated (p = 0.001). There was no relationship between number of BM and survival after excluding single-BM patients. On multivariate analysis, favorable prognostic factors included age <50, smaller total target volume, and longer interval from WBRT to SRS in breast cancer patients; smaller number of BM, KPS >60, and controlled primary in non-small-cell lung cancer patients; and smaller total target volume in melanoma patients. Conclusions: Among patients treated with salvage SRS for BM after prior WBRT, prognostic factors appeared to vary by primary site. Although survival time was significantly longer for patients with a single BM, the median survival time of 7.9 months for patients with multiple BM seems sufficiently long for salvage SRS to appear to be worthwhile, and no evidence was found to support the use of a cutoff for number of BM appropriate for salvage SRS.

  12. Five-year survivors of brain metastases: A single-institution report of 32 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Samuel T.; Barnett, Gene H.; Liu, Stephanie W.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Toms, Steven A.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Videtic, Gregory; Suh, John H. . E-mail: suhj@ccf.org

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To report on 32 patients who survived {>=}5 years from brain metastases treated at a single institution. Methods and Materials: The records of 1288 patients diagnosed with brain metastases between 1973 and 1999 were reviewed. Patients were treated with whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), surgery, and/or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Thirty-two (2.5%) {>=}5-year survivors were identified. Factors contributing to long-term survival were identified. Results: Median survival was 9.3 years for {>=}5-year survivors. Seven of these patients lived {>=}10 years. Female gender was the only patient characteristic that correlated with better survival (p = 0.0369). When these patients were compared with <5-year survivors, age <65 years (p = 0.0044), control of the primary at diagnosis (p = 0.0052), no systemic disease (p = 0.0012), recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 1 (p = 0.0002 with Class 2; p = 0.0022 with Class 3), and single brain metastasis (p = 0.0018) were associated with long-term survival in the univariate logistic regression model. In the multivariate model, RPA Class 1 compared with Class 2 (OR = 0.39, p = 0.0196), surgery (OR = 0.16, p < 0.0001), and SRS (OR = 0.41, p = 0.0188) were associated with long-term survival. Conclusions: For patients with good prognostic factors such as young age, good RPA characteristics and single metastasis, treatment with surgery or SRS offers the best chance for long-term survival.

  13. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K.; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n=4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments. PMID:25970776

  14. Intensity-modulated radiosurgery with rapidarc for multiple brain metastases and comparison with static approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jiazhu; Pawlicki, Todd; Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno J.; Sandhu, Ajay; Lawson, Joshua; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2012-04-01

    Rotational RapidArc (RA) and static intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) have been used for brain radiosurgery. This study compares the 2 techniques from beam delivery parameters and dosimetry aspects for multiple brain metastases. Twelve patients with 2-12 brain lesions treated with IMRS were replanned using RA. For each patient, an optimal 2-arc RA plan from several trials was chosen for comparison with IMRS. Homogeneity, conformity, and gradient indexes have been calculated. The mean dose to normal brain and maximal dose to other critical organs were evaluated. It was found that monitor unit (MU) reduction by RA is more pronounced for cases with larger number of brain lesions. The MU-ratio of RA and IMRS is reduced from 104% to 39% when lesions increase from 2 to 12. The dose homogeneities are comparable in both techniques and the conformity and gradient indexes and critical organ doses are higher in RA. Treatment time is greatly reduced by RA in intracranial radiosurgery, because RA uses fewer MUs, fewer beams, and fewer couch angles.

  15. Blockade of Kv1.3 channels ameliorates radiation-induced brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Lu, Kui; Li, Zichen; Zhao, Yaodong; Wang, Yiping; Hu, Bin; Xu, Pengfei; Shi, Xiaolei; Zhou, Bin; Pennington, Michael; Chandy, K. George; Tang, Yamei

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumors affecting the head, neck, and brain account for significant morbidity and mortality. The curative efficacy of radiotherapy for these tumors is well established, but radiation carries a significant risk of neurologic injury. So far, neuroprotective therapies for radiation-induced brain injury are still limited. In this study we demonstrate that Stichodactyla helianthus (ShK)–170, a specific inhibitor of the voltage-gated potassium (Kv)1.3 channel, protected mice from radiation-induced brain injury. Methods Mice were treated with ShK-170 for 3 days immediately after brain irradiation. Radiation-induced brain injury was assessed by MRI scans and a Morris water maze. Pathophysiological change of the brain was measured by immunofluorescence. Gene and protein expressions of Kv1.3 and inflammatory factors were measured by quantitative real-time PCR, reverse transcription PCR, ELISA assay, and western blot analyses. Kv currents were recorded in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Results Radiation increased Kv1.3 mRNA and protein expression in microglia. Genetic silencing of Kv1.3 by specific short interference RNAs or pharmacological blockade with ShK-170 suppressed radiation-induced production of the proinflammatory factors interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor–α by microglia. ShK-170 also inhibited neurotoxicity mediated by radiation-activated microglia and promoted neurogenesis by increasing the proliferation of neural progenitor cells. Conclusions The therapeutic effect of ShK-170 is mediated by suppression of microglial activation and microglia-mediated neurotoxicity and enhanced neurorestoration by promoting proliferation of neural progenitor cells. PMID:24305723

  16. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  17. Helical Tomotherapy for Whole-Brain Irradiation With Integrated Boost to Multiple Brain Metastases: Evaluation of Dose Distribution Characteristics and Comparison With Alternative Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Levegrün, Sabine; Pöttgen, Christoph; Wittig, Andrea; Lübcke, Wolfgang; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Stuschke, Martin

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate dose distribution characteristics achieved with helical tomotherapy (HT) for whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) with integrated boost (IB) to multiple brain metastases in comparison with alternative techniques. Methods and Materials: Dose distributions for 23 patients with 81 metastases treated with WBRT (30 Gy/10 fractions) and IB (50 Gy) were analyzed. The median number of metastases per patient (N{sub mets}) was 3 (range, 2-8). Mean values of the composite planning target volume of all metastases per patient (PTV{sub mets}) and of the individual metastasis planning target volume (PTV{sub ind} {sub met}) were 8.7 ± 8.9 cm{sup 3} (range, 1.3-35.5 cm{sup 3}) and 2.5 ± 4.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.19-24.7 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Dose distributions in PTV{sub mets} and PTV{sub ind} {sub met} were evaluated with respect to dose conformity (conformation number [CN], RTOG conformity index [PITV]), target coverage (TC), and homogeneity (homogeneity index [HI], ratio of maximum dose to prescription dose [MDPD]). The dependence of dose conformity on target size and N{sub mets} was investigated. The dose distribution characteristics were benchmarked against alternative irradiation techniques identified in a systematic literature review. Results: Mean ± standard deviation of dose distribution characteristics derived for PTV{sub mets} amounted to CN = 0.790 ± 0.101, PITV = 1.161 ± 0.154, TC = 0.95 ± 0.01, HI = 0.142 ± 0.022, and MDPD = 1.147 ± 0.029, respectively, demonstrating high dose conformity with acceptable homogeneity. Corresponding numbers for PTV{sub ind} {sub met} were CN = 0.708 ± 0.128, PITV = 1.174 ± 0.237, TC = 0.90 ± 0.10, HI = 0.140 ± 0.027, and MDPD = 1.129 ± 0.030, respectively. The target size had a statistically significant influence on dose conformity to PTV{sub mets} (CN = 0.737 for PTV{sub mets} ≤4.32 cm{sup 3} vs CN = 0.848 for PTV{sub mets} >4.32 cm{sup 3}, P=.006), in contrast to N{sub mets}. The achieved

  18. The Effect of Early Detection of Occult Brain Metastases in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients on Survival and Cause of Death

    SciTech Connect

    Niwinska, Anna; Tacikowska, Malgorzata; Murawska, Magdalena

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate disease-free survival, survival from the detection of brain metastases, overall survival, and cause of death in patients with occult brain metastases (Group I) vs. patients with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II). Methods and Materials: In 80 HER2-positive breast cancer patients, treated with trastuzumab and cytostatic agents for metastatic disease, magnetic resonance imaging screening of the brain was performed, and in 29 patients (36%) occult brain metastasis was detected (Group I). Whole-brain radiotherapy was delivered to Group I. This first group was compared with 52 patients who had symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) and was treated the same way, at the same clinic, during the same time period. Results: Median disease-free survival was 17 months in Group I and 19.9 months in Group II (p = 0.58). The median time interval between the dissemination of the disease and the detection of occult or symptomatic brain metastases was 9 and 15 months, respectively (p = 0.11). When the brain metastases were detected, the median survival was 9 and 8.78 months, respectively (p = 0.80). The median overall survival was 53 and 51 months, respectively (p = 0.94). In the group with occult brain metastases (Group I) 16% of patients died because of progression within the brain. In the group with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) the rate of cerebral death was 48% (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Whole-brain radiotherapy of occult brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with visceral dissemination produces a three-fold decrease in cerebral deaths but does not prolong survival.

  19. Delayed Complications in Patients Surviving at Least 3 Years After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Sato, Yasunori; Nariai, Tadashi; Barfod, Bierta E.; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Little is known about delayed complications after stereotactic radiosurgery in long-surviving patients with brain metastases. We studied the actual incidence and predictors of delayed complications. Patients and Methods: This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study that used our database. Among our consecutive series of 2000 patients with brain metastases who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) from 1991-2008, 167 patients (8.4%, 89 women, 78 men, mean age 62 years [range, 19-88 years]) who survived at least 3 years after GKRS were studied. Results: Among the 167 patients, 17 (10.2%, 18 lesions) experienced delayed complications (mass lesions with or without cyst in 8, cyst alone in 8, edema in 2) occurring 24.0-121.0 months (median, 57.5 months) after GKRS. The actuarial incidences of delayed complications estimated by competing risk analysis were 4.2% and 21.2% at the 60th month and 120th month, respectively, after GKRS. Among various pre-GKRS clinical factors, univariate analysis demonstrated tumor volume-related factors: largest tumor volume (hazard ratio [HR], 1.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.018-1.154; P=.0174) and tumor volume {<=}10 cc vs >10 cc (HR, 4.343; 95% CI, 1.444-12.14; P=.0108) to be the only significant predictors of delayed complications. Univariate analysis revealed no correlations between delayed complications and radiosurgical parameters (ie, radiosurgical doses, conformity and gradient indexes, and brain volumes receiving >5 Gy and >12 Gy). After GKRS, an area of prolonged enhancement at the irradiated lesion was shown to be a possible risk factor for the development of delayed complications (HR, 8.751; 95% CI, 1.785-157.9; P=.0037). Neurosurgical interventions were performed in 13 patients (14 lesions) and mass removal for 6 lesions and Ommaya reservoir placement for the other 8. The results were favorable. Conclusions: Long-term follow-up is crucial for patients with brain metastases

  20. SU-E-T-536: LINAC-Based Single Isocenter Frameless SRT for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B; Zhang, L; Rigor, N; Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Single-isocenter Stereotactic Radiotherapy of multiple brain metastases with Varian 21 IX LINAC, using Aktina Pinpoint system for patient setup. Methods: In 2014, five single-isocenter RapidArc SRT plans were delivered to five patients with 2 to 8 brain metastases using Varian 21 IX. Aktina Pinpoint system was used for setup and 2mm PTV margin were used. CBCT was acquired before and after the beam delivery. The prescription is 2100 cGy in 3 fractions. Eclipse planning system was used for treatment planning. Depending on the number of metastases and their locations, 1 to 5 coplanar or non coplanar arcs were used. Typically, 2 or 3 arcs are used. IMRT QAs were performed by comparing an A1SL ion chamber point dose measurement in solid water phantom to point dose of the plan; also, based on EPID measurement, 3D spatial dose was calculated using DosimetryCheck software package from MathResolutions Inc. The EPID system has an active area of 40cm by 30cm with 1024 by 768 photodiodes, which corresponds to a resolution of 0.4mm by 0.4mm pixel dimension. Results: for all the plans, at least 95% PTV coverage was achieved for full prescription dose, with plan normalization > 75%. RTOG conformity indices are less than 1.1 and Paddick gradient indices are less than 4.5. The distance from prescription IDL to 50% IDL increases as the number of metastases increases, and it ranges from 0.6mm to 0.8mm. Treatment time varies from 10mins to 30mins, depending on the number of arcs and if the arcs are coplanar. IMRT QA shows that the ion chamber measurement agree with the eclipse calculation within 3%, and 95% of the points passed Gamma, using 3% dose difference and 3mm DTA Conclusion: High quality single isocenter RapidArc SRT plan can be optimized and accurately delivered using Eclipse and Varian 21IX.

  1. DNA methylation and gene deletion analysis of brain metastases in melanoma patients identifies mutually exclusive molecular alterations

    PubMed Central

    Marzese, Diego M.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Roqué, Maria; Vargas-Roig, Laura M.; Huynh, Jamie L.; Wilmott, James S.; Murali, Rajmohan; Buckland, Michael E.; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Thompson, John F.; Morton, Donald L.; Kelly, Daniel F.; Hoon, Dave S. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The brain is a common target of metastases for melanoma patients. Little is known about the genetic and epigenetic alterations in melanoma brain metastases (MBMs). Unraveling these molecular alterations is a key step in understanding their aggressive nature and identifying novel therapeutic targets. Methods Genome-wide DNA methylation analyses of MBMs (n = 15) and normal brain tissues (n = 91) and simultaneous multigene DNA methylation and gene deletion analyses of metastatic melanoma tissues (99 MBMs and 43 extracranial metastases) were performed. BRAF and NRAS mutations were evaluated in MBMs by targeted sequencing. Results MBMs showed significant epigenetic heterogeneity. RARB, RASSF1, ESR1, APC, PTEN, and CDH13 genes were frequently hypermethylated. Deletions were frequently detected in the CDKN2A/B locus. Of MBMs, 46.1% and 28.8% had BRAF and NRAS missense mutations, respectively. Compared with lung and liver metastases, MBMs exhibited higher frequency of CDH13 hypermethylation and CDKN2A/B locus deletion. Mutual exclusivity between hypermethylated genes and CDKN2A/B locus deletion identified 2 clinically relevant molecular subtypes of MBMs. CDKN2A/B deletions were associated with multiple MBMs and frequently hypermethylated genes with shorter time to brain metastasis. Conclusions Melanoma cells that colonize the brain harbor numerous genetically and epigenetically altered genes. This study presents an integrated genomic and epigenomic analysis that reveals MBM-specific molecular alterations and mutually exclusive molecular subtypes. PMID:24968695

  2. Stereotactic radiosurgery as therapy for melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma brain metastases: Impact of added surgical resection and whole-brain radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ganesh; Klimo, Paul; Thompson, Clinton J.; Samlowski, Wolfram; Wang, Michael; Watson, Gordon; Shrieve, Dennis; Jensen, Randy L. . E-mail: randy.jensen@hsc.utah.edu

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Brain metastases of melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma have traditionally responded poorly to conventional treatments, including surgery and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Several studies have suggested a beneficial effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). We evaluated our institutional experience with systematic SRS in patients harboring these 'radioresistant' metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with brain metastases from melanoma, renal carcinoma, and sarcoma underwent SRS with or without WBRT or surgical resection. All patients had Karnofsky performance scores >70, and SRS was performed before the initiation of systemic therapy. The survival time was calculated from the diagnosis of brain metastases using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Statistical significance was calculated using the log-rank test. Factors influencing survival, including surgical resection, WBRT, gender, number of SRS sessions, and histologic type, were evaluated retrospectively using Cox univariate models. Results: The overall median survival was 427 days (14.2 months), which appears superior to the results obtained with conventional WBRT. The addition of neither surgery nor WBRT to SRS provided a statistically significant increase in survival. Conclusion: Our results suggest that patients undergoing SRS for up to five cerebral metastases from 'radioresistant' tumors (melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma) have survival rates comparable to those in other series of more selected patients. The addition of surgical resection or WBRT did not result in improved survival in our series.

  3. [A Case of Effective Whole-Brain Irradiation and Lapatinib/Capecitabine Combination Therapy for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer with Multiple Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Masayuki; Tanabe, Asami; Toda, Tateo; Sakata, Hiroki; Ijichi, Masayoshi; Kusaka, Kouji; Bandai, Yasutsugu

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of a 48-year-old female patient with HER2-positive and hormone receptor-negative breast cancer with multiple liver metastases. She underwent 6 cycles of FEC followed by docetaxel plus trastuzumab (TZB), resulting in a clinical complete response. After 15 cycles of a TZB-containing regimen, she complained of dizziness and nausea, and imaging examinations revealed multiple brain metastases. Whole-brain irradiation(33.6 Gy) was performed, and the chemotherapy regimen was changed to lapatinib (LAP: orally at 1,250 mg/day, every day) and capecitabine (CAP: orally at 2,000 mg/m2, every day for 2 weeks, followed by a 1-week rest interval, as 1 cycle). After 6 weeks of the new treatment, magnetic resonance imaging revealed marked shrinkage of brain metastases. A clinical complete response was maintained for 19 months. While brain metastasis is an important problem with treatment with TZB, LAP is drawing attention because of its ability to pass the blood-brain barrier because of its small molecular weight. LAP/CAP combination therapy may be an effective treatment option for brain metastases of HER2-positive breast cancer in which TZB essentially has no effect. PMID:26199252

  4. A Phase 2 Trial of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost After Surgical Resection for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, Cameron; Yang, T. Jonathan; Hilden, Patrick; Zhang, Zhigang; Chan, Kelvin; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A.; Lymberis, Stella C.; Narayana, Ashwatha; Tabar, Viviane; Gutin, Philip H.; Ballangrud, Åse; Lis, Eric; Beal, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control after surgical resection and postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 49 patients (50 lesions) were enrolled and available for analysis. Eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed malignancy with 1 or 2 intraparenchymal brain metastases, age ≥18 years, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥70. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to test for significant associations between clinical factors and overall survival (OS). Competing risks regression models, as well as cumulative incidence functions, were fit using the method of Fine and Gray to assess the association between clinical factors and both local failure (LF; recurrence within surgical cavity or SRS target), and regional failure (RF; intracranial metastasis outside of treated volume). Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months (range, 1.0-94.1 months). After surgical resection, 39 patients with 40 lesions were treated a median of 31 days (range, 7-56 days) later with SRS to the surgical bed to a median dose of 1800 cGy (range, 1500-2200 cGy). Of the 50 lesions, 15 (30%) demonstrated LF after surgery. The cumulative LF and RF rates were 22% and 44% at 12 months. Patients who went on to receive SRS had a significantly lower incidence of LF (P=.008). Other factors associated with improved local control include non-small cell lung cancer histology (P=.048), tumor diameter <3 cm (P=.010), and deep parenchymal tumors (P=.036). Large tumors (≥3 cm) with superficial dural/pial involvement showed the highest risk for LF (53.3% at 12 months). Large superficial lesions treated with SRS had a 54.5% LF. Infratentorial lesions were associated with a higher risk of developing RF compared to supratentorial lesions (P<.001). Conclusions: Postoperative SRS is associated with high rates of local control, especially for deep brain metastases <3 cm. Tumors ≥3 cm with superficial dural

  5. Serum Biomarkers Associated with Clinical Outcomes Fail to Predict Brain Metastases in Patients with Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bob T.; Lou, Emil; Hsu, Meier; Yu, Helena A.; Naidoo, Jarushka; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Sima, Camelia; Johnson, Melissa L.; Daras, Mariza; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Fleisher, Martin; Kris, Mark G.; Azzoli, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancers account for the majority of brain metastases which pose major therapeutic challenges. Biomarkers prognosticating for the development of brain metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) may improve personalized care. Six serum proteomic biomarkers were previously investigated at Memorial Sloan Kettering but their associations with brain metastases were unknown. Methods Serum NSE, CYFRA 21–1, ProGRP, SCC-Ag, TIMP1, and HE4 by ELISA-based proteomic assays were prospectively collected from consecutive patients with stage IV NSCLC. Pre-treatment serum biomarker levels as well as age, histology, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status were evaluated for association with the baseline presence of brain metastases using logistic regression and multivariable analysis. For patients without brain metastases at baseline, the cumulative incidence of subsequent brain metastases were compared according to baseline biomarkers and clinical factors using Gray’s test. Results A total of 118 patients were enrolled, 31 (26%; 95% CI 0.19–0.35) had brain metastases at baseline and a further 26 (22%; 95% CI 0.15–0.30) developed brain metastases subsequently. Pre-treatment serum biomarker levels were available in 104 patients. There was no significant association between the six serum biomarkers and the baseline presence or subsequent development of brain metastases. Age younger than 65 years was the only clinical factor significantly associated with brain metastasis at baseline (OR 3.00; 95% CI 1.22–7.34, P = 0.02) by multivariable analysis. A trend toward increased cumulative incidence of subsequent brain metastases was observed in patients with EGFR mutation (p = 0.2), but this was not statistically significant possibly due to small sample size. Conclusions Serum NSE, CYFRA 21–1, Pro-GRP, SCC-Ag, TIMP1, and HE4 are not significantly associated with brain metastases. Our methods taking into account follow-up time

  6. The Effect of Contouring Variability on Dosimetric Parameters for Brain Metastases Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Julia; Dunscombe, Peter; Lau, Harold; Burns, Paul; Lim, Gerald; Liu, Hong-Wei; Nordal, Robert; Starreveld, Yves; Valev, Boris; Voroney, Jon-Paul; Spencer, David P.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of contouring variation on stereotactic radiosurgery plan quality metrics for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Fourteen metastases, each contoured by 8 physicians, formed the basis of this study. A template-based dynamic conformal 5-arc dose distribution was developed for each of the 112 contours, and each dose distribution was applied to the 7 other contours in each patient set. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) plan quality metrics and the Paddick conformity index were calculated for each of the 896 combinations of dose distributions and contours. Results: The ratio of largest to smallest contour volume for each metastasis varied from 1.25 to 4.47, with a median value of 1.68 (n=8). The median absolute difference in RTOG conformity index between the value for the reference contour and the values for the alternative contours was 0.35. The variation of the range of conformity index for all contours for a given tumor varied with the tumor size. Conclusions: The high degree of interobserver contouring variation strongly suggests that peer review or consultation should be adopted to standardize tumor volume prescription. Observer confidence was not reflected in contouring consistency. The impact of contouring variability on plan quality metrics, used as criteria for clinical trial protocol compliance, was such that the category of compliance was robust to interobserver effects only 70% of the time.

  7. Initial experience with combined BRAF and MEK inhibition with stereotactic radiosurgery for BRAF mutant melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bindiya G; Ahmed, Kamran A; Johnstone, Peter A S; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael; Etame, Arnold B

    2016-08-01

    The combined use of the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib and MEK inhibitor trametinib has been found to improve survival over dabrafenib alone. The management of melanoma brain metastases continues to present challenges. In this study, we report our initial experience in the management of melanoma brain metastases with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with the use of BRAF and MEK inhibitors. We identified six patients treated with SRS for 17 brain metastases within 3 months of BRAF and MEK inhibitor administration. The median planning target volume was 0.42 cm (range: 0.078-2.08 cm). The median treatment dose was 21 Gy (range 18-24 Gy). The median follow-up of all lesions from SRS was 10.6 months (range 5.8-28.5 months). One lesion was found to undergo local failure 21.7 months following SRS treatment. The median overall survival was 20.0 months (range 6.1-31.8 months) from the time of SRS treatment and 23.1 months (range: 12.1-30.9 months) from the date of BRAFi and MEKi administration. There was no evidence of increased nor unexpected toxicity with the two modalities combined. In this initial experience of melanoma brain metastases treated with BRAF and MEK inhibition with SRS, we find the two modalities can be combined safely. These outcomes should be assessed further in prospective evaluations. PMID:26926151

  8. Brain-Only Metastases Seen on FDG PET as First Relapse of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Two Years Post-Thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Naddaf, Sleiman Y; Syed, Ghulam Mustafa Shah; Hadb, Abdulrahman; Al-Thaqfi, Saif

    2016-09-01

    We report a case of a 60-year-old man diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer who had a relapse seen only in the brain at FDG PET on standard images. Total thyroidectomy was performed in July 2013 after initial diagnosis. Patient received I ablation in December 2013, followed by external beam radiotherapy to the neck. In September 2015, the patient presented with neurological symptoms. Brain MRI showed multiple brain metastases later confirmed on histopathology. An FDG PET/CT scan was performed to evaluate the whole body in November 2015. Multiple hypermetabolic lesions were identified in the brain with no other lesion up to mid thighs. PMID:27405041

  9. Efficacy and safety of icotinib in patients with brain metastases from lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiangru; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib in patients with brain metastases (BMs) from lung adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods Clinical data of 28 cases with BMs from lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively analyzed. All the patients took 125 mg icotinib orally three times a day. Progression of disease, intolerable adverse reactions, and number of deaths were recorded. Results For all the patients, the remission rate of icotinib was 67.8% and the disease control rate was 96.4%. The median overall survival time of patients was 21.2 months, and the median progression-free survival time of patients was 10.9 months. Only mild adverse events of grade 1/2 were observed during the treatment. Conclusion Icotinib was an effective and safe strategy to treat patients with BMs from lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27274284

  10. Afatinib-refractory brain metastases from EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer successfully controlled with erlotinib: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nonagase, Yoshikane; Okamoto, Kunio; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kaoru; Takeda, Masayuki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Shimizu, Toshio; Tsurutani, Junji; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Both afatinib and erlotinib are tyrosine kinase inhibitors that inhibit aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signals in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Afatinib is an irreversible inhibitor directed against EGFR, ErbB-2, and ErbB-4, whereas erlotinib is a reversible inhibitor directed against EGFR only. Although afatinib has been shown to be effective in the treatment for erlotinib-refractory and/or gefitinib-refractory central nervous system metastases from NSCLC, little is known about the efficacy of erlotinib for afatinib-refractory central nervous system metastases. In the present report we describe a case of EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC in which brain metastases developed during first-line afatinib treatment. Whole-brain radiation therapy and substitution of erlotinib for afatinib led to successful shrinkage of the brain metastases. Our report highlights the potential benefit of erlotinib for the management of brain metastases refractory over afatinib in patients with NSCLC. PMID:26575001

  11. Management of Brain Metastases in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rusthoven, Chad G; Doebele, Robert C

    2016-08-20

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 54-year-old man with a former 15-pack-year smoking history presents with cough and dyspnea. Initial work-up with imaging demonstrates a right suprahilar mass measuring 4.7 cm as well as several enlarged hilar and ipsilateral mediastinal lymph nodes. Bronchoscopy with biopsy reveals adenocarcinoma consistent with a lung primary. Staging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) reidentifies the primary mass and lymph nodes and shows several PET-avid bone metastases. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrates a 1.6-cm right parietal mass with mild vasogenic edema and four additional brain metastases measuring 4 to 9 mm in size. Molecular testing is positive for an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement using fluorescence in situ hybridization and negative for EGFR, ROS1, RET, BRAF, KRAS, and other oncogenes. The patient denies any neurologic symptoms and has no significant findings on neurologic exam. He is referred to you for management options for newly diagnosed stage IV (T2aN2M1b) lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27298405

  12. Frameless Image-Guided Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery: Clinical Outcomes for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Breneman, John C. Steinmetz, Ryan; Smith, Aaron; Lamba, Michael; Warnick, Ronald E.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: After preclinical investigations confirming the accuracy of target localization by frameless image-guided radiosurgery, we report the clinical outcomes of patients with brain metastases who underwent frameless radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2006, 53 patients underwent frameless stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator equipped with on-board image guidance for the treatment of 158 brain metastases. The radiation doses were delivered in a single fraction (dose range, 12-22 Gy; median, 18). Patients were followed with magnetic resonance imaging scans at 2-3-month intervals. Progression-free survival was the primary study endpoint. Results: With a median follow-up of 38 weeks (range, 14-112), the overall survival rate was 70% at 6 months, 44% at 1 year, 29% at 18 months, and 16% at 24 months. Local control was achieved in 90% of 168 treated lesions at 6 months, 80% at 12 months, 78% at 18 months, and 78% at 24 months. Local control tended to be improved in lesions treated with {>=}18 Gy and for lesions <0.2 cm{sup 3}. Adverse events occurred in 5 patients (9.6%). No evidence of imaging changes on post-stereotactic radiosurgery scans was found to suggest mistargeting of a radiation isocenter. Conclusion: The clinical outcomes after frameless stereotactic radiosurgery were comparable to those after frame-based radiosurgery techniques. Given its significant advantages in terms of patient comfort, ability to use fractionated treatment regimens, and convenience in scheduling of personnel and equipment resources, frameless radiosurgery will likely become a common technique for intracranial radiosurgery.

  13. Pemetrexed/cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy for advanced lung cancer with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    He, Guangzhao; Xiao, Xiaoguang; Zou, Man; Zhang, Chengliang; Xia, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brain metastases (BMs) are a common and serious complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), surgery, and molecular targeted therapy are usually used to treat NSCLC with BM. Chemotherapeutic options for BM are limited by tumor resistance, ineffective agents, and the blood–brain barrier. Pemetrexed/cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy in nonsquamous NSCLC, but the efficacy of this treatment for nonsquamous NSCLC with BM is uncertain. Methods: We present a case of nonsquamous NSCLC with asymptomatic BM presenting with irritating cough and right shoulder back pain (unknown sensitizing epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase). Results: He benefited from administration of first-line chemotherapy of pemetrexed/cisplatin. Partial remission was achieved in the primary lesion of the lungs and BM lesion. He was further given 3 cycles of pemetrexed monotherapy and WBRT. Complete remission was further achieved in BM lesion. Conclusion: The findings of clinical trials and theoretical studies about the current pemetrexed/cisplatin in the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC with BM are also summarized to provide a reference for the application of pemetrexed/cisplatin in nonsquamous NSCLC with BM. Whether or not pemetrexed/cisplatin is definitely effective in nonsquamous NSCLC with BM must be proven by subsequent phase III clinical trials. PMID:27512852

  14. Breast cancer brain metastases responding to lapatinib plus capecitabine as second-line primary systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Elisabeth S; Berghoff, Anna S; Rudas, Margaretha; Preusser, Matthias; Bartsch, Rupert

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are diagnosed in up to 40% of HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Standard treatment includes local approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), radiosurgery, and neurosurgery. The landscape trial established primary systemic therapy as an effective and safe alternative to WBRT in selected patients with Her2-positive BM. We aim to further focus on the role of systemic therapy in oligosymptomatic patients by presenting this case report. We report on a 50-year-old patient diagnosed with multiple BM 5 years after early breast cancer diagnosis. As the patient was asymptomatic and had a favorable diagnosis-specific GPA score, she received primary systemic treatment with T-DM1. She achieved partial remission within the brain for eight treatment cycles and then progressed despite stable extracranial disease. As the patient remained asymptomatic and refused WBRT, we decided upon trastuzumab, lapatinib plus capecitabine as second-line therapy. Another partial remission of BM was observed; to date, she has received 11 treatment cycles without any sign of disease progression. In this case, WBRT was delayed by at least 14 months, again indicating the activity of systemic treatment in BM. Apparently, in selected patients, BM can be controlled with multiple lines of systemic therapy similar to extracranial disease. Further investigation of systemic treatment approaches is therefore warranted. PMID:25714248

  15. Treatment of brain metastases from HER-2-positive breast cancer: current status and new concepts.

    PubMed

    Bartolotti, Marco; Franceschi, Enrico; Brandes, Alba A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common source of brain metastases (BM). The incidence of BM in breast cancer patients has increased over the past decade, especially among patients with HER-2-positive breast cancer. This is probably due to how aggressive the HER-2-positive disease is but also to the prolongation of survival obtained with current treatments, which allow good control of extracranial disease but are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. At present, whole-brain radiotherapy, surgery and radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy represent the cornerstone of treatment for BM, while the role of pharmacological therapy remains uncertain. Lapatinib demonstrated activity against BM from HER-2-positive breast cancer in small Phase II and retrospective studies, mainly in combination with capecitabine, and cases of dramatic responses to such treatment are present in literature. In this review we focus on the available clinical data regarding the treatment of BM from HER-2-positive breast cancer and on new concepts about the treatment and evaluation of the CNS response. PMID:24156325

  16. Breast Cancer With Brain Metastases: Clinicopathologic Features, Survival, and Paired Biomarker Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qi; Hess, Kenneth R.; Suki, Dima; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Sawaya, Raymond; Ibrahim, Nuhad K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to describe clinicopathologic features of patients with breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM); to evaluate survival after diagnosis of BCBM; and to compare estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 expression in the paired primary and brain tumors. Materials and Methods. We identified 140 consecutive patients who underwent craniotomy for BCBM (either for diagnostic purpose or with therapeutic intent) at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 2002 and 2009. Results. Most patients had invasive ductal histology (91%), grade 3 tumors (67%), and positive axillary lymph node (64%). Of the tumors, 56% were ER-negative, 62% were PR-negative, 44% were HER2-positive, and 28% were triple negative (TN). Brain metastasis (BM) was solitary in 51% of patients. Median interval from breast cancer diagnosis to BM was 46 months; median survival after BM was 14.1 months. In the univariate analysis, younger age, solitary brain metastasis, and ER or PR positivity in the breast tumors were associated with longer survival. There was a statistical trend toward increased survival in HER2-positive patients compared with HER2-negative patients (18 vs. 11 months). In the multivariate analysis, predictors for longer survival included younger age, solitary brain lesion, and HER2 positivity in the breast cancer. Biomarkers were evaluated in paired primary and brain tumors in 35 patients for ER status, 34 for PR status, and 36 for HER2 status. Discordant rates were 28% for ER, 20% for PR, and 3% for HER2. Conclusion. Compared with unselected breast cancer patients at the same institution, patients with breast cancer who had brain metastases had a higher proportion of hormone receptor-negative, HER2-positive, and TN tumors. Younger age, solitary brain lesion, and HER2 expression were independent predictors of better survival in patients with BCBM. HER2 status was highly concordant between the paired primary and brain tumors

  17. Erlotinib Versus Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases in Patients With EGFR-Mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit K.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Rimner, Andreas; Shi, Weiji; Riely, Gregory J.; Beal, Kathryn; Yu, Helena A.; Chan, Timothy A.; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Abraham J.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Radiation therapy (RT) is the principal modality in the treatment of patients with brain metastases (BM). However, given the activity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the central nervous system, it is uncertain whether upfront brain RT is necessary for patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma with BM. Methods and Materials: Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma and newly diagnosed BM were identified. Results: 222 patients were identified. Exclusion criteria included prior erlotinib use, presence of a de novo erlotinib resistance mutation, or incomplete data. Of the remaining 110 patients, 63 were treated with erlotinib, 32 with whole brain RT (WBRT), and 15 with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The median overall survival (OS) for the whole cohort was 33 months. There was no significant difference in OS between the WBRT and erlotinib groups (median, 35 vs 26 months; P=.62), whereas patients treated with SRS had a longer OS than did those in the erlotinib group (median, 64 months; P=.004). The median time to intracranial progression was 17 months. There was a longer time to intracranial progression in patients who received WBRT than in those who received erlotinib upfront (median, 24 vs 16 months, P=.04). Patients in the erlotinib or SRS group were more likely to experience intracranial failure as a component of first failure, whereas WBRT patients were more likely to experience failure outside the brain (P=.004). Conclusions: The survival of patients with EGFR-mutant adenocarcinoma with BM is notably long, whether they receive upfront erlotinib or brain RT. We observed longer intracranial control with WBRT, even though the WBRT patients had a higher burden of intracranial disease. Despite the equivalent survival between the WBRT and erlotinib group, this study underscores the role of WBRT in producing durable intracranial control in comparison with a targeted biologic agent with known central nervous system activity.

  18. The Impact of the Size of Nodal Metastases on Recurrence Risk in Breast Cancer Patients With 1-3 Positive Axillary Nodes After Mastectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor E.R.; Freilich, Jessica; Lin, Hui-Yi; Chuong, Michael; Acs, Geza

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine whether the size of nodal metastases in this subset could predict who would benefit from PMRT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 250 breast cancer patients with 1-3 positive nodes after mastectomy treated with contemporary surgery and systemic therapy at our institution. Of these patients, 204 did not receive PMRT and 46 did receive PMRT. Local and regional recurrence risks were stratified by the size of the largest nodal metastasis measured as less than or equal to 5 mm or greater than 5 mm. Results: The median follow-up was 65.6 months. In the whole group, regional recurrences occurred in 2% of patients in whom the largest nodal metastasis measured 5 mm or less vs 6% for those with metastases measuring greater than 5 mm. For non-irradiated patients only, regional recurrence rates were 2% and 9%, respectively. Those with a maximal nodal size greater than 5 mm had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of regional recurrence (P=.013). The 5-year cumulative incidence of a regional recurrence in the non-irradiated group was 2.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7%-7.2%) for maximal metastasis size of 5 mm or less, 6.9% (95% CI, 1.7%-17.3%) for metastasis size greater than 5 mm, and 16% (95% CI, 3.4%-36.8%) for metastasis size greater than 10 mm. The impact of the maximal nodal size on regional recurrences became insignificant in the multivariable model. Conclusions: In patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy without radiation, nodal metastasis greater than 5 mm was associated with regional recurrence after mastectomy, but its effect was modified by other factors (such as tumor stage). The size of the largest nodal metastasis may be useful to identify high-risk patients who may benefit from radiation therapy after mastectomy.

  19. Institutional, Retrospective Analysis of 777 Patients With Brain Metastases: Treatment Outcomes and Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Antoni, Delphine; Clavier, Jean-Baptiste; Pop, Marius; Schumacher, Catherine; Lefebvre, François; Noël, Georges

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the prognostic factors and survival of a series of 777 patients with brain metastases (BM) from a single institution. Methods and Materials: Patients were treated with surgery followed by whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or with WBRT alone in 16.3% and 83.7% of the cases, respectively. The patients were RPA (recursive partitioning analysis) class I, II, and III in 11.2%, 69.6%, and 18.4% of the cases, respectively; RPA class II-a, II-b, and II-c in 8.3%, 24.8%, and 66.9% of the cases, respectively; and with GPA (graded prognostic assessment) scores of 0-1.0, 1.5-2.0, 2.5-3.0, and 3.5-4.0 in 35%, 27.5%, 18.2%, and 8.6% of the cases, respectively. Results: The median overall survival (OS) times according to RPA class I, II, and III were 20.1, 5.1, and 1.3 months, respectively (P<.0001); according to RPA class II-a, II-b, II-c: 9.1, 8.9, and 4.0 months, respectively (P<.0001); and according to GPA score 0-1.0, 1.5-2.0, 2.5-3.0, and 3.5-4.0: 2.5, 4.4, 9.0, and 19.1 months, respectively (P<.0001). By multivariate analysis, the favorable independent prognostic factors for survival were as follows: for gastrointestinal tumor, a high Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (P=.0003) and an absence of extracranial metastases (ECM) (P=.003); for kidney cancer, few BM (P=.002); for melanoma, few BM (P=.01), an absence of ECM (P=.002), and few ECM (P=.0002); for lung cancer, age (P=.007), a high KPS (P<.0001), an absence of ECM (P<.0001), few ECM and BM (P<.0001 and P=.0006, respectively), and control of the primary tumor (P=.004); and for breast cancer, age (P=.001), a high KPS (P=.007), control of the primary tumor (P=.05), and few ECM and BM (P=.01 and P=.0002, respectively). The triple-negative subtype was a significant unfavorable factor (P=.007). Conclusion: Prognostic factors varied by pathology. Our analysis confirms the strength of prognostic factors used to determine the GPA score, including the genetic subtype for breast cancer.

  20. Multidose Stereotactic Radiosurgery (9 Gy × 3) of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Treatment of Large Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Esposito, Vincenzo; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Salvati, Maurizio; Raco, Antonino; Bozzao, Alessandro; Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes with linear accelerator-based multidose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to large postoperative resection cavities in patients with large brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 to May 2012, 101 patients with a single brain metastasis were treated with surgery and multidose SRS (9 Gy × 3) for large resection cavities (>3 cm). The target volume was the resection cavity with the inclusion of a 2-mm margin. The median cavity volume was 17.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 12.6-35.7 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were survival and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 6-44 months), the 1-year and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 34%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 93% and 84%, with respective incidences of new distant brain metastases of 50% and 66%. Local control was similar for radiosensitive (non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer) and radioresistant (melanoma and renal cell cancer) brain metastases. On multivariate Cox analysis stable extracranial disease, breast cancer histology, and Karnofsky performance status >70 were associated with significant survival benefit. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 9 patients (9%), being symptomatic in 5 patients (5%). Conclusions: Adjuvant multidose SRS to resection cavity represents an effective treatment option that achieves excellent local control and defers the use of whole-brain radiation therapy in selected patients with large brain metastases.

  1. Dose-Volume Response Relationship for Brain Metastases Treated with Frameless Single-Fraction Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jianmin; Yusuf, Mehran B; Dragun, Anthony; Dunlap, Neal; Guan, Timothy; Boling, Warren; Rai, Shesh; Woo, Shiao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to identify a dose-volume response relationship for brain metastases treated with frameless stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: We reviewed patients who underwent frameless single-fraction linear accelerator SRS for brain metastases between 2007 and 2013 from an institutional database. Proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of outcome. A ratio of maximum lesion dose per mm-diameter (Gy/mm) was constructed to establish a dose-volume relationship. Results: There were 316 metastases evaluated in 121 patients (2 - 33 mm in the largest diameter). The median peripheral dose was 18.0 Gy (range: 10.0 – 24.0 Gy). Local control was 84.8% for all lesions and was affected by location, peripheral dose, maximum dose, and lesion size (p values < 0.050). A dose-volume response relationship was constructed using the maximum dose and lesion size. A unit increase in Gy/mm was associated with decreased local failure (p = 0.005). Local control of 80%, 85%, and 90% corresponded to maximum doses per millimeter of 1.67 Gy/mm, 2.86 Gy/mm, and 4.4 Gy/mm, respectively. Toxicity was uncommon and only 1.0% of lesions developed radionecrosis requiring surgery. Conclusions: For brain metastases less than 3 cm, a dose-volume response relationship exists between maximum radiosurgical dose and lesion size, which is predictive of local control. PMID:27284495

  2. [Two patients having recurrent breast cancer with brain metastases well controlled with a gamma knife radio-surgery].

    PubMed

    Hojo, Shigeyuki; Maeura, Yoshiichi; Yoshioka, Setsuko; Fujie, Yujiro; Fukunaga, Hiroki; Okada, Yoshihiro; Ota, Hirofumi; Endo, Wakio

    2006-11-01

    We report two patients having recurrent breast cancer with brain metastases that was controlled well with a gamma knife radio-surgery. The patient is a 50-year-old woman. She underwent radical mastectomy for right breast cancer in September 1993. She suffered from multiple liver metastases in June 2000, so CEF therapy contained hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, and extended right lobectomy of the liver were performed in December 2001. Afterward, pleurodesis was carried out to the carcinomatous pleurisy. Then she underwent simple total hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy for torsion of the metastatic ovarian tumor. MRI study revealed brain metastases with a diameter of 1 cm in her right midbrain in April 2005, so a gamma knife radio-surgery was performed. After the radio-surgery, a weekly paclitaxel therapy followed by peroral chemotherapy with capecitabine was started, and she took the regimen continuously. Another patient is a 56-year-old woman. She underwent skin sparing mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for right breast cancer in November 2002. Metastases to the base of her skull were found in October 2004, so a gamma knife radio-surgery was carried out. After the radio-surgery, a weekly paclitaxel therapy with anastrozole was started. In both of the two patients, the metastatic brain tumors have not shown growth so far and are under good control as of March 2006. PMID:17212144

  3. Brain metastases from solid tumors: disease outcome according to type of treatment and therapeutic resources of the treating center

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate the therapeutic strategies commonly employed in the clinic for the management of brain metastases (BMs) and to correlate disease outcome with type of treatment and therapeutic resources available at the treating center. Methods Four Cancer centres participated to the survey. Data were collected through a questionnaire filled in by one physician for each centre. Results Clinical data regarding 290 cancer patients with BMs from solid tumors were collected. Median age was 59 and 59% of patients had ≤ 3 brain metastases. A local approach (surgery and stereotactic radiosurgery) was adopted in 31% of patients. The local approach demonstrated to be superior in terms of survival compared to the regional/systemic approach (whole brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy, p = <.0001 for survival at 2 years). In the multivariate analysis local treatment was an independent prognostic factor for survival. When patients were divided into 2 groups whether they were treated in centers where local approaches were available or not (group A vs group B respectively, 58% of patients with ≤ 3 BMs in both cohorts), more patients in group A received local strategies although no difference in time to brain progression at 1 year was observed between the two groups of patients. Conclusions In clinical practice, local strategies should be integrated in the management of brain metastases. Proper selection of patients who are candidate to local treatments is of crucial importance. PMID:21244695

  4. Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Taback, Nathan; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The indications for treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) remain controversial. We studied patterns, predictors, and cost of SRS use in elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we identified patients with NSCLC who were diagnosed with brain metastases between 2000 and 2007. Our cohort included patients treated with radiation therapy and not surgical resection as initial treatment for brain metastases. Results: We identified 7684 patients treated with radiation therapy within 2 months after brain metastases diagnosis, of whom 469 (6.1%) cases had billing codes for SRS. Annual SRS use increased from 3.0% in 2000 to 8.2% in 2005 and varied from 3.4% to 12.5% by specific SEER registry site. After controlling for clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, we found SRS use was significantly associated with increasing year of diagnosis, specific SEER registry, higher socioeconomic status, admission to a teaching hospital, no history of participation in low-income state buy-in programs (a proxy for Medicaid eligibility), no extracranial metastases, and longer intervals from NSCLC diagnosis. The average cost per patient associated with radiation therapy was 2.19 times greater for those who received SRS than for those who did not. Conclusions: The use of SRS in patients with metastatic NSCLC increased almost 3-fold from 2000 to 2005. In addition, we found significant variations in SRS use across SEER registries and socioeconomic quartiles. National practice patterns in this study suggested both a lack of consensus and an overall limited use of the approach among elderly patients before 2008.

  5. A pure non-gestational ovarian choriocarcinoma with delayed solitary brain metastases: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rao, K V L Narasinga; Konar, Subhas; Gangadharan, Jagathlal; Vikas, V; Sampath, S

    2015-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is the most malignant tumour of gestational trophoblastic origin. Most ovarian choriocarcinomas are gestational in origin and usually metastasize to the ovary from uterine or tubal choriocarcinoma. Non gestational choriocarcinoma (NGOC) of the ovary is exceedingly rare and usually seen along with other germ cell tumors. Non gestational choriocarcinoma has been found to be resistant to single-agent chemotherapy and has a worse prognosis than gestational choriocarcinoma. We are reporting long term follow up of published rare case of pure non gestational ovarian choriocarcinoma (NGOC) with concurrent metastases to the spleen and adrenal glands, who developed a delayed solitary brain metastases, two years after completion of primary treatment. Surgery along with triple agent chemotherapy and radiotherapy was found to give good remission in this aggressive disease. PMID:26752905

  6. Challenges relating to solid tumour brain metastases in clinical trials, part 1: patient population, response, and progression. A report from the RANO group.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Lee, Eudocia Q; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Barani, Igor J; Baumert, Brigitta G; Brown, Paul D; Camidge, D Ross; Chang, Susan M; Dancey, Janet; Gaspar, Laurie E; Harris, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Kalkanis, Steven N; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Linskey, Mark E; Macdonald, David R; Margolin, Kim; Mehta, Minesh P; Schiff, David; Soffietti, Riccardo; Suh, John H; van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic outcomes for patients with brain metastases need to improve. A critical review of trials specifically addressing brain metastases shows key issues that could prevent acceptance of results by regulatory agencies, including enrolment of heterogeneous groups of patients and varying definitions of clinical endpoints. Considerations specific to disease, modality, and treatment are not consistently addressed. Additionally, the schedule of CNS imaging and consequences of detection of new or progressive brain metastases in trials mainly exploring the extra-CNS activity of systemic drugs are highly variable. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group is an independent, international, collaborative effort to improve the design of trials in patients with brain tumours. In this two-part series, we review the state of clinical trials of brain metastases and suggest a consensus recommendation for the development of criteria for future clinical trials. PMID:23993384

  7. Does immunotherapy increase the rate of radiation necrosis after radiosurgical treatment of brain metastases?

    PubMed

    Colaco, Rovel J; Martin, Pierre; Kluger, Harriet M; Yu, James B; Chiang, Veronica L

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT Radiation necrosis (RN), or its imaging equivalent, treatment-related imaging changes (TRIC), is an inflammatory reaction to high-dose radiation in the brain. The authors sought to investigate the hypothesis that immunotherapy increases the risk of developing RN/TRIC after stereotactic Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery for brain metastases. METHODS A total of 180 patients who underwent GK surgery for brain metastases between 2006 and 2012 were studied. The systemic therapy they received was classified as cytotoxic chemotherapy (CT), targeted therapy (TT), or immunotherapy (IT). The timing of systemic therapy in relation to GK treatment was also recorded. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of developing RN according to type of systemic therapy received. RESULTS The median follow-up time was 11.7 months. Of 180 patients, 39 (21.7%) developed RN/TRIC. RN/TRIC rates were 37.5% (12 of 32) in patients who received IT alone, 16.9% (14 of 83) in those who received CT only, and 25.0% (5 of 20) in those who received TT only. Median overall survival was significantly longer in patients who developed RN/TRIC (23.7 vs 9.9 months, respectively). The RN/TRIC rate was increased significantly in patients who received IT alone (OR 2.40 [95% CI 1.06-5.44]; p = 0.03), whereas receipt of any CT was associated with a lower risk of RN/TRIC (OR 0.38 [95% CI 0.18-0.78]; p = 0.01). The timing of development of RN/TRIC was not different between patients who received IT and those who received CT. CONCLUSIONS Patients who receive IT alone may have an increased rate of RN/TRIC compared with those who receive CT or TT alone after stereotactic radiosurgery, whereas receiving any CT may in fact be protective against RN/TRIC. As the use of immunotherapies increases, the rate of RN/TRIC may be expected to increase compared with rates in the chemotherapy era. PMID:26544782

  8. Tumor Bed Dynamics After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases: Implications for Postoperative Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Lesley A.; Simmons, Nathan E.; Bellerive, Marc; Erkmen, Kadir; Eskey, Clifford J.; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Hartford, Alan C.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze 2 factors that influence timing of radiosurgery after surgical resection of brain metastases: target volume dynamics and intracranial tumor progression in the interval between surgery and cavity stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Three diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were retrospectively analyzed for 41 patients with a total of 43 resected brain metastases: preoperative MRI scan (MRI-1), MRI scan within 24 hours after surgery (MRI-2), and MRI scan for radiosurgery planning, which is generally performed {<=}1 week before SRS (MRI-3). Tumors were contoured on MRI-1 scans, and resection cavities were contoured on MRI-2 and MRI-3 scans. Results: The mean tumor volume before surgery was 14.23 cm{sup 3}, and the mean cavity volume was 8.53 cm{sup 3} immediately after surgery and 8.77 cm{sup 3} before SRS. In the interval between surgery and SRS, 20 cavities (46.5%) were stable in size, defined as a change of {<=}2 cm{sup 3}; 10 cavities (23.3%) collapsed by >2 cm{sup 3}; and 13 cavities (30.2%) increased by >2 cm{sup 3}. The unexpected increase in cavity size was a result of local progression (2 cavities), accumulation of cyst-like fluid or blood (9 cavities), and nonspecific postsurgical changes (2 cavities). Finally, in the interval between surgery and SRS, 5 cavities showed definite local tumor progression, 4 patients had progression elsewhere in the brain, 1 patient had both local progression and progression elsewhere, and 33 patients had stable intracranial disease. Conclusions: In the interval between surgical resection and delivery of SRS, surgical cavities are dynamic in size; however, most cavities do not collapse, and nearly one-third are larger at the time of SRS. These observations support obtaining imaging for radiosurgery planning as close to SRS delivery as possible and suggest that delaying SRS after surgery does not offer the benefit of cavity collapse in most patients. A prospective, multi

  9. EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 molecular status in brain metastases from 77 NSCLC patients

    PubMed Central

    Villalva, Claire; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Guilloteau, Karline; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Wager, Michel; Doyen, Jérôme; Levillain, Pierre Marie; Fontaine, Denys; Blons, Hélène; Pedeutour, Florence; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 mutations in brain metastases from non-small cell lung carcinomas (BM-NSCLC). A total of 77 samples of BM-NSCLC were included and 19 samples of BM from breast, kidney, and colorectal tumors were also studied as controls. These samples were collected from patients followed between 2008 and 2011 at Poitiers and Nice University Hospitals in France. The frequencies of EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and HER-2 mutations in BM-NSCLC were 2.6, 38.5, 0, and 0% respectively. The incidence of KRAS mutation was significantly higher in female and younger patients (P < 0.05). No mutations of the four genes were found in BM from breast or kidney. However, among six BM from colorectal tumors, we identified KRAS mutations in three cases and BRAF mutations in two other cases. This study is the largest analysis on genetic alterations in BM-NSCLC performed to date. Our results suggest a low frequency of EGFR mutations in BM-NSCLC whereas KRAS mutations are as frequent in BM-NSCLC as in primitive NSCLC. These results raise the question of the variability of the brain metastatic potential of NSCLC cells in relation to the mutation pattern. PMID:23930206

  10. Irinotecan and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-03-15

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Poor Performance Status; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. A Phase I Study of Short-Course Accelerated Whole Brain Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Caravatta, Luciana; Deodato, Francesco; Ferro, Marica; Macchia, Gabriella; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Cilla, Savino; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa; Carrozza, Francesco; Flocco, Mariano; Cantore, Giampaolo; Scapati, Andrea; Buwenge, Milly; and others

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of a SHort-course Accelerated whole brain RadiatiON therapy (SHARON) in the treatment of patients with multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: A phase 1 trial in 4 dose-escalation steps was designed: 12 Gy (3 Gy per fraction), 14 Gy (3.5 Gy per fraction), 16 Gy (4 Gy per fraction), and 18 Gy (4.5 Gy per fraction). Eligibility criteria included patients with unfavorable recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class > or =2 with at least 3 brain metastases or metastatic disease in more than 3 organ systems, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the MTD. The dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any acute toxicity {>=}grade 3, according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Information on the status of the main neurologic symptoms and quality of life were recorded. Results: Characteristics of the 49 enrolled patients were as follows: male/female, 30/19; median age, 66 years (range, 23-83 years). ECOG performance status was <3 in 46 patients (94%). Fourteen patients (29%) were considered to be in recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class 3. Grade 1-2 acute neurologic (26.4%) and skin (18.3%) toxicities were recorded. Only 1 patient experienced DLT (neurologic grade 3 acute toxicity). With a median follow-up time of 5 months (range, 1-23 months), no late toxicities have been observed. Three weeks after treatment, 16 of 21 symptomatic patients showed an improvement or resolution of presenting symptoms (overall symptom response rate, 76.2%; confidence interval 0.95: 60.3-95.9%). Conclusions: Short-course accelerated radiation therapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days is tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase 2 study has been planned to evaluate the efficacy on overall survival, symptom control, and quality of life indices.

  12. Brain Radiotherapy plus Concurrent Temozolomide versus Radiotherapy Alone for Patients with Brain Metastases: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Qin, Qin; Sun, Jinglong; Han, Dan; Wang, Zhongtang; Teng, Junjie; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective We performed a meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials to compare the efficacy of brain radiotherapy (RT) combined with temozolomide (TMZ) versus RT alone as first-line treatment for brain metastases (BM). Methods Medline, Embase, and Pubmed were used to search for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Two investigators reviewed the abstracts and independently rated the quality of trials and relevant data. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), and adverse events. Results Seven studies were selected from the literature search. RT plus TMZ produced significant improvement in ORR with odds ratio (OR) of 2.27 (95% CI, 1.29 to 4.00; P = 0.005) compared with RT alone. OS and PFS were not significantly different between the two arms (OS: HR, 1.00; P = 0.959; PFS: HR, 0.73; P = 0.232). However, the RT plus TMZ arm was associated with significantly more grade 3 to 4 nausea and thrombocytopenia. Conclusion Concomitant RT and TMZ, compared to RT alone, significantly increases ORR in patients with BM, but yields increased toxicity and fails to demonstrate a survival advantage. PMID:26930609

  13. What do patients with brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer want from their treatment?

    PubMed

    Dorman, S; Hayes, J; Pease, N

    2009-10-01

    Brain metastases are a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Prognosis is poor and the effectiveness of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is uncertain for patients with moderate performance status. Studies on WBRT effectiveness have thus far used outcome measures, such as survival, performance status and cognitive function. The aim of this study was to study what patients with recently diagnosed brain metastases from NSCLC want from their treatment. We carried out semistructured interviews with nine patients with brain metastases from NSCLC, for whom the benefit of WBRT is uncertain. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used. Themes identified included quality versus quantity of life, factors contributing to quality of life (including family, mobility and normality), 'Go for it!' - the desire to try anything, the desire for a cure or 'magic wand', fear and other factors (including family in decision making, information or lack of information, relationship with professionals, experience of steroids and radiotherapy including adverse effects). Quality of life is important to patients, but many are keen to try any treatment which might prolong their life. Understanding patients' values regarding treatment and goals of treatment can help clinicians discuss these issues with patients and provide appropriate information and can aid selection of appropriate outcome measures. PMID:19443522

  14. Importance of Extracranial Disease Status and Tumor Subtype for Patients Undergoing Radiosurgery for Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Michael A.; Kelly, Paul J.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Pinnell, Nancy E.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Arvold, Nils D.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In this retrospective study, we report on outcomes and prognostic factors for patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for breast cancer brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 132 consecutive patients with breast cancer who were treated with SRS for brain metastases from January 2000 through June 2010. We retrospectively reviewed records of the 51 patients with adequate follow-up data who received SRS as part of the initial management of their brain metastases. Overall survival (OS) and time to central nervous system (CNS) progression from the date of SRS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Triple negative subtype was associated with CNS progression on univariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.0, p = 0.008). On multivariate analysis, triple negative subtype (HR = 8.6, p = 0.001), Luminal B subtype (HR = 4.3, p = 0.03), and omission of whole-brain radiation therapy (HR = 3.7, p = 0.02) were associated with CNS progression. With respect to OS, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) {<=} 80% (HR = 2.0, p = 0.04) and progressive extracranial disease (HR = 3.1, p = 0.002) were significant on univariate analysis; KPS {<=} 80% (HR = 4.1, p = 0.0004), progressive extracranial disease (HR = 6.4, p < 0.0001), and triple negative subtype (HR = 2.9, p = 0.04) were significant on multivariate analysis. Although median survival times were consistent with those predicted by the breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (Breast-GPA) score, the addition of extracranial disease status further separated patient outcomes. Conclusions: Tumor subtype is associated with risk of CNS progression after SRS for breast cancer brain metastases. In addition to tumor subtype and KPS, which are incorporated into the Breast-GPA, progressive extracranial disease may be an important prognostic factor for OS.

  15. Liver metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the liver; Metastatic liver cancer; Liver cancer - metastatic; Colorectal cancer - liver metastases; Colon cancer - liver metastases; Esophageal cancer - liver metastases; Lung cancer - liver metastases; Melanoma - liver metastases

  16. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  17. Whole brain radiotherapy plus simultaneous in-field boost with image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain metastases of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) plus sequential focal radiation boost is a commonly used therapeutic strategy for patients with brain metastases. However, recent reports on WBRT plus simultaneous in-field boost (SIB) also showed promising outcomes. The objective of present study is to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy and toxicities of WBRT plus SIB with image guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for inoperable brain metastases of NSCLC. Methods Twenty-nine NSCLC patients with 87 inoperable brain metastases were included in this retrospective study. All patients received WBRT at a dose of 40 Gy/20 f, and SIB boost with IG-IMRT at a dose of 20 Gy/5 f concurrent with WBRT in the fourth week. Prior to each fraction of IG-IMRT boost, on-line positioning verification and correction were used to ensure that the set-up errors were within 2 mm by cone beam computed tomography in all patients. Results The one-year intracranial control rate, local brain failure rate, and distant brain failure rate were 62.9%, 13.8%, and 19.2%, respectively. The two-year intracranial control rate, local brain failure rate, and distant brain failure rate were 42.5%, 30.9%, and 36.4%, respectively. Both median intracranial progression-free survival and median survival were 10 months. Six-month, one-year, and two-year survival rates were 65.5%, 41.4%, and 13.8%, corresponding to 62.1%, 41.4%, and 10.3% of intracranial progression-free survival rates. Patients with Score Index for Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases (SIR) >5, number of intracranial lesions <3, and history of EGFR-TKI treatment had better survival. Three lesions (3.45%) demonstrated radiation necrosis after radiotherapy. Grades 2 and 3 cognitive impairment with grade 2 radiation leukoencephalopathy were observed in 4 (13.8%) and 4 (13.8%) patients. No dosimetric parameters were found to be associated with these late toxicities. Patients received EGFR-TKI treatment had higher incidence of grades 2–3

  18. Diagnosis of Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Using a Modified Electromagnetism like Mechanism Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Huang; Wang, Kung-Jeng; Adrian, Angelia Melani; Wang, Kung-Min; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are commonly found in patients that are diagnosed with primary malignancy on their lung. Lung cancer patients with brain metastasis tend to have a poor survivability, which is less than 6 months in median. Therefore, an early and effective detection system for such disease is needed to help prolong the patients' survivability and improved their quality of life. A modified electromagnetism-like mechanism (EM) algorithm, MEM-SVM, is proposed by combining EM algorithm with support vector machine (SVM) as the classifier and opposite sign test (OST) as the local search technique. The proposed method is applied to 44 UCI and IDA datasets, and 5 cancers microarray datasets as preliminary experiment. In addition, this method is tested on 4 lung cancer microarray public dataset. Further, we tested our method on a nationwide dataset of brain metastasis from lung cancer (BMLC) in Taiwan. Since the nature of real medical dataset to be highly imbalanced, the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE) is utilized to handle this problem. The proposed method is compared against another 8 popular benchmark classifiers and feature selection methods. The performance evaluation is based on the accuracy and Kappa index. For the 44 UCI and IDA datasets and 5 cancer microarray datasets, a non-parametric statistical test confirmed that MEM-SVM outperformed the other methods. For the 4 lung cancer public microarray datasets, MEM-SVM still achieved the highest mean value for accuracy and Kappa index. Due to the imbalanced property on the real case of BMLC dataset, all methods achieve good accuracy without significance difference among the methods. However, on the balanced BMLC dataset, MEM-SVM appears to be the best method with higher accuracy and Kappa index. We successfully developed MEM-SVM to predict the occurrence of brain metastasis from lung cancer with the combination of SMOTE technique to handle the class imbalance properties. The results confirmed that MEM

  19. Subclassification of Recursive Partitioning Analysis Class II Patients With Brain Metastases Treated Radiosurgically

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Sato, Yasunori; Serizawa, Toru; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nagano, Osamu; Barfod, Bierta E.; Ono, Junichi; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Although the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class is generally used for predicting survival periods of patients with brain metastases (METs), the majority of such patients are Class II and clinical factors vary quite widely within this category. This prompted us to divide RPA Class II patients into three subclasses. Methods and Materials: This was a two-institution, institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using two databases: the Mito series (2,000 consecutive patients, comprising 787 women and 1,213 men; mean age, 65 years [range, 19-96 years]) and the Chiba series (1,753 patients, comprising 673 female and 1,080 male patients; mean age, 65 years [range, 7-94 years]). Both patient series underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery alone, without whole-brain radiotherapy, for brain METs during the same 10-year period, July 1998 through June 2008. The Cox proportional hazard model with a step-wise selection procedure was used for multivariate analysis. Results: In the Mito series, four factors were identified as favoring longer survival: Karnofsky Performance Status (90% to 100% vs. 70% to 80%), tumor numbers (solitary vs. multiple), primary tumor status (controlled vs. not controlled), and non-brain METs (no vs. yes). This new index is the sum of scores (0 and 1) of these four factors: RPA Class II-a, score of 0 or 1; RPA Class II-b, score of 2; and RPA Class II-c, score of 3 or 4. Next, using the Chiba series, we tested whether our index is valid for a different patient group. This new system showed highly statistically significant differences among subclasses in both the Mito series and the Chiba series (p < 0.001 for all subclasses). In addition, this new index was confirmed to be applicable to Class II patients with four major primary tumor sites, that is, lung, breast, alimentary tract, and urogenital organs. Conclusions: Our new grading system should be considered when designing future clinical trials involving brain MET

  20. [A case of effective lapatinib/capecitabine therapy for HER2-positive breast cancer with multiple brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshifumi; Mizuta, Naruhiko; Sakaguchi, Koichi; Nakatsukasa, Katsuhiko; Imai, Aya; Umeda, Yoshimi; Hamaoka, Asako; Morita, Midori; Shouji, Mari; Goto, Mariko; Taguchi, Tetsuya

    2012-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman was suffering from HER2-positive and hormone receptor-negative breast cancer with bone metastasis. She received 16 cycles of paclitaxel(PTX 80mg/m2)plus trastuzumab(TRA 2mg/kg)on a 7-day cycle, and zoledronic acid(ZOL 4mg/body every 28 days), resulting in a near clinical complete response(cCR). Two years later, the patient complained of dizziness and nausea, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple brain metastases. The prior treatments with PTX and TRA were changed to lapatinib(LAP)(orally at 1, 250mg/day every day)and capecitabine(CAP)(orally at 2, 000mg/m2 every day for 2 weeks, followed by a 1-week rest interval as 1 cycle)because of the multiple brain metastases. After 4 cycles of treatment, the number of brain lesions and the tumor sizes were significantly reduced. After 7 cycles, however, magnetic resonance imaging revealed the deterioration of some brain lesions. After whole-brain irradiation(30 Gy in 10 fractions)was added to the treatment, the outcome was near cCR. In conclusion, combination therapy of Lap and Cap may be an effective treatment option for brain metastasis of HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23152022

  1. Prediction of Clinical Outcomes by Chemokine and Cytokine Profiling In CSF from Radiation Treated Breast Cancer Primary with Brain Metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lok, Edwin

    Whole brain radiation is the standard treatment for patients with brain metastasis but unfortunately tumors can recover from radiation-induced damage with the help of the immune system. The hypothesis that differences in immunokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pre- and post-irradiation could reveal tumor biology and correlate with outcome of patients with metastatic breast cancer to the brain is tested. Collected CSF samples were analyzed using Luminex's multiplexing assays to survey global immunokine levels while Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays were used to quantify each individual immunokines. Cluster analysis was performed to segregate patients based on their common immunokine profile and each cluster was correlated with survival and other clinical parameters. Breast cancer brain metastasis was found to have altered immunokine profiles in the CSF, and that Interleukin-1α expression was elevated after irradiation. Therefore, immunokine profiling in the CSF could enable cancer physicians to monitor the status of brain metastases.

  2. Radiotherapy of brain metastases from breast cancer: Treatment results and prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    KÜHNÖL, JULIA; KÜHNÖL, CASPAR; VORDERMARK, DIRK

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases (BM) from breast cancer are associated with high morbidity and a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to analyse the role of radiotherapy in treatment of BM from breast cancer in the context of modern local therapy modalities, current systemic treatment options and prognostic factors. A retrospective analysis of 86 consecutive female patients treated with radiotherapy for BM from breast cancer between 2000 and 2010 was conducted. Patient and treatment characteristics were registered and survival data calculated. All patients received whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with a median dose of 36 Gy, and 19 patients were treated with an additional boost; this included fractionated schemes (median dose, 18 Gy) and radiosurgery (5 and 17 Gy). The median overall survival time from the start of WBRT was 4.1 months in the present cohort. Patients receiving a boost survived 19.7 months in comparison to 3.1 months for patients treated with WBRT alone (P<0.001). Other factors that improved overall survival, based on a univariate analysis, were dose of WBRT and number of BM. There was no statistical evidence for the influence of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status on survival in the current study. The administration of boost treatment following WBRT was also identified as a significant factor influencing survival on multivariate analysis (P=0.030). In conclusion, radiotherapy affects the survival time of patients with BM from breast cancer. In particular, the implementation of boost treatment following WBRT in selected patients seems to extend survival time. PMID:27123095

  3. Activity of T-DM1 in Her2-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Rupert; Berghoff, Anna S; Vogl, Ursula; Rudas, Margaretha; Bergen, Elisabeth; Dubsky, Peter; Dieckmann, Karin; Pinker, Katja; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Galid, Arik; Oehler, Leopold; Zielinski, Christoph C; Gnant, Michael; Steger, Guenther G; Preusser, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in metastatic Her2-positive breast cancer. Local treatment remains the standard of care but lapatinib plus capecitabine was recently established as systemic therapy option. Due to a disruption of the blood-brain/tumour-barrier at metastatic sites, even large molecules may penetrate into the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we report on the activity of T-DM1 in Her2-positive breast cancer BM. T-DM1 was administered at a dose of 3.6 mg once every 3 weeks as primary systemic therapy for BM or upon documented CNS progression after initial local treatment. Thus, this study allowed for the appraisal of T-DM1 activity in BM. Restaging was conducted every 12 weeks with MRI or whenever symptoms of disease progression occurred. Ten patients were included; in two asymptomatic subjects, T-DM1 was administered as primary therapy, while eight had progressive BM. All patients had received prior treatment with trastuzumab, six had already received lapatinib, and three pertuzumab as well. Three patients had partial remission of BM, and two patient had stable disease lasting for ≥6 months; two further patients had stable disease for <6 months while three progressed despite treatment. At 8.5 months median follow-up, intracranial PFS was 5 months, and median OS from initiation of T-DM1 was not reached. Local treatment of BM remains the standard of care; lapatinib plus capecitabine is currently the best established systemic therapy option. Still, T-DM1 apparently offers relevant clinical activity in BM and further investigation is warranted. PMID:26303828

  4. Phase I Trial of Simultaneous In-Field Boost With Helical Tomotherapy for Patients With One to Three Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Yartsev, Slav; Yaremko, Brian; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Hammond, Alex; Lock, Michael; Yu, Edward; Ash, Robert; Caudrelier, Jean-Michelle; Khuntia, Deepak; Bailey, Laura; Bauman, Glenn

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative to surgical resection for selected intracranial lesions. Integrated image-guided intensity-modulated-capable radiotherapy platforms such as helical tomotherapy (HT) could potentially replace traditional radiosurgery apparatus. The present study's objective was to determine the maximally tolerated dose of a simultaneous in-field boost integrated with whole brain radiotherapy for palliative treatment of patients with one to three brain metastases using HT. Methods and Materials: The inclusion/exclusion criteria and endpoints were consistent with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9508 radiosurgery trial. The cohorts were constructed with a 3 + 3 design; however, additional patients were enrolled in the lower dose tolerable cohorts during the toxicity assessment periods. Whole brain radiotherapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) was delivered with a 5-30-Gy (total lesion dose of 35-60 Gy in 10 fractions) simultaneous in-field boost delivered to the brain metastases. The maximally tolerated dose was determined by the frequency of neurologic Grade 3-5 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0, dose-limiting toxicity events within each Phase I cohort. Results: A total of 48 patients received treatment in the 35-Gy (n = 3), 40-Gy (n = 16), 50-Gy (n = 15), 55-Gy (n = 8), and 60-Gy (n = 6) cohorts. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity events in any of the trial cohorts. The 3-month RECIST assessments available for 32 of the 48 patients demonstrated a complete response in 2, a partial response in 16, stable disease in 6, and progressive disease in 8 patients. Conclusion: The delivery of 60 Gy in 10 fractions to one to three brain metastases synchronously with 30 Gy whole brain radiotherapy was achieved without dose-limiting central nervous system toxicity as assessed 3 months after treatment. This approach is being tested in a Phase II efficacy trial.

  5. Targeting Kv1.3 channels to reduce white matter pathology after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Thomas M; Trimmer, Patricia A; Colley, Beverly S; Phillips, Linda L

    2016-09-01

    Axonal injury is present in essentially all clinically significant cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI). While no effective treatment has been identified to date, experimental TBI models have shown promising axonal protection using immunosuppressants FK506 and Cyclosporine-A, with treatment benefits attributed to calcineurin inhibition or protection of mitochondrial function. However, growing evidence suggests neuroprotective efficacy of these compounds may also involve direct modulation of ion channels, and in particular Kv1.3. The present study tested whether blockade of Kv1.3 channels, using Clofazimine (CFZ), would alleviate TBI-induced white matter pathology in rodents. Postinjury CFZ administration prevented suppression of compound action potential (CAP) amplitude in the corpus callosum of adult rats following midline fluid percussion TBI, with injury and treatment effects primarily expressed in unmyelinated CAPs. Kv1.3 protein levels in callosal tissue extracts were significantly reduced postinjury, but this loss was prevented by CFZ treatment. In parallel, CFZ also attenuated the injury-induced elevation in pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1-β. The effects of CFZ on glial function were further studied using mixed microglia/astrocyte cell cultures derived from P3-5 mouse corpus callosum. Cultures of callosal glia challenged with lipopolysaccharide exhibited a dramatic increase in IL1-β levels, accompanied by reactive morphological changes in microglia, both of which were attenuated by CFZ treatment. These results support a cell specific role for Kv1.3 signaling in white matter pathology after TBI, and suggest a treatment approach based on the blockade of these channels. This therapeutic strategy may be especially efficacious for normalizing neuro-glial interactions affecting unmyelinated axons after TBI. PMID:27302680

  6. Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in Women With 1 to 3 Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Treated With Definitive Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T. Jonathan; Oh, Jung Hun; Folkert, Michael R.; Gupta, Gaorav; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Morikawa, Aki; Seidman, Andrew; Brennan, Cameron; Yamada, Yoshiya; Chan, Timothy A.; Beal, Kathryn

    2014-11-01

    Background: With the continuing increase in the use of definitive stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with limited brain metastases (BM), clinicians need more specific prognostic tools. We investigated clinical predictors of outcomes in patients with limited breast cancer BM treated with SRS alone. Methods and Materials: We identified 136 patients with breast cancer and 1-3 BM who underwent definitive SRS for 186 BM between 2000 and 2012. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to assess overall survival (OS), regional failure (RF), and local failure (LF). Associations between clinical factors and outcomes were tested using Cox regression. A point scoring system was used to stratify patients based on OS, and the predictive power was tested with concordance probability estimate (CPE). Results: The median OS was 17.6 months. The 12-month RF and LF rates were 45% and 10%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, >1 lesion (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.6, P=.02), triple-negative (TN) disease (HR=2.0, P=.006), and active extracranial disease (ED) (HR=2.7, P<.0001) were significantly associated with worse OS. The point score system was defined using proportional simplification of the multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression function. The median OS for patients with 3.0-4.0 points (n=37), 4.5-5.5 points (n=28), 6.0-6.5 points (n=37), and 8-8.5 points (n=34) were 9.2, 15.6, 25.1, and 45.1 months, respectively (P<.0001, CPE = 0.72). Active ED (HR=2.4, P=.0007) was significantly associated with RF. Higher risk for LF was significantly associated with larger BM size (HR=3.1, P=.0001). Conclusion: Patients with >1 BM, active ED, and TN had the highest risk of death after SRS. Active ED is an important prognostic factor for OS and intracranial control.

  7. Whole-brain radiotherapy with or without efaproxiral for the treatment of brain metastases: Determinants of response and its prognostic value for subsequent survival

    SciTech Connect

    Stea, Baldassarre . E-mail: bstea@azcc.arizona.edu; Suh, John H.; Boyd, Adam P. M.S.; Cagnoni, Pablo J.; Shaw, Edward

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the prognostic factors for radiographic response and its prognostic value for subsequent survival in patients undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Five hundred fifteen eligible patients were randomized in a phase III trial evaluating WBRT and supplemental oxygen with or without efaproxiral, an allosteric modifier of hemoglobin that reduces hemoglobin oxygen-binding affinity and enhances tumor oxygenation, potentially increasing tumor radiosensitivity. Brain images were obtained at baseline and at scheduled follow-up visits after WBRT. Landmark analysis was used to assess the ability of response at selected time points to predict subsequent survival. Logistic regression was used to assess determinants of response at 3 months. Results: Treatment arm, Karnofsky Performance Status, presence or absence of liver metastases, and primary site were all determinants of response at the 3-month follow-up visit, with patients in the efaproxiral arm experiencing a 67% greater odds of response at this visit (p = 0.02). Response at 3 and 6 months was a significant prognostic factor for longer subsequent survival. Conclusions: The 3-month scan is a valuable prognostic factor for subsequent survival in patients with brain metastases treated with WBRT. Patients in the efaproxiral arm had a higher response rate at 3 and 6 months than those in the control arm.

  8. [A clinical case of combined treatment of a patient with breast cancer and metastases to the brain and meninges].

    PubMed

    Moskvina, E A; Naskhletashvili, D R; Bekyashev, A Kh; Medvedev, S V; Belov, D M; Gasparyan, T G

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a clinical case of successful chemotherapeutic and radiation treatment of a patient with breast cancer and metastases to the brain and meninges and with a pronounced neurological deficit. The patient underwent combined treatment (whole brain radiation with TBD of 30 Gy and local radiation of a metastasis with TBD of 15 Gy associated with capecitabine therapy) with continued administration of capecitabine until improvement. A partial metastasis reduction by 50% and complete regression of the neurological deficit were observed. Disease-free period was 1 year and 10 months, and the overall survival amounted to 2 years. PMID:27029334

  9. Early Significant Tumor Volume Reduction After Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Results in Long-Term Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wook Ha; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Paek, Sun Ha; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate survival of patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Between 1998 and 2010, 46 patients were treated with radiosurgery, and the total number of lesions was 99. The mean age was 58.9 years (range, 33-78 years). Twenty-six patients (56.5%) had a single brain metastasis. The mean tumor volume was 3.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.01-35.1 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 20.8 Gy (range, 12-25 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. A patient was classified into the good-response group when the sum of the volume of the brain metastases decreased to less than 75% of the original volume at a 1-month follow-up evaluation using MRI. Results: As of December 28, 2010, 39 patients (84.8%) had died, and 7 (15.2%) survived. The overall median survival time was 10.0 {+-} 0.4 months (95% confidence interval, 9.1-10.8). After treatment, local tumor control was achieved in 72 (84.7%) of the 85 tumors assessed using MRI after radiosurgery. The good-response group survived significantly longer than the poor-response group (median survival times of 18.0 and 9.0 months, respectively; p = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, classification in the good-response group was the only independent prognostic factor for longer survival (p = 0.037; hazard ratio = 0.447; 95% confidence interval, 0.209-0.953). Conclusions: Radiosurgery seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with brain metastases from RCC. The early significant tumor volume reduction observed after radiosurgery seems to result in long-term survival in RCC patients with brain metastases.

  10. Stereotactic Radiosurgery of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases: Prospective Evaluation of Target Margin on Tumor Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Adler, John R.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Given the neurocognitive toxicity associated with whole-brain irradiation (WBRT), approaches to defer or avoid WBRT after surgical resection of brain metastases are desirable. Our initial experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the resection cavity showed promising results. We examined the outcomes of postoperative resection cavity SRS to determine the effect of adding a 2-mm margin around the resection cavity on local failure (LF) and toxicity. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 120 cavities in 112 patients treated from 1998-2009. Factors associated with LF and distant brain failure (DF) were analyzed using competing risks analysis, with death as a competing risk. The overall survival (OS) rate was calculated by the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method; variables associated with OS were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards and log rank tests. Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF and DF, with death as a competing risk, were 9.5% and 54%, respectively. On univariate analysis, expansion of the cavity with a 2-mm margin was associated with decreased LF; the 12-month cumulative incidence rates of LF with and without margin were 3% and 16%, respectively (P=.042). The 12-month toxicity rates with and without margin were 3% and 8%, respectively (P=.27). On multivariate analysis, melanoma histology (P=.038) and number of brain metastases (P=.0097) were associated with higher DF. The median OS time was 17 months (range, 2-114 months), with a 12-month OS rate of 62%. Overall, WBRT was avoided in 72% of the patients. Conclusion: Adjuvant SRS targeting the resection cavity of brain metastases results in excellent local control and allows WBRT to be avoided in a majority of patients. A 2-mm margin around the resection cavity improved local control without increasing toxicity compared with our prior technique with no margin.

  11. Clinical application of RapidArc volumetric modulated arc therapy as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, four or more multiple brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Heon; Choi, Jinho; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Seok Ho; Sung, Ki Hoon; Kim, Yunmi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine feasibility of RapidArc in sequential or simultaneous integrated tumor boost in whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for poor prognostic patients with four or more brain metastases. Materials and Methods Nine patients with multiple (≥4) brain metastases were analyzed. Three patients were classified as class II in recursive partitioning analysis and 6 were class III. The class III patients presented with hemiparesis, cognitive deficit, or apraxia. The ratio of tumor to whole brain volume was 0.8-7.9%. Six patients received 2-dimensional bilateral WBRT, (30 Gy/10-12 fractions), followed by sequential RapidArc tumor boost (15-30 Gy/4-10 fractions). Three patients received RapidArc WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost to tumors (48-50 Gy) in 10-20 fractions. Results The median biologically effective dose to metastatic tumors was 68.1 Gy10 and 67.2 Gy10 and the median brain volume irradiated more than 100 Gy3 were 1.9% (24 cm3) and 0.8% (13 cm3) for each group. With less than 3 minutes of treatment time, RapidArc was easily applied to the patients with poor performance status. The follow-up period was 0.3-16.5 months. Tumor responses among the 6 patients who underwent follow-up magnetic resonance imaging were partial and stable in 3 and 3, respectively. Overall survival at 6 and 12 months were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. The local progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months were 100% and 62.5%, respectively. Conclusion RapidArc as a component in whole brain radiation therapy for poor prognostic, multiple brain metastases is an effective and safe modality with easy application. PMID:22984683

  12. Predictors of Survival in Contemporary Practice After Initial Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Likhacheva, Anna; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Parikh, Neil R.; Allen, Pamela K.; McAleer, Mary F.; Chiu, Max S.; Sulman, Erik P.; Mahajan, Anita; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Prabhu, Sujit S.; Cahill, Daniel P.; Luo, Dershan; Shiu, Almon S.; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The number of brain metastases (BM) is a major consideration in determining patient eligibility for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), but the evidence for this popular practice is equivocal. The purpose of this study was to determine whether, following multivariate adjustment, the number and volume of BM held prognostic significance in a cohort of patients initially treated with SRS alone. Methods and Materials: A total of 251 patients with primary malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (34%), melanoma (30%), and breast carcinoma (16%), underwent SRS for initial treatment of BM. SRS was used as the sole management (62% of patients) or was combined with salvage treatment with SRS (22%), whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT; 13%), or resection (3%). Median follow-up time was 9.4 months. Survival was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox regression was used to assess the effects of patient factors on distant brain failure (DBF), local control (LC), and overall survival (OS). Results: LC at 1 year was 94.6%, and median time to DBF was 10 months. Median OS was 11.1 months. On multivariate analysis, statistically significant predictors of OS were presence of extracranial disease (hazard ratio [HR], 4.2, P<.001), total tumor volume greater than 2 cm{sup 3} (HR, 1.98; P<.001), age ≥60 years (HR, 1.67; P=.002), and diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (HR, 0.71; P<.001). The presence of extracranial disease was a statistically significant predictor of DBF (HR, 2.15), and tumor volume was predictive of LC (HR, 4.56 for total volume >2 cm{sup 3}). The number of BM was not predictive of DBF, LC, or OS. Conclusions: The number of BM is not a strong predictor for clinical outcomes following initial SRS for newly diagnosed BM. Other factors including total treatment volume and systemic disease status are better determinants of outcome and may facilitate appropriate use of SRS or WBRT.

  13. A Rare Cause of Bowel Obstruction: Peritoneal Metastases in Osteosarcoma at the Tibia in a Young Female Patient with Brain Metastasis. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Badiu, Dumitru Cristinel; Manea, Cristina Alexandra; Porojan, Vlad; Paraschiv, Marius; Mehedintu, Claudia; Coman, Ionut Simion; Grigorean, Valentin Titus

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are the most frequent primary malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. Like brain metastases in osteosarcomas, the bowel metastases are very rare. We present the case of a 23-year-old female patient, diagnosed and operated in 2008 of osteosarcoma at the tibia, for which she had sessions of neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy, but presented lungs metastases for which she underwent surgery in 2014. Then, in March 2015, she was diagnosed with an intracranial expansive process, an osteosarcoma metastasis, for which a total ablation of the tumor was performed during the early postoperatory period, being transferred to the General Surgery Clinic for abdominal pain, abdominal distention, vomiting, and lack of intestinal transit regarding faeces and intestinal gas. Both clinically and imagistically, the diagnosis was of bowel obstruction. This was the reason for performing surgery, thus discovering a bowel obstruction secondary to a metastasis of the terminal ileum and liver metastases that were confirmed as osteosarcoma metastases from an anatomopathological and immunohistochemical point of view. The bowel metastases and the osteosarcoma brain metastases are very rare entities and, their association, most often with young patients, is exceptional. However, bowel metastases must be taken into account as a possible cause of bowel obstruction in patients with osteosarcoma. PMID:27452942

  14. Malignant potential of cells isolated from lymph node or brain metastases of melanoma patients and implications for prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R D; Price, J E; Schackert, G; Itoh, K; Fidler, I J

    1991-04-15

    We studied the correlation between the formation of brain metastasis and the malignant growth potential of seven human melanoma cell lines, isolated from lymph node metastases (A375-SM, TXM-1, DM-4) or from brain metastases (TXM-13, TXM-18, TXM-34, TXM-40), and the potential of three variants of the mouse K-1735 melanoma. Growth rates in different concentrations of fetal bovine serum and colony-forming efficiency in semisolid agarose were measured, and the tumorigenicity and metastatic ability were determined in nude mice (for the human melanoma cell lines) or in C3H/HeN mice (for the K-1735 variants). The ability to form brain metastasis was tested by injection of cells into the carotid artery. A high colony-forming efficiency in agarose, especially at concentrations of agarose greater than 0.6%, corresponded with high tumor take rates, rapid tumor growth rates, and metastatic colonization of the lungs of the recipient mice. For the human melanomas, the lymph node metastasis-derived cells were more tumorigenic and metastatic than the brain metastasis-derived cells. In the K-1735 mouse melanoma, the tumorigenic and metastatic behavior of the cells after i.v. and s.c. injection corresponded with growth in agarose cultures. However, for growth in the brain after intracarotid injection, the different melanoma cell lines showed similar frequencies of tumor take, regardless of tumorigenicity in other sites of the recipient mice, although mice given injections of brain metastasis-derived cells survived longer than mice given injections of lymph node metastasis (human melanoma) or lung metastasis (K-1735 M-2)-derived cell lines. The results from the human and mouse melanoma cell lines show that the brain metastasis-derived cell lines were not more malignant than the lymph node or lung metastasis-derived cells. These data imply that the production of brain metastasis is not always the final stage of a metastatic cascade. PMID:1826230

  15. [The case of a long-surviving patient with breast cancer and brain metastases treated using multidisciplinary therapy].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akimasa; Nishi, Takashi; Morohashi, Satoko; Okano, Kensuke; Hakamada, Kenichi

    2014-11-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old-woman who was diagnosed with left breast cancer, and underwent a left mastectomy and left axillary lymph node resection. The histopathological examination indicated scirrhous carcinoma and lesser papillotubular carcinoma[estrogen receptor-negative (ER-), progesterone receptor-negative(PgR-), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive, grade 3 (HER2, 3+)] with lymph node metastases. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (EC) followed by paclitaxel was administered. During the therapy, the patient noticed a mass on her left chest wall. It was diagnosed as a locally recurrent tumor. A computed tomography (CT) scan indicated supraclavicular lymph node metastasis. The patient underwent radiotherapy and was administered chemotherapy with TS-1 and trastuzumab. Brain metastases were found 24 months postoperatively, and the patient underwent surgery and wholebrain radiotherapy. After these, systemic capecitabine and trastuzumab chemotherapy was administered. The therapy was subsequently changed to capecitabine and lapatinib. There have been no subsequent metastatic tumors, and good control has been achieved for a long time after the detection of brain metastases. PMID:25731368

  16. Incidence of Brain Atrophy and Decline in Mini-Mental State Examination Score After Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Brain Metastases: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shibamoto, Yuta Baba, Fumiya; Oda, Kyota; Hayashi, Shinya; Kokubo, Masaki; Ishihara, Shun-Ichi; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of brain atrophy and dementia after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases not undergoing surgery. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients underwent WBRT to 40 Gy in 20 fractions with or without a 10-Gy boost. Brain magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were performed before and soon after radiotherapy, every 3 months for 18 months, and every 6 months thereafter. Brain atrophy was evaluated by change in cerebrospinal fluid-cranial ratio (CCR), and the atrophy index was defined as postradiation CCR divided by preradiation CCR. Results: Of 101 patients (median age, 62 years) entering the study, 92 completed WBRT, and 45, 25, and 10 patients were assessable at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Mean atrophy index was 1.24 {+-} 0.39 (SD) at 6 months and 1.32 {+-} 0.40 at 12 months, and 18% and 28% of the patients had an increase in the atrophy index by 30% or greater, respectively. No apparent decrease in mean MMSE score was observed after WBRT. Individually, MMSE scores decreased by four or more points in 11% at 6 months, 12% at 12 months, and 0% at 18 months. However, about half the decrease in MMSE scores was associated with a decrease in performance status caused by systemic disease progression. Conclusions: Brain atrophy developed in up to 30% of patients, but it was not necessarily accompanied by MMSE score decrease. Dementia after WBRT unaccompanied by tumor recurrence was infrequent.

  17. Prognostic Value of MR Imaging Texture Analysis in Brain Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Oligo-Metastases Undergoing Stereotactic Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tini, Paolo; Biondi, Michelangelo; Sebaste, Lucio; Vanzi, Eleonora; De Otto, Gianmarco; Rubino, Giovanni; Carfagno, Tommaso; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Cerase, Alfonso; Mazzoni, Lorenzo Nicola; Banci Buonamici, Fabrizio; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background  Stereotactic irradiation is widely used in brain oligo-metastases treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) of brain metastases (BM) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods  This study included thirty-eight consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic irradiation, that is, stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) or radiosurgery (SRS), from January 2011 to December 2014 for 1-2 brain BM from NSCLC. Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was not delivered. The diagnostic MRI DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images were collected and analyzed with a homemade ImageJ macro, and typical TA parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and uniformity) were evaluated for: brain progression-free survival; modality of brain metastatic progression (local progression or/and new metastases); and overall survival, after SRT/SRS. Results After SRT/SRS 14 patients (36.8%) experienced recurrence in the brain, with a recurrence in the irradiated site (five patients, 13.2%), new metastases (11 patients, 28.9%), local recurrence and new metastases (two patients, 5.25%). Nineteen patients (50%) died of tumor progression or other causes. Entropy and uniformity were significantly associated with local progression, whereas kurtosis was significantly associated with both local progression and new brain metastases. Conclusions  These results appear promising, since the knowledge of factors correlated with the modality of brain progression after stereotactic irradiation of brain oligo-metastatic foci of NSCLC might help in driving the best treatment in these patients (association of SRT/SRS with WBRT? Increase of SRT/SRS dose?). Our preliminary data needs confirmation in large patient series. PMID:27226944

  18. Ultrasound Imaging-guided Intracardiac Injection to Develop a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Followed by Longitudinal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heling; Zhao, Dawen

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis, occurring in 30% of breast cancer patients at stage IV, is associated with high mortality. The median survival is only 6 months. It is critical to have suitable animal models to mimic the hemodynamic spread of the metastatic cells in the clinical scenario. Here, we are introducing the use of small animal ultrasound imaging to guide an accurate injection of brain tropical breast cancer cells into the left ventricle of athymic nude mice. Longitudinal MRI is used to assessing intracranial initiation and growth of brain metastases. Ultrasound-guided intracardiac injection ensures not only an accurate injection and hereby a higher successful rate but also significantly decreased mortality rate, as compared to our previous manual procedure. In vivo high resolution MRI allows the visualization of hyperintense multifocal lesions, as small as 310 µm in diameter on T2-weighted images at 3 weeks post injection. Follow-up MRI reveals intracranial tumor growth and increased number of metastases that distribute throughout the whole brain. PMID:24637963

  19. Clinical and molecular characteristics of HNSCC patients with brain metastases: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Olcay Cem; Lindel, Katja; Hauswald, Henrik; Brandt, Regine; Klauschen, Frederick; Wolf, Janina; Wolf, Thomas; Plinkert, Peter K; Simon, Christian; Weichert, Wilko; Stenzinger, Albrecht

    2014-06-01

    Among the metastasis patterns of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), intracranial spread is a rare but dreaded event. To date only very few cases have been reported and clinical and molecular data are sparse. We screened our archives for HNSCC patients from 1992 to 2005 who were diagnosed with brain metastases (BM). For retrospective analysis, all clinico-pathological data including disease-free survival (DFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and overall survival (OS) were compiled. Additionally, we assessed the mutational status of the TP53 gene and the prevalence of HPV serotypes by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect p16INK4A expression levels as surrogate marker for HPV infection. The prevalence rate of BM in our cohort comprising 193 patients with advanced HNSCC was 5.7%. Of 11 patients with BM, 3 were female and 9 were male. Seven of the primary tumors were of oropharyngeal origin (OPSCC). LPFS of the cohort was 11.8 months, DFS was 12.1 months and OS was 36.0 months. After the diagnosis of BM, survival was 10.5 months. Five tumors showed a mutation in the TP53 gene, while five of the seven OPSCC tumors had a positive HPV status displaying infection with serotype 16 in all cases. Compared with patients who harbored TP53wt/HPV-positive tumors, patients with TP53 mutations showed a poor prognosis. Compared with the whole cohort, the interval between diagnosis of the primary and the detection of BM was prolonged in the HPV-infected OPSCC subgroup (26.4 vs. 45.6 months). The prognosis of HNSCC patients with BM is poor. In our cohort, most tumors were OPSCC with the majority being HPV positive. Our study points toward a putatively unusual metastatic behavior of HPV-positive OPSCC. PMID:23990032

  20. Relationship Between HER2 Status and Prognosis in Women With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyuan; Marko, Nicholas F.; Chao, Sam T.; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Weil, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze factors affecting outcomes in breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BM) and characterize the role of HER2 status. Methods and Materials: We identified 264 breast cancer patients treated between 1999 and 2008 for BM. HER2 status was known definitively for 172 patients and was used to define cohorts in which survival and risk factors were analyzed. Results: Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated improved mean overall survival (105.7 vs. 74.3 months, p < 0.02), survival after diagnosis of BM (neurologic survival, NS) (32.2 vs. 18.9 months, p < 0.01), and survival after treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) (31.3 vs. 14.1, p < 0.01) in HER2+ patients relative to those with HER2- breast cancer. HER2+ status was an independent, positive prognostic factor for survival on univariate and multivariate hazard analysis (hazard ratio: overall survival = 0.66, 0.18; NS = 0.50, 0.34). Additionally, subgroup analysis suggests that stereotactic radiosurgery may be of particular benefit in patients with HER2+ tumors. Conclusions: Overall survival, NS, and RS are improved in patients with HER2+ tumors, relative to those with HER2- lesions, and HER2 amplification is independently associated with increased survival in patients with BM from breast cancer. Our findings suggest that the prognosis of HER2+ patients may be better than that of otherwise similar patients who are HER2- and that stereotactic radiosurgery may be beneficial for some patients with HER2+ lesions.

  1. Gamma Knife radiosurgery combined with stereotactic aspiration as an effective treatment method for large cystic brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HONGWEI; QI, SONGTAO; DOU, CHANGWU; JU, HAITAO; HE, ZHANBIAO; MA, QINGHAI

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the efficacy and clinical outcomes of stereotactic aspiration combined with the Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) method were evaluated retrospectively for patients with large cystic brain metastases. This combined method aims to decrease the tumor weight (volume) and increase the possible radiation dose. The present study involved 48 patients who were diagnosed with cystic metastatic brain tumors between January 2008 and December 2012 in the Department of Neurosurgery of Nanfang Hospital Southern Medical University (Guangzhou, China). Every patient underwent Leksell stereotactic frame, 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic cyst aspiration and Leksell GKRS. Subsequent to the therapy, MRI was performed every 3 months. The results indicated that 48 cases were followed up for 24–72 months, with a mean follow-up duration of 36.2 months. Following treatment, 44 patients (91.7%) exhibited tumor control and 4 patients (8.3%) experienced progression of the local tumor. During this period, 35 patients (72.9%) succumbed, but only 2 (4.2%) of these succumbed to the brain metastases. The total local control rate was 91.7% and the median overall survival time of all patients was 19.5 months. The 1-year overall survival rate was 70.8% and the 2-year overall survival rate was 26.2%. In conclusion, these results indicated that the method of stereotactic cyst aspiration combined with GKRS was safe and effective for patients with large cystic brain metastases. This method is effective for patients whose condition is too weak for general anesthesia and in whom the tumors are positioned at eloquent areas. This method enables patients to avoid a craniotomy, and provides a good tumor control rate, survival time and quality of life. PMID:27347148

  2. Distribution and prognostic relevance of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoints in human brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Harter, Patrick N.; Bernatz, Simon; Scholz, Alexander; Zeiner, Pia S.; Zinke, Jenny; Kiyose, Makoto; Blasel, Stella; Beschorner, Rudi; Senft, Christian; Bender, Benjamin; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W.; Wikman, Harriet; Glatzel, Markus; Meinhardt, Matthias; Juratli, Tareq A.; Steinbach, Joachim P.; Plate, Karl H.; Wischhusen, Jörg; Weide, Benjamin; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The activation of immune cells by targeting checkpoint inhibitors showed promising results with increased patient survival in distinct primary cancers. Since only limited data exist for human brain metastases, we aimed at characterizing tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and expression of immune checkpoints in the respective tumors. Two brain metastases cohorts, a mixed entity cohort (n = 252) and a breast carcinoma validation cohort (n = 96) were analyzed for CD3+, CD8+, FOXP3+, PD-1+ lymphocytes and PD-L1+ tumor cells by immunohistochemistry. Analyses for association with clinico-epidemiological and neuroradiological parameters such as patient survival or tumor size were performed. TILs infiltrated brain metastases in three different patterns (stromal, peritumoral, diffuse). While carcinomas often show a strong stromal infiltration, TILs in melanomas often diffusely infiltrate the tumors. Highest levels of CD3+ and CD8+ lymphocytes were seen in renal cell carcinomas (RCC) and strongest PD-1 levels on RCCs and melanomas. High amounts of TILs, high ratios of PD-1+/CD8+ cells and high levels of PD-L1 were negatively correlated with brain metastases size, indicating that in smaller brain metastases CD8+ immune response might get blocked. PD-L1 expression strongly correlated with TILs and FOXP3 expression. No significant association of patient survival with TILs was observed, while high levels of PD-L1 showed a strong trend towards better survival in melanoma brain metastases (Log-Rank p = 0.0537). In summary, melanomas and RCCs seem to be the most immunogenic entities. Differences in immunotherapeutic response between tumor entities regarding brain metastases might be attributable to this finding and need further investigation in larger patient cohorts. PMID:26517811

  3. Integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of human brain metastases identifies alterations of potential clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Saunus, Jodi M; Quinn, Michael C J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Pearson, John V; Bailey, Peter J; Nones, Katia; McCart Reed, Amy E; Miller, David; Wilson, Peter J; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Mariasegaram, Mythily; Lau, Queenie; Withers, Teresa; Jeffree, Rosalind L; Reid, Lynne E; Da Silva, Leonard; Matsika, Admire; Niland, Colleen M; Cummings, Margaret C; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Anderson, Matthew J; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Taylor, Darrin; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Kassahn, Karin S; Narayanan, Vairavan; Taib, Nur Aishah; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Chow, Yock Ping; kConFab; Jat, Parmjit S; Brandner, Sebastian; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Khanna, Kum Kum; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Grimmond, Sean M; Simpson, Peter T; Waddell, Nicola; Lakhani, Sunil R

    2015-11-01

    Treatment options for patients with brain metastases (BMs) have limited efficacy and the mortality rate is virtually 100%. Targeted therapy is critically under-utilized, and our understanding of mechanisms underpinning metastatic outgrowth in the brain is limited. To address these deficiencies, we investigated the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of 36 BMs from breast, lung, melanoma and oesophageal cancers, using DNA copy-number analysis and exome- and RNA-sequencing. The key findings were as follows. (a) Identification of novel candidates with possible roles in BM development, including the significantly mutated genes DSC2, ST7, PIK3R1 and SMC5, and the DNA repair, ERBB-HER signalling, axon guidance and protein kinase-A signalling pathways. (b) Mutational signature analysis was applied to successfully identify the primary cancer type for two BMs with unknown origins. (c) Actionable genomic alterations were identified in 31/36 BMs (86%); in one case we retrospectively identified ERBB2 amplification representing apparent HER2 status conversion, then confirmed progressive enrichment for HER2-positivity across four consecutive metastatic deposits by IHC and SISH, resulting in the deployment of HER2-targeted therapy for the patient. (d) In the ERBB/HER pathway, ERBB2 expression correlated with ERBB3 (r(2)  = 0.496; p < 0.0001) and HER3 and HER4 were frequently activated in an independent cohort of 167 archival BM from seven primary cancer types: 57.6% and 52.6% of cases were phospho-HER3(Y1222) or phospho-HER4(Y1162) membrane-positive, respectively. The HER3 ligands NRG1/2 were barely detectable by RNAseq, with NRG1 (8p12) genomic loss in 63.6% breast cancer-BMs, suggesting a microenvironmental source of ligand. In summary, this is the first study to characterize the genomic landscapes of BM. The data revealed novel candidates, potential clinical applications for genomic profiling of resectable BMs, and highlighted the possibility of therapeutically targeting

  4. Differential interaction of ADP-ribosylation factors 1, 3, and 5 with rat brain Golgi membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Haun, R S; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1992-01-01

    Six mammalian ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) identified by cDNA cloning were expressed as recombinant proteins (rARFs) that stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Microsequencing of soluble ARFs I and II (sARFs I and II), purified from bovine brain, established that they are ARFs 1 and 3, respectively. Rabbit antibodies (IgG) against sARF II reacted similarly with ARFs 1, 2, and 3 (class I) on Western blots. ARFs 1 and 3 were distinguished by their electrophoretic mobilities. Antiserum against rARF 5 cross-reacted partially with rARF 4 but not detectably with rARF 6 and minimally with class I ARFs. Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP[gamma S]) increased recovery of ARF activity and immunoreactivity in organelle fractions separated by density gradient centrifugation, after incubation of rat brain homogenate with ATP and a regenerating system. ARF 1 accumulated in microsomes plus Golgi and Golgi fractions, whereas ARF 5 seemed to localize more specifically in Golgi; the smaller increment in ARF 3 was distributed more evenly among fractions. On incubation of Golgi with a crude ARF fraction, GTP[gamma S], and an ATP-regenerating system, association of ARF activity with Golgi increased with increasing ATP concentration paralleled by increases in immunoreactive ARFs 1 and 5 and, to a lesser degree, ARF 3. Golgi incubated with GTP[gamma S] and purified ARF 1 or 3 bound more ARF 1 than ARF 3. Based on immunoreactivity and assay of ARF activity, individual ARFs 1, 3, and 5 appeared to behave independently and selectively in their GTP-dependent association with Golgi in vitro. Images PMID:1409634

  5. Differential interaction of ADP-ribosylation factors 1, 3, and 5 with rat brain Golgi membranes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Haun, R S; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1992-10-01

    Six mammalian ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) identified by cDNA cloning were expressed as recombinant proteins (rARFs) that stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Microsequencing of soluble ARFs I and II (sARFs I and II), purified from bovine brain, established that they are ARFs 1 and 3, respectively. Rabbit antibodies (IgG) against sARF II reacted similarly with ARFs 1, 2, and 3 (class I) on Western blots. ARFs 1 and 3 were distinguished by their electrophoretic mobilities. Antiserum against rARF 5 cross-reacted partially with rARF 4 but not detectably with rARF 6 and minimally with class I ARFs. Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP[gamma S]) increased recovery of ARF activity and immunoreactivity in organelle fractions separated by density gradient centrifugation, after incubation of rat brain homogenate with ATP and a regenerating system. ARF 1 accumulated in microsomes plus Golgi and Golgi fractions, whereas ARF 5 seemed to localize more specifically in Golgi; the smaller increment in ARF 3 was distributed more evenly among fractions. On incubation of Golgi with a crude ARF fraction, GTP[gamma S], and an ATP-regenerating system, association of ARF activity with Golgi increased with increasing ATP concentration paralleled by increases in immunoreactive ARFs 1 and 5 and, to a lesser degree, ARF 3. Golgi incubated with GTP[gamma S] and purified ARF 1 or 3 bound more ARF 1 than ARF 3. Based on immunoreactivity and assay of ARF activity, individual ARFs 1, 3, and 5 appeared to behave independently and selectively in their GTP-dependent association with Golgi in vitro. PMID:1409634

  6. Predictors of Individual Tumor Local Control After Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Garsa, Adam A.; Badiyan, Shahed N.; DeWees, Todd; Simpson, Joseph R.; Huang, Jiayi; Drzymala, Robert E.; Barani, Igor J.; Dowling, Joshua L.; Rich, Keith M.; Chicoine, Michael R.; Kim, Albert H.; Leuthardt, Eric C.; Robinson, Clifford G.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control rates and predictors of individual tumor local control for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Between June 1998 and May 2011, 401 brain metastases in 228 patients were treated with Gamma Knife single-fraction SRS. Local failure was defined as an increase in lesion size after SRS. Local control was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards model was used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to identify an optimal cutpoint for conformality index relative to local control. A P value <.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Median age was 60 years (range, 27-84 years). There were 66 cerebellar metastases (16%) and 335 supratentorial metastases (84%). The median prescription dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-24 Gy). Median overall survival from time of SRS was 12.1 months. The estimated local control at 12 months was 74%. On multivariate analysis, cerebellar location (hazard ratio [HR] 1.94, P=.009), larger tumor volume (HR 1.09, P<.001), and lower conformality (HR 0.700, P=.044) were significant independent predictors of local failure. Conformality index cutpoints of 1.4-1.9 were predictive of local control, whereas a cutpoint of 1.75 was the most predictive (P=.001). The adjusted Kaplan-Meier 1-year local control for conformality index ≥1.75 was 84% versus 69% for conformality index <1.75, controlling for tumor volume and location. The 1-year adjusted local control for cerebellar lesions was 60%, compared with 77% for supratentorial lesions, controlling for tumor volume and conformality index. Conclusions: Cerebellar tumor location, lower conformality index, and larger tumor volume were significant independent predictors of local failure after SRS for brain metastases from NSCLC. These results warrant further investigation in a prospective

  7. Phase 3 Trials of Stereotactic Radiosurgery With or Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for 1 to 4 Brain Metastases: Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Kocher, Martin; Neupane, Binod; Collette, Sandra; Tago, Masao; Shaw, Prakesh; Beyene, Joseph; Chang, Eric L.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with or without whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for patients presenting with 1 to 4 brain metastases. Method and Materials: Three trials were identified through a literature search, and IPD were obtained. Outcomes of interest were survival, local failure, and distant brain failure. The treatment effect was estimated after adjustments for age, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) score, number of brain metastases, and treatment arm. Results: A total of 364 of the pooled 389 patients met eligibility criteria, of whom 51% were treated with SRS alone and 49% were treated with SRS plus WBRT. For survival, age was a significant effect modifier (P=.04) favoring SRS alone in patients ≤50 years of age, and no significant differences were observed in older patients. Hazard ratios (HRs) for patients 35, 40, 45, and 50 years of age were 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.24-0.90), 0.52 (95% CI = 0.29-0.92), 0.58 (95% CI = 0.35-0.95), and 0.64 (95% CI = 0.42-0.99), respectively. Patients with a single metastasis had significantly better survival than those who had 2 to 4 metastases. For distant brain failure, age was a significant effect modifier (P=.043), with similar rates in the 2 arms for patients ≤50 of age; otherwise, the risk was reduced with WBRT for patients >50 years of age. Patients with a single metastasis also had a significantly lower risk of distant brain failure than patients who had 2 to 4 metastases. Local control significantly favored additional WBRT in all age groups. Conclusions: For patients ≤50 years of age, SRS alone favored survival, in addition, the initial omission of WBRT did not impact distant brain relapse rates. SRS alone may be the preferred treatment for this age group.

  8. [A Case of Brain Metastasis from Rectal Cancer with Synchronous Liver and Lung Metastases after Multimodality Treatment--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Masaru; Tominaga, Ben; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Yuuya; Watanabe, Shuuichi; Adikrisna, Rama; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of brain metastasis from rectal cancer a long time after the initial resection. A 62-year-old woman, diagnosed with lower rectal cancer with multiple synchronous liver and lung metastases, underwent abdominoperineal resection after preoperative radiochemotherapy (40 Gy at the pelvis, using the de Gramont regimen FL therapy: 1 kur). The histological diagnosis was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Various regimens of chemotherapy for unresectable and metastatic colorectal cancer were administered, and a partial response was obtained; thereby, the metastatic lesions became resectable. The patient underwent partial resection of the liver and lung metastases. Pathological findings confirmed that both the liver and lung lesions were metastases from the rectal cancer. A disease-free period occurred for several months; however, there were recurrences of the lung metastases, so we started another round of chemotherapy. After 8 months, she complained of vertigo and dizziness. A left cerebellar tumor about 3 cm in diameter was revealed by MRI and neurosurgical excision was performed. Pathological findings confirmed a cerebellar metastasis from the rectal cancer. Twenty months after resection of the brain tumor, the patient complained of a severe headache. A brain MRI showed hydrocephalia, and carcinomatous meningitis from rectal cancer was diagnosed by a spinal fluid cytology test. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted, but the cerebrospinal pressure did not decreased and she died 20 months after the first surgery. Although brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, the number of patients with brain metastasis is thought to increase in the near future. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is effective enough to prolong the survival period even if multiple metastases have occurred. However, after a long survival period with lung metastases such as in our case, there is a high probability of developing brain metastases. PMID:26805112

  9. Brain metastases in Asian HER2-positive breast cancer patients: anti-HER2 treatments and their impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Y S; Cornelio, G H; Devi, B C R; Khorprasert, C; Kim, S B; Kim, T Y; Lee, S C; Park, Y H; Sohn, J H; Sutandyo, N; Wong, D W Y; Kobayashi, M; Landis, S H; Yeoh, E M; Moon, H; Ro, J

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Asia, large-scale studies on anti-HER2 treatment in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with brain metastases are limited. We studied the treatment patterns of these patients in Asia to evaluate the impact of anti-HER2 treatment on the time to occurrence of brain metastases (TTBM) and survival after brain metastasis (BM). Methods: A retrospective study of HER2-positive breast cancer patients diagnosed with BM between January 2006 and December 2008 in six Asian countries was conducted. Demographics, tumour characteristics, treatment details, and events dates were collected from medical records. Results: Data from 280 patients were analysed. Before BM, 63% received anti-HER2 treatment. These patients had significantly longer TTBM than those without anti-HER2 treatment (median 33 vs 19 months; P<0.002). After BM, 93% received radiotherapy, 57% received chemotherapy, and 41% received anti-HER2 treatment (trastuzumab and/or lapatinib). Use of both anti-HER2 agents, primarily sequentially, after BM demonstrated the longest survival after BM and was associated with a significant survival benefit over no anti-HER2 treatment (median 26 vs 6 months; hazard ratio 0.37; 95% CI 0.19–0.72). Conclusion: Anti-HER2 treatment before BM was associated with longer TTBM. Anti-HER2 treatment after BM was associated with a survival benefit, especially when both trastuzumab and lapatinib were utilised. PMID:22918394

  10. Effect of Tumor Subtype on Survival and the Graded Prognostic Assessment for Patients With Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Kased, Norbert; Roberge, David; Xu Zhiyuan; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Sneed, Penny K.; Chao, Samuel T.; Weil, Robert J.; Suh, John; Bhatt, Amit; Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Shih, Helen A.; Kirkpatrick, John; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Fiveash, John B.; and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The diagnosis-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) was published to clarify prognosis for patients with brain metastases. This study refines the existing Breast-GPA by analyzing a larger cohort and tumor subtype. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional retrospective database of 400 breast cancer patients treated for newly diagnosed brain metastases was generated. Prognostic factors significant for survival were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). Factors were weighted by the magnitude of their regression coefficients to define the GPA index. Results: Significant prognostic factors by multivariate Cox regression and RPA were Karnofsky performance status (KPS), HER2, ER/PR status, and the interaction between ER/PR and HER2. RPA showed age was significant for patients with KPS 60 to 80. The median survival time (MST) overall was 13.8 months, and for GPA scores of 0 to 1.0, 1.5 to 2.0, 2.5 to 3.0, and 3.5 to 4.0 were 3.4 (n = 23), 7.7 (n = 104), 15.1 (n = 140), and 25.3 (n = 133) months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Among HER2-negative patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 6.4 to 9.7 months, whereas in HER2-positive patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 17.9 to 20.7 months. The log-rank statistic (predictive power) was 110 for the Breast-GPA vs. 55 for tumor subtype. Conclusions: The Breast-GPA documents wide variation in prognosis and shows clear separation between subgroups of patients with breast cancer and brain metastases. This tool will aid clinical decision making and stratification in clinical trials. These data confirm the effect of tumor subtype on survival and show the Breast-GPA offers significantly more predictive power than the tumor subtype alone.

  11. A Phase III Study of Conventional Radiation Therapy Plus Thalidomide Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Metastases (RTOG 0118)

    SciTech Connect

    Knisely, Jonathan P.S. Berkey, Brian; Chakravarti, Arnab; Yung, Al W.K.; Curran, Walter J.; Robins, H. Ian; Movsas, Benjamin; Brachman, David G.; Henderson, Randall H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To compare whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) with WBRT combined with thalidomide for patients with brain metastases not amenable to resection or radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Patients with Zubrod performance status 0-1, MRI-documented multiple (>3), large (>4 cm), or midbrain brain metastases arising from a histopathologically confirmed extracranial primary tumor, and an anticipated survival of >8 weeks were randomized to receive WBRT to a dose of 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions with or without thalidomide during and after WBRT. Prerandomization stratification used Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) Class and whether post-WBRT chemotherapy was planned. Endpoints included overall survival, progression-free survival, time to neurocognitive progression, the cause of death, toxicities, and quality of life. A protocol-planned interim analysis documented that the trial had an extremely low probability of ever showing a significant difference favoring the thalidomide arm given the results at the time of the analysis, and it was therefore closed on the basis of predefined statistical guidelines. Results: Enrolled in the study were 332 patients. Of 183 accrued patients, 93 were randomized to receive WBRT alone and 90 to WBRT and thalidomide. Median survival was 3.9 months for both arms. No novel toxicities were seen, but thalidomide was not well tolerated in this population. Forty-eight percent of patients discontinued thalidomide because of side effects. Conclusion: Thalidomide provided no survival benefit for patients with multiple, large, or midbrain metastases when combined with WBRT; nearly half the patients discontinued thalidomide due to side effects.

  12. Comparative efficacy of whole-brain radiotherapy with and without elemene liposomes in patients with multiple brain metastases from non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Y.N.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Zeng, Y.C.; Chi, F.; Jin, X.Y.; Wu, R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We explored and compared the clinical effects of whole-brain radiotherapy (wbrt) with and without elemene liposomes in patients with multiple brain metastases from non-small-cell lung carcinoma (nsclc). Methods We retrospectively analyzed 62 patients with multiple brain metastases from nsclc who received wbrt (30 Gy in 10 fractions) at Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University from January 2012 to May 2013. In 30 patients, elemene liposomes (400 mg) were injected intravenously via a peripherally inserted central catheter for 21 consecutive days from the first day of radiotherapy. Overall survival (os) and nervous system progression-free survival (npfs) for the two groups were compared by Kaplan–Meier analysis. Factors influencing npfs were examined by Cox regression analysis. Chi-square or Fisher exact tests were used for group comparisons. Results The median os was 9.0 months in the wbrt plus elemene group and 7.8 months in the wbrt-alone group (p = 0.581); the equivalent median npfs durations were 5.2 months and 3.7 months (p = 0.005). Patient treatment plan was an independent factor associated with npfs (p = 0.002). Tumour response and disease-control rates in the wbrt plus elemene group were 26.67% and 76.67% respectively; they were 18.75% and 62.5% in the wbrt group (p = 0.452). Compared with the patients in the wbrt-alone group, significantly fewer patients in the wbrt plus elemene group developed headaches (p = 0.04); quality of life was also significantly higher in the wbrt plus elemene group both at 1 month and at 2 months (p = 0.021 and p = 0.001 respectively). Conclusions The addition of elemene liposomes to wbrt might prolong npfs in patients with multiple brain metastases from nsclc, while also reducing the incidence of headache and improving patient quality of life. PMID:27536187

  13. Defining the Optimal Planning Target Volume in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery of Brain Metastases: Results of a Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Wang, Zhiheng; Sampson, John H.; McSherry, Frances; Herndon, James E.; Allen, Karen J.; Duffy, Eileen; Hoang, Jenny K.; Chang, Zheng; Yoo, David S.; Kelsey, Chris R.; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify an optimal margin about the gross target volume (GTV) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of brain metastases, minimizing toxicity and local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases less than 4 cm in greatest dimension, no previous brain radiation therapy, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) above 70 were eligible for this institutional review board–approved trial. Individual lesions were randomized to 1- or 3- mm uniform expansion of the GTV defined on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The resulting planning target volume (PTV) was treated to 24, 18, or 15 Gy marginal dose for maximum PTV diameters less than 2, 2 to 2.9, and 3 to 3.9 cm, respectively, using a linear accelerator–based image-guided system. The primary endpoint was local recurrence (LR). Secondary endpoints included neurocognition Mini-Mental State Examination, Trail Making Test Parts A and B, quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain), radionecrosis (RN), need for salvage radiation therapy, distant failure (DF) in the brain, and overall survival (OS). Results: Between February 2010 and November 2012, 49 patients with 80 brain metastases were treated. The median age was 61 years, the median KPS was 90, and the predominant histologies were non–small cell lung cancer (25 patients) and melanoma (8). Fifty-five, 19, and 6 lesions were treated to 24, 18, and 15 Gy, respectively. The PTV/GTV ratio, volume receiving 12 Gy or more, and minimum dose to PTV were significantly higher in the 3-mm group (all P<.01), and GTV was similar (P=.76). At a median follow-up time of 32.2 months, 11 patients were alive, with median OS 10.6 months. LR was observed in only 3 lesions (2 in the 1 mm group, P=.51), with 6.7% LR 12 months after SRS. Biopsy-proven RN alone was observed in 6 lesions (5 in the 3-mm group, P=.10). The 12-month DF rate was 45.7%. Three months after SRS, no significant change in

  14. Impact on overall survival of the combination of BRAF inhibitors and stereotactic radiosurgery in patients with melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Amparo; Zia, Sayyad; Verma, Rashika; Pavlick, Anna; Wilson, Melissa; Golfinos, John G; Silverman, Joshua S; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of BRAF inhibitors on survival outcomes in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for melanoma brain metastases. We prospectively collected treatment parameters and outcomes for 80 patients with melanoma brain metastases who underwent SRS. Thirty-five patients harbored the BRAF mutation (BRAF-M) and 45 patients did not (BRAF-WT). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of overall survival. The median overall survival from first SRS procedure was 6.7, 11.2 months if treated with a BRAF inhibitor and 4.5 months for BRAF-WT. Actuarial survival rates for BRAF-M patients on an inhibitor were 54 % at 6 months and 41 % at 12 months from the time of SRS. In contrast, BRAF-WT had overall survival rates of 28 % at 6 months and 19 % at 12 months. Overall survival was extended for patients on a BRAF inhibitor at or after the first SRS. The median time to intracranial progression was 3.9 months on a BRAF inhibitor and 1.7 months without. The local control rate for all treated tumors was 92.5 %, with no difference based on BRAF status. Patients with higher KPS, fewer treated intracranial metastases, controlled systemic disease, RPA Class 1 and BRAF-M patients had extended overall survival. Overall, patients with BRAF-M treated with both SRS and BRAF inhibitors, at or after SRS, have increased overall survival from the time of SRS. As patients live longer as a result of more effective systemic and local therapies, close surveillance and early management of intracranial disease with SRS will become increasingly important. PMID:26852222

  15. Chiropractic management of a patient with breast cancer metastases to the brain and spine: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kanga, Ismat; Steiman, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Cancers of the breast, kidney, lungs, prostate and thyroid metastasize to the musculoskeletal system in the majority of patients with malignancy. This report chronicles the case of a 65-year-old female with a known history of breast cancer who presented to a chiropractic clinic. Once metastasis was ruled out as the cause of her complaint, the patient was treated with manual therapies and exercises. As the patient’s treatments progressed and her pain improved, she presented with a new complaint of ‘pressure’ in her head. Advanced imaging revealed metastasis to the brain and subsequently to the spine. The aim of this case is to heighten awareness of the presentation of metastasis to the brain and the spine in a chiropractic patient, and to demonstrate the benefit of chiropractic care in the management of such patients. PMID:26500361

  16. Intraoperative real-time MRI-guided stereotactic biopsy followed by laser thermal ablation for progressive brain metastases after radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Torcuator, Roy G; Hulou, M Maher; Chavakula, Vamsidhar; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Golby, Alexandra J

    2016-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is one of the treatment options for brain metastases. However, there are patients who will progress after radiosurgery. One of the potential treatments for this subset of patients is laser ablation. Image-guided stereotactic biopsy is important to determine the histopathological nature of the lesion. However, this is usually based on preoperative, static images, which may affect the target accuracy during the actual procedure as a result of brain shift. We therefore performed real-time intraoperative MRI-guided stereotactic aspiration and biopsies on two patients with symptomatic, progressive lesions after radiosurgery followed immediately by laser ablation. The patients tolerated the procedure well with no new neurologic deficits. Intraoperative MRI-guided stereotactic biopsy followed by laser ablation is safe and accurate, providing real-time updates and feedback during the procedure. PMID:26596402

  17. Systemic delivery of HER2-retargeted oncolytic-HSV by mesenchymal stromal cells protects from lung and brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Palladini, Arianna; Nicoletti, Giordano; Ranieri, Dario; Dall'Ora, Massimiliano; Grosso, Valentina; Rossi, Martina; Alviano, Francesco; Bonsi, Laura; Nanni, Patrizia; Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Campadelli-Fiume, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Fully retargeted oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (o-HSVs) gain cancer-specificity from redirection of tropism to cancer-specific receptors, and are non-attenuated. To overcome the hurdles of systemic delivery, and enable oncolytic viruses (o-viruses) to reach metastatic sites, carrier cells are being exploited. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) were never tested as carriers of retargeted o-viruses, given their scarse-null expression of the cancer-specific receptors. We report that MSCs from different sources can be forcedly infected with a HER2-retargeted oncolytic HSV. Progeny virus spread from MSCs to cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We evaluated the organ distribution and therapeutic efficacy in two murine models of metastatic cancers, following a single i.v. injection of infected MSCs. As expected, the highest concentration of carrier-cells and of viral genomes was in the lungs. Viral genomes persisted throughout the body for at least two days. The growth of ovarian cancer lung metastases in nude mice was strongly inhibited, and the majority of treated mice appeared metastasis-free. The treatment significantly inhibited also breast cancer metastases to the brain in NSG mice, and reduced by more than one-half the metastatic burden in the brain. PMID:26430966

  18. CogState computerized memory tests in patients with brain metastases: secondary endpoint results of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933.

    PubMed

    Caine, Chip; Deshmukh, Snehal; Gondi, Vinai; Mehta, Minesh; Tomé, Wolfgang; Corn, Benjamin W; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey Noah; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Raben, Adam; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is associated with memory dysfunction. As part of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933, a phase II study of WBRT for brain metastases that conformally avoided the hippocampal stem cell compartment (HA-WBRT), memory was assessed pre- and post-HA-WBRT using both traditional and computerized memory tests. We examined whether the computerized tests yielded similar findings and might serve as possible alternatives for assessment of memory in multi-institution clinical trials. Adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in ten fractions and completed Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), CogState International Shopping List Test (ISLT) and One Card Learning Test (OCLT), at baseline, 2 and 4 months. Tests' completion rates were 52-53 % at 2 months and 34-42 % at 4 months. All baseline correlations between HVLT-R and CogState tests were significant (p ≤ 0.003). At baseline, both CogState tests and one component of HVLT-R differentiated those who were alive at 6 months and those who had died (p ≤ 0.01). At 4 months, mean relative decline was 7.0 % for HVLT-R Delayed Recall and 18.0 % for ISLT Delayed Recall. OCLT showed an 8.0 % increase. A reliable change index found no significant changes from baseline to 2 and 4 months for ISLT Delayed Recall (z = -0.40, p = 0.34; z = -0.68, p = 0.25) or OCLT (z = 0.15, p = 0.56; z = 0.41, p = 0.66). Study findings support the possibility that hippocampal avoidance may be associated with preservation of memory test performance, and that these computerized tests also may be useful and valid memory assessments in multi-institution adult brain tumor trials. PMID:26511494

  19. Phase I Study of Concurrent Whole Brain Radiotherapy and Erlotinib for Multiple Brain Metastases From Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Joline S.W.; Lagerwaard, Frank J. Smit, Egbert F.; Senan, Suresh

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib has shown activity in patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. The present dose-escalation Phase I trial evaluated the toxicity of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with concurrent and maintenance erlotinib in this patient group. Methods and Materials: Erlotinib (Cohort 1, 100 mg/d; Cohort 2, 150 mg/d) was started 1 week before, and continued during, WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions). Maintenance erlotinib (150 mg/d) was continued until unacceptable toxicity or disease progression. Results: A total of 11 patients completed WBRT, 4 in Cohort 1 and 7 in Cohort 2. The median duration of erlotinib treatment was 83 days. No treatment-related neurotoxicity was observed. No treatment-related Grade 3 or greater toxicity occurred in Cohort 1. In Cohort 2, 1 patient developed a Grade 3 acneiform rash and 1 patient had Grade 3 fatigue. Two patients in Cohort 2 developed erlotinib-related interstitial lung disease, contributing to death during maintenance therapy. The median overall survival and interval to progression was 133 and 141 days, respectively. Six patients developed extracranial progression; only 1 patient had intracranial progression. In 7 patients with follow-up neuroimaging at 3 months, 5 had a partial response and 2 had stable disease. Conclusion: WBRT with concurrent erlotinib is well tolerated in patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. The suggestion of a high intracranial disease control rate warrants additional study.

  20. Analyses of resected human brain metastases of breast cancer reveal the association between up-regulation of hexokinase 2 and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L; Weil, Robert J; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M; Merino, Maria J; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M; Meltzer, Paul S; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2009-09-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer seem to be increasingin incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser-captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared with unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases, which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMgamma3, SIAH, STHMN3, and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P) in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using short hairpin RNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose-limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival after craniotomy (P = 0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  1. Analyses of Resected Human Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer Reveal the Association between Up-regulation of Hexokinase 2 and Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S. Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L.; Weil, Robert J.; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M.; Merino, Maria J.; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H. Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared to unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, TNM stage and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Q-PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMγ3, SIAH, STHMN3 and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P), in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using shRNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival post-craniotomy (P=0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  2. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immune response in mouse models: the role of regulatory Tcells, anti-tumor antibodies, and immune attacks on brain metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatansever, Fatma; Kawakubo, Masayoshi; Chung, Hoon; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-02-01

    We have previously shown that photodynamic therapy mediated by a vascular regimen of benzoporphyrin derivative and 690nm light is capable of inducing a robust immune response in the mouse CT26.CL25 tumor model that contains a tumor-rejection antigen, beta-galactosidase (β-gal). For the first time we show that PDT can stimulate the production of serum IgG antibodies against the β-gal antigen. It is known that a common cause of death from cancer, particularly lung cancer, is brain metastases; especially the inoperable ones that do not respond to traditional cytotoxic therapies either. We asked whether PDT of a primary tumor could stimulate immune response that could attack the distant brain metastases. We have developed a mouse model of generating brain metastases by injecting CT26.CL25 tumor cells into the brain as well as injecting the same cancer cells under the skin at the same time. When the subcutaneous tumor was treated with PDT, we observed a survival advantage compared to mice that had untreated brain metastases alone.

  3. Next generation sequencing of stage IV squamous cell lung cancers reveals an association of PI3K aberrations and evidence of clonal heterogeneity in patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Paul K.; Shen, Ronglai; Won, Helen; Rekhtman, Natasha; Wang, Lu; Sima, Camelia S.; Arora, Arshi; Seshan, Venkatraman; Ladanyi, Marc; Berger, Michael F.; Kris, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers (SQCLC) has revealed several putative oncogenic drivers. There are, however, little data to suggest that these alterations have clinical relevance. We performed comprehensive genomic profiling of 79 stage IV SQCLCs (including next-generation sequencing) and analyzed differences in the clinical characteristics of two major SQCLC subtypes: FGFR1 amplified and PI3K aberrant. Patients with PI3K aberrant tumors had aggressive disease marked by worse survival (median OS 8.6 vs. 19.1 mo, p<0.001), higher metastatic burden (>3 organs 18% vs. 3%, p=0.025), and greater incidence of brain metastases (27% vs. 0% in others, p<0.001). We performed whole-exome and RNA sequencing on paired brain metastases and primary lung cancers to elucidate the metastatic process to brain. SQCLC primaries that gave rise to brain metastases exhibited truncal PTEN loss. SQCLC brain metastases exhibited a high degree of genetic heterogeneity and evidence of clonal differences between their primary sites. PMID:25929848

  4. Single-Isocenter Frameless Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Simultaneous Treatment of Multiple Brain Metastases: Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, Sameer K.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Simpson, Daniel R.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To describe our clinical experience using a unique single-isocenter technique for frameless intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IM-SRS) to treat multiple brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with a median of 5 metastases (range, 2-13) underwent optically guided frameless IM-SRS using a single, centrally located isocenter. Median prescription dose was 18 Gy (range, 14-25). Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and clinical examination occurred every 2-4 months. Results: Median follow-up for all patients was 3.3 months (range, 0.2-21.3), with 20 of 26 patients (77%) followed up until their death. For the remaining 6 patients alive at the time of analysis, median follow-up was 14.6 months (range, 9.3-18.0). Total treatment time ranged from 9.0 to 38.9 minutes (median, 21.0). Actuarial 6- and 12-month overall survivals were 50% (95% confidence interval [C.I.], 31-70%) and 38% (95% C.I., 19-56%), respectively. Actuarial 6- and 12-month local control (LC) rates were 97% (95% C.I., 93-100%) and 83% (95% C.I., 71-96%), respectively. Tumors {<=}1.5 cm had a better 6-month LC than those >1.5 cm (98% vs. 90%, p = 0.008). New intracranial metastatic disease occurring outside of the treatment volume was observed in 7 patients. Grade {>=}3 toxicity occurred in 2 patients (8%). Conclusion: Frameless IM-SRS using a single-isocenter approach for treating multiple intracranial metastases can produce clinical outcomes that compare favorably with those of conventional SRS in a much shorter treatment time (<40 minutes). Given its faster treatment time, this technique is appealing to both patients and personnel in busy clinics.

  5. Bafetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma or Brain Metastases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma

  6. Inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor reduces triple-negative breast cancer brain metastases: The potential benefit of perioperative β-blockade

    PubMed Central

    CHOY, CECILIA; RAYTIS, JOHN L.; SMITH, DAVID D.; DUENAS, MATTHEW; NEMAN, JOSH; JANDIAL, RAHUL; LEW, MICHAEL W.

    2016-01-01

    In response to recent studies, we investigated an association between perioperative β-blockade and breast cancer metastases. First, a retrospective study examining perioperative β-blocker use and cancer recurrence and metastases was conducted on 1,029 patients who underwent breast cancer surgery at the City of Hope Cancer Center between 2000 and 2010. We followed the clinical study and examined proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro of primary and brain-metastatic breast cancer cells in response to β2-activation and inhibition. We also investigated in vivo the metastatic potential of propranolol-treated metastatic cells. For stage II breast cancer patients, perioperative β-blockade was associated with decreased cancer recurrence using Cox regression analysis (hazard's ratio =0.51; 95% CI: 0.23–0.97; p=0.041). Triple-negative (TN) brain-metastatic cells were found to have increased β2-adrenergic receptor mRNA and protein expression relative to TN primary cells. In response to β2-adrenergic receptor activation, TN brain-metastatic cells also exhibited increased cell proliferation and migration relative to the control. These effects were abrogated by propranolol. Propranolol decreased β2-adrenergic receptor-activated invasion. In vivo, propranolol treatment of TN brain-metastatic cells decreased establishment of brain metastases. Our results suggest that stress and corresponding β2-activation may promote the establishment of brain metastases of TN breast cancer cells. In addition, our data suggest a benefit to perioperative β-blockade during surgery-induced stress with respect to breast cancer recurrence and metastases. PMID:27035124

  7. Inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor reduces triple-negative breast cancer brain metastases: The potential benefit of perioperative β-blockade.

    PubMed

    Choy, Cecilia; Raytis, John L; Smith, David D; Duenas, Matthew; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul; Lew, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    In response to recent studies, we investigated an association between perioperative β-blockade and breast cancer metastases. First, a retrospective study examining perioperative β-blocker use and cancer recurrence and metastases was conducted on 1,029 patients who underwent breast cancer surgery at the City of Hope Cancer Center between 2000 and 2010. We followed the clinical study and examined proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro of primary and brain-metastatic breast cancer cells in response to β2-activation and inhibition. We also investigated in vivo the metastatic potential of propranolol-treated metastatic cells. For stage II breast cancer patients, perioperative β-blockade was associated with decreased cancer recurrence using Cox regression analysis (hazard's ratio =0.51; 95% CI: 0.23-0.97; p=0.041). Triple-negative (TN) brain-metastatic cells were found to have increased β2-adrenergic receptor mRNA and protein expression relative to TN primary cells. In response to β2-adrenergic receptor activation, TN brain-metastatic cells also exhibited increased cell proliferation and migration relative to the control. These effects were abrogated by propranolol. Propranolol decreased β2-adrenergic receptor-activated invasion. In vivo, propranolol treatment of TN brain-metastatic cells decreased establishment of brain metastases. Our results suggest that stress and corresponding β2-activation may promote the establishment of brain metastases of TN breast cancer cells. In addition, our data suggest a benefit to perioperative β-blockade during surgery-induced stress with respect to breast cancer recurrence and metastases. PMID:27035124

  8. Gadolinium-Based Nanoparticles and Radiation Therapy for Multiple Brain Melanoma Metastases: Proof of Concept before Phase I Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kotb, Shady; Detappe, Alexandre; Lux, François; Appaix, Florence; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Tran, Vu-Long; Plissonneau, Marie; Gehan, Hélène; Lefranc, Florence; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Verry, Camille; Berbeco, Ross; Tillement, Olivier; Sancey, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles containing high-Z elements are known to boost the efficacy of radiation therapy. Gadolinium (Gd) is particularly attractive because this element is also a positive contrast agent for MRI, which allows for the simultaneous use of imaging to guide the irradiation and to delineate the tumor. In this study, we used the Gd-based nanoparticles, AGuIX®. After intravenous injection into animals bearing B16F10 tumors, some nanoparticles remained inside the tumor cells for more than 24 hours, indicating that a single administration of nanoparticles might be sufficient for several irradiations. Combining AGuIX® with radiation therapy increases tumor cell death, and improves the life spans of animals bearing multiple brain melanoma metastases. These results provide preclinical proof-of-concept for a phase I clinical trial. PMID:26909115

  9. Treatment of malignant gliomas and brain metastases in adults with a combination of adriamycin, VM 26, and CCNU. Results of a phase II trail.

    PubMed

    Pouillart, P; Mathe, G; Thy, T H; Lheritier, J; Poisson, M; Huguenin, P; Gauthier, H; Morin, P; Parrot, R

    1976-11-01

    Forty-three patients with inoperable or recurring malignant gliomas, and 30 patients with multiple recurring brain metastases were treated with a combination of Adriamycin (45 mg/m2) and 4-dimethyl-epipodophyllotoxin D-thenylidene (VM 26) (60 mg/m2 for 2 days) with 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) (60 mg/m2 for 2 days). These cycles of treatment were repeated as soon as the hematologic restoration was complete. The treatment was well tolerated and the clinical condition of 31 of 43 glioblastoma patients improved during the 2 months after the beginning of the treatment. Six of eight patients with breast cancer metastases, one of 13 with bronchial cancer matastases, and three of nine with other types of cancer metastases also benefitted from the treatment. Examination of the results obtained revealed the following characteristics: 1) This combination had a low degree of efficiency in the treatment of metastases to brain, except for breast cancer metastases; 2) there was no complete correlation between the clinical results observed and the cinegammagraphic developments; 3) the results obtained were similar, independent of the initial localization; and a 6-month median survival period was established, with 10 patients now in a state of apparently complete remission, 180 to 506 days after beginning of the treatment. PMID:1033028

  10. Phase II randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of whole-brain irradiation with concomitant chloroquine for brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Chloroquine (CLQ), an antimalarial drug, has a lysosomotropic effect associated with increased radiationsensibility, which is mediated by the leakage of hydrolytic enzymes, increased apoptosis, autophagy and increased oxidative stress in vitro. In this phase II study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of radiosensibilization using CLQ concomitant with 30 Gray (Gy) of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) to treat patients with brain metastases (BM) from solid tumors. Methods Seventy-three eligible patients were randomized. Thirty-nine patients received WBI (30 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks) concomitant with 150 mg of CLQ for 4 weeks (the CLQ arm). Thirty-four patients received the same schedule of WBI concomitant with a placebo for 4 weeks (the control arm). All the patients were evaluated for quality of life (QoL) using the EORTC Quality of Life (QoL) Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) (Mexican version) before beginning radiotherapy and one month later. Results The overall response rate (ORR) was 54% for the CLQ arm and 55% for the control arm (p=0.92). The progression-free survival of brain metastases (BMPFS) rates at one year were 83.9% (95% CI 69.4-98.4) for the CLQ arm and 55.1% (95% CI 33.6-77.6) for the control arm. Treatment with CLQ was independently associated with increased BMPFS (RR 0.31,95% CI [0.1-0.9], p=0.046).The only factor that was independently associated with increased overall survival (OS) was the presence of< 4 brain metastases (RR 1.9, 95% CI [1.12-3.3], p=0.017). WBI was associated with improvements in cognitive and emotional function but also with worsened nausea in both patients groups. No differences in QoL or toxicity were found between the study arms. Conclusion Treatment with CLQ plus WBI improved the control of BM (compared with the control arm) with no increase in toxicity; however, CLQ did not improve the RR or OS. A phase III clinical trial is warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:24010771

  11. Repeat stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of brain metastases from NSCLC: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    MARVASO, GIULIA; BARONE, AGNESE; VACCARO, CATERINA; BRUZZANITI, VICENTE; GRESPI, SILVIA; SCOTTI, VALERIO; BIANCO, CATALDO

    2013-01-01

    The aims of radiotherapeutic treatment of brain metastases include maintaining neurocognitive function and improvement of survival. Based on these premises, we present a case report in which the role of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was investigated in a patient with a recurrent brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer in the same area as previously treated with radiosurgery. A 40-year-old male caucasian patient was diagnosed with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and underwent SRS. The patient developed a recurrence of the disease and a second SRS on the same area was performed. After 8 months, tumor restaging demonstrated a lesion compatible with a recurrence and the patient underwent surgery. Histological diagnosis following surgery revealed only the occurrence of radionecrosis. Radiotherapy was well-tolerated and no grade 3/4 neurological toxicity occurred. To date, no consensus exists on the efficacy of retreatment with SRS. Despite the limited number of studies in this field, in the present case report, we outline the outcomes of this unconventional approach. PMID:24137433

  12. Repeat stereotactic radiosurgery in the management of brain metastases from NSCLC: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marvaso, Giulia; Barone, Agnese; Vaccaro, Caterina; Bruzzaniti, Vicente; Grespi, Silvia; Scotti, Valerio; Bianco, Cataldo

    2013-10-01

    The aims of radiotherapeutic treatment of brain metastases include maintaining neurocognitive function and improvement of survival. Based on these premises, we present a case report in which the role of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) was investigated in a patient with a recurrent brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer in the same area as previously treated with radiosurgery. A 40-year-old male caucasian patient was diagnosed with brain metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and underwent SRS. The patient developed a recurrence of the disease and a second SRS on the same area was performed. After 8 months, tumor restaging demonstrated a lesion compatible with a recurrence and the patient underwent surgery. Histological diagnosis following surgery revealed only the occurrence of radionecrosis. Radiotherapy was well-tolerated and no grade 3/4 neurological toxicity occurred. To date, no consensus exists on the efficacy of retreatment with SRS. Despite the limited number of studies in this field, in the present case report, we outline the outcomes of this unconventional approach. PMID:24137433

  13. Decision Analysis of Stereotactic Radiation Surgery Versus Stereotactic Radiation Surgery and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for 1 to 3 Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Lester-Coll, Nataniel H.; Dosoretz, Arie P.; Yu, James B.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is effective for controlling intracranial disease, it is also associated with neurocognitive side effects. It is unclear whether a theoretically improved quality of life after stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) alone relative to that after SRS with adjuvant WBRT would justify the omission of WBRT, given the higher risk of intracranial failure. This study compares SRS alone with SRS and WBRT, to evaluate the theoretical benefits of intracranial tumor control with adjuvant WBRT against its possible side effects, using quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE) as a primary endpoint. Methods and Materials: A Markov decision analysis model was used to compare QALE in a cohort of patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases and Karnofsky performance status of at least 70. Patients were treated with SRS alone or with SRS immediately followed by WBRT. Patients treated with SRS alone underwent surveillance magnetic resonance imaging and received salvage WBRT if they developed intracranial relapse. All patients whose cancer relapsed after WBRT underwent simulation as dying of intracranial progression. Model parameters were estimated from published literature. Results: Treatment with SRS yielded 6.2 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs). The addition of initial WBRT reduced QALE by 1.2 QALMs. On one-way sensitivity analysis, the model was sensitive only to a single parameter, the utility associated with the state of no evidence of disease after SRS alone. At values greater than 0.51, SRS alone was preferred. Conclusions: In general, SRS alone is suggested to have improved quality of life in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases compared to SRS and immediate WBRT. Our results suggest that immediate treatment with WBRT after SRS can be reserved for patients who would have a poor performance status regardless of treatment. These findings are stable under a wide range of assumptions.

  14. Gamma-Knife radiosurgery in the management of melanoma patients with brain metastases: A series of 106 patients without whole-brain radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline . E-mail: marqueste@wanadoo.fr; Regis, Jean-Marie; Muracciole, Xavier; Laurans, Renaud; Richard, Marie-Aleth; Bonerandi, Jean-Jacques; Grob, Jean-Jacques

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To assess retrospectively a strategy that uses Gamma-Knife radiosurgery (GKR) in the management of patients with brain metastases (BMs) of malignant melanoma (MM). Methods: GKR without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was performed for patients with Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) of 60 or above who harbored 1 to 4 BMs of 30 mm or less and was repeated as often as needed. Survival was assessed in the whole population, whereas local-control rates were assessed for patients with follow-up longer than 3 months. Results: A total of 221 BMs were treated in 106 patients; 61.3% had a single BM. Median survival from the time of GKR was 5.09 months. Control rate of treated BMs was 83.7%, with 14% of complete response (14 BMs), 42% of partial response (41 BMs), and 43% of stabilization (43 BMs). In multivariate analysis, survival prognosis factors retained were KPS greater than 80, cortical or subcortical location, and Score Index for Radiosurgery (SIR) greater than 6. On the basis of KPS, BM location, and age, a score called MM-GKR, predictive of survival in our population, was defined. Conclusion: Gamma-Knife radiosurgery provides a surgery-like ability to obtain control of a solitary BM and could be consider as an alternative treatment to the combination of GKR+WBRT as a palliative strategy. MM-GKR classification is more adapted to MM patients than are SIR, RPA and Brain Score for Brain Metastasis.

  15. The melanoma-specific graded prognostic assessment does not adequately discriminate prognosis in a modern population with brain metastases from malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Anna; Furness, Andrew; W Corbett, Richard; Bloomfield, Adam; Porta, Nuria; Morris, Stephen; Ali, Zohra; Larkin, James; Harrington, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The melanoma-specific graded prognostic assessment (msGPA) assigns patients with brain metastases from malignant melanoma to 1 of 4 prognostic groups. It was largely derived using clinical data from patients treated in the era that preceded the development of newer therapies such as BRAF, MEK and immune checkpoint inhibitors. Therefore, its current relevance to patients diagnosed with brain metastases from malignant melanoma is unclear. This study is an external validation of the msGPA in two temporally distinct British populations. Methods: Performance of the msGPA was assessed in Cohort I (1997–2008, n=231) and Cohort II (2008–2013, n=162) using Kaplan–Meier methods and Harrell's c-index of concordance. Cox regression was used to explore additional factors that may have prognostic relevance. Results: The msGPA does not perform well as a prognostic score outside of the derivation cohort, with suboptimal statistical calibration and discrimination, particularly in those patients with an intermediate prognosis. Extra-cerebral metastases, leptomeningeal disease, age and potential use of novel targeted agents after brain metastases are diagnosed, should be incorporated into future prognostic models. Conclusions: An improved prognostic score is required to underpin high-quality randomised controlled trials in an area with a wide disparity in clinical care. PMID:26484413

  16. Results of a randomized comparison of radiotherapy and bromodeoxyuridine with radiotherapy alone for brain metastases: Report of RTOG trial 89-05

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.L.; Scott, C.B.; Leibel, S.A.

    1995-09-30

    The purpose of this trial was to determine if the addition of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to radiotherapy prolongs survival when compared to radiotherapy alone in patients with brain metastases. Seventy-two patients with brain metastases were randomized to 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions of 2.5 Gy or to the same dose with BrdUrd 0.8 g/m{sup 2} per day for 4 days of each of 3 weeks. Patients were stratified by primary site (breast, lung or other), number of metastases (single or multiple) and age (<60 vs. >60). There was no significant difference between the two treatment arms (p = 0.904). The study was open from October 1989 to March 1993 and accrued 72 patients. Only one patient in the RT only arm remains alive. The two treatment arms were balanced with respect to all stratification variables. Toxicity due to radiotherapy was similar in both arms. BrdUrd caused significant Grade 4 and 5 hematologic and skin toxicity in five patients. Two patients died due to hematologic toxicity and one from a Stevens-Johnson type skin reaction. Phenytoin played a role in the skin reactions and ranitidine was associated with the hematologic deaths. Ranitidine was eliminated, BrdUrd was discontinued after any hematologic toxicity, and no further Grade 4 or 5 toxicities were seen. The median survival was 6.12 months in the radiotherapy group and 4.3 in the BrdUrd group (p = 0.904). Patients with solitary brain metastases had significantly better survival (p = 0.031). BrdUrd did not enhance the efficacy of the radiotherapy regiment tested, in spite of the fact that brain metastases have shown high labeling indices. The toxicity of this schedule of BrdUrd administration was apparently increased by ranitidine and phenytoin. 16 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. IDH1(R132) mutation identified in one human melanoma metastasis, but not correlated with metastases to the brain.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Giselle Y; Reitman, Zachary J; Solomon, David; Waldman, Todd; Bigner, Darell D; McLendon, Roger E; Rosenberg, Steven A; Samuels, Yardena; Yan, Hai

    2010-07-30

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) are enzymes which convert isocitrate to alpha-ketoglutarate while reducing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+to NADPH). IDH1/2 were recently identified as mutated in a large percentage of progressive gliomas. These mutations occur at IDH1(R132) or the homologous IDH2(R172). Melanomas share some genetic features with IDH1/2-mutated gliomas, such as frequent TP53 mutation. We sought to test whether melanoma is associated with IDH1/2 mutations. Seventy-eight human melanoma samples were analyzed for IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R172) mutation status. A somatic, heterozygous IDH1 c.C394T (p.R132C) mutation was identified in one human melanoma metastasis to the lung. Having identified this mutation in one metastasis, we sought to test the hypothesis that certain selective pressures in the brain environment may specifically favor the cell growth or survival of tumor cells with mutations in IDH1/2, regardless of primary tumor site. To address this, we analyzed IDH1(R132) and IDH2(R172) mutation status 53 metastatic brain tumors, including nine melanoma metastases. Results revealed no mutations in any samples. This lack of mutations would suggest that mutations in IDH1(R132) or IDH2(R172) may be necessary for the formation of tumors in a cell-lineage dependent manner, with a particularly strong selective pressure for mutations in progressive gliomas; this also suggests the lack of a particular selective pressure for growth in brain tissue in general. Studies on the cell-lineages of tumors with IDH1/2 mutations may help clarify the role of these mutations in the development of brain tumors. PMID:20603105

  18. What predicts early volumetric edema increase following stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases?

    PubMed

    Hanna, Andrew; Boggs, D Hunter; Kwok, Young; Simard, Marc; Regine, William F; Mehta, Minesh

    2016-04-01

    A volumetric analysis of pre- and post-radiosurgery (PreSRS and PostSRS) edema in patients with cerebral metastases was performed to determine factors of a predictive model assessing the risk of developing increased edema relatively early after SRS. One-hundred-fourteen metastases in 55 patients were analyzed. Selection for this analysis required an MRI ≤ 30 days before SRS and an MRI ≤ 100 days after SRS. Tumor volumes were calculated on PreSRS, SRS, and PostSRS T1-weighted postgadolinium images while edema volumes were calculating using PreSRS and PostSRS fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MR images. An increase in edema was defined as an increase in measurable edema of at least 5%. We developed and evaluated a model predicting the relative risk (RR) of increased edema after SRS. Peritumoral edema increased in 18% (21/114) of the analyzed lesions. Melanoma/renal histology, recursive partitioning analysis class III, and prior WBRT carried RRs of developing postSRS edema increase of 2.45, 2.48, and 3.16, respectively (all P values <0.05). The PreSRS edema/tumor ratio predicted for a RR of 1.007/ratio unit, and steroid dose at time of SRS predicted for a RR of 0.89/mg (all P values <0.05). A predictive model for assessing the RR of increased edema after SRS was developed based from these data and may be useful in identifying patients who might benefit from prophylactic anti-edema therapies before, during, or after SRS. This model could be used as the basis of inclusion criteria for prospective trials investigating novel anti-edema therapies. PMID:26721241

  19. OP09STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY FOR BRAIN METASTASES AT THE CHRISTIE AT SALFORD ROYAL HOSPITAL: OUR TWO-YEAR EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Helbrow, J.; McBain, C.; Gattamaneni, R.; Tran, A.; McCarthy, C.; Edwards, R.; Redikin, J.; Handley, J.; O'Hara, C.; Kennedy, J.; Mills, S.; Soh, C.; Leggate, J.; Whitfield, G.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases (BMs) commenced at The Christie at Salford in Dec 11 using the Novalis TxTM and BrainLab ExacTrac® system. We report our first 2 years' data. METHOD: Patients meeting NHS commissioning criteria were referred via MDT for assessment and if suitable consent. We used the BrainLab mask, CT and MRI. Gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were grown by 2mm if <4cm3 and by 1mm if >4cm3 to a planning target volume. The dose to the 80% isodose was 21Gy/1 fraction(#), 18Gy/1# and 25.5Gy/3# alternate days for PTVs <7cm3, 7-13cm3 and >13cm3 respectively and 30Gy/5# on alternate days to the 90% isodose in critical locations or where organ at risk constraints were exceeded. Follow up was 3-monthly with MRI and clinic review. Radiological response was classified as complete, unequivocal, enlargement consistent with treatment, enlargement suspicious of progression or unequivocal progression. RESULTS: Between Dec 11-Jan 14, 89 patients were consented, 51% female. Median age was 61 years (range 16-81). Primaries included lung (34%), breast (22%) and melanoma (15%), which was controlled in 67%; 42% had no extracranial metastases. A total of 170 BMs were treated (1 a retreat); per course a median of 2 (1-5) BMs were treated with median total GTV 4.87cm3 (0.05-29.9cm3). Prescribed dose was 21Gy/1# in 101 BMs, 18Gy/1# in 43, 25.5Gy/3# in 10 and 30Gy/5# in 16. One year survival from first SRS was: overall 48% (95% CI 34%-60%), lung 39% (18%-59%), breast 89% (62%-97%) and melanoma 44% (10%-75%). CONCLUSION: Overall survival results are encouraging and suggest appropriate patient selection. More detailed analysis including toxicity and time to intracranial progression will be presented.

  20. An unusual response with long term survival using erlotinib in NSCLC lung with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Madhup; Nanda, Sambit Swarup; Prakash, Chandra; Kulshreshtha, Dinkar

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a middle-aged woman with adenocarcinoma of the lung and metastatic brain lesions. In view of her poor general condition and poor compliance to first-line chemotherapy, the patient was kept on tablet erlotinib after whole brain radiotherapy. This novel treatment resulted in a dramatic response with radiological regression in both the primary lung lesion and metastatic intracranial lesions translating in unexpected and ongoing 24-month survival. PMID:26729829

  1. MicroRNAs in brain metastases: big things come in small packages.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Ryan; Gabikian, Patrik; Sarvaiya, Purvaba; Ulasov, Ilya; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic brain tumors provide a formidable obstacle in the survival of affected cancer patients, an obstacle that current treatment is essentially ineffective against. Our understanding of the metastatic cascade has demonstrated the role of incorrectly regulated protein expression and proved it to be a crucial component of this process. Recently, molecular studies have emphasized the role of microRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that alter protein expression, in the regulation of both normal and abnormal biological processes, including cancer and its metastasis to the brain. Furthermore, studies have demonstrated the ability to distinguish normal from cancerous cells, primary from secondary brain tumors, and correctly categorize metastatic brain tumor tissue of origin based solely on microRNA profiles. Interestingly, manipulation of microRNAs has proven effective in cancer treatment. With the promise of reduced toxicity, increased efficacy, and individually directed therapy, using microRNA in the treatment of metastatic brain tumors may prove very useful. In this review, we focus on the multiple potential microRNA targets for the treatment of metastatic brain lesions as well as current and future directions for its use in gene therapy. PMID:23138927

  2. Hippocampus-Sparing Whole-Brain Radiotherapy and Simultaneous Integrated Boost for Multiple Brain Metastases From Lung Adenocarcinoma: Early Response and Dosimetric Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Kim, Hye Ryun; Suh, Yang Gun; Kim, Jun Won; Choi, Chihwan; Baek, Jong Geal; Cho, Jaeho

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the volume response and treatment outcome after hippocampus-sparing whole-brain radiotherapy (HS-WBRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) using tomotherapy were evaluated. Patients with primary lung adenocarcinoma and multiple brain metastases who had a Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70 and exhibited well-controlled extracranial disease were treated. The prescribed dose was administered in 10 to 14 fractions as 25 to 28 Gy to whole-brain parenchyma, as 40 to 48 Gy to the gross metastatic lesion, and as 30 to 42 Gy to a 5-mm margin to the metastatic lesion. Double-dose gadolinium contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 1-mm slice thickness was performed before treatment and at 1, 4, and 7 months post-treatment. The tumor volume reduction ratio was calculated for each follow-up. Between July 2011 and September 2012, 11 patients with 70 lesions were included in this analysis. The median number of lesions per patient was 4 (range, 2-15). The median initial tumor volume was 0.235 cm(3) (range, 0.020-10.140 cm(3)). The treatment plans were evaluated regarding conformation number (CN), target coverage (TC), and homogeneity index (HI). The median follow-up duration was 14 months (range, 3-25 months) and the 1-year intracranial control rate was 67%. The tumor volume reduction was most prominent during the first month with a median reduction rate of 0.717 (range, -0.190 to 1.000). Complete remission was seen in 22 (33%) lesions, and 45 (64%) lesions showed more than 65% reduction in tumor volume. The CN, TC, and HI values were comparable to that of previous studies, and the mean hippocampal dose was 13.65 Gy. No treatment breaks or ≥ G3 acute toxicities were observed during or after treatment. The HS-WBRT with SIB in patients with multiple brain metastases was effective and feasible for volume reduction and showed excellent intracranial control. PMID:25601853

  3. A Phase I/II Trial of Topotecan and Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases in Patients With Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hedde, Jan-Peter; Neuhaus, Thomas . E-mail: t.neuhaus@jk-bonn.de; Schueller, Heinrich; Metzler, Ute; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.; Kleinschmidt, Rolf; Losem, Christoph; Lange, Oliver; Grohe, Christian; Stier, Sebastian; Ko, Yon-Dschun

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Outcomes in patients with brain metastases undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) are hardly encouraging, and an improvement in results is therefore needed. One possible approach is the addition of chemotherapeutics. However the data presented thus far are also disappointing. A promising substance in this setting could become topotecan, which is known to cross the blood-brain barrier and additionally offers radiosensitizing effects. Therefore we performed a phase I/II trial to evaluate the feasibility of a concurrent radiochemotherapy regimen. Methods and Materials: From January 1999 to July 2001, a total of 75 patients (10 in phase I and 65 in phase II) were included. The WBRT was applied with a fraction size of 2 Gy/day for a total of 40 Gy. Topotecan was administered as a 30-min infusion with 0.2 to 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days over 4 weeks within 2 h to radiation therapy. Results: Because of the higher toxic rates seen in patients receiving 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}/day, the recommended dosage for phase II was 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}/day. In this group Grade 3/4 hematologic and nonhematologic side effects occurred in 19% and 21% of the patients, respectively. The overall response rate was 72% with an overall survival of 17 weeks and 30 weeks among the responders. Conclusions: Based on the moderate toxicity profile presented here we recommend to perform a phase III trial to confirm the promising phase I/II data.

  4. Perillyl Alcohol and Its Drug-Conjugated Derivatives as Potential Novel Methods of Treating Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Thomas C; Da Fonseca, Clovis O; Schönthal, Axel H

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the central nervous system remains difficult to treat, and such patients are faced with a dismal prognosis. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), despite being partially compromised within malignant lesions in the brain, still retains much of its barrier function and prevents most chemotherapeutic agents from effectively reaching the tumor cells. Here, we review some of the recent developments aimed at overcoming this obstacle in order to more effectively deliver chemotherapeutic agents to the intracranial tumor site. These advances include intranasal delivery to achieve direct nose-to-brain transport of anticancer agents and covalent modification of existing drugs to support enhanced penetration of the BBB. In both of these areas, use of the natural product perillyl alcohol, a monoterpene with anticancer properties, contributed to promising new results, which will be discussed here. PMID:27598140

  5. Prognostic factors analysis in EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases treated with whole brain-radiotherapy and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    WEI, HANGPING; SU, MENG; LIN, RUIFANG; LI, HUIFANG; ZOU, CHANGLIN

    2016-01-01

    The survival time of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases has been previously reported to be 6.5–10.0 months, even with systematic treatment. Patients that possess a certain epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation alongside NSCLC with brain metastases also have a short survival rate, and a reliable prognostic model for these patients demonstrates a strong correlation between the outcome and treatment recommendations. The Cox proportional hazards regression and classification tree models were used to explore the prognostic factors in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients with brain metastases following whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) treatment. A total of 66 EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients with brain metastases were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses by Cox proportional hazards regression were then performed. The classification tree model was applied in order to identify prognostic groups of the patients. In the survival analysis, age, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and status of the primary tumor were prognostic factors for progression free survival (P=0.006, 0.014 and 0.005, respectively) and overall survival (P=0.009, 0.013 and 0.009, respectively). The classification tree model was subsequently applied, which revealed 3 patient groups with significantly different survival times: Group I, age <65 years and CEA ≤10 µg/ml; Group II, age <65 years and CEA >10 µg/ml or age ≥65 years and CEA ≤10 µg/ml; and Group III, age ≥65 years and CEA >10 µg/ml. The major prognostic predictors for EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients with brain metastases following WBRT and EGFR-TKI were age and CEA. In addition, primary tumor control may be important for predicting survival. PMID:26998157

  6. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Heekyoung; Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710; Cancer Stem Cell Research Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 ; Yoon, Su Jin; Jin, Juyoun; Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710; Cancer Stem Cell Research Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 ; Choi, Seung Ho; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; and others

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. {yields} Radiosensitivity of cancer cells was enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor. {yields} Depletion of Chk1 in cancer cells showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation. {yields} Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity.

  7. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Rice, Thomas W.; Adelstein, David J.; Barnett, Gene H.; Mekhail, Tarek M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  8. Cediranib Maleate and Whole Brain Radiation Therapy in Patients With Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-07

    Male Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  9. Treatment patterns and outcomes in BRAF V600E-mutant melanoma patients with brain metastases receiving vemurafenib in the real-world setting

    PubMed Central

    Gibney, Geoffrey T; Gauthier, Geneviève; Ayas, Charles; Galebach, Philip; Wu, Eric Q; Abhyankar, Sarang; Reyes, Carolina; Guérin, Annie; Yim, Yeun Mi

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are a common and serious complication among patients with metastatic melanoma. The selective BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib has demonstrated clinical efficacy in patients with BRAF V600E-mutant melanoma brain metastases (MBM). We examined the real-world application and clinical outcomes of vemurafenib in this patient population. Demographic, treatment patterns, response, and survival data were collected from medical charts. Clinical data on 283 patients with active BRAF V600E-mutant MBM treated with vemurafenib were provided by 70 US oncologists. Mean age was 57.2 years, 60.8% were male, 67.5% had ECOG performance status of 0–1, and 43.1% used corticosteroids at vemurafenib initiation. Median follow-up was 5.7 months. Following vemurafenib initiation, 48.1% of patients experienced intracranial response and 45.6% experienced extracranial response. The Kaplan–Meier estimate for overall survival was 59% at 12 months. Multivariate analyses showed associations between intracranial response and both corticosteroid use and vemurafenib as initial therapy after MBM diagnosis. Larger size (5–10 mm vs. <5 mm) and number of brain metastases (≥5 vs. <2) and progressive extracranial disease at treatment initiation were associated with decreased intracranial response and increased risk of disease progression. Multiple extracranial sites (2 vs. <2) and the absence of local treatments were also associated with increased risk of progression. Increased risk of death was associated with ≥2 extracranial disease sites, progressive extracranial disease, and ≥5 brain metastases. Subgroups of MBM patients may derive more benefit with vemurafenib, warranting prospective investigation. PMID:25991583

  10. A New Prognostic Index and Comparison to Three Other Indices for Patients With Brain Metastases: An Analysis of 1,960 Patients in the RTOG Database

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W. Berkey, Brian M.S.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to introduce a new prognostic index for patients with brain metastases and compare it with three published indices. Treatment for brain metastases varies widely. A sound prognostic index is thus important to guide both clinical decision making and outcomes research. Methods and Materials: A new index was developed because of limitations in the three existing indices and new data (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9508) are available since the others were developed. All four indices were compared using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database of 1,960 patients with brain metastases from five randomized trials. The ability of the four indices to distinguish its separate classes was determined statistically. Advantages and disadvantages of each index are discussed. Results: Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) and the new Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) had the most statistically significant differences between classes (p < 0.001 for all classes). Conclusions: The new index, the GPA, is as prognostic as the RPA and more prognostic than the other indices. The GPA is the least subjective, most quantitative and easiest to use of the four indices. Future clinical trials should compare the GPA with the RPA to prospectively validate these findings.

  11. Randomized phase II study of lapatinib plus capecitabine or lapatinib plus topotecan for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Eierman, Wolfgang; Greil, Richard; Campone, Mario; Kaufman, Bella; Steplewski, Klaudia; Lane, Stephen R; Zembryki, Denise; Rubin, Stephen D; Winer, Eric P

    2011-12-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with advanced, HER2-positive breast cancer develop brain metastases. A significant proportion of women experience central nervous system (CNS) progression after standard radiation therapy. The optimal treatment in the refractory setting is undefined. This study evaluated the toxicity and efficacy of lapatinib in combination with chemotherapy among patients with HER2-positive, progressive brain metastases. Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer with progressive brain metastases after trastuzumab and cranial radiotherapy were included. The primary endpoint was CNS objective response, defined as a ≥ 50% volumetric reduction of CNS lesion(s) in the absence of new or progressive CNS or non-CNS lesions, or increasing steroid requirements. The study was closed early after 22 of a planned 110 patients were enrolled due to excess toxicity and lack of efficacy in the lapatinib plus topotecan arm. The objective response rate (ORR) in the lapatinib plus capecitabine arm was 38% (exact 95% confidence interval [CI] 13.9-68.4). No responses were observed in the lapatinib plus topotecan arm. Although the study was stopped prior to full enrollment, some promising indications of CNS activity were noted for lapatinib plus capecitabine. The combination of lapatinib plus topotecan was not active and was associated with excess toxicity. PMID:21706359

  12. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Heekyoung; Yoon, Su Jin; Jin, Juyoun; Choi, Seung Ho; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Nam, Do-Hyun; Yoo, Hae Yong

    2011-03-01

    The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. PMID:21291864

  13. Karnofsky Performance Status and Lactate Dehydrogenase Predict the Benefit of Palliative Whole-Brain Irradiation in Patients With Advanced Intra- and Extracranial Metastases From Malignant Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Partl, Richard; Richtig, Erika; Avian, Alexander; Berghold, Andrea; Kapp, Karin S.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To determine prognostic factors that allow the selection of melanoma patients with advanced intra- and extracerebral metastatic disease for palliative whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) or best supportive care. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 87 patients who underwent palliative WBRT between 1988 and 2009 for progressive or multiple cerebral metastases at presentation. Uni- and multivariate analysis took into account the following patient- and tumor-associated factors: gender and age, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), neurologic symptoms, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, number of intracranial metastases, previous resection or stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases, number of extracranial metastasis sites, and local recurrences as well as regional lymph node metastases at the time of WBRT. Results: In univariate analysis, KPS, LDH, number of intracranial metastases, and neurologic symptoms had a significant influence on overall survival. In multivariate survival analysis, KPS and LDH remained as significant prognostic factors, with hazard ratios of 3.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-6.5) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.6-4.9), respectively. Patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH ≤240 U/L had a median survival of 191 days; patients with KPS ≥70 and LDH >240 U/L, 96 days; patients with KPS <70 and LDH ≤240 U/L, 47 days; and patients with KPS <70 and LDH >240 U/L, only 34 days. Conclusions: Karnofsky performance status and serum LDH values indicate whether patients with advanced intra- and extracranial tumor manifestations are candidates for palliative WBRT or best supportive care.

  14. Improved Treatment of MT-3 Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases in a Mouse Xenograft by LRP-Targeted Oxaliplatin Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Orthmann, Andrea; Peiker, Lisa; Fichtner, Iduna; Hoffmann, Annika; Hilger, Ralf Axel; Zeisig, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    The anti-cancer drug oxaliplatin (OxP) has rarely been used to treat breast carcinoma, as it cannot cross the BBB to treat the frequently subsequent brain metastases. Here, we encapsulated OxP in liposomes prepared to reduce side effects and to simultaneously treat primary tumor and brain metastasis. The angiopep LRP-receptor ligand was bound to the vesicular surface for targeting. Targeted and non-targeted OxP liposomes were tested in vitro (binding, uptake, and transcytosis) and in vivo. Liposomes contained 0.65 mg OxP/mL, their mean diameter was 165 nm, and they released 50% of OxP within 8 days at 4 degrees C and within 22 h at 36 degrees C. MDCK cells were used for uptake and transcytosis quantification. Compared to non-targeted liposomes, targeted liposomes showed 12-fold greater uptake, and 2.25-fold higher transcytosis. In vivo efficacy was tested using human MT-3 breast cancer cells transplanted subcutaneously and intracerebrally into female nude mice, and tumor growth inhibition was measured. OxP was injected (6 mg OxP/kg) four times. The best results were obtained with targeted liposomes (T/C: 21% for subcutaneous and 50% for intracerebral). OxP liposomes with a fluid membrane all inhibited MT-3 tumors significantly better than free OxP, with no significant difference between targeted and non-targeted liposomes. The therapeutic effect was accompanied with strong leukopenia and mild thrombocytopenia with all formulations. The newly developed OxP liposomes significantly improved the treatment of subcutaneously and intracerebrally growing breast cancer, but the targeted angiopep-equipped liposomes showed no superior effect in vivo. PMID:27301172

  15. Risk Factors for Brain Metastases in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer With Definitive Chest Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhe; Bi, Nan; Wang, Jingbo; Hui, Zhouguang; Xiao, Zefen; Feng, Qinfu; Zhou, Zongmei; Chen, Dongfu; Lv, Jima; Liang, Jun; Fan, Chengcheng; Liu, Lipin; Wang, Luhua

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We intended to identify risk factors that affect brain metastases (BM) in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) receiving definitive radiation therapy, which may guide the choice of selective prevention strategies. Methods and Materials: The characteristics of 346 patients with stage III NSCLC treated with thoracic radiation therapy from January 2008 to December 2010 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. BM rates were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors for BM. Results: The median follow-up time was 48.3 months in surviving patients. A total of 74 patients (21.4%) experienced BM at the time of analysis, and for 40 (11.7%) of them, the brain was the first site of failure. The 1-year and 3-year brain metastasis rates were 15% and 28.1%, respectively. In univariate analysis, female sex, age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, T3-4, N3, >3 areas of lymph node metastasis, high lactate dehydrogenase and serum levels of tumor markers (CEA, NSE, CA125) before treatment were significantly associated with BM (P<.05). In multivariate analysis, age ≤60 years (P=.004, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.491), non-squamous cell carcinoma (P=.000, HR=3.726), NSE >18 ng/mL (P=.008, HR=1.968) and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL (P=.002, HR=2.129) were independent risk factors for BM. For patients with 0, 1, 2, and 3 to 4 risk factors, the 3-year BM rates were 7.3%, 18.9%, 35.8%, and 70.3%, respectively (P<.001). Conclusions: Age ≤60 years, non-squamous cell carcinoma, serum NSE >18 ng/mL, and CA125 ≥ 35 U/mL were independent risk factors for brain metastasis. The possibilities of selectively using prophylactic cranial irradiation in higher-risk patients with LA-NSCLC should be further explored in the future.

  16. Validity of Three Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Indexes for Breast Cancer Patients With Radiosurgically Treated Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Sato, Yasunori; Barfod, Bierta E.; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: We tested the validity of 3 recently proposed prognostic indexes for breast cancer patients with brain metastases (METs) treated radiosurgically. The 3 indexes are Diagnosis-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (DS-GPA), New Breast Cancer (NBC)-Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA), and our index, sub-classification of RPA class II patients into 3 sub-classes (RPA class II-a, II-b and II-c) based on Karnofsky performance status, tumor number, original tumor status, and non-brain METs. Methods and Materials: This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using our database of 269 consecutive female breast cancer patients (mean age, 55 years; range, 26-86 years) who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) alone, without whole-brain radiation therapy, for brain METs during the 15-year period between 1996 and 2011. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the absolute risk of each event. Results: Kaplan-Meier plots of our patient series showed statistically significant survival differences among patients stratified into 3, 4, or 5 groups based on the 3 systems (P<.001). However, the mean survival time (MST) differences between some pairs of groups failed to reach statistical significance with all 3 systems. Thus, we attempted to regrade our 269 breast cancer patients into 3 groups by modifying our aforementioned index along with the original RPA class I and III, (ie, RPA I+II-a, II-b, and II-c+III). There were statistically significant MST differences among these 3 groups without overlap of 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between any 2 pairs of groups: 18.4 (95% CI = 14.0-29.5) months in I+II-a, 9.2 in II-b (95% CI = 6.8-12.9, P<.001 vs I+II-a) and 5.0 in II-c+III (95% CI = 4.2-6.8, P<.001 vs II-b). Conclusions: As none of the new grading systems, DS-GPS, BC-RPA and our system, was applicable to our set of radiosurgically treated patients for comparing survivals after GKRS, we slightly modified our system for breast cancer

  17. RO4929097 and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-22

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Competing Risk Analysis of Neurologic versus Nonneurologic Death in Patients Undergoing Radiosurgical Salvage After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy Failure: Who Actually Dies of Their Brain Metastases?

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, John T.; Colmer, Hentry G.; White, Lance; Fitzgerald, Nora; Isom, Scott; Bourland, John D.; Laxton, Adrian W.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Chan, Michael D.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To estimate the hazard for neurologic (central nervous system, CNS) and nonneurologic (non-CNS) death associated with patient, treatment, and systemic disease status in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) failure, using a competing risk model. Patients and Methods: Of 757 patients, 293 experienced recurrence or new metastasis following WBRT. Univariate Cox proportional hazards regression identified covariates for consideration in the multivariate model. Competing risks multivariable regression was performed to estimate the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for both CNS and non-CNS death after adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors. The resultant model was converted into an online calculator for ease of clinical use. Results: The cumulative incidence of CNS and non-CNS death at 6 and 12 months was 20.6% and 21.6%, and 34.4% and 35%, respectively. Patients with melanoma histology (relative to breast) (aHR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0), brainstem location (aHR 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.5), and number of metastases (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.2) had increased aHR for CNS death. Progressive systemic disease (aHR 0.55, 95% CI 0.4-0.8) and increasing lowest margin dose (aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.9-0.99) were protective against CNS death. Patients with lung histology (aHR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.9) and progressive systemic disease (aHR 2.14, 95% CI 1.5-3.0) had increased aHR for non-CNS death. Conclusion: Our nomogram provides individual estimates of neurologic death after salvage stereotactic radiosurgery for patients who have failed prior WBRT, based on histology, neuroanatomical location, age, lowest margin dose, and number of metastases after adjusting for their competing risk of death from other causes.

  19. Surgical Cavity Constriction and Local Progression Between Resection and Adjuvant Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Matthew B; Sneed, Penny K; Aghi, Manish K; McDermott, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to a surgical cavity after brain metastasis resection is a promising treatment for improving local control. The optimal timing of adjuvant SRS, however, has yet to be determined. Changes in resection cavity volume and local progression in the interval between surgery and SRS are likely important factors in deciding when to proceed with adjuvant SRS. We conducted a retrospective review of patients with a brain metastasis treated with surgical resection followed by SRS to the resection cavity. Post-operative and pre-radiosurgery magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was reviewed for evidence of cavity volume changes, amount of edema, and local tumor progression. Resection cavity volume and edema volume were measured using volumetric analysis. We identified 21 consecutive patients with a brain metastasis treated with surgical resection and radiosurgery to the resection cavity. Mean age was 57 yrs. The most common site of metastasis was the frontal lobe (38%), and the most common primary neoplasms were lung adenocarcinoma and melanoma (24% each). The mean postoperative resection cavity volume was 7.8 cm3 and shrank to a mean of 4.5 cm3 at the time of repeat imaging for radiosurgical planning (median 41 days after initial post-operative MRI), resulting in a mean reduction in cavity volume of 43%. Patients who underwent pre-SRS imaging within 1 month of their initial post-operative MRI had a mean volume reduction of 13% compared to 61% in those whose pre-SRS imaging was ≥1 month (p=0.0003). Post-resection edema volume was not related to volume reduction (p=0.59). During the interval between MRIs, 52% of patients showed evidence of tumor progression within the resection cavity wall. There was no significant difference in local recurrence if the interval between resection and radiosurgery was <1 month (n=8) versus ≥1 month (n=13, p=0.46). These data suggest that the surgical cavity after brain metastasis resection constricts over time

  20. Development and Preclinical Application of an Immunocompetent Transplant Model of Basal Breast Cancer with Lung, Liver and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hoenerhoff, Mark; Hixon, Julie A.; Durum, Scott K.; Qiu, Ting-hu; He, Siping; Burkett, Sandra; Liu, Zi-Yao; Swanson, Steven M.; Green, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is associated with a poor prognosis and for which no targeted therapies currently exist. In order to improve preclinical testing for TNBC that relies primarily on using human xenografts in immunodeficient mice, we have developed a novel immunocompetent syngeneic murine tumor transplant model for basal-like triple-negative breast cancer. The C3(1)/SV40-T/t-antigen (C3(1)/Tag) mouse mammary tumor model in the FVB/N background shares important similarities with human basal-like TNBC. However, these tumors or derived cell lines are rejected when transplanted into wt FVB/N mice, likely due to the expression of SV40 T-antigen. We have developed a sub-line of mice (designated REAR mice) that carry only one copy of the C3(1)/Tag-antigen transgene resulting from a spontaneous transgene rearrangement in the original founder line. Unlike the original C3(1)/Tag mice, REAR mice do not develop mammary tumors or other phenotypes observed in the original C3(1)/Tag transgenic mice. REAR mice are more immunologically tolerant to SV40 T-antigen driven tumors and cell lines in an FVB/N background (including prostate tumors from TRAMP mice), but are otherwise immunologically intact. This transplant model system offers the ability to synchronously implant the C3(1)/Tag tumor-derived M6 cell line or individual C3(1)/Tag tumors from various stages of tumor development into the mammary fat pads or tail veins of REAR mice. C3(1)/Tag tumors or M6 cells implanted into the mammary fat pads spontaneously metastasize at a high frequency to the lung and liver. M6 cells injected by tail vein can form brain metastases. We demonstrate that irradiated M6 tumor cells or the same cells expressing GM-CSF can act as a vaccine to retard tumor growth of implanted tumor cells in the REAR model. Preclinical studies performed in animals with an intact immune system should more authentically replicate treatment responses in

  1. Development and Preclinical Application of an Immunocompetent Transplant Model of Basal Breast Cancer with Lung, Liver and Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Aprelikova, Olga; Tomlinson, Christine C; Hoenerhoff, Mark; Hixon, Julie A; Durum, Scott K; Qiu, Ting-Hu; He, Siping; Burkett, Sandra; Liu, Zi-Yao; Swanson, Steven M; Green, Jeffrey E

    2016-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is associated with a poor prognosis and for which no targeted therapies currently exist. In order to improve preclinical testing for TNBC that relies primarily on using human xenografts in immunodeficient mice, we have developed a novel immunocompetent syngeneic murine tumor transplant model for basal-like triple-negative breast cancer. The C3(1)/SV40-T/t-antigen (C3(1)/Tag) mouse mammary tumor model in the FVB/N background shares important similarities with human basal-like TNBC. However, these tumors or derived cell lines are rejected when transplanted into wt FVB/N mice, likely due to the expression of SV40 T-antigen. We have developed a sub-line of mice (designated REAR mice) that carry only one copy of the C3(1)/Tag-antigen transgene resulting from a spontaneous transgene rearrangement in the original founder line. Unlike the original C3(1)/Tag mice, REAR mice do not develop mammary tumors or other phenotypes observed in the original C3(1)/Tag transgenic mice. REAR mice are more immunologically tolerant to SV40 T-antigen driven tumors and cell lines in an FVB/N background (including prostate tumors from TRAMP mice), but are otherwise immunologically intact. This transplant model system offers the ability to synchronously implant the C3(1)/Tag tumor-derived M6 cell line or individual C3(1)/Tag tumors from various stages of tumor development into the mammary fat pads or tail veins of REAR mice. C3(1)/Tag tumors or M6 cells implanted into the mammary fat pads spontaneously metastasize at a high frequency to the lung and liver. M6 cells injected by tail vein can form brain metastases. We demonstrate that irradiated M6 tumor cells or the same cells expressing GM-CSF can act as a vaccine to retard tumor growth of implanted tumor cells in the REAR model. Preclinical studies performed in animals with an intact immune system should more authentically replicate treatment responses in

  2. Changing practice patterns of Gamma Knife versus linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases in the US.

    PubMed

    Park, Henry S; Wang, Elyn H; Rutter, Charles E; Corso, Christopher D; Chiang, Veronica L; Yu, James B

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a crucial component in the management of limited brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Intracranial SRS has traditionally been delivered using a frame-based Gamma Knife (GK) platform, but stereotactic modifications to the linear accelerator (LINAC) have made an alternative approach possible. In the absence of definitive prospective trials comparing the efficacy and toxicities of treatment between the 2 techniques, nonclinical factors (such as technology accessibility, costs, and efficiency) may play a larger role in determining which radiosurgery system a facility may choose to install. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to investigate national patterns of GK SRS versus LINAC SRS use and to determine which factors may be associated with the adoption of these radiosurgery systems. METHODS The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients > 18 years old with NSCLC who were treated with single-fraction SRS to the brain between 2003 and 2011. Patients who received "SRS not otherwise specified" or who did not receive a radiotherapy dose within the range of 12-24 Gy were excluded to reduce the potential for misclassification. The chi-square test, t-test, and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to compare potential demographic, clinicopathologic, and health care system predictors of GK versus LINAC SRS use, when appropriate. RESULTS This study included 1780 patients, among whom 1371 (77.0%) received GK SRS and 409 (23.0%) underwent LINAC SRS. Over time, the proportion of patients undergoing LINAC SRS steadily increased, from 3.2% in 2003 to 30.8% in 2011 (p < 0.001). LINAC SRS was adopted more rapidly by community versus academic facilities (overall 29.2% vs 17.2%, p < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, 4 independent predictors of increased LINAC SRS use emerged, including year of diagnosis in 2008-2011 versus 2003-2007 (adjusted OR [AOR] 2.04, 95% CI 1

  3. Discovery of novel spiro 1,3,4-thiadiazolines as potent, orally bioavailable and brain penetrant KSP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mansoor, Umar Faruk; Angeles, Angie R; Dai, Chaoyang; Yang, Liping; Vitharana, Dilrukshi; Basso, Andrea D; Gray, Kimberly; Tang, Huadong; Liu, Ming; Liang, Lianzhu; Allbritton, Omaira; Siddiqui, M Arshad

    2015-05-15

    Kinesin spindle protein (KSP) is a mitotic kinesin that is expressed only in proliferating cells and plays a key role in spindle pole separation, formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle, as well as centrosome separation and maturation. Inhibition of KSP has the potential to provide anti-tumor activity while avoiding peripheral neuropathy associated with some microtubule-targeted drugs. Based on MK-0731 and related heterocyclic compounds targeting the KSP monastrol binding site, structurally constrained spiro-cyclic KSP inhibitors were designed. In particular, rapid evaluation and optimization of the novel spiro 1,3,4-thiadiazolines resulted in a series of potent KSP inhibitors demonstrating mechanism based activities in cells, including induction of the mitotic marker phospho-histone H3 and induction of monaster spindle formation. Further optimization of the pharmacokinetic (PK) properties afforded MK-8267 as a potent, orally bioavailable and brain penetrant KSP inhibitor which showed anti-tumor activity in preclinical xenograft models. PMID:25868746

  4. 1,3-dinitrobenzene induces age- and region-specific oxidation to mitochondria-related proteins in brain.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Laura L; Landis, Rory W; Remmer, Henriette; Bergin, Ingrid L; Philbert, Martin A

    2015-05-01

    Regions of the brain with high energy requirements are especially sensitive to perturbations in mitochondrial function. Hence, neurotoxicant exposures that target mitochondria in regions of high energy demand have the potential to accelerate mitochondrial damage inherently occurring during the aging process. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene (DNB) is a model neurotoxicant that selectively targets mitochondria in brainstem nuclei innervated by the eighth cranial nerve. This study investigates the role of age in the regional susceptibility of brain mitochondria-related proteins (MRPs) to oxidation following exposure to DNB. Male F344 rats (1 month old [young], 3 months old [adult], 18 months old [aged]) were exposed to 10 mg/kg DNB prior to mitochondrial isolation and histopathology experiments. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, 3 important region- and age-related increases in DNB-induced MRP oxidation were determined: (1) brainstem mitochondria are ×3 more sensitive to DNB-induced oxidation than cortical mitochondria; (2) oxidation of brainstem MRPs is significantly higher than in cortical counterparts; and (3) MRPs from the brainstems of older rats are significantly more oxidized than those from young or adult rats. Furthermore, lower levels of DNB cause signs of intoxication (ataxia, chromodacryorrhea) and vacuolation of the susceptible neuropil in aged animals, while neither is observed in DNB-exposed young rats. Additionally, methemoglobin levels increase significantly in DNB-exposed adult and aged animals, but not young DNB-exposed animals. This suggests that oxidation of key MRPs observed in brainstem of aged animals is necessary for DNB-induced signs of intoxication and lesion formation. These results provide compelling evidence that environmental chemicals such as DNB may aid in the acceleration of injury to specific brain regions by inducing oxidation of sensitive mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25716674

  5. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene Induces Age- and Region-Specific Oxidation to Mitochondria-Related Proteins in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kubik, Laura L.; Landis, Rory W.; Remmer, Henriette; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Philbert, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Regions of the brain with high energy requirements are especially sensitive to perturbations in mitochondrial function. Hence, neurotoxicant exposures that target mitochondria in regions of high energy demand have the potential to accelerate mitochondrial damage inherently occurring during the aging process. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene (DNB) is a model neurotoxicant that selectively targets mitochondria in brainstem nuclei innervated by the eighth cranial nerve. This study investigates the role of age in the regional susceptibility of brain mitochondria-related proteins (MRPs) to oxidation following exposure to DNB. Male F344 rats (1 month old [young], 3 months old [adult], 18 months old [aged]) were exposed to 10 mg/kg DNB prior to mitochondrial isolation and histopathology experiments. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, 3 important region- and age-related increases in DNB-induced MRP oxidation were determined: (1) brainstem mitochondria are ×3 more sensitive to DNB-induced oxidation than cortical mitochondria; (2) oxidation of brainstem MRPs is significantly higher than in cortical counterparts; and (3) MRPs from the brainstems of older rats are significantly more oxidized than those from young or adult rats. Furthermore, lower levels of DNB cause signs of intoxication (ataxia, chromodacryorrhea) and vacuolation of the susceptible neuropil in aged animals, while neither is observed in DNB-exposed young rats. Additionally, methemoglobin levels increase significantly in DNB-exposed adult and aged animals, but not young DNB-exposed animals. This suggests that oxidation of key MRPs observed in brainstem of aged animals is necessary for DNB-induced signs of intoxication and lesion formation. These results provide compelling evidence that environmental chemicals such as DNB may aid in the acceleration of injury to specific brain regions by inducing oxidation of sensitive mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25716674

  6. Brain Metastases as Presenting Feature in 'Burned Out' Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common malignancy in males aged 20 to 39, and the incidence is increasing. TGCTs have a tendency to grow rapidly with a high risk of metastatic spread. TGCTs generally present with a palpable testicular mass, yet may present less commonly with symptoms arising from metastatic disease.  A 24-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with progressive headaches. Initial imaging reported a single mass in the right frontal lobe. Complete surgical resection revealed suspicion for metastatic poorly differentiated carcinoma with an inconclusive immunohistochemical profile. Further staging scans revealed pulmonary and pelvic tumor deposits. Tumor markers with alpha-fetoprotein, beta-human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase were not elevated. Follow-up cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial disease progression and he underwent whole brain radiation therapy. Additional outside pathology consultation for chromosomal analysis revealed features consistent with a TGCT. A scrotal ultrasound revealed a minimally atrophic right testicle. With evidence supporting the potential for response to chemotherapeutic treatment in TGCT, the patient was started on cisplatin and etoposide. Bleomycin was planned for the second cycle of chemotherapy if his pulmonary function improved.  A salient feature of all invasive TGCTs is a gain in material in the short arm of chromosome 12, and is diagnostic if present. Although the initial pathology revealed a non-diagnostic metastatic tumor, further testing revealed amplification of chromosome 12p. The examination of poorly differentiated carcinomas of an unknown primary site using light microscopy and immunohistochemical profiling alone may be inadequate, and should undergo molecular chromosomal analysis. This case is presented for its unconventional presentation and rarity of occurrence. It brings forward the discussion of both the commonality of TGCT in young male

  7. Brain Metastases as Presenting Feature in 'Burned Out' Testicular Germ Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kate; Brunet, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common malignancy in males aged 20 to 39, and the incidence is increasing. TGCTs have a tendency to grow rapidly with a high risk of metastatic spread. TGCTs generally present with a palpable testicular mass, yet may present less commonly with symptoms arising from metastatic disease.  A 24-year-old otherwise healthy male presented with progressive headaches. Initial imaging reported a single mass in the right frontal lobe. Complete surgical resection revealed suspicion for metastatic poorly differentiated carcinoma with an inconclusive immunohistochemical profile. Further staging scans revealed pulmonary and pelvic tumor deposits. Tumor markers with alpha-fetoprotein, beta-human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase were not elevated. Follow-up cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed intracranial disease progression and he underwent whole brain radiation therapy. Additional outside pathology consultation for chromosomal analysis revealed features consistent with a TGCT. A scrotal ultrasound revealed a minimally atrophic right testicle. With evidence supporting the potential for response to chemotherapeutic treatment in TGCT, the patient was started on cisplatin and etoposide. Bleomycin was planned for the second cycle of chemotherapy if his pulmonary function improved.  A salient feature of all invasive TGCTs is a gain in material in the short arm of chromosome 12, and is diagnostic if present. Although the initial pathology revealed a non-diagnostic metastatic tumor, further testing revealed amplification of chromosome 12p. The examination of poorly differentiated carcinomas of an unknown primary site using light microscopy and immunohistochemical profiling alone may be inadequate, and should undergo molecular chromosomal analysis. This case is presented for its unconventional presentation and rarity of occurrence. It brings forward the discussion of both the commonality of TGCT in young male

  8. Decision Making in a Data-Poor Environment: Management of Brain Metastases From Testicular and Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, Timothy

    2016-02-01

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 32-year-old man with a history of a mixed germ cell tumor of the testis presented with acute-onset, right-sided weakness and numbness. His previous treatment included orchiectomy, which revealed a 5-cm tumor that was 95% yolk sac tumor and 5% embryonal carcinoma, and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for clinical stage I disease in January 2010, which revealed no nodal metastases. Starting in June 2010, he was treated with four cycles of etoposide and cisplatin for pulmonary and thoracic lymph node metastases and a rising serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level. He subsequently received four cycles of paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and cisplatin for relapse in the lungs and mediastinal nodes with a rising AFP level starting in January 2011. He reported having a 2-week history of intermittent headaches in December 2011, when he presented with acute-onset, right-sided weakness and numbness. Computed tomographs of the head was obtained and demonstrated a left parietal intracranial hemorrhage without midline shift or hydrocephalus. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a complex, 4.5-cm mass consistent with a hemorrhagic metastasis. His serum AFP level was elevated at 47 ng/mL. The patient became progressively obtunded and underwent emergency surgical decompression and resection of the tumor. Histopathologic evaluation of the resected tissue showed metastatic germ cell tumor predominantly consisting of a yolk sac element (Fig 1). His AFP level declined

  9. Preclinical Evaluation of Oncolytic Δγ134.5 Herpes Simplex Virus Expressing Interleukin-12 for Therapy of Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Cody, James J.; Scaturro, Pietro; Cantor, Alan B.; Yancey Gillespie, G.; Parker, Jacqueline N.; Markert, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The metastasis of breast cancer to the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is a problem of increasing importance. As improving treatments continue to extend patient survival, the incidence of CNS metastases from breast cancer is on the rise. New treatments are needed, as current treatments are limited by deleterious side effects and are generally palliative. We have previously described an oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV), designated M002, which lacks both copies of the γ134.5 neurovirulence gene and carries a murine interleukin 12 (IL-12) expression cassette, and have validated its antitumor efficacy in a variety of preclinical models of primary brain tumors. However, M002 has not been yet evaluated for use against metastatic brain tumors. Here, we demonstrate the following: both human breast cancer and murine mammary carcinoma cells support viral replication and IL-12 expression from M002; M002 replicates in and destroys breast cancer cells from a variety of histological subtypes, including “triple-negative” and HER2 overexpressing; M002 improves survival in an immunocompetent model more effectively than does a non-cytokine control virus. Thus, we conclude from this proof-of-principle study that a γ134.5-deleted IL-12 expressing oncolytic HSV may be a potential new therapy for breast cancer brain metastases. PMID:23346408

  10. Adjuvant Whole-Brain Radiotherapy Versus Observation After Radiosurgery or Surgical Resection of One to Three Cerebral Metastases: Results of the EORTC 22952-26001 Study

    PubMed Central

    Kocher, Martin; Soffietti, Riccardo; Abacioglu, Ufuk; Villà, Salvador; Fauchon, Francois; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Fariselli, Laura; Tzuk-Shina, Tzahala; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Carrie, Christian; Hassel, Mohamed Ben; Kouri, Mauri; Valeinis, Egils; van den Berge, Dirk; Collette, Sandra; Collette, Laurence; Mueller, Rolf-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer phase III trial assesses whether adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) increases the duration of functional independence after surgery or radiosurgery of brain metastases. Patients and Methods Patients with one to three brain metastases of solid tumors (small-cell lung cancer excluded) with stable systemic disease or asymptomatic primary tumors and WHO performance status (PS) of 0 to 2 were treated with complete surgery or radiosurgery and randomly assigned to adjuvant WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions) or observation (OBS). The primary end point was time to WHO PS deterioration to more than 2. Results Of 359 patients, 199 underwent radiosurgery, and 160 underwent surgery. In the radiosurgery group, 100 patients were allocated to OBS, and 99 were allocated to WBRT. After surgery, 79 patients were allocated to OBS, and 81 were allocated to adjuvant WBRT. The median time to WHO PS more than 2 was 10.0 months (95% CI, 8.1 to 11.7 months) after OBS and 9.5 months (95% CI, 7.8 to 11.9 months) after WBRT (P = .71). Overall survival was similar in the WBRT and OBS arms (median, 10.9 v 10.7 months, respectively; P = .89). WBRT reduced the 2-year relapse rate both at initial sites (surgery: 59% to 27%, P < .001; radiosurgery: 31% to 19%, P = .040) and at new sites (surgery: 42% to 23%, P = .008; radiosurgery: 48% to 33%, P = .023). Salvage therapies were used more frequently after OBS than after WBRT. Intracranial progression caused death in 78 (44%) of 179 patients in the OBS arm and in 50 (28%) of 180 patients in the WBRT arm. Conclusion After radiosurgery or surgery of a limited number of brain metastases, adjuvant WBRT reduces intracranial relapses and neurologic deaths but fails to improve the duration of functional independence and overall survival. PMID:21041710

  11. A New Treatment Paradigm: Neoadjuvant Radiosurgery Before Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases With Analysis of Local Tumor Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, Anthony L.; Burri, Stuart H.; Wiggins, Walter F.; Boltes, Margaret O.; Mehrlich, Melissa; Norton, H. James; Fraser, Robert W.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Resected brain metastases (BM) require radiation therapy to reduce local recurrence. Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) reduces recurrence, but with potential toxicity. Postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a strategy without prospective data and problematic target delineation. SRS delivered in the preoperative setting (neoadjuvant, or NaSRS) allows clear target definition and reduction of intraoperative dissemination of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Our treatment of resectable BM with NaSRS was begun in 2005. Subsequently, a prospective trial of NaSRS was undertaken. A total of 47 consecutively treated patients (23 database and 24 prospective trial) with a total of 51 lesions were reviewed. No statistical difference was observed between the 2 cohorts, and they were combined for analysis. The median follow-up time was 12 months (range, 1-58 months), and the median age was 57. A median of 1 day elapsed between NaSRS and resection. The median diameter of lesions was 3.04 cm (range, 1.34-5.21 cm), and the median volume was 8.49 cc (range, 0.89-46.7 cc). A dose reduction strategy was used, with a median dose of 14 Gy (range, 11.6-18 Gy) prescribed to 80% isodose. Results: Kaplan-Meier overall survival was 77.8% and 60.0% at 6 and 12 months. Kaplan-Meier local control was 97.8%, 85.6%, and 71.8% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Five of 8 failures were proved pathologically without radiation necrosis. There were no perioperative adverse events. Ultimately, 14.8% of the patients were treated with WBRT. Local failure was more likely with lesions >10 cc (P=.01), >3.4 cm (P=.014), with a trend in surface lesions (P=.066) and eloquent areas (P=.052). Six of the 8 failures had an obvious dural attachment or proximity to draining veins. Conclusions: NaSRS can be performed safely and effectively with excellent results without documented radiation necrosis. Local control was excellent even in the setting of large (>3 cm) lesions. The strong

  12. Analyses of prognostic factors in cases of non-small cell lung cancer with multiple brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiaomei; Zhou, Daoan; Liang, Shixiong; Zhou, Caicun

    2016-01-01

    Aim To observe the therapeutic efficacy and prognostic factors that influence survival rates in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with multiple brain metastases (BMs), (more than three and less than ten). Methods Retrospective analyses were conducted on the clinical data of 209 NSCLC patients with multiple BMs and were admitted to our hospital between March 2007 and November 2012. All BM patients received whole-brain radiotherapy. Two hundred patients received combined chemotherapy during the treatment process; 99 received targeted drug therapy; and nine got only symptomatic and supportive treatment. Survival time was defined as the period from the start of BM therapy to the patient’s death or end of the follow-up period. The Kaplan–Meier method was used to calculate the median survival time, and the 6-month, 1-, and 2-year cumulative survival rates, as well as to plot the survival curves. The patients’ cultural background included their socioeconomic status, level of education, their understanding of the disease, and the degree of care and support they received from their family members. Log-rank test was employed to test the differences in the survival rates between the subgroups. Cox multivariate regression analyses were used to analyze the various factors influencing the prognoses of NSCLC with multiple BMs. Results The follow-up duration was between 1 and 87 months. The median survival time for all BM patients was 12.1 months (95% confidence interval 9.37–14.83). The 6-month, 1-, and 2-year cumulative survival rates were 80%, 50.2%, and 10.7%, respectively. Univariate analyses revealed that the independent factors influencing survival prognoses included Karnofsky Performance Status score, control of the primary lung tumor, interval between the confirmed diagnoses of lung cancer and BM, presence of extracranial metastasis, number of chemotherapy cycles undergone, Graded Prognostic Assessment class, administration of combined targeted drug

  13. Validation of the new graded prognostic assessment scale for brain metastases: a multicenter prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prognostic indexes are useful to guide tailored treatment strategies for cancer patients with brain metastasis (BM). We evaluated the new Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) scale in a prospective validation study to compare it with two published prognostic indexes. Methods A total of 285 newly diagnosed BM (n = 85 with synchronous BM) patients, accrued prospectively between 2000 and 2009, were included in this analysis. Mean age was 62 ± 12.0 years. The median KPS and number of BM was 70 (range, 20-100) and 3 (range, 1-50), respectively. The majority of primary tumours were lung (53%), or breast (17%) cancers. Treatment was administered to 255 (89.5%) patients. Only a minority of patients could be classified prospectively in a favourable prognostic class: GPA 3.5-4: 3.9%; recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) 1, 8.4% and Basic Score for BM (BSBM) 3, 9.1%. Mean follow-up (FU) time was 5.2 ± 4.7 months. Results During the period of FU, 225 (78.9%) patients died. The 6 months- and 1 year-OS was 36.9% and 17.6%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, performance status (P < 0.001), BSBM (P < 0.001), Center (P = 0.007), RPA (P = 0.02) and GPA (P = 0.03) were statistically significant for OS. The survival prediction performances' of all indexes were identical. Noteworthy, the significant OS difference observed within 3 months of diagnosis between the BSBM, RPA and GPA classes/groups was not observed after this cut-off time point. Harrell's concordance indexes C were 0.58, 0.61 and 0.58 for the GPA, BSBM and RPA, respectively. Conclusions Our data suggest that the new GPA index is a valid prognostic index. In this prospective study, the prediction performance was as good as the BSBM or RPA systems. These published indexes may however have limited long term prognostication capability. PMID:21366924

  14. Density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes correlates with extent of brain edema and overall survival time in patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Anna S; Fuchs, Elisabeth; Ricken, Gerda; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Bindea, Gabriela; Spanberger, Thomas; Hackl, Monika; Widhalm, Georg; Dieckmann, Karin; Prayer, Daniela; Bilocq, Amelie; Heinzl, Harald; Zielinski, Christoph; Bartsch, Rupert; Birner, Peter; Galon, Jerome; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune microenvironment of the brain differs from that of other organs and the role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in brain metastases (BM), one of the most common and devastating complication of cancer, is unclear. We investigated TIL subsets and their prognostic impact in 116 BM specimens using immunohistochemistry for CD3, CD8, CD45RO, FOXP3, PD1 and PD-L1. The Immunoscore was calculated as published previously. Overall, we found TIL infiltration in 115/116 (99.1%) BM specimens. PD-L1 expression was evident in 19/67 (28.4%) BM specimens and showed no correlation with TIL density (p > 0.05). TIL density was not associated with corticosteroid administration (p > 0.05). A significant difference in infiltration density according to TIL subtype was present (p < 0.001; Chi Square); high infiltration was most frequently observed for CD3+ TILs (95/116; 81.9%) and least frequently for PD1+ TILs (18/116; 15.5%; p < 0.001). Highest TIL density was observed in melanoma, followed by renal cell cancer and lung cancer BM (p < 0.001). The density of CD8+ TILs correlated positively with the extent of peritumoral edema seen on pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (p = 0.031). The density of CD3+ (15 vs. 6 mo; p = 0.015), CD8+ (15 vs. 11 mo; p = 0.030) and CD45RO+ TILs (18 vs. 8 mo; p = 0.006) showed a positive correlation with favorable median OS times. Immunoscore showed significant correlation with survival prognosis (27 vs. 10 mo; p < 0.001). The prognostic impact of Immunoscore was independent from established prognostic parameters at multivariable analysis (HR 0.612, p < 0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that dense TILs infiltrates are common in BM and correlate with the amount of peritumoral brain edema and survival prognosis, thus identifying the immune system as potential biomarker for cancer patients with CNS affection. Further studies are needed to substantiate our findings. PMID:26942067

  15. SU-E-T-79: Comparison of Doses Received by the Hippocampus in Patients Treated with Single Vs Multiple Isocenter Based Stereotactic Radiation Therapy to the Brain for Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Algan, O; Giem, J; Young, J; Ali, I; Ahmad, S; Hossain, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the doses received by the hippocampus and normal brain tissue during a course of stereotactic radiotherapy utilizing a single isocenter (SI) versus multiple isocenter (MI) in patients with multiple intracranial metastases. Methods: Seven patients imaged with MRI including SPGR sequence and diagnosed with 2–3 brain metastases were included in this retrospective study. Two sets of stereotactic IMRT treatment plans, (MI vs SI), were generated. The hippocampus was contoured on SPGR sequences and doses received by the hippocampus and whole brain were calculated. The prescribed dose was 25Gy in 5 fractions. The two groups were compared using t-test analysis. Results: There were 17 lesions in 7 patients. The median tumor, right hippocampus, left hippocampus and brain volumes were: 3.37cc, 2.56cc, 3.28cc, and 1417cc respectively. In comparing the two treatment plans, there was no difference in the PTV coverage except in the tail of the DVH curve. All tumors had V95 > 99.5%. The only statistically significant parameter was the V100 (72% vs 45%, p=0.002, favoring MI). All other evaluated parameters including the V95 and V98 did not reveal any statistically significant differences. None of the evaluated dosimetric parameters for the hippocampus (V100, V80, V60, V40, V20, V10, D100, D90, D70, D50, D30, D10) revealed any statistically significant differences (all p-values > 0.31) between MI and SI plans. The total brain dose was slightly higher in the SI plans, especially in the lower dose regions, although this difference was not statistically significant. Utilizing brain-sub-PTV volumes did not change these results. Conclusion: The use of SI treatment planning for patients with up to 3 brain metastases produces similar PTV coverage and similar normal tissue doses to the hippocampus and the brain compared to MI plans. SI treatment planning should be considered in patients with multiple brain metastases undergoing stereotactic treatment.

  16. Randomized Phase II Trial of High-Dose Melatonin and Radiation Therapy for RPA Class 2 Patients With Brain Metastases (RTOG 0119)

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, Lawrence . E-mail: Berklb@moffitt.usf.edu; Berkey, Brian; Rich, Tyvin; Hrushesky, William; Gallagher, Michael; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; McGarry, Ronald C.; Suh, John; Mehta, Minesh

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To determine if high-dose melatonin for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 2 patients with brain metastases improved survival over historical controls, and to determine if the time of day melatonin was given affected its toxicity or efficacy. RTOG 0119 was a phase II randomized trial for this group of patients. Methods and Materials: RTOG RPA Class 2 patients with brain metastases were randomized to 20 mg of melatonin, given either in the morning (8-9 AM) or in the evening (8-9 PM). All patients received radiation therapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) in the afternoon. Melatonin was continued until neurologic deterioration or death. The primary endpoint was overall survival time. Neurologic deterioration, as reflected by the Mini-Mental Status Examination, was also measured. Results: Neither of the randomized groups had survival distributions that differed significantly from the historic controls of patients treated with whole-brain radiotherapy. The median survivals of the morning and evening melatonin treatments were 3.4 and 2.8 months, while the RTOG historical control survival was 4.1 months. Conclusions: High-dose melatonin did not show any beneficial effect in this group of patients.

  17. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Melanoma Brain Metastases in Patients Receiving Ipilimumab: Safety Profile and Efficacy of Combined Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kiess, Ana P.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.; Tabar, Viviane; Huse, Jason T.; Chan, Timothy A.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Beal, Kathryn

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Ipilimumab (Ipi), a monoclonal antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been shown to improve survival in patients with metastatic melanoma. In this single-institution study, we investigated the safety and efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with melanoma brain metastases (BMs) who also received Ipi. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2011, 46 patients with melanoma received Ipi and underwent single-fraction SRS for BMs. A total of 113 BMs (91% intact, 9% postoperative) were treated with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 15-24 Gy). Ipi was given at 3 mg/kg (54%) or 10 mg/kg (46%) for a median of 4 doses (range, 1-21). Adverse events were recorded with the use of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate survival, and Cox regression was used to investigate associations. Results: Fifteen patients received SRS during Ipi, 19 received SRS before Ipi, and 12 received SRS after Ipi. Overall survival (OS) was significantly associated with the timing of SRS/Ipi (P=.035) and melanoma-specific graded prognostic assessment (P=.013). Patients treated with SRS during or before Ipi had better OS and less regional recurrence than did those treated with SRS after Ipi (1-year OS 65% vs 56% vs 40%, P=.008; 1-year regional recurrence 69% vs 64% vs 92%, P=.003). SRS during Ipi also yielded a trend toward less local recurrence than did SRS before or after Ipi (1-year local recurrence 0% vs 13% vs 11%, P=.21). On magnetic resonance imaging, an increase in BM diameter to >150% was seen in 50% of patients treated during or before Ipi but in only 13% of patients treated after Ipi. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities were seen in 20% of patients. Conclusion: Overall, the combination of Ipi and SRS appears to be well tolerated. Concurrent delivery of Ipi and SRS is associated with favorable locoregional control and possibly longer survival. It may also cause a temporary increase in tumor size, possibly

  18. Outcome Evaluation of Oligometastatic Patients Treated with Surgical Resection Followed by Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery (HSRS) on the Tumor Bed, for Single, Large Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Federico; Navarria, Pierina; Cozzi, Luca; Ascolese, Anna Maria; Maggi, Giulia; Riva, Marco; Masci, Giovanna; D’Agostino, Giuseppe; Finocchiaro, Giovanna; Santoro, Armando; Bello, Lorenzo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of a combined treatment, surgery followed by adjuvant hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (HSRS) on the tumor bed, in oligometastatic patients with single, large brain metastasis (BM). Methods and Materials Fom January 2011 to March 2015, 69 patients underwent complete surgical resection followed by HSRS with a total dose of 30Gy in 3 daily fractions. Clinical outcome was evaluated by neurological examination and MRI 2 months after radiotherapy and then every 3 months. Local progression was defined as radiographic increase of the enhancing abnormality in the irradiated volume, and brain distant progression as the presence of new brain metastases or leptomeningeal enhancement outside the irradiated volume. Surgical morbidity and radiation-therapy toxicity, local control (LC), brain distant progression (BDP), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results The median preoperative volume and maximum diameter of BM was 18.5cm3 (range 4.1–64.2cm3) and 3.6cm (range 2.1-5-4cm); the median CTV was 29.0cm3 (range 4.1–203.1cm3) and median PTV was 55.2cm3 (range 17.2–282.9cm3). The median follow-up time was 24 months (range 4–33 months). The 1-and 2-year LC in site of treatment was 100%; the median, 1-and 2-year BDP was 11.9 months, 19.6% and 33.0%; the median, 1-and 2-year OS was 24 months (range 4–33 months), 91.3% and 73.0%. No severe postoperative morbidity or radiation therapy toxicity occurred in our series. Conclusions Multimodal approach, surgery followed by HSRS, can be an effective treatment option for selected patients with single, large brain metastases from different solid tumors. PMID:27348860

  19. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Wang, Meihua; Robins, H. Ian; Schell, Michael C.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Komaki, Ritsuko; Souhami, Luis; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Khuntia, Deepak; Demas, William; Shah, Sunjay A.; Nedzi, Lucien A.; Perry, Gad; Suh, John H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2013-04-01

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

  20. Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Minesh P. Shapiro, William R.; Phan, See C.; Gervais, Radj; Carrie, Christian; Chabot, Pierre; Patchell, Roy A.; Glantz, Michael J.; Recht, Lawrence; Langer, Corey; Sur, Ranjan K.; Roa, Wilson H.; Mahe, Marc A.; Fortin, Andre; Nieder, Carsten; Meyers, Christina A.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

  1. Stereotactic Radiosurgical Treatment of Brain Metastases to the Choroid Plexus;Renal cell cancer; Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA); Graded prognostic assessment (GPA); Survival and outcomes; Gamma knife

    SciTech Connect

    Siomin, Vitaly; Lin, Jennifer L.; Marko, Nicholas F.; Barnett, Gene H.; Toms, Steven A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Navaratne, Kapila; Suh, John H.; Weil, Robert J.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Choroid plexus metastases (CPM) are uncommon lesions. Consequently, optimal management of CPM is uncertain. We summarize our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of CPM. Methods and Materials: Sixteen consecutive patients with presumed CPM treated with SRS between 1997 and 2007 were examined. Twelve were men with a median age at diagnosis of CPM of 61.9 {+-} 9.9 years; 14 had metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). All patients had controlled primary disease at the time of treatment for CPM. Four patients with RCC and 1 with non-small-cell lung cancer had undergone whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) previously and 2 had received SRS to other brain metastases. The disease-free interval from the primary diagnosis to CPM diagnosis averaged 39.3 {+-} 46.2 months (range, 1.0-156.3). Five patients were asymptomatic; of the remaining 11, none had symptoms related to CPM. All presented with a single CPM. Results: Average maximum diameter of the CPMs was 2.0 {+-} 1.0 cm (range, 0.9-4.1 cm); mean volume was 2.4 {+-} 2.6 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-9.3). Median SRS dose was 24 Gy to the 53% isodose line (range, 14-24 Gy). Survival after SRS to the CPM was 25.3 {+-} 23.4 months (range, 3.2-101.6). Patients in Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) class I (n = 10) had improved survival compared to those in class II (n = 6), as did those with better GPA scores. There were no local failures. After SRS, 1 patient underwent WBRT, 3 patients had one, and another had two subsequent SRS treatments to other brain lesions. Of the 14 patients who have died, 11 succumbed to systemic disease progression, 2 to progressive, multifocal central nervous system disease, and 1 to systemic disease with concurrent, stable central nervous system disease. There were no complications related to SRS. Conclusions: Most CPMs are associated with RCC. SRS represents a safe and viable treatment option as primary modality for these metastases, with excellent outcomes.

  2. Prophylactic cranial irradiation for preventing brain metastases in patients undergoing radical treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer: A Cochrane Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Jason Francis . E-mail: jason.lester@velindre-tr.wales.nhs.uk; MacBeth, Fergus R.; Coles, Bernadette

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) has a role in the management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative intent. Methods and Materials: A search strategy was designed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PCI with no PCI in NSCLC patients treated with curative intent. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cancerlit were searched, along with relevant journals, books, and review articles to identify potentially eligible trials. Four RCTs were identified and reviewed. A total of 951 patients were randomized in these RCTs, of whom 833 were evaluable and reported. Forty-two patients with small-cell lung cancer were excluded, leaving 791 patients in total. Because of the small patient numbers and trial heterogeneity, no meta-analysis was attempted. Results: Prophylactic cranial irradiation did significantly reduce the incidence of brain metastases in three trials. No trial reported a survival advantage with PCI over observation. Toxicity data were poorly collected and no quality of life assessments were carried out in any trial. Conclusion: Prophylactic cranial irradiation may reduce the incidence of brain metastases, but there is no evidence of a survival benefit. It was not possible to evaluate whether any radiotherapy regimen is superior, and the effect of PCI on quality of life is not known. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of PCI in clinical practice. Where possible, patients should be offered entry into a clinical trial.

  3. Current Dosing Paradigm for Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone After Surgical Resection of Brain Metastases Needs to Be Optimized for Improved Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos; Dhabaan, Anees; Hall, William; Raore, Bethwel; Olson, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter; Oyesiku, Nelson; Crocker, Ian

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To describe the use of radiosurgery (RS) alone to the resection cavity after resection of brain metastases as an alternative to adjuvant whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Sixty-two patients with 64 cavities were treated with linear accelerator-based RS alone to the resection cavity after surgical removal of brain metastases between March 2007 and August 2010. Fifty-two patients (81%) had a gross total resection. Median cavity volume was 8.5 cm{sup 3}. Forty-four patients (71%) had a single metastasis. Median marginal and maximum doses were 18 Gy and 20.4 Gy, respectively. Sixty-one cavities (95%) had gross tumor volume to planning target volume expansion of {>=}1 mm. Results: Six-month and 1-year actuarial local recurrence rates were 14% and 22%, respectively, with a median follow-up period of 9.7 months. Six-month and 1-year actuarial distant brain recurrence, total intracranial recurrence, and freedom from WBRT rates were 31% and 51%, 41% and 63%, and 91% and 74%, respectively. The symptomatic cavity radiation necrosis rate was 8%, with 2 patients (3%) undergoing surgery. Of the 11 local failures, 8 were in-field, 1 was marginal, and 2 were both (defined as in-field if {>=}90% of recurrence within the prescription isodose and marginal if {>=}90% outside of the prescription isodose). Conclusions: The high rate of in-field cavity failure suggests that geographic misses with highly conformal RS are not a major contributor to local recurrence. The current dosing regimen derived from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 90-05 should be optimized in this patient population before any direct comparison with WBRT.

  4. A Case of Alveolar Echinococcosis Presenting as Cerebral and Spinal Intradural Metastases.

    PubMed

    Atalan, Guneri; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Sönmez, Güner; Celik, Mahir; Simsek, Berksan

    2016-06-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis. The involvement of Central Nervous System is reported to be 1-3% in literature. Brain involvement is considered a sign of the terminal phase of alveolar echinococcosis. We here in reported a 67-year-old female who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with brain and spinal intradural metastases. PMID:27551181

  5. Lung metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs) and spread through the ...

  6. Blockage of the Upregulation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.3 Improves Outcomes after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian-jian; Li, Wei-ping; Lin, Yong; Feng, Jun-feng; Jia, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Excessive active voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the cellular abnormalities associated with secondary brain injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We previously presented evidence that significant upregulation of Nav1.3 expression occurs in the rat cortex at 2 h and 12 h post-TBI and is correlated with TBI severity. In our current study, we tested the hypothesis that blocking upregulation of Nav1.3 expression in vivo in the acute stage post-TBI attenuates the secondary brain injury associated with TBI. We administered either antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) targeting Nav1.3 or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, and 8 h following TBI. Control sham animals received aCSF administration at the same time points. At 12 h post-TBI, Nav1.3 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels in bilateral hippocampi of the aCSF group were significantly elevated, compared with the sham and ODN groups (p<0.01). However, the Nav1.3 mRNA levels in the uninjured contralateral hippocampus of the ODN group were significantly lowered, compared with the sham group (p<0.01). Treatment with antisense ODN significantly decreased the number of degenerating neurons in the ipsilateral hippocampal CA3 and hilar region (p<0.01). A set of left-to-right ratio value analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 image on one day, three days, and seven days post-TBI showed marked edema in the ipsilateral hemisphere of the aCSF group, compared with that of the ODN group (p<0.05). The Morris water maze memory retention test showed that both the aCSF and ODN groups took longer to find a hidden platform, compared with the sham group (p<0.01). However, latency in the aCSF group was significantly higher than in the ODN group (p<0.05). Our in vivo Nav1.3 inhibition studies suggest that therapeutic strategies to block upregulation of Nav1.3 expression in the brain may improve outcomes following TBI. PMID:24313291

  7. Microglial Kv1.3 Channels and P2Y12 Receptors Differentially Regulate Cytokine and Chemokine Release from Brain Slices of Young Adult and Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue damage following stroke or traumatic brain injury is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes, while microglia play a central role in causing and regulating neuroinflammation via production of proinflammatory substances, including cytokines and chemokines. Here, we used brain slices, an established in situ brain injury model, from young adult and aged mice to investigate cytokine and chemokine production with particular focus on the role of microglia. Twenty four hours after slice preparation, higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. TNF-α and IL-6, and chemokines, i.e. CCL2 and CXCL1, were released from brain slices of aged mice than from slices of young adult mice. However, maximal microglial stimulation with LPS for 24 h did not reveal age-dependent differences in the amounts of released cytokines and chemokines. Mechanisms underlying microglial cytokine and chemokine production appear to be similar in young adult and aged mice. Inhibition of microglial Kv1.3 channels with margatoxin reduced release of IL-6, but not release of CCL2 and CXCL1. In contrast, blockade of microglial P2Y12 receptors with PSB0739 inhibited release of CCL2 and CXCL1, whereas release of IL-6 remained unaffected. Cytokine and chemokine production was not reduced by inhibitors of Kir2.1 K+ channels or adenosine receptors. In summary, our data suggest that brain tissue damage-induced production of cytokines and chemokines is age-dependent, and differentially regulated by microglial Kv1.3 channels and P2Y12 receptors. PMID:26011191

  8. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  9. Comparison of the effectiveness of whole-brain radiotherapy plus temozolomide versus whole-brain radiotherapy in treating brain metastases based on a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bai, Gui-Rong; An, Jin-Bing; Chu, Yang; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Li, Shu-Ming; Yan, Kai-Jing; Lü, Fu-Rong; Gu, Ning; Griffin, Amanda N; Sun, Bin-Yuan; Li, Wei; Wang, Guo-Cheng; Zhou, Shui-Ping; Sun, He; Liu, Chang-Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) combination with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) has been tested by many randomized controlled trials in the treatment of brain metastases (BMs) in China and other countries. We performed an up-to-date meta-analysis to determine (i) the log odds ratios (LORs) of objective response (ORR) and adverse effects (AEs) for all-grade, and (ii) the T value of mean overall survival in patients with BMs treated with WBRT combined with TMZ versus WBRT alone. PubMed, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and WanFang Data were searched for articles published up to 28 January 2015. Eligible studies were selected according to the PRISMA statement. ORR, AEs, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random-effects models. Eighteen studies were included in our analysis. A total of 1028 participants were enrolled. Summary LORs of ORR were 1.0239 (P<0.0001) on comparing WBRT plus TMZ with WBRT ORR (n=17). The overall mean difference of mean overall survival (n=17) between TMZ plus WBRT and WBRT was 2.2505 weeks (P=0.02185). There was a significant difference between WBRT plus TMZ and WBRT alone with a LOR of AEs for all-grade of (i) 0.923 for gastrointestinal toxicity and (ii) 0.7978 for myelosuppression. Sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis were also performed. The 18 eligible randomized controlled trials demonstrated that the combination of WBRT and TMZ significantly improves the ORR and is statistically insignificant in prolonging the survival of patients with BMs. In addition, an increase in the incidence of gastrointestinal toxicity and myelosuppression was significant for all-grade. PMID:26426520

  10. Potential Applications of Imaging and Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases and Glioblastoma to Improve Patient Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Nam P.; Nguyen, Mai L.; Vock, Jacqueline; Lemanski, Claire; Kerr, Christine; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Chi, Alexander; Khan, Rihan; Woods, William; Altdorfer, Gabor; D’Andrea, Mark; Karlsson, Ulf; Hamilton, Russ; Ampil, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and brain metastasis remains a challenge because of the poor survival and the potential for brain damage following radiation. Despite concurrent chemotherapy and radiation dose escalation, local recurrence remains the predominant pattern of failure in GBM most likely secondary to repopulation of cancer stem cells. Even though radiotherapy is highly effective for local control of radio-resistant tumors such as melanoma and renal cell cancer, systemic disease progression is the cause of death in most patients with brain metastasis. Preservation of quality of life (QOL) of cancer survivors is the main issue for patients with brain metastasis. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) by virtue of precise radiation dose delivery may reduce treatment time of patients with GBM without excessive toxicity and potentially improve neurocognitive function with preservation of local control in patients with brain metastasis. Future prospective trials for primary brain tumors or brain metastasis should include IGRT to assess its efficacy to improve patient QOL. PMID:24312897

  11. SU-E-T-587: Optimal Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Technique for Multiple Brain Metastases with Increasing Number of Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Keeling, V; Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To show improvements in dose conformity and normal brain tissue sparing using an optimal planning technique (OPT) against clinically acceptable planning technique (CAP) in the treatment of multiple brain metastases. Methods: A standardized international benchmark case with12 intracranial tumors was planned using two different VMAT optimization methods. Plans were split into four groups with 3, 6, 9, and 12 targets each planned with 3, 5, and 7 arcs using Eclipse TPS. The beam geometries were 1 full coplanar and half non-coplanar arcs. A prescription dose of 20Gy was used for all targets. The following optimization criteria was used (OPT vs. CAP): (No upper limit vs.108% upper limit for target volume), (priority 140–150 vs. 75–85 for normal-brain-tissue), and (selection of automatic sparing Normal-Tissue-Objective (NTO) vs. Manual NTO). Both had priority 50 to critical structures such as brainstem and optic-chiasm, and both had an NTO priority 150. Normal-brain-tissue doses along with Paddick Conformity Index (PCI) were evaluated. Results: In all cases PCI was higher for OPT plans. The average PCI (OPT,CAP) for all targets was (0.81,0.64), (0.81,0.63), (0.79,0.57), and (0.72,0.55) for 3, 6, 9, and 12 target plans respectively. The percent decrease in normal brain tissue volume (OPT/CAP*100) achieved by OPT plans was (reported as follows: V4, V8, V12, V16, V20) (184, 343, 350, 294, 371%), (192, 417, 380, 299, 360%), and (235, 390, 299, 281, 502%) for the 3, 5, 7 arc 12 target plans, respectively. The maximum brainstem dose decreased for the OPT plan by 4.93, 4.89, and 5.30 Gy for 3, 5, 7 arc 12 target plans, respectively. Conclusion: Substantial increases in PCI, critical structure sparing, and decreases in normal brain tissue dose were achieved by eliminating upper limits from optimization, using automatic sparing of normal tissue function with high priority, and a high priority to normal brain tissue.

  12. Ultra-high resolution polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy for brain imaging at 6 um, 3.4 um and 1.3 um resolution (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Akkin, Taner; Magnain, Caroline V.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Cramer, Avilash; Wang, Ruopeng; Sakadžic, Sava; Boas, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Neuroanatomical pathways form the basis for functional activity of brain circuits. In the past, we developed a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography with serial scanning to achieve large-scale brain imaging. The system was able to visualize 3D fiber tracts of ~20 um in diameter. To investigate the neuroanatomical pathways at finer scales, we have now built a polarization-maintaining fiber based ultra-high resolution polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscope (PS-OCM) at 1300 nm. The PS-OCM has an axial resolution of 3.5 um in tissue. The detection setup consists of two spectrometers, acquiring spectral interference on orthogonal polarization channels. With a single measurement, the setup generates four contrasts: reflectivity, cross-polarization, retardance and optic axis orientation. To investigate the capability of PS-OCM at different resolutions, we used three microscope objectives that yield lateral resolutions of 6.0 um, 3.4 um and 1.3 um. Blocks of formalin fixed mouse brain and human brain were scanned. The cross-polarization and retardance images clearly depict the neuronal fiber structures, which are comparable with that generated by the maximum projection of volumetric reflectivity data. The optic axis orientation quantifies the in-plane fiber orientation. With the lateral resolution of 1.3 um, the retardance contrast is weak in white matter due to the shallow depth of focus. Overall, the ultra-high resolution PS-OCM provides a new tool to reveal neuroanatomical maps in the brain at cellular resolution.

  13. Prognostic factors in patients treated with stereotactic image-guided robotic radiosurgery for brain metastases: a single-center retrospective analysis of 223 patients.

    PubMed

    Pontoriero, Antonio; Conti, Alfredo; Iatì, Giuseppe; Mondello, Stefania; Aiello, Dario; Rifatto, Carmen; Risoleti, Edoarda; Mazzei, Micol; Tomasello, Francesco; Pergolizzi, Stefano; De Renzis, Costantino

    2016-07-01

    In this retrospective study, we evaluated the overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) of brain metastases (BM) in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The scope was to identify host, tumor, and treatment factors predictive of LC and survival and define implications for clinical decisions. A total of 223 patients with 360 BM from various histologies treated with SRS alone or associated with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in our institution between July 1, 2008 and August 31, 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among other prognostic factors, we had also evaluated retrospectively Karnofsky performance status scores (KPS) and graded prognostic assessment (GPA). Overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were the primary endpoints. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate OS and LC and identify factors predictive of survival and local control. The median duration of follow-up time was 9 months (range 0.4-51 months). Median overall survival of all patients was 11 months. The median local control was 38 months. No statistical difference in terms of survival or LC between patients treated with SRS alone or associated with WBRT was found. On multivariate analysis, KPS was the only statistically significant predictor of OS (hazard ratio [HR] 2.53, p = 0.006). On univariate analysis, KPS and GPA were significantly prognostic for survival. None of the host, tumor, or treatment factors analyzed in the univariate model factors were significantly associated with local failure. PMID:27106896

  14. Brain Insulin Receptor Causes Activity-Dependent Current Suppression in the Olfactory Bulb Through Multiple Phosphorylation of Kv1.3

    PubMed Central

    FADOOL, D. A.; TUCKER, K.; PHILLIPS, J. J.; SIMMEN, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin and insulin receptor (IR) kinase are found in abundance in discrete brain regions yet insulin signaling in the CNS is not understood. Because it is known that the highest brain insulin-binding affinities, insulin-receptor density, and IR kinase activity are localized to the olfactory bulb, we sought to explore the downstream substrates for IR kinase in this region of the brain to better elucidate the function of insulin signaling in the CNS. First, we demonstrate that IR is postnatally and developmentally expressed in specific lamina of the highly plastic olfactory bulb (OB). ELISA testing confirms that insulin is present in the developing and adult OB. Plasma insulin levels are elevated above that found in the OB, which perhaps suggests a differential insulin pool. Olfactory bulb insulin levels appear not to be static, however, but are elevated as much as 15-fold after a 72-h fasting period. Bath application of insulin to cultured OB neurons acutely induces outward current suppression as studied by the use of traditional whole-cell and single-channel patchclamp recording techniques. Modulation of OB neurons is restricted to current magnitude; IR kinase activation does not modulate current kinetics of inactivation or deactivation. Transient transfection of human embryonic kidney cells with cloned Kv1.3 ion channel, which carries a large proportion of the outward current in these neurons, revealed that current suppression was the result of multiple tyrosine phosphorylation of Kv1.3 channel. Y to F single-point mutations in the channel or deletion of the kinase domain in IR blocks insulininduced modulation and phosphorylation of Kv1.3. Neuromodulation of Kv1.3 current in OB neurons is activity dependent and is eliminated after 20 days of odor/sensory deprivation induced by unilateral naris occlusion at postnatal day 1. IR kinase but not Kv1.3 expression is downregulated in the OB ipsilateral to the occlusion, as demonstrated in cryosections of right (control

  15. Diagnosis-Specific Prognostic Factors, Indexes, and Treatment Outcomes for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases: A Multi-Institutional Analysis of 4,259 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Chao, Samuel T.; Sneed, Penny K.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Controversy endures regarding the optimal treatment of patients with brain metastases (BMs). Debate persists, despite many randomized trials, perhaps because BM patients are a heterogeneous population. The purpose of the present study was to identify significant diagnosis-specific prognostic factors and indexes (Diagnosis-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment [DS-GPA]). Methods and Materials: A retrospective database of 5,067 patients treated for BMs between 1985 and 2007 was generated from 11 institutions. After exclusion of the patients with recurrent BMs or incomplete data, 4,259 patients with newly diagnosed BMs remained eligible for analysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses of the prognostic factors and outcomes by primary site and treatment were performed. The significant prognostic factors were determined and used to define the DS-GPA prognostic indexes. The DS-GPA scores were calculated and correlated with the outcomes, stratified by diagnosis and treatment. Results: The significant prognostic factors varied by diagnosis. For non-small-cell lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer, the significant prognostic factors were Karnofsky performance status, age, presence of extracranial metastases, and number of BMs, confirming the original GPA for these diagnoses. For melanoma and renal cell cancer, the significant prognostic factors were Karnofsky performance status and the number of BMs. For breast and gastrointestinal cancer, the only significant prognostic factor was the Karnofsky performance status. Two new DS-GPA indexes were thus designed for breast/gastrointestinal cancer and melanoma/renal cell carcinoma. The median survival by GPA score, diagnosis, and treatment were determined. Conclusion: The prognostic factors for BM patients varied by diagnosis. The original GPA was confirmed for non-small-cell lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. New DS-GPA indexes were determined for other histologic types and correlated with the outcome, and

  16. Preservation of Memory With Conformal Avoidance of the Hippocampal Neural Stem-Cell Compartment During Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases (RTOG 0933): A Phase II Multi-Institutional Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gondi, Vinai; Pugh, Stephanie L.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Caine, Chip; Corn, Ben; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey N.; Konski, Andre A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Shah, Sunjay; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hippocampal neural stem-cell injury during whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) may play a role in memory decline. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy can be used to avoid conformally the hippocampal neural stem-cell compartment during WBRT (HA-WBRT). RTOG 0933 was a single-arm phase II study of HA-WBRT for brain metastases with prespecified comparison with a historical control of patients treated with WBRT without hippocampal avoidance. Patients and Methods Eligible adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Standardized cognitive function and quality-of-life (QOL) assessments were performed at baseline and 2, 4, and 6 months. The primary end point was the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test–Revised Delayed Recall (HVLT-R DR) at 4 months. The historical control demonstrated a 30% mean relative decline in HVLT-R DR from baseline to 4 months. To detect a mean relative decline ≤ 15% in HVLT-R DR after HA-WBRT, 51 analyzable patients were required to ensure 80% statistical power with α = 0.05. Results Of 113 patients accrued from March 2011 through November 2012, 42 patients were analyzable at 4 months. Mean relative decline in HVLT-R DR from baseline to 4 months was 7.0% (95% CI, −4.7% to 18.7%), significantly lower in comparison with the historical control (P < .001). No decline in QOL scores was observed. Two grade 3 toxicities and no grade 4 to 5 toxicities were reported. Median survival was 6.8 months. Conclusion Conformal avoidance of the hippocampus during WBRT is associated with preservation of memory and QOL as compared with historical series. PMID:25349290

  17. Efficacy and safety of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Jacot, William; Pons, Elvire; Frenel, Jean-Sébastien; Guiu, Séverine; Levy, Christelle; Heudel, Pierre Etienne; Bachelot, Thomas; D'Hondt, Véronique; Darlix, Amélie; Firmin, Nelly; Romieu, Gilles; Thezenas, Simon; Dalenc, Florence

    2016-06-01

    Few data are currently available regarding the efficacy and safety of T-DM1 in breast cancer (BC) patients with unselected brain metastases (BM), since most clinical trials have excluded BM patients or have only included highly selected patients. HER2 + BC patients with BM treated with T-DM1 in 5 French centers were included in this retrospective study. Clinical management was performed according to the product guidelines. Efficacy was evaluated recording tumor response rates, progression-free (PFS) and overall survival, treatment compliance, and safety. Thirty nine patients received T-DM1, among whom 82 % presented with concomitant extra-cerebral disease. Median number of previous metastatic chemotherapy and HER2-directed targeted therapy regimens was 2 (range 0-8) and 1 (0-7), respectively. Thirty six patients had received BM loco-regional treatment (72 % whole-brain radiation therapy). After a median follow-up of 8.1 months (1.4-39.6), 24 patients had progressed (first site of progression: brain 14; meningeal 2; outside of the central nervous system 5; both intra- and extra-cerebral 3), 12 patients had died (disease progression), and 27 patients were still alive. Median number of T-DM1 cycles was 8 (1-43). There were 17 partial responses (44 %) and 6 patients achieved disease stabilization (59 % clinical benefit rate). Median PFS was 6.1 months (95 %CI 5.2-18.3), with one- and two-year PFS rates of 33 and 17 %, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated, without unexpected toxicities, treatment delay, or dose reduction. In this retrospective study, T-DM1 appeared to be an effective and well-tolerated therapeutic option in unselected HER2 + BC patients with BM. These findings require a prospective validation. PMID:27167986

  18. [Brain radiation necrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy of the resection cavity for intracranial metastases: analysis of the literature from four cases].

    PubMed

    Doré, M; Lefebvre, L; Delpon, G; Thillays, F

    2015-04-01

    Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy after resection of brain metastasis is an alternative to whole brain radiotherapy. A high dose per fraction is associated with a risk of radiation necrosis. We present four cases of confirmed histological radiation necrosis. Differentiating recurrent tumour from radiation necrosis in this scenario is challenging. An enhancing area in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a "cut bell pepper" appearance may suggest radiation necrosis. Advanced imaging modalities such as perfusion MR imaging and positron emission tomography can be useful. Dosimetric predictors of the occurrence of radiation necrosis after stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy are poorly understood and require prospective studies on larger cohorts. PMID:25573799

  19. Quality of Life in Patients With Brain Metastases Using the EORTC QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL

    SciTech Connect

    Caissie, Amanda; Nguyen, Janet; Chen, Emily; Zhang Liying; Sahgal, Arjun; Clemons, Mark; Kerba, Marc; Arnalot, Palmira Foro; Danjoux, Cyril; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Holden, Lori; Danielson, Brita; Chow, Edward

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The 20-item European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Brain Neoplasm (QLQ-BN20) is a validated quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaire for patients with primary brain tumors. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 15 Palliative (QLQ-C15-PAL) core palliative questionnaire is a 15-item version of the core 30-item QLQ-C30 and was developed to decrease the burden on patients with advanced cancer. The combination of the QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30 to assess QOL may be too burdensome for patients. The primary aim of this study was to assess QOL in patients before and after treatment for brain metastases using the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL, a version of the QLQ-BN20 questionnaire with 2 additional questions assessing cognitive functioning that were not addressed in the QLQ-C15-PAL. Methods and Materials: Patients with brain metastases completed the QLQ-C15-PAL and QLQ-BN20+2 questionnaires to assess QOL before and 1 month after radiation. Linear regression analysis was used to assess changes in QOL scores over time, as well as to explore associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales, patient demographics, and clinical variables. Spearman correlation assessed associations between the QLQ-BN20+2 and QLQ-C15-PAL scales. Results: Among 108 patients, the majority (55%) received whole-brain radiotherapy only, with 65% of patients completing follow-up at 1 month after treatment. The most prominent symptoms at baseline were future uncertainty (QLQ-BN20+2) and fatigue (QLQ-C15-PAL). After treatment, significant improvement was seen for the QLQ-C15-PAL insomnia scale, as well as the QLQ-BN20+2 scales of future uncertainty, visual disorder, and concentration difficulty. Baseline Karnofsky Performance Status was negatively correlated to QLQ-BN20+2 motor dysfunction but positively related to QLQ-C15-PAL physical functioning and QLQ-BN20+2 cognitive functioning at

  20. Risk of Leptomeningeal Disease in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery Targeting the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Atalar, Banu; Modlin, Leslie A.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Nagpal, Seema; Hanlon, Alexandra; Soltys, Scott G.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to determine the risk of leptomeningeal disease (LMD) in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the postsurgical resection cavity of a brain metastasis, deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in all patients. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 175 brain metastasis resection cavities in 165 patients treated from 1998 to 2011 with postoperative SRS. The cumulative incidence rates, with death as a competing risk, of LMD, local failure (LF), and distant brain parenchymal failure (DF) were estimated. Variables associated with LMD were evaluated, including LF, DF, posterior fossa location, resection type (en-bloc vs piecemeal or unknown), and histology (lung, colon, breast, melanoma, gynecologic, other). Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 1-157 months), median overall survival was 17 months. Twenty-one of 165 patients (13%) developed LMD at a median of 5 months (range, 2-33 months) following SRS. The 1-year cumulative incidence rates, with death as a competing risk, were 10% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6%-15%) for developing LF, 54% (95% CI, 46%-61%) for DF, and 11% (95% CI, 7%-17%) for LMD. On univariate analysis, only breast cancer histology (hazard ratio, 2.96) was associated with an increased risk of LMD. The 1-year cumulative incidence of LMD was 24% (95% CI, 9%-41%) for breast cancer compared to 9% (95% CI, 5%-14%) for non-breast histology (P=.004). Conclusions: In patients treated with SRS targeting the postoperative cavity following resection, those with breast cancer histology were at higher risk of LMD. It is unknown whether the inclusion of whole-brain irradiation or novel strategies such as preresection SRS would improve this risk or if the rate of LMD is inherently higher with breast histology.

  1. Randomized Comparison of Whole Brain Radiotherapy, 20 Gy in Four Daily Fractions Versus 40 Gy in 20 Twice-Daily Fractions, for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, P.H.; Bucci, J.; Browne, L.

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: The present study compared the intracranial control rate and quality of life for two radiation fractionation schemes for cerebral metastases. Methods and Materials: A total of 113 patients with a Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status <3; and stable (>2 months), absent, or concurrent presentation of extracranial disease were randomized to 40 Gy in 20 twice-daily fractions (Arm A) or 20 Gy in four daily fractions (Arm B), stratified by resection status. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life 30-item questionnaire was administered monthly during Year 1, bimonthly during Year 2, and then every 6 months to Year 5. Results: The patient age range was 28-83 years (mean 62). Of the 113 patients, 41 had undergone surgical resection, and 74 patients had extracranial disease (31 concurrent and 43 stable). The median survival time was 6.1 months in Arm A and 6.6 months in Arm B, and the overall 5-year survival rate was 3.5%. Intracranial progression occurred in 44% of Arm A and 64% of Arm B patients (p = .03). Salvage surgery or radiotherapy was used in 4% of Arm A patients and 21% of Arm B patients (p = .004). Death was attributed to central nervous system progression in 32% of patients in Arm A and 52% of patients in Arm B (p = .03). The toxicity was minimal, with a minor increase in short-term cutaneous reactions in Arm A. The patients' quality of life was not impaired by the more intense treatment in Arm A. Conclusion: Intracranial disease control was improved and the quality of life was maintained with 40 Gy in 20 twice-daily fractions. This schema should be considered for better prognosis subgroups of patients with cerebral metastases.

  2. Comparing the expression of integrins αvβ3, αvβ5, αvβ6, αvβ8, fibronectin and fibrinogen in human brain metastases and their corresponding primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schittenhelm, Jens; Klein, Annemarie; Tatagiba, Marcos S; Meyermann, Richard; Fend, Falko; Goodman, Simon L; Sipos, Bence

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the expression of αv-series integrins in brain metastases. Inhibitors targeting these integrins are being tested for their therapeutic potential. Material and Method: The extracellular regions of the αvβ3, αvβ5, αvβ6, αvβ8, the cytoplasmic domain of β3, the αv-chain, and the ECM molecules fibronectin and fibrinogen were studied immunohistochemically in a series of 122 carcinoma and 60 melanomas metastatic to the central nervous system. In addition, 38 matched primary and metastatic tumors to the brain were compared directly. Results: The αv-subunit was generally moderately to highly expressed in most tumors. αvβ3 and cytoplasmic β3 were weakly to moderately detectable in metastatic renal cell carcinomas and melanomas, αvβ5 was prominently expressed in metastatic renal and colorectal carcinomas, αvβ6 was most abundantly detectable in metastatic lung adenocarcinomas, but absent in melanomas. The tumor associated vessels in CNS metastases consistently expressed αvβ3, αvβ5, αv-, fibronectin and fibrinogen, however, mostly at low levels, while αvβ6, αvβ8 were lacking in vasculature. The comparative analysis of 38 matched primary tumors and brain metastases showed comparable levels of expression only for αvβ3 and αvβ8, while αvβ6 and αvβ5 were higher in primaries. Conclusion: We confirmed that integrin expression exhibits considerable heterogeneity according to tumor origin. αvβ5 is the most promising target for integrin targeted treatment in brain metastases. PMID:24294359

  3. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brainstem metastases: Survival, tumor control, and patient outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Aamir; Brown, Paul D. . E-mail: brown.paul@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with brainstem metastases have limited treatment options. In this study, we reviewed outcomes after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of patients with brainstem metastases. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 22 consecutive patients presenting with brainstem metastases who underwent SRS. The most frequent primary malignancy was the lung (n = 11), followed by breast (n = 3) and kidney (n = 2). Three patients (14%) also underwent whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). The median tumor volume was 0.9 mL (range, 0.1-3.3 mL); the median tumor margin dose was 16 Gy (range, 14-23 Gy). Results: Median survival time after SRS was 8.5 months. Although local tumor control was achieved in all patients with imaging follow-up (n = 19), 5 patients died from development and progression of new brain metastases. Two patients (9%) had symptom improvement after SRS, whereas 1 patient (5%) developed a new hemiparesis after SRS. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is safe and provides a high local tumor control rate for patients with small brainstem metastases. Patients with limited systemic disease and good performance status should be strongly considered for SRS.

  4. Addition of Anti-Angiogenetic Therapy with Bevacizumab to Chemo- and Radiotherapy for Leptomeningeal Metastases in Primary Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Michael C.; Zeiner, Pia S.; Jahnke, Kolja; Wagner, Marlies; Mittelbronn, Michel; Steinbach, Joachim P.

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of a primary brain tumor is a condition which is challenging to treat, as it often occurs in rather late disease stages in highly pretreated patients. Its prognosis is dismal and there is still no accepted standard of care. We report here a good clinical effect with a partial response in three out of nine patients and a stable disease with improvement on symptoms in two more patients following systemic anti-angiogenic treatment with bevacizumab (BEV) alone or in combination with chemo- and/or radiotherapy in a series of patients with leptomeningeal dissemination from primary brain tumors (diffuse astrocytoma WHO°II, anaplastic astrocytoma WHO°III, anaplastic oligodendroglioma WHO°III, primitive neuroectodermal tumor and glioblastoma, both WHO°IV). This translated into effective symptom control in five out of nine patients, but only moderate progression-free and overall survival times were reached. Partial responses as assessed by RANO criteria were observed in three patients (each one with anaplastic oligodendroglioma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor and glioblastoma). In these patients progression-free survival (PFS) intervals of 17, 10 and 20 weeks were achieved. In three patients (each one with diffuse astrocytoma, anaplastic astrocytoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor) stable disease was observed with PFS of 13, 30 and 8 weeks. Another three patients (all with glioblastoma) were primary non-responders and deteriorated rapidly with PFS of 3 to 4 weeks. No severe adverse events were seen. These experiences suggest that the combination of BEV with more conventional therapy schemes with chemo- and/or radiotherapy may be a palliative treatment option for patients with leptomeningeal dissemination of brain tumors. PMID:27253224

  5. Tumor DNA in cerebral spinal fluid reflects clinical course in a patient with melanoma leptomeningeal brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingmei; Pan, Wenying; Connolly, Ian D; Reddy, Sunil; Nagpal, Seema; Quake, Stephen; Gephart, Melanie Hayden

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) from brain tumor patients contains tumor cellular and cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which provides a less-invasive and routinely accessible method to obtain tumor genomic information. In this report, we used droplet digital PCR to test mutant tumor DNA in CSF of a patient to monitor the treatment response of metastatic melanoma leptomeningeal disease (LMD). The primary melanoma was known to have a BRAF (V600E) mutation, and the patient was treated with whole brain radiotherapy and BRAF inhibitors. We collected 9 CSF samples over 6 months. The mutant cfDNA fraction gradually decreased from 53 % (time of diagnosis) to 0 (time of symptom alleviation) over the first 6 time points. Three months after clinical improvement, the patient returned with severe symptoms and the mutant cfDNA was again detected in CSF at high levels. The mutant DNA fraction corresponded well with the patient's clinical response. We used whole exome sequencing to examine the mutation profiles of the LMD tumor DNA in CSF before therapeutic response and after disease relapse, and discovered a canonical cancer mutation PTEN (R130*) at both time points. The cellular and cfDNA revealed similar mutation profiles, suggesting cfDNA is representative of LMD cells. This study demonstrates the potential of using cellular or cfDNA in CSF to monitor treatment response for LMD. PMID:26961773

  6. Antacid Use and De Novo Brain Metastases in Patients with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Who Were Treated Using First-Line First-Generation Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Mu; Lai, Chien-Hao; Chang, Huang-Chih; Chao, Tung-Ying; Tseng, Chia-Cheng; Fang, Wen-Feng; Wang, Chin-Chou; Chung, Yu-Hsiu; Wang, Yi-Hsi; Su, Mao-Chang; Liu, Shih-Feng; Huang, Kuo-Tung; Chen, Hung-Chen; Chang, Ya-Chun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background Antacid treatments decrease the serum concentrations of first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), although it is unknown whether antacids affect clinical outcomes. As cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of TKIs are much lower than serum concentrations, we hypothesized that this drug-drug interaction might affect the prognosis of patients with de novo brain metastases. Materials and Methods This retrospective study evaluated 269 patients with EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had been diagnosed between December 2010 and December 2013, and had been treated using first-line first-generation EGFR-TKIs. Among these patients, we identified patients who concurrently used H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as antacids. Patients who exhibited >30% overlap between the use of TKIs and antacids were considered antacid users. Results Fifty-seven patients (57/269, 21.2%) were antacid users, and antacid use did not significantly affect progression-free survival (PFS; no antacids: 11.2 months, H2RAs: 9.4 months, PPIs: 6.7 months; p = 0.234). However, antacid use significantly reduced overall survival (OS; no antacids: 25.0 months, H2RAs: 15.5 months, PPIs: 11.3 months; p = 0.002). Antacid use did not affect PFS for various metastasis sites, although antacid users with de novo brain metastases exhibited significantly shorter OS, compared to non-users (11.8 vs. 16.3 months, respectively; p = 0.041). Antacid use did not significantly affect OS in patients with bone, liver, or pleural metastases. Conclusion Antacid use reduced OS among patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC who were treated using first-line first-generation EGFR-TKIs, and especially among patients with de novo brain metastases. PMID:26894507

  7. Alveolar echinococcosis of liver presenting with neurological symptoms due to brain metastases with simultaneous lung metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aydinli, Bülent; Aydin, Unal; Yazici, Pinar; Oztürk, Gürkan; Onbaş, Omer; Polat, K Yalçin

    2008-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis (EM). AE is an endemic disease in Turkey and it is particularly common in people living in the eastern Anatolia Region. In addition to various clinical presentations, symptoms which lead to diagnosis, however, are usually associated with the metastatic lesions. We herein reported a 62-year-old man who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with simultaneous lung and brain metastasis. We think there was only one therapeutic option, namely medical treatment with albendazol, which is the usual treatment for patients living in eastern Anatolia and who are admitted late resulting in a subsequent inoperable situation. Thus, radiological screening studies for the public in this region may increase the possibility of surgical treatment for alveolar hydatid disease. PMID:19156614

  8. Assessment of intracranial metastases from neuroendocrine tumors/carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ragab Shalaby, Ahmed M.; Kazuei, Hoshi; Koichi, Honma; Naguib, Saeed; Al-Menawei, Lubna A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most common sites of origin for neuroendocrine carcinoma are gastrointestinal tract and its accessory glands, and lungs. Materials and Methods: One-hundred fifty cases diagnosed with metastatic brain lesions were retrieved from hospital records within 5 years. For these cases, the primary neoplasm, histopathological classification, metastasis, treatment, and fate all were studied. Results: Intracranial deposits were detected in 10%. The primary lesion was in the lungs in 87% of patients, and 1 patient in the breast and 1 in esophagus. Pathological classification of the primary lesion was Grade 2 (MIB-1: 3–20%) in 1 patient and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MIB-1: ≥21%) in 14 patients. The median period from onset of the primary lesion up to diagnosis of brain metastasis was 12.8 months. About 33% of patients had a single metastasis whereas 67% patients had multiple metastases. Brain metastasis was extirpated in 33% of patients. Stereotactic radiotherapy alone was administered in 20% of patients, and brain metastasis was favorably controlled in most of the patients with coadministration of cranial irradiation as appropriate. The median survival period from diagnosis of brain metastasis was 8.1 months. Conclusion: Most of patients with brain metastasis from neuroendocrine carcinoma showed the primary lesion in the lungs, and they had multiple metastases to the liver, lymph nodes, bones, and so forth at the time of diagnosis of brain metastasis. The guidelines for accurate diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine carcinoma should be immediately established based on further analyses of those patients with brain metastasis. PMID:27365963

  9. 2-Cyclopropylimino-3-methyl-1,3-thiazoline hydrochloride alters lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory cytokines and neuronal morphology in mouse fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Cho, Chang Hun; Choi, Soo Young; Ahn, Jee-Yin; Yang, Seung-Ju; Cho, Sung-Woo

    2016-03-01

    It is well documented that a maternal immune response to infection during pregnancy can cause neurodevelopmental damage. We demonstrate in our current study that maternally administered 2-cyclopropylimino-3-methyl-1,3-thiazoline hydrochloride (KHG26377), a novel thiazole derivative, prevents fetal malformations and neurodevelopmental deficits in offspring by blocking lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. Administration of KHG26377 effectively regulated LPS-induced inflammatory markers and mediators such as soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, se-Selectin, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 in the maternal serum. Furthermore, maternally administered KHG26377 showed an inhibitory effect on the LPS-induced developmental toxicity by selectively suppressing the TNF-α level in maternal serum, amniotic fluid, placenta, fetal liver, and fetal brain as well as by suppression of LPS-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and myelin basic protein (MBP) levels in the fetal brain. In addition, pretreatment of neuronal cells with KHG26377 effectively reestablished the cell body morphology and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) staining compared to the LPS-treated group in cortex primary neuronal cultures. Although the clinical relevance of our findings remains to be determined, our results provide novel insights into KHG26377 as a possible therapeutic agent to protect fetuses against various inflammatory responses. PMID:26522435

  10. Radiotherapy plus EGFR TKIs in non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases: an update meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Min, Weijie; Li, Yanan; Yue, Zhijian; Wu, Chunyan; Zhou, Caicun

    2016-06-01

    Brain metastasis (BM) is the common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a poor prognosis and dismal survival rate. This update meta-analysis aimed to derive a more precise estimation of radiotherapy plus epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in NSCLC patients with BM. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Library were searched to identify any relevant publications. After screening the literature and undertaking quality assessment and data extraction, the meta-analysis was performed using STATA Version 12.0. In total, 15 studies involving 1552 participants were included. The results indicated that radiotherapy plus EGFR TKIs was more effective at improving response rate and disease control rate (DCR) (risk ratio (RR) = 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12-1.96, P = 0.005; RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.02-1.60, P = 0.035; respectively) than radiotherapy alone or plus chemotherapy. Moreover, radiotherapy plus EGFR TKIs significantly prolonged the time to central nervous system progression (CNS-TTP) (HR = 0.56, 95% CI [0.33, 0.80]; P = 0.000) and median overall survival (OS) (HR = 0.58, 95% CI [0.42, 0.74]; P = 0.000) but significantly increased adverse events (any grade) (RR = 1.25, 95% CI [1.01, 1.57]; P = 0.009), especially rash and dry skin. These results suggested that radiotherapy plus EGFR TKIs produced superior response rate and DCR and markedly prolonged the CNS-TTP and OS of NSCLC patients with BM. However, combined groups had the higher rate of incidence of overall adverse effects, especially rash and dry skin. PMID:26990668

  11. Prospective Evaluation of Quality of Life and Neurocognitive Effects in Patients With Multiple Brain Metastases Receiving Whole-Brain Radiotherapy With or Without Thalidomide on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trial 0118

    SciTech Connect

    Corn, Benjamin W. Moughan, Jennifer M.S.; Knisely, Jonathan P.S.; Fox, Sherry W.; Chakravarti, Arnab; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Curran, Walter J.; Robins, H. Ian; Brachman, David G.; Henderson, Randal H.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0118 randomized patients with multiple brain metastases to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) {+-} thalidomide. This secondary analysis of 156 patients examined neurocognitive and quality of life (QOL) outcomes. Methods and Materials: Quality of life was determined with the Spitzer Quality of Life Index (SQLI). The Folstein Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) assessed neurocognitive function. SQLI and MMSE were administered at baseline and at 2-month intervals. MMSE was scored with a threshold value associated with neurocognitive functioning (absolute cutoff level of 23) and with the use of corrections for age and educational level. Results: Baseline SQLI predicted survival. Patients with SQLI of 7-10 vs. <7 had median survival time (MST) of 4.8 vs. 3.1 months, p = 0.05. Both arms showed steady neurocognitive declines, but SQLI scores remained stable. Higher levels of neurocognitive decline were observed with age and education-level corrections. Of patients considered baseline age/educational level neurocognitive failures, 32% died of intracranial progression. Conclusions: Quality of life and neuropsychological testing can be prospectively administered on a Phase III cooperative group trial. The MMSE should be evaluated with adjustments for age and educational level. Baseline SQLI is predictive of survival. Despite neurocognitive declines, QOL remained stable during treatment and follow-up. Poor neurocognitive function may predict clinical deterioration. Lack of an untreated control arm makes it difficult to determine the contribution of the respective interventions (i.e., WBRT, thalidomide) to neurocognitive decline. The RTOG has developed a trial to study the role of preventative strategies aimed at forestalling neurocognitive decline in this population.

  12. Hair-sparing whole brain radiotherapy with volumetric arc therapy in patients treated for brain metastases: dosimetric and clinical results of a phase II trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the dosimetric results and impact of volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) on temporary alopecia and hair-loss related quality of life (QOL) in whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods The potential of VMAT-WBRT to reduce the dose to the hair follicles was assessed. A human cadaver was treated with both VMAT-WBRT and conventional opposed field (OF) WBRT, while the subcutaneously absorbed dose was measured by radiochromic films and calculated by the planning system. The impact of these dose reductions on temporary alopecia was examined in a prospective phase II trial, with the mean score of hair loss at 1 month after VMAT-WBRT (EORTC-QOL BN20) as a primary endpoint and delivering a dose of 20 Gy in 5 fractions. An interim analysis was planned after including 10 patients to rule out futility, defined as a mean score of hair loss exceeding 56.7. A secondary endpoint was the global alopecia areata severity score measured with the “Severity of Alopecia Tool” (SALT) with a scale of 0 (no hair loss) to 100 (complete alopecia). Results For VMAT-WBRT, the cadaver measurements demonstrated a dose reduction to the hair follicle volume of 20.5% on average and of 41.8% on the frontal-vertex-occipital medial axis as compared to OF-WBRT. In the phase II trial, a total of 10 patients were included before the trial was halted due to futility. The EORTC BN20 hair loss score following WBRT was 95 (SD 12.6). The average median dose to the hair follicle volume was 12.6 Gy (SD 0.9), corresponding to a 37% dose reduction compared to the prescribed dose. This resulted in a mean SALT-score of 75. Conclusions Compared to OF-WBRT, VMAT-WBRT substantially reduces hair follicle dose. These dose reductions could not be related to an improved QOL or SALT score. PMID:25074394

  13. Identification of accurate reference genes for RT-qPCR analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from primary non-small cell lung cancers and brain and lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Søes, Signe; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens; Hager, Henrik; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2013-08-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and metastatic spread of the cancer rather than the primary tumor is the main cause of death. However, the molecular alterations of cancer cells leading to the formation of metastasis are poorly understood. This is partly a result of most solid tumor samples available for retrospective studies being archived as formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens causing the nucleic acids to be highly degraded. Furthermore, stably expressed reference genes for normalization of gene expression data using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) have not been identified for combined analysis of primary lung tumors and the tissues where to the cancer metastasize. Using an optimized RT-qPCR workflow we have analyzed the expression of 23 candidate reference genes in a total of 54 FFPE specimens derived from primary Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer tumors, brain metastases, and lymph node metastases as well as normal lung, lymph node, and brain tissues. We show that every aspect of the workflow is highly reproducible, and the PUM1, TBP, and IPO8 genes were identified as the most stably expressed reference genes among the candidates, by using the GeNorm and NormFinder software programs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that commonly used reference genes such as ACTB (β-actin), GAPDH, and rRNA18S are less stably expressed in the studied samples. The presented workflow and the identified reference genes may facilitate more reliable gene expression studies in lung cancer using RNA from FFPE tissues. PMID:23643276

  14. Small ubiquitin-like modifier 1-3 is activated in human astrocytic brain tumors and is required for glioblastoma cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Liangli; Roehn, Gabriele; Pearlstein, Robert D.; Ali-Osman, Francis; Pan, Hongjie; Goldbrunner, Roland; Krantz, Matthew; Harms, Christoph; Paschen, Wulf

    2013-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO1, 2, 3) is a group of proteins that conjugate to lysine residues of target proteins thereby modifying their activity, stability, and subcellular localization. A large number of SUMO target proteins are transcription factors and other nuclear proteins involved in gene expression. Furthermore, SUMO conjugation plays key roles in genome stability, quality control of newly synthesized proteins, proteasomal degradation of proteins and DNA damage repair. Any marked increase in levels of SUMO-conjugated proteins is therefore expected to have a major impact on the fate of cells. We show here that SUMO conjugation is activated in human astrocytic brain tumors. Levels of both SUMO1- and SUMO2/3-conjugated proteins were markedly increased in tumor samples. The effect was least pronounced in low-grade astrocytoma (WHO Grade II) and most pronounced in glioblastoma multiforme (WHO Grade IV). We also found a marked rise in levels of Ubc9, the only SUMO conjugation enzyme identified so far. Blocking SUMO1-3 conjugation in glioblastoma cells by silencing their expression blocked DNA synthesis, cell growth and clonogenic survival of cells. It also resulted in DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation of H2AX, indicative of DNA double-strand damage, and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Collectively, these findings highlight the pivotal role of SUMO conjugation in DNA damage repair processes and imply that the SUMO conjugation pathway could be a new target of therapeutic intervention aimed at increasing the sensitivity of glioblastomas to radio- and chemotherapy. PMID:23078246

  15. An Interindividual Comparison of O-(2- [{sup 18}F]Fluoroethyl)-L-Tyrosine (FET)- and L-[Methyl-{sup 11}C]Methionine (MET)-PET in Patients With Brain Gliomas and Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Astner, Sabrina T.; Riedel, Eva; Nieder, Carsten; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Heinemann, Felix; Schwaiger, Markus; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: L-[methyl-{sup 11}C]methionine (MET)-positron emission tomography (PET) has a high sensitivity and specificity for imaging of gliomas and metastatic brain tumors. The short half-life of {sup 11}C (20 minutes) limits the use of MET-PET to institutions with onsite cyclotron. O-(2- [{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) is labeled with {sup 18}F (half-life, 120 minutes) and could be used much more broadly. This study compares the uptake of FET and MET in gliomas and metastases, as well as treatment-induced changes. Furthermore, it evaluates the gross tumor volume (GTV) of gliomas defined on PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: We examined 42 patients with pretreated gliomas (29 patients) or brain metastases (13 patients) prospectively by FET- and MET-PET on the same day. Uptake of FET and MET was quantified by standardized uptake values. Imaging contrast was assessed by calculating lesion-to-gray matter ratios. Tumor extension was quantified by contouring GTV in 17 patients with brain gliomas. Gross tumor volume on PET was compared with GTV on MRI. Sensitivity and specificity of MET- and FET-PET for differentiation of viable tumor from benign changes were evaluated by comparing the PET result with histology or clinical follow-up. Results: There was a strong linear correlation between standardized uptake values calculated for both tracers in cortex and lesions: r = 0.78 (p = 0.001) and r = 0.84 (p < 0.001), respectively. Image contrast was similar for MET- and FET-PET (lesion-to-gray matter ratios of 2.36 {+-} 1.01 and 2.33 {+-} 0.77, respectively). Mean GTV in 17 glioma patients was not significantly different on MET- and FET-PET. Both MET- and FET-PET delineated tumor tissue outside of MRI changes. Both tracers provided differentiated tumor tissue and treatment-related changes with a sensitivity of 91% at a specificity of 100%. Conclusions: O-(2- [{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine-PET and MET-PET provide comparable diagnostic

  16. Translocation between membranes and cytosol of p42IP4, a specific inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate/phosphatidylinositol 3,4, 5-trisphosphate-receptor protein from brain, is induced by inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and regulated by a membrane-associated 5-phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Stricker, R; Adelt, S; Vogel, G; Reiser, G

    1999-10-01

    The highly conserved 42-kDa protein, p42IP4 was identified recently from porcine brain. It has also been identified similarly in bovine, rat and human brain as a protein with two pleckstrin homology domains that binds Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 with high affinity and selectivity. The brain-specific p42IP4 occurs both as membrane-associated and cytosolic protein. Here, we investigate whether p42IP4 can be translocated from membranes by ligand interaction. p42IP4 is released from cerebellar membranes by incubation with Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. This dissociation is concentration-dependent (> 100 nM), occurs within a few minutes and and is ligand-specific. p42IP4 specifically associates with PtdIns(3, 4,5)P3-containing lipid vesicles and can dissociate from these vesicles by addition of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. p42IP4 is only transiently translocated from the membranes as Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 can be degraded by a membrane-associated 5-phosphatase to Ins(1,3,4)P3. Then, p42IP4 re-binds to the membranes from which it can be re-released by re-addition of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. Thus, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 specifically induces the dissociation from membranes of a PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 binding protein that can reversibly re-associate with the membranes. Quantitative analysis of the inositol phosphates in rat brain tissue revealed a concentration of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 comparable to that required for p42IP4 translocation. Thus, in vivo p42IP4 might interact with membranes in a ligand-controlled manner and be involved in physiological processes induced by the two second messengers Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. PMID:10504414

  17. Response of 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids to single and fractionated doses of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea.

    PubMed

    Sano, Y; Hoshino, T; Barker, M; Deen, D F

    1984-02-01

    This study was designed to examine the relative effect of each of four fractions of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) against 9L rat brain tumor multicellular spheroids and to compare the results of the cell survival and growth delay assays. Similar levels of cell kill resulted when BCNU was administered either as single fractions of 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, or 6.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr or as one to four fractions of 1.5 micrograms/ml that were administered sequentially for 1 hr each. Survival was increased if the assay was delayed until 24 hr after drug treatment, which indicates that 9L cells in spheroids recover from BCNU-induced potentially lethal damage. When BCNU was administered in 1.5-micrograms/ml fractions, plating efficiencies depended markedly on the interval between the fractions. The 12-hr protocol produced an overall higher cell kill. Fractionation schedules of 24 and 36 hr produced less cell kill than did the other schedules. Survival plateaued for the last three treatments with BCNU in the 36-hr schedule. Cells in S phase at the time of administration of the initial 1.5-micrograms/ml fraction of BCNU moved into G1- and G2-M phases by 12 hr after treatment. For time periods longer than 12 hr, cells began to appear in the BCNU-resistant S phase. Thus, the movement of cells into the drug-sensitive and -resistant phases after the first fraction correlates well with the corresponding overall cytotoxic effect produced by treatment with the combined BCNU (1.5 micrograms/ml) fractions. For a higher concentration (3.0 micrograms/ml for 1 hr), maximum cell kill was reached within the 12- to 18-hr interval, after which cell kill plateaued. Cells were not found in the S-phase fraction 12 to 36 hr after the first treatment with 3.0 micrograms/ml; maximum cell kill for the fractionated protocols resulted at these times. Therefore, BCNU, which is classified as a cell cycle-nonspecific drug, can induce a partial synchrony in 9L spheroid cells, which determines

  18. Swept-source optical coherence tomography powered by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser enables 2.3-mm-deep brain imaging in mice in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-10-01

    We report noninvasive, in vivo optical imaging deep within a mouse brain by swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT), enabled by a 1.3-μm vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL). VCSEL SS-OCT offers a constant signal sensitivity of 105 dB throughout an entire depth of 4.25 mm in air, ensuring an extended usable imaging depth range of more than 2 mm in turbid biological tissue. Using this approach, we show deep brain imaging in mice with an open-skull cranial window preparation, revealing intact mouse brain anatomy from the superficial cerebral cortex to the deep hippocampus. VCSEL SS-OCT would be applicable to small animal studies for the investigation of deep tissue compartments in living brains where diseases such as dementia and tumor can take their toll.

  19. Unusual Thyroid Carcinoma Metastases: a Case Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Farina, Eleonora; Monari, Fabio; Tallini, Giovanni; Repaci, Andrea; Mazzarotto, Renzo; Giunchi, Francesca; Panzacchi, Riccardo; Cammelli, Silvia; Padula, Gilbert D A; Deodato, Francesco; Pasquali, Renato; Fanti, Stefano; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Morganti, Alessio G

    2016-03-01

    The most common sites of metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer are the neck lymph nodes, while distant metastases typically involve the lungs, the bones, and less frequently the brain. Uncommon metastatic sites include the liver, adrenal gland, kidney, pancreas, and skin. The epidemiological aspects of thyroid metastases in rare sites are largely unknown and their identification could have a significant impact on patients management. A mini-series of unusual metastatic sites of thyroid carcinoma is proposed as a contribution to current knowledge on anatomopathological characteristics and clinical outcome. Of the six cases that were assessed, the metastases were the following: skin metastases (2), skin and pancreas metastases (1), renal metastasis (1), adrenal metastasis (1), and liver metastasis (1). In our experience, metastases in rare sites do not always represent a negative prognostic factor for disease outcome. In fact they can occur as single distant lesion and if surgically resectable, their treatment can also lead to local disease remission. PMID:26662609

  20. Mixed Inhibition of Adenosine Deaminase Activity by 1,3-Dinitrobenzene: A Model for Understanding Cell-Selective Neurotoxicity in Chemically-Induced Energy Deprivation Syndromes in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yipei; Liu, Xin; Schneider, Brandon; Zverina, Elaina A.; Russ, Kristen; Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva J.; Fierke, Carol A.; Richardson, Rudy J.; Philbert, Martin A.

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are acutely sensitive to 1,3-dinitrobenzene (1,3-DNB) while adjacent neurons are relatively unaffected, consistent with other chemically-induced energy deprivation syndromes. Previous studies have investigated the role of astrocytes in protecting neurons from hypoxia and chemical injury via adenosine release. Adenosine is considered neuroprotective, but it is rapidly removed by extracellular deaminases such as adenosine deaminase (ADA). The present study tested the hypothesis that ADA is inhibited by 1,3-DNB as a substrate mimic, thereby preventing adenosine catabolism. ADA was inhibited by 1,3-DNB with an IC50 of 284μM, Hill slope, n = 4.8 ± 0.4. Native gel electrophoresis showed that 1,3-DNB did not denature ADA. Furthermore, adding Triton X-100 (0.01–0.05%, wt/vol), Nonidet P-40 (0.0015–0.0036%, wt/vol), or bovine serum albumin (0.05 mg/ml or changing [ADA] (0.2 and 2nM) did not substantially alter the 1,3-DNB IC50 value. Likewise, dynamic light scattering showed no particle formation over a (1,3-DNB) range of 149–1043μM. Kinetics revealed mixed inhibition with 1,3-DNB binding to ADA (KI = 520 ± 100μM, n = 1 ± 0.6) and the ADA-adenosine complex (KIS = 262 ± 7μM, n = 6 ± 0.6, indicating positive cooperativity). In accord with the kinetics, docking predicted binding of 1,3-DNB to the active site and three peripheral sites. In addition, exposure of DI TNC-1 astrocytes to 10–500μM 1,3-DNB produced concentration-dependent increases in extracellular adenosine at 24 h. Overall, the results demonstrate that 1,3-DNB is a mixed inhibitor of ADA and may thus lead to increases in extracellular adenosine. The finding may provide insights to guide future work on chemically-induced energy deprivation. PMID:22106038

  1. Efficacy of the Irreversible ErbB Family Blocker Afatinib in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor (TKI)–Pretreated Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Brain Metastases or Leptomeningeal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tufman, Amanda; Wehler, Thomas; Pelzer, Theo; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Schütz, Martin; Serke, Monika; Stöhlmacher-Williams, Jan; Märten, Angela; Maria Huber, Rudolf; Dickgreber, Nicolas J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Afatinib is an effective first-line treatment in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and has shown activity in patients progressing on EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). First-line afatinib is also effective in patients with central nervous system (CNS) metastasis. Here we report on outcomes of pretreated NSCLC patients with CNS metastasis who received afatinib within a compassionate use program. Methods: Patients with NSCLC progressing after at least one line of chemotherapy and one line of EGFR-TKI treatment received afatinib. Medical history, patient demographics, EGFR mutational status, and adverse events including tumor progression were documented. Results: From 2010 to 2013, 573 patients were enrolled and 541 treated with afatinib. One hundred patients (66% female; median age, 60 years) had brain metastases and/or leptomeningeal disease with 74% having documented EGFR mutation. Median time to treatment failure for patients with CNS metastasis was 3.6 months, and did not differ from a matched group of 100 patients without CNS metastasis. Thirty-five percent (11 of 31) of evaluable patients had a cerebral response, five (16%) responded exclusively in brain. Response duration (range) was 120 (21–395) days. Sixty-six percent (21 of 32) of patients had cerebral disease control on afatinib. Data from one patient with an impressive response showed an afatinib concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid of nearly 1 nMol. Conclusion: Afatinib appears to penetrate into the CNS with concentrations high enough to have clinical effect on CNS metastases. Afatinib may therefore be an effective treatment for heavily pretreated patients with EGFR-mutated or EGFR–TKI-sensitive NSCLC and CNS metastasis. PMID:25247337

  2. Factors Influencing the Central Nervous System Distribution of a Novel Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibitor GSK2126458: Implications for Overcoming Resistance with Combination Therapy for Melanoma Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Vaidhyanathan, Shruthi; Wilken-Resman, Brynna; Ma, Daniel J; Parrish, Karen E; Mittapalli, Rajendar K; Carlson, Brett L; Sarkaria, Jann N; Elmquist, William F

    2016-02-01

    Small molecule inhibitors targeting the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (Braf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase) have had success in extending survival for patients with metastatic melanoma. Unfortunately, resistance may occur via cross-activation of alternate signaling pathways. One approach to overcome resistance is to simultaneously target the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. Recent reports have shown that GSK2126458 [2,4-difluoro-N-(2-methoxy-5-(4-(pyridazin-4-yl)quinolin-6-yl)pyridin-3-yl) benzenesulfonamide], a dual phosphoinositide 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, can overcome acquired resistance to Braf and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors in vitro. These resistance mechanisms may be especially important in melanoma brain metastases because of limited drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that influence the brain distribution of GSK2126458 and to examine the efficacy of GSK2126458 in a novel patient-derived melanoma xenograft (PDX) model. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that GSK2126458 is a substrate for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), two dominant active efflux transporters in the blood-brain barrier. The steady-state brain distribution of GSK2126458 was 8-fold higher in the P-gp/Bcrp knockout mice compared with the wild type. We also observed that when simultaneously infused to steady state, GSK212658, dabrafenib, and trametinib, a rational combination to overcome mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor resistance, all had limited brain distribution. Coadministration of elacridar, a P-gp/Bcrp inhibitor, increased the brain distribution of GSK2126458 by approximately 7-fold in wild-type mice. In the PDX model, GSK2126458 showed efficacy in flank tumors but was ineffective in intracranial melanoma. These results show that

  3. Melanoma with gastric metastases.

    PubMed

    Wong, Katherine; Serafi, Sam W; Bhatia, Abhijit S; Ibarra, Irene; Allen, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old woman with a history of malignant melanoma who presented with dyspnea and fatigue was found to have metastases to the stomach detected on endoscopy. Primary cutaneous malignant melanoma with gastric metastases is a rare occurrence, and it is often not detected until autopsy because of its non-specific manifestations. PMID:27609722

  4. Poster — Thur Eve — 64: Preliminary investigation of arc configurations for optimal sparing of normal tissue in hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HF-SRT) of multiple brain metastases using a 5mm interdigitating micro-multileaf collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Leavens, C; Wronski, M; Lee, YK; Ruschin, M; Soliman, H; Sahgal, A

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate normal tissue sparing in intra-cranial HF-SRT, comparing various arc configurations with the Synergy Beam Modulator (SynBM) and Agility linacs, the latter incorporating leaf interdigitation and backup jaws. Methods: Five patients with multiple brain metastases (BMs), (5 BMs (n=2), 3 BMs (n=3)) treated with HF-SRT using 25 Gy (n=2) or 30 Gy (n=3) in 5 fractions, were investigated. Clinical treatment plans used the SynBM. Each patient was retrospectively re-planned on Agility, employing three planning strategies: (A) one isocenter and dedicated arc for each BM; (B) a single isocenter, centrally placed with respect to BMs; (C) the isocenter and arc configuration used in the SynBM plan, where closely spaced (<5cm) BMs used a dedicated isocenter and arcs. Agility plans were normalized for PTV coverage and heterogeneity. Results and Conclusion: Strategy A obtained the greatest improvements over the SynBM plan, where the maximum OAR dose, and mean dose to normal brain (averaged for all patients) were reduced by 55cGy and 25cGy, respectively. Strategy B was limited by having a single isocenter, hence less jaw shielding and increased MLC leakage. The maximum OAR dose was reduced by 13cGy, however mean dose to normal brain increased by 84cGy. Strategy C reduced the maximum OAR dose and mean dose to normal brain by 32cGy and 9cGy, respectively. The results from this study indicate that, for intra-cranial HF-SRT of multiple BMs, Agility plans are equal or better than SynBM plans. Further planning is needed to investigate dose sparing using Strategy A and the SynBM.

  5. Colorectal cancer: Metastases to a single organ

    PubMed Central

    Vatandoust, Sina; Price, Timothy J; Karapetis, Christos S

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common malignancy worldwide. In CRC patients, metastases are the main cause of cancer-related mortality. In a group of metastatic CRC patients, the metastases are limited to a single site (solitary organ); the liver and lungs are the most commonly involved sites. When metastatic disease is limited to the liver and/or lungs, the resectability of the metastatic lesions will dictate the management approach and the outcome. Less commonly, the site of solitary organ CRC metastasis is the peritoneum. In these patients, cytoreduction followed by hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy may improve the outcome. Rarely, CRC involves other organs, such as the brain, bone, adrenals and spleen, as the only site of metastatic disease. There are limited data to guide clinical practice in these cases. Here, we have reviewed the disease characteristics, management approaches and prognosis based on the metastatic disease site in patients with CRC with metastases to a single organ. PMID:26557001

  6. Stereotactic radiosurgery for four or more intracranial metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, Ajay K.; Flickinger, John C. . E-mail: flickingerjc@upmc.edu; Kondziolka, Douglas; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcomes after a single stereotactic radiosurgery procedure for the care of patients with 4 or more intracranial metastases. Methods and Materials: Two hundred five patients with primary malignancies, including non-small-cell lung carcinoma (42%), breast carcinoma (23%), melanoma (17%), renal cell carcinoma (6%), colon cancer (3%), and others (10%) underwent gamma knife radiosurgery for 4 or more intracranial metastases at one time. The median number of brain metastases was 5 (range, 4-18) with a median total treatment volume of 6.8 cc (range, 0.6-51.0 cc). Radiosurgery was used as sole management (17% of patients), or in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (46%) or after failure of whole brain radiotherapy (38%). The median marginal radiosurgery dose was 16 Gy (range, 12-20 Gy). The mean follow-up was 8 months. Results: The median overall survival after radiosurgery for all patients was 8 months. The 1-year local control rate was 71%, and the median time to progressive/new brain metastases was 9 months. Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification system, the median overall survivals for RPA classes I, II, and III were 18, 9, and 3 months, respectively (p < 0.00001). Multivariate analysis revealed total treatment volume, age, RPA classification, and marginal dose as significant prognostic factors. The number of metastases was not statistically significant (p 0.333). Conclusion: Radiosurgery seems to provide survival benefit for patients with 4 or more intracranial metastases. Because total treatment volume was the most significant predictor of survival, the total volume of brain metastases, rather than the number of metastases, should be considered in identifying appropriate radiosurgery candidates.

  7. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  8. Unusual metastases of lung cancer: bulbus oculi and maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Ates, I; Yazici, O; Ates, H; Ozdemir, N; Zengin, N

    2015-09-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma often makes metastasis to the brain, liver, kidneys, bone, bone marrow and adrenal glands. It can also make metastasis to other parts of the body rarely for example eye, nose, parotid gland and paranasal sinus. We did not encounter with combined ocular bulbus and the maxillary sinus metastases of lung cancer in the accessible literature. In this case report, a patient who was combined ocular bulbus and the maxillary sinus metastases of lung adenocarcinoma will be discussed. PMID:26928715

  9. A rare case of asymptomatic radioiodine-avid renal and brain metastases 20 years after hemi-thyroidectomy for adenomatous goiter.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Verma, Roshan Kumar; Lal, Anupam; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old patient, with a history of left hemi-thyroidectomy for adenomatous goiter 20 years previously, was found to have pulmonary lesions on chest X-ray, a brain lesion on computerized tomography (CT), and elevated serum thyroglobulin (Tg). While completion thyroidectomy revealed that no pathological evidence of thyroid malignancy, radioiodine-avid pulmonary, brain, and renal and bone lesions were identified on diagnostic as well as posttherapy whole body planar scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography-CT. Subsequent ultrasonography-guided biopsy of a renal nodule showed thyroid follicular cells. This case suggests that metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma should be suspected in asymptomatic patients with incidentally detected lesions, raised serum Tg, and history of thyroid lesions. PMID:26917894

  10. A rare case of asymptomatic radioiodine-avid renal and brain metastases 20 years after hemi-thyroidectomy for adenomatous goiter

    PubMed Central

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Verma, Roshan Kumar; Lal, Anupam; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old patient, with a history of left hemi-thyroidectomy for adenomatous goiter 20 years previously, was found to have pulmonary lesions on chest X-ray, a brain lesion on computerized tomography (CT), and elevated serum thyroglobulin (Tg). While completion thyroidectomy revealed that no pathological evidence of thyroid malignancy, radioiodine-avid pulmonary, brain, and renal and bone lesions were identified on diagnostic as well as posttherapy whole body planar scintigraphy and single photon emission computed tomography-CT. Subsequent ultrasonography-guided biopsy of a renal nodule showed thyroid follicular cells. This case suggests that metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma should be suspected in asymptomatic patients with incidentally detected lesions, raised serum Tg, and history of thyroid lesions. PMID:26917894

  11. Study of LAT1 Expression in Brain Metastases: Towards a Better Understanding of the Results of Positron Emission Tomography Using Amino Acid Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Papin-Michault, Caroline; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Dufour, Maxime; Almairac, Fabien; Coutts, Mickael; Patouraux, Stéphanie; Virolle, Thierry; Darcourt, Jacques; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using radiolabeled amino acid (PET-AA) appears to be promising in distinguishing between recurrent tumour and radionecrosis in the follow-up of brain metastasis (BM). The amino acid transporter LAT1 and its cofactor CD98, which are involved in AA uptake, have never been investigated in BM. The aim of our study was to determine and compare the expression of LAT1 and CD98 in BM and in non-tumoral brain tissue (NT). The expression of LAT1 and CD98 were studied by immunohistochemistry in 67 BM, including 18 BM recurrences after radiotherapy, in 53 NT, and in 13 cases of patients with previously irradiated brain tumor and investigated by [18F] FDOPA-PET. LAT1 and CD98 expression were detected in 98.5% and 59.7% of BM respectively and were significantly associated with BM tissue as compared to NT (p<0.001). LAT1 expression in recurrent BM was significantly increased as compared to newly occurring BM. Ten cases investigated by [18F] FDOPA-PET corresponding to recurrent BM displayed significant [18F] FDOPA uptake and LAT1 overexpression whereas three cases corresponding to radionecrosis showed no or low uptake and LAT1 expression. LAT1 expression level and [18F] FDOPA uptake were significantly correlated. In conclusion, we hypothesized that BM may overexpress the AA transporter LAT1. We have shown that LAT1 overexpression was common in BM and was specific for BM as compared to healthy brain. These results could explain the specific BM uptake on PET-AA. PMID:27276226

  12. Study of LAT1 Expression in Brain Metastases: Towards a Better Understanding of the Results of Positron Emission Tomography Using Amino Acid Tracers.

    PubMed

    Papin-Michault, Caroline; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Dufour, Maxime; Almairac, Fabien; Coutts, Mickael; Patouraux, Stéphanie; Virolle, Thierry; Darcourt, Jacques; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography using radiolabeled amino acid (PET-AA) appears to be promising in distinguishing between recurrent tumour and radionecrosis in the follow-up of brain metastasis (BM). The amino acid transporter LAT1 and its cofactor CD98, which are involved in AA uptake, have never been investigated in BM. The aim of our study was to determine and compare the expression of LAT1 and CD98 in BM and in non-tumoral brain tissue (NT). The expression of LAT1 and CD98 were studied by immunohistochemistry in 67 BM, including 18 BM recurrences after radiotherapy, in 53 NT, and in 13 cases of patients with previously irradiated brain tumor and investigated by [18F] FDOPA-PET. LAT1 and CD98 expression were detected in 98.5% and 59.7% of BM respectively and were significantly associated with BM tissue as compared to NT (p<0.001). LAT1 expression in recurrent BM was significantly increased as compared to newly occurring BM. Ten cases investigated by [18F] FDOPA-PET corresponding to recurrent BM displayed significant [18F] FDOPA uptake and LAT1 overexpression whereas three cases corresponding to radionecrosis showed no or low uptake and LAT1 expression. LAT1 expression level and [18F] FDOPA uptake were significantly correlated. In conclusion, we hypothesized that BM may overexpress the AA transporter LAT1. We have shown that LAT1 overexpression was common in BM and was specific for BM as compared to healthy brain. These results could explain the specific BM uptake on PET-AA. PMID:27276226

  13. Quick regression of brain metastases from lung adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huaqiong; Zhu, Shuangli; Wang, Shaobin; Li, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastasis (BM) commonly occurs in patients with advanced lung cancer, and is associated with poor prognosis and limited treatment options, particularly for end-stage patients who are in poor physical and mental state. We herein present a case of lung adenocarcinoma with BM, as revealed by tumor marker and imaging studies. The patient was a 74-year-old woman who was diagnosed with lung adenocarcinoma with several metastatic lesions in the mediastinal lymph nodes, bone and brain. The patient underwent two cycles of chemotherapy, but the cancer recurred with enlarged BM, resulting in confusion and body dysfunction. The patient then received epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy with icotinib. After approximately 12 h of treatment the symptoms disappeared, and the metastatic lesions in the brain largely regressed in the following months. Our case indicates that the EGFR-TKI icotinib may provide a rapid and safe approach for emergency situations with BM from lung adenocarcinoma.

  14. Consideration of optimal isodose surface selection for target coverage in micro-multileaf collimator-based stereotactic radiotherapy for large cystic brain metastases: comparison of 90%, 80% and 70% isodose surface-based planning

    PubMed Central

    Ohtakara, K; Hayashi, S; Tanaka, H; Hoshi, H

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aims to compare dynamic conformal arc (DCA) plans based on different-percentage isodose surfaces (IDSs), normalised to 100% at the isocentre, for target coverage (TC; dose prescription) in stereotactic radiotherapy for large cystic brain metastases. Methods The DCA plans were generated for 15 targets (5 spherical models and 10 metastatic brain lesions) based on 90%, 80% and 70% IDSs for dose prescription to attain ≥99% TC values using the Novalis Tx platform. These plans were optimised mainly by leaf margin and/or collimator angle adjustment, while similar arc arrangements were used. Results TC values were equivalent among the three plans. Conformity index values were similar between the 80% and 70% plans, while they were worse in the 90% plans. Mean doses (Dmean) of the interior 3 mm rind structure were highest in the 70% plans, followed by the 80% plans and lowest in the 90% plans. Dmean of the exterior 3 mm rind structure and the ratio of 50%/100% isodose volumes (Paddick's gradient index values) were highest in the 90% plans, followed by 80% and lowest in the 70% plans. Conclusions These results suggest that the 70% IDS plans might be beneficial for both tumour control and reducing toxicity to surrounding normal tissue if appropriate dose conformity and precise treatment set-up are ensured. The 90% IDS plans are unfavourable in view of inferior dose gradient outside the target and should be limited to cases in which the target dose homogeneity is given the highest priority. PMID:22422384

  15. A Simple Scoring System Predicting the Survival Time of Patients with Bone Metastases after RT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Yi; Li, Hui-Fang; Su, Meng; Lin, Rui-Fang; Chen, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Ping; Zou, Chang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to develop a scoring system to predict the survival time of patients with bone metastases after radiation therapy (RT). The scoring system can guide physicians to a better selection of appropriate treatment regimens. Materials and Methods The medical records of 125 patients with bone metastases treated with RT between January 2007 and September 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Fifteen potential prognostic factors were investigated: sex, age, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), type of primary tumor, resection of tumor before bone metastases, interval between primary tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, Carcinoembryonic Antigen(CEA), lung metastases before bone metastases, liver metastases before bone metastases, brain metastases before bone metastases, stage, T, N, M, and degree of cellular differentiation. Results In an univariate analysis, 10 factors were significantly associated with survival time after bone metastasis: sex, KPS, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, CEA, lung metastases before bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. In a multivariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be significant: sex, KPS, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. The median survival of all patients with bone metastases after RT was 14.1 months. There were significant differences in the median survival of patients with bone metastases after RT of 4.9 months, 10.5 months, and 29.7 months in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion According to this scoring system, the survival time of patients after bone metastasis can be estimated. PMID:27438606

  16. Endobronchial metastases of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosado Dawid, Natalia-Zuberoa; Villegas Fernández, Francisco Ramón; Rodríguez Cruz, María Del Mar; Ramos Meca, Asunción

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal metastases affecting trachea or bronchi are highly unusual. Up to 26% of endotracheal/endobronchial metastases are due to colorectal cancer. Treatment and palliative management rely on a multidisciplinary team to improve their quality of life. PMID:26856850

  17. Orbital Metastases from Breast Cancer: Retrospective Analysis at an Academic Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Tiffany M; Tebit, Emaculate V; El Sayed, Ali; Smolkin, Mark E; Dillon, Patrick M

    2016-07-01

    Orbital metastases from breast cancer (BC) are rare, but often debilitating. BC accounts for nearly half of metastases to the orbit. Orbital metastases may be discovered years after the initial diagnosis of BC, and are rare at initial presentation. A search of the institutional data base at an academic cancer center identified BC patients who developed or presented with orbital metastases from 2000 to 2013. Baseline characteristics, treatment modalities, survival and treatment responses were collected from the electronic medical record. There were 20 patients identified with orbital metastases (0.7% of all BC cases). The median age at diagnosis of BC was 49 years; 80% had estrogen positive disease. The interval between the initial diagnosis of BC and the presentation of orbital metastases was 8.5 years (0-19 years). Orbital disease was the initial presentation of BC in two cases. Three patients developed bilateral orbital metastases and seven had accompanying brain metastases. The most common presentation was decreased vision (55%), followed by diplopia (25%). The median survival after orbital metastases was 24 months. Thirteen patients (65%) received local radiation therapy. Of those radiated, 90% reported improvement of orbital symptoms. Other treatments included intraocular bevacizumab, surgery, and systemic therapy. Orbital metastases tend to occur in estrogen receptor positive disease and are often found years after BC onset. Orbital metastases may be associated with the development of brain metastases. Radiotherapy is the preferred local therapy and had high symptom control in this cohort. Oncologists should be aware of the signs of orbital metastases and the treatment options. PMID:27143519

  18. Extraneural Metastases of Glioblastoma without Simultaneous Central Nervous System Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wonki; Yoo, Heon; Shin, Sang Hoon; Gwak, Ho Shin

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is well known as the most common malignant primary brain tumor. It could easily spread into the adjacent or distant brain tissue by infiltration, direct extension and cerebro-spinal fluid dissemination. The extranueural metastatic spread of GBM is relatively rare but it could have more progressive disease course. We report a 39-year-old man who had multiple bone metastases and malignant pleural effusion of the GBM without primary site recurrence. PMID:25408938

  19. Extraneural metastases in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Muoio, Valéria Marques Figueira; Shinjo, Sueli Oba; Matushita, Hamilton; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common childhood malignant tumor of central nervous system, but it may also occur in adults. It presents high invasive growth with spreading of tumor cells into the leptomeningeal space along the neuroaxis early in the course of the disease. Extraneural metastases are rare but frequently lethal, occurring only in 1 to 5% of patients, and are related, in the most of cases, to the presence of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Here we characterize the clinical profile of five cases of medulloblastoma with systemic spreading of tumor cells, also comparing them to cases already described in the literature. PMID:21625760

  20. Colorectal Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Ashraf J.; Bani Hani, Murad; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Cunningham, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of CRLM is complex and requires a multidisciplinary team approach for optimal outcomes. Over the past several decades, the 5-year survival following resection of CRLM has increased and the criteria for resection have broadened substantially. Even patients with multiple, bilateral CRLM, previously thought unresectable, may now be candidates for resection. Two-stage hepatectomy, repeat curative-intent hepatectomy, and even selected resection of extrahepatic metastases have further increased the number of patients who may be treated with curative intent. Multiple liver-directed therapies exist to treat unresectable, incurable patients with adequate survival benefit and morbidity rates. PMID:22312501

  1. Painful Boney Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Boney metastasis may lead to terrible suffering from debilitating pain. The most likely malignancies that spread to bone are prostate, breast, and lung. Painful osseous metastases are typically associated with multiple episodes of breakthrough pain which may occur with activities of daily living, weight bearing, lifting, coughing, and sneezing. Almost half of these breakthrough pain episodes are rapid in onset and short in duration and 44% of episodes are unpredictable. Treatment strategies include: analgesic approaches with "triple opioid therapy", bisphosphonates, chemotherapeutic agents, hormonal therapy, interventional and surgical approaches, steroids, radiation (external beam radiation, radiopharmaceuticals), ablative techniques (radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation), and intrathecal analgesics. PMID:23861996

  2. Benign Metastasizing Leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Moss, Joel

    2016-09-01

    Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is a rare and poorly characterized disease affecting primarily premenopausal women. Asymptomatic patients are often diagnosed incidentally by radiographs or other lung-imaging procedures performed for other indications, and the diagnosis is eventually confirmed by biopsy. Patients with BML are usually treated pharmacologically with antiestrogen therapies or surgically with oophorectomy or hysterectomy. Antiestrogen therapy is typically efficacious and, in general, most patients have a favorable prognosis. Asymptomatic patients with a confirmed diagnosis of BML, may be followed conservatively without treatment. PMID:27514603

  3. Society for Neuro-Oncology 2014 annual meeting updates on central nervous system metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Rimas V.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The 19th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) took place in November of 2014. The focus of many abstracts, as well as the Education Day, was on recent advances in the study of central nervous system (CNS) metastases. Tumor Biology Key studies evaluating the factors in tumors and their microenvironment associated with the development and growth of brain metastases are reviewed. Prognostication Studies investigating the factors that independently influence survival in participants with brain metastases are presented. Response Assessment The Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology criteria for brain metastases (RANO-BM) and the Neurological Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (NANO) criteria, which were both presented, are recapped. Radiotherapy Studies are reviewed evaluating factors that influence survival outcomes in participants with brain metastases who were treated with radiotherapy. Studies investigating the potential risk of radiation necrosis with the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapies are presented. Systemic Therapies Brain metastases-focused subset analyses from the ASCEND-1 trial for ALK-translocated non–small cell lung cancer are presented. Preclinical and clinical work on solid tumor leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is also covered. Sequelae of Central Nervous System Metastases and Their Treatments An overview is provided of treatment- related toxicities as well as important concepts that may influence strategies to protect against these toxicities. Conclusions Key concepts regarding tumor biology, prognostication, response assessment, therapeutic management, and sequelae of treatment for CNS metastases are summarized. Advances in our understanding of the basic and clinical science of CNS metastases have the potential to improve outcomes for patients.

  4. 1,3-Dichlorobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,3 - Dichlorobenzene ; CASRN 541 - 73 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinog

  5. 1,3-Dichloropropene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,3 - Dichloropropene ( DCP ) ; CASRN 542 - 75 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Non

  6. 1,3-Butadiene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,3 - Butadiene ; CASRN 106 - 99 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  7. Biology of liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Berman, R S; Portera, C A; Ellis, L M

    2001-01-01

    A primary goal of cancer research is an increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms mediating the process of cancer metastasis. Analyses of colon cancer cells (the seeds) and the microenvironment (the soil) have increased our understanding of the biologic mechanisms mediating metastasis formation. Insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating the pathobiology of colon cancer metastasis, as well as a better understanding of the interaction between the metastatic cell and the host environment (including the vasculature), should provide a foundation for new therapeutic approaches. To the clinician, it is readily apparent that by the time metastases form, most steps in the metastatic cascade have completed. Therefore, therapy to down-regulate or interrupt the last stages of metastasis, proliferation and angiogenesis as well as mechanisms to disrupt cell survival signals seems the most promising areas of investigation. PMID:11775436

  8. [Management of bone metastases].

    PubMed

    Nagykálnai, Tamás; Landherr, László

    2014-02-01

    The skeleton is the most common site to be affected by advanced breast, prostatic, lung, kidney, thyroid and other solid tumors (in addition to myeloma multiplex). Bone metastases cause significant morbidity with nearly always fatal outcome. Over 600 000 new patients diagnosed in the developed countries yearly. On average every 4-6 months patients suffer from series of severe skeletal complications such as pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hypercalcemic events, etc., besides the permanent pain. Local external beam radiotherapy, systemic radioisotope-, endocrine-, and chemotherapy, oral and i.v. bisphosphonates and recently s.c. denosumab are the mainstays of treatment, in addition to pain-killers and other usual "classical" interventions. The modern treatments singificantly reduce the probability of skeletal complications and improve the patients' quality of life and, sometimes, they extend the survival as well. The authors briefly summarize the available treatment options. PMID:24486845

  9. Metastases to the breast

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, E.S.; Johnston, C.; Haney, P.J.

    1983-10-01

    Metastases to the breast are uncommon, wtih about 250 cases reported from clinical and autopsy series. The mammographic findings in 16 new cases revealed a spectrum of changes that included solitary of multiple lesions, well demarcated or poorly marginated masses, and diffuse involvement of skin or parenchyma or both. Diffuse disease was seen more frequently in this series (4/16), at times simulating inflammatory breast cancer. Although diagnosis of a primary malignancy usually preceded detection of the breast lesion, 40% (6/16) had no history of malignancy. Prognosis remains poor; however, it was improved in the lymphoma-leukemia group due to improved immunotherapeutic and chemotherapeutic regimes. The clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features are discussed. Some of the lesions encountered can be confused with a primary breast malignancy or a benign lesion, necessitating prompt and accurate biopsy to preclude unnecessary major surgery and to improve survival in cancers amenable to current therapy.

  10. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Cystic Cerebral Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Ebinu, Julius O.; Lwu, Shelly; Monsalves, Eric; Arayee, Mandana; Chung, Caroline; Laperriere, Normand J.; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Goetz, Pablo; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in the treatment of nonsurgical cystic brain metastasis, and to determine predictors of response to GKRS. Methods: We reviewed a prospectively maintained database of brain metastases patients treated at our institution between 2006 and 2010. All lesions with a cystic component were identified, and volumetric analysis was done to measure percentage of cystic volume on day of treatment and consecutive follow-up MRI scans. Clinical, radiologic, and dosimetry parameters were reviewed to establish the overall response of cystic metastases to GKRS as well as identify potential predictive factors of response. Results: A total of 111 lesions in 73 patients were analyzed; 57% of lesions received prior whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Lung carcinoma was the primary cancer in 51% of patients, 10% breast, 10% colorectal, 4% melanoma, and 26% other. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were recursive partitioning analysis class 1, the remainder class 2. Mean target volume was 3.3 mL (range, 0.1-23 mL). Median prescription dose was 21 Gy (range, 15-24 Gy). Local control rates were 91%, 63%, and 37% at 6, 12, and 18 months, respectively. Local control was improved in lung primary and worse in patients with prior WBRT (univariate). Only lung primary predicted local control in multivariate analysis, whereas age and tumor volume did not. Lesions with a large cystic component did not show a poorer response compared with those with a small cystic component. Conclusions: This study supports the use of GKRS in the management of nonsurgical cystic metastases, despite a traditionally perceived poorer response. Our local control rates are comparable to a matched cohort of noncystic brain metastases, and therefore the presence of a large cystic component should not deter the use of GKRS. Predictors of response included tumor subtype. Prior WBRT decreased effectiveness of SRS for local control rates.

  11. [Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastases].

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Hisayasu

    2015-11-01

    Bone metastasis is associated with many symptoms such as bone pain, pathological fracture, and spinal cord compression. Especially, pain secondary to bone metastases is a serious problem in many patients with metastatic cancer. Radiotherapy can provide remarkable pain relief, reduce the requirement for analgesic drugs, and prevent pathological fracture or spinal cord compression with few complications in most patients. Many randomized controlled trials have shown equivalent extent of pain relief between single-fraction and multiple-fraction regimens. Reirradiation of painful bone metastases is effective for palliation of pain in non-responders or patients with recurrent pain after an initial satisfactory response to a previous radiation therapy. Systemic administration of radioisotopes is an important palliative care option for painful multifocal bone metastases detected on nuclear imaging; however, the application of this option depends on the histologic features of the tumor and distribution of the metastases. Metastatic spinal cord compression is the most frequent oncologic emergency and necessitates timely and appropriate treatment. External beam radiotherapy is commonly used for the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression. Surgical decompression and stabilization should be considered for metastatic spinal cord compression or pathological fracture in select patients. Postoperative radiotherapy should be administered to patients who have undergone surgical intervention for bone metastases. For patients at a high risk for oncologic emergency, optimal prophylactic management is highly recommended. PMID:26602393

  12. [Splenic metastases from female genital tract malignancies].

    PubMed

    Piura, Ettie; Piura, Benjamin

    2010-05-01

    Splenic metastases are rare. Usually, they are part of a disseminated disease and located on the splenic capsule. Common sources are breast cancer, lung cancer and malignant melanoma. SoLitary splenic metastases are rare, usuaLLy located in the splenic parenchyma and metastasizing via the hematogenous route. Splenic metastases from ovarian carcinoma are usuaLly part of a disseminated disease, located on the splenic capsule and metastasize via the peritoneum. Splenic metastases from endometriaL carcinoma are usuaLLy solitary, Located in the splenic parenchyma and metastasize via the hematogenous route. Splenic metastases from cervical carcinoma are divided equally between metastases as part of a disseminated disease and soLitary metastases. Less than 100 cases of solitary splenic metastases have been reported with half of them being metastases from female genital tract malignancies: 30--ovarian carcinoma; 11--endometriaL carcinoma; 8--cervical carcinoma; and 1--tubal carcinoma. Few cases have been reported of splenic rupture because of metastases from choriocarcinoma. Splenic metastases as part of a disseminated disease are associated with poor prognosis, and splenectomy--apart from cases in which it might assist in achieving optimaL debulking--is not effective. Solitary splenic metastases represent a more moderate disease and the treatment of choice is splenectomy. SoLitary splenic metastases may be detected after an interval from the diagnosis of the primary disease. Hence, patients who had been treated for female genital tract malignancy, even if they are asymptomatic, need a long-term follow-up, including serial imaging studies of the spleen. PMID:20929072

  13. A high-affinity inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate receptor protein from brain is specifically labelled by a newly synthesized photoaffinity analogue, N-(4-azidosalicyl)aminoethanol(1)-1-phospho-D-myo-inositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, G; Schäfer, R; Donié, F; Hülser, E; Nehls-Sahabandu, M; Mayr, G W

    1991-01-01

    A photolabile arylazido analogue of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 selectively substituted at the 1-phosphate group was synthesized by coupling 2-aminoethanol(1)-1-phospho-D-myo-inositol 4,5-bisphosphate with N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidosalicylic acid [Schäfer, Nehls-Sahabandu, Grabowsky, Dehlinger-Kremer, Schulz & Mayr (1990) Biochem. J. 272, 817-825] and subsequently phosphorylating the product by bovine brain Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase. The product, N-(4-azidosalicyl)-aminoethanol(1)-1-phospho-D-myo-inositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [AsaIns(1,3,4,5)P4] was radioiodinated and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. AsaIns(1,3,4,5)P4 bound to a high-affinity Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 receptor from pig cerebellum with an affinity only 3-fold lower than that of Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. Photoirradiation of 125I-AsaIns(1,3,4,5)P4 in the presence of the receptor preparation revealed that the radioactive label was specifically associated with a protein band of apparent molecular mass 42 kDa, which Donié & Reiser [(1991) Biochem. J. 275, 453-457] had previously tentatively assigned to the Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 receptor protein. The radioactive label was displaced from the receptor when the binding reaction with 125I-AsaIns(1,3,4,5)P4 was carried out in the presence of 5 microM-Ins(1,3,4,5)P4. Images Fig. 3. PMID:1660714

  14. Brain and spinal tumour.

    PubMed

    Goh, C H; Lu, Y Y; Lau, B L; Oy, J; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2014-12-01

    This study reviewed the epidemiology of brain and spinal tumours in Sarawak from January 2009 till December 2012. The crude incidence of brain tumour in Sarawak was 4.6 per 100,000 population/year with cumulative rate 0.5%. Meningioma was the most common brain tumour (32.3%) and followed by astrocytoma (19.4%). Only brain metastases showed a rising trend and cases were doubled in 4 years. This accounted for 15.4% and lung carcinoma was the commonest primary. Others tumour load were consistent. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and astrocytoma were common in paediatrics (60%). We encountered more primary spinal tumour rather than spinal metastases. Intradural schwannoma was the commonest and frequently located at thoracic level. The current healthcare system in Sarawak enables a more consolidate data collection to reflect accurate brain tumours incidence. This advantage allows subsequent future survival outcome research and benchmarking for healthcare resource planning. PMID:25934956

  15. Intracranial response to nivolumab in NSCLC patients with untreated or progressing CNS metastases.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Elizabeth; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Nechushtan, Hovav; Goldstein, Daniel A; Zer, Alona; Flex, Dov; Siegal, Tali; Peled, Nir

    2016-08-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) metastases occur in 30% of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Localized treatments targeting CNS metastases result in delays in systemic therapy administration and are associated with neurocognitive impairment. Nivolumab is an immune check-point inhibitor that is approved as a second-line treatment of NSCLC. Data regarding the intracranial activity of nivolumab is lacking. We retrospectively reviewed the efficacy and safety of nivolumab in five patients with advanced NSCLC and new/progressing intracranial metastases. Intracranial response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using mRECIST v. 1.1 criteria. All patients had parenchymal brain metastases; two patients had leptomeningeal carcinomatosis diagnosed according to radiological criteria. All patients were asymptomatic and did not require corticosteroids or immediate local therapy. We observed one complete and one partial response in the brain. Stabilization of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis for 10 weeks was achieved in one additional patient. Two patients progressed in the CNS. Time-to-response comprised 5 weeks and 9 weeks; both responses are still ongoing at the time of the report (24+ and 28+ weeks since start of treatment). Systemic responses and intracranial responses were largely concordant. No treatment-related or CNS metastases-related grade≥3 adverse events were observed. Nivolumab might have intracranial activity and favorable safety profile in patients with CNS metastases secondary to NSCLC. Nivolumab CNS activity warrants further evaluation. PMID:27393516

  16. A 1,3-Dihydro-1,3-azaborine Debuts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Senmiao; Zakharov, Lev N.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first synthesis and characterization of a 1,3-dihydro-1,3-azaborine, a long-sought BN isostere of benzene. 1,3-Dihydro-1,3-azaborine is a stable structural motif with considerable aromatic character as evidenced by structural analysis and its reaction chemistry. Single crystal X-ray analysis indicates bonding consistent with significant electron delocalization. 1,3-Dihydro-1,3-azaborines also undergo nucleophilic substitutions at boron and electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions. In view of the versatility and impact of aromatic compounds in the biomedical field and in materials science, the present study further expands the available chemical space of arenes via BN/CC isosterism. PMID:22091703

  17. Embracing rejection: Immunologic trends in brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Farber, S Harrison; Tsvankin, Vadim; Narloch, Jessica L; Kim, Grace J; Salama, April K S; Vlahovic, Gordana; Blackwell, Kimberly L; Kirkpatrick, John P; Fecci, Peter E

    2016-07-01

    Brain metastases represent the most common type of brain tumor. These tumors offer a dismal prognosis and significantly impact quality of life for patients. Their capacity for central nervous system (CNS) invasion is dependent upon induced disruptions to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), alterations to the brain microenvironment, and mechanisms for escaping CNS immunosurveillance. In the emerging era of immunotherapy, understanding how metastases are influenced by the immunologic peculiarities of the CNS will be crucial to forging therapeutic advances. In this review, the immunology of brain metastasis is explored. PMID:27622023

  18. Emerging Treatments for Choroidal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Connie J.; McCoy, Allison N.; Brahmer, Julie; Handa, James T.

    2015-01-01

    It has been over a century since Perls described the first case of choroidal metastasis. For the next six decades only 230 cases were described in the literature. Today, however, ocular metastasis is recognized as the most common intraocular malignancy. Thanks to recent advances in treatment options for metastatic disease, patients are living longer, and choroidal metastases will become an increasingly important issue for oncologists and ophthalmologists alike. We summarize the current knowledge of choroidal metastases and examine their emerging systemic and local therapies. Targeted therapies for metastatic lung, breast, and colon cancer—the most common causes of choroidal metastases—are reviewed in detail with the goal of identifying the most effective treatment strategies. PMID:22117885

  19. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V

    2015-07-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench-to-bedside evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74-year-old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5'RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After two cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET/CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration by

  20. Systemic and CNS activity of the RET inhibitor vandetanib combined with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus in KIF5B-RET re-arranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Berry, Jenny; Roxas, Michael; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Subbiah, Ishwaria Mohan; Ali, Siraj M.; McMahon, Caitlin; Miller, Vincent; Cascone, Tina; Pai, Shobha; Tang, Zhenya; Heymach, John V.

    2016-01-01

    In-frame fusion KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene)-RET transcripts have been characterized in 1–2% of non-small cell lung cancers and are known oncogenic drivers. The RET tyrosine kinase inhibitor, vandetanib, suppresses fusion-induced, anchorage-independent growth activity. In vitro studies have shown that vandetanib is a high-affinity substrate of breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp1/Abcg2) but is not transported by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), limiting its blood-brain barrier penetration. A co-administration strategy to enhance the brain accumulation of vandetanib by modulating P-gp/Abcb1- and Bcrp1/Abcg2-mediated efflux with mTOR inhibitors, specifically everolimus, was shown to increase the blood-brain barrier penetration. We report the first bench to bed-side evidence that RET inhibitor combined with an mTOR inhibitor is active against brain-metastatic RET-rearranged lung cancer and the first evidence of blood-brain barrier penetration. A 74 year old female with progressive adenocarcinoma of the lung (wild-type EGFR and no ALK rearrangement) presented for therapy options. A deletion of 5’RET was revealed by FISH assay, indicating RET-gene rearrangement. Because of progressive disease in the brain, she was enrolled in a clinical trial with vandetanib and everolimus (NCT01582191). Comprehensive genomic profiling revealed fusion of KIF5B (the-kinesin-family-5B-gene) and RET, in addition to AKT2 gene amplification. After 2 cycles of therapy a repeat MRI brain showed a decrease in the intracranial disease burden and PET /CT showed systemic response as well. Interestingly, AKT2 amplification seen is a critical component of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, alterations of which has been associated with both de novo and acquired resistance to targeted therapy. The addition of everolimus may have both overcome the AKT2 amplification to produce a response in addition to its direct effects on the RET gene. Our case report forms the first evidence of blood-brain

  1. [Bone metastases in breast carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Teut, Michael; Warning, Albrecht

    2006-02-01

    The case of a 66-year-old patient with multiple osteolytic bone metastases caused by breast cancer is presented. The patient refused conventional pain therapy although she suffered from severe pain. A complementary therapy with homoeopathic high potencies, devil's-claw extract, enzymes, alendronate and orthomolecular substitution as well as physiotherapy resulted in effective pain relief over a period of 1 year. The case is discussed. PMID:16582551

  2. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery as a Therapeutic Strategy for Intracranial Sarcomatous Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, Thomas; Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay M.Ch.; Monaco, Edward A.; Flickinger, John C.; Kofler, Julia; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the indication and outcomes for Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS) in the care of patients with intracranial sarcomatous metastases. Methods and Materials: Data from 21 patients who underwent radiosurgery for 60 sarcomatous intracranial metastases (54 parenchymal and 6 dural-based) were studied. Nine patients had radiosurgery for solitary tumors and 12 for multiple tumors. The primary pathology was metastatic leiomyosarcoma (4 patients), osteosarcoma (3 patients), soft-tissue sarcoma (5 patients), chondrosarcoma (2 patients), alveolar soft part sarcoma (2 patients), and rhabdomyosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, liposarcoma, neurofibrosarcoma, and synovial sarcoma (1 patient each). Twenty patients received multimodality management for their primary tumor, and 1 patient had no evidence of systemic disease. The mean tumor volume was 6.2 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.07-40.9 cm{sup 3}), and a median margin dose of 16 Gy was administered. Three patients had progressive intracranial disease despite fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS. Results: A local tumor control rate of 88% was achieved (including patients receiving boost, up-front, and salvage SRS). New remote brain metastases developed in 7 patients (33%). The median survival after diagnosis of intracranial metastasis was 16 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 61%. Conclusions: Gamma Knife radiosurgery was a well-tolerated and initially effective therapy in the management of patients with sarcomatous intracranial metastases. However, many patients, including those who also received fractionated whole-brain radiotherapy, developed progressive new brain disease.

  3. Medulloblastoma in an Adult With Late Extraneural Metastases to the Mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Morris, John C.; Breneman, John C.; Essell, James; Wang, Jiang; Benzaquen, Sadia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Medulloblastoma, although the most common brain tumor of childhood, is exceedingly rare in adults. These tumors have a propensity for local recurrence and to metastasize along the leptomeninges; however, extraneural metastases are very rare and typically occur in the bone or bone marrow. We have not come across any case in literature of medulloblastoma with mediastinal metastases in an adult. Case Presentation. We report a case of medulloblastoma in a 38-year-old lady who was treated with surgery followed by craniospinal radiation. Ten years later she presented with hoarseness from true vocal cord paralysis. She was diagnosed to have infiltrating metastases of her medulloblastoma to the mediastinum, which was confirmed by biopsy. There was no local recurrence. This was treated with chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue, and she remained progression free for 2 years. Conclusion. Medulloblastomas are rare in adults and can present with late extraneural metastases following treatment. Although most common reported sites are bone and bone marrow, late metastases to other unexpected areas like the mediastinum are possible too and warrant awareness. This can be treated with chemotherapy followed by high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell rescue in a young patient with good performance status. PMID:26425604

  4. Medulloblastoma in an Adult With Late Extraneural Metastases to the Mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Abhimanyu; Morris, John C; Breneman, John C; Essell, James; Wang, Jiang; Benzaquen, Sadia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Medulloblastoma, although the most common brain tumor of childhood, is exceedingly rare in adults. These tumors have a propensity for local recurrence and to metastasize along the leptomeninges; however, extraneural metastases are very rare and typically occur in the bone or bone marrow. We have not come across any case in literature of medulloblastoma with mediastinal metastases in an adult. Case Presentation. We report a case of medulloblastoma in a 38-year-old lady who was treated with surgery followed by craniospinal radiation. Ten years later she presented with hoarseness from true vocal cord paralysis. She was diagnosed to have infiltrating metastases of her medulloblastoma to the mediastinum, which was confirmed by biopsy. There was no local recurrence. This was treated with chemotherapy followed by stem cell rescue, and she remained progression free for 2 years. Conclusion. Medulloblastomas are rare in adults and can present with late extraneural metastases following treatment. Although most common reported sites are bone and bone marrow, late metastases to other unexpected areas like the mediastinum are possible too and warrant awareness. This can be treated with chemotherapy followed by high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell rescue in a young patient with good performance status. PMID:26425604

  5. Intraosseous Metastasizing of Pineoblastoma into the Anterior Skull Base, Calvarial Bones, and Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Nikitin, Konstantin V; Konovalov, Alexander N; Pitskhelauri, David I; Shishkina, Liudmila V; Golanov, Andrey V.; Cherekaev, Vasily A; Kobiakov, Grigory L; Absalyamova, Oksana V; Lasunin, Nikolay; Antipina, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Pineoblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of the central nervous system (CNS), which arises from the parenchyma of the pineal gland. It is characterized by aggressive clinical behavior and frequent metastases along the craniospinal axis. Extraneural metastases may occur due to surgical seeding of tumor cells beyond the dura and/or hematogenous spread, ventriculoperitoneal shunting, or through Batson’s plexus. To our knowledge, only six documented cases of intraosseous metastases of pineoblastoma are described in the literature. A 23-year-old female patient presented with clinical and radiological symptoms of a pineal tumor causing secondary hydrocephalus. After initial surgical treatment, chemotherapy, and local radiotherapy with craniospinal irradiation, she developed multiple metastases affecting the anterior skull base, intracranial meninges, frontal bone, and finally, the entire vertebral column. The patient received surgical treatment for the anterior skull base metastasis, repeated irradiation of the neuraxis, radiosurgical and radiotherapeutic procedures, and chemotherapy. The patient survived 57 months after the primary disease manifestation and died of multiple metastases. This presented case is the first known description of metastasis of pineoblastoma in the anterior cranial base. Multiple intracranial metastases were suppressed using CyberKnife radiation treatment and chemotherapy until massive involvement of spinal column occurred. Interestingly, no signs of brain radiation necrosis after repeated radiation treatments were observed, and the patient developed only moderate neurocognitive decline. PMID:26858918

  6. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pancreatic Metastases of a Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Waltraud; Fottner, Christian; Hansen, Torsten; Schad, Arno; Schadmand-Fischer, Simin; Weber, Matthias M.; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Lang, Hauke; Musholt, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Apart from regional lymph node metastases, systemic metastases occur sporadically in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC). The lung and bones are the most frequent localizations. Additionally known but extremely rare locations are metastases of the skeletal muscles, ovaries, submandibular gland, sphenoidal sinus, brain, adrenals, and, as shown in only two previously published cases to date, the pancreas. Summary In this article we report about two additional patients with pancreatic metastases from PTC. There is almost no prior experience about therapeutic approaches to this type of metastases. In both patients distant metastases within the pancreas were successfully removed. Postoperative histology confirmed the diagnoses. Supplemental genetic analysis did not demonstrate a BRAF V600E mutation or expression of a RET/PTC1 rearrangement in one case, but revealed a BRAF V600E mutation in the second case. Surgery avoided impending complications maintaining quality of life. One patient had a tumor-specific survival of 42 months. The other patient has occult disease. Conclusions Our two patients benefited of a calculated aggressive surgical action. Thus, if low perioperative mortality and morbidity can be warranted, surgical measures are justifiable in selected cases. PMID:20025539

  7. Transarterial Therapy for Colorectal Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Bhutiani, Neal; Martin, Robert C G

    2016-04-01

    Until recently, hepatic arterial therapies (HAT) had been used for colorectal liver metastases after failure of first-, second-, and third-line chemotherapies. HAT has gained greater acceptance in patients with liver-dominant colorectal metastases after failure of surgery or systemic chemotherapy. The current data demonstrate that HAT is a safe and effective option for preoperative downsizing, optimizing the time to surgery, limiting non-tumor-bearing liver toxicity, and improving overall survival after surgery in patients with colorectal liver-only metastases. The aim of this review is to present the current data for HAT in liver-only and liver-dominant colorectal liver metastases. PMID:27017870

  8. A Case of Alveolar Echinococcosis Presenting as Cerebral and Spinal Intradural Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Atalan, Guneri; Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Sönmez, Güner; Celik, Mahir; Simsek, Berksan

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a chronic and serious, even lethal, parasitic infection caused by the helminth Echinococcus multilocularis. The involvement of Central Nervous System is reported to be 1–3% in literature. Brain involvement is considered a sign of the terminal phase of alveolar echinococcosis. We here in reported a 67-year-old female who had liver alveolar hydatid disease with brain and spinal intradural metastases. PMID:27551181

  9. Bilateral orbital metastases from breast cancer: a case report of successful palliation using stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ho; Choi, Sang Yul; Cho, Chul Koo; Yang, Kwang Mo; Noh, Woo Chul; Kim, Mi-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Of ophthalmic involvement from metastatic breast cancer, extraocular/intraorbital metastases are extremely rare. External beam radiotherapy has been a mainstay palliation for symptomatic orbital metastases. We present a case of bilateral orbital metastases from breast cancer successfully treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). A 38-year-old woman presented with decreased vision in the right eye for 3 weeks. Eight months previously, she underwent whole-brain radiotherapy for multiple brain metastases from breast cancer. Visual acuity was hand motion, and the eyelid closed incompletely in the affected eye. Computed tomography scans showed a 3-cm extraconal mass in the right orbit. She underwent temporary tarsorrhaphy followed by SRT. A total dose of 39 Gy was delivered to the right orbital mass in three daily fractions. Four months later, her visual function was normal in both eyes and the right orbital mass disappeared. A new lesion was detected in the left orbit. She underwent SRT for the left orbital lesion using the same dose-fractionation schedule. No radiation-related toxicities were observed. She died 19 months after the first SRT. Our case suggests that SRT may be an effective and safe treatment option in patients with orbital metastases from breast cancer. PMID:21999613

  10. Treatment of Brain Metastasis from Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Alexander; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2010-01-01

    Brain metastases are not only the most common intracranial neoplasm in adults but also very prevalent in patients with lung cancer. Patients have been grouped into different classes based on the presence of prognostic factors such as control of the primary tumor, functional performance status, age, and number of brain metastases. Patients with good prognosis may benefit from more aggressive treatment because of the potential for prolonged survival for some of them. In this review, we will comprehensively discuss the therapeutic options for treating brain metastases, which arise mostly from a lung cancer primary. In particular, we will focus on the patient selection for combined modality treatment of brain metastases, such as surgical resection or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) combined with whole brain irradiation; the use of radiosensitizers; and the neurocognitive deficits after whole brain irradiation with or without SRS. The benefit of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) and its potentially associated neuro-toxicity for both small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are also discussed, along with the combined treatment of intrathoracic primary disease and solitary brain metastasis. The roles of SRS to the surgical bed, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, WBRT with an integrated boost to the gross brain metastases, as well as combining WBRT with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, are explored as well. PMID:24281220

  11. Melanoma Brain Metastasis: Mechanisms, Models, and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Kircher, David A; Silvis, Mark R; Cho, Joseph H; Holmen, Sheri L

    2016-01-01

    The development of brain metastases in patients with advanced stage melanoma is common, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for their development are poorly understood. Melanoma brain metastases cause significant morbidity and mortality and confer a poor prognosis; traditional therapies including whole brain radiation, stereotactic radiotherapy, or chemotherapy yield only modest increases in overall survival (OS) for these patients. While recently approved therapies have significantly improved OS in melanoma patients, only a small number of studies have investigated their efficacy in patients with brain metastases. Preliminary data suggest that some responses have been observed in intracranial lesions, which has sparked new clinical trials designed to evaluate the efficacy in melanoma patients with brain metastases. Simultaneously, recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of melanoma cell dissemination to the brain have revealed novel and potentially therapeutic targets. In this review, we provide an overview of newly discovered mechanisms of melanoma spread to the brain, discuss preclinical models that are being used to further our understanding of this deadly disease and provide an update of the current clinical trials for melanoma patients with brain metastases. PMID:27598148

  12. A direct measurement of strontium-89 activity in bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Ben-Josef, E; Maughan, R L; Vasan, S; Porter, A T

    1995-06-01

    The total absorbed dose after systemic administration of 89Sr has been determined by measuring directly its activity in bone metastases. Autoradiography was performed on sections of bones obtained from patients treated with 89Sr to study the pattern of deposition. Discs of 5 and 8 mm diameter were cut from metastatic sites and normal bone. The beta-ray activity was determined with a scintillation counter, which was calibrated using similar bovine cancellous bone discs, onto which a known activity of 89Sr was transferred by pipette. From the activity measured, the initial activity (at the time of 89Sr administration) was calculated. The absorbed dose was estimated using the methodology described in NCRP Report No. 58. The estimated initial activity of 89Sr in the bone metastases varied from 2.3 to 240 MBq kg-1, with a mean value of 31 +/- 27 MBq kg-1. The total absorbed dose ranged from 1.3 to 64 Gy, with a mean of 18 +/- 16 Gy. The average total dose to normal bone sites was 1.1 +/- 0.4 Gy. The metastases to normal bone dose ratio in individual samples varied from 8 +/- 4 to 40 +/- 25. These estimates are in agreement with those obtained previously by indirect methods. PMID:7675358

  13. Combined-modality therapy for patients with regional nodal metastases from melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ballo, Matthew T. . E-mail: mballo@mdanderson.org; Ross, Merrick I.; Cormier, Janice N.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Hwu, Patrick; Zagars, Gunar K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and patterns of failure for patients with nodal metastases from melanoma treated with combined-modality therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1983 and 2003, 466 patients with nodal metastases from melanoma were managed with lymphadenectomy and radiation, with or without systemic therapy. Surgery was a therapeutic procedure for clinically apparent nodal disease in 434 patients (regionally advanced nodal disease). Adjuvant radiation was generally delivered with a hypofractionated regimen. Adjuvant systemic therapy was delivered to 154 patients. Results: With a median follow-up of 4.2 years, 252 patients relapsed and 203 patients died of progressive disease. The actuarial 5-year disease-specific, disease-free, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 49%, 42%, and 44%, respectively. By multivariate analysis, increasing number of involved lymph nodes and primary ulceration were associated with an inferior 5-year actuarial disease-specific and distant metastasis-free survival. Also, the number of involved lymph nodes was associated with the development of brain metastases, whereas thickness was associated with lung metastases, and primary ulceration was associated with liver metastases. The actuarial 5-year regional (in-basin) control rate for all patients was 89%, and on multivariate analysis there were no patient or disease characteristics associated with inferior regional control. The risk of lymphedema was highest for those patients with groin lymph node metastases. Conclusions: Although regional nodal disease can be satisfactorily controlled with lymphadenectomy and radiation, the risk of distant metastases and melanoma death remains high. A management approach to these patients that accounts for the competing risks of distant metastases, regional failure, and long-term toxicity is needed.

  14. Spilled Gallstones Mimicking Peritoneal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Loan, William; Carey, Declan P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Spillage of bile and gallstones due to accidental perforation of the gallbladder wall is often encountered during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Although spilled stones were once considered harmless, there is increasing evidence that they can result in septic or other potential complications. Case Report: We report a case of spilled gallstones mimicking peritoneal metastases on radiological investigations; diagnosis was confirmed by diagnostic laparoscopy. Conclusion: Every effort should be made to retrieve spilled gallstones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. When all the stones cannot be retrieved, it should be documented in the patient's medical records to avoid delay in the diagnosis of late complications. Diagnostic laparoscopy is useful when the radiological investigations are inconclusive. PMID:19366546

  15. Dissection of the Process of Brain Metastasis Reveals Targets and Mechanisms for Molecular-based Intervention.

    PubMed

    Weidle, Ulrich H; Birzele, Fabian; Kollmorgen, Gwendlyn; Rüger, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases outnumber the incidence of brain tumors by a factor of ten. Patients with brain metastases have a dismal prognosis and current treatment modalities achieve only a modest clinical benefit. We discuss the process of brain metastasis with respect to mechanisms and involved targets to outline options for therapeutic intervention and focus on breast and lung cancer, as well as melanoma. We describe the process of penetration of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) by disseminated tumor cells, establishment of a metastatic niche, colonization and outgrowth in the brain parenchyma. Furthermore, the role of angiogenesis in colonization of the brain parenchyma, interactions of extravasated tumor cells with microglia and astrocytes, as well as their propensity for neuromimicry, is discussed. We outline targets suitable for prevention of metastasis and summarize targets suitable for treatment of established brain metastases. Finally, we highlight the implications of findings revealing druggable mutations in brain metastases that cannot be identified in matching primary tumors. PMID:27365375

  16. Halofuginone inhibits the establishment and progression of melanoma bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Patricia; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Yin, Juan Juan; Fournier, Pierrick GJ.; McKenna, Ryan C.; Davis, Holly W.; Peng, Xiang H.; Niewolna, Maria; Javelaud, Delphine; Chirgwin, John M.; Mauviel, Alain; Guise, Theresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF-β) derived from bone fuels melanoma bone metastases by inducing tumor secretion of pro-metastatic factors that act on bone cells to change the skeletal microenvironment. Halofuginone is a plant alkaloid derivative that blocks TGF-β signaling with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative properties. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that halofuginone therapy decreases development and progression of bone metastasis caused by melanoma cells through inhibition of TGF-β signaling. Halofuginone treatment of human melanoma cells inhibited cell proliferation, phosphorylation of SMAD proteins in response to TGF-β, and TGF-β-induced SMAD-driven transcription. In addition, halofuginone reduced expression of TGF-β target genes that enhance bone metastases, including PTHrP, CTGF, CXCR4, and IL11. Also, cell apoptosis was increased in response to halofuginone. In nude mice inoculated with 1205Lu melanoma cells, a preventive protocol with halofuginone inhibited bone metastasis. The beneficial effects of halofuginone treatment were comparable to those observed with other anti-TGF-β strategies, including systemic administration of SD208, a small molecule inhibitor of TGF-β receptor I kinase, or forced overexpression of Smad7, a negative regulator of TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, mice with established bone metastases treated with halofuginone had significantly less osteolysis than mice receiving placebo assessed by radiographys. Thus, halofuginone is also effective in reducing the progression of melanoma bone metastases. Moreover, halofuginone treatment reduced melanoma metastasis to the brain, showing the potential of this novel treatment against cancer metastasis. PMID:23002206

  17. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Single Brainstem Metastases: The Cleveland Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Koyfman, Shlomo A.; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Chao, Samuel T.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the imaging and clinical outcomes of patients with single brainstem metastases treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the data from patients with single brainstem metastases treated with SRS. Locoregional control and survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Between 1997 and 2007, 43 patients with single brainstem metastases were treated with SRS. The median age at treatment was 59 years, the median Karnofsky performance status was 80, and the median follow-up was 5.3 months. The median dose was 15 Gy (range, 9.6-24), and the median conformality and heterogeneity index was 1.7 and 1.9, respectively. The median survival was 5.8 months from the procedure date. Of the 33 patient with post-treatment imaging available, a complete radiographic response was achieved in 2 (4.7%), a partial response in 8 (18.6%), and stable disease in 23 (53.5%). The 1-year actuarial rate of local control, distant brain control, and overall survival was 85%, 38.3%, and 31.5%, respectively. Of the 43 patients, 8 (19%) died within 2 months of undergoing SRS, and 15 (36%) died within 3 months. On multivariate analysis, greater performance status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.95, p = .004), score index for radiosurgery (HR, 0.7; p = .004), graded prognostic assessment score (HR, 0.48; p = .003), and smaller tumor volume (HR, 1.23, p = .002) were associated with improved survival. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SRS is a safe and effective local therapy for patients with brainstem metastases.

  18. Brain Metastasis of Pleural Mesothelioma after a Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Aya; Tamiya, Akihiro; Kanazu, Masaki; Nonaka, Junichi; Yonezawa, Taiji; Asami, Kazuhiro; Atagi, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an uncommon, fatal neoplasm induced by asbestos exposure. Brain metastases from MPM are extremely rare, with most such cases diagnosed only at the time of autopsy. This report describes what we believe to be the first case of MPM metastasizing to the brain after a subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as the subsequent surgical removal of the brain metastasis. PMID:27041164

  19. Liver Metastases in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Folprecht, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Resection of colorectal liver metastases is a treatment standard because patients experience long-term disease-free survival or are even cured after undergoing this procedure. Improved surgical techniques for liver resection in combination with downsizing liver metastases by chemotherapy, interventions to induce liver hypertrophy before resection, and the use of ablative techniques have allowed us to expand the indications for liver surgery and local treatment in situations with limited metastatic colorectal cancer. Resectability and identification of patients who might benefit from liver surgery and local ablative techniques are key factors for the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Despite the wide acceptance of liver surgery and ablative techniques, there are many open questions on the management of limited metastatic disease, such as which patients benefit from an aggressive surgical approach, what the indications for ablative and other local techniques are, and what the role of chemotherapy is for patients with resectable or resected disease. Unfortunately, results of randomized trials are only available for a limited number of these questions. PMID:27249722

  20. Management of resectable colorectal lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Moorcraft, Sing Yu; Ladas, George; Bowcock, Anne; Chau, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Lung metastases occur in 10-20 % of patients with colorectal cancer. The biology of colorectal lung metastases is poorly understood, however lung metastases are more common in patients with rectal cancer and in patients with RAS mutations. Although the majority of patients have extrapulmonary disease, a small proportion of patients with lung metastases are suitable for lung metastasectomy and surgical resection has become a standard of care, based on data from retrospective series demonstrating a 5-year overall survival of 40-68 %. However, there remains uncertainty regarding the optimal management approach for these patients due to the lack of evidence from randomized controlled trials and current practice varies between institutions. For example, the role for neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy is not yet defined and there are no randomized trials comparing surgery with alternative treatment options such as radiofrequency ablation and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy. Further research is needed to improve the selection of patients for surgery, but favourable prognostic factors include a normal pre-operative CEA, solitary metastasis, complete resection and a long disease-free interval. There is also evidence that patients with resectable liver and lung metastases may benefit from resection of both sites of disease, and that re-resection may be of benefit in selected patients who relapse with resectable lung metastases. This article summarizes the biology of colorectal lung metastases and discusses the management of patients with lung metastases. PMID:26659389

  1. A case of early extraneural medulloblastoma metastases in a young adult

    PubMed Central

    Kondoff, Slavomir Iliev; Milev, Milko Dimitrov; Laleva, Lili Naskova; Tzekov, Christo Christov; Kostadinova, Christina Petrova; Kirova-Nedyalkova, Galina Ivanova; Dakova, Polina Danailova

    2015-01-01

    Extraneural metastases are a relatively rare manifestation of the primary brain tumors, and a major part of the cases has been associated with initial medulloblastoma. Herein, we present the case of a young female adult diagnosed and operated for medulloblastoma. The patient developed extraneural metastases in the first postoperative year. The condition exhibited an aggressive course of development, and the applied treatment approaches were unable to halt its progression. A short literature review identifies the predictive factors determining both prognosis and treatability of the condition; the current limitations and future perspectives of the treatment options are discussed. PMID:26425169

  2. Activity of T-DM1 in HER-2 positive central nervous system breast cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Sofia; Maralani, Pejman; Verma, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with metastatic human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) positive breast cancer (BC) to the lungs and bones was diagnosed with central nervous system (CNS) metastases in November 2011. The MRI showed a right parietal lobe mass with adjacent leptomeningeal disease and several small bilateral cerebellar metastases. She was treated with whole brain irradiation (WBI), followed by capecitabine and lapatinib (December 2011-March 2013) and trastuzumab and lapatinib (May 2013-August 2013). Then, the brain MRI showed progression. In the absence of significant neurological symptoms, we postponed WBI and closely monitored for the development of neurological symptoms. Systemic treatment with trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), an antibody-drug conjugate composed of the cytotoxic agent DM1 conjugated to trastuzumab, was initiated in September 2013 to control systemic disease. Unexpectedly, after two cycles of treatment the brain MRI showed a decrease in size of CNS metastases. This case report suggests possible activity of T-DM1 in HER-2 positive BC with CNS metastases. PMID:25123575

  3. Evaluation of lactate detection using selective multiple quantum coherence in phantoms and brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    Harris, L M; Tunariu, N; Messiou, C; Hughes, J; Wallace, T; DeSouza, N M; Leach, M O; Payne, G S

    2015-01-01

    Lactate is a product of glucose metabolism. In tumour tissues, which exhibit enhanced glycolytic metabolism, lactate signals may be elevated, making lactate a potential useful tumour biomarker. Methods of lactate quantitation are complicated because of overlap between the lactate methyl doublet CH3 resonance and a lipid resonance at 1.3 ppm. This study presents the use of a selective homonuclear multiple quantum coherence transfer sequence (SelMQC-CSI), at 1.5 T, to better quantify lactate in the presence of lipids. Work performed on phantoms showed good lactate detection (49%) and lipid suppression (98%) efficiencies. To evaluate the method in the brain, the sequence was tested on a group of 23 patients with treated brain tumours, either glioma (N = 20) or secondary metastases in the brain (N = 3). Here it was proved to be of use in determining lactate concentrations in vivo. Lactate was clearly seen in SelMQC spectra of glioma, even in the presence of lipids, with high grade glioma (7.3 ± 1.9 mM, mean ± standard deviation) having higher concentrations than low grade glioma (1.9 ± 1.5 mM, p = 0.048). Lactate was not seen in secondary metastases in the brain. SelMQC-CSI is shown to be a useful technique for measuring lactate in tumours whose signals are otherwise contaminated by lipid. © 2015 The Authors NMR in Biomedicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25586623

  4. 1,3,5-Trinitrobenzene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    1,3,5 - Trinitrobenzene ; CASRN 99 - 35 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  5. Cutaneous metastases from signet cell carcinoma of the gut: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    George, Anu Anna; Peter, Dincy; Masih, Deepti; Thomas, Meera; Pulimood, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous metastasis from visceral tumors is a rare entity with a reported incidence between 0.3% and 9.8%. These usually occur late in the course of the disease; the average time interval between the diagnosis of malignancy and presentation of cutaneous metastases has been reported to be 33 months. In rare instances (in about 0.8%–1.3% of patients), cutaneous metastases may be a pointer to an underlying undiagnosed malignancy. We report two patients presenting to us with soft, nodular, cutaneous lesions, which was the manifestation of metastatic signet cell carcinoma arising from the gut. We report these cases owing to their rarity.

  6. Distinct deleted regions on chromosome segment 16q23-24 associated with metastases in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, C; Berx, G; Larsson, C; Auer, G; Aspenblad, U; Pan, Y; Sundelin, B; Ekman, P; Nordenskjöld, M; van Roy, F; Bergerheim, U S

    1999-03-01

    Cadherins (CDH) are cell adhesion molecules and their dysfunctions have been implicated in the development of cancer metastases. Several cadherin genes are tandemly located on 16q, which is frequently deleted in prostate cancer. We therefore used 22 markers on 16q to localize important deleted regions in metastases of this tumor. We found 16q deletions in 24/32 (75%) tumors. All lymph node and brain metastases showed extensive deletions, while 52% of primary tumors displayed limited deletions. Commonly deleted regions (CDRs) on 16q23-24, CDR2 (D16S515-D16S516) and CDR4 (D16S520-D13S3028), were strongly associated with metastases and increased Gleason score. Reduced CDH1 (E-cadherin) expression was seen in 16/32 (50%) tumors, but the CDH1 gene is not within either of these two regions. Sequencing analysis for all 16 exons of the CDH1 gene did not reveal any mutations in 10 tumors, including three brain metastases with both 16q22.1 deletion and absent E-cadherin expression. Our results implicate other, yet unidentified genes on 16q23-24 to be the frequent targets of mutations and deletions in prostate cancer metastases. PMID:10451696

  7. Characteristics of breast cancer patients with central nervous system metastases: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Harputluoglu, Hakan; Dizdar, Omer; Aksoy, Sercan; Kilickap, Saadettin; Dede, Didem S; Ozisik, Yavuz; Guler, Nilufer; Barista, Ibrahim; Gullu, Ibrahim; Hayran, Mutlu; Selek, Ugur; Cengiz, Mustafa; Zorlu, Faruk; Tekuzman, Gulten; Altundag, Kadri

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of breast cancer patients with central nervous system (CNS) metastases and factors associated with survival after development of CNS metastasis. One-hundred-forty-four patients with brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Median age at the time of brain metastasis diagnosis was 48.9. Median time between initial diagnosis and development of brain metastasis was 36 months. Fourteen cases had leptomeningeal involvement. Twenty-two patients (15.3%) had single metastasis. Ten percent of the patients had surgery, 94% had radiotherapy and 63% had chemotherapy. Median survival after development of brain metastasis was 7.4 months. Survival of patients with single metastasis was significantly longer than those with multiple metastases (33.5 vs. 6.5 months, p = 0.0006). Survival of patients who received chemotherapy was significantly longer than those who received radiotherapy alone (9.9 vs. 2 months, p < 0.0001). In multivariate Cox regression analyses, presence of single metastasis and application of chemotherapy were the only significant factors associated with better survival (p = 0.047 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Age at initial diagnosis or at the time of brain metastasis, time from initial diagnosis to development of brain metastasis, menopausal status, tumor stage, grade, hormone receptor or HER2 status individually were not associated with survival. In this study, survival after the diagnosis of CNS metastases appeared to be affected by patient characteristics rather than biologic characteristics of the tumor. This is probably secondary to the lack of effective treatment options in these patients and overall poor prognosis. PMID:18507204

  8. Missing metastases as a model to challenge current therapeutic algorithms in colorectal liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lucidi, Valerio; Hendlisz, Alain; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Donckier, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    In oncosurgical approach to colorectal liver metastases, surgery remains considered as the only potentially curative option, while chemotherapy alone represents a strictly palliative treatment. However, missing metastases, defined as metastases disappearing after chemotherapy, represent a unique model to evaluate the curative potential of chemotherapy and to challenge current therapeutic algorithms. We reviewed recent series on missing colorectal liver metastases to evaluate incidence of this phenomenon, predictive factors and rates of cure defined by complete pathologic response in resected missing metastases and sustained clinical response when they were left unresected. According to the progresses in the efficacy of chemotherapeutic regimen, the incidence of missing liver metastases regularly increases these last years. Main predictive factors are small tumor size, low marker level, duration of chemotherapy, and use of intra-arterial chemotherapy. Initial series showed low rates of complete pathologic response in resected missing metastases and high recurrence rates when unresected. However, recent reports describe complete pathologic responses and sustained clinical responses reaching 50%, suggesting that chemotherapy could be curative in some cases. Accordingly, in case of missing colorectal liver metastases, the classical recommendation to resect initial tumor sites might have become partially obsolete. Furthermore, the curative effect of chemotherapy in selected cases could lead to a change of paradigm in patients with unresectable liver-only metastases, using intensive first-line chemotherapy to intentionally induce missing metastases, followed by adjuvant surgery on remnant chemoresistant tumors and close surveillance of initial sites that have been left unresected. PMID:27099436

  9. Prostatic carcinosarcoma with lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Stefanie R; Kang, David J; Armas, Armando

    2013-01-01

    Carcinosarcoma of the prostate is an uncommon malignancy with poor long-term prognosis. The cancer is typically discovered at an advanced stage, and with less than 100 reported cases, there is limited literature concerning treatment options. Our patient presented with a history of benign prostatic hypertrophy, erectile dysfunction, and nocturia. Biopsy of his prostate indicated that the patient had prostatic adenocarcinoma, but histopathology after prostatectomy revealed carcinosarcoma. It has been over six years since this patient's diagnosis of carcinosarcoma. Over this span of time, he has received a radical prostatectomy, radiotherapy, and androgen ablative therapy. The patient also developed multiple lung metastases that have been treated with video-assisted thoracic surgery and stereotactic body radiosurgery. Overall, he has remained unimpaired and in good condition despite his aggressive form of cancer. PMID:24294528

  10. Metastases of unknown primary site.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C; Thomas, L C

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that effective therapy does not currently exist for the majority of patients presenting with metastases of unknown primary site, the last decade has witnessed significant advances in the approach to this heterogeneous disease. The use of modern pathologic techniques that frequently provide better diagnostic precision and the recognition of specific subgroups with a favorable prognosis and responsiveness to treatment has improved the outcome for some patients. Currently the diagnostic strategy should emphasize the rapid identification of patients likely to benefit from available therapy, whereas clinical research should focus on the development of more effective treatments for those patients with unresponsive tumors. In the future, continued improvements in the molecular characterization of these tumors will likely enhance understanding of the metastatic process, allow for more specific definitions of cell lineage, and provide insights for better therapy. PMID:8569295

  11. Bone metastases in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Portales, Fabienne; Thézenas, Simon; Samalin, Emmanuelle; Assenat, Eric; Mazard, Thibault; Ychou, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal (CRC) and gastroesophageal (GEC) cancers unusually spread to the bone. However, bone metastases (BM) are responsible for skeletal-related events (SREs) associated with an altered quality of life. Aiming to describe the characteristics and prognostic influence of BM from gastro-intestinal cancers, we performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data in patients treated in our institution (1996-2006). 189 patients (5.5 %) developed BM: 79 with GEC and 110 with CRC. 57 patients had bone-exclusive metastases. In univariate analyses, the median time to BM occurrence was correlated with the primary tumour (PT) localisation, surgery, histology and TNM staging. However, in multivariate analyses, the occurrence delay was significantly shorter only for patients with GEC (HR 2.1), N1-2 status (HR 1.9), M1 status (HR 2.4), and epidermoid carcinoma (HR 6.0). Pain was the most frequent clinical sign leading to BM diagnosis (77.2 %). SRE occurred in 55 % of patients. Median overall survivals (OSs) of patients with CRC and GEC were 9.4 months [95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 6.4-11.1] and 3.4 months (95 % CI 2.5-9.0), respectively. In univariate analyses, OS was correlated with PT surgery and NM staging, and the number of BM. In multivariate analyses, only the PT surgery and the number of BM remained correlated with OS. Our results suggest that there may be a subset of patients associated with a quicker development of BM. Given their higher risk of SRE, they could benefit from an early screening, calling for further prospective studies encompassing patients with and without BM. PMID:25381591

  12. Endobronchial metastases from extrathoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Akoglu, Sebahat; Uçan, Eyüp S; Celik, Gülperi; Sener, Gülper; Sevinç, Can; Kilinç, Oğuz; Itil, Oya

    2005-01-01

    Endobronchial metastases (EBM) from extrapulmonary malignant tumors are rare. The most common extrathoracic malignancies associated with EBM are breast, renal and colorectal carcinomas. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the clinical, radiographic and bronchoscopic aspects of patients with EBM who were diagnosed between 1992 and 2002. Data about patients' clinical conditions, symptoms, radiographic and endoscopic findings, and histopathological examination results were investigated. EBM was defined as bronchoscopically visible lesions histopathologically identical to the primary tumor in patients with extrapulmonary malignancies. We found 15 cases with EBM. Primary tumors included breast (3), colorectal (3), and renal (2) carcinomas; Malignant Melanoma (2); synovial sarcoma (1), ampulla of Vater adenocarcinoma (1), pheochromocytoma (1), hypernephroma (1), and Hodgkin's Disease (1). The most common symptoms were dyspnea (80%), cough (66.6%) and hemoptysis (33.3%). Multiple (40%) or single (13.3%) pulmonary nodules, mediastinal or hilar lymphadenopathy (40%), and effusion (40%) were the most common radiographic findings. The mean interval from initial diagnosis to diagnosis of EBM was 32.8 months (range, 0-96 months) and median survival time was 18 months (range, 4-84). As a conclusion, various extrapulmonary tumors can metastasize to the bronchus. Symptoms and radiographic findings are similar with those in primary lung cancer. Therefore, EBM should be discriminated from primary lung cancer histopathologically. Although mean survival time is usually short, long-term survivors were reported. Consequently, treatment must be planned according to the histology of the primary tumor, evidence of metastasis to other sites and medical status of the patient. PMID:16475029

  13. Brain metastasis detection by resonant Raman optical biopsy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Zhang, Chunyuan; Pu, Yang; Li, Zhongwu; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    Resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy provides an effective way to enhance Raman signal from particular bonds associated with key molecules due to changes on a molecular level. In this study, RR is used for detection of human brain metastases of five kinds of primary organs of lung, breast, kidney, rectal and orbital in ex-vivo. The RR spectra of brain metastases cancerous tissues were measured and compared with those of normal brain tissues and the corresponding primary cancer tissues. The differences of five types of brain metastases tissues in key bio-components of carotene, tryptophan, lactate, alanine and methyl/methylene group were investigated. The SVM-KNN classifier was used to categorize a set of RR spectra data of brain metastasis of lung cancerous tissues from normal brain tissue, yielding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 75%, respectively. The RR spectroscopy may provide new moleculebased optical probe tools for diagnosis and classification of brain metastatic of cancers.

  14. An unusual case of exclusive liver metastases from adenoid cystic carcinoma of the submandibular gland: a role for surgery? Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Genoveffa; Sagnotta, Andrea; Muroni, Mirko; Cacchi, Claudio; D'Amato, Alberto

    2011-04-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a relatively rare tumor of the salivary glands, accounting for approximately 5%-10% of all salivary gland tumors. An important feature of ACCs is the long clinical course with a high rate of distant metastases, with an incidence of more than 40% for ACC of submandibular glands. The preferential sites of metastases are the lung and bone, followed by the brain and liver. Most liver metastases are derived from nonparotid ACCs, and the presentation is often related to local recurrence or metastases to other organs. We herein report the case of a patient with liver metastases treated by a hepatectomy, which occurred 18 months after the primary resection of an ACC of the submandibular gland. We furthermore review the literature concerning the management of these tumors. PMID:21431502

  15. I BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON MULTIMODAL TREATMENT OF COLORECTAL LIVER METASTASES. MODULE 2: APPROACH TO RESECTABLE METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    RIBEIRO, Héber Salvador de Castro; TORRES, Orlando Jorge Martins; MARQUES, Márcio Carmona; HERMAN, Paulo; KALIL, Antonio Nocchi; FERNANDES, Eduardo de Souza Martins; de OLIVEIRA, Fábio Ferreira; CASTRO, Leonaldson dos Santos; HANRIOT, Rodrigo; OLIVEIRA, Suilane Coelho Ribeiro; BOFF, Marcio Fernando; da COSTA, Wilson Luiz; GIL, Roberto de Almeida; PFIFFER, Tulio Eduardo Flesch; MAKDISSI, Fabio Ferrari; ROCHA, Manoel de Souza; do AMARAL, Paulo Cezar Galvão; COSTA, Leonardo Atem Gonçalves de Araújo; ALOIA, Tomas A.; D'ALBUQUERQUE, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; COIMBRA, Felipe José Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liver metastases of colorectal cancer are frequent and potentially fatal event in the evolution of patients. Aim: In the second module of this consensus, management of resectable liver metastases was discussed. Method: Concept of synchronous and metachronous metastases was determined, and both scenarius were discussed separately according its prognostic and therapeutic peculiarities. Results: Special attention was given to the missing metastases due to systemic preoperative treatment response, with emphasis in strategies to avoid its reccurrence and how to manage disappeared lesions. Conclusion: Were presented validated ressectional strategies, to be taken into account in clinical practice. PMID:27120731

  16. Metastasizing Maxillary Ameloblastoma: Report of a Case with Molecular Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Rotellini, Matteo; Maggiore, Giandomenico; Trovati, Massimo; Saraceno, Massimo Squadrelli

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Ameloblastoma is a benign odontogenic tumour that may exhibit aggressive biological behaviour with local recurrence and metastasis following initial surgical resection. Surgery is the most acceptable modality of treatment, even if a biological approach is currently on study. We report a case of maxillary ameloblastoma with development of neck and brain metastases after repeated local recurrences. Molecular analysis was performed with the aim to better characterize this neoplasm and its peculiar behaviour. Methods We investigated the status of tumour protein p53 (TP53), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) genes with immunohistochemical, fluorescent in situ hybridization and/or direct sequencing in order to clarify their possible role in the development of this neoplasm and the possibility of a targeted treatment. Results The histological appearance of the tumour was the same in the primary lesion, in the recurrence and in the metastases. EGFR positivity was present in the recurrence and the brain metastasis, while HER2 was negative in all samples tested. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis for EGFR showed disomy of neoplastic cells. Direct DNA sequencing of TP53 gene exons 5 - 9 was carried out in tumour samples from the infratemporal recurrence and brain metastasis, with no mutational alteration detected. Similarly, sequencing analysis of BRAF exon 15 (V600) and EGFR gene showed wild type results in all samples tested. Conclusions Further studies are needed to identify molecular pathways that may provide an opportunity of alternative treatments and/or new potential predictive markers of local and distant spread of this rare tumour. PMID:27099699

  17. Outcomes in patients with brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nishi; Mellon, Eric; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Frakes, Jessica; Shridhar, Ravi; Pimiento, Jose; Meredith, Ken; Tran, Nam D.; Saeed, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Background Brain metastases from esophageal carcinoma have historically been rare and associated with poor prognosis. With improvements in systemic disease control, the incidence of brain metastases is expected to rise. To better inform management decisions, we sought to identify factors associated with survival in patients with brain metastasis from esophageal cancer. Methods We retrospectively identified 49 patients with brain metastasis from stage I–IV primary esophageal cancer treated with surgery, radiation, or a combination of modalities at our tertiary referral center between 1998 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to collect demographic and clinical information. Results Median age at diagnosis of the primary esophageal cancer was 60 years. Forty-one (84%) patients were male and forty patients (82%) had adenocarcinoma. Median overall survival (MS) following esophageal cancer diagnosis was 24 months (range, 3–71 months), and median survival after the identification of brain metastases was 5 months (range, 1–52 months). On univariate analysis, only patients with poor Karnofsky performance status (KPS <70), recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification (III), or 3 or more brain