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Sample records for 1-associated periodic syndrome

  1. Differential impact of high and low penetrance TNFRSF1A gene mutations on conventional and regulatory CD4+ T cell functions in TNFR1-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pucino, Valentina; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Perna, Francesco; Obici, Laura; Merlini, Giampaolo; Cattalini, Marco; La Torre, Francesco; Maggio, Maria Cristina; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Magnotti, Flora; Galgani, Mario; Galeazzi, Mauro; Marone, Gianni; De Rosa, Veronica; Talarico, Rosaria; Cantarini, Luca; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    TNFR-associated periodic syndrome is an autoinflammatory disorder caused by autosomal-dominant mutations in TNFRSF1A, the gene encoding for TNFR superfamily 1A. The lack of knowledge in the field of TNFR-associated periodic syndrome biology is clear, particularly in the context of control of immune self-tolerance. We investigated how TNF-α/TNFR superfamily 1A signaling can affect T cell biology, focusing on conventional CD4(+)CD25(-) and regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell functions in patients with TNFR-associated periodic syndrome carrying either high or low penetrance TNFRSF1A mutations. Specifically, we observed that in high penetrance TNFR-associated periodic syndrome, at the molecular level, these alterations were secondary to a hyperactivation of the ERK1/2, STAT1/3/5, mammalian target of rapamycin, and NF-κB pathways in conventional T cells. In addition, these patients had a lower frequency of peripheral regulatory T cells, which also displayed a defective suppressive phenotype. These alterations were partially found in low penetrance TNFR-associated periodic syndrome, suggesting a specific link between the penetrance of the TNFRSF1A mutation and the observed T cell phenotype. Taken together, our data envision a novel role for adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of TNFR-associated periodic syndrome involving both CD4(+) conventional T cells and Tregs, suggesting a novel mechanism of inflammation in the context of autoinflammatory disorders. PMID:26598380

  2. [Genetic fever syndromes. Hereditary recurrent (periodic) fever syndromes].

    PubMed

    Neudorf, U; Lainka, E; Kallinich, T; Holzinger, D; Roth, J; Föll, D; Niehues, T

    2013-05-01

    Genetic fever syndromes or hereditary recurrent fever syndromes (HRF) are considered to be part of the autoinflammatory diseases (AID) which result from errors in the innate immune system. Patients typically have self-limiting episodes of fever and high levels of inflammation markers. The mode of inheritance is autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant. The diseases of the HRF include familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-associated periodic syndrome, hyper-IgD syndrome and cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes. The disease known as deficiency of interleukin 1 (IL1) receptor antagonist does not fully belong to this group because fever is not a typical symptom. The therapy depends on the type and severity of the disease. Effective prophylaxis is possible for FMF. Biologicals, especially IL1 blocking agents are highly effective in very severe fever syndromes. In order to collect more information on AID, to establish a biobank and coordinate research in this field the AID-Net project was founded. Currently 606 patients with AID are registered of whom 381 have HRF. PMID:23552978

  3. Two cases of RIT1 associated Noonan syndrome: Further delineation of the clinical phenotype and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Milosavljević, Doris; Overwater, Eline; Tamminga, Saskia; de Boer, Karin; Elting, Mariet W; van Hoorn, Marion E; Rinne, Tuula; Houweling, Arjan C

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in RIT1, involved in the RAS-MAPK pathway, have recently been identified as a cause for Noonan syndrome. We present two patients with Noonan syndrome caused by a RIT1 mutation with novel phenotypic manifestations, severe bilateral lower limb lymphedema starting during puberty, and fetal hydrops resulting in intrauterine fetal death, respectively. Including our patients, a total of 52 patients have been reported with Noonan syndrome caused by a RIT1 mutation. Our report contributes to the delineation of the phenotype associated with RIT1 mutations and underlines that lymphatic involvement is part of this spectrum. In addition, we provide an overview of the currently described Noonan syndrome patients with RIT1 mutations in literature. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27109146

  4. Segmental neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) associated with Cobb syndrome: case report.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Castroviejo, I; Pascual-Pascual, S-I; Viaño, J

    2008-12-01

    We present a 3-month-old girl who showed segmental NF1 and Cobb syndrome. She has a cutaneous vascular malformation located on the middle T (4)-T (6) region superimposed on a giant cutaneous café-au-lait spot. Magnetic resonance arteriography (MRA) revealed bilateral renal artery stenosis, extensive hypertrophy of the spinal epidural venous plexus, coarctation and tubular hypoplasia of the aortic arch and proximal portion of descending aorta. To the best of our knowledge the association of both neurocutaneous disorders has not being previously described. PMID:19568998

  5. 'Moya' than meets the eye: neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with Moyamoya syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tan, R M; Chng, S M; Seow, W T; Wong, J; Lim, C C

    2008-04-01

    Moyamoya syndrome (MMS) is an uncommon association of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). We describe a seven-year-old chinese girl with NF1 and unilateral MMS with multiple hyperintensities on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The ischaemic lesions in the ipsilateral white matter were hypointense on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images, in contrast to the hyperintense "unidentified bright objects" (UBOs) of NF1. Neuroradiologists should be aware of associated MMS in NF1 patients, and distinguish the effects of ischaemia from UBOs, especially on FLAIR MR imaging. PMID:18418511

  6. Measuring the rotation periods of 4-10 Myr T-Tauri stars in the Orion OB1 association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanveer Karim, Md; Stassun, Keivan; Briceno, Cesar; Vivas, Kathy; Raetz, Stefanie; Calvet, Nuria; Mateu, Cecilia; Downes, Juan Jose; Hernandez, Jesus; Neuhäuser, Ralph; Mugrauer, Markus; Takahashi, Hidenori; Tachihara, Kengo; Chini, Rolf; YETI

    2016-01-01

    Most existing studies of young stellar populations have focused on the youngest (< 2-3 Myr) T-Tauri stars, which are usually associated with their natal gas and hence easier to identify. In contrast, older T-Tauri stars (~ 4-10 Myr), being more difficult to find, have been less studied, even though they hold key insight to understanding evolution of lower-mass (0.1-2 M⊙) stars and of protoplanetary discs. We present a study of photometric variability of 1974 confirmed 4-10 Myr old T-Tauri stars in the Orion OB1 association using optical time-series from three different surveys: the Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía-Quest Equatorial Survey Team (CIDA-QUEST), the Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (YETI) and from a Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) campaign. We investigated stellar rotation periods according to the type of stars (Classical or Weak-lined T-Tauri stars) and their locations, to look for population-wide trends. We detected 563 periodic variables and 1411 non-periodic variables by investigating the light curves of these stars. We find that ~ 30% of Weak-line T-Tauri stars (WTTS) and ~ 20% of Classical T-Tauri stars (CTTS) are periodic. Though we did not find any noticeable difference in rotation period between CTTS and WTTS, our study does show a change in the overall rotation periods of stars 4-10 Myr old, consistent with predictions of angular momentum evolution models, an important constraint for theoretical models for an age range for which no similar data existed.

  7. [Basal cell nevus syndrome. Presentation of 2 cases. 1 associated with medulloblastoma].

    PubMed

    Balsa, R E; Ingratta, S M; Galeano, F A; Raffaeli, C A; Drut, R; Vestfrid, M

    1985-01-01

    A case of nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome in a four years old girl with preceding familiar history is reported. In her epithelioma father numerous basocellular, milia cysts, mandibular cysts, dentition disorders, brain falx calcifica ted and hiperkeratosis of the sole of the feet were described. Clinically, the girl presented initial migraine and vomits together with macrocephalus, bossing forehead, hypertelorism, physical disorders, retarded maturation, "keel" thorax, genu recurvatum, hallux valgus, hammerfinger, pigmented nevus and hyperkeratosis of the sole of the feet. Radiologically diastasis of the skull suture with jagged image, endocranial hypertension, signs of macrocephalus of the facial bones, calcification of the brain falx, bridge of the sella turcica, bifid ribs and fusion of the ribs was observed. The axial computed tomography showed calcification of the vermix cerebelosus and severe hydrocephalus suggesting the presence of an occupant mass. After total surgical removal of the mass, the histological examination revealed a medulloblastoma. The skin biopsy of a cutaneous nevic element showed a basal-cell epithelioma. With the exception of an ovarian fibroma and fusion of the vertebras non appreciable because of the age. With the exception of the ovarian fibroma and the fusion of the vertebras, the patient showed the same characteristics as those described in the classification of Gorlin. The importance of this paper communication lie on the preceding familiar history, infrequency, compromise of different systems, malignant tendency of the cutaneous lesions and frequent association with non cutaneous neoplasias. PMID:3887060

  8. CtBP1 associates metabolic syndrome and breast carcinogenesis targeting multiple miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Paola; Dalton, Guillermo N.; Scalise, Georgina D.; Moiola, Cristian P.; Porretti, Juliana; Massillo, Cintia; Kordon, Edith; Gardner, Kevin; Zalazar, Florencia; Flumian, Carolina; Todaro, Laura; Vazquez, Elba S.; Meiss, Roberto; De Siervi, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MeS) has been identified as a risk factor for breast cancer. C-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1) is a co-repressor of tumor suppressor genes that is activated by low NAD+/NADH ratio. High fat diet (HFD) increases intracellular NADH. We investigated the effect of CtBP1 hyperactivation by HFD intake on mouse breast carcinogenesis. We generated a MeS-like disease in female mice by chronically feeding animals with HFD. MeS increased postnatal mammary gland development and generated prominent duct patterns with markedly increased CtBP1 and Cyclin D1 expression. CtBP1 induced breast cancer cells proliferation. Serum from animals with MeS enriched the stem-like/progenitor cell population from breast cancer cells. CtBP1 increased breast tumor growth in MeS mice modulating multiple genes and miRNA expression implicated in cell proliferation, progenitor cells phenotype, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, mammary development and cell communication in the xenografts. These results define a novel function for CtBP1 in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26933806

  9. CtBP1 associates metabolic syndrome and breast carcinogenesis targeting multiple miRNAs.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Paola; Dalton, Guillermo N; Scalise, Georgina D; Moiola, Cristian P; Porretti, Juliana; Massillo, Cintia; Kordon, Edith; Gardner, Kevin; Zalazar, Florencia; Flumian, Carolina; Todaro, Laura; Vazquez, Elba S; Meiss, Roberto; De Siervi, Adriana

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MeS) has been identified as a risk factor for breast cancer. C-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1) is a co-repressor of tumor suppressor genes that is activated by low NAD+/NADH ratio. High fat diet (HFD) increases intracellular NADH. We investigated the effect of CtBP1 hyperactivation by HFD intake on mouse breast carcinogenesis. We generated a MeS-like disease in female mice by chronically feeding animals with HFD. MeS increased postnatal mammary gland development and generated prominent duct patterns with markedly increased CtBP1 and Cyclin D1 expression. CtBP1 induced breast cancer cells proliferation. Serum from animals with MeS enriched the stem-like/progenitor cell population from breast cancer cells. CtBP1 increased breast tumor growth in MeS mice modulating multiple genes and miRNA expression implicated in cell proliferation, progenitor cells phenotype, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, mammary development and cell communication in the xenografts. These results define a novel function for CtBP1 in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:26933806

  10. Secondary Sjogren's syndrome presenting with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Dormohammadi Toosi, Taraneh; Naderi, Neda; Movassaghi, Shafieh; Seradj, Mehran Heydari; Khalvat, Ali; Shahbazi, Fatemeh

    2014-11-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) may develop in a large population of patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS), but most of the subjects are asymptomatic. Here, we report a patient with known rheumatoid arthritis and symptoms of xerostomia, xerophthalmia and periodic paralysis. SS should be considered as a cause of RTA. The treatment of the underlying disorder may ameliorate the symptoms. PMID:25988057

  11. Secondary Sjogren's syndrome presenting with hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Dormohammadi Toosi, Taraneh; Naderi, Neda; Movassaghi, Shafieh; Seradj, Mehran Heydari; Khalvat, Ali; Shahbazi, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) may develop in a large population of patients with Sjogren's syndrome (SS), but most of the subjects are asymptomatic. Here, we report a patient with known rheumatoid arthritis and symptoms of xerostomia, xerophthalmia and periodic paralysis. SS should be considered as a cause of RTA. The treatment of the underlying disorder may ameliorate the symptoms. PMID:25988057

  12. Coexistent tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qingping; Zhou, Lan; Tomecki, Kenneth J

    2012-07-01

    A 32-year-old Caucasian woman had periodic fevers, skin disease, polyarthralgia and hypermobile joints that were consistent with tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome confirmed with a finding of R92Q missense mutation of the TNFRSFA1 gene with Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility type syndrome. They are both autosomal dominant disorders, and their coexistence suggests that they could share some phenotypic features that may require special consideration in management. Conceivably, they could share common gene mutations although no such data are available. PMID:21785959

  13. Recurrent Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis Unmasks Sjogren Syndrome without Sicca Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Min; Huang, Neng-Chyan; Wann, Shue-Ren; Chang, Yun-Te; Wang, Jyh-Seng

    2015-04-01

    Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis (HPP) may occur as a rare complication of Sjogren Syndrome (SS) and Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA). A 64-year male patient came with HPP, and was later diagnosed with distal RTA. The patient, who had no xerostomia and xerophthalmia, was diagnosed with primary SS from serologic and histologic findings of minor salivary gland biopsy. The patient recovered after potassium replacement therapy. Renal biopsy was also performed and revealed evidence of tubulointerstitial nephritis. Corticosteroids were administered and there was no recurrence of HPP during a 4-year follow-up period. The case highlights the significance of acute hypokalemia management in emergency department as it can unmask SS even if the SS is not associated with sicca symptoms. Hypokalemic paralysis associated with normal anion gap metabolic acidosis should prompt toward the diagnosis of SS. PMID:25933458

  14. Sjögren's syndrome presenting as hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Dowd, J E; Lipsky, P E

    1993-12-01

    We describe a 21-year-old Hispanic woman who presented with hypokalemic paralysis as the initial manifestation of Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Our review of the English literature revealed 12 previously reported cases of SS and renal tubular acidosis (RTA). Paralysis often preceded the sicca complex in those patients. Renal function in the patients with hypokalemic paralysis was reduced compared with that in patients who had primary SS and RTA but no history of hypokalemic paralysis (P < 0.002). Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare manifestation of SS. It is seen more often in patients with primary SS, may precede the classic sicca complex, and may serve as a clinical marker for more severe renal disease in patients who have primary SS and RTA. PMID:8250993

  15. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nora S; Sartori-Valinotti, Julio C; Bruce, Alison J

    2016-01-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, the most common periodic disorder of childhood, presents with the cardinal symptoms of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis typically before age 5. This review presents the recent literature on PFAPA and summarizes key findings in the pathogenesis, evaluation, and treatment of the disease. Theories surrounding the pathogenesis of PFAPA include a faulty innate immunologic response in conjunction with dysregulated T-cell activation. A potential genetic link is also under consideration. Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene variants have been implicated and appear to modify disease severity. In individuals with the heterozygous variant, PFAPA episodes are milder and shorter in duration. Diagnostic criteria include the traditional clinical signs, in addition to the following biomarkers: elevated C-reactive protein in the absence of elevated procalcitonin, vitamin D, CD64, mean corpuscular volume, and other nonspecific inflammatory mediators in the absence of an infectious explanation for fever. Treatment of PFAPA includes tonsillectomy, a single dose of corticosteroids, and, most recently, interleukin 1 blockers such as anakinra, rilonacept, and canakinumab. Tonsillectomy remains the only permanent treatment modality. PMID:27343963

  16. Mutations in AP3D1 associated with immunodeficiency and seizures define a new type of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Sandra; Schulz, Ansgar; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Dieckmann, Nele M G; Niethammer, Klaus; Fuchs, Sebastian; Eckl, Katja Martina; Plank, Roswitha; Werner, Roland; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Bank, Julia; Strauss, Anne; von Bernuth, Horst; Zur Stadt, Udo; Grieve, Samantha; Griffiths, Gillian M; Lehmberg, Kai; Hennies, Hans Christian; Ehl, Stephan

    2016-02-25

    Genetic disorders affecting biogenesis and transport of lysosome-related organelles are heterogeneous diseases frequently associated with albinism. We studied a patient with albinism, neutropenia, immunodeficiency, neurodevelopmental delay, generalized seizures, and impaired hearing but with no mutation in genes so far associated with albinism and immunodeficiency. Whole exome sequencing identified a homozygous mutation in AP3D1 that leads to destabilization of the adaptor protein 3 (AP3) complex. AP3 complex formation and the degranulation defect in patient T cells were restored by retroviral reconstitution. A previously described hypopigmented mouse mutant with an Ap3d1 null mutation (mocha strain) shares the neurologic phenotype with our patient and shows a platelet storage pool deficiency characteristic of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) that was not studied in our patient because of a lack of bleeding. HPS2 caused by mutations in AP3B1A leads to a highly overlapping phenotype without the neurologic symptoms. The AP3 complex exists in a ubiquitous and a neuronal form. AP3D1 codes for the AP3δ subunit of the complex, which is essential for both forms. In contrast, the AP3β3A subunit, affected in HPS2 patients, is substituted by AP3β3B in the neuron-specific heterotetramer. AP3δ deficiency thus causes a severe neurologic disorder with immunodeficiency and albinism that we propose to classify as HPS10. PMID:26744459

  17. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome in the peripartum period

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Iris L; Bourjeily, Ghada

    2008-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a disease characterized by the triad of oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding diathesis and organ failure secondary to lysosomal accumulation of ceroid lipofuscin. We report the case of a pregnant woman with HPS who had a successful vaginal delivery with the administration of desmopressin.

  18. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smoking Obesity Many people with narcolepsy or rapid eye movement (REM) behavior disorder move their legs periodically during ... brain activity, heart rate, breathing, muscle activity, and eye movements are monitored while people sleep. People may also ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): definition, semiology, prognosis, pathogenesis, treatment, and place relative to other periodic joint diseases. Joint Bone Spine. 2004 Jul;71(4):284-90. Review. Citation on PubMed Pettersson T, Kantonen J, Matikainen S, ...

  20. Brugada syndrome and its relevance in the perioperative period

    PubMed Central

    Sorajja, Dan; Ramakrishna, Harish; Poterack, A. Karl; Shen, Win-Kuang; Mookadam, Farouk

    2015-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, as well as ventricular tachyarrhythmias. The defective cardiac sodium channels result in usual electrocardiographic findings of a coved-type ST elevation in precordial leads V1 to V3. The majority of patients have uncomplicated courses with anesthesia, surgery, and invasive procedures. However there is risk of worsening ST elevation and ventricular arrhythmias due to perioperative medications, surgical insult, electrolyte abnormalities, fever, autonomic nervous system tone, as well as other perturbations. Given the increasing numbers of patients with inherited conduction disorders presenting for non-cardiac surgery that are at risk of sudden cardiac death, safe anesthetic management depends upon a detailed knowledge of these conditions. PMID:26139749

  1. Benign and periodic movement disorders in 2 children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Purpura, Giulia; Bozza, Margherita; Bargagna, Stefania

    2014-10-01

    Children with Down syndrome show hypotonia and ligamentous laxity that are associated with motor development delay. Neurologic disorders are common in children with Down syndrome; however, in literature the presence of periodic movement disorders has not yet been described. We report 2 different types of periodic movement disorders in 2 infants with Down syndrome. In the first case, we described an 8-month-old girl with involuntary head nodding and absence of any other neurologic or ophthalmologic abnormalities. In the second case, we described a 6-month-old boy with abnormal but painless head rotation and inclination, alternating from side to side. Episodes of head tilting were often associated with a state of general uneasiness. Neurologic examination between attacks was normal. The aim of this paper is to provide practical information on recognition and management of movement disorders in Down syndrome. PMID:24309245

  2. Complex exercise rehabilitation program for women of the II period of age with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Ok; Olga, Kozyreva

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a complex exercise program integrating Eastern and Western complex exercise rehabilitation programs in order to examine the effects of it on the human body with the subjects for women of the II period of mature age with metabolic syndrome. The subjects of this study are 60 II period of mature aged women with metabolic syndrome living in G City, and the experimental group conducted Taekwon-aerobic exercise, European rehabilitation gymnastics, gym ball exercise, and elastic band exercise while the control group performed European rehabilitation gymnastics, gym ball exercise, and elastic band exercise which is the rehabilitation program being presently conducted in Russia, for 90 min per day for three weeks. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was utilized to verify pre and post-intergroup difference, and the significant level was set as P< 0.05. Whereas body weight, % fat, WHR, SBP, DBP and blood glucose were significant decreased, muscle weight and pulse wave velocity were significant increased after complex exercise rehabilitation programs Both Eastern and Western complex exercise rehabilitation programs showed positive effects on the body of the II period of mature aged women with metabolic syndrome, and if various exercise programs are conducted, it will be more effective in improving II period of mature aged women’s metabolic syndrome afterwards. PMID:24278877

  3. Mutation in LEMD3 (Man1) Associated with Osteopoikilosis and Late-Onset Generalized Morphea: A New Buschke-Ollendorf Syndrome Variant

    PubMed Central

    Korman, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Laumann, Anne; Ferguson, Polly; Varga, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Buschke-Ollendorf syndrome (BOS) is an uncommon syndrome characterized by osteopoikilosis and other bone abnormalities, accompanied by skin lesions, most frequently connective tissue nevi. BOS is caused by mutations in the LEMD3 gene, which encodes the inner nuclear membrane protein Man1. We describe a unique case of osteopoikilosis associated with late-onset localized scleroderma and familial LEMD3 mutations. Case Report. A 72-year-old woman presented with adult-onset diffuse morphea and bullous skin lesions. Evaluation revealed multiple hyperostotic lesions (osteopoikilosis) suggestive of BOS. DNA sequencing identified a previously undescribed nonsense mutation (Trp621X) in the LEMD3 gene encoding Man1. Two additional family members were found to have osteopoikilosis and carry the same LEMD3 mutation. Conclusions and Relevance. We report a unique familial LEMD3 mutation in an individual with osteopoikilosis and late-onset morphea. We propose that this constellation represents a novel syndromic variant of BOS. PMID:27382493

  4. Mutation in LEMD3 (Man1) Associated with Osteopoikilosis and Late-Onset Generalized Morphea: A New Buschke-Ollendorf Syndrome Variant.

    PubMed

    Korman, Benjamin; Wei, Jun; Laumann, Anne; Ferguson, Polly; Varga, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Buschke-Ollendorf syndrome (BOS) is an uncommon syndrome characterized by osteopoikilosis and other bone abnormalities, accompanied by skin lesions, most frequently connective tissue nevi. BOS is caused by mutations in the LEMD3 gene, which encodes the inner nuclear membrane protein Man1. We describe a unique case of osteopoikilosis associated with late-onset localized scleroderma and familial LEMD3 mutations. Case Report. A 72-year-old woman presented with adult-onset diffuse morphea and bullous skin lesions. Evaluation revealed multiple hyperostotic lesions (osteopoikilosis) suggestive of BOS. DNA sequencing identified a previously undescribed nonsense mutation (Trp621X) in the LEMD3 gene encoding Man1. Two additional family members were found to have osteopoikilosis and carry the same LEMD3 mutation. Conclusions and Relevance. We report a unique familial LEMD3 mutation in an individual with osteopoikilosis and late-onset morphea. We propose that this constellation represents a novel syndromic variant of BOS. PMID:27382493

  5. Identification of multiple phytotoxins produced by Fusarium virguliforme including a phytotoxic effector (FvNIS1) associated with soybean sudden death syndrome foliar symptoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxins produced by the soil-borne fungus, Fusarium virguliforme, cause foliar symptoms in soybean. The disease in soybean is referred to as soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS). Three toxins produced by the fungus were reported to be associated with SDS foliar symptoms, but none produced identical S...

  6. Changes in Yearly Birth Prevalence Rates of Children with Down Syndrome in the Period 1986-2007 in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Graaf, G.; Haveman, M.; Hochstenbach, R.; Engelen, J.; Gerssen-Schoorl, K.; Poddighe, P.; Smeets, D.; van Hove, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Netherlands are lacking reliable national empirical data in relation to the development of birth prevalence of Down syndrome. Our study aims at assessing valid national live birth prevalence rates for the period 1986-2007. Method: On the basis of the annual child/adult ratio of Down syndrome diagnoses in five out of the eight Dutch…

  7. Key facts and hot spots on tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Vitale, Antonio; Lucherini, Orso Maria; De Clemente, Caterina; Caso, Francesco; Emmi, Giacomo; Costa, Luisa; Silvestri, Elena; Andreozzi, Laura; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2014-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), formerly known as familial Hibernian fever, is the most common autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disease, resulting from mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene, encoding the 55-kD tumor necrosis factor receptor. The pathophysiologic mechanism of TRAPS remains ambiguous and only partially explained. The onset age of the syndrome is variable and the clinical scenery is characterized by recurrent episodes of high-grade fever that typically lasts 1-3 weeks, associated with migrating myalgia, pseudocellulitis, diffuse abdominal pain, appendicitis-like findings, ocular inflammatory signs, and risk of long-term amyloidosis. Fever episodes are responsive to high-dose corticosteroids, but different classes of drugs have been reported to be ineffective. The use of etanercept is unable to control systemic inflammation, while interleukin-1 blockade has been shown as effective in the control of disease activity in many patients reported so far. PMID:24935411

  8. Current treatment recommendations and considerations for cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Galeotti, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) encompasses a spectrum of three phenotypes of increasing severity. The syndrome is due to dominant mutations in NLRP3, which encodes a key component of the innate immunity that regulates the secretion of IL-1β. CAPS manifests as systemic inflammation, which compromises quality of life and leads to serious complications and handicap. Anti-IL-1 drugs have shown remarkable efficacy in treating CAPS symptoms and have significantly changed patients' lives. They have acceptable safety profiles but do have some differences. We review three drugs that are currently marketed for CAPS, give additional information for the practical use of these drugs, and provide some recommendations for management. PMID:26312542

  9. Advances in the diagnosis and treatment of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Aguado-Gil, L; Irarrazaval-Armendáriz, I; Pretel-Irazabal, M

    2013-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease included in the group of autoinflammatory syndromes. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation in different regions of the body. The main clinical manifestations are myalgia, migratory erythematous rash, periorbital edema, and abdominal pain. The diagnosis is reached using gene analysis and prognosis depends on the appearance of amyloidosis secondary to the recurrent episodes of inflammation. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors and corticosteroids are the most widely used treatments. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of TRAPS, thanks to a better understanding of its pathogenesis. Dermatologists must be aware that the skin manifestations of TRAPS are particularly important, as they are often diagnostic. PMID:23891452

  10. Identification of Multiple Phytotoxins Produced by Fusarium virguliforme Including a Phytotoxic Effector (FvNIS1) Associated With Sudden Death Syndrome Foliar Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao-Xun; Domier, Leslie L; Radwan, Osman; Yendrek, Craig R; Hudson, Matthew E; Hartman, Glen L

    2016-02-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean is caused by a soilborne pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme. Phytotoxins produced by F. virguliforme are translocated from infected roots to leaves, in which they cause SDS foliar symptoms. In this study, additional putative phytotoxins of F. virguliforme were identified, including three secondary metabolites and 11 effectors. While citrinin, fusaric acid, and radicicol induced foliar chlorosis and wilting, Soybean mosaic virus (SMV)-mediated overexpression of F. virguliforme necrosis-inducing secreted protein 1 (FvNIS1) induced SDS foliar symptoms that mimicked the development of foliar symptoms in the field. The expression level of fvnis1 remained steady over time, although foliar symptoms were delayed compared with the expression levels. SMV::FvNIS1 also displayed genotype-specific toxicity to which 75 of 80 soybean cultivars were susceptible. Genome-wide association mapping further identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms at two loci, where three leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase (LRR-RLK) genes were found. Culture filtrates of fvnis1 knockout mutants displayed a mild reduction in phytotoxicity, indicating that FvNIS1 is one of the phytotoxins responsible for SDS foliar symptoms and may contribute to the quantitative susceptibility of soybean by interacting with the LRR-RLK genes. PMID:26646532

  11. A recessive Nav1.4 mutation underlies congenital myasthenic syndrome with periodic paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Habbout, Karima; Poulin, Hugo; Rivier, François; Giuliano, Serena; Sternberg, Damien; Fontaine, Bertrand; Eymard, Bruno; Morales, Raul Juntas; Echenne, Bernard; King, Louise; Hanna, Michael G.; Männikkö, Roope; Chahine, Mohamed; Nicole, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the molecular basis of a complex phenotype of congenital muscle weakness observed in an isolated but consanguineous patient. Methods: The proband was evaluated clinically and neurophysiologically over a period of 15 years. Genetic testing of candidate genes was performed. Functional characterization of the candidate mutation was done in mammalian cell background using whole cell patch clamp technique. Results: The proband had fatigable muscle weakness characteristic of congenital myasthenic syndrome with acute and reversible attacks of most severe muscle weakness as observed in periodic paralysis. We identified a novel homozygous SCN4A mutation (p.R1454W) linked to this recessively inherited phenotype. The p.R1454W substitution induced an important enhancement of fast and slow inactivation, a slower recovery for these inactivated states, and a frequency-dependent regulation of Nav1.4 channels in the heterologous expression system. Conclusion: We identified a novel loss-of-function mutation of Nav1.4 that leads to a recessive phenotype combining clinical symptoms and signs of congenital myasthenic syndrome and periodic paralysis, probably by decreasing channel availability for muscle action potential genesis at the neuromuscular junction and propagation along the sarcolemma. PMID:26659129

  12. Discomfort with uncertainty: Is testing for Brugada syndrome in the neonatal period warranted?

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Michelle N.; Simson, Gabrielle Gold-von

    2013-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is rare genetic disorder, which manifests as syncope or sudden death caused by polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. Diagnosis is based on symptoms and characteristic electrocardiography findings. Identification of mutations in SCN5A support the diagnosis, but the yield is low. According to experts, BrS patients with a history of cardiac arrest should have insertion of an automatic implantable cardiac defibrillator and asymptomatic patients can be managed conservatively. Treatment challenges occur in patients with “intermediate” clinical characteristics and in populations where there is paucity of data such as with neonates and children. We discuss the case of a woman with BrS who is faced with decision challenges in the postpartum period. Should her newborn have testing? When? Will deferment of testing impose an unreasonable uncertainty due to delay of diagnosis? Or conversely, will premature workup impose an unnecessary intervention?

  13. Behavioral Sleep Medicine Interventions for Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Yurcheshen, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) are sleep disorders that are commonly seen in clinical practice. The standard treatment recommendations for these disorders are pharmacologic; most recently both conditions are most typically managed with pramipexole or ropinerole, which are FDA approved for the treatment of RLS. A mix of behavioral suggestions is included in treatment algorithms for providers as well as in patient education materials. While these suggestions have considerable merit, they are typically not delivered as an intervention, but instead provided as a series of helpful tips. There is emerging evidence for providing such suggestions as a more active and comprehensive intervention as part of a cognitive-behavioral package as well as for exercise therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia to be delivered as active treatments for RLS and/or PLMD. PMID:20161553

  14. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome managed with the couple canakinumab-alendronate.

    PubMed

    Lopalco, Giuseppe; Rigante, Donato; Vitale, Antonio; Frediani, Bruno; Iannone, Florenzo; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-04-01

    Management of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is puzzling, and therapeutic choices can be complicated, due to both wide genetic heterogeneity and protean clinical phenotype. We report on a 35-year-old female who was diagnosed with TRAPS, after finding the V95M mutation on the TNFRSF1A gene; who was treated in order with etanercept, anakinra, and canakinumab (150 mg/every 8 weeks by subcutaneous injection, then increased to 150 mg every 4 weeks); and who started therapy with oral alendronate (70 mg/weekly) to control her osteoporosis. Alendronate combined with canakinumab led to the optimal clinical control of all TRAPS manifestations and normalization of inflammatory markers. Further studies should be performed to clarify bisphosphonates' role in the scenery of autoinflammatory disorders. PMID:24609716

  15. Trapped without a diagnosis: Tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    Kirresh, Ali; Everitt, Alex; Kon, Onn Min; DasGupta, Ranan; Pickering, Matthew C; Lachmann, Helen J

    2016-08-01

    Tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominant condition caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene. It is characterised by recurrent episodes of myalgia, followed by prolonged fever, migratory rashes, headache, serositis, arthralgia, abdominal pain and periorbital oedema. We describe a 49-year-old man with a self-limiting episode of paraparesis who reported recurrent bouts of abdominal symptoms and headaches since childhood. He had a persistent inflammatory response with night sweats and weight loss. We diagnosed TRAPS 2 years after having identified a TNFRSF1A gene mutation. His symptoms and inflammatory response resolved dramatically with the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra. PMID:26965498

  16. Concurrence of thyrotoxicosis and Gitelman's syndrome-associated hypokalemia-induced periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Teramura-Ikeda, Tomoko; Kudo, Naoko; Kaneda, Shigehiro; Tajima, Toshihiro

    2012-04-01

    A 16-year-old Japanese boy with a history of truancy had been treated at a psychiatric clinic. When the patient was referred to us for hypokalemia-associated paralysis, the diagnosis of thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis was made, common in Asian men. Subsequently, the patient was found to have persistently high plasma renin and aldos-terone levels. Thus, solute carrier family 12 member 3 gene (SLC12A3) analysis was performed. A novel missense homozygous mutation CTC->CAC at codon 858 (L858H) was found for which the patient was homozygous and his non-consanguineous parents heterozygote. These findings indicated that the patient developed hypokalemia-associated paralysis concurrently with thyrotoxicosis and Gitelman's syndrome. This case underscores the importance of careful examinations of adolescents with complaints of truancy as well as of precise determinations of the causes of hypokalemia-associated paralysis. PMID:22802996

  17. Adult respiratory distress syndrome due to fat embolism in the postoperative period following liposuction and fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Costa, André Nathan; Mendes, Daniel Melo; Toufen, Carlos; Arrunátegui, Gino; Caruso, Pedro; de Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2008-08-01

    Fat embolism is defined as mechanical blockage of the vascular lumen by circulating fat globules. Although it primarily affects the lungs, it can also affect the central nervous system, retina, and skin. Fat embolism syndrome is a dysfunction of these organs caused by fat emboli. The most common causes of fat embolism and fat embolism syndrome are long bone fractures, although there are reports of its occurrence after cosmetic procedures. The diagnosis is made clinically, and treatment is still restricted to support measures. We report the case of a female patient who developed adult respiratory distress syndrome due to fat embolism in the postoperative period following liposuction and fat grafting. In this case, the patient responded well to alveolar recruitment maneuvers and protective mechanical ventilation. In addition, we present an epidemiological and pathophysiological analysis of fat embolism syndrome after cosmetic procedures. PMID:18797748

  18. Unified Modeling of Familial Mediterranean Fever and Cryopyrin Associated Periodic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Yasemin; Demir, Alper; Erman, Burak; Gül, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Familial mediterranean fever (FMF) and Cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are two prototypical hereditary autoinflammatory diseases, characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation as a result of mutations in MEFV and NLRP3 genes encoding Pyrin and Cryopyrin proteins, respectively. Pyrin and Cryopyrin play key roles in the multiprotein inflammasome complex assembly, which regulates activity of an enzyme, Caspase 1, and its target cytokine, IL-1β. Overproduction of IL-1β by Caspase 1 is the main cause of episodic fever and inflammatory findings in FMF and CAPS. We present a unifying dynamical model for FMF and CAPS in the form of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The model is composed of two subsystems, which capture the interactions and dynamics of the key molecular players and the insults on the immune system. One of the subsystems, which contains a coupled positive-negative feedback motif, captures the dynamics of inflammation formation and regulation. We perform a comprehensive bifurcation analysis of the model and show that it exhibits three modes, capturing the Healthy, FMF, and CAPS cases. The mutations in Pyrin and Cryopyrin are reflected in the values of three parameters in the model. We present extensive simulation results for the model that match clinical observations. PMID:26161132

  19. Tonsillar microbiota in children with PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tejesvi, M V; Uhari, M; Tapiainen, T; Pirttilä, A M; Suokas, M; Lantto, U; Koivunen, P; Renko, M

    2016-06-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) is a childhood febrile syndrome of unknown origin that is often cured with tonsillectomy. We aimed to compare the bacterial microbiota of the tonsils removed from PFAPA patients with those of controls. We used next-generation sequencing technology to investigate the bacterial microbiota of the tonsils of 30 PFAPA patients and 24 controls. We found significant differences in the presence and relative abundance of many bacteria between PFAPA cases and controls. For example, cyanobacteria, potential producers of microcystins and other toxins, were more common in the case samples (14/30, 47 %) than in the controls (4/24, 17 %, p = 0.02), and the mean relative abundance of cyanobacteria was higher in the case samples (0.2 %) than in the controls (0.01 %, p = 0.01). Streptococci were present in all samples in both groups, but their mean relative abundance was lower in the case samples (3.7 %) than in the controls (9.6 %, p = 0.01). Typical nasopharyngeal microbes such as fusobacteria, Prevotella, Tannerella, Porphyromonas, and Parvimonas dominated the microbiota of the tonsils in both groups. The microbiota of the tonsils removed from PFAPA patients differed significantly from those of the controls. Tonsillar microbiota may play a role in triggering the inflammatory processes that lead to symptoms of PFAPA. PMID:27025724

  20. Long-term safety profile of anakinra in patients with severe cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Löfqvist, Malin; Leinonen, Mika; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Olivecrona, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Anakinra is approved for the treatment of RA and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). While the anakinra safety profile is well established in RA, the long-term safety profile in severe CAPS is less well documented and will therefore be discussed in this report. Methods. A prospective, open-label, single centre, clinical cohort study was conducted at the National Institutes of Health in the USA, from 2003 to 2010, investigating the efficacy and safety of anakinra treatment for up to 5 years in 43 patients with CAPS. Safety was evaluated using adverse event (AE) reports, laboratory assessments, vital signs and diary reports. Results. In total, 1233 AEs were reported during the study, with a yearly rate of 7.7 AEs per patient. The event rate decreased over time, and dose escalation during the study did not affect AE frequency. Anakinra had similar safety profiles in adults and children. The most frequently reported AEs were typical CAPS disease symptoms such as headache and arthralgia. Injection site reactions occurred mainly during the first month of anakinra treatment. In total, 14 patients experienced 24 serious AEs (SAEs), all of which resolved during the study period. The most common types of SAEs were infections such as pneumonia and gastroenteritis. There were no permanent discontinuations of treatment due to AEs. Conclusion. In this study anakinra treatment of patients with severe CAPS for up to 5 years was safe and well tolerated both in paediatric and adult patients, with most AEs emerging during the first months after treatment initiation. Trial registration: ClincialTrials.gov, clinicaltrials.gov, NCT00069329 PMID:27143789

  1. Impaired cytokine responses in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Haverkamp, M H; van de Vosse, E; Goldbach-Mansky, R; Holland, S M

    2014-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is characterized by dysregulated inflammation with excessive interleukin (IL)-1β activation and secretion. Neonatal-onset multi-system inflammatory disease (NOMID) is the most severe form. We explored cytokine responses in 32 CAPS patients before and after IL-1β blocking therapy. We measured cytokines produced by activated peripheral blood monuclear cells (PBMCs) from treated and untreated CAPS patients after stimulation for 48 h with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), PHA plus IL-12, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or LPS plus interferon (IFN)-γ. We measured IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in the supernatants. PBMCs from three untreated CAPS patients were cultured in the presence of the IL-1β blocker Anakinra. Fifty healthy individuals served as controls. CAPS patients had high spontaneous production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF and IFN-γ by unstimulated cells. However, stimulation indexes (SIs, ratio of stimulated to unstimulated production) of these cytokines to PHA and LPS were low in NOMID patients compared to controls. Unstimulated IL-10 and IL-12p70 production was normal, but up-regulation after PHA and LPS was also low. LPS plus IFN-γ inadequately up-regulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF and IL-10 in CAPS patients. In-vitro but not in-vivo treatment with Anakinra improved SIs by lowering spontaneous cytokine production. However, in-vitro treatment did not improve the low stimulated cytokine levels. Activating mutations in NLRP3 in CAPS are correlated with poor SIs to PHA, LPS and IFN-γ. The impairment in stimulated cytokine responses in spite of IL-1β blocking therapy suggests a broader intrinsic defect in CAPS patients, which is not corrected by targeting IL-1β. PMID:24773462

  2. Reliability of heart period and systolic arterial pressure variabilities in women with fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Carolina Pieroni; Zamunér, Antonio Roberto; Forti, Meire; de França, Thalita Fonseca; da Silva, Ester

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to define absolute and relative reliability of spectral indices of cardiovascular autonomic control in the supine position in women with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). Twenty-three women with FMS (age 48 ± 7 years) took part in the study. ECG, finger blood pressure, and respiration were continuously recorded in all participants at rest in baseline 1 (BL1) and after 15 days from BL1 (BL2). The power spectrum analysis provided two oscillatory components: low frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz) and high frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz) from the heart period (HP) variability and the LF oscillatory component from SAP variability (LFSAP). Absolute and relative reliability were rated by 95 % of the limit of random variation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), respectively. No significant differences were observed between BL1 and BL2 for the spectral indices of HP and SAP variabilities. The 95 % limit of the random variation of these indices indicated that the values of repeated measurements were between 22 % higher and 0.2 % lower (more reliable parameter; average of HP variability) and 912.9 % higher and 0.2 % lower (less reliable parameter; LFSAP) than BL1. Conversely, the index of relative reliability (ICC) ranged from 0.23 to 0.70 indicating a good reliability. The spectral indices of cardiovascular autonomic control in women with FMS seem to present good relative reliability. Therefore, these indices can be useful as parameters to quantify if a variation was consistent and accurate in the retest besides adding crucial information for clinical research and clinical evaluation of FMS patients. PMID:27094947

  3. Assessment of 25(OH)D vitamin concentration in plasma of residents of Lodz with metabolic syndrome in pre- and postmenopausal period

    PubMed Central

    Materek-Kuśmierkiewicz, Izabela; Moczulski, Dariusz; Gaszyńska, Ewelina; Szatko, Franciszek; Tokarski, Sławomir; Kowalski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome disorders and the occurrence of these disorders greatly contributes to the deficiency of vitamin D. Postmenopausal women are particularly prone to that deficiency. Aim The aim of the study was to assess vitamin D concentration in the plasma of pre- and postmenopausal women, with or without metabolic syndrome. Material and methods The study included 141 women aged 26-77 (the mean age 58.74 years old), divided into 4 groups depending on the pre- or postmenopausal period and diagnosed or not with metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria (2005). Vitamin D concentration was assessed by LIAISON® test using chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) technology. Results The mean vitamin D concentration was the highest among premenopausal women without metabolic syndrome (24.32 ng/ml), it was insignificantly higher than in postmenopausal women without metabolic syndrome (23.52 ng/ml) and significantly higher than in both groups with metabolic syndrome – premenopausal (19.86 ng/ml) and postmenopausal women (9.32 ng/ml). The recommended plasma 25(OH)D concentration was not found in any of postmenopausal women with diagnosed metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome had a significantly lower 25(OH)D vitamin concentration in plasma than postmenopausal women without metabolic syndrome. The frequency of vitamin D deficiency in women with metabolic syndrome was very high, significantly higher than in women without metabolic syndrome. PMID:26327869

  4. A case of split notochord syndrome: Presenting with respiratory failure in the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Yesim; Akman, Ipek; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapicier, Ozlem; Somuncu, Salih

    2016-05-01

    Split notochord syndrome (SNS) is a very rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a male newborn with a neuroenteric cyst in the posterior mediastinum and multiple vertebrae anomalies presenting with respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension. This report also discusses the embryological development and the etiologic theories of SNS. PMID:27195197

  5. A case of split notochord syndrome: Presenting with respiratory failure in the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Yesim; Akman, Ipek; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapicier, Ozlem; Somuncu, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Summary Split notochord syndrome (SNS) is a very rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a male newborn with a neuroenteric cyst in the posterior mediastinum and multiple vertebrae anomalies presenting with respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension. This report also discusses the embryological development and the etiologic theories of SNS. PMID:27195197

  6. Language Development in Down Syndrome: From the Prelinguistic Period to the Acquisition of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbeduto, Leonard; Warren, Steven F.; Conners, Frances A.

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is associated with abnormalities in multiple organ systems and a characteristic phenotype that includes numerous behavioral features. Language, however, is among the most impaired domains of functioning in DS and, perhaps, also the greatest barrier to independent meaningful inclusion in the community. In this article, we review…

  7. [Neurological and psychopathological syndromes in the follow-up period after exposure to ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Loganovskiĭ, K N

    2000-01-01

    Neurologic, psychiatric and psychophysiologic (computed EEG) examinations were carried out in 100 Chernobyl accident's survivors who had got acute radiation sickness (ARS), in 100 Chernobyl liquidators who worked for 5 or more years in the zone (1986-1987) as well as in control groups: 20 normal age- and gender-matched adults and 50 veterans of the Afganistan war with consequences of the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and 50 veterans with both PTSD and mild closed head injury. Left-hemispheric cortical-limbic and diencephalic right-hemispheric syndromes were revealed. Left-hemispheric frontal-temporal-limbic dysfunction was associated with schizophrenia-like syndrome, while diencephalic right-hemispheric dysfunction--with the affective syndrome. Doses more than 0.3 Sv (including the ARS-patients) resulted more frequently in the left-hemispheric cortical-limbic and schizophrenia-like syndromes. Diencephalic right-hemispheric and affective syndromes were more frequently observed after the exposure to doses less [corrected] than 0.3 Sv. Development of schizophrenia spectrum disorders in the irradiated Chernobyl survivors could be due to radiation-induced left fronto-temporal-limbic dysfunction following irradiation doses more than 0.3 Sv (including the ARS-patients). The cerebral patterns of schizophrenia and postradiation brain damage are similar. Persons exposed fo 0.3 Sv and more could be classified as the group of higher risk of the development of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. The authors suggest that ionizing radiation may be an environmental trigger factor which can cause schizophrenia in the predisposed subjects. PMID:10812665

  8. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis in Sjogren's syndrome secondary to distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Hakkı; Kaya, Mustafa; Özbek, Mustafa; ÜUreten, Kemal; Safa Yıldırım, İ

    2013-07-01

    We report a 53-year-old Turkish female presented with progressive weakness and mild dyspnea. Laboratory results demonstrated severe hypokalemia with hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. The urinary anion gap was positive in the presence of acidemia, thus she was diagnosed with hypokalemic paralysis from a severe distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA). Immunologic work-up showed a strongly positive ANA of 1:3,200 and positive antibodies to SSA and SSB. Schirmer's test was abnormal. Autoimmune and other tests revealed Sjögren syndrome as the underlying cause of the distal renal tubular acidosis. Renal involvement in Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is not uncommon and may precede sicca complaints. The pathology in most cases is a tubulointerstitial nephritis causing among other things, distal RTA, and, rarely, hypokalemic paralysis. Treatment consists of potassium repletion, alkali therapy, and corticosteroids. Primary SS could be a differential in women with acute weakness and hypokalemia. PMID:22212410

  9. Methodological challenges in monitoring new treatments for rare diseases: lessons from the cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome registry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes (CAPS) are a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases and encompass Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells Syndrome (MWS), and Neonatal Onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID). Canakinumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against IL-1 beta and approved for CAPS patients but requires post-approval monitoring due to low and short exposures during the licensing process. Creative approaches to observational methodology are needed, harnessing novel registry strategies to ensure Health Care Provider reporting and patient monitoring. Methods A web-based registry was set up to collect information on long-term safety and effectiveness of canakinumab for CAPS. Results Starting in November 2009, this registry enrolled 241 patients in 43 centers and 13 countries by December 31, 2012. One-third of the enrolled population was aged < 18; the overall population is evenly divided by gender. Enrolment is ongoing for children. Conclusions Innovative therapies in orphan diseases require post-approval structures to enable in depth understanding of safety and natural history of disease. The rarity and distribution of such diseases and unpredictability of treatment require innovative methods for enrolment and follow-up. Broad international practice-based recruitment and web-based data collection are practical. PMID:24016338

  10. Remission of severe restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep after bilateral excision of multiple foot neuromas: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Restless legs syndrome is a sensorimotor neurological disorder characterized by an urge to move the legs in response to uncomfortable leg sensations. While asleep, 70 to 90 percent of patients with restless legs syndrome have periodic limb movements in sleep. Frequent periodic limb movements in sleep and related brain arousals as documented by polysomnography are associated with poorer quality of sleep and daytime fatigue. Restless legs syndrome in middle age is sometimes associated with neuropathic foot dysesthesias. The causes of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep are unknown, but the sensorimotor symptoms are hypothesized to originate in the central nervous system. We have previously determined that bilateral forefoot digital nerve impingement masses (neuromas) may be a cause of both neuropathic foot dysesthesias and the leg restlessness of restless legs syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first report of bilateral foot neuromas as a cause of periodic limb movements in sleep. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian woman with severe restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movements in sleep and bilateral neuropathic foot dysesthesias was diagnosed as having neuromas in the second, third, and fourth metatarsal head interspaces of both feet. The third interspace neuromas represented regrowth (or 'stump') neuromas that had developed since bilateral third interspace neuroma excision five years earlier. Because intensive conservative treatments including repeated neuroma injections and various restless legs syndrome medications had failed, radical surgery was recommended. All six neuromas were excised. Leg restlessness, foot dysesthesias and subjective sleep quality improved immediately. Assessment after 18 days showed an 84 to 100 percent reduction of visual analog scale scores for specific dysesthesias and marked reductions of pre-operative scores of the Pittsburgh sleep quality index, fatigue severity

  11. Nystagmus in a newborn: a manifestation of Joubert syndrome in the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Salva, Inês; Albuquerque, Carolina; Moreira, Ana; Dâmaso, Catarina

    2016-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare disorder, usually autosomal recessive, with a prevalence of 1:80,000 to 1:100,000. This disease presents most commonly as breathing irregularities, although the two major clinical criteria are hypotonia and developmental delay, sometimes associated with ocular movement abnormalities. The severity of the presentation varies, ranging from mild cases with normal intelligence to severe developmental delays associated with early death. We report a case of a newborn who presented to the emergency department for absent ocular fixation and torsional nystagmus without other neurological abnormalities. Her cranial MR showed cerebellar vermis agenesis and a molar tooth sign. Her laboratory evaluation, and renal and abdominal ultrasound were normal. An electroretinogram showed mixed retinal dystrophy and an AHI1 homozygous missense c.1981T>C mutation was identified (parents are carriers). Throughout infancy, she has shown mild developmental delay and hypotonia, but no respiratory abnormalities. Owing to variable expressivity, a high level of suspicion is required. PMID:26759440

  12. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis (PFAPA) Syndrome: a Review of the Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Vanoni, Federica; Hofer, Michaël

    2016-04-01

    PFAPA syndrome represents the most common cause of recurrent fever in children in European populations, and it is characterized by recurrent episodes of high fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis, and aphthous stomatitis. Many possible causative factors have been explored so far, including infectious agents, immunologic mechanisms and genetic predisposition, but the exact etiology remains unclear. Recent findings demonstrate a dysregulation of different components of innate immunity during PFAPA flares, such as monocytes, neutrophils, complement, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, suggesting an inflammasome-mediated innate immune system activation and supporting the hypothesis of an autoinflammatory disease. Moreover, in contrast with previous considerations, the strong familial clustering suggests a potential genetic origin rather than a sporadic disease. In addition, the presence of variants in inflammasome-related genes, mostly in NLRP3 and MEFV, suggests a possible role of inflammasome-composing genes in PFAPA pathogenesis. However, none of these variants seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, indicating a high genetic heterogeneity as well as an oligogenic or polygenic genetic background. PMID:26984802

  13. Determination of rifaximin treatment period according to lactulose breath test values in nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Bae, Suhyun; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kim, Young-Sang; Kim, Kyu-Nam

    2015-06-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) can partly explain irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and rifaximin has been observed to improve abdominal symptoms in nonconstipated IBS patients. However, there are few reports on the association of the rifaximin treatment periods with the results of a lactulose breath test (LBT). Therefore, we performed a retrospective review of patient charts to investigate the relation between the rifaximin treatment periods with LBT results in nonconstipated IBS patients. We also evaluated the time to achieve a symptomatic improvement in the IBS patients as compared to the changes in the LBT. We reviewed the charts for patients who showed IBS symptoms with documented positive results for LBT during their initial visit and who had a follow-up LBT after treatment with rifaximin. The LBT values were compared to the subjects' symptom scores. A total of 102 subjects had a follow-up LBT to assess LBT normalization. The subjects were divided into groups according to treatment periods of 4 weeks (n = 36), 8 weeks (n = 43), and 12 weeks (n = 23). The groups with a longer treatment exhibited an increase in the hydrogen gas value at 90 min and its sum during 90 min at the initial LBT. There were significant differences in hydrogen gas value at 90 min and in its sum during 90 min at the initial LBT between the groups treated for 4 and 12 weeks. The most significant treatment response was observed during the first 4 weeks for all treatment groups. Symptomatic improvement occurred earlier than LBT normalization in the treatment period over 4 weeks. The results indicate that different rifaximin treatment periods are needed in accordance with LBT levels to effectively eradicate SIBO. PMID:26028929

  14. Refined multiscale entropy analysis of heart period and QT interval variabilities in long QT syndrome type-1 patients.

    PubMed

    Bari, Vlasta; Valencia, Jose F; Vallverdu, Montserrat; Girardengo, Giulia; Bassani, Tito; Marchi, Andrea; Calvillo, Laura; Caminal, Pere; Cerutti, Sergio; Brink, Paul A; Crotti, Lia; Schwartz, Peter J; Porta, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses complexity of cardiovascular control in patients affected by type-1 variant of long QT (LQT1) syndrome. Complexity was assessed by refined multiscale entropy of heart period (HP) and QT interval variabilities. HP was taken as the time distance between two consecutive R peaks (RR) and QT interval was approximated as the time distance between the R-peak and T-wave apex (RTa) and between R-peak and T-wave end (RTe). RR, RTa and RTe intervals were automatically extracted from 24h Holter recordings and the daytime period was analyzed (from 02:00 to 06:00 PM). Non mutation carrier (NMC) individuals (n=11), utilized as a control group, were taken from the same family line of the mutation carrier (MC) subjects (n=26). We found that, while NMC and MC groups were indistinguishable based on time domain and complexity analyses of RR dynamics, complexity analysis of RTa and RTe variabilities clearly separates the two populations and suggests an impairment in the cardiac control mechanisms acting on the ventricles. PMID:24110995

  15. Canakinumab efficacy and long-term tocilizumab administration in tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    La Torre, Francesco; Muratore, Maurizio; Vitale, Antonio; Moramarco, Fulvio; Quarta, Laura; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited autoinflammatory disease caused by mutations in the TNFRSF1A gene. Treatment is aimed at preventing acute disease attacks, improving quality of life, and preventing long-term complications such as systemic reactive amyloidosis. Biologic agents have significantly improved TRAPS management. In particular, interleukin 1 (IL-1) inhibition either with the recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra or with the human IgG1 anti-IL-1β monoclonal antibody canakinumab has recently shown to induce a prompt and stable disease remission. Conversely, the successful experience with IL-6 inhibition is nowadays limited to a single patient. Anyway, introduction of new treatment options for patients requiring a lifelong therapy is desirable. We describe two TRAPS patients (son and father) successfully treated with canakinumab and tocilizumab, respectively. In particular, we highlight the clinical and laboratory efficacy as well as the good safety profile of tocilizumab during a 42-month follow-up period. PMID:26048626

  16. Factors associated with major complications in the short-term postoperative period in dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ree, Jennifer J; Milovancev, Milan; MacIntyre, Laura A; Townsend, Katy L

    2016-09-01

    Surgical correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) in dogs has been reported to result in low complication rates and good long-term outcomes. Previous reports have not identified risk factors for the development of complications following BAS surgery. This retrospective study evaluated a wide variety of patient- and procedure-related, pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors for an association with the development of major postoperative complications in the short-term period following BAS surgery. The overall major complication rate, including death or euthanasia, was 4/55 (7%) dogs. Temporary tracheostomy was the only major surgical complication identified (n = 3). Multiple logistic regression identified postoperative radiographic evidence of pneumonia as associated with the development of any major complication overall, requirement of a temporary tracheostomy postoperatively, and death or euthanasia, within the short-term postoperative period. Future prospective studies should evaluate specific risk factors for an association with major complications following BAS surgery in dogs to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27587891

  17. Periodic health examination, 1996 update: 1. Prenatal screening for and diagnosis of Down syndrome. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.

    PubMed Central

    Dick, P T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To make recommendations to physicians providing prenatal care on (1) whether prenatal screening for and diagnosis of Down syndrome (DS) is advisable and (2) alternative screening and diagnosis manoeuvres. OPTIONS: "Triple-marker" screening of maternal serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin and unconjugated estriol; fetal ultrasonographic examination; amniocentesis; and chorionic villus sampling (CVS). OUTCOMES: Accuracy of detection of DS in fetuses, and risks to the mother, including psychologic distress, and to the fetus from the screening and diagnostic interventions. EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search for relevant articles published from Jan. 1, 1966, to Mar. 31, 1994, with the use of MeSH terms "Down syndrome," "prenatal diagnosis," "screening," "prevention," "amniocentesis," "chorionic villus sampling," "ultrasonography," "anxiety," "depression" and "psychological stress" and a manual search of bibliographies, recent issues of key journals and Current Contents. VALUES: The evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination were used. A high value was placed on providing pregnant women with the opportunity to determine whether they are carrying a fetus with DS and to make choices concerning the termination of the pregnancy. The economic issues involved are complex and were not considered. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Triple-marker screening identifies an estimated 58% of fetuses with DS, but it has an estimated rate of true-positive results of 0.1% and of false-positive results of 3.7% (given a risk cut-off of one chance in 190 of DS). These rates vary with maternal age and the risk cut-off chosen. Women with a known risk of having a fetus with DS (e.g., those who have had a previous child with DS) may benefit from a reduction in anxiety after confirmation that their fetus does not have DS. Screening allows women at low risk of having a child with DS to detect fetuses with the syndrome, but

  18. First Report of Circulating MicroRNAs in Tumour Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Ferracin, Manuela; Fulci, Valerio; McDermott, Michael F.; Merlini, Giampaolo; Muscari, Isabella; Magnotti, Flora; Dickie, Laura J.; Galeazzi, Mauro; Negrini, Massimo; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Cimaz, Rolando; Cantarini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of long-lasting fever and inflammation in different regions of the body, such as the musculo-skeletal system, skin, gastrointestinal tract, serosal membranes and eye. Our aims were to evaluate circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) levels in patients with TRAPS, in comparison to controls without inflammatory diseases, and to correlate their levels with parameters of disease activity and/or disease severity. Expression levels of circulating miRNAs were measured by Agilent microarrays in 29 serum samples from 15 TRAPS patients carrying mutations known to be associated with high disease penetrance and from 8 controls without inflammatory diseases. Differentially expressed and clinically relevant miRNAs were detected using GeneSpring GX software. We identified a 6 miRNAs signature able to discriminate TRAPS from controls. Moreover, 4 miRNAs were differentially expressed between patients treated with the interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist, anakinra, and untreated patients. Of these, miR-92a-3p and miR-150-3p expression was found to be significantly reduced in untreated patients, while their expression levels were similar to controls in samples obtained during anakinra treatment. MiR-92b levels were inversely correlated with the number of fever attacks/year during the 1st year from the index attack of TRAPS, while miR-377-5p levels were positively correlated with serum amyloid A (SAA) circulating levels. Our data suggest that serum miRNA levels show a baseline pattern in TRAPS, and may serve as potential markers of response to therapeutic intervention. PMID:24066048

  19. First report of circulating microRNAs in tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    Lucherini, Orso Maria; Obici, Laura; Ferracin, Manuela; Fulci, Valerio; McDermott, Michael F; Merlini, Giampaolo; Muscari, Isabella; Magnotti, Flora; Dickie, Laura J; Galeazzi, Mauro; Negrini, Massimo; Baldari, Cosima Tatiana; Cimaz, Rolando; Cantarini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare autosomal dominant autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of long-lasting fever and inflammation in different regions of the body, such as the musculo-skeletal system, skin, gastrointestinal tract, serosal membranes and eye. Our aims were to evaluate circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) levels in patients with TRAPS, in comparison to controls without inflammatory diseases, and to correlate their levels with parameters of disease activity and/or disease severity. Expression levels of circulating miRNAs were measured by Agilent microarrays in 29 serum samples from 15 TRAPS patients carrying mutations known to be associated with high disease penetrance and from 8 controls without inflammatory diseases. Differentially expressed and clinically relevant miRNAs were detected using GeneSpring GX software. We identified a 6 miRNAs signature able to discriminate TRAPS from controls. Moreover, 4 miRNAs were differentially expressed between patients treated with the interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist, anakinra, and untreated patients. Of these, miR-92a-3p and miR-150-3p expression was found to be significantly reduced in untreated patients, while their expression levels were similar to controls in samples obtained during anakinra treatment. MiR-92b levels were inversely correlated with the number of fever attacks/year during the 1(st) year from the index attack of TRAPS, while miR-377-5p levels were positively correlated with serum amyloid A (SAA) circulating levels. Our data suggest that serum miRNA levels show a baseline pattern in TRAPS, and may serve as potential markers of response to therapeutic intervention. PMID:24066048

  20. Transient compartment-like syndrome and normokalaemic periodic paralysis due to a Cav1.1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chunxiang; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Weber, Marc-André; Bednarz, Marcin; Groome, James R.; Jonsson, Malin K. B.

    2013-01-01

    We studied a two-generation family presenting with conditions that included progressive permanent weakness, myopathic myopathy, exercise-induced contracture before normokalaemic periodic paralysis or, if localized to the tibial anterior muscle group, transient compartment-like syndrome (painful acute oedema with neuronal compression and drop foot). 23Na and 1H magnetic resonance imaging displayed myoplasmic sodium overload, and oedema. We identified a novel familial Cav1.1 calcium channel mutation, R1242G, localized to the third positive charge of the domain IV voltage sensor. Functional expression of R1242G in the muscular dysgenesis mouse cell line GLT revealed a 28% reduced central pore inward current and a −20 mV shift of the steady-state inactivation curve. Both changes may be at least partially explained by an outward omega (gating pore) current at positive potentials. Moreover, this outward omega current of 27.5 nS/nF may cause the reduction of the overshoot by 13 mV and slowing of the upstroke of action potentials by 36% that are associated with muscle hypoexcitability (permanent weakness and myopathic myopathy). In addition to the outward omega current, we identified an inward omega pore current of 95 nS/nF at negative membrane potentials after long depolarizing pulses that shifts the R1242G residue above the omega pore constriction. A simulation reveals that the inward current might depolarize the fibre sufficiently to trigger calcium release in the absence of an action potential and therefore cause an electrically silent depolarization-induced muscle contracture. Additionally, evidence of the inward current can be found in 23Na magnetic resonance imaging-detected sodium accumulation and 1H magnetic resonance imaging-detected oedema. We hypothesize that the episodes are normokalaemic because of depolarization-induced compensatory outward potassium flux through both delayed rectifiers and omega pore. We conclude that the position of the R1242G residue

  1. Analysis of the genetic basis of periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di Gioia, Silvio Alessandro; Bedoni, Nicola; von Scheven-Gête, Annette; Vanoni, Federica; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Hofer, Michaël; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory syndrome in children from Western countries. In spite of its strong familial clustering, its genetic basis and inheritance pattern are still unknown. We performed a comprehensive genetic study on 68 individuals from 14 families. Linkage analysis suggested a susceptibility locus on chromosome 8, but direct molecular sequencing did not support this initial statistical finding. Exome sequencing revealed the absence of any gene that was mutated in all patients. Exhaustive screening of genes involved in other autoinflammatory syndromes or encoding components of the human inflammasome showed no DNA variants that could be linked to PFAPA molecular pathology. Among these, the previously-reported missense mutation V198M in the NLRP3 gene was clearly shown not to co-segregate with PFAPA. Our results on this relatively large cohort indicate that PFAPA syndrome is unlikely to be a monogenic condition. Moreover, none of the several genes known to be involved in inflammation or in autoinflammatory disorders seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, suggesting that PFAPA results from oligogenic or complex inheritance of variants in multiple disease genes and/or non-genetic factors. PMID:25988833

  2. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  3. Pregnancy-associated atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome in the postpartum period: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Egbor, M; Johnson, A; Harris, F; Makanjoula, D; Shehata, H

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy has been reported to be a trigger in about 10% of all patients with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS). However, in contrast to pregnancy-associated thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura, the presentation of pregnancy-associated aHUS remains ill defined and can therefore be difficult to diagnose and manage appropriately. Here we report a case of pregnancy-associated relapse of aHUS in a patient with a previous medical history of aHUS prior to pregnancy.

  4. Variable intrafamilial expressivity of the rare tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated periodic syndrome-associated mutation I170N that affects the TNFR1A cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Salzberger, Bernd; Haerle, Peter; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Kastner, Daniel; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Rosenfeld, Stephanie; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    We report on a 33-year-old female patient with a relatively mild clinical case of TNF-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and her 58-year-old father in whom end-stage renal disease due to TRAPS-related AA-amyloidosis has already developed. TRAPS was caused by a I170N mutation that has previously not been associated with amyloidosis. It remains unclear if an only mildly affected patient such as ours would benefit from treatment considering her father’s severe course of disease. The relevant literature on this problem is reviewed. PMID:20169391

  5. Basic Characteristics of Adults with Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenopathy Syndrome in Comparison with the Typical Pediatric Expression of Disease.

    PubMed

    Cattalini, Marco; Soliani, Martina; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are caused by inflammasome dysregulation leading to overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a pathological delay in the inflammation switching off. The progress of cellular biology has partially clarified pathogenic mechanisms behind monogenic autoinflammatory diseases, whereas little is known about the polygenic ones. Although the genetic susceptibility of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is still obscure, the presence of overlapping symptoms with monogenic periodic fevers, the recurrence in family members, the important role played by dysregulated interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion during flares, the overexpression of inflammasome-associated genes during attacks, and, last but not least, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-1β blockade strongly indicate a potential genetic involvement in its pathogenesis, probably linked with environmental factors. PFAPA syndrome has a typical inception in the pediatric age, but a delayed onset during adulthood has been described as well. Treatments required as well as effectiveness of tonsillectomy remain controversial, even if the disease seems to have a self-limited course mostly in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this complex polygenic/multifactorial autoinflammatory disorder in which the innate immune system undoubtedly plays a basic role. PMID:26357457

  6. Basic Characteristics of Adults with Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenopathy Syndrome in Comparison with the Typical Pediatric Expression of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, Marco; Soliani, Martina; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are caused by inflammasome dysregulation leading to overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a pathological delay in the inflammation switching off. The progress of cellular biology has partially clarified pathogenic mechanisms behind monogenic autoinflammatory diseases, whereas little is known about the polygenic ones. Although the genetic susceptibility of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is still obscure, the presence of overlapping symptoms with monogenic periodic fevers, the recurrence in family members, the important role played by dysregulated interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion during flares, the overexpression of inflammasome-associated genes during attacks, and, last but not least, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-1β blockade strongly indicate a potential genetic involvement in its pathogenesis, probably linked with environmental factors. PFAPA syndrome has a typical inception in the pediatric age, but a delayed onset during adulthood has been described as well. Treatments required as well as effectiveness of tonsillectomy remain controversial, even if the disease seems to have a self-limited course mostly in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this complex polygenic/multifactorial autoinflammatory disorder in which the innate immune system undoubtedly plays a basic role. PMID:26357457

  7. Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease and Periodic Limb Movements in Sleep in the Elderly with and without Dementia.

    PubMed

    Figorilli, Michela; Puligheddu, Monica; Ferri, Raffaele

    2015-09-01

    There is great interest in the study of sleep in healthy and cognitively impaired elderly. Sleep disorders have been related to quality of aging. Sleep-related movements are a frequent cause of disordered sleep and daytime sleepiness. Restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED) is often unrecognized in the elderly. This review explores RLS/WED in the elderly population. The elderly population may be subdivided into 3 groups: healthy, dependent, and frail. The RLS/WED could be a predictor for lower physical function; its burden on quality of life and health care-related costs, in the elderly, should be an important clinical and public health concern. PMID:26329443

  8. Immunohistochemistry screening of sebaceous lesions for Muir-Torre syndrome in a 26-year period in a Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Archer-Dubon, Carla; Alvarez-Zavala, Bertha; Reyes, Edgardo; Orozco-Topete, Rocio

    2008-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis defined as the association of rare sebaceous gland skin tumors, keratoacanthomas, and a personal or familial history of malignant visceral tumors. Germline mutations in certain mismatch repair genes (MMR) have been identified in MTS families and their identification is a cornerstone for diagnosis of MTS. We reviewed our series of sebaceous neoplasms and performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) in order to screen for new MTS cases. Sebaceous neoplasms and visceral tumors from the same patient diagnosed between 1980-2006 were included. Immunohistochemistry to determine the presence or absence of MMR gene products in skin and visceral tumors was performed with mouse monoclonal antibodies anti-MSH2, anti-MSH6 and anti-MLH1. Six sebaceous neoplasms were identified in six females. Four patients presented a lack of expression of at least one of the MMR proteins in visceral and cutaneous neoplasms, thus warranting the diagnosis of MTS. Immunohistochemistry is a useful and accessible technique for the characterization of MMR gene expression in patients with sebaceous neoplasms. PMID:19265614

  9. A Case Report of Idiopathic Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome That Occurred During the Postoperative Period of Abdominoperineal Resection for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Saito, Shinsuke; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman without any past medical history underwent abdominoperineal resection for rectal cancer in our department. On postoperative day 15, the patient complained of sudden abdominal pain, and high fever was noted in addition to the appearance of erythema around the stoma. The diagnosis of phlegmon was made, and antibiotic infusion was started. However, a few days later, the patient developed hypovolemic shock with hypoalbuminemia and hemoconcentration. Fasciotomy was performed to exclude the necrotizing fasciitis, though all cultures were negative. Upon exclusion of the differential diagnoses, idiopathic systemic capillary leak syndrome (ISCLS) was diagnosed. She was successfully treated with massive fluid infusion under ventilation and continuous hemodiafiltration. Here, we report the first case of ISCLS that occurred during the postoperative period of colorectal surgery. PMID:25594640

  10. A Case of Concurrent Miller-Dieker Syndrome (17p13.3 Deletion) and 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Macmurdo, C

    2015-12-01

    Features of Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS, 17p13.3 deletion syndrome, LIS1-associated lissencephaly) include classic lissencephaly, microcephaly, cardiac malformations, growth restriction, and characteristic facial changes. Individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome or velocardiofacial syndrome) are known to have congenital cardiac malformations (in particular conotruncal defects), palatal abnormalities (especially velopharyngeal insufficiency), hypocalcemia, immune deficiency, learning disabilities, and characteristic facial features. This case report describes phenotypic characteristics of a patient with extremely rare instance of having both MDS and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome that is unique in the medical literature. Prognosis in this concurrent phenotype is poor with our patient suffering from several malformations seen in both conditions and expiring in the neonatal period. PMID:27617133

  11. [Demographic characteristics of Down's syndrome in Navarra. Trends of pre and postnatal diagnosis for the period 1991-2009].

    PubMed

    Ramos Arroyo, M A; Lizarraga Rojas, M; Hernández Charro, B; Martínez Jaurrieta, M D; Zabaleta Jurio, J; Alonso Sánchez, A

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the development of pre and postnatal diagnosis of sindrome de Down (SD) in the Autonomous Community of Navarre from 1991 to 2009 and assesses its preventive impact in the population, as well as to associated socio-demographic changes. In the absence of a prenatal diagnosis for DS, the change in maternal age from 1991 to 2009 would have caused a 50% increase in births with this disorder. However, the antenatal rate detection of DS increased from 15.8% in 1991-4 to 64.3% in 2006-9, giving rise to a decreasing incidence trend, not statistically significant, during the study period and to a higher mean age of mothers of live births with DS (32.75± 5,02 and 34.8±4,82 years during the first and second periods of the study, respectively). The proportion of young mothers (<35 years) of live births with DS was 66% in 1991-4 and 45% in 2006-9. Close to one fifth of the total population of pregnant women, however, did not want to go through a maternal screening test or amniocentesis. Seventeen per cent of all live births with DS had a positive screening test, but mothers decided to continue pregnancy. These results suggest that, despite the application of new and more sensitive prenatal screening tests, the incidence of DS may still be relatively high in our population, an important factor to be considered for future antenatal preventive programs and adequate postnatal care. PMID:24008527

  12. HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis and probable HTLV-1- associated myelopathy in an adolescent female*

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Raquel Bisacotti; Tonoli, Renata Elise; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Pinto, Giselle Martins; Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated infective dermatitis (ID) is a chronic, severe and recurrent eczema occurring during childhood in patients vertically infected with HTLV-1. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesia (HAM/ TSP) is slow and progressive. We report the case of an adolescent female from a non-endemic area for HTLV-1 who presents ID and, most likely, associated HAM/TSP. PMID:26312674

  13. Pharmacologically Induced/Exacerbated Restless Legs Syndrome, Periodic Limb Movements of Sleep, and REM Behavior Disorder/REM Sleep Without Atonia: Literature Review, Qualitative Scoring, and Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Romy; Chesson, Andrew L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pharmacologically induced/exacerbated restless legs syndrome (RLS), periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS), and REM behavior disorder/REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) are increasingly recognized in clinical sleep medicine. A scoring system to evaluate the literature was created and implemented. The aim was to identify the evidence with the least amount of confound, allowing for more reliable determinations of iatrogenic etiology. Methods: Points were provided for the following criteria: manuscript type (abstract, peer-reviewed paper); population size studied (large retrospective study, small case series, case report); explicitly stated dosage timing; identification of peak symptoms related to time of medication administration (i.e., medication was ingested in the evening or at bedtime); initiation of a treatment plan; symptoms subsided or ceased with decreased dosage or drug discontinuation (for RLS articles only); negative personal history for RLS prior to use of the medication; exclusion of tobacco/alcohol/excessive caffeine use; exclusion of sleep disordered breathing by polysomnography (PSG); and PSG documentation of presence or absence of PLMS. For RLS and PLMS articles were also given points for the following criteria: each 2003 National Institutes of Health (NIH) RLS criteria met; exclusion of low serum ferritin; and exclusion of peripheral neuropathy by neurological examination. Results: Thirty-two articles on drug-induced RLS, 6 articles on drug-induced PLMS, and 15 articles on drug-induced RBD/RSWA were analyzed. Conclusion: Based on scores ≥ 10 and trials of medication reduction/cessation, the strongest evidence available for drug induced RLS are for the following drugs: escitalopram; fluoxetine; L-dopa/carbidopa and pergolide; L-thyroxine; mianserin; mirtazapine; olanzapine; and tramadol. Since none of the PLMS articles assessed PLMI in trials of medication reduction/cessation, the strongest evidence based on scores ≥ 10 are for the

  14. Restless legs syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a nervous system problem that causes you to feel an unstoppable urge to get ... DA, Bista SR, et al. The treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults-an ...

  15. Homozygosity for the V377I mutation in mevalonate kinase causes distinct clinical phenotypes in two sibs with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Laurent; Alsaleh, Ghada; Georgel, Philippe; Carapito, Raphael; Waterham, Hans R; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Bahram, Siamak; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive auto-inflammatory disorder characterised by recurring episodes of fever associated with multiple non-specific inflammatory symptoms and caused by mutations in the MVK gene. The phenotypic spectrum is wide and depends mostly on the nature of the mutations. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is a relatively mild presentation and predominantly associated with a c.1129G>A (p.V377I) mutation in the MVK gene. We report cases of two sisters homozygous for this mutation but exhibiting distinct (symptomatic vs asymptomatic) phenotypes. Methods Patient history was obtained; physical and clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was quantified. Results Low MVK enzymatic activity is not necessarily associated with inflammatory symptoms. Increased inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS is associated with symptomatic MVK deficiency. Conclusions Individuals who are homozygous for the common p.V377I mutation in the MVK gene may not display the characteristic inflammatory episodes diagnostic of MKD and thus may be lost for correct and timely diagnosis. PMID:26977311

  16. Spontaneous Low-Frequency Cerebral Hemodynamics Oscillations in Restless Legs Syndrome with Periodic Limb Movements During Sleep: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jung-Ick; Lee, Gwan-Taek; Kim, Choong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep (PLMS) are associated with cortical and cardiovascular activation. Changes in cerebral hemodynamics caused by cortical activity can be measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We investigated oscillatory components of cerebral hemodynamics during PLM and different sleep stages in restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients with PLMS. Methods Four female RLS patients with PLMS, and four age- and sex-matched normal controls were included. PLM and sleep stages were scored using polysomnography, while the spontaneous cerebral hemodynamics was measured by NIRS. The phase and amplitude of the cerebral oxyhemoglobin concentration [HbO] and the deoxyhemoglobin concentration [Hb] low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) were evaluated during each sleep stage [waking, light sleep (LS; stages N1 and N2), slow-wave sleep (stage N3), and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep]. In RLS patients with PLMS, the cerebral hemodynamics during LS was divided into LS with and without PLM. Results The cerebral hemodynamics activity varied among the different sleep stages. There were changes in phase differences between [HbO] and [Hb] LFOs during the different sleep stages in the normal controls but not in the RLS patients with PLMS. The [HbO] and [Hb] LFO amplitudes were higher in the patient group than in controls during both LS with PLM and REM sleep. Conclusions The present study has demonstrated the presence of cerebral hemodynamics disturbances in RLS patients with PLMS, which may contribute to an increased risk of cerebrovascular events. PMID:26754783

  17. [POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITATIONS ANALYSIS OF SCREENING IN PREGNANT WOMEN FOR DOWN SYNDROME AND OTHER COMMON CHROMOSOMAL DISORDERS OVER A PERIOD OF TWO YEARS].

    PubMed

    Hachmerian M; Angelova L; Ivanov St; Kovachev E

    2016-01-01

    Maternal biochemical screening and the new non-invasive prenatal screening tests as well as prenatal diagnostic tests as tools to fight serious chromosomal diseases have their possibilities and limitations. The article presents analysis of the results in 7 201 pregnant women: 4426 first trimester and 2775 second trimester biochemical screening, together with 994 calculated integrated risks performed in the Laboratory of medical genetics in 2013 and 2014 year. A matter of mass screening in both periods is the criterion of efficiency--financially justified reasons on the basis of comparison "sensitivity" of different approaches. First trimester screening revealed 5 (71.42%) cases of chromosomal disease and 1 (14.28%) case with large congenital anomaly. From second trimester biochemical screening 3 (60%) cases were revealed. Chromosomal pathology in pregnant women with calculated integrated risk was found in 7 (70%) cases. From a total of 22 screened pregnant women with prenatal or postnatal verified diagnosis of Down syndrome, Edvards, Patau or Turner, highest detection rate is found in first trimester screening--6 of 7 (85.7%). Contingent approach is most widely used in Europe and we confidently recommend it. PMID:27514138

  18. Mutant forms of tumour necrosis factor receptor I that occur in TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome retain signalling functions but show abnormal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Ian; Radford, Paul M; Draper-Morgan, Kelly-Ann; McIntosh, Richard; Bainbridge, Susan; Dickinson, Peter; Jamhawi, Lama; Sansaridis, Marios; Huggins, Mary L; Tighe, Patrick J; Powell, Richard J

    2004-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a hereditary autoinflammatory disorder involving autosomal-dominant missense mutations in TNF receptor superfamily 1A (TNFRSF1A) ectodomains. To elucidate the molecular effects of TRAPS-related mutations, we transfected HEK-293 cells to produce lines stably expressing high levels of either wild-type (WT) or single mutant recombinant forms of TNFRSF1A. Mutants with single amino acid substitutions in the first cysteine-rich domain (CRD1) were produced both as full-length receptor proteins and as truncated forms lacking the cytoplasmic signalling domain (Δsig). High-level expression of either WT or mutant full-length TNFRSF1A spontaneously induced apoptosis and interleukin-8 production, indicating that the mutations in CRD1 did not abrogate signalling. Consistent with this, WT and mutant full-length TNFRSF1A formed cytoplasmic aggregates that co-localized with ubiquitin and chaperones, and with the signal transducer TRADD, but not with the inhibitor, silencer of death domain (SODD). Furthermore, as expected, WT and mutant Δsig forms of TNFRSF1A did not induce apoptosis or interleukin-8 production. However, whereas the WT full-length TNFRSF1A was expressed both in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface, the mutant receptors showed strong cytoplasmic expression but reduced cell-surface expression. The WT and mutant Δsig forms of TNFRSF1A were all expressed at the cell surface, but a proportion of the mutant receptors were also retained in the cytoplasm and co-localized with BiP. Furthermore, the mutant forms of surface-expressed Δsig TNFRSF1A were defective in binding TNF-α. We conclude that TRAPS-related CRD1 mutants of TNFRSF1A possess signalling properties associated with the cytoplasmic death domain, but other behavioural features of the mutant receptors are abnormal, including intracellular trafficking and TNF binding. PMID:15312137

  19. Molecular identification and genetic diversity of open reading frame 7 field isolated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome in North Sumatera, Indonesia, in the period of 2008-2014

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Faisal; Widayanti, Rini; Haryanto, Aris; Tabu, Charles Rangga

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Molecular identification and genetic diversity of open reading frame 7 (ORF7) of field isolated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in North Sumatera, Indonesia, in the period of 2008-2014. Materials and Methods: A total of 47 PRRSV samples were collected from the death case of pigs. The samples were collected from different districts in the period of 2008-2014 from North Sumatera province. Two pairs of primer were designed to amplify ORF7 of Type 1 and 2 PRRSV based on the sequence of reference viruses VR2332 and Lelystad. Viral RNAs were extracted from samples using PureLink™ micro-to-Midi total RNA purification system (Invitrogen). To amplify the ORF7 of PRRSV, the synthesis cDNA and DNA amplification were performed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR method. Then the DNA sequencing of PCR products and phylogenetic analysis were accomplished by molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 6.0 software program. Results: RT-: PCR and nested PCR used in this study had successfully detected of 18 samples positive PRRS virus with the amplification products at 703bp and 508bp, respectively. Sequencing of the ORF7 shows that 18 PRRS viruses isolated from North Sumatera belonged to North American (NA). JXA1 Like and classic NA type viruses. Several mutations were detected, particularly in the area of nuclear localization signal (NLS1) and in NLS2. In the local viruses, which were related closed to JXA1 virus; there are two differences in amino acids in position 12 and 43 of ORF7. Our tested viruses showed that the amino acid positions 12 and 43 are Asparagine and Arginine, while the reference virus (VR2332, Lelystad, and JXA1) occupied both by Lysine. Based on differences in two amino acids at position 12 and 43 showed that viruses from North Sumatera has its own uniqueness and related closed to highly pathogenic PRRS (HP-PRRS) virus (JXA1). Conclusion: The results demonstrated that North Sumatera

  20. Restless legs syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... they sleep. This condition is called periodic limb movement disorder. All of these symptoms make it hard to ... treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults-an update for 2012: practice parameters ...

  1. A primary Sjögren's syndrome patient with distal renal tubular acidosis, who presented with symptoms of hypokalemic periodic paralysis: Report of a case study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Pamuk, Omer Nuri; Gerenli, Murat; Celik, Yahya

    2005-11-01

    Although renal tubular acidosis (RTA), secondary to autoimmune interstitial nephritis, develops in a large proportion of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), most of the subjects are asymptomatic. Here, we shall present a 39-year-old female patient who came to us with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP), and who was later diagnosed with distal RTA. The patient, who had xerostomia and xerophthalmia for a long period of time, was diagnosed with primary SS from serologic and histologic findings. The patient recovered by being prescribed potassium replacement therapy. Although renal biopsy was not performed, corticosteroids were administered because HPP indicated severe interstitial nephritis. HPP did not reoccur during a 2-year follow-up period. We also review cases with SS-related distal RTA and HPP. PMID:15690142

  2. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a condition in which there is an extra electrical pathway of the heart. The ... to periods of rapid heart rate ( tachycardia ). Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is one of the most common ...

  3. Conventional Risk Factors and Acute Coronary Syndrome during a Period of Socioeconomic Transition: Population-based Case-control Study in Tirana, Albania

    PubMed Central

    Burazeri, Genc; Goda, Artan; Sulo, Gerhard; Stefa, Jonida; Roshi, Enver; Kark, Jeremy D.

    2007-01-01

    Aim To assess the association between conventional risk factors and acute coronary syndrome in Albania, a transitional country in Southeast Europe. Methods A population-based case-control study was conducted in Tirana in 2003-2006. A total of 467 consecutive patients with nonfatal acute coronary syndrome were recruited. There were 370 men with mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of 59.1 ± 8.7 years and 97 women with mean±SD age of 63.3 ± 7.1 years. The control group comprised a population-representative sample of Tirana residents. In the control group, there were 469 men with mean±SD age of 53.1 ± 10.4 years and 268 women aged 54.0 ± 10.9 years. A structured questionnaire on demographic, socioeconomic, psychosocial factors, and health behaviors was administered. Physical measurements included anthropometrics and blood pressure. Venous blood and adipose tissue aspirations from the gluteal region were frozen-stored for future analysis. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression was used to assess the independent associations of conventional risk factors with acute coronary syndrome. Results Upon adjustment for covariates, family history of coronary heart disease was found to be a strong predictor of acute coronary syndrome in both men (odds ratio [OR], 3.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.58-5.30) and women (OR, 4.53; 2.40-8.57). Waist-to-hip ratio in men (OR, 4.03; 2.83-5.73) and obesity in women (OR, 3.31; 1.54-7.14) were strongly associated with acute coronary syndrome. In men, but not in women, there was a significant association with hypertension and current smoking (P = 0.011 and P<0.001, respectively). Diabetes was not significantly independently associated in either sex. Conclusion Classical risk factors predicted coronary heart disease in Albania, similarly as in the rest of the world, although associations with family history and anthropometric indices were stronger. These findings are resulting largely from the heterogeneous

  4. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  5. Canakinumab (ACZ885, a fully human IgG1 anti-IL-1β mAb) induces sustained remission in pediatric patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents a spectrum of three auto-inflammatory syndromes, familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease/chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (NOMID/CINCA) with etiology linked to mutations in the NLRP3 gene resulting in elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. CAPS is a rare hereditary auto-inflammatory disease, which may start early in childhood and requires a life-long treatment. Canakinumab, a fully human anti-IL-1β antibody, produces sustained selective inhibition of IL-1β. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of canakinumab in the treatment of pediatric CAPS patients. Methods Seven pediatric patients (five children and two adolescents) with CAPS were enrolled in a phase II, open-label study of canakinumab in patients with CAPS. Canakinumab was administered at a dose of 2 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.) (for patients with body weight ≤ 40 kg) or 150 mg s.c. (for patients with body weight > 40 kg) with re-dosing upon each relapse. The primary efficacy variable was time to relapse following achievement of a complete response (defined as a global assessment of no or minimal disease activity and no or minimal rash and values for serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and/or serum amyloid A (SAA) within the normal range, < 10 mg/L). Results All patients achieved a complete response within seven days after the first dose of canakinumab and responses were reinduced on retreatment following relapse. Improvements in symptoms were evident within 24 hours after the first dose, according to physician assessments. The estimated median time to relapse was 49 days (95% CI 29 to 68) in children who received a dose of 2 mg/kg. Canakinumab was well tolerated. One serious adverse event, vertigo, was reported, but resolved during treatment. Conclusions Canakinumab, 2 mg/kg or

  6. Are we aware of restless legs syndrome in COPD patients who are in an exacerbation period? Frequency and probable factors related to underlying mechanism.

    PubMed

    Aras, Gulfidan; Kadakal, Figen; Purisa, Sevim; Kanmaz, Dilek; Aynaci, Aysun; Isik, Elvan

    2011-12-01

    A few previous studies have reported that the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a 29.1% to 36.8% frequency of restless legs syndrome (RLS). In this study, we observed RLS symptoms in patients experiencing COPD exacerbation to better understand the relationship between the many clinical parameters of COPD and the presence of RLS and to attract the attention of specialists on the association between the two conditions. Twenty-two male patients in COPD exacerbation; 17 healthy individuals were evaluated in this study. The patients were evaluated using the 2003 RLS symptom criteria outlined by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Groups (IRLSSG). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Epworth daytime sleepiness scale were used to assess the sleep quality of patients. The RLS symptoms were correlated with blood levels of laboratory and clinical parameters. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 statistical software packet. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Epworth daytime sleepiness scale scores were increased in COPD patients and correlated significantly with RLS symptoms. It was found that 54.5% of COPD patients with acute exacerbations were observed to have RLS symptoms. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was significantly higher in COPD patients with RLS symptoms compared to COPD patients without RLS symptoms (p < 0.05). We did not observe any significant difference in the previously reported metabolic and clinical parameters associated with RLS in COPD patients with and without RLS. RLS symptoms increase during COPD exacerbation and lead to decreased sleep quality. PMID:22149404

  7. Problem Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ Home Body Getting your period Problem periods Problem periods It’s common to have cramps or feel ... doctor Some common period problems Signs of period problems top One way to know if you may ...

  8. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to ...

  9. Second-Impact Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sarah; Battin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS.…

  10. Cushing's Syndrome in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Cushing’s Syndrome in Children by Meg Keil, MS, CRNP How is Cushing’s syndrome (CS) in children different than in adults? · CS in children is rare. An estimated ... child or adolescent during this period. Editor’s Note: Meg Keil,MS, CRNP is a nurse practitioner at ...

  11. [Kleine-Levin syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wurthmann, C; Klieser, E

    1991-05-01

    The Kleine-Levin syndrome is generally considered to be a benign functional disorder of hypothalamic structures. Its onset is usually in adolescence. The most characteristic symptoms are periodic hypersomnia, excessive eating, hypersexuality, irritability and apathy. Associated features are depressive and schizophrenic symptoms. A biological relationship between the Klein-Levin syndrome and endogenous psychoses is discussed. PMID:1869237

  12. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (also known as neuromyotonia, Isaacs-Mertens syndrome, continuous muscle fiber activity syndrome, and quantal squander syndrome) is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by hyperexcitability and continuous firing of ... which include progressive muscle stiffness, continuously contracting ...

  13. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system ( ... over a period of weeks and then stabilize. Guillain-Barre can be hard to diagnose. Possible tests include ...

  14. The Effect of an Exercise Program in Conjunction With Short-Period Patellar Taping on Pain, Electromyogram Activity, and Muscle Strength in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Defne; Callaghan, Michael James; Ozkan, Huseyin; Ozdag, Fatih; Atay, Ozgur Ahmet; Yuksel, Inci; Doral, Mahmut Nedim

    2010-01-01

    Background: McConnell recommended that patellar tape be kept on all day, until patients learn how to activate their vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) during an exercise program. This application may pose problems because prolonged taping may be inadvisable for some patients or even contraindicated owing to skin discomfort, irritation, or allergic reaction. Hypothesis: Wearing patellofemoral tape for a shorter duration during an exercise program would be just as beneficial as a prolonged taping application. Study Design: Prospective cohort. Methods: Twelve patients and 16 healthy people participated. Patients underwent short-period patellar taping plus an exercise program for 3 months. Numeric pain rating, muscle strength of the knee extensors, and electromyogram activity of the vastus lateralis and VMO were evaluated. Results: There were significant differences in electromyogram activity (P = .04) and knee extensor muscle strength (P = .03) between involved and uninvolved sides before treatment. After treatment, pain scores decreased, and there were no significant differences between involved and uninvolved sides in electromyogram activity (P = .68) and knee extensor strength (P = .62). Before treatment, mean VMO activation started significantly later than that of vastus lateralis, as compared with the matched healthy control group (P = .01). After treatment, these differences were nonsignificant (P = .08). Conclusion: Short-period patellar taping plus an exercise program improves VMO and vastus lateralis activation. Clinical Relevance: A shorter period of taping for the exercise program may be as beneficial as a prolonged taping application. PMID:23015969

  15. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection

  16. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing disease Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor Diabetes Ectopic Cushing syndrome Exogenous Cushing syndrome Kidney stones Pituitary tumor Rheumatoid arthritis Tumor Update Date 10/28/2015 Updated by: ...

  17. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  18. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, ...

  19. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  20. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is a rare condition caused by missing a copy of several genes. Parents may not have ... history of the condition. However, a person with Williams syndrome has a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  1. HIV-1 incidence and HIV-1 associated mortality in a cohort of urban factory workers in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Borgdorff, M W; Barongo, L R; Klokke, A H; Newell, J N; Senkoro, K P; Velema, J P; Gabone, R M

    1995-08-01

    The objectives were to determine HIV-1 incidence and HIV-1 associated mortality in a prospective cohort study and to determine whether the cohort is suitable for studies attempting to determine the impact of interventions on HIV-1 incidence. The study population was a cohort of 2038 urban factory workers in northwest Tanzania of whom 1772 workers (1478 men or 87% and 294 women or 89%) had enrolled in the study during October 1991 to September 1993. 471 (27%) of the total study population were lost to follow-up by the end of the study period. Outcome measures were HIV-1 seroconversion and death. At intake, 153 of 1478 (10.4%) men and 52 of 294 (17.7%) women were infected with HIV-1. In the study period, 17 seroconversions took place in 1365.9 person years of follow-up giving an HIV-1 incidence rate of 1.2/100 person-years of follow-up. No association was found between seroconversion and age or sex. The crude annual mortality rate was 4.9/100 person-years in those with and 0.3/100 person-years in those without HIV-1 infection, giving an age- and sex-adjusted mortality ratio of 12.9. The age- and sex-adjusted population attributable risk was 0.5/100 person-years, and of all deaths, 62% were attributable to HIV-1 infection. Of the 14 HIV-1 infected people who died, 9 met the criteria of the 1987 revised Centers for Disease Control/World Health Organization AIDS case definition: one had cryptococcal meningitis and eight HIV wasting syndrome. Two others had had weight loss and fever, but the evidence was inadequate to make or reject the diagnosis of AIDS. The remaining three without an AIDS diagnosis had pulmonary tuberculosis, diarrhea, and pyomyositis, respectively. HIV-1 infection was a major cause of death in this adult population. At an HIV-1 incidence of 1.2/100 person-years, a large cohort size would be required to evaluate the impact of interventions on HIV-1 incidence. PMID:7590710

  2. The Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder in Adults—An Update for 2012: Practice Parameters with an Evidence-Based Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Kristo, David A.; Bista, Sabin R.; Rowley, James A.; Zak, Rochelle S.; Casey, Kenneth R.; Lamm, Carin I.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Rosenberg, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed to update the previous AASM practice parameters on the treatments, both dopaminergic and other, of RLS and PLMD. A considerable amount of literature has been published since these previous reviews were performed, necessitating an update of the corresponding practice parameters. Therapies with a STANDARD level of recommendation include pramipexole and ropinirole. Therapies with a GUIDELINE level of recommendation include levodopa with dopa decarboxylase inhibitor, opioids, gabapentin enacarbil, and cabergoline (which has additional caveats for use). Therapies with an OPTION level of recommendation include carbamazepine, gabapentin, pregabalin, clonidine, and for patients with low ferritin levels, iron supplementation. The committee recommends a STANDARD AGAINST the use of pergolide because of the risks of heart valve damage. Therapies for RLS secondary to ESRD, neuropathy, and superficial venous insufficiency are discussed. Lastly, therapies for PLMD are reviewed. However, it should be mentioned that because PLMD therapy typically mimics RLS therapy, the primary focus of this review is therapy for idiopathic RLS. Citation: Aurora RN; Kristo DA; Bista SR; Rowley JA: Zak RS; Casey KR; Lamm CI; Tracy SL; Rosenberg RS. The treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adults—an update for 2012: practice parameters with an evidence-based systematic review and meta-analyses. SLEEP 2012;35(8):1039-1062. PMID:22851801

  3. Long-term outcome and lineage-specific chimerism in 194 patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome treated by hematopoietic cell transplantation in the period 1980-2009: an international collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Moratto, Daniele; Giliani, Silvia; Bonfim, Carmem; Mazzolari, Evelina; Fischer, Alain; Ochs, Hans D; Cant, Andrew J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Cowan, Morton J; Albert, Michael H; Small, Trudy; Pai, Sung-Yun; Haddad, Elie; Lisa, Antonella; Hambleton, Sophie; Slatter, Mary; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Picard, Capucine; Torgerson, Troy R; Burroughs, Lauri; Koliski, Adriana; Neto, Jose Zanis; Porta, Fulvio; Qasim, Waseem; Veys, Paul; Kavanau, Kristina; Hönig, Manfred; Schulz, Ansgar; Friedrich, Wilhelm; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2011-08-11

    In this retrospective collaborative study, we have analyzed long-term outcome and donor cell engraftment in 194 patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) who have been treated by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in the period 1980- 2009. Overall survival was 84.0% and was even higher (89.1% 5-year survival) for those who received HCT since the year 2000, reflecting recent improvement of outcome after transplantation from mismatched family donors and for patients who received HCT from an unrelated donor at older than 5 years. Patients who went to transplantation in better clinical conditions had a lower rate of post-HCT complications. Retrospective analysis of lineage-specific donor cell engraftment showed that stable full donor chimerism was attained by 72.3% of the patients who survived for at least 1 year after HCT. Mixed chimerism was associated with an increased risk of incomplete reconstitution of lymphocyte count and post-HCT autoimmunity, and myeloid donor cell chimerism < 50% was associated with persistent thrombocytopenia. These observations indicate continuous improvement of outcome after HCT for WAS and may have important implications for the development of novel protocols aiming to obtain full correction of the disease and reduce post-HCT complications. PMID:21659547

  4. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... number of days after the last one. The Menstrual Cycle Most girls get their first period between the ... to skip periods or to have an irregular menstrual cycle. Illness, rapid weight change, or stress can also ...

  5. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness.

    PubMed

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  6. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R. Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  7. Oligodendrocyte Injury and Pathogenesis of HIV-1-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Xu, Enquan; Liu, Jianuo; Xiong, Huangui

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes wrap neuronal axons to form myelin, an insulating sheath which is essential for nervous impulse conduction along axons. Axonal myelination is highly regulated by neuronal and astrocytic signals and the maintenance of myelin sheaths is a very complex process. Oligodendrocyte damage can cause axonal demyelination and neuronal injury, leading to neurological disorders. Demyelination in the cerebrum may produce cognitive impairment in a variety of neurological disorders, including human immunodeficiency virus type one (HIV-1)-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although the combined antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of HIV-1-associated dementia, a severe form of HAND, milder forms of HAND remain prevalent even when the peripheral viral load is well controlled. HAND manifests as a subcortical dementia with damage in the brain white matter (e.g., corpus callosum), which consists of myelinated axonal fibers. How HIV-1 brain infection causes myelin injury and resultant white matter damage is an interesting area of current HIV research. In this review, we tentatively address recent progress on oligodendrocyte dysregulation and HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27455335

  8. [The Kleine-Levin syndrome].

    PubMed

    Visscher, F; Smit, L M; Smith, F; Boer, F; Njiokiktjien, C

    1989-12-01

    Two boys, aged 12 and 13 years, showed relapsing periods of somnolence and excessive eating, starting after a viral illness. One of them also showed periodic disturbance of sexual impulse control. The symptomatic periods were followed by symptom-free intervals in a highly characteristic pattern. This gave the clue to the diagnosis Kleine-Levin syndrome. The cause of this syndrome is unknown, in some cases a relationship between infectious disease or traumatic brain damage has been postulated. A dysfunction of the hypothalamus and associated structures is suspected. The syndrome has a rather favourable prognosis. The symptoms can be relieved by amphetamines, methylphenidate and probably also by lithium carbonate. PMID:2617509

  9. An infrared supershell surrounding the Cygnus OB1 association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saken, Jon M.; Shull, J. M.; Garmany, Catharine D.; Nichols-Bohlin, Joy; Fesen, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    New studies are reported of a large, 2 x 5 deg peanut-shaped cavity in the far-infrared emission seen using IRAS data for the Cygnus X region. A more complete and better defined infrared supershell than reported by Lozinskaya and Repin (1990) is found and connected to the Cyg OB1 association. It is shown that the cavity represents the early stages of a superbubble produced by the winds and possible SNe from 10 to 20 massive stars. The locations and properties of these stars are used to estimate the energy deposition rate and to understand the manner in which supershells form and propagate. In Cyg OB1, spatially distributed subclustering appears to have played an important role in determining the nonspherical morphology of the superbubble.

  10. Thyroid Function in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the thyroid function of 181 patients (mean age 14 years) with Down's syndrome and found more thyroid dysfunctions than in the general population. Periodic thyroid hormone function tests are recommended for Down's syndrome individuals, especially as they get older. (Author/DB)

  11. Role of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and TNFRSF1A R92Q mutation in the pathogenesis of TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Caminero, A; Comabella, M; Montalban, X

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that tumour necrosis factor (TNF)/TNFRSF1A signalling is involved in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Different genetic and clinical findings over the last few years have generated renewed interest in this relationship. This paper provides an update on these recent findings. Genome-wide association studies have identified the R92Q mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene as a genetic risk factor for MS (odds ratio 1·6). This allele, which is also common in the general population and in other inflammatory conditions, therefore only implies a modest risk for MS and provides yet another piece of the puzzle that defines the multiple genetic risk factors for this disease. TNFRSF1A mutations have been associated with an autoinflammatory disease known as TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Clinical observations have identified a group of MS patients carrying the R92Q mutation who have additional TRAPS symptoms. Hypothetically, the co-existence of MS and TRAPS or a co-morbidity relationship between the two could be mediated by this mutation. The TNFRSF1A R92Q mutation behaves as a genetic risk factor for MS and other inflammatory diseases, including TRAPS. Nevertheless, this mutation does not appear to be a severity marker of the disease, neither modifying the clinical progression of MS nor its therapeutic response. An alteration in TNF/TNFRS1A signalling may increase proinflammatory signals; the final clinical phenotype may possibly be determined by other genetic or environmental modifying factors that have not yet been identified. PMID:22059991

  12. Defining the roles for Vpr in HIV-1-associated neuropathogenesis.

    PubMed

    James, Tony; Nonnemacher, Michael R; Wigdahl, Brian; Krebs, Fred C

    2016-08-01

    It is increasingly evident that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) has a unique role in neuropathogenesis. Its ability to induce G2/M arrest coupled with its capacity to increase viral gene transcription gives it a unique role in sustaining viral replication and aiding in the establishment and maintenance of a systemic infection. The requirement of Vpr for HIV-1 infection and replication in cells of monocytic origin (a key lineage of cells involved in HIV-1 neuroinvasion) suggests an important role in establishing and sustaining infection in the central nervous system (CNS). Contributions of Vpr to neuropathogenesis can be expanded further through (i) naturally occurring HIV-1 sequence variation that results in functionally divergent Vpr variants; (ii) the dual activities of Vpr as a intracellular protein delivered and expressed during HIV-1 infection and as an extracellular protein that can act on neighboring, uninfected cells; (iii) cell type-dependent consequences of Vpr expression and exposure, including cell cycle arrest, metabolic dysregulation, and cytotoxicity; and (iv) the effects of Vpr on exosome-based intercellular communication in the CNS. Revealing that the effects of this pleiotropic viral protein is an essential part of a greater understanding of HIV-1-associated pathogenesis and potential approaches to treating and preventing disease caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:27056720

  13. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy in a solid organ transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Montesdeoca Andrade, Maria Jose; Correa Diaz, Edgar Patricio; Buestán, Maria Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is endemic in Japan, the Caribbean and in South American countries such as Ecuador. This virus is the cause of HTLV-1-associated myelopathy or tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), a myelopathy characterised by chronic progressive paraparesis, spasticity and urinary symptoms. We report the case of a 40-year-old man who received a kidney transplant from a living donor and developed HAM/TSP, 24 months after transplant. The diagnosis was confirmed by detection of HTLV-1 in blood and cerebrospinal fluid by the ELISA and Western Blot tests. For myelopathy, the patient was treated with pulse methylprednisolone, but had poor response to treatment. We recommend that all patients receiving transplants and their donors who come from endemic countries be given a mandatory screening for HTLV-1 through an ELISA test, in an effort to inform candidates for renal transplantation of the potential risk of infection and the development of this disease. PMID:27268291

  14. Periodized wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossnagle, G.; Restrepo, J.M.; Leaf, G.K.

    1993-12-01

    The properties of periodized Daubechies wavelets on [0,1] are detailed and contrasted against their counterparts which form a basis for L{sup 2}(R). Numerical examples illustrate the analytical estimates for convergence and demonstrate by comparison with Fourier spectral methods the superiority of wavelet projection methods for approximations. The analytical solution to inner products of periodized wavelets and their derivatives, which are known as connection coefficients, is presented, and several tabulated values are included.

  15. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes developmental delay and neurological problems. The physician Harry Angelman first delineated the syndrome in 1965, when ... 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, FL 34238 national@ ...

  16. Bloom's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ...

  17. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  18. Premenstrual syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;2:CD001396. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: etiology, diagnosis, management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  19. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing syndrome is called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone are examples of this type of ... Blood cortisol levels Blood sugar Saliva cortisol levels Dexamethasone suppression test 24-hour urine for cortisol and ...

  20. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  1. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  2. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  3. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have children and who have a family history of Morquio syndrome. Counseling is also recommended for families who have a child with Morquio syndrome to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available.

  4. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001549.htm Asperger syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form ...

  5. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis References Joseph RL, Alleva JT, Hudgins TH. Piriformis syndrome. In: Frontera: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  6. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid gland. Pendred syndrome also can affect the vestibular system, which controls balance. Some people with Pendred syndrome will show vestibular weakness when their balance is tested. However, the ...

  7. Hurler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hurler syndrome is a rare disease of metabolism in which a person cannot break down long chains of sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (formerly called mucopolysaccharides). Hurler syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidosis, ...

  8. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  9. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  10. The Orion OB1 association. 1: Stellar content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. G. A.; De Geus, E. J.; De Zeeuw, P. T.

    1994-01-01

    Walfraven photometry of established and probable members of the Orion OB1 association is presented. Effective temperature, surface gravity, luminosity and mass are derived for all stars, using atmosphere model by Kurucz (1979). Absolute magnitudes are calculated using the Straizys and Kuriliene (1981) tables. Distance moduli and visual extinctions are determined. A comparison of the visual extinctions to IRAS 100 micrometers data shows that the near edge of the Orion A and B clouds lies at a distance of approximately 320 pc, while the far edge is at approximately 500 pc. A method for deriving the ages of the subgroups by comparing theoretical isochrones to the observations in the log g, log T(sub eff) plane is presented. The derived ages suggest, contrary to earlier studies, that subgroup 1b is younger than 1c, which can possibly be explained by past geometries of the system of stars and gas. The initial mass function for Orion OB1 is derived with the aid of the Kolmogorov-Smirnoff test. Through extensive simulations, we show that it is very difficult to derive accurately the Initial Mass Function (IMF) from the available data. To within somewhat weak limits the IMF is found to be of the form xi(log M) = AM(exp -1.7 +/- 0.2) for all subgroups. The energy output of the subgroups in the form of stellar winds and supernovae is calculated and compared to the observed size and expansion velocity of the Orion-Eridanus bubble. It is shown that the energy output of the association can account for the morphology and kinematics of the interstellar medium (ISM).

  11. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  12. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. ... In most cases, Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. This form of Down syndrome is called trisomy 21. ...

  13. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  14. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet’s and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. PMID:25562014

  15. Periodic cages.

    PubMed

    Diudea, Mircea V; Nagy, Csaba L; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Ioan; Graovac, Ante; Janezic, Dusanka; Vikić-Topić, Drazen

    2005-01-01

    Various cages are constructed by using three types of caps: f-cap (derived from spherical fullerenes by deleting zones of various size), kf-cap (obtainable by cutting off the polar ring, of size k), and t-cap ("tubercule"-cap). Building ways are presented, some of them being possible isomerization routes in the real chemistry of fullerenes. Periodic cages with ((5,7)3) covering are modeled, and their constitutive typing enumeration is given. Spectral data revealed some electronic periodicity in fullerene clusters. Semiempirical and strain energy calculations complete their characterization. PMID:15807490

  16. Oculocerebral hypopigmentation syndrome (Cross syndrome).

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Unsal, E; Köse, G

    1991-01-01

    A typical case of Cross syndrome with hypopigmentation, mental and psychomotor retardation, spasticity, bilateral optic atrophy and dental defects in a three-year-old boy is presented. The clinical features of this rare syndrome are discussed. PMID:1814043

  17. Iliopsoas Syndrome in Dancers

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Catherine; Swanson, David; Garofolo, Garret; Rose, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Coxa saltans refers to a constellation of diagnoses that cause snapping of the hip and is a major cause of anterior hip pain in dancers. When the internal type is accompanied by weakness or pain, it is referred to as iliopsoas syndrome. Iliopsoas syndrome is the result of repetitive active hip flexion in abduction and can be confused with other hip pathology, most commonly of labral etiology. Purpose: To report the incidence, clinical findings, treatment protocol, and results of treatment for iliopsoas syndrome in a population of dancers. Study Design: Retrospective case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A retrospective database review of 653 consecutive patients evaluated for musculoskeletal complaints over a 3-year period was completed. The diagnosis of iliopsoas syndrome was made based on anterior hip or groin pain, weakness with resisted hip flexion in abduction, or symptomatic clicking or snapping with a positive iliopsoas test. Patients identified with iliopsoas syndrome were further stratified according to age at time of onset, insidious versus acute onset, duration of symptoms, side of injury, presence of rest pain, pain with activities of daily living, and associated lower back pain. All patients diagnosed with iliopsoas syndrome underwent physical therapy, including hip flexor stretching and strengthening, pelvic mobilization, and modification of dance technique or exposure as required. Results: A total of 49 dancers were diagnosed and treated for iliopsoas syndrome. Within this injured population of 653 patients, the incidence in female dancers was 9.2%, significantly higher than that in male dancers (3.2%). The mean age at the time of injury was 24.6 years. The incidence of iliopsoas syndrome in dancers younger than 18 years was 12.8%, compared with 7% in dancers older than 18 years. Student dancers had the highest incidence (14%), followed by amateur dancers (7.5%), while professional dancers had the lowest incidence (4.6%). All

  18. Caveolin-1 Associated Adenovirus Entry into Human Corneal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Santanu; Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V.; Lee, Jeong Yoon; Ramke, Mirja; Chodosh, James; Rajaiya, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    The cellular entry of viruses represents a critical area of study, not only for viral tropism, but also because viral entry dictates the nature of the immune response elicited upon infection. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), caused by viruses within human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D), is a severe, ocular surface infection associated with corneal inflammation. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis has previously been shown to play a critical role in entry of other HAdV species into many host cell types. However, HAdV-D endocytosis into corneal cells has not been extensively studied. Herein, we show an essential role for cholesterol rich, lipid raft microdomains and caveolin-1, in the entry of HAdV-D37 into primary human corneal fibroblasts. Cholesterol depletion using methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) profoundly reduced viral infection. When replenished with soluble cholesterol, the effect of MβCD was reversed, allowing productive viral infection. HAdV-D37 DNA was identified in caveolin-1 rich endosomal fractions after infection. Src kinase activity was also increased in caveolin-1 rich endosomal fractions after infection, and Src phosphorylation and CXCL1 induction were both decreased in caveolin-1-/- mice corneas compared to wild type mice. siRNA knock down of caveolin-1 in corneal cells reduced chemokine induction upon viral infection, and caveolin-1-/- mouse corneas showed reduced cellular entry of HAdV-D37. As a control, HAdV-C2, a non-corneal pathogen, appeared to utilize the caveolar pathway for entry into A549 cells, but failed to infect corneal cells entirely, indicating virus and cell specific tropism. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the presence of caveolin-1 in HAdV-D37-containing vesicles during the earliest stages of viral entry. Collectively, these experiments indicate for the first time that HAdV-D37 uses a lipid raft mediated caveolin-1 associated pathway for entry into corneal cells, and connects the processes of viral entry with downstream

  19. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Denys-Drash syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... de Mello MP, Brandalise SR, Aguiar Sdos S. The novel WT1 gene mutation p.H377N associated to Denys- ... Chen S, Lai KN, Wang Y. Clinical pictures and novel mutations of WT1-associated Denys-Drash syndrome in ...

  1. Mayer-Rokitansky syndrome and anorectal malformation.

    PubMed

    Patankar, Shreeprasad P; Kalrao, Vijay; Patankar, Shilpa S

    2004-12-01

    Mayer Rokitansky Kuster Houser syndrome (MRKH syndrome) is characterized by Mullerian duct structures agenesis, vaginal atresia being the commonest variant. It can be associated with renal, skeletal, spine and other malformations. Patient with Mayer Rokitansky syndrome has a varied presentation from newborn period to adolescence. Thorough investigations are required for classification of the syndrome and diagnosis of associated anomalies. The MRKH syndrome patient may require complex vaginal reconstructive surgery and a detailed counseling about the potentials of menstruation and fertility. Here we are presenting a patient having association of anorectal malformation, Mullerian duct agenesis and renal anomaly. PMID:15630325

  2. Overgrowth Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Andrew C; Kalish, Jennifer M

    2015-09-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall-Smith, Weaver, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith-Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  3. Lutembacher's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sandhya S.; Sakaria, Amit K.; Mahajan, Sanket K.; Shah, Kuldeep B.

    2012-01-01

    The definition of Lutembacher's syndrome has undergone many changes. It refers to combination of congenital Atrial Septal Defect with acquired mitral stenosis. Lutembacher's syndrome is a very rare disease and in the past, it has been either overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Here, we will discuss a case of a pregnant lady who developed breathlessness during her third trimester of pregnancy and on detailed examination and investigation, she was found to be having Lutembacher's syndrome. PMID:22629045

  4. Sheehan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Postpartum hypopituitarism; Postpartum pituitary insufficiency; Hypopituitarism Syndrome ... Malee MP. Pituitary and adrenal disorders in pregnancy. In: Gabbe ... Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  5. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for families who have a child with Sanfilippo syndrome, to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available. Alternative Names MPS III References Pyeritz ...

  6. [Autoinflammatory syndromes in childhood].

    PubMed

    Horneff, G

    2015-08-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases are a group of hereditary and non-hereditary diseases of the innate immune system, characterized by inflammation with no apparent cause, recurrence at irregular intervals and manifestation on the skin, mucous membranes, joints, bone, gastrointestinal tract, blood vessels and the central nervous system (CNS). Amyloidosis and other possibly severe long-term complications are important. Advances in genetics and molecular biology have improved understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases, including familial Mediterranean fever, mevalonate kinase deficiency syndrome, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome and improved others. The vast majority of these diseases are based on activation of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) pathway, so that inhibition of IL-1 provides a therapeutic option. Other syndromes are characterized by a granulomatous inflammation. Newer autoinflammatory diseases, such as chronic atypical neutrophilic dermatosis with lipodystrophy and elevated temperature (CANDLE) and stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI) are, however, driven by interferons. PMID:26238708

  7. [Environmental factors in Asperger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Abe, Takaaki; Kato, Satoshi

    2007-03-01

    This paper reviews what is currently known about the environmental factors in Asperger syndrome that is a neurodevelopmental disorder of genetic origins. Its characteristics tend to occur in families of those with the syndrome. The rate of complications during pregnancy or the neonatal period in the patients with Asperger syndrome was about the same as that in the control group. It is true that their involvement in their outer world could not influence the core social deficits very much. But it might facilitate the appearance of the second symptoms such as dissociation, anxiety, depression, persecutory delusion as well as antisocial behavior including serious criminal acts. PMID:17354554

  8. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thin, and loose jointed. Most people with Marfan syndrome have heart and blood vessel problems, such as a weakness in the aorta or heart valves that leak. They may also have problems with ... diagnose Marfan syndrome. Your doctor may use your medical history, family ...

  9. Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at birth is often smaller than average. A child with Turner syndrome is much shorter than children who are the ... Growth hormone may help a child with Turner syndrome grow taller. ... started when the girl is 12 or 13 years old. These help trigger ...

  10. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It also helps control how your body grows and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects ... A mutation, or change, in the gene that controls how the body makes fibrillin causes Marfan syndrome. Fibrillin is a ...

  11. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  12. Adolescents with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merrick, Joav; Kandel, Isack; Vardi, Gideon

    2004-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of transition that can create stress for both adolescents and parents. Adolescents with Down syndrome (DS) go through the same stages as other adolescents, but due to lack of cognitive and behavioral factors they and their parents may find this period particularly challenging. This paper reviews several studies, especially from the United Kingdom, of groups of adolescents with Down syndrome and their controls followed from childhood, through adolescence into adulthood. There are special medical problems for this population that require annual medical examinations and surveillance, but the focus has shifted from health problems to social maturation, developing independence, and transition from school to employment or work activity. Medical transition from a pediatric to family physician provider is mentioned with recommendations as to how that transition can be made as smooth as possible. PMID:15148854

  13. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Edward; Pross, Hugh

    1992-01-01

    To determine the effect of certain herbal and homeopathic preparations on symptoms, lymphocyte markers, and cytotoxic function of the lymphocytes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, we studied six outpatients diagnosed with the disease by their family physicians. Patients were given herbal and homeopathic preparations after a 3-week symptom-recording period. After treatment, symptoms were again recorded. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment. None of the values showed any significant change after treatment. PMID:21221272

  14. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... with this syndrome do not have a smile). Miller syndrome Miller Syndrome is very rare condition characterized by downward ... dysplasia • Hemangioma • Hemifacial Microsomia / Goldenhar syndrome • Microtia/Atresia • Miller syndrome • Moebius syndrome • Nager syndrome • Pierre Robin Sequence • ...

  15. Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  16. Neurocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Klar, Nitasha; Cohen, Bernard; Lin, Doris D M

    2016-01-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes (or phakomatoses) are a diverse group of congenital disorders that encompass abnormalities of neuroectodermal and, sometimes, mesodermal development, hence commonly involving the skin, eye, and central nervous system. These are often inherited conditions and typically present in early childhood or adolescence. Some of the abnormalities and clinical symptoms may, however, be progressive, and there is an increased risk of neoplastic formation in many of the syndromes. As a group, neurocutaneous syndromes are characterized by distinctive cutaneous stigmata and neurologic symptomology, the latter often representing the most devastating and debilitating features of these diseases. Many of these syndromes are markedly heterogeneous in nature as they affect many organ systems. Given the incurable nature of these conditions and the broad spectrum of pathologies they comprise, treatments vary on a case-by-case basis and tend to be palliative rather than curative. With the advances in molecular genetics, however, greater understanding of biologic functions of the gene products and the correlative phenotypic expression is being attained, and this knowledge may guide future therapeutic developments. This chapter focuses on the cutaneous and neurologic pathology with emphasis on neuroimaging of selective neurocutaneous syndromes, including tuberous sclerosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia, and incontinentia pigmenti. PMID:27432683

  17. [Aarskog's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hromádková, L; Frána, L

    1991-05-01

    The authors described the rare Aarskog syndrome in a 6-year-old boy, associated with left-sided Brown's syndrome. Another 4-year-old boy came from an affected family where the brother suffered also from Aarskog's syndrome and in the mother some microsymptoms were detected. The authors recommend that patients who on examination of a refraction defect or strabism display uncommon features in the face or other parts of the body should be always subjected to a general examination incl. genetic examination. PMID:1913912

  18. Hubris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair. PMID:18724614

  19. LEOPARD Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Majumdar, Biswajit; Rudra, Olympia; Chakraborty, Sougat

    2015-10-01

    LEOPARD syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited or sporadic disorder of variable penetrance and expressivity. The acronym LEOPARD stands for its cardinal clinical features including Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and Deafness. We present herein a patient with LEOPARD syndrome and distinctive features. It was noteworthy that our patient presented with the concern of generalized lentiginosis and subsequent evaluation revealed that the patient had LEOPARD syndrome. In this report we would like to highlight the importance of detailed clinical examination and appropriate imaging in patients with multiple lentigines. PMID:26632807

  20. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms. PMID:27250614

  1. Velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, A. C.; Super, M.

    1997-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is a syndrome of multiple anomalies that include cleft palate, cardiac defects, learning difficulties, speech disorder and characteristic facial features. It has an estimated incidence of 1 in 5000. The majority of cases have a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. The phenotype of this condition shows considerable variation, not all the principal features are present in each case. Identification of the syndrome can be difficult as many of the anomalies are minor and present in the general population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9497944

  2. A Japanese patient with the Costello syndrome.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, N; Chiyo, H; Imai, K; Otani, K; Futagi, Y

    1994-05-01

    The Costello syndrome is characterized by dwarfism, unique cutaneous lesions, distinct facial gestalt, and mental retardation. We present a Japanese patient with the Costello syndrome. She showed high serum IgM level during the early infantile period. Nissen's fundplication was carried out to treat severe gastroesophageal reflux. Endocrinological investigations revealed a partial deficiency of growth hormone. PMID:8168845

  3. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  4. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... their limitations, they may also feel frustration and anger. Many different medical conditions are seen in people ... syndrome and their families deal with the frustration, anger, and compulsive behavior that often occur. Parents and ...

  5. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  6. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, and other organs. One of these proteins is fibrillin. A problem with the ...

  7. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to determine effective treatment strategies. NIH Patient Recruitment for Paraneoplastic Syndromes Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association 22100 ...

  8. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stolinsky, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Neoplasms can produce a variety of remote effects on the host; these are referred to as paraneoplastic syndromes. The syndromes may affect any of the systems of the body, may precede or follow the diagnosis of the underlying neoplasm, and may or may not parallel the course of the neoplasm in severity. The diagnosis of and therapy for these syndromes can be challenging to a physician, but successful therapy may bring about worthwhile relief for the patient. In addition, the syndromes and the substances that cause them are sometimes useful in diagnosing and in following the course of certain neoplasms. Perhaps of greater importance, study of these remote effects of neoplasia may shed light on the nature of the neoplastic process itself. PMID:6990627

  9. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hunter syndrome is a disease in which long chains of sugar molecules (glycosaminoglycans, formerly called mucopolysaccharides ) are ... of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase. Without this enzyme, chains of sugar molecules build up in various body ...

  10. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... They often include chronic diarrhea, abnormal stools, weight loss, and gas. Your doctor may use lab, imaging, or other tests to make a diagnosis. Treatment of malabsorption syndromes depends on the cause.

  11. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by repetitive activities, such as running. The pressure in a compartment only increases during that activity. Compartment syndrome is most common in the lower leg and forearm. It can also occur in the hand, foot, thigh, and upper arm.

  12. Sotos Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Sotos Syndrome Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  13. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or problems with their heart, stomach or eyes. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ... a baby who has Down syndrome will be. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ...

  14. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jobe MT. Compartment syndromes and Volkmann contracture. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. ... and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  15. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... turnersyndrome. html • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development (NIH): www. nichd. nih. gov/ health/ topics/ Turner_ Syndrome. cfm • Mayo Clinic: www. mayoclinic. com/ health/ turner- ...

  16. Reifenstein syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the gene will be affected. Every female child has a 50% chance of carrying the gene. Family history is important in determining risk factors. The syndrome is estimated to affect 1 in 99,000 people.

  17. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). Specifically, it is known as MPS III. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 260. Spranger J. Mucopolysaccharidoses. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  18. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. PMID:25840463

  19. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease. Symptoms KIDNEYS With all types of Alport syndrome the kidneys are affected. The tiny blood vessels in the glomeruli of the kidneys are damaged. ...

  20. Nephrotic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the ... of certain legal and illegal drugs, or morbid obesity can lead to nephrotic syndrome. Symptoms Some kids ...

  1. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... proportions (long legs, short trunk, shoulder equal to hip size) Abnormally large breasts ( gynecomastia ) Infertility Sexual problems Less than normal amount of pubic, armpit, and facial hair Small, firm testicles Tall height Exams and Tests Klinefelter syndrome may first be ...

  2. [Sneddon syndrome].

    PubMed

    Berchtold, B; Hunziker, T; Zala, L; Braathen, L R

    1991-05-01

    A 44-year-old female with Sneddon's syndrome, i.e. generalized racemose livedo and recurrent cerebrovascular disease, is presented. Significant levels of IgG anticardiolipin antibodies were found in her serum. PMID:1874623

  3. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Our Blog Newsletter Home About Us The PSF Provides Board of Directors Medical Advisory Board International Affiliates Proteus Syndrome Diagnostic Criteria & FAQs Medical Research Glossary Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift ...

  4. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone your body produces to help ... into energy for your body. If you are insulin resistant, too much sugar builds up in your ...

  5. Wallenberg's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some people with Wallenberg’s syndrome report that the world seems to be tilted in an unsettling way, which makes it difficult to keep their balance when they walk. Is there any treatment? Treatment ...

  6. Scheie syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for families who have a child with Scheie syndrome, to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available. Alternative Names Mucopolysaccharidosis type I S; MPS ...

  7. Apert syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by ridging along sutures (craniosynostosis) Frequent ear infections Fusion or severe webbing of the 2nd, 3rd, and ... midface Skeletal (limb) abnormalities Short height Webbing or fusion of the toes Several other syndromes can lead ...

  8. Alport Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines (medications to control high blood pressure) Diuretics (water pills) Limit sodium (salt) in your diet If you are approaching kidney disease because of Alport syndrome, a ... NY Register Now 2016 Orangeburg Kidney Walk Thu, ...

  9. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  10. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Genetic counseling is recommended for couples who want to have children and who have a family history of Hunter syndrome. Prenatal testing is available. Carrier testing for female relatives of affected males is available at a few centers.

  11. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have many of the skeletal (bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments ... appearance to the top of the ear Aortic enlargement and/or mitral valve regurgitation (occasionally) People with ...

  12. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... or numbness in the buttock and along the back of the leg Difficulty sitting Pain from sitting that grows worse as you continue ...

  13. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menkes syndrome, cells in the body can absorb copper, but they are unable to release it. It ... makes it hard for the body to distribute copper in food from the intestines into the bloodstream ...

  14. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Joubert Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Joubert Syndrome Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  16. [DIDMOAD syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alicanoğlu, R; Canbakan, B; Yildiz, N; Arikan, E; Kundur, H; Bahtiyar, K; Sayali, E

    1994-01-01

    The DIDMOAD or so called Wolfram syndrome is a hereditary disease with autosomal-recessive transmission showing 4 main features: diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, nervus opticus atrophia and deafness. Beside this it shows multiple organ involvement. Our 38-year old male patient, showing all above mentioned features except deafness had urinary tract involvement and neurological symptoms. EEG, cerebral MRI, tests with evoked potentials and HLA-typing were performed to discuss the aetiopathogenetic background in our patient. Almost all symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome can be mixed up with complications of diabetes mellitus, which is usually the first symptom of the Wolfram syndrome. Because of this, wrong diagnosis is not rare. Hence in differential diagnosis in any diabetes mellitus type I patient, the possibility of the Wolfram syndrome should be discussed. PMID:8023526

  17. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... make ribosomal proteins) This condition is similar to Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and the 2 conditions should not ... chromosome 19 is found in some people with Diamond-Blackfan anemia. The anemia in Aase syndrome is ...

  18. Waardenburg syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions passed down through families. The syndrome involves deafness and pale skin, hair, and eye color. ... Symptoms may include: Cleft lip (rare) Constipation Deafness (more ... that don't match ( heterochromia ) Pale color skin, hair, and ...

  19. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Search" box. Then click "Submit Query". Organizations Organizations Listen Nonprofit support and advocacy groups bring together ... endorsement by GARD. Suggest an organization to add. Organizations Supporting this Disease American Association for Klinefelter Syndrome ...

  20. [Netherton syndrome].

    PubMed

    Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Torrelo, Antonio; Drake, Marta; Armesto, Susana; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor; Zambrano, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    Netherton syndrome is a rare disease inherited as an autosomal recessive trait due to mutations in the SPINK5 gene. It is characterized by the triad of ichthyosiform dermatosis, alterations of the hair shaft and immunological disorders. We present the case of a 12-year-old girl with the triad of ichthyosis linearis circumflexa, trichorrhexis invaginata and atopic dermatitis, characteristic of Netherton syndrome. PMID:16956571

  1. Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments. PMID:23312968

  2. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem. PMID:22927862

  3. Alagille syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, I D; Piccoli, D A; Spinner, N B

    1997-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (OMIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with abnormalities of the liver, heart, eye, skeleton, and a characteristic facial appearance. Also referred to as the Alagille-Watson syndrome, syndromic bile duct paucity, and arteriohepatic dysplasia, it is a significant cause of neonatal jaundice and cholestasis in older children. In the fully expressed syndrome, affected subjects have intrahepatic bile duct paucity and cholestasis, in conjunction with cardiac malformations (most frequently peripheral pulmonary stenosis), ophthalmological abnormalities (typically of the anterior chamber with posterior embryotoxon being the most common), skeletal anomalies (most commonly butterfly vertebrae), and characteristic facial appearance. Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but expressivity is highly variable. Sibs and parents of probands are often found to have mild expression of the presumptive disease gene, with abnormalities of only one or two systems. The frequency of new mutations appears relatively high, estimated at between 15 and 50%. The disease gene has been mapped to chromosome 20 band p12 based on multiple patients described with cytogenetic or molecular rearrangements of this region. However, the frequency of detectable deletions of 20p12 is low (less than 7%). Progress has been made in the molecular definition of an Alagille syndrome critical region within the short arm of chromosome 20. We will review the clinical, genetic, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in this syndrome. Images PMID:9039994

  4. Novel loss-of-function variants in DIAPH1 associated with syndromic microcephaly, blindness, and early onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Barry, Brenda J; Rajab, Anna; El-Quessny, Malak; Seman, Ann; Coury, Stephanie Newton; Barkovich, A James; Yang, Edward; Walsh, Christopher A; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Stoler, Joan M

    2016-02-01

    Exome sequencing identified homozygous loss-of-function variants in DIAPH1 (c.2769delT; p.F923fs and c.3145C>T; p.R1049X) in four affected individuals from two unrelated consanguineous families. The affected individuals in our report were diagnosed with postnatal microcephaly, early-onset epilepsy, severe vision impairment, and pulmonary symptoms including bronchiectasis and recurrent respiratory infections. A heterozygous DIAPH1 mutation was originally reported in one family with autosomal dominant deafness. Recently, however, a homozygous nonsense DIAPH1 mutation (c.2332C4T; p.Q778X) was reported in five siblings in a single family affected by microcephaly, blindness, early onset seizures, developmental delay, and bronchiectasis. The role of DIAPH1 was supported using parametric linkage analysis, RNA and protein studies in their patients' cell lines and further studies in human neural progenitors cells and a diap1 knockout mouse. In this report, the proband was initially brought to medical attention for profound metopic synostosis. Additional concerns arose when his head circumference did not increase after surgical release at 5 months of age and he was diagnosed with microcephaly and epilepsy at 6 months of age. Clinical exome analysis identified a homozygous DIAPH1 mutation. Another homozygous DIAPH1 mutation was identified in the research exome analysis of a second family with three siblings presenting with a similar phenotype. Importantly, no hearing impairment is reported in the homozygous affected individuals or in the heterozygous carrier parents in any of the families demonstrating the autosomal recessive microcephaly phenotype. These additional families provide further evidence of the likely causal relationship between DIAPH1 mutations and a neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26463574

  5. Cri du chat syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome who wish to become pregnant may consider genetic counseling. Alternative Names Chromosome 5p deletion syndrome; 5p minus syndrome; Cat cry syndrome References Bacino CA, Lee B. Cytogenetics. ...

  6. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Holmes-Adie syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Adie's Syndrome, Adie's ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Holmes-Adie syndrome ? Holmes-Adie syndrome (HAS) is a ...

  7. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in individuals with Down syndrome than their peers without Down syndrome. An awareness of these more ... of the eyes, ears, and joints - just like peers without Down syndrome. What About Down Syndrome Is ...

  8. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Job syndrome; Hyper IgE syndrome ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome. It is named after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was tested by an affliction with draining skin sores and pustules . ...

  9. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the tip Reifenstein syndrome (also known as Gilbert-Dreyfus syndrome or Lubs syndrome) Infertile male syndrome ... F, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al., eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, ...

  10. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ... Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ...

  11. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Tics and Tourette Syndrome Overview What is Tourette syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a type of tic disorder. Children who have Tourette syndrome will repeat both movements and ...

  12. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  13. Psychiatric Comorbidities in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kallweit, Ulf; Werth, Esther; Seiz, Angela; Sefidan, Sandra; Dahmen, Norbert; Manconi, Mauro; Ehlert, Ulrike; Bassetti, Claudio L A

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sleep disorder with frequent (39%) coexisting psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with any psychiatric comorbidity had fewer periodic leg movements in sleep. Psychiatric disorders should be taken into account in patients with RLS. PMID:27019065

  14. Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters Updated:Jul 24,2014 Metabolic syndrome may be ... Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • Your Risk for Metabolic Syndrome • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Prevention & ...

  15. Preexcitation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2016-03-01

    The classic electrocardiogram in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by a short PR interval and prolonged QRS duration in the presence of sinus rhythm with initial slurring. The clinical syndrome associated with above electrocardiogram finding and the history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is referred to as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Various eponyms describing accessory or anomalous conduction pathways in addition to the normal pathway are collectively referred to as preexcitation syndromes. The latter form and associated eponyms are frequently used in literature despite controversy and disagreements over their actual anatomical existence and electrophysiological significance. This communication highlights inherent deficiencies in the knowledge that has existed since the use of such eponyms began. With the advent of curative ablation, initially surgical, and then catheter based, the knowledge gaps have been mostly filled with better delineation of the anatomic and electrophysiological properties of anomalous atrioventricular pathways. It seems reasonable, therefore, to revisit the clinical and electrophysiologic role of preexcitation syndromes in current practice. PMID:26897561

  16. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Crowther, Mark; Branch, Ware; Khamashta, Munther A

    2010-10-30

    The antiphospholipid syndrome causes venous, arterial, and small-vessel thrombosis; pregnancy loss; and preterm delivery for patients with severe pre-eclampsia or placental insufficiency. Other clinical manifestations are cardiac valvular disease, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, and cognitive impairment. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote activation of endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets; and overproduction of tissue factor and thromboxane A2. Complement activation might have a central pathogenetic role. Of the different antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant is the strongest predictor of features related to antiphospholipid syndrome. Therapy of thrombosis is based on long-term oral anticoagulation and patients with arterial events should be treated aggressively. Primary thromboprophylaxis is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and probably in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome. Obstetric care is based on combined medical-obstetric high-risk management and treatment with aspirin and heparin. Hydroxychloroquine is a potential additional treatment for this syndrome. Possible future therapies for non-pregnant patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are statins, rituximab, and new anticoagulant drugs. PMID:20822807

  17. Obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galarza-Maldonado, Claudio; Kourilovitch, Maria R; Pérez-Fernández, Oscar M; Gaybor, Mariana; Cordero, Christian; Cabrera, Sonia; Soroka, Nikolai F

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in pregnancy has a serious impact on maternal and fetal morbidity. It causes recurrent pregnancy miscarriage and it is associated with other adverse obstetric findings like preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome and others. The 2006 revised criteria, which is still valid, is used for APS classification. Epidemiology of obstetric APS varies from one population group to another largely due to different inclusion criteria and lack of standardization of antibody detection methods. Treatment is still controversial. This topic should include a multidisciplinary team and should be individualized. Success here is based on strict control and monitoring throughout pregnancy and even in the preconception and postpartum periods. Further research in this field and unification of criteria are required to yield better therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:22001418

  18. [Pregnancy and antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costedoat-Chalumeau, N; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Leguern, V; Leroux, G; Le Thi Huong, D; Wechsler, B; Morel, N; Vauthier-Brouzes, D; Dommergues, M; Cornet, A; Aumaître, O; Pourrat, O; Piette, J-C; Nizard, J

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is associated with a risk of obstetrical complications, affecting both the mother and the fetus. Obstetrical APS is defined by a history of three consecutive spontaneous miscarriages before 10 weeks of gestation (WG), an intra-uterine fetal death after 10 WG, or a premature birth before 34 WG because of severe pre-eclampsia, eclampsia or placental adverse outcomes (intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios). Pregnancy in women with a diagnosis of obstetric APS is at increased risk for placental abruption, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet count) syndrome and thrombosis that may be part of a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). A previous thrombosis and the presence of a lupus anticoagulant are risk factors for pregnancy failure. A multidisciplinary approach, associating the internist, the anesthesiologist and the obstetrician, is recommended for these high-risk pregnancies. Preconception counseling is proposed to identify pregnancy contraindications, and to define and adapt the treatment prior and during the upcoming pregnancy. Heparin and low-dose aspirin are the main treatments. The choice between therapeutic or prophylactic doses of heparin will depend on the patient's medical history. The anticoagulant therapeutic window for delivery should be as narrow as possible and adapted to maternal thrombotic risk. There is a persistent maternal risk in the postpartum period (thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, CAPS) justifying an antithrombotic coverage during this period. We suggest a monthly clinical and biological monitoring which can be more frequent towards the end of pregnancy. The persistence of notches at the Doppler-ultrasound evaluation seems to be the best predictor for a higher risk of placental vascular complications. Treatment optimization and multidisciplinary antenatal care improve the prognosis of pregnancies in women with obstetric APS, leading to a favorable outcome most of the time. PMID

  19. Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Singla, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a condition characterized by thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and bacteremia caused by primarily anaerobic organisms, following a recent oropharyngeal infection. This has been an uncommon illness in the era of antibiotic therapy, though it has been reported with increasing frequency in the past 15 years. Lemierre's syndrome should be suspected in young healthy patients with prolonged symptoms of pharyngitis followed by symptoms of septicemia or pneumonia, or an atypical lateral neck pain. Diagnosis is often confirmed by identification of thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and growth of anaerobic bacteria on blood culture. Treatment involves prolonged antibiotic therapy occasionally combined with anticoagulation. We review the literature and a case of a child with Lemierre's syndrome. PMID:24152679

  20. [Kallmann syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mokosch, A; Bernecker, C; Willenberg, H S; Neumann, N J

    2011-10-01

    The Kallmann syndrome is a very rare congenital association of gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and hyposmia or anosmia. Clinically it is characterized by low serum concentrations of testosterone and inadequate low levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone as well as incomplete sexual maturation, lack of secondary sexual features (facial and body hair growth, deepening of the voice), micropenis and sometimes even cryptorchidism. The reduced or absent sense of smell is typical for the Kallmann syndrome and distinguishes this syndrome from other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Additional findings may include synkinesia, hearing loss, unilateral renal aplasia, brachy- or syndactyly, agenesis of corpus callosum, cleft palate and dental agenesis. A 19-year-old man presented to our male infertility clinic with delayed sexual maturation, eunuchoid habitus, micropenis, cryptorchidism, erectile dysfunction and absence of ejaculation, anemia and osteoporosis as well as low serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone in combination with hyposmia. PMID:21918848

  1. SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cotten, A; Flipo, R M; Mentre, A; Delaporte, E; Duquesnoy, B; Chastanet, P

    1995-09-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne are sometimes associated with peculiar aseptic skeletal conditions, but such skeletal lesions can be found without skin lesions. The term SAPHO syndrome has been coined for this cluster of manifestations. (The acronym SAPHO refers to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis.) The most common site of the disease is the upper anterior chest wall, characterized by predominantly osteosclerotic lesions, hyperostosis, and arthritis of the adjacent joints. Osteosclerosis of the vertebral bodies, hyperostosis, and erosions of the vertebral plates can be encountered. Unilateral sacroiliitis is frequently observed. Long bone involvement consists of osteosclerosis or osteolysis with periosteal new bone formation. Peripheral arthritis can be present but is rarely associated with joint destruction. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains unknown, but a link with seronegative spondyloarthropathies is probable. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual syndrome to avoid misdiagnosis (eg, tumor, infection), unnecessary surgery, and antibiotic therapy. PMID:7501856

  2. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  3. Imaging manifestations of a dreaded obstetric complication in the immediate postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Zarghouni, Mehrzad; Cannon, Walter

    2014-01-01

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet) syndrome is a dreaded complication that may develop during pregnancy or in the immediate postpartum period. Rarely this syndrome manifests itself with imaging findings. We report a case of HELLP syndrome in which the diagnosis was reaffirmed via imaging findings. PMID:24688204

  4. [Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G; Hansen, Peter Bo; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-04-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:19416617

  5. Prenatal Testing for Intellectual Disability: Misperceptions and Reality with Lessons from down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acharya, Kruti

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In the United States, it is recommended that prenatal testing for Down syndrome be offered to all women. Because of this policy and consequent public perception, having Down syndrome has become a disadvantage in the prenatal period. However, in the postnatal period, there may be…

  6. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26118429

  7. Dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, O L; Méhes, K

    1986-01-01

    Four children including two siblings with Dubowitz syndrome are presented. All four were preterm or small-for-dates. On the basis of their symptoms, it is suggested that infantile eczema is not an essential sign of the disorder, whereas the high frequency of hernia, strabism and upward slant of the palpebral fissures is underestimated in the literature. PMID:3730185

  8. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also possible that many genes with smaller effects and environmental factors may play a role in the development ... Publication No. 12-2163 Back to Tourette Syndrome Information Page See a list ... by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  9. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... get worse and be harmful to both the mother and child. Your health care provider may induce labor by ... treatment, a small number of women die. The death rate among babies born to mothers with HELLP syndrome depends on birth weight and ...

  10. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... binding protein 2 (MeCP2), which is needed for brain development and acts as one of the many biochemical ... the following criteria do not have Rett syndrome: brain injury secondary to ... abnormal psychomotor development in the first 6 months of life. Is ...

  11. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... organizations can help kids learn how to explain tics to others. How Should I Act Around Someone Who Has It? Kids who have Tourette syndrome want to be treated like everybody else. They can do regular stuff, just like other kids. In fact, Tim Howard grew up to be a soccer star. ...

  12. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  13. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you already have metabolic syndrome, making these healthy lifestyle choices can help reduce your risk of heart disease and other health problems. If lifestyle changes alone can’t control your ... to help. Maintain a healthy weight Your doctor can measure your body mass ...

  14. Reye's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis and medical treatment of RS. NIH Patient Recruitment for Reye's Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical ... Drug Administration (FDA) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane, CDER-HFD-240 Rockville, MD ... Privacy Statement NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ®

  15. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot ... > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A A Text Size ...

  16. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hearing test Slit-lamp eye exam Skin fibroblast culture X-rays of the long bones, ribs, and spine People with Morquio syndrome should have MRI of the lower skull and upper neck to determine if their upper vertebrae are underdeveloped.

  17. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary. PMID:25260820

  18. [Refeeding syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it. PMID:27088791

  19. Influence of advancing age on clinical presentation, treatment efficacy and safety, and long-term outcome of pre-excitation syndromes: a retrospective cohort study of 961 patients included over a 25-year period

    PubMed Central

    Brembilla-Perrot, Béatrice; Olivier, Arnaud; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Manenti, Vladimir; Brembilla, Alice; Villemin, Thibaut; Admant, Philippe; Beurrier, Daniel; Bozec, Erwan; Girerd, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There are very little data on pre-excitation syndrome (PS) in the elderly. We investigated the influence of advancing age on clinical presentation, treatment and long-term outcome of PS. Setting Single-centre retrospective study of patient files. Participants In all, 961 patients (72 patients ≥60 years (mean 68.5±6), 889 patients <60 years (mean 30.5±14)) referred for overt pre-excitation and indication for electrophysiological study (EPS) were followed for 5.3±5 years. Usual care included 24 h Holter monitoring, echocardiography and EPS. Patients underwent accessory pathway (AP) ablation if necessary. Primary and secondary outcome measures Occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) or procedure-induced adverse event. Results Electrophysiological data and recourse to AP ablation (43% vs 48.5%, p=0.375) did not significantly differ between the groups. Older patients more often had symptomatic forms (81% vs 63%, p=0.003), history of spontaneous AF (8% vs 3%, p=0.01) or adverse presentation (poorly tolerated arrhythmias: 18% vs 7%, p=0.0009). In multivariable analysis, patients ≥60 years had a significantly higher risk of history of AF (OR=4.2, 2.1 to 8.3, p=0.001) and poorly tolerated arrhythmias (OR=3.8, 1.8 to 8.1, p=0.001). Age ≥60 years was associated with an increased major AP ablation complication risk (10% vs 1.9%, p=0.006). During follow-up, occurrence of AF (13.9% vs 3.6%, p<0.001) and incidence of poorly tolerated tachycardia (4.2% vs 0.6%, p=0.001) were more frequent in patients ≥60 years, although frequency of ablation failure or recurrence was similar (20% vs 15.5%, p=0.52). In multivariable analysis, patients ≥60 years had a significantly higher risk of AF (OR=2.9, 1.2 to 6.8, p≤0.01). Conclusions In this retrospective monocentre study, patients ≥60 years referred for PS work up appeared at higher risk of AF and adverse presentation, both prior and after the work up. These results suggest that, in elderly

  20. Andersen-Tawil Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew H; Fish, Frank A; Kannankeril, Prince J

    2006-01-01

    Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) is a rare condition consisting of ventricular arrhythmias, periodic paralysis, and dysmorphic features. In 2001, mutations in KCNJ2, which encodes the a subunit of the potassium channel Kir2.1, were identified in patients with ATS. To date, KCNJ2 is the only gene implicated in ATS, accounting for approximately 60% of cases. ATS is a unique channelopathy, and represents the first link between cardiac and skeletal muscle excitability. The arrhythmias observed in ATS are distinctive; patients may be asymptomatic, or minimally symptomatic despite a high arrhythmia burden with frequent ventricular ectopy and bidirectional ventricular tachycardia. However, patients remain at risk for life-threatening arrhythmias, including torsades de pointes and ventricular fibrillation, albeit less commonly than observed in other genetic arrhythmia syndromes. The characteristic heterogeneity at both the genotypic and phenotypic levels contribute to the continued difficulties with appropriate diagnosis, risk stratification, and effective therapy. The initial recognition of a syndromic association of clinically diverse symptoms, and the subsequent identification of the underlying molecular genetic basis of ATS has enhanced both clinical care, and our understanding of the critical function of Kir2.1 on skeletal muscle excitability and cardiac action potential. PMID:16943893

  1. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  2. A Male with Cooccurrence of Down Syndrome and Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tovi; Buterbaugh, Allison; Love, Kaitlin; Visootsak, Jeannie

    2013-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common identifiable genetic cause of intellectual disability, with a unique physical gestalt that makes diagnosis possible during the newborn period. However, the physical characteristics of Fragile X syndrome are fairly subtle, resulting in the first clinical suspicion often arising from delayed developmental milestones. In addition, maladaptive behavior and autistic-like tendencies, such as hand flapping, poor eye contact, and hand biting, may be noted in Fragile X syndrome but are not as commonly observed in Down syndrome. Recognition of a potential secondary diagnosis, such as Fragile X syndrome, in individuals with Down syndrome is critical because there have been advances in targeted pharmacologic treatments for both conditions. Thus, an accurate diagnosis has implications in improving the individual's quality of life. PMID:24083039

  3. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  4. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chamot, A M; Kahn, M F

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence of musculoskeletal manifestations (including synovitis, chest wall arthroosteitis and multifocal osteomyelitis) in association with severe acne, palmoplantar pustulosis and perhaps with some presentations of psoriasis, have been described by many authors in the past 30 years. These different multifaceted descriptions have been designated by a variety of terms. More recently, a possible link between these conditions and spondarthritides has also been underlined by a slightly increased prevalence of HLA B27 and occasional occurrences of sacroiliitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease and possibly psoriasis. An acronym, the SAPHO syndrome (which stands for Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis Hyperostosis and Osteitis) is proposed for this group of diseases because of the similarity of musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with severe acne and pustulosis. The clinical, epidemiological, pathophysiological, immunogenetic and diagnostic aspects, as well as the management of this syndrome are reviewed. PMID:7975935

  5. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  6. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:pages 391-391. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: etiology, diagnosis, management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  7. Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Gilles; Heidenreich, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    Animals presenting with brachycephalic syndrome suffer from multilevel obstruction of the airways as well as secondary structural collapse. Stenotic nares, aberrant turbinates, nasopharyngeal collapse, soft palate elongation and hyperplasia, laryngeal collapse, and left bronchus collapse are being described as the most common associated anomalies. Rhinoplasty and palatoplasty as well as newer surgical techniques and postoperative care strategies have resulted in significant improvement of the prognosis even in middle-aged dogs. PMID:27012936

  8. Guillain Barre syndrome in an HIV-1-infected patient after the beginning of combined antiretroviral therapy: an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Digiulio, Maria Anna; Cavallari, Eugenio Nelson; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-associated Guillan-Barre syndrome (hGBS) is an ascendant progressive polyradiculoneuropathy described throughout the course of the viral disease, mainly associated with the acute retroviral syndrome. HGBS is occasionally described in severely immunocompromised subjects in the context of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. The case described occurred soon after the start of a combined antiretroviral treatment in an HIV-1 infected patient with ulcerative colitis in the absence of severe immunosuppression. This manifestation may be interpreted as an uncommon appearance of an immune reconstitution syndrome in the presence of a predisposing autoimmune pathology. PMID:24531178

  9. Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    ANTZELEVITCH, CHARLES

    2007-01-01

    First introduced as a new clinical entity in 1992, the Brugada syndrome is associated with a relatively high risk of sudden death in young adults, and occasionally in children and infants. Recent years have witnessed a striking proliferation of papers dealing with the clinical and basic aspects of the disease. Characterized by a coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads of the electrocardiogram (ECG), the Brugada syndrome has a genetic basis that thus far has been linked only to mutations in SCN5A, the gene that encodes the α-subunit of the sodium channel. The Brugada ECG is often concealed, but can be unmasked or modulated by a number of drugs and pathophysiological states including sodium channel blockers, a febrile state, vagotonic agents, tricyclic antidepressants, as well as cocaine and propranolol intoxication. Average age at the time of initial diagnosis or sudden death is 40 ± 22, with the youngest patient diagnosed at 2 days of age and the oldest at 84 years. This review provides an overview of the clinical, genetic, molecular, and cellular aspects of the Brugada syndrome, incorporating the results of two recent consensus conferences. Controversies with regard to risk stratification and newly proposed pharmacologic strategies are discussed. PMID:17038146

  10. Roberts syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoshan; Lu, Shuai; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    All living organisms must go through cycles of replicating their genetic information and then dividing the copies between two new cells. This cyclical process, in cells from bacteria and human alike, requires a protein complex known as cohesin. Cohesin is a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complex. While bacteria have one form of this complex, yeast have several SMC complexes, and humans have at least a dozen cohesin complexes alone. Therefore the ancient structure and function of SMC complexes has been both conserved and specialized over the course of evolution. These complexes play roles in replication, repair, organization, and segregation of the genome. Mutations in the genes that encode cohesin and its regulatory factors are associated with developmental disorders such as Roberts syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, and cancer. In this review, we focus on how acetylation of cohesin contributes to its function. In Roberts syndrome, the lack of cohesin acetylation contributes to nucleolar defects and translational inhibition. An understanding of basic SMC complex function will be essential to unraveling the molecular etiology of human diseases associated with defective SMC function. PMID:25054091