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Sample records for 1-associated periodic syndrome

  1. Falling into TRAPS – receptor misfolding in the TNF receptor 1-associated periodic fever syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kimberley, Fiona C; Lobito, Adrian A; Siegel, Richard M; Screaton, Gavin R

    2007-01-01

    TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a dominantly inherited disease caused by missense mutations in the TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) gene. Patients suffer from periodic bouts of severe abdominal pain, localised inflammation, migratory rashes, and fever. More than 40 individual mutations have been identified, all of which occur in the extracellular domain of TNFR1. In the present review we discuss new findings describing aberrant trafficking and function of TNFR1 harbouring TRAPS mutations, challenging the hypothesis that TRAPS pathology is driven by defective receptor shedding, and we suggest that TNFR1 might acquire novel functions in the endoplasmic reticulum, distinct from its role as a cell surface receptor. We also describe the clinical manifestations of TRAPS, current treatment regimens, and the widening array of patient mutations. PMID:17666110

  2. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1-associated periodic syndrome without fever: cytokine profile before and during etanercept treatment.

    PubMed

    Morbach, H; Richl, P; Stojanov, S; Lohse, P; Girschick, Hermann J

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study are autoinflammatory syndromes which are usually characterized by repeated attacks of fever, especially in children. The presentation of these diseases, however, varies between entities and between patients of a particular syndrome. We report a 16-year-old female patient, who suffered from periodic erythema and myositis/fasciitis. She experienced at least nine attacks of dermatitis and myositis, while no fever episodes were noted over a 3-year period. A delay of puberty with amenorrhea and a short stature were also present. Laboratory investigations consistently showed markedly increased inflammatory parameters (especially a high serum amyloid A) and dysproteinemia. Because the patient′s mother complained about chronic and periodic abdominal pain with also persistently elevated inflammatory parameters, the differential diagnosis included hereditary disorders resulting in chronic inflammation. The diagnosis of an inherited tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) 1-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) was confirmed by genetic analyses. Long-term anti-inflammatory treatment with etanercept resulted in a significant clinical improvement and reduction of the inflammatory parameters ESR, CRP, interleukin-6, TNF-α, and soluble TNF-α receptor 1, but not of interleukin-12. Monitoring of the cytokine profile suggested partial effectiveness of etanercept in the treatment of TRAPS. Hereditary fever syndromes have to be considered in case of chronic unexplained inflammation even if fever is no presenting symptom. PMID:19381634

  3. Duplication and Deletion of CFC1 Associated with Heterotaxy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruixue; Long, Fei; Wang, Liping; Xu, Yuejuan; Guo, Ying; Li, Fen; Chen, Sun; Sun, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Heterotaxy syndrome, which causes significant morbidity and mortality, is a class of congenital disorders, in which normal left–right asymmetry cannot be properly established. To explore the role of copy number variants (CNVs) in the occurrence of heterotaxy syndrome, we recruited 93 heterotaxy patients and studied 12 of them by the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array. The results were confirmed in the remaining 81 patients and 500 healthy children by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The analysis of the SNP6.0 array showed a duplication of chromosome 2q21.1, which was verified by qPCR. The result of qPCR in the other 81 patients showed that 8/81 patients had the CNVs of 2q21.1 and the only overlapping gene in these patients is CFC1. However, in the 500 healthy children, only one carried the duplication of CFC1 (p=3.5×10−7). The duplication and deletion of CFC1 may play key roles in the occurrence of heterotaxy syndrome. Moreover, the transposed great arteries, double outlet right ventricle, single atrium, and single ventricle may share a common genetic etiology with the heterotaxy syndrome. PMID:25423076

  4. Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Posch, Christian; Kaulfersch, Wilhelm; Rappersberger, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) are characterized by apparently unprovoked attacks of fever, rashes, and musculoskeletal and sensorineural inflammation accompanied by high acute-phase reactants. Excessive interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling appears to be a constant feature in the pathomechanism of the disease, driven by a gain-of-function mutation in the NLRP3 gene. Herein, we present the case of a 9-month-old boy with recurrent nonpruritic rashes and episodes of fever. The difficulties of early diagnosis due to initially mild clinical symptoms and the dramatic response to anti-IL-1 therapy after diagnosis emphasize the practical relevance of considering CAPS as a differential diagnosis in these patients. PMID:22891689

  5. Silent period in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Resende, L A; Alves, R P; Castro, H A; Kimaid, P A; Fortinguerra, C R; Schelp, A O

    2000-01-01

    The silent period is a misunderstood electrophysiological phenomenon leading to several different hypotheses explaining its electrogenesis. It has been studied by different authors and different methodologies giving a wide variability of results, therefore an exact pattern of its normal values does not exist. This work was undertaken to define the normal morphology and duration of the silent period obtained by supramaximal stimulus of the median nerve, during maximum isometric effort of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle against resistance, using 20 adult volunteers without neurological alterations. The normal median duration was 104.6 milliseconds. The same methodology was applied to 20 hands from 20 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome. The silent period showed many types of morphological alterations, but the major alteration observed was a tendency to temporal elongation. No correlation between the severity of the carpal tunnel syndrome and the silent period alterations were observed. PMID:10782355

  6. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Manual of Health Quizzes Self-Assessment Tools Tables Common Medical ... Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Sleep Disorders Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome ( ...

  7. [Genetic syndromes recognizable in the neonatal period].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a neonatal neurological lesion associated or not with dysmorphism or with a particular phenotype can be caused by a) prenatal infections (Group TORCH) toxic or teratotoxic agents (alcohol, cocain, antiepileptics, inhalants such as toluene, etc.), vascular defects or genetic anomalies; b) perinatal isquemic hypoxic lesions, infectious or metabolic disorders, etc. In this paper we analyze all entities of genetic origin neonatally recognizable by their phenotype which must be included in the differential diagnosis of all children neurologically compromised. In order to simplify the diagnosis, these entities will be divided according to the prevalence of the phenotype present at birth, dividing them into two large groups: 1) Genic alterations which include: Syndromes with characteristic facies and member malformations, Supra growth syndrome, Syndrome with neonatal growth deficit, Neuro-ectodermic syndromes, Syndromes with characteristic facies and ocular compromise, Syndromes with characteristic facies including those that bear MIM number, and 2) Chromosomal alterations (autosomal in number, mosaic, deletion, and sex chromosomes). The detection of these anomalies through phenotype studies involving congenital encephalopathies of genetic origin is of major importance because it will permit the orientation of specific diagnostic studies, the prevention of difficult and expensive maneuvers, and furthermore, it will offer adequate family counseling and control eventual complications. PMID:19239999

  8. Measuring the rotation periods of 4-10 Myr T-Tauri stars in the Orion OB1 association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanveer Karim, Md; Stassun, Keivan; Briceno, Cesar; Vivas, Kathy; Raetz, Stefanie; Calvet, Nuria; Mateu, Cecilia; Downes, Juan Jose; Hernandez, Jesus; Neuhäuser, Ralph; Mugrauer, Markus; Takahashi, Hidenori; Tachihara, Kengo; Chini, Rolf; YETI

    2016-01-01

    Most existing studies of young stellar populations have focused on the youngest (< 2-3 Myr) T-Tauri stars, which are usually associated with their natal gas and hence easier to identify. In contrast, older T-Tauri stars (~ 4-10 Myr), being more difficult to find, have been less studied, even though they hold key insight to understanding evolution of lower-mass (0.1-2 M⊙) stars and of protoplanetary discs. We present a study of photometric variability of 1974 confirmed 4-10 Myr old T-Tauri stars in the Orion OB1 association using optical time-series from three different surveys: the Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía-Quest Equatorial Survey Team (CIDA-QUEST), the Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (YETI) and from a Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) campaign. We investigated stellar rotation periods according to the type of stars (Classical or Weak-lined T-Tauri stars) and their locations, to look for population-wide trends. We detected 563 periodic variables and 1411 non-periodic variables by investigating the light curves of these stars. We find that ~ 30% of Weak-line T-Tauri stars (WTTS) and ~ 20% of Classical T-Tauri stars (CTTS) are periodic. Though we did not find any noticeable difference in rotation period between CTTS and WTTS, our study does show a change in the overall rotation periods of stars 4-10 Myr old, consistent with predictions of angular momentum evolution models, an important constraint for theoretical models for an age range for which no similar data existed.

  9. SURF1-associated Leigh syndrome: a case series and novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inn-Chi; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Wang, Jing; Li, Fang-Yuan; Weng, Shao-Wen; Craigen, William J; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2012-08-01

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a mitochondrial disease that typically presents in infancy with subacute neurodegenerative encephalopathy. It is genetically heterogeneous, but mutations in the complex IV assembly genes, particularly SURF1, are an important cause. In this study, SURF1 gene was sequenced in 590 patients with clinical suspicion of LS, complex IV deficiency, or clinical features of mitochondrial disorders. We identified 21 patients with clinical features of LS who are either homozygous or compound heterozygous for SURF1 mutations. Twenty-two different mutations were identified, including 13 novel mutations. Of the 42 mutant alleles, 36 (86%) are null mutations (frameshift, splicing, or nonsense) and 6 (14%) are missense. We have also reviewed the previously reported SURF1 mutations and observed a clustering of mutation in exon 8 of SURF1, suggesting a vital function for this region. Although mutations in SURF1 have been mainly associated with typical LS, five of the patients in this report had an atypical course of LS. There is no definite genotype-phenotype correlation; however, frameshift mutations resulting in protein truncation closer to the C-terminus may carry a better prognosis. PMID:22488715

  10. Babinski-Nageotte Syndrome Diagnosed in Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Oruç, Serdar; Demirbaş, Hayri; Güzel, Abdullah; Beker Acay, Mehtap; Yaman, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Babinski-Nageotte Syndrome (BNS) is one of the brainstem syndromes characterized by muscle weakness in the opposite half of the body with classic Wallenberg findings. According to our literature survey, only a few cases have been reported and none of them was in the postpartum period. We report a case of a typical BNS in a postpartum woman with an ischemic lesion in the medulla oblongata shown on magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26989533

  11. Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes: Otolaryngologic and Audiologic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Neda; Brewer, Carmen C.; Zalewski, Christopher; King, Kelly A.; Butman, John A.; Plass, Nicole; Henderson, Cailin; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Kim, H. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) represent a spectrum of CIAS1 gene-mediated autoinflammatory diseases characterized by recurrent systemic inflammation. The clinical spectrum of CAPS varies from mild to severe and includes the syndromes historically described as familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID). This article presents the largest cohort of patients with CAPS. The objective is to describe the pathogenesis, otolaryngologic, and audiologic manifestations of CAPS. Study Design Prospective (2003–2009). Setting National Institutes of Health. Subjects and Methods Fifty-seven patients with a diagnosis of CAPS were identified (31 NOMID, 11 NOMID/MWS, 9 MWS, and 6 FCAS). Comprehensive data regarding clinical manifestations, audiologic phenotype, and fluid attenuation inversion recovery MRI (FLAIR-MRI) of the brain and inner ear were obtained. Results Complete audiologic data obtained on 70% of ears revealed conductive hearing loss in 4 (11%) NOMID ears and mixed hearing loss in 5 (13%) NOMID and 2 (14%) NOMID/MWS ears. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), worse in higher frequencies, was the most common type of hearing loss and was present in 23 (61%) NOMID, 10 (71%) NOMID/MWS, and 4 (33%) MWS ears. All of the patients with FCAS had normal hearing except 2, who had SNHL from 4 to 8 kHz. On FLAIR-MRI sequence, cochlear enhancement was noted in 26 of 29 (90%) NOMID, 6 of 11 (55%) NOMID/MWS, 3 of 9 (33%) MWS, and 1 of 6 (17%) FCAS patients and was significantly associated with the presence of hearing loss. Maxillary sinus hypoplasia and mucosal thickening were found in 39% and 86% of the cohort, respectively. Conclusion CIAS1 pathway–mediated CAPS is associated with unregulated autoinflammation mediated by interleukin-1 in the cochlea and hearing loss. Timely diagnosis is crucial to initiate early treatment with interleukin-1 receptor antagonists. PMID:21493283

  12. Recurrent Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis Unmasks Sjogren Syndrome without Sicca Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Min; Huang, Neng-Chyan; Wann, Shue-Ren; Chang, Yun-Te; Wang, Jyh-Seng

    2015-04-01

    Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis (HPP) may occur as a rare complication of Sjogren Syndrome (SS) and Renal Tubular Acidosis (RTA). A 64-year male patient came with HPP, and was later diagnosed with distal RTA. The patient, who had no xerostomia and xerophthalmia, was diagnosed with primary SS from serologic and histologic findings of minor salivary gland biopsy. The patient recovered after potassium replacement therapy. Renal biopsy was also performed and revealed evidence of tubulointerstitial nephritis. Corticosteroids were administered and there was no recurrence of HPP during a 4-year follow-up period. The case highlights the significance of acute hypokalemia management in emergency department as it can unmask SS even if the SS is not associated with sicca symptoms. Hypokalemic paralysis associated with normal anion gap metabolic acidosis should prompt toward the diagnosis of SS. PMID:25933458

  13. Surf1, associated with Leigh syndrome in humans, is a heme-binding protein in bacterial oxidase biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Freya A; Hannappel, Achim; Anderka, Oliver; Ludwig, Bernd

    2009-09-18

    Biogenesis of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) relies on a large number of assembly factors, among them the transmembrane protein Surf1. The loss of human Surf1 function is associated with Leigh syndrome, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by severe COX deficiency. In the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans, two homologous proteins, Surf1c and Surf1q, were identified, which we characterize in the present study. When coexpressed in Escherichia coli together with enzymes for heme a synthesis, the bacterial Surf1 proteins bind heme a in vivo. Using redox difference spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry, the binding of the heme cofactor to purified apo-Surf1c and apo-Surf1q is quantified: Each of the Paracoccus proteins binds heme a in a 1:1 stoichiometry and with Kd values in the submicromolar range. In addition, we identify a conserved histidine as a residue crucial for heme binding. Contrary to most earlier concepts, these data support a direct role of Surf1 in heme a cofactor insertion into COX subunit I by providing a protein-bound heme a pool. PMID:19625251

  14. Mutations in AP3D1 associated with immunodeficiency and seizures define a new type of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Sandra; Schulz, Ansgar; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Dieckmann, Nele M G; Niethammer, Klaus; Fuchs, Sebastian; Eckl, Katja Martina; Plank, Roswitha; Werner, Roland; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Bank, Julia; Strauss, Anne; von Bernuth, Horst; Zur Stadt, Udo; Grieve, Samantha; Griffiths, Gillian M; Lehmberg, Kai; Hennies, Hans Christian; Ehl, Stephan

    2016-02-25

    Genetic disorders affecting biogenesis and transport of lysosome-related organelles are heterogeneous diseases frequently associated with albinism. We studied a patient with albinism, neutropenia, immunodeficiency, neurodevelopmental delay, generalized seizures, and impaired hearing but with no mutation in genes so far associated with albinism and immunodeficiency. Whole exome sequencing identified a homozygous mutation in AP3D1 that leads to destabilization of the adaptor protein 3 (AP3) complex. AP3 complex formation and the degranulation defect in patient T cells were restored by retroviral reconstitution. A previously described hypopigmented mouse mutant with an Ap3d1 null mutation (mocha strain) shares the neurologic phenotype with our patient and shows a platelet storage pool deficiency characteristic of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) that was not studied in our patient because of a lack of bleeding. HPS2 caused by mutations in AP3B1A leads to a highly overlapping phenotype without the neurologic symptoms. The AP3 complex exists in a ubiquitous and a neuronal form. AP3D1 codes for the AP3δ subunit of the complex, which is essential for both forms. In contrast, the AP3β3A subunit, affected in HPS2 patients, is substituted by AP3β3B in the neuron-specific heterotetramer. AP3δ deficiency thus causes a severe neurologic disorder with immunodeficiency and albinism that we propose to classify as HPS10. PMID:26744459

  15. Neonatal Bartter syndrome--use of indomethacin in the newborn period and prevention of growth failure.

    PubMed

    Mackie, F E; Hodson, E M; Roy, L P; Knight, J F

    1996-12-01

    Neonatal Bartter syndrome differs from the classical Bartter syndrome in the occurrence of antenatal presentation with polyhydramnios. Nephrocalcinosis and severe growth retardation are common sequelae. Indomethacin has been reported to improve linear growth, but its use in the early newborn period has been infrequently described. In this paper we report normal growth and development and the absence of nephrocalcinosis in an infant now aged 19 months with neonatal Bartter syndrome treated from day 3 of life with indomethacin. With early diagnosis and treatment with indomethacin plus adequate water, calories, and sodium, normal growth can be achieved and nephrocalcinosis may be prevented in children with neonatal Bartter syndrome. PMID:8971899

  16. Periodic Limb Movement Disorder (PLMD) and Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... caffeine or stimulant drugs) or certain antidepressants Have iron deficiency Have anemia Are pregnant Have a severe chronic kidney or liver disorder Have diabetes Have a neurologic disorder, such as multiple sclerosis or Parkinson disease Symptoms Both periodic limb movement ...

  17. Periodic fever syndromes in Eastern and Central European countries: results of a pediatric multinational survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze the prevalence of diagnosed and suspected autoinflammatory diseases in Eastern and Central European (ECE) countries, with a particular interest on the diagnostic facilities in these countries. Methods Two different strategies were used to collect data on patients with periodic fever syndromes from ECE countries- the Eurofever survey and collection of data with the structured questionnaire. Results Data from 35 centers in 14 ECE countries were collected. All together there were 11 patients reported with genetically confirmed familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), 14 with mevalonate-kinase deficiency (MKD), 11 with tumor necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and 4 with chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (CINCA). Significantly higher numbers were reported for suspected cases which were not genetically tested. All together there were 49 suspected FMF patients reported, 24 MKD, 16 TRAPS, 7 CINCA and 2 suspected Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) patients. Conclusions The number of genetically confirmed patients with periodic fever syndromes in ECE countries is very low. In order to identify more patients in the future, it is important to organize educational programs for increasing the knowledge on these diseases and to establish a network for genetic testing of periodic fever syndromes in ECE countries. PMID:21539753

  18. Incidence of Down's syndrome in a large Malaysian maternity hospital over an 18 month period.

    PubMed

    Hoe, T S; Boo, N Y; Clyde, M M

    1989-06-01

    Over an 18 month period, 34,522 livebirths were delivered in the Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. 36 of them had Down's Syndrome. Based on our findings, the incidence of Down's syndrome among the Malaysian babies born in this hospital was 1:959 livebirths. According to racial distributions, the incidence among Malay was 1:981 livebirths, Chinese 1:940 livebirths, and Indian 1:860 livebirths. Our incidence was lower than those from the Western populations. Unlike others' studies, there was also a female preponderance of Down's syndrome among the Malaysian babies. PMID:2531468

  19. Fetal response to periodic sleep apnea: a new syndrome in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Joel-Cohen, S J; Schoenfeld, A

    1978-04-01

    Periodic sleep apnea, a chronic sleep deprivation state, in which marked changes in the arterial PO2 and PCO2 tensions have been recorded, is a relatively new syndrome not previously reported in pregnancy. It is characterized by episodes of apnea, prevalently obstructive, during sleep. The majority of patients with this syndrome have snored heavily for years, suggesting a causal relationship between snoring and periodic sleep apnea. The effects of prolonged snoring on alveolar ventilation and systemic pressure(s) suggest that this snoring has physiopathological implications on maternal cardio-respiratory reserve and indirectly upon the fetus, especially as there are recordable changes in fetal heart rate and also a change in the acid-base status of the fetus. The possibility that this syndrome may have an adverse effect upon the fetus is stressed. PMID:45501

  20. Complex exercise rehabilitation program for women of the II period of age with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Ok; Olga, Kozyreva

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a complex exercise program integrating Eastern and Western complex exercise rehabilitation programs in order to examine the effects of it on the human body with the subjects for women of the II period of mature age with metabolic syndrome. The subjects of this study are 60 II period of mature aged women with metabolic syndrome living in G City, and the experimental group conducted Taekwon-aerobic exercise, European rehabilitation gymnastics, gym ball exercise, and elastic band exercise while the control group performed European rehabilitation gymnastics, gym ball exercise, and elastic band exercise which is the rehabilitation program being presently conducted in Russia, for 90 min per day for three weeks. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was utilized to verify pre and post-intergroup difference, and the significant level was set as P< 0.05. Whereas body weight, % fat, WHR, SBP, DBP and blood glucose were significant decreased, muscle weight and pulse wave velocity were significant increased after complex exercise rehabilitation programs Both Eastern and Western complex exercise rehabilitation programs showed positive effects on the body of the II period of mature aged women with metabolic syndrome, and if various exercise programs are conducted, it will be more effective in improving II period of mature aged women’s metabolic syndrome afterwards. PMID:24278877

  1. Successful management of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome with canakinumab in infancy.

    PubMed

    Kanariou, Maria; Tantou, Sofia; Varela, Ioanna; Raptaki, Maria; Petropoulou, Chrissa; Nikas, Ioannis; Valari, Manthoula

    2014-11-01

    Neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID)/chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome is a rare, early-onset autoinflammatory disorder and the most severe form of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome, which is associated with overproduction of interleukin (IL)-1?. This is a case report of a 70-day-old boy, who was diagnosed with NOMID/CINCA syndrome and who has been treated with anti-IL-1? monoclonal antibody (canakinumab) since then, despite his early infancy. The patient presented with fever, aseptic meningitis, and rash. The clinical manifestations combined with the elevated acute-phase reactants strengthened the suspicion of the diagnosis of NOMID/CINCA syndrome. Specific immunologic workup revealed high levels of serum amyloid A and IL-6. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of a de novo mutation of the CIAS1/NLR3 gene (p.Thr348Met), and canakinumab was started at a dose of 4 mg/kg, higher than the recommended dose for older age. White blood cell, serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, and IL-6 levels quickly decreased and became normal within a month, and the clinical condition of the patient improved significantly. The infant remains without recurrence of disease or further complications and with satisfactory mental development with anti-IL-1? monoclonal antibody treatment for >2 years. This report indicates the importance of early diagnosis of NOMID/CINCA syndrome and medication with IL-1 blockers as soon as possible for the improvement of the prognosis of cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome and of a better patient outcome. PMID:25349319

  2. Changes in Yearly Birth Prevalence Rates of Children with Down Syndrome in the Period 1986-2007 in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Graaf, G.; Haveman, M.; Hochstenbach, R.; Engelen, J.; Gerssen-Schoorl, K.; Poddighe, P.; Smeets, D.; van Hove, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Netherlands are lacking reliable national empirical data in relation to the development of birth prevalence of Down syndrome. Our study aims at assessing valid national live birth prevalence rates for the period 1986-2007. Method: On the basis of the annual child/adult ratio of Down syndrome diagnoses in five out of the eight Dutch…

  3. Changes in Yearly Birth Prevalence Rates of Children with Down Syndrome in the Period 1986-2007 in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Graaf, G.; Haveman, M.; Hochstenbach, R.; Engelen, J.; Gerssen-Schoorl, K.; Poddighe, P.; Smeets, D.; van Hove, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The Netherlands are lacking reliable national empirical data in relation to the development of birth prevalence of Down syndrome. Our study aims at assessing valid national live birth prevalence rates for the period 1986-2007. Method: On the basis of the annual child/adult ratio of Down syndrome diagnoses in five out of the eight Dutch

  4. Changes in metabolic syndrome of Korean children and adolescents in the period 1998 to 2001.

    PubMed

    Lim, S; Jang, H C; Park, K S; Lee, H K; Chung, H R; Joung, H J; Cho, S I

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence and pattern of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents in the interval between the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES) in 1998 and 2001. Two nationwide surveys (KNHANES) were conducted in Korea in 1998 and 2001. A stratified multistage probability sampling design was used to ensure representation of the entire Korean population. The National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III)-derived definition was used for the definition of metabolic syndrome. A total of 1763 (mean age+/-SD of 14.6+/-2.8 yr) and 1245 (14.1+/-2.8 yr) Korean children and adolescents in the age range 10-19 yr participated in the studies of 1998 and 2001, respectively. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in male children and adolescents increased significantly from 5.7% in 1998 to 9.0% in 2001. However, there was no increase in females (5.1% in 1998 and 4.9% in 2001). Of the 5 components of metabolic syndrome, low HDL-cholesterolemia showed the highest increase in males and females during the 3 yr. Hypertriglyceridemia increased next in both genders. In contrast, the proportion of female subjects meeting the fasting glucose criterion decreased over the same period. As dyslipidemia was the principal contributor to the increase in metabolic syndrome in Korean male children and adolescents during the 3 yr, a strategy of dietary pattern change and the encouragement of physical activity should be introduced to these groups at a national level. PMID:18475051

  5. A hepatic cancer patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome during the perioperative period of partial hepatectomy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Su-Dan; Ye, Bin; Liang, Zhi-Jian

    2015-01-01

    We reported a case of hepatic cancer patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome during the perioperative period of partial hepatectomy in the present study. We analyzed the clinical data and described the characteristics of this patient. PMID:26550403

  6. Identification of Multiple Phytotoxins Produced by Fusarium virguliforme Including a Phytotoxic Effector (FvNIS1) Associated With Sudden Death Syndrome Foliar Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao-Xun; Domier, Leslie L; Radwan, Osman; Yendrek, Craig R; Hudson, Matthew E; Hartman, Glen L

    2016-02-01

    Sudden death syndrome (SDS) of soybean is caused by a soilborne pathogen, Fusarium virguliforme. Phytotoxins produced by F. virguliforme are translocated from infected roots to leaves, in which they cause SDS foliar symptoms. In this study, additional putative phytotoxins of F. virguliforme were identified, including three secondary metabolites and 11 effectors. While citrinin, fusaric acid, and radicicol induced foliar chlorosis and wilting, Soybean mosaic virus (SMV)-mediated overexpression of F. virguliforme necrosis-inducing secreted protein 1 (FvNIS1) induced SDS foliar symptoms that mimicked the development of foliar symptoms in the field. The expression level of fvnis1 remained steady over time, although foliar symptoms were delayed compared with the expression levels. SMV::FvNIS1 also displayed genotype-specific toxicity to which 75 of 80 soybean cultivars were susceptible. Genome-wide association mapping further identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms at two loci, where three leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase (LRR-RLK) genes were found. Culture filtrates of fvnis1 knockout mutants displayed a mild reduction in phytotoxicity, indicating that FvNIS1 is one of the phytotoxins responsible for SDS foliar symptoms and may contribute to the quantitative susceptibility of soybean by interacting with the LRR-RLK genes. PMID:26646532

  7. Canakinumab in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome: an update for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Iris

    2013-01-01

    The cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a very rare disease. It is estimated that there are 1–2 cases for every 1 million people in the US and 1 in every 360,000 in France. However, many patients are diagnosed very late or not at all, meaning the real prevalence is likely to be higher. CAPS encompasses the three entities of familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle–Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID)/chronic infantile neurologic, cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome. They have in common a causative mutation in the NLRP3 gene. The altered gene product cryopyrin leads to activation of the inflammasome which in turn is responsible for excessive production of interleukin (IL)-1β. IL-1β causes the inflammatory manifestations in CAPS. These appear as systemic inflammation including fever, headache or fatigue, rash, eye disease, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, musculoskeletal manifestations and central nervous system (CNS) symptoms (NOMID/CINCA only). With the advent of IL-1 Inhibitors, safe and effective therapeutic options became available for this devastating disease. To prevent severe and possible life-threatening disease sequelae, early and correct diagnosis and immediate initiation of therapy are mandatory in most patients. Canakinumab is a fully human monoclonal IgG1 anti-IL-1β antibody. It provides selective and prolonged IL-1β blockade and has demonstrated a rapid (within hours), complete and sustained response in most CAPS patients without any consistent pattern of side effects. Long-term follow-up trials have demonstrated sustained efficacy, safety and tolerability. Canakinumab is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for FCAS and MWS and by European Medicines Agency for treatment of all three phenotypes of CAPS. PMID:24294305

  8. Concurrence of thyrotoxicosis and Gitelman's syndrome-associated hypokalemia-induced periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Teramura-Ikeda, Tomoko; Kudo, Naoko; Kaneda, Shigehiro; Tajima, Toshihiro

    2012-04-01

    A 16-year-old Japanese boy with a history of truancy had been treated at a psychiatric clinic. When the patient was referred to us for hypokalemia-associated paralysis, the diagnosis of thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis was made, common in Asian men. Subsequently, the patient was found to have persistently high plasma renin and aldos-terone levels. Thus, solute carrier family 12 member 3 gene (SLC12A3) analysis was performed. A novel missense homozygous mutation CTC->CAC at codon 858 (L858H) was found for which the patient was homozygous and his non-consanguineous parents heterozygote. These findings indicated that the patient developed hypokalemia-associated paralysis concurrently with thyrotoxicosis and Gitelman's syndrome. This case underscores the importance of careful examinations of adolescents with complaints of truancy as well as of precise determinations of the causes of hypokalemia-associated paralysis. PMID:22802996

  9. Obvious optic disc swelling in a patient with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Mariko; Yoshikawa, Tadanobu; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio; Takahashi, Kanji

    2013-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is a group of rare hereditary autoinflammatory diseases caused by mutations of the NLRP3 gene, and leads to excessive production of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-lβ. A 35-year-old male presented with recurrent symptoms of urticarial-like rash, periodic fever, arthralgia, headache, and eye redness. His best-corrected visual acuity was 1.0 OD and 0.9 OS. Slit-lamp examination showed conjunctival and episcleral injection in both eyes. Ophthalmoscopy revealed obvious bilateral optic disc swelling and retinal vascular sheathing around the optic discs. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography also showed obvious optic disc swelling. Steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs did not improve these symptoms. Genetic testing detected a heterozygous mutation of c.907G>A. Thus, the patient was genetically confirmed with CAPS. Visual acuity did not decrease for 3 years, although the optic discs became white in color. CAPS should therefore be distinguished from other disorders when examining optic disc swelling and/or uveitis patients with urticarial-like rash and periodic fever. PMID:23966762

  10. Tonsillar microbiota in children with PFAPA (periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tejesvi, M V; Uhari, M; Tapiainen, T; Pirttilä, A M; Suokas, M; Lantto, U; Koivunen, P; Renko, M

    2016-06-01

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) is a childhood febrile syndrome of unknown origin that is often cured with tonsillectomy. We aimed to compare the bacterial microbiota of the tonsils removed from PFAPA patients with those of controls. We used next-generation sequencing technology to investigate the bacterial microbiota of the tonsils of 30 PFAPA patients and 24 controls. We found significant differences in the presence and relative abundance of many bacteria between PFAPA cases and controls. For example, cyanobacteria, potential producers of microcystins and other toxins, were more common in the case samples (14/30, 47 %) than in the controls (4/24, 17 %, p = 0.02), and the mean relative abundance of cyanobacteria was higher in the case samples (0.2 %) than in the controls (0.01 %, p = 0.01). Streptococci were present in all samples in both groups, but their mean relative abundance was lower in the case samples (3.7 %) than in the controls (9.6 %, p = 0.01). Typical nasopharyngeal microbes such as fusobacteria, Prevotella, Tannerella, Porphyromonas, and Parvimonas dominated the microbiota of the tonsils in both groups. The microbiota of the tonsils removed from PFAPA patients differed significantly from those of the controls. Tonsillar microbiota may play a role in triggering the inflammatory processes that lead to symptoms of PFAPA. PMID:27025724

  11. Impaired cytokine responses in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    Haverkamp, M H; van de Vosse, E; Goldbach-Mansky, R; Holland, S M

    2014-01-01

    Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) is characterized by dysregulated inflammation with excessive interleukin (IL)-1β activation and secretion. Neonatal-onset multi-system inflammatory disease (NOMID) is the most severe form. We explored cytokine responses in 32 CAPS patients before and after IL-1β blocking therapy. We measured cytokines produced by activated peripheral blood monuclear cells (PBMCs) from treated and untreated CAPS patients after stimulation for 48 h with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), PHA plus IL-12, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or LPS plus interferon (IFN)-γ. We measured IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in the supernatants. PBMCs from three untreated CAPS patients were cultured in the presence of the IL-1β blocker Anakinra. Fifty healthy individuals served as controls. CAPS patients had high spontaneous production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF and IFN-γ by unstimulated cells. However, stimulation indexes (SIs, ratio of stimulated to unstimulated production) of these cytokines to PHA and LPS were low in NOMID patients compared to controls. Unstimulated IL-10 and IL-12p70 production was normal, but up-regulation after PHA and LPS was also low. LPS plus IFN-γ inadequately up-regulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF and IL-10 in CAPS patients. In-vitro but not in-vivo treatment with Anakinra improved SIs by lowering spontaneous cytokine production. However, in-vitro treatment did not improve the low stimulated cytokine levels. Activating mutations in NLRP3 in CAPS are correlated with poor SIs to PHA, LPS and IFN-γ. The impairment in stimulated cytokine responses in spite of IL-1β blocking therapy suggests a broader intrinsic defect in CAPS patients, which is not corrected by targeting IL-1β. PMID:24773462

  12. A pro-inflammatory signalome is constitutively activated by C33Y mutant TNF receptor 1 in TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS).

    PubMed

    Negm, Ola H; Mannsperger, Heiko A; McDermott, Elizabeth M; Drewe, Elizabeth; Powell, Richard J; Todd, Ian; Fairclough, Lucy C; Tighe, Patrick J

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in TNFRSF1A encoding TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) cause the autosomal dominant TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS): a systemic autoinflammatory disorder. Misfolding, intracellular aggregation, and ligand-independent signaling by mutant TNFR1 are central to disease pathophysiology. Our aim was to understand the extent of signaling pathway perturbation in TRAPS. A prototypic mutant TNFR1 (C33Y), and wild-type TNFR1 (WT), were expressed at near physiological levels in an SK-Hep-1 cell model. TNFR1-associated signaling pathway intermediates were examined in this model, and in PBMCs from C33Y TRAPS patients and healthy controls. In C33Y-TNFR1-expressing SK-Hep-1 cells and TRAPS patients' PBMCs, a subtle, constitutive upregulation of a wide spectrum of signaling intermediates and their phosphorylated forms was observed; these were associated with a proinflammatory/antiapoptotic phenotype. In TRAPS patients' PBMCs, this upregulation of proinflammatory signaling pathways was observed irrespective of concurrent treatment with glucocorticoids, anakinra or etanercept, and the absence of overt clinical symptoms at the time that the blood samples were taken. This study reveals the pleiotropic effect of a TRAPS-associated mutant form of TNFR1 on inflammatory signaling pathways (a proinflammatory signalome), which is consistent with the variable and limited efficacy of cytokine-blocking therapies in TRAPS. It highlights new potential target pathways for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24668260

  13. Language Development in Down Syndrome: From the Prelinguistic Period to the Acquisition of Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbeduto, Leonard; Warren, Steven F.; Conners, Frances A.

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is associated with abnormalities in multiple organ systems and a characteristic phenotype that includes numerous behavioral features. Language, however, is among the most impaired domains of functioning in DS and, perhaps, also the greatest barrier to independent meaningful inclusion in the community. In this article, we review…

  14. Sporadic Blau syndrome with onset of widespread granulomatous dermatitis in the newborn period.

    PubMed

    Stoevesandt, Johanna; Morbach, Henner; Martin, Tammy M; Zierhut, Manfred; Girschick, Hermann; Hamm, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a dominantly inherited, chronic autoinflammatory disorder characterized by the clinical triad of granulomatous dermatitis, symmetric arthritis, and recurrent uveitis with onset below 4 years of age. It is caused by activating mutations in the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) gene, previously referred to as CARD15 gene. Noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues are the pathologic hallmark of the condition. We report the lifelong severe disease course in a 14-year-old Caucasian boy with sporadic Blau syndrome. Unusually, granulomatous dermatitis started in the first week of life. Whereas skin involvement faded away spontaneously in subsequent years, polyarthritis and anterior uveitis appeared in the second and third year of life respectively. Mutational analysis of the NOD2 gene revealed a missense mutation (R334W) previously detected in other Blau syndrome pedigrees. With this report, we would like to stress the rare possibility of Blau syndrome in generalized papular rashes of infancy and the importance of histopathologic study for clarification. The finding of early-onset widespread granulomatous dermatitis should prompt eye and joint examination in regular intervals and entail mutational analysis of the NOD2 gene. PMID:20199415

  15. A case of split notochord syndrome: Presenting with respiratory failure in the neonatal period

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Yesim; Akman, Ipek; Demir, Mustafa Kemal; Yapicier, Ozlem; Somuncu, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Summary Split notochord syndrome (SNS) is a very rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a male newborn with a neuroenteric cyst in the posterior mediastinum and multiple vertebrae anomalies presenting with respiratory failure and pulmonary hypertension. This report also discusses the embryological development and the etiologic theories of SNS. PMID:27195197

  16. Assessment of 25(OH)D vitamin concentration in plasma of residents of Lodz with metabolic syndrome in pre- and postmenopausal period

    PubMed Central

    Materek-Kuśmierkiewicz, Izabela; Moczulski, Dariusz; Gaszyńska, Ewelina; Szatko, Franciszek; Tokarski, Sławomir; Kowalski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for metabolic syndrome disorders and the occurrence of these disorders greatly contributes to the deficiency of vitamin D. Postmenopausal women are particularly prone to that deficiency. Aim The aim of the study was to assess vitamin D concentration in the plasma of pre- and postmenopausal women, with or without metabolic syndrome. Material and methods The study included 141 women aged 26-77 (the mean age 58.74 years old), divided into 4 groups depending on the pre- or postmenopausal period and diagnosed or not with metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria (2005). Vitamin D concentration was assessed by LIAISON® test using chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) technology. Results The mean vitamin D concentration was the highest among premenopausal women without metabolic syndrome (24.32 ng/ml), it was insignificantly higher than in postmenopausal women without metabolic syndrome (23.52 ng/ml) and significantly higher than in both groups with metabolic syndrome – premenopausal (19.86 ng/ml) and postmenopausal women (9.32 ng/ml). The recommended plasma 25(OH)D concentration was not found in any of postmenopausal women with diagnosed metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome had a significantly lower 25(OH)D vitamin concentration in plasma than postmenopausal women without metabolic syndrome. The frequency of vitamin D deficiency in women with metabolic syndrome was very high, significantly higher than in women without metabolic syndrome. PMID:26327869

  17. Restless leg syndrome, periodic limb movements, febrile seizures and Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in an Indian family

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Meena; Batra, Amit; Trivedi, Anurag; Chowdhury, Debashish; Khwaja, Geeta A.

    2012-01-01

    Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a common neurological disorder which can affect individuals of all age groups and incidence increasing with age. It can cause severe sleep disruption and negatively impact quality of life of an individual. Its diagnosis is clinical, based on essential criteria of International RLS Study Group. It can be idiopathic or associated with various medical and other neurological disorders. Idiopathic RLS can be sporadic or may have a familial inheritance, with several genetic loci been reported till date. RLS has a strong association with periodic limb movements, both sleep and awake. Very few studies of familial RLS/Periodic limb movements in sleep and their associations have been reported. We report an Indian family with autosomal dominant RLS/PLMS, with RLS and PLMS as well as psychiatric disorders, febrile seizures and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in different family members, over three generations. PMID:22412272

  18. The treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder. An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Review.

    PubMed

    Hening, W; Allen, R; Earley, C; Kushida, C; Picchietti, D; Silber, M

    1999-11-01

    A task force consisting of six authors reviewed the published literature on the therapy of the restless legs syndrome or periodic limb movements in sleep available in indices through April, 1998. They selected the 45 articles for detailed review which presented original investigations of therapeutic impact on the restless legs syndrome (RLS) or periodic limb movements (PLM) and which met minimal standards. These articles dealt with a range of pharmacological and other treatment modalities, although most dealt with medications and almost half of those concentrated on dopaminergic agents, especially levodopa in various formulations. Almost half of the articles reviewed used controlled methodologies, most commonly cross-over methodologies with randomized allocation of subjects. Multi-center studies with large numbers of subjects and long-term controlled studies were not found. Information was extracted from the articles and study design, clinical definition, evaluative measures, side effects, and outcomes were tabulated in 6 evidence tables and summarized in the accompanying text. This literature was evaluated for the nature of the studies performed and its coverage of potential therapies. The review concludes with comments on possible future directions for therapeutic investigation based on the current state of the literature. PMID:10566916

  19. Nystagmus in a newborn: a manifestation of Joubert syndrome in the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Salva, Inês; Albuquerque, Carolina; Moreira, Ana; Dâmaso, Catarina

    2016-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare disorder, usually autosomal recessive, with a prevalence of 1:80,000 to 1:100,000. This disease presents most commonly as breathing irregularities, although the two major clinical criteria are hypotonia and developmental delay, sometimes associated with ocular movement abnormalities. The severity of the presentation varies, ranging from mild cases with normal intelligence to severe developmental delays associated with early death. We report a case of a newborn who presented to the emergency department for absent ocular fixation and torsional nystagmus without other neurological abnormalities. Her cranial MR showed cerebellar vermis agenesis and a molar tooth sign. Her laboratory evaluation, and renal and abdominal ultrasound were normal. An electroretinogram showed mixed retinal dystrophy and an AHI1 homozygous missense c.1981T>C mutation was identified (parents are carriers). Throughout infancy, she has shown mild developmental delay and hypotonia, but no respiratory abnormalities. Owing to variable expressivity, a high level of suspicion is required. PMID:26759440

  20. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis (PFAPA) Syndrome: a Review of the Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulou, Katerina; Vanoni, Federica; Hofer, Michaël

    2016-04-01

    PFAPA syndrome represents the most common cause of recurrent fever in children in European populations, and it is characterized by recurrent episodes of high fever, pharyngitis, cervical adenitis, and aphthous stomatitis. Many possible causative factors have been explored so far, including infectious agents, immunologic mechanisms and genetic predisposition, but the exact etiology remains unclear. Recent findings demonstrate a dysregulation of different components of innate immunity during PFAPA flares, such as monocytes, neutrophils, complement, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially IL-1β, suggesting an inflammasome-mediated innate immune system activation and supporting the hypothesis of an autoinflammatory disease. Moreover, in contrast with previous considerations, the strong familial clustering suggests a potential genetic origin rather than a sporadic disease. In addition, the presence of variants in inflammasome-related genes, mostly in NLRP3 and MEFV, suggests a possible role of inflammasome-composing genes in PFAPA pathogenesis. However, none of these variants seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, indicating a high genetic heterogeneity as well as an oligogenic or polygenic genetic background. PMID:26984802

  1. Determination of rifaximin treatment period according to lactulose breath test values in nonconstipated irritable bowel syndrome subjects.

    PubMed

    Bae, Suhyun; Lee, Kwang Jae; Kim, Young-Sang; Kim, Kyu-Nam

    2015-06-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) can partly explain irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and rifaximin has been observed to improve abdominal symptoms in nonconstipated IBS patients. However, there are few reports on the association of the rifaximin treatment periods with the results of a lactulose breath test (LBT). Therefore, we performed a retrospective review of patient charts to investigate the relation between the rifaximin treatment periods with LBT results in nonconstipated IBS patients. We also evaluated the time to achieve a symptomatic improvement in the IBS patients as compared to the changes in the LBT. We reviewed the charts for patients who showed IBS symptoms with documented positive results for LBT during their initial visit and who had a follow-up LBT after treatment with rifaximin. The LBT values were compared to the subjects' symptom scores. A total of 102 subjects had a follow-up LBT to assess LBT normalization. The subjects were divided into groups according to treatment periods of 4 weeks (n = 36), 8 weeks (n = 43), and 12 weeks (n = 23). The groups with a longer treatment exhibited an increase in the hydrogen gas value at 90 min and its sum during 90 min at the initial LBT. There were significant differences in hydrogen gas value at 90 min and in its sum during 90 min at the initial LBT between the groups treated for 4 and 12 weeks. The most significant treatment response was observed during the first 4 weeks for all treatment groups. Symptomatic improvement occurred earlier than LBT normalization in the treatment period over 4 weeks. The results indicate that different rifaximin treatment periods are needed in accordance with LBT levels to effectively eradicate SIBO. PMID:26028929

  2. Comparison of early postoperative period electrophysiological and clinical findings following carpal tunnel syndrome: is EMG necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Aksekili, Mehmet Atıf Erol; Biçici, Vedat; Işık, Çetin; Aksekili, Hatice; Uğurlu, Mahmut; Akkurt, Adem; Doğan, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Background: In this study, we aimed to compare the clinical findings and ENMG results of the patients who underwent surgery due to CTS, in the preoperative and early postoperative period. Methods: 33 wrists of 29 patients who underwent open carpal tunnel surgery in our clinic due to CTS, between 2009 and 2011, were evaluated. Electrophysiological progress was evaluated with ENMG and clinical state with Boston scale. Results: A significant decrease was observed in the postoperative BS symptomatic (SSS) and functional (FSS) scores of patients as compared to preoperative period (P=0.00), In the electrophysiological findings, statistically significant improvement was observed in all groups but very severe CTS group (P<0.05). When preoperative and postoperative EMG findings were compared, changes in DSL and DSA values were statistically significant (P<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was seen between DML (P=0.085) and DMA (P=246) values on the 3rd month. When an examination was conducted on the patients whose DML and DSL values could not be obtained in the preoperative EMG, DML values were obtained in the early postoperative period in 6 of 7 cases (85.71% P<0.001), and DSL values were obtained in 17 of 24 cases (70.8% P<0.000). Conclusions: Sensory nerve findings were more significant, showed faster recovery compared to motor nerve findings, and accompanied the clinical recovery. Performance of an EMG test, especially on sensory nerves, will be more effective in patients selected in the early period, with the exception of patients with very severe CTS. PMID:26309691

  3. Comparison of early postoperative period electrophysiological and clinical findings following carpal tunnel syndrome: is EMG necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Aksekili, Mehmet Atıf Erol; Biçici, Vedat; Işık, Çetin; Aksekili, Hatice; Uğurlu, Mahmut; Doğan, Metin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the clinical findings and ENMG results of the patients who underwent surgery due to CTS, in the preoperative and early postoperative period. Methods: 33 wrists of 29 patients who underwent open carpal tunnel surgery in our clinic due to CTS, between 2009 and 2011, were evaluated. Electrophysiological progress was evaluated with ENMG and clinical state with Boston scale. Results: A significant decrease was observed in the postoperative BS symptomatic (SSS) and functional (FSS) scores of patients as compared to preoperative period (P=0.00). In the electrophysiological findings, statistically significant improvement was observed in all groups but very severe CTS group (P<0.05). When preoperative and postoperative EMG findings were compared, changes in DSL and DSA values were statistically significant (P<0.05). However, no statistically significant difference was seen between DML (P=0.085) and DMA (P=246) values on the 3rd month. When an examination was conducted on the patients whose DML and DSL values could not be obtained in the preoperative EMG, DML values were obtained in the early postoperative period in 6 of 7 cases (85.71%, P<0.001), and DSL values were obtained in 17 of 24 cases (70.8%, P<0.000). Conclusions: Sensory nerve findings were more significant, showed faster recovery compared to motor nerve findings, and accompanied the clinical recovery. Performance of an EMG test, especially on sensory nerves, will be more effective in patients selected in the early period, with the exception of patients with very severe CTS. PMID:26131237

  4. An Evidence-based Analysis of the Association between Periodic Leg Movements during Sleep and Arousals in Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Raffaele; Rundo, Francesco; Zucconi, Marco; Manconi, Mauro; Bruni, Oliviero; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Fulda, Stephany

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To analyze statistically the association between periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS) and arousals, in order to eventually support or challenge the current scoring rules and to further understand their reciprocal influence. Setting: Sleep research center. Patients: Twenty untreated consecutive patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) (13 women and 7 males, mean age 60.9 y). Methods: In each recording, we selected all PLMS/arousal pairs that met the following inclusion criteria: (a) PLMS events that were separated from another PLMS event (preceding or following) by at least 10 s of EMG inactivity; (b) arousal events separated from another arousal event (preceding or following) by at least 10 s of stable EEG baseline activity; (c) PLMS/arousal pairs were then selected among events identified according to the previous two criteria, when PLMS and arousals were separated (offset-to-onset) by no more than 10 s, regardless of which was first. Measurements and Results: We selected a mean of 46.1 (SD 25.55) PLMS/arousal pairs per subject; in these pairs, average PLMS duration was 3.2 s (0.65) and average arousal duration was 6.5 s (0.92). Within these event pairs, the great majority (on average 98.4%, SD 3.88) was separated by less than 0.5 s (i.e., between the end of one event and the onset of the other, regardless of which was first). Arousal onsets preceded PLMS onset in 41.2% of pairs, while the opposite was true for the remaining 58.8% of pairs. A significant correlation between PLMS duration and arousal duration was also found (r = 0.447, P < 0.000001). Conclusion: The results of this study support the current rule for the definition of the association between periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS) and arousals. The tight time relationship between PLMS and arousals and their correlated durations seem to indicate that both events might be regulated by a complex mechanism, rather than being connected by a simple reciprocal cause/effect relationship. Citation: Ferri R, Rundo F, Zucconi M, Manconi M, Bruni O, Ferini-Strambi L, Fulda S. An evidence-based analysis of the association between periodic leg movements during sleep and arousals in restless legs syndrome. SLEEP 2015;38(6):919–924. PMID:25581922

  5. Periodic health examination, 1996 update: 1. Prenatal screening for and diagnosis of Down syndrome. Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination.

    PubMed Central

    Dick, P T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To make recommendations to physicians providing prenatal care on (1) whether prenatal screening for and diagnosis of Down syndrome (DS) is advisable and (2) alternative screening and diagnosis manoeuvres. OPTIONS: "Triple-marker" screening of maternal serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin and unconjugated estriol; fetal ultrasonographic examination; amniocentesis; and chorionic villus sampling (CVS). OUTCOMES: Accuracy of detection of DS in fetuses, and risks to the mother, including psychologic distress, and to the fetus from the screening and diagnostic interventions. EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search for relevant articles published from Jan. 1, 1966, to Mar. 31, 1994, with the use of MeSH terms "Down syndrome," "prenatal diagnosis," "screening," "prevention," "amniocentesis," "chorionic villus sampling," "ultrasonography," "anxiety," "depression" and "psychological stress" and a manual search of bibliographies, recent issues of key journals and Current Contents. VALUES: The evidence-based methods and values of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination were used. A high value was placed on providing pregnant women with the opportunity to determine whether they are carrying a fetus with DS and to make choices concerning the termination of the pregnancy. The economic issues involved are complex and were not considered. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Triple-marker screening identifies an estimated 58% of fetuses with DS, but it has an estimated rate of true-positive results of 0.1% and of false-positive results of 3.7% (given a risk cut-off of one chance in 190 of DS). These rates vary with maternal age and the risk cut-off chosen. Women with a known risk of having a fetus with DS (e.g., those who have had a previous child with DS) may benefit from a reduction in anxiety after confirmation that their fetus does not have DS. Screening allows women at low risk of having a child with DS to detect fetuses with the syndrome, but may cause psychologic distress if there is a false-positive screening test result. Up to 20% of women with positive results of screening tests may decline to undergo a subsequent amniocentesis. Amniocentesis and CVS are very accurate in diagnosing DS in fetuses and have a very low rate of serious complications for the mother. Amniocentesis is associated with a 1.7% rate of fetal loss when it is performed after 16 weeks' gestation, whereas the rate among controls is 0.7% (for a difference of 1%, 95% confidence interval 0.3% to 1.5%). CVS entails a greater risk of fetal loss than amniocentesis (odds ratio 1.32, 95% confidence interval 1.11 to 1.57). There is little evidence from controlled trials of significant associations between amniocentesis or CVS and neonatal morbidity or malformations; however, samples have been too small to show differences in rare outcomes. Results from some case-control studies suggest that CVS increases the risk of transverse limb deficiency. Costs were not considered because they are beyond the scope of this review. RECOMMENDATIONS: There is fair evidence to offer triple-marker screening through a comprehensive program to pregnant women under 35 years of age (grade B recommendation). Women given detailed information about serum-marker screening show more satisfaction with the screening than those not given this information. There is fair evidence to offer amniocentesis or CVS to pregnant women 35 years of age and older and to women with a history of a fetus with DS or of a chromosome 21 anomaly (grade B recommendation). Information on the limitations and advantages of each procedure should be offered. Triple-marker screening may be offered as an alternative to CVS or amniocentesis to pregnant women over 35. VALIDATION: Recommendations concerning prenatal diagnosis are similar to those of the US Preventive Services Task Force, the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists and the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group. No previous specific recommendations concerning triple-maker screening exist. SPONSORS: These guidelines were developed and endorsed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination, which is funded by Health Canada and the National Health Research and Development Program. PMID:8630836

  6. A novel syndrome of congenital sideroblastic anemia, B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD).

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Daniel H; May, Alison; Jolles, Stephen; Connor, Philip; Powell, Colin; Heeney, Matthew M; Giardina, Patricia J; Klaassen, Robert J; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Geraghty, Michael T; Major-Cook, Nathalie; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Thuret, Isabelle; Thompson, Alexis A; Marques, Laura; Hughes, Stephen; Bonney, Denise K; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Fleming, Mark D; Wynn, Robert F

    2013-07-01

    Congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders identified by pathological erythroid precursors with perinuclear mitochondrial iron deposition in bone marrow. An international collaborative group of physicians and laboratory scientists collated clinical information on cases of CSA lacking known causative mutations, identifying a clinical subgroup of CSA associated with B immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and development delay. Twelve cases from 10 families were identified. Median age at presentation was 2 months. Anemia at diagnosis was sideroblastic, typically severe (median hemoglobin, 7.1 g/dL) and markedly microcytic (median mean corpuscular volume, 62.0 fL). Clinical course involved recurrent febrile illness and gastrointestinal disturbance, lacking an infective cause. Investigation revealed B-cell lymphopenia (CD19⁺ range, 0.016-0.22 × 10⁹/L) and panhypogammaglobulinemia in most cases. Children displayed developmental delay alongside variable neurodegeneration, seizures, cerebellar abnormalities, sensorineural deafness, and other multisystem features. Most required regular blood transfusion, iron chelation, and intravenous immunoglobulin replacement. Median survival was 48 months, with 7 deaths caused by cardiac or multiorgan failure. One child underwent bone marrow transplantation aged 9 months, with apparent cure of the hematologic and immunologic manifestations. We describe and define a novel CSA and B-cell immunodeficiency syndrome with additional features resembling a mitochondrial cytopathy. The molecular etiology is under investigation. PMID:23553769

  7. A novel syndrome of congenital sideroblastic anemia, B-cell immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and developmental delay (SIFD)

    PubMed Central

    May, Alison; Jolles, Stephen; Connor, Philip; Powell, Colin; Heeney, Matthew M.; Giardina, Patricia J.; Klaassen, Robert J.; Chakraborty, Pranesh; Geraghty, Michael T.; Major-Cook, Nathalie; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Thuret, Isabelle; Thompson, Alexis A.; Marques, Laura; Hughes, Stephen; Bonney, Denise K.; Bottomley, Sylvia S.; Fleming, Mark D.; Wynn, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders identified by pathological erythroid precursors with perinuclear mitochondrial iron deposition in bone marrow. An international collaborative group of physicians and laboratory scientists collated clinical information on cases of CSA lacking known causative mutations, identifying a clinical subgroup of CSA associated with B immunodeficiency, periodic fevers, and development delay. Twelve cases from 10 families were identified. Median age at presentation was 2 months. Anemia at diagnosis was sideroblastic, typically severe (median hemoglobin, 7.1 g/dL) and markedly microcytic (median mean corpuscular volume, 62.0 fL). Clinical course involved recurrent febrile illness and gastrointestinal disturbance, lacking an infective cause. Investigation revealed B-cell lymphopenia (CD19+ range, 0.016-0.22 × 109/L) and panhypogammaglobulinemia in most cases. Children displayed developmental delay alongside variable neurodegeneration, seizures, cerebellar abnormalities, sensorineural deafness, and other multisystem features. Most required regular blood transfusion, iron chelation, and intravenous immunoglobulin replacement. Median survival was 48 months, with 7 deaths caused by cardiac or multiorgan failure. One child underwent bone marrow transplantation aged 9 months, with apparent cure of the hematologic and immunologic manifestations. We describe and define a novel CSA and B-cell immunodeficiency syndrome with additional features resembling a mitochondrial cytopathy. The molecular etiology is under investigation. PMID:23553769

  8. Transient compartment-like syndrome and normokalaemic periodic paralysis due to a Cav1.1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chunxiang; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Weber, Marc-André; Bednarz, Marcin; Groome, James R.; Jonsson, Malin K. B.

    2013-01-01

    We studied a two-generation family presenting with conditions that included progressive permanent weakness, myopathic myopathy, exercise-induced contracture before normokalaemic periodic paralysis or, if localized to the tibial anterior muscle group, transient compartment-like syndrome (painful acute oedema with neuronal compression and drop foot). 23Na and 1H magnetic resonance imaging displayed myoplasmic sodium overload, and oedema. We identified a novel familial Cav1.1 calcium channel mutation, R1242G, localized to the third positive charge of the domain IV voltage sensor. Functional expression of R1242G in the muscular dysgenesis mouse cell line GLT revealed a 28% reduced central pore inward current and a −20 mV shift of the steady-state inactivation curve. Both changes may be at least partially explained by an outward omega (gating pore) current at positive potentials. Moreover, this outward omega current of 27.5 nS/nF may cause the reduction of the overshoot by 13 mV and slowing of the upstroke of action potentials by 36% that are associated with muscle hypoexcitability (permanent weakness and myopathic myopathy). In addition to the outward omega current, we identified an inward omega pore current of 95 nS/nF at negative membrane potentials after long depolarizing pulses that shifts the R1242G residue above the omega pore constriction. A simulation reveals that the inward current might depolarize the fibre sufficiently to trigger calcium release in the absence of an action potential and therefore cause an electrically silent depolarization-induced muscle contracture. Additionally, evidence of the inward current can be found in 23Na magnetic resonance imaging-detected sodium accumulation and 1H magnetic resonance imaging-detected oedema. We hypothesize that the episodes are normokalaemic because of depolarization-induced compensatory outward potassium flux through both delayed rectifiers and omega pore. We conclude that the position of the R1242G residue before elicitation of the omega current is decisive for its conductance: if the residue is located below the gating pore as in the resting state then outward currents are observed; if the residue is above the gating pore because of depolarization, as in the inactivated state, then inward currents are observed. This study shows for the first time that functional characterization of omega pore currents is possible using a cultured cell line expressing mutant Cav1.1 channels. Likewise, it is the first calcium channel mutation for complicated normokalaemic periodic paralysis. PMID:24240197

  9. Evaluation of macrophage activation syndrome associated with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: single center experience over a one-year period

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Yücel, Gözde; Sinoplu, Ada Bulut; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the demographic, clinical, laboratory properties of patients with macrophage activation syndrome and treatment outcomes. Material and Methods: The data of the patients who were diagnosed with macrophage activation syndrome secondary to systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis between June 2013–May 2014 were evaluated by screening patient records. Results: Ten patients with macrophage activation syndrome were followed up in one year. The mean age at the time of diagnosis was found to be 7.6±4.5 years. The most common clinical finding at presentation (80%) was increased body temperature. Hepatosplenomegaly was found in half of the patients. The most common hematological finding (90%) was anemia. The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate was found to be 71.8±36.2 mm/h, whereas it was measured to be lower (31.2±25.2 mm/h) at the time of the diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome. Increased ferritin level was found in all of our patients (the mean ferritin level was found to be 23 957±15 525 ng/mL). Hypertriglyceridemia was found in nine patients (90%). The mean triglyceride level was found to be 397±332 mg/dL. Systemic steroid treatment was administered to all patients. Cyclosporine A was given to eight patients (80%), canakinumab was given to four patients (40%) and anakinra was given to five patients (50%). Plasmapheresis was performed in two patients. Improvement was found in all patients except for one patient. The patient in whom no improvement was observed showed a chronic course. Conclusions: The diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome should be considered in presence of sudden disturbance in general condition, resistant high fever and systemic inflammation findings in children with active rheumatic disease. Complete recovery can be provided with early and efficient treatment in macrophage activation syndrome which develops secondary to systemic juvenil idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26884689

  10. Analysis of the genetic basis of periodic fever with aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Silvio Alessandro Di; Bedoni, Nicola; von Scheven-Gête, Annette; Vanoni, Federica; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Hofer, Michaël; Rivolta, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory syndrome in children from Western countries. In spite of its strong familial clustering, its genetic basis and inheritance pattern are still unknown. We performed a comprehensive genetic study on 68 individuals from 14 families. Linkage analysis suggested a susceptibility locus on chromosome 8, but direct molecular sequencing did not support this initial statistical finding. Exome sequencing revealed the absence of any gene that was mutated in all patients. Exhaustive screening of genes involved in other autoinflammatory syndromes or encoding components of the human inflammasome showed no DNA variants that could be linked to PFAPA molecular pathology. Among these, the previously-reported missense mutation V198M in the NLRP3 gene was clearly shown not to co-segregate with PFAPA. Our results on this relatively large cohort indicate that PFAPA syndrome is unlikely to be a monogenic condition. Moreover, none of the several genes known to be involved in inflammation or in autoinflammatory disorders seem to be relevant, alone, to its etiology, suggesting that PFAPA results from oligogenic or complex inheritance of variants in multiple disease genes and/or non-genetic factors. PMID:25988833

  11. A pilot study to compare the cerebral hemodynamics between patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement syndrome (PLMS) during nocturnal sleep with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Schneider, Maja; Laures, Marco; Fritschi, Ursula; Hügli, Gordana; Lehner, Isabella; Qi, Ming; Khatami, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and periodic limb movement in sleep syndrome (PLMS) are two common sleep disorders. Previous studies showed that OSA and PLMS share common features, such as increased cardio-vascular risk, both apnea events and limb movements occur periodically, they are usually associated with cortical arousals, and both of them can induce declines in peripheral oxygen saturation measured with pulse oximetry. However, the question whether apnea events and limb movements also show similar characteristics in cerebral hemodynamic and oxygenation has never been addressed. In this pilot study, we will first time compare the cerebral hemodynamic changes induced by apnea events and limb movements in patients with OSA (n=4) and PLMS (n=4) with NIRS. In patients with OSA, we found periodic oscillations in HbO2, HHb, and blood volume induced by apnea/hypopnea events, HbO2 and HHb showed reverse changing trends. By contrast, the periodic oscillations linked to limb movements were only found in HbO2 and blood volume in patients with PLMS. These findings of different cerebral hemodynamics patterns between apnea events and limb movements may indicate different regulations of nervous system between these two sleep disorders.

  12. The Pathogenesis of Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Cervical Adenitis Syndrome: A Review of Current Research

    PubMed Central

    Kraszewska-Głomba, Barbara; Matkowska-Kocjan, Agnieszka; Szenborn, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Background. PFAPA syndrome is a chronic disease that is characterized by recurrent episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis. Knowledge regarding the etiology of PFAPA is limited. Objectives. To provide up-to-date information considering etiology of PFAPA syndrome, by summarizing what has been explored and established in this area so far. Materials and Methods. PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus databases were searched for pertinent reports. Eventually 19 articles were selected. The results were classified into categories regarding three areas of interest: familial occurrence, genetic basis, and immunological mechanisms of PFAPA. Results. Recent findings suggest that there is a familial tendency to PFAPA but the level of evidence does not warrant definite conclusions. The absence of a clear monogenic trait indicates a heterogenous, polygenic, or complex inheritance of PFAPA syndrome. As two mutations with a possible functional effect on the inflammasomes (MEFV E148Q and NLRP3 Q703K) have been found in several PFAPA cohorts, the role of inflammasome-related genes in PFAPA pathogenesis cannot be excluded. Immunological mechanisms of PFAPA involve an abnormal, IL-1β dependent innate immune response to an environmental trigger, which leads to Th1-driven inflammation expressed by recruitment of T-cells to the periphery. PMID:26457006

  13. Variable intrafamilial expressivity of the rare tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated periodic syndrome-associated mutation I170N that affects the TNFR1A cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Salzberger, Bernd; Haerle, Peter; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Kastner, Daniel; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Rosenfeld, Stephanie; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    We report on a 33-year-old female patient with a relatively mild clinical case of TNF-receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and her 58-year-old father in whom end-stage renal disease due to TRAPS-related AA-amyloidosis has already developed. TRAPS was caused by a I170N mutation that has previously not been associated with amyloidosis. It remains unclear if an only mildly affected patient such as ours would benefit from treatment considering her father’s severe course of disease. The relevant literature on this problem is reviewed. PMID:20169391

  14. Reduced Number of CD8+ Cells in Tonsillar Germinal Centres in Children with the Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Førsvoll, J; Janssen, E A M; Møller, I; Wathne, N; Skaland, I; Klos, J; Kristoffersen, E K; Øymar, K

    2015-07-01

    The syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) is an autoinflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. Tonsillectomy may cause a prompt resolution of the syndrome. The aim was to study the histologic and immunological aspects of the palatine tonsils in PFAPA, to help understand the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Tonsils from children with PFAPA (n = 11) and children with tonsillar hypertrophy (n = 16) were evaluated histologically after haematoxylin and eosin staining. The number of different cell types was identified immunohistochemically by cluster of differentiation (CD) markers: CD3 (T cells), CD4 (T helper cells), CD8 (cytotoxic T cells), CD15 (neutrophils), CD20 (B cells), CD45 (all leucocytes), CD57 (NK cells) and CD163 (monocytes and macrophages). Tonsils from children with PFAPA showed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia dominated by well-developed germinal centres with many tingible body macrophages. The histologic findings were unspecific, and a similar morphologic appearance was also found in the tonsils from controls. The number of CD8+ cells in germinal centres differed between children with PFAPA [median 9 cells (quartiles: 5, 15)] and controls [18 cells (12, 33) (P = 0.001)] and between children with PFAPA with (median 14 cells; 9, 16) and without (4 cells; 3, 8) aphthous stomatitis (P = 0.015). For the other cell types, no differences in germinal centres were found between children with PFAPA and controls. In conclusion, a lower number of CD8+ cells were found in germinal centres of tonsils in children with PFAPA compared to controls, which may be a feature linked to the aetiology of the syndrome. PMID:25882211

  15. Basic Characteristics of Adults with Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenopathy Syndrome in Comparison with the Typical Pediatric Expression of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cattalini, Marco; Soliani, Martina; Rigante, Donato; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cantarini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases are caused by inflammasome dysregulation leading to overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines and a pathological delay in the inflammation switching off. The progress of cellular biology has partially clarified pathogenic mechanisms behind monogenic autoinflammatory diseases, whereas little is known about the polygenic ones. Although the genetic susceptibility of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome is still obscure, the presence of overlapping symptoms with monogenic periodic fevers, the recurrence in family members, the important role played by dysregulated interleukin- (IL-) 1β secretion during flares, the overexpression of inflammasome-associated genes during attacks, and, last but not least, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-1β blockade strongly indicate a potential genetic involvement in its pathogenesis, probably linked with environmental factors. PFAPA syndrome has a typical inception in the pediatric age, but a delayed onset during adulthood has been described as well. Treatments required as well as effectiveness of tonsillectomy remain controversial, even if the disease seems to have a self-limited course mostly in children. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of this complex polygenic/multifactorial autoinflammatory disorder in which the innate immune system undoubtedly plays a basic role. PMID:26357457

  16. MRP8 and MRP14, phagocyte-specific danger signals, are sensitive biomarkers of disease activity in cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Austermann, Judith; Holzinger, Dirk; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Gramlich, Katharina; Lohse, Peter; Jung, Thomas; Roth, Johannes; Benseler, Susanne M; Foell, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the sensitivity of the phagocyte-specific molecules myeloid-related protein (MRP) 8 and MRP14 (calprotectin) for monitoring disease activity during anti-interleukin (IL)-1 therapies in patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), including familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle–Wells syndrome (MWS) and chronic infantile neurological, cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome. Methods A total of 39 patients with CAPS, including 5 FCAS, 16 MWS and 18 CINCA syndrome, received anti-IL-1 therapy. All patients with CINCA and 12 with MWS were treated with IL-1Ra (anakinra), 14 patients with MWS with a monoclonal anti-IL-1β antibody (canakinumab) and patients with FCAS received IL-1 Trap (rilonacept). During serial clinical visits serum amyloid A, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and MRP8/14 serum levels were analysed. Results Untreated patients with CAPS had significantly elevated MRP8/14 values. In response to treatment there was a significant reduction of MRP8/14 levels in CINCA (2,830 (range 690 – 8,480) ng/ml to 670 ng/ml, p < 0.001) and MWS patients (anakinra-treated: 4,390 (1790 – 9780) ng/ml to 1,315 ng/ml (p = 0.003); canakinumab-treated: 3,000 (500 – 13060) ng/ml to 630 ng/ml (p=0.001)). However, in many patients with CAPS, MRP8/14 levels were still elevated compared with healthy individuals, reflecting residual disease activity. However, canakinumab-treated patients with CAPS showed normalised MRP8/14 levels, suggesting control of phagocyte activation. Conclusions Monitoring of cellular systems involved in inflammatory cascades of the innate immunity was successfully applied to the IL-1-driven CAPS diseases. This is the first study illustrating different states of subclinical disease activity in all types of CAPS depending on the type of anti-IL-1 therapy. MRP8/14 is a sensitive biomarker for monitoring disease activity, status of inflammation and response to IL-1 blockade in patients with CAPS. PMID:21908452

  17. Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease and Periodic Limb Movements in Sleep in the Elderly with and without Dementia.

    PubMed

    Figorilli, Michela; Puligheddu, Monica; Ferri, Raffaele

    2015-09-01

    There is great interest in the study of sleep in healthy and cognitively impaired elderly. Sleep disorders have been related to quality of aging. Sleep-related movements are a frequent cause of disordered sleep and daytime sleepiness. Restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED) is often unrecognized in the elderly. This review explores RLS/WED in the elderly population. The elderly population may be subdivided into 3 groups: healthy, dependent, and frail. The RLS/WED could be a predictor for lower physical function; its burden on quality of life and health care-related costs, in the elderly, should be an important clinical and public health concern. PMID:26329443

  18. Recurrent abdominal pain as the presentation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) in an Asian girl: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Ju; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lau, Yu-Lung; Lee, Wen-I; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is characterized by periodic fever, cutaneous rash, conjunctivitis, lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, myalgia, and arthralgia. It is a rare autosomal dominant disease and strongly associated with heterozygous mutations in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor super family 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene. It is believed to be more common in Western countries than in Asian countries. Here, we present the case of a 14-year-old girl with periodic fever and abdominal pain with elevation of inflammatory markers for 2 years. After extensive work-up of infectious etiology with negative results, the diagnosis of TRAPS was made although no gene mutations were identified in the TNFRSF1A gene, MVK gene, and NALP3/CIAS1 gene. She had partial clinical response to corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents. However, the treatment response to TNF-? inhibitor etanercept was dramatic. She has remained symptom free under regular weekly to biweekly etanercept treatment for 2 years. We also reviewed the related literature and summarized the data of 10 Asian cases of TRAPS. PMID:22921805

  19. [Asthenic syndrome in clinical course of acute period of brain concussion during complex treatment using nootropic agents].

    PubMed

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 108 persons aged from 16 till 60 years in acute period of closed craniocerebral injury (CCCT) has been done. Every participants have been divided into 2 groups depending on a nootrop medication they receive in a complex treatment. A control group consisted of 30 practically healthy people. Objective examination by means of tests was done on the 1-st, 10-th that 30-th day of treatment. Patients of 1-st (37 persons) group received piracetam in complex treatment and patients of the 2-nd group (71 persons) pramistar. Patients of the first group received a base treatment (analgetics, tranquilizers, vitamins of group B, magnesium sulfate, diuretic preparations) as well as piracetam at dosage 0.2, two tablets three times per day. The Patients of the 2-nd group received a base treatment as well as pramistar at dosage 0.6, one tablet 2 times per day. Specially developed multiaspects scales and questionnaires, MRT of the brain and EEG have been used for objectification of patient, complaints. During a complex clinico-neuropsychological examination it was found that all cases of concussion of the brain are accompanied by those or other asthenic disorders. PMID:19145827

  20. HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis and probable HTLV-1- associated myelopathy in an adolescent female*

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Raquel Bisacotti; Tonoli, Renata Elise; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Pinto, Giselle Martins; Riesgo, Rudimar dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated infective dermatitis (ID) is a chronic, severe and recurrent eczema occurring during childhood in patients vertically infected with HTLV-1. HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesia (HAM/ TSP) is slow and progressive. We report the case of an adolescent female from a non-endemic area for HTLV-1 who presents ID and, most likely, associated HAM/TSP. PMID:26312674

  1. Experience of severe desaturation during anesthetic induction period in an obese adult patient with Prader-Willi syndrome -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joon Woo; Kim, Eun-Ju; Min, Byung Woo; Ban, Jong Seouk; Lee, Sang Gon; Lee, Ji-Hyang

    2012-02-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is characterized by infantile hypotonia, childhood-onset obesity, short stature, mental retardation, hyperphagia, hypogonadism. After infantile hypotonia phase, patient is prone to morbid obesity due to hyperphagia. Complications associated with morbid obesity are recognized as the main risk factors for death the lifespan of patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. We experienced desaturation and bronchospasm during arteriovenous fistula surgery in an obese adult with Prader-Willi syndrome. PMID:22379576

  2. Homozygosity for the V377I mutation in mevalonate kinase causes distinct clinical phenotypes in two sibs with hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS)

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Laurent; Alsaleh, Ghada; Georgel, Philippe; Carapito, Raphael; Waterham, Hans R; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Bahram, Siamak; Sibilia, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mevalonate kinase (MVK) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive auto-inflammatory disorder characterised by recurring episodes of fever associated with multiple non-specific inflammatory symptoms and caused by mutations in the MVK gene. The phenotypic spectrum is wide and depends mostly on the nature of the mutations. Hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS) is a relatively mild presentation and predominantly associated with a c.1129G>A (p.V377I) mutation in the MVK gene. We report cases of two sisters homozygous for this mutation but exhibiting distinct (symptomatic vs asymptomatic) phenotypes. Methods Patient history was obtained; physical and clinical examination and laboratory tests were performed; lipopolysaccharide (LPS) response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was quantified. Results Low MVK enzymatic activity is not necessarily associated with inflammatory symptoms. Increased inflammatory cytokine secretion in response to LPS is associated with symptomatic MVK deficiency. Conclusions Individuals who are homozygous for the common p.V377I mutation in the MVK gene may not display the characteristic inflammatory episodes diagnostic of MKD and thus may be lost for correct and timely diagnosis. PMID:26977311

  3. Spontaneous Low-Frequency Cerebral Hemodynamics Oscillations in Restless Legs Syndrome with Periodic Limb Movements During Sleep: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jung-Ick; Lee, Gwan-Taek; Kim, Choong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep (PLMS) are associated with cortical and cardiovascular activation. Changes in cerebral hemodynamics caused by cortical activity can be measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We investigated oscillatory components of cerebral hemodynamics during PLM and different sleep stages in restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients with PLMS. Methods Four female RLS patients with PLMS, and four age- and sex-matched normal controls were included. PLM and sleep stages were scored using polysomnography, while the spontaneous cerebral hemodynamics was measured by NIRS. The phase and amplitude of the cerebral oxyhemoglobin concentration [HbO] and the deoxyhemoglobin concentration [Hb] low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) were evaluated during each sleep stage [waking, light sleep (LS; stages N1 and N2), slow-wave sleep (stage N3), and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep]. In RLS patients with PLMS, the cerebral hemodynamics during LS was divided into LS with and without PLM. Results The cerebral hemodynamics activity varied among the different sleep stages. There were changes in phase differences between [HbO] and [Hb] LFOs during the different sleep stages in the normal controls but not in the RLS patients with PLMS. The [HbO] and [Hb] LFO amplitudes were higher in the patient group than in controls during both LS with PLM and REM sleep. Conclusions The present study has demonstrated the presence of cerebral hemodynamics disturbances in RLS patients with PLMS, which may contribute to an increased risk of cerebrovascular events. PMID:26754783

  4. Hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome: a new MVK mutation (p.R277G) associated with a severe phenotype.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana A; Arstegui, Juan I; Brito, Maria J; Neves, Conceio; Conde, Marta

    2014-06-01

    Hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; MIM# 260920) is a rare recessively-inherited autoinflammatory condition caused by mutations in the MVK gene, which encodes for mevalonate kinase, an essential enzyme in the isoprenoid pathway. HIDS is clinically characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation. Here we report on the case of a 2 year-old Portuguese boy with recurrent episodes of fever, malaise, massive cervical lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly since the age of 12 months. Rash, arthralgia, abdominal pain and diarrhea were also seen occasionally. During attacks a vigorous acute-phase response was detected, including elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A and leukocytosis. Clinical and laboratory improvement was seen between attacks. Despite normal serum IgD level, HIDS was clinically suspected. Mutational MVK analysis revealed the homozygous genotype with the novel p.Arg277Gly (p.R277G) mutation, while the healthy non-consanguineous parents were heterozygous. Short nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroid courses were given during attacks with poor benefits, whereas anakinra showed positive responses only at high doses. The p.R277G mutation here described is a novel missense MVK mutation, and it has been detected in this case with a severe HIDS phenotype. Further studies are needed to evaluate a co-relation genotype, enzyme activity and phenotype, and to define the best therapeutic strategies. PMID:24656624

  5. Kidney Transplant in a Patient With Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Syndrome (TRAPS): Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Rodziewicz, N; Bhushan, S; Avasia, A; Singh, N

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor -1-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is a rare disease that may result in chronic kidney disease due to secondary amyloidosis. We report a case of a patient with a history of TRAPS who received a kidney transplant 11 years ago and still has functioning kidney transplant despite recurrence of amyloidosis and proteinuria. PMID:26915881

  6. Retrospective Analysis of Corticosteroid Treatment in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and/or Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis over a Period of 10 Years in Vajira Hospital, Navamindradhiraj University, Bangkok

    PubMed Central

    Prompongsa, Sirikarn

    2014-01-01

    Background. Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and/or toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are uncommon and life-threatening drug reaction associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Objective. We studied SJS and/or TEN by conducting a retrospective analysis of 87 patients treated during a 10-year period. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of the records of all patients with a diagnosis of SJS and/or TEN based on clinical features and histological confirmation of SJS and/or TEN was not available at the Department of Medicine, Vajira hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. The data were collected from two groups from 2003 to 2007 and 2008 to 2012. Results. A total of 87 cases of SJS and/or TEN were found, comprising 44 males and 43 females whose mean age was 46.5 years. The average length of stay was 17 days. Antibiotics, anticonvulsants, and allopurinol were the major culprit drugs in both groups. The mean SCORTEN on admission was 2.1 in first the group while 1.7 in second the group. From 2008 to 2012, thirty-nine patients (76.5%) were treated with corticosteroids while only eight patients (22.2%) were treated between 2003 and 2007. The mortality rate declined from 25% from the first group to 13.7% in the second group. Complications between first and second groups had no significant differences. Conclusions. Short-term corticosteroids may contribute to a reduced mortality rate in SJS and/or TEN without increasing secondary infection. Further well-designed studies are required to compare the effect of corticosteroids treatment for SJS and/or TEN. PMID:25024697

  7. Long-term efficacy of a short period of taping followed by an exercise program in a cohort of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paoloni, Marco; Fratocchi, Giancarlo; Mangone, Massimiliano; Murgia, Massimiliano; Santilli, Valter; Cacchio, Angelo

    2012-03-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is a common source of anterior knee pain. While treatment for PFPS may be successful in the short term, long-term results are less promising. The purpose of this study was to record long-term pain and functionality outcomes following rehabilitation in patients affected by PFPS. A prospective cohort study of 44 patients with a diagnosis of PFPS and an activation imbalance between the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles were enrolled. Patients underwent patellar taping (2 weeks) followed by a rehabilitation program lasting until the end of the third month. Primary outcome measures were pain and the functional level of the patellofemoral joint. Secondary outcome measures were surface electromyographic (sEMG) onset timing of the VMO/VL during seated knee extension and squat and isometric knee extensor muscle strength. Significant differences in all the outcome measures were observed between the affected and unaffected sides before treatment. The pain score significantly decreased both posttreatment (Δ = -4.7; 95% CI = -5.4 to -3.9) and at the 12-month follow-up (Δ = -5.5; 95% CI = -6.1 to -4.8), while the functional level significantly increased both posttreatment (Δ = 24; 95% CI = 18.3 to 30.2) and at the 12-month follow-up (Δ = 26; 95% CI = 21.4 to 30.6). Posttreatment, 35/44 patients (79.5%) and 31/44 patients (70.5%) achieved normal sEMG onset timing of the VMO and VL in the seated knee extension exercise and in the squat exercise, respectively. A short period of patellar taping followed by an exercise program results in long-lasting pain control in PFPS associated with muscular dysfunction. PMID:22048741

  8. Syndromic Scoliosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neurofibromatosis (NF) Noonan Syndrome VATER/VACTERL Syndrome Angelman Syndrome Rett Prader Willi Osteogenesis Imperfecta Trisomy 21 (Down's Syndrome) Symptoms Highly variable based on underlying syndrome and ...

  9. Molecular identification and genetic diversity of open reading frame 7 field isolated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome in North Sumatera, Indonesia, in the period of 2008-2014

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Faisal; Widayanti, Rini; Haryanto, Aris; Tabu, Charles Rangga

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Molecular identification and genetic diversity of open reading frame 7 (ORF7) of field isolated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in North Sumatera, Indonesia, in the period of 2008-2014. Materials and Methods: A total of 47 PRRSV samples were collected from the death case of pigs. The samples were collected from different districts in the period of 2008-2014 from North Sumatera province. Two pairs of primer were designed to amplify ORF7 of Type 1 and 2 PRRSV based on the sequence of reference viruses VR2332 and Lelystad. Viral RNAs were extracted from samples using PureLink™ micro-to-Midi total RNA purification system (Invitrogen). To amplify the ORF7 of PRRSV, the synthesis cDNA and DNA amplification were performed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR method. Then the DNA sequencing of PCR products and phylogenetic analysis were accomplished by molecular evolutionary genetics analysis version 6.0 software program. Results: RT-: PCR and nested PCR used in this study had successfully detected of 18 samples positive PRRS virus with the amplification products at 703bp and 508bp, respectively. Sequencing of the ORF7 shows that 18 PRRS viruses isolated from North Sumatera belonged to North American (NA). JXA1 Like and classic NA type viruses. Several mutations were detected, particularly in the area of nuclear localization signal (NLS1) and in NLS2. In the local viruses, which were related closed to JXA1 virus; there are two differences in amino acids in position 12 and 43 of ORF7. Our tested viruses showed that the amino acid positions 12 and 43 are Asparagine and Arginine, while the reference virus (VR2332, Lelystad, and JXA1) occupied both by Lysine. Based on differences in two amino acids at position 12 and 43 showed that viruses from North Sumatera has its own uniqueness and related closed to highly pathogenic PRRS (HP-PRRS) virus (JXA1). Conclusion: The results demonstrated that North Sumatera type PRRS virus has caused PRRS outbreaks in pig in North Sumatera between 2008 and 2014. The JAX1 like viruses had unique amino acid residue in position 12 and 43 of asparagine and lysine, and these were genetic determinants of North Sumatera viruses compared to other PRRS viruses. PMID:27047168

  10. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Usher syndrome Table of Contents Overview Symptoms Cause Inheritance ... pigmentosa syndrome Dystrophia retinae pigmentosa-dysostosis syndrome Graefe-Usher syndrome Hallgren syndrome Usher's syndrome Related Diseases Usher ...

  11. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  12. Scheie syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... as MPS I S. See also: MPS I H (Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) ... individuals with Scheie syndrome, and also Hurler and Hurler-Scheie syndromes. Early detection and treatment of spinal cord compression ...

  13. Unravelling the effects of age, period and cohort on metabolic syndrome components in a Taiwanese population using partial least squares regression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigate whether the changing environment caused by rapid economic growth yielded differential effects for successive Taiwanese generations on 8 components of metabolic syndrome (MetS): body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and uric acid (UA). Methods To assess the impact of age, birth year and year of examination on MetS components, we used partial least squares regression to analyze data collected by Mei-Jaw clinics in Taiwan in years 1996 and 2006. Confounders, such as the number of years in formal education, alcohol intake, smoking history status, and betel-nut chewing were adjusted for. Results As the age of individuals increased, the values of components generally increased except for UA. Men born after 1970 had lower FPG, lower BMI, lower DBP, lower TG, Lower LDL and greater HDL; women born after 1970 had lower BMI, lower DBP, lower TG, Lower LDL and greater HDL and UA. There is a similar pattern between the trend in levels of metabolic syndrome components against birth year of birth and economic growth in Taiwan. Conclusions We found cohort effects in some MetS components, suggesting associations between the changing environment and health outcomes in later life. This ecological association is worthy of further investigation. PMID:21619595

  14. Canakinumab (ACZ885, a fully human IgG1 anti-IL-1β mAb) induces sustained remission in pediatric patients with cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS) represents a spectrum of three auto-inflammatory syndromes, familial cold auto-inflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS), and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease/chronic infantile neurological cutaneous and articular syndrome (NOMID/CINCA) with etiology linked to mutations in the NLRP3 gene resulting in elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) release. CAPS is a rare hereditary auto-inflammatory disease, which may start early in childhood and requires a life-long treatment. Canakinumab, a fully human anti-IL-1β antibody, produces sustained selective inhibition of IL-1β. This study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of canakinumab in the treatment of pediatric CAPS patients. Methods Seven pediatric patients (five children and two adolescents) with CAPS were enrolled in a phase II, open-label study of canakinumab in patients with CAPS. Canakinumab was administered at a dose of 2 mg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.) (for patients with body weight ≤ 40 kg) or 150 mg s.c. (for patients with body weight > 40 kg) with re-dosing upon each relapse. The primary efficacy variable was time to relapse following achievement of a complete response (defined as a global assessment of no or minimal disease activity and no or minimal rash and values for serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and/or serum amyloid A (SAA) within the normal range, < 10 mg/L). Results All patients achieved a complete response within seven days after the first dose of canakinumab and responses were reinduced on retreatment following relapse. Improvements in symptoms were evident within 24 hours after the first dose, according to physician assessments. The estimated median time to relapse was 49 days (95% CI 29 to 68) in children who received a dose of 2 mg/kg. Canakinumab was well tolerated. One serious adverse event, vertigo, was reported, but resolved during treatment. Conclusions Canakinumab, 2 mg/kg or 150 mg s.c., induced rapid and sustained clinical and biochemical responses in pediatric patients with CAPS. Trial registration number ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00487708 PMID:21356079

  15. Second-Impact Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sarah; Battin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS.

  16. Second-Impact Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Sarah; Battin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Sports-related injuries are among the more common causes of injury in adolescents that can result in concussion and its sequelae, postconcussion syndrome and second-impact syndrome (SIS). Students who experience multiple brain injuries within a short period of time (hours, days, or weeks) may suffer catastrophic or fatal reactions related to SIS.…

  17. Auriculotemporal Syndrome (Frey Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Motz, Kevin M; Kim, Young J

    2016-04-01

    Frey syndrome is a common sequela of parotidectomy, and although it is not frequently manifested clinically, it can cause significant morbidity for those affected. Frey syndrome results from synkinetic autonomic reinnervation by transected postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fiber within the parotid gland to the overlying sweat glands of the skin. Many surgical techniques have been proposed to prevent the development of Frey syndrome. For those who develop clinical symptoms of Frey syndrome, objective testing can be performed with a Minor starch-iodine test. Some of the current methods to prevent and treat symptomatic Frey syndrome are reviewed. PMID:26902982

  18. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... as MPS III. See also: MPS I H (Hurler syndrome) MPS II (Hunter syndrome) MPS IV (Morquio syndrome) ... unlike the cloudy corneas seen in persons with Hurler syndrome (MPS I H). Neurological testing will reveal signs ...

  19. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Rett Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Rett Syndrome Fact Sheet ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publicaciones en Español What is Rett Syndrome? Rett syndrome is a childhood neurodevelopmental disorder that ...

  20. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Tourette Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Tourette Syndrome Print A A ... Act Around Someone Who Has It? What Is Tourette Syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a condition that affects a ...

  1. Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Antiphospholipid Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Hughes Syndrome Table of Contents ( ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Antiphospholipid Syndrome? Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder caused ...

  2. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with a defect in chromosome number 11. Infancy can be a critical period in babies with ... Children with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome who survive infancy do ... appears to be normal to very slightly decreased. Swelling of ...

  3. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system ( ... over a period of weeks and then stabilize. Guillain-Barre can be hard to diagnose. Possible tests include ...

  4. Kearns-Sayre Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NINDS NINDS Kearns-Sayre Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... the number of organs involved. Early diagnosis and periodic electrocardiogram (ECG) are important since heart block can ...

  5. Elevated levels of CXCL10 in the Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and cervical Adenitis syndrome (PFAPA) during and between febrile episodes; an indication of a persistent activation of the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Periodic Fever, Aphthous stomatitis, Pharyngitis and cervical Adenitis syndrome (PFAPA) is the most common periodic fever syndrome in childhood. Clinically, PFAPA may resemble autoinflammatory diseases, but the etiology is not fully understood. Methods We measured inflammatory proteins in plasma and hematologic parameters in children with PFAPA during and between febrile episodes, and in a control group with suspected bacterial pneumonia. In children with PFAPA, a first blood sample was taken within 24 hours of a febrile episode and a second sample between episodes. In children with pneumonia, the first sample was taken shortly after admission and a second sample after full recovery. Results A total of 22 children with PFAPA and 14 children with pneumonia were included. In children with PFAPA, levels of interleukin (IL) 6, CXCL10 and CCL4 were significantly increased during febrile episodes. The levels of IL-6 and CXCL10 were higher in children with PFAPA during febrile episodes than in children with pneumonia. The levels of CXCL10 remained higher in children with PFAPA between febrile episodes compared to children with pneumonia after recovery. Children with PFAPA had a relative eosinopenia and lymphocytopenia with reduced numbers of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during febrile episodes. This pattern was not observed in the children with pneumonia. Conclusions The results indicate an innate immune response as the initial step in PFAPA, and a subsequent adaptive response with activation and redistribution of T cells. Moreover, an activation of the innate immune system involving CXCL10 may persist between febrile episodes. CXCL10 may be a possibly clinical marker in children with PFAPA. PMID:24134207

  6. The Effect of an Exercise Program in Conjunction With Short-Period Patellar Taping on Pain, Electromyogram Activity, and Muscle Strength in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Defne; Callaghan, Michael James; Ozkan, Huseyin; Ozdag, Fatih; Atay, Ozgur Ahmet; Yuksel, Inci; Doral, Mahmut Nedim

    2010-01-01

    Background: McConnell recommended that patellar tape be kept on all day, until patients learn how to activate their vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) during an exercise program. This application may pose problems because prolonged taping may be inadvisable for some patients or even contraindicated owing to skin discomfort, irritation, or allergic reaction. Hypothesis: Wearing patellofemoral tape for a shorter duration during an exercise program would be just as beneficial as a prolonged taping application. Study Design: Prospective cohort. Methods: Twelve patients and 16 healthy people participated. Patients underwent short-period patellar taping plus an exercise program for 3 months. Numeric pain rating, muscle strength of the knee extensors, and electromyogram activity of the vastus lateralis and VMO were evaluated. Results: There were significant differences in electromyogram activity (P = .04) and knee extensor muscle strength (P = .03) between involved and uninvolved sides before treatment. After treatment, pain scores decreased, and there were no significant differences between involved and uninvolved sides in electromyogram activity (P = .68) and knee extensor strength (P = .62). Before treatment, mean VMO activation started significantly later than that of vastus lateralis, as compared with the matched healthy control group (P = .01). After treatment, these differences were nonsignificant (P = .08). Conclusion: Short-period patellar taping plus an exercise program improves VMO and vastus lateralis activation. Clinical Relevance: A shorter period of taping for the exercise program may be as beneficial as a prolonged taping application. PMID:23015969

  7. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection and management of clinical complications such as scoliosis and febrile seizures. An adequate psychological and educational program with speech therapy and motor stimulation plays an important role in the global development of the patients. Final body height is difficult to predict but growth tends to normalize after puberty. PMID:17825104

  8. Immunophenotypic predictive profiling of BRCA1-associated breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Domagala, Pawel; Huzarski, Tomasz; Lubinski, Jan; Gugala, Karol

    2010-01-01

    The immunophenotypic predictive profile of BRCA1-associated cancers including major predictive markers, i.e., PARP-1, EGFR, c-kit, HER-2, and steroid hormones (ER/PR) that may have therapeutic relevance has not yet been reported in a comprehensive study. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression of these proteins in a large cohort of BRCA1-associated breast cancers. PARP-1 immunoreactivity was found in 81.9%, EGFR in 43.6%, ER/PR in 17.9%, c-kit in 14.7%, and overexpression of HER-2 in 3.6% of cancers. For all markers studied, 8.2% of tumors were negative. Expression of only one predictive marker was found in 29.7% of cancers, and most frequently, it was PARP-1 (20.8%). In 62.1% of tumors, more than one predictive marker was expressed: PARP-1 and EGFR in 30.4%, PARP-1, and hormone receptors in 13.3% and PARP-1 with c-kit in 7.5% of all tumors. Coexpression of two or more other predictive markers was rare. There were significant differences in the median age at diagnosis of BRCA1-associated cancer between patients with ER+ vs. ER− and grades 1–2 vs. grade 3 tumors. These results demonstrate that BRCA1-associated cancers differ with respect to expression of proteins that are regarded as targets for specific therapies and that 92% of patients with BRCA1-associated cancers may benefit from one or several options for specific therapy (in addition to DNA damaging agents, e.g., cisplatin). About 8% of cancers which do not express therapeutic target proteins may not respond to such therapies. Knowledge of the immunophenotypic predictive profile may help with the recruitment of patients for trials of targeted therapies. PMID:20941507

  9. Somatic neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) inactivation characterizes NF1-associated pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Gutmann, David H.; McLellan, Michael D.; Hussain, Ibrahim; Wallis, John W.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan; Wylie, Todd; Kandoth, Cyriac; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Guha, Abhijit; Miller, Christopher A.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.

    2013-01-01

    Low-grade brain tumors (pilocytic astrocytomas) arising in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) inherited cancer predisposition syndrome are hypothesized to result from a combination of germline and acquired somatic NF1 tumor suppressor gene mutations. However, genetically engineered mice (GEM) in which mono-allelic germline Nf1 gene loss is coupled with bi-allelic somatic (glial progenitor cell) Nf1 gene inactivation develop brain tumors that do not fully recapitulate the neuropathological features of the human condition. These observations raise the intriguing possibility that, while loss of neurofibromin function is necessary for NF1-associated low-grade astrocytoma development, additional genetic changes may be required for full penetrance of the human brain tumor phenotype. To identify these potential cooperating genetic mutations, we performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) analysis of three NF1-associated pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) tumors. We found that the mechanism of somatic NF1 loss was different in each tumor (frameshift mutation, loss of heterozygosity, and methylation). In addition, tumor purity analysis revealed that these tumors had a high proportion of stromal cells, such that only 50%–60% of cells in the tumor mass exhibited somatic NF1 loss. Importantly, we identified no additional recurrent pathogenic somatic mutations, supporting a model in which neuroglial progenitor cell NF1 loss is likely sufficient for PA formation in cooperation with a proper stromal environment. PMID:23222849

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Proteus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... TN, Tosi LL, Mullikin JC, Biesecker LG. A mosaic activating mutation in AKT1 associated with the Proteus syndrome. N Engl J Med. 2011 Aug 18;365(7):611-9. Epub 2011 Jul ... Reviewed : June 2012 Published : May 31, 2016 The ...

  11. A retrospective study on equine herpesvirus type-1 associated myeloencephalopathy in France (2008-2011).

    PubMed

    van Galen, Gaby; Leblond, Agnes; Tritz, Pierre; Martinelle, Ludovic; Pronost, Stéphane; Saegerman, Claude

    2015-09-30

    Diagnosis of equine herpesvirus-1 associated myeloencephalopathy (EHM) can be troublesome, but early recognition and knowledge of risk factors are essential for prevention and control. The objectives for this study are to (1) describe EHM in France, (2) improve clinical recognition, (3) identify risk factors. Through epidemiosurveillance of acute neurological cases (all considered to be potentially infectious cases) in France (2008-2011), 26 EHM cases were identified and 29 EHM negative control cases. EHM cases were described and compared to controls with univariate, multivariate and classification and regression tree analysis. EHM cases had a 46% fatality rate and were frequently isolated cases. Most showed ataxia, paresis and a cauda equina syndrome, yet presence of other neurological signs was variable. Statistical analysis identified the following variables to be significantly associated to EHM compared to controls: introduction of a new horse to the herd, cauda equina syndrome, larger herd size, saddle horses and month of occurrence. The presence of many isolated cases, and less typical and variable clinical presentations emphasize the difficulty in diagnosing EHM. Nevertheless, history and clinical examination of acute neurological cases can be valuable in recognizing EHM early as well in order to select those cases that need further laboratory testing and infection control measures. Moreover, with a different study format and geographic location, risk factors were found to be similar to previous studies, therefore strengthening their significance to the spread of EHM. PMID:26228835

  12. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... fine motor coordination, slurred speech, memory loss, vision problems, sleep disturbances, dementia, seizures, sensory loss in the limbs, and vertigo or dizziness. Paraneoplastic syndromes include Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, stiff-person syndrome, encephalomyelitis, myasthenia ...

  13. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you have a malabsorption syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to remove ...

  14. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  15. The Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome and Periodic Limb Movement Disorder in AdultsAn Update for 2012: Practice Parameters with an Evidence-Based Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Kristo, David A.; Bista, Sabin R.; Rowley, James A.; Zak, Rochelle S.; Casey, Kenneth R.; Lamm, Carin I.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Rosenberg, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed to update the previous AASM practice parameters on the treatments, both dopaminergic and other, of RLS and PLMD. A considerable amount of literature has been published since these previous reviews were performed, necessitating an update of the corresponding practice parameters. Therapies with a STANDARD level of recommendation include pramipexole and ropinirole. Therapies with a GUIDELINE level of recommendation include levodopa with dopa decarboxylase inhibitor, opioids, gabapentin enacarbil, and cabergoline (which has additional caveats for use). Therapies with an OPTION level of recommendation include carbamazepine, gabapentin, pregabalin, clonidine, and for patients with low ferritin levels, iron supplementation. The committee recommends a STANDARD AGAINST the use of pergolide because of the risks of heart valve damage. Therapies for RLS secondary to ESRD, neuropathy, and superficial venous insufficiency are discussed. Lastly, therapies for PLMD are reviewed. However, it should be mentioned that because PLMD therapy typically mimics RLS therapy, the primary focus of this review is therapy for idiopathic RLS. Citation: Aurora RN; Kristo DA; Bista SR; Rowley JA: Zak RS; Casey KR; Lamm CI; Tracy SL; Rosenberg RS. The treatment of restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder in adultsan update for 2012: practice parameters with an evidence-based systematic review and meta-analyses. SLEEP 2012;35(8):1039-1062. PMID:22851801

  16. Problem Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... body fat to be very low, which can cause your periods to stop. This can happen if you are training hard for sports or if you ... problems with hormones. One common hormone condition that causes period problems is ... will often stop having periods. When to see a doctor top ...

  17. [Proteus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Benichou, J J; Labrune, B; Formanek, A; Denoix, C; Oger, P

    1990-01-01

    Two new cases of Proteus syndrome are reported. This congenital syndrome, first described in 1983, comprises gigantism of extremities, body hemihypertrophy, pigmented nevi and multiple tumors (subcutaneous, lipomas, hamartomas). This syndrome belongs to the same group as Recklinghausen disease, Maffucci or Klippel-Trenaunay syndromes. The prognosis is not well known but mostly depends on functional and psychologic consequences of important deformations. PMID:2206106

  18. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  19. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  20. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R. Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  1. AAV Gene Therapy for MPS1-associated Corneal Blindness.

    PubMed

    Vance, Melisa; Llanga, Telmo; Bennett, Will; Woodard, Kenton; Murlidharan, Giridhar; Chungfat, Neil; Asokan, Aravind; Gilger, Brian; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Samulski, R Jude; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Although cord blood transplantation has significantly extended the lifespan of mucopolysaccharidosis type 1 (MPS1) patients, over 95% manifest cornea clouding with about 50% progressing to blindness. As corneal transplants are met with high rejection rates in MPS1 children, there remains no treatment to prevent blindness or restore vision in MPS1 children. Since MPS1 is caused by mutations in idua, which encodes alpha-L-iduronidase, a gene addition strategy to prevent, and potentially reverse, MPS1-associated corneal blindness was investigated. Initially, a codon optimized idua cDNA expression cassette (opt-IDUA) was validated for IDUA production and function following adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector transduction of MPS1 patient fibroblasts. Then, an AAV serotype evaluation in human cornea explants identified an AAV8 and 9 chimeric capsid (8G9) as most efficient for transduction. AAV8G9-opt-IDUA administered to human corneas via intrastromal injection demonstrated widespread transduction, which included cells that naturally produce IDUA, and resulted in a >10-fold supraphysiological increase in IDUA activity. No significant apoptosis related to AAV vectors or IDUA was observed under any conditions in both human corneas and MPS1 patient fibroblasts. The collective preclinical data demonstrate safe and efficient IDUA delivery to human corneas, which may prevent and potentially reverse MPS1-associated cornea blindness. PMID:26899286

  2. [The Kleine-Levin syndrome].

    PubMed

    Visscher, F; Smit, L M; Smith, F; Boer, F; Njiokiktjien, C

    1989-12-01

    Two boys, aged 12 and 13 years, showed relapsing periods of somnolence and excessive eating, starting after a viral illness. One of them also showed periodic disturbance of sexual impulse control. The symptomatic periods were followed by symptom-free intervals in a highly characteristic pattern. This gave the clue to the diagnosis Kleine-Levin syndrome. The cause of this syndrome is unknown, in some cases a relationship between infectious disease or traumatic brain damage has been postulated. A dysfunction of the hypothalamus and associated structures is suspected. The syndrome has a rather favourable prognosis. The symptoms can be relieved by amphetamines, methylphenidate and probably also by lithium carbonate. PMID:2617509

  3. Period Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    ... and what to do if you're a girl who gets them. What Are Period Cramps? Lots of girls experience cramps before or during their periods. Cramps ... prostaglandins (say: pross-tuh-GLAN-dinz), chemicals a girl's body produces to make the muscles of the ...

  4. Irregular Periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... of 10 and 15, but some get it earlier and some later. The first period is known as menarche (pronounced: MEH-nar-kee). Doctors often talk about a girl's monthly cycle — the number of days from the start of her period to the start of the ...

  5. Role of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and TNFRSF1A R92Q mutation in the pathogenesis of TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Caminero, A; Comabella, M; Montalban, X

    2011-01-01

    It has long been known that tumour necrosis factor (TNF)/TNFRSF1A signalling is involved in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Different genetic and clinical findings over the last few years have generated renewed interest in this relationship. This paper provides an update on these recent findings. Genome-wide association studies have identified the R92Q mutation in the TNFRSF1A gene as a genetic risk factor for MS (odds ratio 1·6). This allele, which is also common in the general population and in other inflammatory conditions, therefore only implies a modest risk for MS and provides yet another piece of the puzzle that defines the multiple genetic risk factors for this disease. TNFRSF1A mutations have been associated with an autoinflammatory disease known as TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). Clinical observations have identified a group of MS patients carrying the R92Q mutation who have additional TRAPS symptoms. Hypothetically, the co-existence of MS and TRAPS or a co-morbidity relationship between the two could be mediated by this mutation. The TNFRSF1A R92Q mutation behaves as a genetic risk factor for MS and other inflammatory diseases, including TRAPS. Nevertheless, this mutation does not appear to be a severity marker of the disease, neither modifying the clinical progression of MS nor its therapeutic response. An alteration in TNF/TNFRS1A signalling may increase proinflammatory signals; the final clinical phenotype may possibly be determined by other genetic or environmental modifying factors that have not yet been identified. PMID:22059991

  6. An infrared supershell surrounding the Cygnus OB1 association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saken, Jon M.; Shull, J. M.; Garmany, Catharine D.; Nichols-Bohlin, Joy; Fesen, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    New studies are reported of a large, 2 x 5 deg peanut-shaped cavity in the far-infrared emission seen using IRAS data for the Cygnus X region. A more complete and better defined infrared supershell than reported by Lozinskaya and Repin (1990) is found and connected to the Cyg OB1 association. It is shown that the cavity represents the early stages of a superbubble produced by the winds and possible SNe from 10 to 20 massive stars. The locations and properties of these stars are used to estimate the energy deposition rate and to understand the manner in which supershells form and propagate. In Cyg OB1, spatially distributed subclustering appears to have played an important role in determining the nonspherical morphology of the superbubble.

  7. HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis: updates on the pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    McGill, Neilia-Kay; Vyas, Jui; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Tokura, Yoshiki; Piguet, Vincent

    2012-11-01

    HTLV-1-associated infective dermatitis (HAID) is the main paediatric manifestation of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It is characterised by a chronic exudative eczematous eruption and persistent infection with Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and beta-haemolytic streptococci (BHS). Prevalence is highest in the Caribbean and Brazil; however, cases have been reported in other HTLV-1 endemic regions. Approximately 20 million people worldwide are infected with HTLV-1 and only 5-10% suffer from disease. Other manifestations include adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). HAID may also progress to ATLL or TSP/HAM. Treatment options are limited to prolonged antibiotic therapy. The aim of this paper is to review existing evidence and propose new theories on the pathogenesis of HAID. The current view is that HTLV-1 infection is required and in susceptible individuals leads to immune dysregulation with subsequent immunosuppression and superinfection with SA and BHS. Evidence suggests that host, environment and genetic factors may play a causative role. Genetic factors within ethnic groups determine host immune response and carrier state or disease manifestation of HTLV-1 infection. Increased IgE levels may contribute to the SA and BHS superinfection in HAID. Additionally, the possible impact of filaggrin, skin proteinase dysregulation, Langerhans cell dysfunction and TH2 chemokines is highlighted. More than 45years since the discovery of HAID, the exact pathogenesis is still not fully understood. Further research is still needed to clearly elucidate the exact pathogenic mechanism of HAID. PMID:23163646

  8. Thyroid Function in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated the thyroid function of 181 patients (mean age 14 years) with Down's syndrome and found more thyroid dysfunctions than in the general population. Periodic thyroid hormone function tests are recommended for Down's syndrome individuals, especially as they get older. (Author/DB)

  9. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, M. S.; Farooque, A. I.; Wahid, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a life-threatening reaction of neuroleptic medication. The estimated incidence rate of neuroleptic malignant syndrome is between 1% and 1.5% of patients treated with neuroleptics. The reported mortality rate varies from 11% to 38%. Risk factors include younger males (80% less than 40 years) and physical disability. Although 80% of neuroleptic malignant syndrome cases develop within the first 2 weeks of treatment, the syndrome can develop anytime during the therapy period. The clinical picture and laboratory findings are not always unique. Less than 50% of cases manifest with classical symptoms. Deaths usually result from cardiovascular collapse. Renal failure, pulmonary emboli, aspiration pneumonia, and respiratory failure are also reported. Familiarity with the syndrome, baseline laboratory values including creatine phosphokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, serum glutamicoxaloacetic transaminase, and complete blood cell count with a differential count, and a high index of suspicion are of the utmost importance in making the diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. A judicial choice of neuroleptic medication and careful observation of patients may reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. PMID:1460685

  10. Sensitive Periods

    PubMed Central

    Zeanah, Charles H.; Gunnar, Megan R.; McCall, Robert B.; Kreppner, Jana M.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter reviews sensitive periods in human brain development based on the literature on children raised in institutions. Sensitive experiences occur when experiences are uniquely influential for the development of neural circuitry. Because in humans, we make inferences about sensitive periods from evaluations of complex behaviors, we underestimate the occurrence of sensitive periods at the level of neural circuitry. Although we are most interested in complex behaviors, such as IQ or attachment or externalizing problems, many different sensitive periods at the level of circuits probably underlie these complex behaviors. Results from a number of studies suggest that across most, but not all, domains of development, institutional rearing limited to the first 4–6 months of life is associated with no significant increase risk for long-term adverse effects relative to non-institutionalized children. Beyond that, evidence for sensitive periods is less compelling, meaning that “the earlier the better” rule for enhanced caregiving is a reasonable conclusion at the current state of the science. PMID:25125708

  11. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  12. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  13. [Gardner's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Femiano, F; Cozzolino, S; Malzone, A

    1990-01-01

    The Gardner syndrome is characterized by polyposis coli and multiple hard and soft tissue tumors. This work show crucial dentist's role in the early diagnosis important for the highly malignant potential of this syndrome. PMID:2097961

  14. Hurler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hurler syndrome is a rare disease of metabolism in which a person cannot break down long chains of sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (formerly called mucopolysaccharides). Hurler syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidosis, ...

  15. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  16. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Definition Common Signs Diagnostic Criteria (I have ... NIH to go with this criteria) Glossary Videos Proteus Syndrome is a condition which involves atypical growth ...

  17. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Rett Syndrome: Overview Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Rett syndrome is a neurological and developmental genetic disorder that ...

  18. Rett syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system that leads to developmental problems in children, especially in ... Rett syndrome occurs almost always in girls. It may be diagnosed as autism or cerebral palsy. Most Rett ...

  19. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  20. Serotonin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines that caused the syndrome In life-threatening cases, medicines that keep your muscles still (paralyze them) and ... Syndrome. Am J Psychiatry . 1991: 148:705. US Food and Drug Administration. FDA Public Health Advisory: Combined Use of ...

  1. LEOPARD syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    LEOPARD syndrome is a very rare inherited disorder in which there are problems with the skin, face, ... LEOPARD syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. This means the person only needs the abnormal ...

  2. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  3. Branchiootorenal Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rare Disease Day More Search for News on Rare Diseases Search Go Advanced News Search About GARD About ... GARD Home Diseases Branchiootorenal syndrome Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) Print friendly version Branchiootorenal syndrome ...

  4. Zellweger Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cure disorders such as Zellweger syndrome. NIH Patient Recruitment for Zellweger Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 National Institute of Child Health and ...

  5. Learning about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? What are the symptoms ... syndrome Additional Resources for Down Syndrome What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome is a chromosomal condition related to ...

  6. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dysplasia Goldenhar/Hemifacial Moebius syndrome Pfeiffer syndrome Pierre Robin Sequence Treacher Collins syndrome Other syndromes Wonder News & ... absence of the radial limb. Pfeiffer syndrome Pierre Robin Sequence Saethre-Chotzen Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a ...

  7. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  8. Cushing Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... links Share this: Page Content What is Cushing’s syndrome? Cushing’s syndrome is a condition that occurs when the body’s ... medication or as a result of a tumor, Cushing’s syndrome can develop. Many factors influence whether this happens, ...

  9. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the

  10. Rowell syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ramesh Y; Varma, Chaitanya; Bhatt, Sonia; Balachandran, C

    2014-01-01

    Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine. PMID:25506561

  11. Periodic Fever: A Review on Clinical, Management and Guideline for Iranian Patients - Part II

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Mansouri, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid; Aghighi, Yahya; Moradinejad, Mohammad-Hassan; Fereshteh-Mehregan, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Periodic fever syndromes are a group of diseases characterized by episodes of fever with healthy intervals between febrile episodes. In the first part of this paper, we presented a guideline for approaching patients with periodic fever and reviewed two common disorders with periodic fever in Iranian patients including familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and periodic fever syndromes except for periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA). In this part, we review other autoinflammatory disorders including hyper IgD, tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, autoinflammatory bone disorders and some other rare autoinflammatory disorders such as Sweet’s and Blau syndromes. In cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes group, we discussed chronic infantile neurologic cutaneous and articular (CINCA) syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome and familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome. Autoinflammatory bone disorders are categorized to monogenic disorders such as pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma ;gangraenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome, the deficiency of interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) and Majeed syndrome and polygenic background or sporadic group such as chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) or synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome are classified in sporadic group. Other autoinflammatory syndromes are rare causes of periodic fever in Iranian system registry. PMID:25562014

  12. The Orion OB1 association. 1: Stellar content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. G. A.; De Geus, E. J.; De Zeeuw, P. T.

    1994-01-01

    Walfraven photometry of established and probable members of the Orion OB1 association is presented. Effective temperature, surface gravity, luminosity and mass are derived for all stars, using atmosphere model by Kurucz (1979). Absolute magnitudes are calculated using the Straizys and Kuriliene (1981) tables. Distance moduli and visual extinctions are determined. A comparison of the visual extinctions to IRAS 100 micrometers data shows that the near edge of the Orion A and B clouds lies at a distance of approximately 320 pc, while the far edge is at approximately 500 pc. A method for deriving the ages of the subgroups by comparing theoretical isochrones to the observations in the log g, log T(sub eff) plane is presented. The derived ages suggest, contrary to earlier studies, that subgroup 1b is younger than 1c, which can possibly be explained by past geometries of the system of stars and gas. The initial mass function for Orion OB1 is derived with the aid of the Kolmogorov-Smirnoff test. Through extensive simulations, we show that it is very difficult to derive accurately the Initial Mass Function (IMF) from the available data. To within somewhat weak limits the IMF is found to be of the form xi(log M) = AM(exp -1.7 +/- 0.2) for all subgroups. The energy output of the subgroups in the form of stellar winds and supernovae is calculated and compared to the observed size and expansion velocity of the Orion-Eridanus bubble. It is shown that the energy output of the association can account for the morphology and kinematics of the interstellar medium (ISM).

  13. Periodic Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    Periodic polymers can be made by self assembly, directed self assembly and by photolithography. Such materials provide a versatile platform for 1, 2 and 3D periodic nano-micro scale composites with either dielectric or impedance contrast or both, and these can serve for example, as photonic and or phononic crystals for electromagnetic and elastic waves as well as mechanical frames/trusses. Compared to electromagnetic waves, elastic waves are both less complex (longitudinal modes in fluids) and more complex (longitudinal, transverse in-plane and transverse out-of-plane modes in solids). Engineering of the dispersion relation between wave frequency w and wave vector, k enables the opening of band gaps in the density of modes and detailed shaping of w(k). Band gaps can be opened by Bragg scattering, anti-crossing of bands and discrete shape resonances. Current interest is in our group focuses using design - modeling, fabrication and measurement of polymer-based periodic materials for applications as tunable optics and control of phonon flow. Several examples will be described including the design of structures for multispectral band gaps for elastic waves to alter the phonon density of states, the creation of block polymer and bicontinuous metal-carbon nanoframes for structures that are robust against ballistic projectiles and quasi-crystalline solid/fluid structures that can steer shock waves.

  14. Caveolin-1 associated adenovirus entry into human corneal cells.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Zhou, Xiaohong; Mukherjee, Santanu; Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V; Lee, Jeong Yoon; Ramke, Mirja; Chodosh, James; Rajaiya, Jaya

    2013-01-01

    The cellular entry of viruses represents a critical area of study, not only for viral tropism, but also because viral entry dictates the nature of the immune response elicited upon infection. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC), caused by viruses within human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D), is a severe, ocular surface infection associated with corneal inflammation. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis has previously been shown to play a critical role in entry of other HAdV species into many host cell types. However, HAdV-D endocytosis into corneal cells has not been extensively studied. Herein, we show an essential role for cholesterol rich, lipid raft microdomains and caveolin-1, in the entry of HAdV-D37 into primary human corneal fibroblasts. Cholesterol depletion using methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) profoundly reduced viral infection. When replenished with soluble cholesterol, the effect of MβCD was reversed, allowing productive viral infection. HAdV-D37 DNA was identified in caveolin-1 rich endosomal fractions after infection. Src kinase activity was also increased in caveolin-1 rich endosomal fractions after infection, and Src phosphorylation and CXCL1 induction were both decreased in caveolin-1-/- mice corneas compared to wild type mice. siRNA knock down of caveolin-1 in corneal cells reduced chemokine induction upon viral infection, and caveolin-1-/- mouse corneas showed reduced cellular entry of HAdV-D37. As a control, HAdV-C2, a non-corneal pathogen, appeared to utilize the caveolar pathway for entry into A549 cells, but failed to infect corneal cells entirely, indicating virus and cell specific tropism. Immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the presence of caveolin-1 in HAdV-D37-containing vesicles during the earliest stages of viral entry. Collectively, these experiments indicate for the first time that HAdV-D37 uses a lipid raft mediated caveolin-1 associated pathway for entry into corneal cells, and connects the processes of viral entry with downstream proinflammatory cell signaling. PMID:24147000

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Denys-Drash syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of WT1-associated Denys-Drash syndrome in two Chinese children. Ren Fail. 2011;33(9):910-4. doi: 10.3109/0886022X.2011.605528. Epub 2011 Aug ... resources on this site should not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  16. Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Devi, Basanti; Behera, Binodini; Patro, Sibasish; Pattnaik, Subhransu S; Puhan, Manas R

    2013-05-01

    Gorlin Syndrome, a rare genodermatosis, otherwise known as Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is a multisystem disease affecting skin, nervous system, eyes, endocrine glands, and bones. It is characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas, palmoplantar pits, jaw cysts, and bony deformities like kyphoscoliosis and frontal bossing. We would like to report a case of Gorlin syndrome with classical features, as this is a rare genodermatosis. PMID:23723494

  17. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties. Adults with Klinefelter syndrome may also experience primary hypogonadism (decreased testosterone production), small testes, enlarged ...

  18. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gift Stock Gift Sunshine Society Contact Privacy Policy Proteus Syndrome Foundation The Proteus Syndrome Foundation , a 501c3 ... 1 Trial with ARQ 092 in Proteus Syndrome Proteus Syndrome Patient Registry The Proteus Syndrome Foundation Contact ...

  19. Outcomes of Renal Transplantation in HIV-1 Associated Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Chheda, Neha D.; Lucas, Gregory M.; Estrella, Michelle; Fine, Derek M.; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have demonstrated that renal transplantation in HIV positive patients is both safe and effective. However, none of these studies have specifically examined outcomes in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN). Methods Medical records of all HIV-infected patients who underwent kidney transplantation at Johns Hopkins Hospital between September 2006 and January 2014 were reviewed. Data was collected to examine baseline characteristics and outcomes of transplant recipients with HIVAN defined pathologically as collapsing focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) with tubulo-interstitial disease. Results and Discussion During the study period, a total of 16 patients with HIV infection underwent renal transplantation. Of those, 11 patients were identified to have biopsy-proven HIVAN as the primary cause of their end stage renal disease (ESRD) and were included in this study. They were predominantly African American males with a mean age of 47.6 years. Seven (64%) patients developed delayed graft function (DGF), and 6 (54%) patients required post-operative dialysis within one week of transplant. Graft survival rates at 1 and 3 years were 100% and 81%, respectively. Acute rejection rates at 1 and 3 years were 18% and 27%, respectively. During a mean follow up of 3.4 years, one patient died. Conclusions Acute rejection rates in HIVAN patients in this study are higher than reported in the general ESRD population, which is similar to findings from prior studies of patients with HIV infection and ESRD of various causes. The high rejection rates appear to have no impact on short or intermediate term graft survival. PMID:26061701

  20. Alagille Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... person's discomfort. Scientists have not yet found a way to prevent Alagille syndrome. Caregivers and parents of children with Alagille syndrome should try to maximize their children's potential for growth through good eating, diet, and nutrition. [ Top ] Clinical Trials The National ...

  1. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are ... words, spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  2. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  3. Prostatitis Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. Curtis

    1991-01-01

    The many prostatitis syndromes remain a frustrating enigma to family physicians as well as specialists. An understanding of the etiology and pathophysiology of these syndromes and a rigorous diagnostic plan to properly classify the patients at first presentation are essential to a successful treatment outcome. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:21229071

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thin, and loose jointed. Most people with Marfan syndrome have heart and blood vessel problems, such as a weakness in the aorta or heart valves that leak. They may also have problems with ... diagnose Marfan syndrome. Your doctor may use your medical history, family ...

  5. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It also helps control how your body grows and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects ... A mutation, or change, in the gene that controls how the body makes fibrillin causes Marfan syndrome. Fibrillin is a ...

  6. Postthrombotic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the prevention and management of postthrombotic syndrome. Ann Pharmacother . 2009;43:1824–1835. Reproduced from Vazquez ... in the prevention and management of postthrombotic syndrome. Ann Pharmacother . 2009 ; 43 : 1824 –1835. OpenURL CrossRef Medline ↵ ...

  7. Prenatal Diagnosis of WAGR Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tezcan, Berrin; Rich, Philip; Bhide, Amarnath

    2015-01-01

    Wilm's tumour, aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 500,000 to 1 million. It is a contiguous gene syndrome due to deletion at chromosome 11p13 in a region containing WT1 and PAX6 genes. Children with WAGR syndrome mostly present in the newborn/infancy period with sporadic aniridia. The genotypic defects in WAGR syndrome have been well established. However, antenatal ultrasonographic presentation of this syndrome has never been reported. Prenatal diagnosis of this condition is possible in some cases with careful ultrasound examination of classical and nonclassical manifestations of this syndrome. The key point for this rare diagnosis was the decision to perform chromosomal microarray analysis after antenatal diagnosis of absent corpus callosum and absent cavum septum pellucidum, as this finding mandates search for potentially associated genetic disorders. We report a case of WAGR syndrome diagnosed prenatally at 29-week gestation. The diagnosis of the anomaly was based on two- and three-dimensional ultrasound as well as fetal MRI scan and microarray analysis. The ultrasonographic findings included borderline ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, and absent cavum septum pellucidum. Cytogenetic results from the amniotic fluid confirmed WAGR syndrome. Parental karyotype was normal, with no evidence of copy number change, deletion, or rearrangement of this region of chromosome 11. PMID:26605098

  8. Alzheimer's Disease and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  9. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leyton, Edward; Pross, Hugh

    1992-01-01

    To determine the effect of certain herbal and homeopathic preparations on symptoms, lymphocyte markers, and cytotoxic function of the lymphocytes in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, we studied six outpatients diagnosed with the disease by their family physicians. Patients were given herbal and homeopathic preparations after a 3-week symptom-recording period. After treatment, symptoms were again recorded. Blood samples were taken before and after treatment. None of the values showed any significant change after treatment. PMID:21221272

  10. Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  11. Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Takashima, S

    1997-04-01

    Down syndrome, trisomy of chromosome 21, is well investigated because it is a genetic disease with characteristic mental retardation and precocious dementia of Alzheimer type. Maternal serum markers of human chorionic gonadotrophin unconjugated estriol and amyloid precursor protein, nuchal skinfold on ultrasound and new genetic probes are developed to allow better detection of Down syndrome. The overproduction of A beta 42 because of excessive genes is thought to be a leading factor for early onset of dementia in Down syndrome adults. Animal models and transgenic mice may be helpful in determining the specific gene and pathogenesis for mental retardation and precocious dementia. PMID:9146996

  12. LEOPARD Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Majumdar, Biswajit; Rudra, Olympia; Chakraborty, Sougat

    2015-10-01

    LEOPARD syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited or sporadic disorder of variable penetrance and expressivity. The acronym LEOPARD stands for its cardinal clinical features including Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and Deafness. We present herein a patient with LEOPARD syndrome and distinctive features. It was noteworthy that our patient presented with the concern of generalized lentiginosis and subsequent evaluation revealed that the patient had LEOPARD syndrome. In this report we would like to highlight the importance of detailed clinical examination and appropriate imaging in patients with multiple lentigines. PMID:26632807

  13. Hubris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair. PMID:18724614

  14. Myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, D C; List, A F

    1989-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic and ineffective hematopoiesis and a varying risk of transformation to acute leukemia. Although the natural history of these syndromes is variable, several factors appear to be of prognostic importance, including the French-American-British classification, the karyotype, in vitro colony formation, and others. The pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndrome is not known, but recent evidence suggests that alterations of cellular oncogenes may be a causative factor. There is no standard therapy for myelodysplasia, and thus novel approaches to patient management are warranted. PMID:2672599

  15. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is typically caused by antibodies that bind to potassium channels on the motor nerve. Issacs' syndrome is only ... several neurological conditions that can be caused by potassium channel antibodies. Is there any treatment? Anticonvulsants, including phenytoin ...

  16. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common symptoms of Cushing's syndrome include upper body obesity, severe fatigue and muscle weakness, high blood pressure, backache, elevated blood sugar, easy bruising, and bluish-red stretch marks on ...

  17. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menkes syndrome, cells in the body can absorb copper, but they are unable to release it. It ... makes it hard for the body to distribute copper in food from the intestines into the bloodstream ...

  18. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. PMID:25840463

  19. Ohtahara Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... The course of Ohtahara syndrome is severely progressive. Seizures become more frequent, accompanied by delays in physical and cognitive development. Some children will die in infancy; others will survive but ...

  20. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease. This is called an autosomal recessive trait. There are 2 forms of Morquio syndrome: Type A and Type B. People with Type A do not have a substance ( enzyme ) called galactosamine-6-sulfatase. People with Type ...

  1. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occupational therapy (to help with issues such as language skills, hand-eye coordination and social skills) may be helpful for your child. As with any child, children who have Down syndrome need regular medical care. Because children with Down ...

  2. Levator Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse Levator ... out other painful rectal conditions (such as thrombosed hemorrhoids, fissures, or abscesses). The physical examination is often ...

  3. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Gulgonen A, Ozer K. Compartment syndrome. In: Wolfe SE, Hotchkiss RN, Pederson WC, Kozin SH, eds. Green's Operative Hand Surgery . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingston; 2012:chap 57. Jobe ...

  4. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone your body produces to help ... into energy for your body. If you are insulin resistant, too much sugar builds up in your ...

  5. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  6. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... shouts unexpectedly or blinks his eyes hard. These tics are symptoms of Luke's Tourette syndrome. But to ... looks like he's in pain or needs help. Tics are sudden, repetitive movements or sounds that some ...

  7. Troyer Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Troyer syndrome is one of more than 40 genetically-distinct neurological disorders known collectively as the hereditary ... the NINDS or the NIH is appreciated. Last Modified January 3, 2012 National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  8. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... lifestyle is a lifelong commitment. Successfully controlling metabolic syndrome requires long-term effort and teamwork with your health care providers. Rate This ... US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and ...

  9. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... others, too. Checking for metabolic syndrome mostly involves stuff your doctor would be doing anyway, like taking ... lungs. It can be hard to take this stuff seriously when your thirties and forties seem like ...

  10. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... and enables the use of recently developed animal models such as transgenic mice which are deficient in ... about the September 2011 workshop on optimizing animal models in Rett syndrome preclinical research, visit http://www. ...

  11. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... expand treatment options. Scientists also are developing mouse models that have the same characteristics as the human types of Usher syndrome. Mouse models will make it easier to determine the function ...

  12. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have many of the skeletal (bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments ... appearance to the top of the ear Aortic enlargement and/or mitral valve regurgitation (occasionally) People with ...

  13. Sotos Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Sotos Syndrome Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  14. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Tourette Syndrome Fact Sheet ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  15. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  16. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hunter syndrome is a disease in which long chains of sugar molecules (glycosaminoglycans, formerly called mucopolysaccharides ) are ... of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase. Without this enzyme, chains of sugar molecules build up in various body ...

  17. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stolinsky, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Neoplasms can produce a variety of remote effects on the host; these are referred to as paraneoplastic syndromes. The syndromes may affect any of the systems of the body, may precede or follow the diagnosis of the underlying neoplasm, and may or may not parallel the course of the neoplasm in severity. The diagnosis of and therapy for these syndromes can be challenging to a physician, but successful therapy may bring about worthwhile relief for the patient. In addition, the syndromes and the substances that cause them are sometimes useful in diagnosing and in following the course of certain neoplasms. Perhaps of greater importance, study of these remote effects of neoplasia may shed light on the nature of the neoplastic process itself. PMID:6990627

  18. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  19. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  20. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the development of effective drug therapies. NIH Patient Recruitment for Dravet Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Epilepsy Foundation 8301 Professional Place East, ...

  1. [Diogenes syndrome].

    PubMed

    Klosterkötter, J; Peters, U H

    1985-11-01

    Endogenous or physically conditioned psychoses are usually considered to be the underlying cause of signs of extreme self-neglect and social retreat if these occur suddenly in persons who had been socially successful up to that time. However, in recent years several independent researchers have found extreme sociocultural refusal attitudes even in patients not displaying any psychotic disturbances. This unexpected result led to a new syndrome concept which has since been accepted internationally under the designation "Diogenes syndrome". Hence, the Diogenes syndrome comprises shameless neglect of body and personal environment, associated with collectionism, social retreat and rejection of any well-meant help. It has been reported that this constellation of signs allegedly occurs with enhanced frequency in women over 60 years of age with self-isolation tendencies in their previous life history. The following article reviews the literature published so far on the Diogenes syndrome and presents two cases treated by the authors, as a suitable means to re-examine and to define the new syndrome concept more precisely. The following conclusions can be drawn from the cases already reported in the literature and the two cases newly presented here: The socioculturally complete rejection associated with the Diogenes syndrome is the final result of a personality-based abnormal emotional reaction development. Marked seclusion tendencies in the previous life history, as well as organic brain diseases, are relevant. Medical treatment can be successful mainly by means of behaviour therapy techniques. PMID:4077006

  2. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem. PMID:22927862

  3. Novel loss-of-function variants in DIAPH1 associated with syndromic microcephaly, blindness, and early onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Barry, Brenda J; Rajab, Anna; El-Quessny, Malak; Seman, Ann; Coury, Stephanie Newton; Barkovich, A James; Yang, Edward; Walsh, Christopher A; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Stoler, Joan M

    2016-02-01

    Exome sequencing identified homozygous loss-of-function variants in DIAPH1 (c.2769delT; p.F923fs and c.3145C>T; p.R1049X) in four affected individuals from two unrelated consanguineous families. The affected individuals in our report were diagnosed with postnatal microcephaly, early-onset epilepsy, severe vision impairment, and pulmonary symptoms including bronchiectasis and recurrent respiratory infections. A heterozygous DIAPH1 mutation was originally reported in one family with autosomal dominant deafness. Recently, however, a homozygous nonsense DIAPH1 mutation (c.2332C4T; p.Q778X) was reported in five siblings in a single family affected by microcephaly, blindness, early onset seizures, developmental delay, and bronchiectasis. The role of DIAPH1 was supported using parametric linkage analysis, RNA and protein studies in their patients' cell lines and further studies in human neural progenitors cells and a diap1 knockout mouse. In this report, the proband was initially brought to medical attention for profound metopic synostosis. Additional concerns arose when his head circumference did not increase after surgical release at 5 months of age and he was diagnosed with microcephaly and epilepsy at 6 months of age. Clinical exome analysis identified a homozygous DIAPH1 mutation. Another homozygous DIAPH1 mutation was identified in the research exome analysis of a second family with three siblings presenting with a similar phenotype. Importantly, no hearing impairment is reported in the homozygous affected individuals or in the heterozygous carrier parents in any of the families demonstrating the autosomal recessive microcephaly phenotype. These additional families provide further evidence of the likely causal relationship between DIAPH1 mutations and a neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26463574

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome, ... Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome? Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a ...

  5. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen What is Usher Syndrome? What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized ...

  6. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Tics and Tourette Syndrome Overview What is Tourette syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a type of tic disorder. Children who have Tourette syndrome will repeat both movements and ...

  7. Learning about WAGR Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... children who have WAGR syndrome may have normal intelligence. Other symptoms of WAGR syndrome may also include: ... mild. Some individuals with WAGR syndrome have normal intelligence. Children with WAGR syndrome should be referred for ...

  8. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the tip Reifenstein syndrome (also known as Gilbert-Dreyfus syndrome or Lubs syndrome) Infertile male syndrome ... F, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al., eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, ...

  9. National Down Syndrome Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... ndss.org Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ... Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ...

  10. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meet Jessi Patient to Patient - John Connect on Twitter Tweets by @AlportSyndFndn Alport Syndrome Diagnosis Early and ... Alport Syndrome YouTube Alport Syndrome LinkedIn Alport Syndrome Twitter Alport Syndrome Flickr Alport Syndrome Instagram Follow @twitterapi ...

  11. Preexcitation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2016-03-01

    The classic electrocardiogram in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by a short PR interval and prolonged QRS duration in the presence of sinus rhythm with initial slurring. The clinical syndrome associated with above electrocardiogram finding and the history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is referred to as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Various eponyms describing accessory or anomalous conduction pathways in addition to the normal pathway are collectively referred to as preexcitation syndromes. The latter form and associated eponyms are frequently used in literature despite controversy and disagreements over their actual anatomical existence and electrophysiological significance. This communication highlights inherent deficiencies in the knowledge that has existed since the use of such eponyms began. With the advent of curative ablation, initially surgical, and then catheter based, the knowledge gaps have been mostly filled with better delineation of the anatomic and electrophysiological properties of anomalous atrioventricular pathways. It seems reasonable, therefore, to revisit the clinical and electrophysiologic role of preexcitation syndromes in current practice. PMID:26897561

  12. Expressive vocabulary ability of toddlers with Williams syndrome or Down syndrome: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Mervis, C B; Robinson, B F

    2000-01-01

    School-aged children and adults with Williams syndrome have repeatedly been found to evidence an expressive vocabulary advantage relative to same-aged individuals with Down syndrome. However, Singer Harris, Bellugi, Bates, Jones, and Rossen (1997) argued that this advantage is reversed during the initial period of language acquisition; during this time, children with Down syndrome have larger expressive vocabularies than children with Williams syndrome. This result may have been due to methodological problems, however. This study uses a different design to reconsider the question of whether toddlers with Williams syndrome show an expressive vocabulary advantage over same-aged toddlers with Down syndrome. Parents of twenty-four 2-year-olds with Williams syndrome and twenty-eight 2-year-olds with Down syndrome completed the vocabulary checklist from the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory: Words and Sentences. The 2 groups were carefully matched for chronological age (CA). Results indicated that the toddlers with Williams syndrome had substantially and significantly larger expressive vocabulary sizes than did the CA-matched children with Down syndrome. Additional analyses of children for whom data were available between the ages of 2 years 0 months and 2 years 3 months indicated that the expressive vocabulary advantage for children with Williams syndrome was present even at this very young age when none of the children had begun to produce word combinations. The Discussion section that follows addresses the discrepancy between these findings and those of Singer Harris et al. and considers the variability present within both the Williams syndrome and Down syndrome samples. Also discussed is the continuity across the lifespan in both the expressive vocabulary advantage shown by individuals with Williams syndrome relative to same-aged individuals with Down syndrome and the expressive vocabulary variability within each syndrome. PMID:10916578

  13. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, Lia; Taravelli, Erika; Girardengo, Giulia; Schwartz, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    The Short QT Syndrome is a recently described new genetic disorder, characterized by abnormally short QT interval, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and life threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This autosomal dominant syndrome can afflict infants, children, or young adults; often a remarkable family background of cardiac sudden death is elucidated. At electrophysiological study, short atrial and ventricular refractory periods are found, with atrial fibrillation and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia easily induced by programmed electrical stimulation. Gain of function mutations in three genes encoding K+ channels have been identified, explaining the abbreviated repolarization seen in this condition: KCNH2 for Ikr (SQT1), KCNQ1 for Iks (SQT2) and KCNJ2 for Ik1 (SQT3). The currently suggested therapeutic strategy is an ICD implantation, although many concerns exist for asymptomatic patients, especially in pediatric age. Pharmacological treatment is still under evaluation; quinidine has shown to prolong QT and reduce the inducibility of ventricular arrhythmias, but awaits additional confirmatory clinical data. PMID:20126594

  14. [Carotidynia and Eagle syndrome: two neck pain syndromes to be rediscovered].

    PubMed

    Dulguerov, Pavel; Kohler, Romain; Becker, Minerva

    2011-10-01

    Two classical syndromes of upper cervical pain in the carotid region are discussed: carotidynia and Eagle syndrome. In both cases, after an initial period of enthusiasm, poorly defined diagnostic criteria led to frequent wrong diagnosis and poor treatment responses. This led to doubts about the existence of these syndromes. New radiologic diagnostic criteria have emerged and should allow for a more precise diagnosis. With the correct diagnosis, medical and surgical treatments should be better tailored and more efficient. PMID:22046682

  15. [Kallmann syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mokosch, A; Bernecker, C; Willenberg, H S; Neumann, N J

    2011-10-01

    The Kallmann syndrome is a very rare congenital association of gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and hyposmia or anosmia. Clinically it is characterized by low serum concentrations of testosterone and inadequate low levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone as well as incomplete sexual maturation, lack of secondary sexual features (facial and body hair growth, deepening of the voice), micropenis and sometimes even cryptorchidism. The reduced or absent sense of smell is typical for the Kallmann syndrome and distinguishes this syndrome from other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Additional findings may include synkinesia, hearing loss, unilateral renal aplasia, brachy- or syndactyly, agenesis of corpus callosum, cleft palate and dental agenesis. A 19-year-old man presented to our male infertility clinic with delayed sexual maturation, eunuchoid habitus, micropenis, cryptorchidism, erectile dysfunction and absence of ejaculation, anemia and osteoporosis as well as low serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone in combination with hyposmia. PMID:21918848

  16. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  17. Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nivean, M; Utkarsha, P

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudoexfoliation (PXF) syndrome is a well-recognized clinical entity of considerable clinical significance. It is associated with poor mydriasis, cataracts with weak zonular support, secondary glaucoma and possibly with biochemical abnormalities, such as elevated homocysteine and systemic diseases involving the cardiovascular and central nervous system. There have also been some recent studies identifying mutations in genes which are associated with PXF. How to cite this article: Ariga M, Nivean M, Utkarsha P. Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome. J Current Glau Prac 2013;7(3): 118-120.

  18. Eagle syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro Costa; Mendanha, Mário; Frada, Tiago; Carvalho, Jorge; Silva, Alvaro; Amarante, José

    2014-01-01

    Eagle syndrome, also known as elongated styloid process, is a condition first described by Watt Eagle in 1937. It occurs when an elongated styloid process or calcified stylohyoid ligament causes recurrent throat pain or foreign body sensation, dysphagia, or facial pain. Additional symptoms may include neck or throat pain with radiation to the ipsilateral ear. It is usually hard to diagnose because the symptoms related to this condition can be confused with those attributed to a wide variety of facial neuralgias. In this article, a case of Eagle syndrome exhibiting unilateral symptoms with bilateral elongation of styloid process is reported. PMID:24406612

  19. Imaging manifestations of a dreaded obstetric complication in the immediate postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    Zarghouni, Mehrzad; Cannon, Walter

    2014-01-01

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelet) syndrome is a dreaded complication that may develop during pregnancy or in the immediate postpartum period. Rarely this syndrome manifests itself with imaging findings. We report a case of HELLP syndrome in which the diagnosis was reaffirmed via imaging findings. PMID:24688204

  20. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26118429

  1. Aicardi Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Aicardi Syndrome Foundation P.O. Box 3202 St. Charles, IL 60174 web@aicardisyndrome.org http://www.aicardisyndrome.org Tel: 800-374-8518 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  2. Joubert Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 Joubert Syndrome Foundation & Related Cerebellar Disorders 1415 West Avenue Cincinnati, OH 45215 info@jsfrcd.org http://www.jsfrcd.org Tel: 614-864-1362 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  3. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 800-432-6435 Fax: 630-978-7408 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW Suite 1200 Washington, DC 20006 Info@thearc.org http://www.thearc.org Tel: 202-534-3700; 800-433-5255 Fax: 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, ...

  4. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.

  5. Alport Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... older the risk of kidney failure increases. All boys and girls with the autosomal recessive type of Alport Syndrome ... with this disease have the X-linked type. Boys with this type are severely ... in their lives. Girls with this type usually have milder symptoms than ...

  6. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  7. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... be cured. Early treatment programs can help improve skills. They may include speech, physical, occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many people with Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  8. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Web version Metabolic Syndrome Overview What is insulin resistance? Your body changes most of the food you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows ... as insulin resistance. If you have insulin resistance, your body will ...

  9. Prenatal Testing for Intellectual Disability: Misperceptions and Reality with Lessons from down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acharya, Kruti

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In the United States, it is recommended that prenatal testing for Down syndrome be offered to all women. Because of this policy and consequent public perception, having Down syndrome has become a disadvantage in the prenatal period. However, in the postnatal period, there may be…

  10. Prenatal Testing for Intellectual Disability: Misperceptions and Reality with Lessons from down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acharya, Kruti

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In the United States, it is recommended that prenatal testing for Down syndrome be offered to all women. Because of this policy and consequent public perception, having Down syndrome has become a disadvantage in the prenatal period. However, in the postnatal period, there may be

  11. [POEMS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Masson, C; Krespi, Y

    1994-04-01

    POEMS syndrome has been defined as an association of plasma cell dyscrasia with polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein and skin changes. Although certain authors do not distinguish this syndrome from osteosclerosing myeloma, syndromes comparable to POEMS have been observed without bone lesions. Others have described the clinical features involved under the terms of Crow-Fukase's syndrome, PEP syndrome (pigmentation, oedema, plasma cell dyscrasia, or Takatsuki's syndrome. Seen in men twice as often as in women, usually between the ages of 40-50 years, all five clinical features are not always present or may be accompanied by other signs. The first sign of the peripheral polyneuropathy is usually sensorial impairment followed by distal then proximal motor deficit. The deficit is usually severe and 50% of the patients become unable to walk. Cranial nerves are rarely involved. Liver, spleen and lymph node enlargement are observed. The most frequent signs of an endocrinopathy are gynaecomastia, atrophy of the testicules, impotence and amenorrhoea. Testosterone levels are low and oestrogen levels are increased in men together with luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and prolactin. Hypothyroidism is frequent and diabetes mellitus is observed in 50% of the patients. Protein M is a monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG or IgA), almost always with a light lambda chain. Skin changes include hyperpigmentation, hypertrichosis, hyperhidrosis, thickening of the skin suggestive of sclerodermia and papillary angiomas. Other signs, especially peripheral oedema often occur early in the disease course and may precede the peripheral neuropathy. POEMS syndrome is often associated with a myeloma (up to 50% of the cases in certain series). Although immunoglobulin deposit on myelin sheaths, anti-endocrine antibodies and receptors of lambda chains have been proposed as playing a role, no mechanism of pathogenesis has been determined. The natural history of the disease leads to a severe polyneuropathy. The patients become totally bedridden and death results from complications of decubitus rather from the direct effect of the underlying dyscrasia. When bone lesions are minor, radiotherapy or surgery can improve the neuropathy and resection of a solitary plasmocytoma can lead to total remission. Chemotherapy or corticosteroids may improve the polyneuropathy in certain cases. Plasma exchange has not been successful. PMID:8072960

  12. Influence of advancing age on clinical presentation, treatment efficacy and safety, and long-term outcome of pre-excitation syndromes: a retrospective cohort study of 961 patients included over a 25-year period

    PubMed Central

    Brembilla-Perrot, Béatrice; Olivier, Arnaud; Sellal, Jean-Marc; Manenti, Vladimir; Brembilla, Alice; Villemin, Thibaut; Admant, Philippe; Beurrier, Daniel; Bozec, Erwan; Girerd, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives There are very little data on pre-excitation syndrome (PS) in the elderly. We investigated the influence of advancing age on clinical presentation, treatment and long-term outcome of PS. Setting Single-centre retrospective study of patient files. Participants In all, 961 patients (72 patients ≥60 years (mean 68.5±6), 889 patients <60 years (mean 30.5±14)) referred for overt pre-excitation and indication for electrophysiological study (EPS) were followed for 5.3±5 years. Usual care included 24 h Holter monitoring, echocardiography and EPS. Patients underwent accessory pathway (AP) ablation if necessary. Primary and secondary outcome measures Occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) or procedure-induced adverse event. Results Electrophysiological data and recourse to AP ablation (43% vs 48.5%, p=0.375) did not significantly differ between the groups. Older patients more often had symptomatic forms (81% vs 63%, p=0.003), history of spontaneous AF (8% vs 3%, p=0.01) or adverse presentation (poorly tolerated arrhythmias: 18% vs 7%, p=0.0009). In multivariable analysis, patients ≥60 years had a significantly higher risk of history of AF (OR=4.2, 2.1 to 8.3, p=0.001) and poorly tolerated arrhythmias (OR=3.8, 1.8 to 8.1, p=0.001). Age ≥60 years was associated with an increased major AP ablation complication risk (10% vs 1.9%, p=0.006). During follow-up, occurrence of AF (13.9% vs 3.6%, p<0.001) and incidence of poorly tolerated tachycardia (4.2% vs 0.6%, p=0.001) were more frequent in patients ≥60 years, although frequency of ablation failure or recurrence was similar (20% vs 15.5%, p=0.52). In multivariable analysis, patients ≥60 years had a significantly higher risk of AF (OR=2.9, 1.2 to 6.8, p≤0.01). Conclusions In this retrospective monocentre study, patients ≥60 years referred for PS work up appeared at higher risk of AF and adverse presentation, both prior and after the work up. These results suggest that, in elderly patients, the decision for EPS and AP ablation should be discussed in light of their suspected higher risk of events and ablation complications. However, these findings should be further validated in future prospective multicentre studies. PMID:27188807

  13. Down syndrome in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    al-Awadi, S A; Farag, T I; Teebi, A S; Naguib, K K; Sundareshan, T S; Murthy, D S

    1990-01-01

    During a 7-year-period (1980-1986) trisomy 21 was confirmed in 635 cases (257 males and 278 females). There were 611 cases of trisomy 21 (96.2%), 12 of different translocations (1.9%), 9 of mosaicism (1.4%), and 3 with nonclassical karyotypes (0.5%). The frequency of chromosome aberrations in our study is compared to that of major world-wide cytogenetic surveys comprising 17,738 Down syndrome cases. These surveys showed that regular trisomy 21 constitutes 92.9%, translocations 4.3%, mosaicism 2.2%, and nonclassical karyotypes 0.5%. PMID:2149982

  14. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  15. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal

  16. Thyroid Hormone Receptors Predict Prognosis in BRCA1 Associated Breast Cancer in Opposing Ways

    PubMed Central

    Heublein, Sabine; Mayr, Doris; Meindl, Alfons; Angele, Martin; Gallwas, Julia; Jeschke, Udo; Ditsch, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Since BRCA1 associated breast cancers are frequently classified as hormone receptor negative or even triple negative, the application of endocrine therapies is rather limited in these patients. Like hormone receptors that bind to estrogen or progesterone, thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. TRs might be interesting biomarkers - especially in the absence of classical hormone receptors. The current study aimed to investigate whether TRs may be specifically expressed in BRCA1 associated cancer cases and whether they are of prognostic significance in these patients as compared to sporadic breast cancer cases. This study analyzed TRα and TRβ immunopositivity in BRCA1 associated (n = 38) and sporadic breast cancer (n = 86). Further, TRs were studied in MCF7 (BRCA1 wildtype) and HCC3153 (BRCA1 mutated) cells. TRβ positivity rate was significantly higher in BRCA1 associated as compared to sporadic breast cancers (p = 0.001). The latter observation remained to be significant when cases that had been matched for clinicopathological criteria were compared (p = 0.037). Regarding BRCA1 associated breast cancer cases TRβ positivity turned out to be a positive prognostic factor for five-year (p = 0.007) and overall survival (p = 0.026) while TRα positivity predicted reduced five-year survival (p = 0.030). Activation of TRβ resulted in down-modulation of CTNNB1 while TRα inhibition reduced cell viability in HCC3153. However, only BRCA1 wildtype MCF7 cells were capable of rapidly degrading TRα1 in response to T3 stimulation. Significantly, this study identified TRβ to be up-regulated in BRCA1 associated breast cancer and revealed TRs to be associated with patients’ prognosis. TRs were also found to be expressed in triple negative BRCA1 associated breast cancer. Further studies need to be done in order to evaluate whether TRs may become interesting targets of endocrine therapeutic approaches, especially when tumors are triple-negative. PMID:26029931

  17. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:pages 391-391. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: etiology, diagnosis, management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. Comprehensive ...

  18. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R.; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors. PMID:26365061

  19. Kartagener syndrome.

    PubMed

    Skeik, Nedaa; Jabr, Fadi I

    2011-01-01

    Kartagener syndrome is a rare, ciliopathic, autosomal recessive genetic disorder that causes a defect in the action of the cilia lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tube. Patients usually present with chronic recurrent rhinosinusitis, otitis media, pneumonia, and bronchiectasis caused by pseudomonal infection. Situs inversus can be seen in about 50% of cases. Diagnosis can be made by tests to prove impaired cilia function, biopsy, and genetic studies. Treatment is supportive. In severe cases, the prognosis can be fatal if bilateral lung transplantation is delayed. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with chronic recurrent upper respiratory infections, pseudomonal pneumonia, and chronic bronchiectasis who presented with acute respiratory failure. She was diagnosed with Kartagener syndrome based on her clinical presentation and genetic studies. She expired on ventilator with refractory respiratory and multiorgan failure. PMID:21403791

  20. Overtraining Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kreher, Jeffrey B.; Schwartz, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Fatigue and underperformance are common in athletes. Understanding overtraining syndrome (OTS) is helpful in the evaluation, management, and education of athletes. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles in English were searched with OVID (1948-2011) and PubMed using the following keywords: overtraining syndrome, overtraining, overreaching, unexplained underperformance, staleness, pathophysiology, management, treatment, evaluation. Bibliographies were reviewed for additional resources. Results: OTS appears to be a maladapted response to excessive exercise without adequate rest, resulting in perturbations of multiple body systems (neurologic, endocrinologic, immunologic) coupled with mood changes. Many hypotheses of OTS pathogenesis are reviewed, and a clinical approach to athletes with possible OTS (including history, testing, and prevention) is presented. Conclusions: OTS remains a clinical diagnosis with arbitrary definitions per the European College of Sports Science’s position statement. History and, in most situations, limited serologies are helpful. However, much remains to be learned given that most past research has been on athletes with overreaching rather than OTS. PMID:23016079

  1. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  2. Dravet syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Incorpora, Gemma

    2009-01-01

    "Dravet syndrome" (DS) previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized), which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB). DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+). PMID:19737414

  3. [Kabuki syndrome].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Rikke Børthy; Lindholm, Pernille; Bonde, Christian T

    2010-05-01

    A clinical case of the rare Kabuki syndrome is described in a 2-year-old boy. At the time of birth he was diagnosed with cleft palate and from the age of six months he presented with unusual facial features and slow psychomotoric development. At the age of two he has no language and only minimal speech perception and is showing signs of growth retardation. PMID:20444412

  4. Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Gilles; Heidenreich, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    Animals presenting with brachycephalic syndrome suffer from multilevel obstruction of the airways as well as secondary structural collapse. Stenotic nares, aberrant turbinates, nasopharyngeal collapse, soft palate elongation and hyperplasia, laryngeal collapse, and left bronchus collapse are being described as the most common associated anomalies. Rhinoplasty and palatoplasty as well as newer surgical techniques and postoperative care strategies have resulted in significant improvement of the prognosis even in middle-aged dogs. PMID:27012936

  5. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  6. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of

  7. Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhambhani, Vikas; Muenke, Maximilian

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, vision problems, hearing loss, and lymphedema. Familial recurrence is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, but most cases are due to de novo mutations. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical features, but may be missed in mildly affected patients. Molecular genetic testing can confirm diagnosis in 70% of cases and has important implications for genetic counseling and management. Most patients with Noonan syndrome are intellectually normal as adults, but some may require multidisciplinary evaluation and regular follow-up care. Age-based Noonan syndrome-specific growth charts and treatment guidelines are available. PMID:24444506

  8. Hypereosinophilic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Casey; Ogbogu, Princess

    2016-04-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome consists of a group of disorders characterized by abnormal accumulation of eosinophils in the blood or peripheral tissues, independent of known secondary causes of eosinophilia such as parasitic infection. Clinical manifestations of the condition are highly variable, ranging from asymptomatic eosinophilia to severe tissue damage and end-organ failure. This entity has been recognized for decades, with early studies identifying distinct groups of patients with differing symptoms, exam findings, laboratory abnormalities, and prognosis. In the past, these patients were treated with non-targeted immunosuppressive agents, often with limited efficacy. More recently, advances in the knowledge of eosinophil biology and molecular diagnostics have allowed for more specific delineation of the many disease subgroups that characterize hypereosinophilic syndrome. Identification of these groups has led to a personalized management approach to the condition, with improved diagnostic techniques as well as stratification of patients into more effective treatment groups. This review will discuss the evolution of the definition of hypereosinophilic syndrome, outline current disease classifications, provide a guide for evaluation and monitoring, and discuss current and future therapeutic modalities. PMID:26475367

  9. Heterotaxy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Heterotaxy is defined as an abnormality where the internal thoraco-abdominal organs demonstrate abnormal arrangement across the left-right axis of the body. This broad term includes patients with a wide variety of very complex cardiac lesions. Patients with heterotaxy can be stratified into the subsets of asplenia syndrome and polysplenia syndrome, or the subsets of heterotaxy with isomerism of the right atrial appendages and heterotaxy with isomerism of the left atrial appendages. Treatment of patients with isomerism is determined by the nature and severity of the associated cardiac and extracardiac lesions. Most cardiac operations for patients with isomerism are palliative in nature, since normal anatomy is rarely achieved and mortality rates remain high for patients with heterotaxy syndrome. Patients with left isomerism in general have less severe cardiac malformations than those with right isomerism and, hence, more chance of biventricular repair. For almost all patients with right isomerism, and for many with left isomerism, biventricular repair will not be feasible, and all palliative protocols are then staging procedures prior to a Fontan-type repair. Recent advances in medical management, and improvements in surgical techniques have resulted in improved survival for these patients, and the surgical outcomes are comparable to those with Fontan circulation irrespective of the presence or absence of heterotaxy. PMID:21731561

  10. Hepatorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lata, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is defined as a functional renal failure in patients with liver disease with portal hypertension and it constitutes the climax of systemic circulatory changes associated with portal hypertension. This term refers to a precisely specified syndrome featuring in particular morphologically intact kidneys, where regulatory mechanisms have minimised glomerular filtration and maximised tubular resorption and urine concentration, which ultimately results in uraemia. The syndrome occurs almost exclusively in patients with ascites. Type 1 HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume due to both an extreme splanchnic arterial vasodilatation and a reduction of cardiac output. Type 2 HRS is characterised by a stable or slowly progressive renal failure so that its main clinical consequence is not acute renal failure, but refractory ascites, and its impact on prognosis is less negative. Liver transplantation is the most appropriate therapeutic method, nevertheless, only a few patients can receive it. The most suitable “bridge treatments” or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. Terlipressin is at an initial dose of 0.5-1 mg every 4 h by intravenous bolus to 3 mg every 4 h in cases when there is no response. Renal function recovery can be achieved in less than 50% of patients and a considerable decrease in renal function may reoccur even in patients who have been responding to therapy over the short term. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt plays only a marginal role in the treatment of HRS. PMID:23049205

  11. Acrodysostosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-01-01

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR-Gsα-cAMP-PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway. PMID:24363928

  12. Acrodysostosis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-01-01

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR–Gsα–cAMP–PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway. PMID:24363928

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of Robinow syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Castro, Simon; Peraza, Efren; Barraza, Astrid; Zapata, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Robinow syndrome, also known as fetal face syndrome, is a rare genetically heterogeneous condition characterized mainly by mesomelic limb shortening, facial malformations, and genital abnormalities. This report describes the sonographic findings in a case of autosomal-dominant Robinow syndrome diagnosed at 23.1 weeks' gestation, in a patient with no history of affected relatives. Here we describe the sonographic characteristics of this syndrome from the diagnosis until birth. The prenatal and postnatal findings, the differential diagnosis, and the prognosis of patients with this syndrome are discussed. 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound, 42:297-300, 2014. PMID:24151023

  14. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  15. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes problems with the skin, sinuses, lungs, bones, and teeth. ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome. It is named after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was ...

  16. Restless Legs Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Restless Legs Syndrome Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS ... I get more information? What is restless legs syndrome? Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder ...

  17. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome is spontaneous, meaning it happens randomly. Such random mutations are usually not inherited or passed from ... of Rett syndrome will be more severe. This random process allows most females with Rett syndrome to ...

  18. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  19. Learning about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the mothers of infants with Down syndrome. Intelligence in individuals with Down syndrome ranges from low ... is not possible to tell the level of intelligence a baby with Down syndrome will have. All ...

  20. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  1. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research on Marfan syndrome Currently, NHGRI is not conducting research on Marfan syndrome. The National Institutes of Health is conducting a research study involving Marfan syndrome: Manifestations of Heritable Disorders ...

  2. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... life expectancy. Do children with Down syndrome have eye problems? Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased ... When should children with Down syndrome receive an eye exam? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that ...

  3. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  4. Myriad manifestations of Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bagul, Pritish K; Borgaonkar, Devendra V; Jaiswal, Vinay; Phadke, Milind S; Lanjewar, Charan P; Kerkar, Prafulla G

    2015-01-01

    4 months male child presented with failure to thrive. On general examination child had normal O2 saturation with characteristic elfin facies. Further evaluation of the patient showed major manifestations of Williams syndrome in form of supravalvar aortic stenosis, branched pulmonary artery stenosis along with cardiomyopathy. Although the entity is known, this article shows comprehensive diagnostic workup with the aid of multimodality imaging techniques. The genetic diagnosis of Williams syndrome was confirmed using fluroscent in situ hybridisation techniques (FISH). In this patient most of the manifestations of elastin vasculopathy were noted in the form of involvement of ascending aorta, pulmonary arteries and myocardium. We also want to emphasis the importance of echocardiography in newborn patients with dysmorphic facies as Williams syndrome can be easily missed in neonatal period. PMID:26071298

  5. Myriad manifestations of Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bagul, Pritish K.; Borgaonkar, Devendra V.; Jaiswal, Vinay; Phadke, Milind S.; Lanjewar, Charan P.; Kerkar, Prafulla G.

    2015-01-01

    4 months male child presented with failure to thrive. On general examination child had normal O2 saturation with characterstic elfin facies. Further evaluation of the patient showed major manifestations of Williams syndrome in form of supravalvar aortic stenosis, branched pulmonary artery stenosis along with cardiomyopathy. Although the entity is known, this article shows comprehensive diagnostic workup with the aid of multimodality imaging techniques. The genetic diagnosis of Williams syndrome was confirmed using fluroscent in situ hybridisation techniques (FISH). In this patient most of the manifestations of elastin vasculopathy were noted in the form of involvement of ascending aorta, pulmonary arteries and myocardium. We also want to emphasis the importance of echocardiography in newborn patients with dysmorphic facies as Williams syndrome can be easily missed in neonatal period. PMID:26071298

  6. Guillain Barre syndrome in an HIV-1-infected patient after the beginning of combined antiretroviral therapy: an immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome?

    PubMed

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Digiulio, Maria Anna; Cavallari, Eugenio Nelson; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-associated Guillan-Barre syndrome (hGBS) is an ascendant progressive polyradiculoneuropathy described throughout the course of the viral disease, mainly associated with the acute retroviral syndrome. HGBS is occasionally described in severely immunocompromised subjects in the context of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. The case described occurred soon after the start of a combined antiretroviral treatment in an HIV-1 infected patient with ulcerative colitis in the absence of severe immunosuppression. This manifestation may be interpreted as an uncommon appearance of an immune reconstitution syndrome in the presence of a predisposing autoimmune pathology. PMID:24531178

  7. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  8. Syndrome in question. MAGIC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Ana Cláudia Mendes do; Gaspardo, Daniela Barros Cortez; Cortez, Tatiana Mimura; Miot, Hélio Amante

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a male 40-year-old patient with established diagnosis of Behçet's disease which had evolved to recurrent bilateral auricular polychondritis crises. MAGIC syndrome (mouth and genital ulcers with inflamed cartilage) is rare and groups together patients with this clinical picture without necessarily fulfilling the clinical criteria for Behçet's disease or relapsing polychondritis, demonstrating an independent disorder. PMID:24626673

  9. Familial Periodic Paralyses

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS NINDS Familial Periodic Paralyses Information Page Synonym(s): Periodic Paralyses Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What are Familial Periodic Paralyses? Is there any treatment? What is the ...

  10. Down syndrome and ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Verger, P

    1997-12-01

    This review examines the epidemiologic and experimental studies into the possible role ionizing radiation might play in Down Syndrome (trisomy 21). It is prompted by a report of a temporal cluster of cases of this chromosomal disorder observed in West Berlin exactly 9 mo after the radioactive cloud from Chernobyl passed. In approximately 90% of cases, Down Syndrome is due to the nondisjunction of chromosome 21, most often in the oocyte, which may be exposed to ionizing radiation during two separate periods: before the completion of the first meiosis or around the time of ovulation. Most epidemiologic studies into trisomies and exposure to ionizing radiation examine only the first period; the Chernobyl cluster is related to the second. Analysis of these epidemiologic results indicates that the possibility that ionizing radiation might be a risk factor in Down Syndrome cannot be excluded. The experimental results, although sometimes contradictory, demonstrate that irradiation may induce nondisjunction in oogenesis and spermatogenesis; they cannot, however, be easily extrapolated to humans. The weaknesses of epidemiologic studies into the risk factors for Down Syndrome at birth (especially the failure to take into account the trisomy cases leading to spontaneous abortion) are discussed. We envisage the utility and feasibility of new studies, in particular among women exposed to prolonged or repeated artificially-produced ionizing radiation. PMID:9373065

  11. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in Sotos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Terumichi; Ihara, Kenji; Ochiai, Masayuki; Kinjo, Tadamune; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Kojima-Ishii, Kanako; Noda, Marie; Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Misaki, Maiko; Minagawa, Kyoko; Tominaga, Koji; Hara, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    Sotos syndrome (OMIM #117550) is a congenital syndrome characterized by overgrowth with advanced bone age, macrocephaly, and learning difficulties. Endocrine complications of this syndrome have not yet been fully described in previous reports. We here investigated the clinical manifestations of Sotos syndrome in Japanese patients who presented with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy. We recruited patients diagnosed as having Sotos syndrome who presented with the complication of hyperinsulinemia during the neonatal period using a survey of the abstracts of Pediatric Meetings in domestic areas of Japan from 2007 to 2011. As a result, five patients (four females and one male) were recruited to evaluate the clinical presentation of Sotos syndrome by reference to the clinical record of each patient. A 5q35 deletion including the NSD1 gene was detected in all patients. Major anomalies in the central nervous, cardiovascular, and genito-urinary systems were frequently found. Hypoglycemia occurred between 0.5 and 3 hr after birth and high levels of insulin were initially found within 3 days of birth. The patients were treated with intravenous glucose infusion at a maximum rate of 4.6-11.0 mg/kg/min for 12-49 days. Three of the five patients required nasal tube feeding. One patient received medical treatment with diazoxide. This study shows that patients with Sotos syndrome may present with transient hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in the neonatal period. PMID:23239432

  12. Morvan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  13. [Alagille syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Mirta; Alvarez, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Alagille syndrome (AS) is a multisystemic disease autosomal dominant, with variable expression. The major clinical manifestations are: chronic cholestasis, congenital heart disease, posterior embryotoxon in the eye, characteristic facial phenotype, and butterfy vertebrae. AS is caused by mutations in JAGGED1 (more than 90%) and in NOTCH2. Differential diagnosis include: infections, genetic-metabolic diseases, biliary atresia, idiopathic cholestasis. Cholestasis, pruritus and xanthomas have been successfully treated with choleretic agents (ursodeoxycholic acid) and other medications (cholestyramine, rifampin, naltrexone). In certain cases, partial external biliary diversion has also proved successful. Liver transplantation is indicated in children with cirrhosis and liver failure. PMID:23224309

  14. Ortner's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shahul, Hameed Aboobackar; Manu, Mohan K; Mohapatra, Aswini Kumar; Magazine, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    A 42-year-old man with a significant smoking history presented with chronic expectorative cough and exertional shortness of breath with recent-onset hoarseness. Chest examination was essentially normal and cardiovascular examination was suggestive of aortic regurgitation. Ears, nose and throat evaluation showed left vocal cord palsy and CT scan revealed an aortic arch aneurysm. Ortner's syndrome refers to hoarseness due to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to a cardiovascular abnormality. Aortic aneurysms usually present with chest pain, back pain or epigastric pain, depending on the site of the aneurysm. An aortic arch aneurysm presenting as hoarseness is extremely rare. PMID:24618861

  15. Postmenopausal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Pronob K.; Agarwal, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Menopause is one of the most significant events in a woman's life and brings in a number of physiological changes that affect the life of a woman permanently. There have been a lot of speculations about the symptoms that appear before, during and after the onset of menopause. These symptoms constitute the postmenopausal syndrome; they are impairing to a great extent to the woman and management of these symptoms has become an important field of research lately. This chapter attempts to understand these symptoms, the underlying pathophysiology and the management options available. PMID:26330639

  16. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard

    2008-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is diagnosed when arterial or venous thrombosis or recurrent miscarriages occur in a person in whom laboratory tests for antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant and/or anti-beta 2-glycoprotein I) are positive. Despite the strong association between antiphospho-lipid antibodies and thrombosis, their pathogenic role in the development of thrombosis has not been fully elucidated. Novel mechanisms involving both the complement pathway and micro-particles have been described. The knowledge of these new pathogenic approaches might identify novel therapeutic targets and therefore may improve the management of these patients. PMID:19090981

  17. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Odenike, Olatoyosi; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis The myelodysplastic syndromes are a diverse group of clonal stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, and an increased propensity to evolve to acute myeloid leukemia. The molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is poorly understood, but recurring chromosomal abnormalities occur in ~50% of cases, and are the focus of much investigation. The availability of newer molecular techniques has allowed the identification of additional genetic aberrations, including mutations and epigenetic changes of prognostic and potential therapeutic importance. This review will focus on the key role of cytogenetic analysis in MDS in the context of the diagnosis, prognosis, and pathogenesis of these disorders. PMID:22118747

  18. Brugada Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Marwan M; Hotait, Mostafa; Scheinman, Melvin

    2016-03-01

    Brugada syndrome might stay undetected in patients until surviving cardiac arrest. Despite the prominent advances in exploring the disease in the past 2 decades, many questions remain unanswered and the controversies continue. Despite all mutations identified to be associated with the disease, two-thirds of cases have a negative genetic test. Future studies should be more directed on modulating factors and their impact on patients' risk for sudden death to help physicians in risk stratifying their patients and optimally implementing an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to prevent sudden cardiac death. PMID:26920201

  19. Translationally controlled tumor protein is a novel biological target for neurofibromatosis type 1-associated tumors.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daiki; Hirayama, Mio; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Mizuguchi, Souhei; Wilson Morifuji, Masayo; Ihn, Hironobu; Takeya, Motohiro; Kuramochi, Akira; Araki, Norie

    2014-09-19

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease that predisposes individuals to develop benign neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Due to the lack of information on the molecular mechanism of NF1-associated tumor pathogenesis or biomarkers/therapeutic targets, an effective treatment for NF1 tumors has not been established. In this study, the novel NF1-associated protein, translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), was identified by integrated proteomics and found to be up-regulated via activated MAPK/PI3K-AKT signaling in response to growth factors in NF1-deficient Schwann cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of NF1-associated tumors revealed that the TCTP expression level correlated with tumorigenicity. In NF1-deficient MPNST cells, TCTP protein but not mRNA was down-regulated by NF1 GTPase-activating protein-related domain or MAPK/PI3K inhibitors, and this correlated with suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. mTOR inhibition by rapamycin also down-regulated TCTP protein expression, whereas knockdown or overexpression of TCTP suppressed or activated mTOR signaling, respectively, and affected cell viability. These results suggest that a positive feedback loop between TCTP and mTOR contributes to NF1-associated tumor formation. Last, the anti-tumor effect of artesunate, which binds to and degrades TCTP, was evaluated. Artesunate significantly suppressed the viability of MPNST cells but not normal Schwann cells, and the TCTP level inversely correlated with artesunate sensitivity. Moreover, combinational use of artesunate and rapamycin enhanced the cytotoxic effect on MPNST cells. These findings suggest that TCTP is functionally implicated in the progression of NF1-associated tumors and could serve as a biological target for their therapy. PMID:25092287

  20. Rett syndrome: a study of the face.

    PubMed

    Allanson, Judith E; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Moog, Ute; Smeets, Eric E

    2011-07-01

    Rett syndrome is a unique disorder of neurodevelopment that is characterized by an evolving behavioral and developmental phenotype, which emerges after an apparently normal early infantile period. It almost exclusively affects females. The face of Rett syndrome is said to resemble that of Angelman syndrome, although there seems little objective support for this impression and it is not a concept with universal support. This observational and anthropometric study was carried out to define the key facial characteristics of females with Rett syndrome and to evaluate whether any changes of significance occur with age. Thirty-seven affected Caucasian females, from 2 to 20 years of age, were evaluated. Thirty-five of them had a documented mutation in MECP2 while the remaining two fulfilled the clinical criteria for Rett syndrome and had been diagnosed by an experienced clinician. Few unusual facial features were noted. Almost all facial measurements were within the normal range although head circumference tended to fall below the normal range with increasing age. The pattern of measurements was constant over time, with the exception of increased facial width in the under 3-year-old girls. The face of Rett syndrome does not demonstrate marked prognathism, wide mouth, spaced teeth or striking microcephaly, all features of Angelman syndrome. Thus, while Rett and Angelman syndromes have similar clinical, neurological, and behavioral phenotypes, they do not appear to share similar facial features. PMID:21626673

  1. Noonan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    BHAMBHANI, VIKAS; MUENKE, MAXIMILIAN

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a common genetic disorder that causes multiple congenital abnormalities and a large number of potential health conditions. Most affected individuals have characteristic facial features that evolve with age; a broad, webbed neck; increased bleeding tendency; and a high incidence of congenital heart disease, failure to thrive, short stature, feeding difficulties, sternal deformity, renal malformation, pubertal delay, cryptorchidism, developmental or behavioral problems, vision problems, hearing loss, and lymphedema. Familial recurrence is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, but most cases are due to de novo mutations. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of clinical features, but may be missed in mildly affected patients. Molecular genetic testing can confirm diagnosis in 70% of cases and has important implications for genetic counseling and management. Most patients with Noonan syndrome are intellectually normal as adults, but some may require multidisciplinary evaluation and regular follow-up care. Age-based Noonan syndrome–specific growth charts and treatment guidelines are available. PMID:24444506

  2. Meckel syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Salonen, R; Paavola, P

    1998-01-01

    Meckel syndrome (MKS) is a lethal syndrome with a central nervous system malformation, usually occipital meningoencephalocele, bilaterally large multicystic kidneys with fibrotic changes of the liver, and polydactyly in most cases. Additional anomalies are frequent. A common characteristic of the parenchymal changes of many organs is a proliferation of the stromal connective tissue and increase and dilatation of the associated epithelial ducts. Autosomal recessive inheritance is well confirmed and the gene locus has been mapped to chromosome 17q21-24 by genome wide linkage study. The locus was later refined to within a less than 1 cM region (17q22), in which most of the Finnish MKS patients share a common chromosomal haplotype suggesting one major and relatively old mutation. However, in most of the non-Finnish MKS families studied, this linkage could not be confirmed. The linkage studies provide evidence that more than one locus is involved in bringing about the combination of CNS malformations, cystic kidneys, and polydactyly, maybe even in typical cases of MKS. Prenatal diagnosis of MKS by vaginal ultrasound scan is possible from 11-12 weeks of pregnancy, especially in families where there is a known risk. In those families where linkage to 17q22 is established, prenatal diagnosis by DNA analysis is possible. Images PMID:9643292

  3. [Endocrinopathies during the postpartum period. Management].

    PubMed

    Gallo-Vallejo, J L; Gallo-Vallejo, F J

    2015-03-01

    The various endocrinopathies that may occur during the postpartum period are described. The most important and common is gestational and pre-gestational diabetes, but other less common, and also very important ones, are mentioned such as hypopituitarism (Sheehan's syndrome and lymphocytic hypophysitis) and thyroid disorders, pre-existing (hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism), or postpartum onset (postpartum thyroiditis and Graves' disease). After describing their characteristics, the emphasis is placed on the proper management of these endocrine diseases, some of them which exclusively appear during the postpartum period. PMID:24837528

  4. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Polycystic Ovary Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Print A ... condition called polycystic ovary sydrome (PCOS) . What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome? Polycystic (pronounced: pol-ee-SISS-tik) ovary syndrome ...

  5. Post-Polio Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Post-Polio Syndrome ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Post-Polio Syndrome? Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is a condition ...

  6. Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Series Videos Webinar Series Health Care Associated Conditions ADHD & Down Syndrome Alzheimer's Disease & Down Syndrome Anesthesia & Down Syndrome Atlantoaxial Instability & Down Syndrome Blood Diseases & Down Syndrome Dental Issues & Down Syndrome Dual Diagnosis of Down Syndrome & Autism Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & ...

  7. Periodic exploding dissipative solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, Carlos; Descalzi, Orazio

    2016-03-01

    We show the existence of periodic exploding dissipative solitons. These nonchaotic explosions appear when higher-order nonlinear and dispersive effects are added to the complex cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation modeling fiber soliton lasers. This counterintuitive phenomenon is the result of period-halving bifurcations leading to order (periodic explosions), followed by period-doubling bifurcations leading to chaos (chaotic explosions).

  8. Familial syndrome resembling Aarskog syndrome.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingzhi; Qi, Ming; Zhou, Huali; Yong, Jing; Qiu, Huiqing; Cong, Peikuan; Hong, Xutao; Li, Chengjiang; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Yu, Yunsong

    2010-08-01

    Aarskog(-Scott) syndrome (AAS) is characterized by short stature, and facial, limb, and genital anomalies. AAS can be an X-linked condition caused by mutations in the FGD1 gene, but there is evidence that an autosomal dominant or recessive form also exists. We report on a Chinese family in whom several members have manifestations of AAS, but differ in limb anomalies and show additional characteristics. FGD1 sequencing and linkage analysis excluded FGD1 as the cause in this family. A common known submicroscopic chromosome imbalance is less likely. Both autosomal dominant and recessive patterns of inheritance remain possible. PMID:20607856

  9. HAMARTOMATOUS POLYPOSIS SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Amanda; Jasperson, Kory; Kohlmann, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes are a diverse group of inherited conditions grouped together because they exhibit hamartomatous rather than epithelial polyp histology. Each syndrome exhibits characteristic polyp histology, gastrointestinal polyp distribution, gastrointestinal cancer risks, extra-intestinal benign findings and often extra-intestinal cancer risks. Identifying individuals at risk for these syndromes and accurately defining the precise diagnosis is necessary for planning surveillance and management in order to prevent the benign and malignant complications. Characteristic syndrome features including gastrointestinal findings, pathology, genetics, and management options for the three most common hamartomatous polyposis syndromes, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome, and juvenile polyposis will be presented in this review. PMID:19414148

  10. Piriformis Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... nerve, such as sitting, walking up stairs or running. When should I call my doctor? Talk to ... long periods of time, climbing stairs, walking or running. You can also develop it after a traumatic ...

  11. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... come from: Sitting for long periods Over exercising Running, walking, or doing other repetitive activities Playing sports ... activities that cause pain, such as biking or running. You can resume these activities after the pain ...

  12. Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or incomplete development at puberty, including sparse pubic hair and small breasts Broad, flat chest shaped like a shield Drooping eyelids Dry eyes Infertility No periods (absent menstruation) Short height Vaginal dryness, can lead to painful intercourse

  13. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. PMID:26280343

  14. Biomarkers of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders: challenges of proteomic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ciborowski, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 enters the brain shortly after infection, which may lead to neurological complications and in the most severe cases to encephalitis, dementia and death. The introduction of antiretroviral therapy reduced the incidence of the most severe conditions, nevertheless, approximately half of those infected with this virus will suffer to various degrees from HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Despite many years of research, there are no biomarkers that can objectively measure and, more importantly, predict the onset and the tempo of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. Here we review biomarker candidates of neurocognitive impairment due to HIV infection of the brain that have been proposed during the last two decades, and discuss perspectives and limitations of proteomic approaches in the search for new, more sensitive and specific biomarkers. PMID:20477714

  15. [Stormorken's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Stormorken, Helge

    2002-12-10

    In 1985, a new syndrome with the following characteristics was described: thrombopathia, thrombopenia, asplenia, miosis, headache, ichthyosis, dyslexia, muscle defect, and subsequently also hypocalcaemia. Skin and deep bleedings, leg spasms, disturbed dark vision and dyslexia are main worries. This paper describes these patients with a review of the investigations performed. Causes of the bleeding tendency are complex disturbances of the platelet membrane causing insufficient stability of the haemostatic plug, the nature of which is unresolved, but involves membrane scrambling. The muscle defect consists in tubular aggregates and high blood values of creatine kinase. A connection with the hypocalcaemia is possible, because increasing the ionic Ca with calcitriol significantly improves muscle function. Miosis is resistant to mydriatics and causes decreased dark vision, possibly also influencing dyslexia. The asplenia has little influence on immunocompetence, and the patients have survived 300 patient years without critical infections. The gene defect has not yet been unravelled. PMID:12569706

  16. Nodding syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Scott F; Sejvar, James J; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A H; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B; Winkler, Andrea S; Mbonye, Anthony K

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5-15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case-control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  17. Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, E.E.J.; Pelc, K.; Dan, B.

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome is one of the most common causes of complex disability in girls. It is characterized by early neurological regression that severely affects motor, cognitive and communication skills, by autonomic dysfunction and often a seizure disorder. It is a monogenic X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder related to mutation in MECP2, which encodes the methyl-CpG-binding protein MeCP2. There are several mouse models either based on conditional knocking out of the Mecp2 gene or on a truncating mutation. We discuss the clinical aspects with special emphasis on the behavioral phenotype and we review current perspectives in clinical management alongside with perspectives in altering gene expression. PMID:22670134

  18. [Paraneoplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Erdmann, H

    1984-02-01

    Paraneoplasia has come to denote those tumor activities not caused within an organism directly by invasion, obstruction, or by the tumor burden itself. PSN research has yielded best results through the examination of those hormones produced by the tumor, esp. the pro-ACTH and its functionally active subgroups, furthermore the ADH, gonadotropins, HPL, STH, prolactine etc. Frequently very special features have been found to characterize this disease which have been published in detail. In addition to this, several differentiating PNS have been described without having been sufficiently defined, esp. those concerning the nervous system, the haematopoesia , the kidneys, the skin and the gastrointestinal system. In very rare cases there has been a mention or different characteristic syndromes that have come to be assigned to special kinds of tumors. PMID:6371641

  19. Nodding Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sejvar, James J.; Riek, Lul; Vandemaele, Katelijn A.H.; Lamunu, Margaret; Kuesel, Annette C.; Schmutzhard, Erich; Matuja, William; Bunga, Sudhir; Foltz, Jennifer; Nutman, Thomas B.; Winkler, Andrea S.; Mbonye, Anthony K.

    2013-01-01

    An epidemic illness characterized by head nodding associated with onchocerciasis has been described in eastern Africa since the early 1960s; we summarize published reports and recent studies. Onset of nodding occurs in previously healthy 5–15-year-old children and is often triggered by eating or cold temperatures and accompanied by cognitive impairment. Its incidence has increased in Uganda and South Sudan over the past 10 years. Four case–control studies identified modest and inconsistent associations. There were nonspecific lesions seen by magnetic resonance imaging, no cerebrospinal fluid inflammation, and markedly abnormal electroencephalography results. Nodding episodes are atonic seizures. Testing has failed to demonstrate associations with trypanosomiasis, cysticercosis, loiasis, lymphatic filariasis, cerebral malaria, measles, prion disease, or novel pathogens; or deficiencies of folate, cobalamin, pyridoxine, retinol, or zinc; or toxicity from mercury, copper, or homocysteine. There is a consistent enigmatic association with onchocerciasis detected by skin snip or serologic analysis. Nodding syndrome is an unexplained epidemic epilepsy. PMID:23965548

  20. Meigs' Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lichtblau, Steven

    1984-01-01

    A 52-year-old female physician was admitted to hospital because of severe dyspnea and massive pleural effusion. At first, it seemed she may have been suffering from heart failure with an associated malignant disease. The patient was seemingly unaware of her progressive illness. During her hospital stay, it became evident that she was denying the possibility of cancer because of her husband's death from adenocarcinoma of the esophagus three years earlier. The carcinoma was inoperable and he was treated with chemotherapy. The patient was very upset about her husband's untimely death, and his treatment convinced her that she did not want chemotherapy if she was found to have cancer. Fortunately, it was discovered that she had benign cystic teratoma of the ovary with ascites and hydrothorax (Meigs' syndrome). ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:21278951

  1. Hepatopulmonary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong; Fan, Daiming

    2015-07-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is a pulmonary complication observed in patients with chronic liver disease and/or portal hypertension, attributable to an intrapulmonary vascular dilatation that may induce severe hypoxemia. Microvascular dilation and angiogenesis in the lung have been identified as pathologic features that drive gas exchange abnormalities in experimental HPS. Pulse oximetry is a useful screening test for HPS, which can guide subsequent use of arterial blood gases. Contrast-enhanced echocardiography, perfusion lung scanning, and pulmonary arteriography are three currently used diagnostic imaging modalities that identify the presence of intrapulmonary vascular abnormalities. The presence of HPS increases mortality and impairs quality of life, but is reversible with liver transplantation. No medical therapy is established as effective for HPS. At the present time, liver transplantation is the only available treatment for HPS. PMID:25732713

  2. Cirrhosis and hepatopulmonary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tumgor, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized as a triad: liver disease, intrapulmonary vascular dilatation and arterial hypoxemia. HPS is reported to be present in 4% to 32% of adult patients with end-stage liver disease and in 9%-20% of children. The pathogenesis of HPS has not been clearly identified. Portal hypertension causes impairment in the perfusion of the bowel and increases the enteral translocation of Gram (-) bacteria and endotoxins. This stimulates the release of vasoactive mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, heme oxygenase-derived carbon monoxide and nitric oxide. Genetic alterations have not been associated with this syndrome yet; however, cytokines and chemokines have been suggested to play a role. Recently, it was reported that cumulated monocytes lead to the activation of vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent signaling pathways and pulmonary angiogenesis, which plays an important role in HPS pathogenesis. At present, the most effective and only radical treatment is a liver transplant (LT). Cirrhotic patients who are on the waiting list for an LT have a shorter survival period if they develop HPS. Therefore, it is suggested that all cirrhotic cases should be followed closely for HPS and they should have priority in the waiting list. PMID:24627594

  3. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve damage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, surgical treatments, and postoperative treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, internal neurolysis, local and systemic corticosteroids, massage therapy, nerve and tendon gliding exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), pyridoxine, therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints. PMID:21718565

  4. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (PFAPA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in Research Career Planning ... Statistics Workforce Study Prevalence Statistics Workforce Statistics Glossary Academic Resources Tools & Resources Rheumatology Training Programs Awards & Grants ...

  5. Kleine-levin syndrome treated with clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Rezvanian, Elham; Watson, Nathaniel F

    2013-11-15

    Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by periodic hypersomnia and various degrees of cognitive and behavioral disturbance, hyperphagia, and hypersexuality. Effective treatment is challenging. Stimulants marginally address sleepiness, but may increase irritability and do not improve cognitive and behavioral disturbances. Modafinil may shorten the symptomatic period but not the recurrence rate. Lithium and carbamazepine are beneficial in some cases, possibly related to similarities between KLS and affective disorders. Currently, no single medication is consistently successful in treating the syndrome. Here we report the short-term effect of clarithromycin in a patient with KLS. PMID:24235906

  6. A syndrome of microcephaly, short stature, polysyndactyly, and dental anomalies caused by a homozygous KATNB1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Gökhan; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Bögershausen, Nina; Beleggia, Filippo; Möller-Hartmann, Claudia; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Wollnik, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous acceptor splice-site mutation in intron 6 of the KATNB1 gene in a patient from a consanguineous Turkish family who presented with congenital microcephaly, lissencephaly, short stature, polysyndactyly, and dental abnormalities. cDNA analysis revealed complete loss of the natural acceptor splice-site resulting either in the usage of an alternative, exonic acceptor splice-site inducing a frame-shift and premature protein truncation or, to a minor extent, in complete skipping of exon 7. Both effects most likely lead to complete loss of KATNB1 function. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in KATNB1 have very recently been described as a cause of microcephaly with brain malformations and seizures. We extend the KATNB1 associated phenotype by describing a syndrome characterized by primordial dwarfism, lissencephaly, polysyndactyly, and dental anomalies, which is caused by a homozygous truncating KATNB1 mutation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26640080

  7. Addressing the Needs of Students with Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsiyannis, Antonis; Ellenburg, Jennifer S.; Acton, Olivia M.; Torrey, Gregory

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses symptoms of students with Rett Syndrome, a disability in females characterized by the development of multiple specific deficits following a period of normal functioning after birth. Specific interventions for students with Rett syndrome are provided and address communication, stereotypic movements, self-injurious behaviors,…

  8. Child neurology: Zellweger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul R; Raymond, Gerald V

    2013-05-14

    Zellweger syndrome (ZS) is a severe manifestation of disease within the spectrum of peroxisome biogenesis disorders that includes neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, infantile Refsum disease, and rhizomelic chondroplasia punctata. Patients with ZS present in the neonatal period with a characteristic phenotype of distinctive facial stigmata, pronounced hypotonia, poor feeding, hepatic dysfunction, and often seizures and boney abnormalities. In patients with ZS, a mutation in one of the PEX genes coding for a peroxin (a peroxisome assembly protein) creates functionally incompetent organelles causing an accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA), among other complications. Despite an absence of treatment options, prompt diagnosis of ZS is important for providing appropriate symptomatic care, definitive genetic testing, and counseling regarding family planning. PMID:23671347

  9. Fifteen-Year Follow-Up of Thyroid Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V.; Ninan, S.; Haque, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The natural history of thyroid function in adults with Down syndrome is relatively unknown with limited long-term follow-up data. Method: This study investigated annual thyroid function tests in 200 adults with Down syndrome over a 15-year period. Results: For healthy adults with Down syndrome there is a gradual increase in thyroxine…

  10. Depression and Dementia in Aging Adults with Down Syndrome: A Case Study Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Hyunsook; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A case study of three adults (ages 46-47) with Down syndrome investigated the patterns of symptoms associated with depression and dementia. Characteristics that distinguish between dementia and depression in adults with Down syndrome are described. Periodic comprehensive assessment of adults with Down syndrome to detect functioning changes is…

  11. Fifteen-Year Follow-Up of Thyroid Status in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V.; Ninan, S.; Haque, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The natural history of thyroid function in adults with Down syndrome is relatively unknown with limited long-term follow-up data. Method: This study investigated annual thyroid function tests in 200 adults with Down syndrome over a 15-year period. Results: For healthy adults with Down syndrome there is a gradual increase in thyroxine

  12. Syndromes and constitutional chromosomal abnormalities associated with Wilms tumour

    PubMed Central

    Scott, R H; Stiller, C A; Walker, L; Rahman, N

    2006-01-01

    Wilms tumour has been reported in association with over 50 different clinical conditions and several abnormal constitutional karyotypes. Conclusive evidence of an increased risk of Wilms tumour exists for only a minority of these conditions, including WT1 associated syndromes, familial Wilms tumour, and certain overgrowth conditions such as Beckwith?Wiedemann syndrome. In many reported conditions the rare co?occurrence of Wilms tumour is probably due to chance. However, for several conditions the available evidence cannot either confirm or exclude an increased risk, usually because of the rarity of the syndrome. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that an increased risk of Wilms tumour occurs only in a subset of individuals for some syndromes. The complex clinical and molecular heterogeneity of disorders associated with Wilms tumour, together with the apparent absence of functional links between most of the known predisposition genes, suggests that abrogation of a variety of pathways can promote Wilms tumorigenesis. PMID:16690728

  13. 'Intermittent' solar periodicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Charles L.

    1992-01-01

    The signal from a stable periodicity can seem to be intermittent when it is partially masked by an unmodelled window function or when the data set is too short to resolve closely spaced periodicities. By taking this into account, short-lived periodicities in solar data can be reinterpreted as evidence for continuously periodic behavior. The periodic sources are located in the solar interior and caused by global oscillation modes. The convective envelope acts as the window for these sources. Recent reports of seven periodicities from 100 to 1000 days are compared with this model. Precise long-term values for the periodicities are predicted and they agree closely with observations. Some elements are suggested that might explain the well-documented 155-day periodicity. Conventional filtering methods to suppress effects of the 11-year cycle are criticized as inadequate.

  14. Anxiety in Asperger's syndrome: Assessment in real time.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dougal J; Wood, Christopher; Wastell, Sarah; Skirrow, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety is a major problem for many people with Asperger's syndrome who may have qualitatively different fears from a non-Asperger's syndrome population. Research has relied on measures developed for non-Asperger's syndrome populations that require reporting past experiences of anxiety, which may confound assessment in people with Asperger's syndrome due to problems with autobiographical memory as are often reported in this group.Experience sampling methodology was used to record real-time everyday experiences in 20 adults with Asperger's syndrome and 20 neurotypical adults. Within-subject analysis was used to explore the phenomenology of thoughts occurring in people with Asperger's syndrome when they were anxious. Comparisons were made with the group that did not have Asperger's syndrome. The Asperger's syndrome group were significantly more anxious than the comparison group. Factors associated with feelings of anxiety in the Asperger's syndrome group were high levels of self-focus, worries about everyday events and periods of rumination lasting over 10 min. People in the Asperger's syndrome group also had a tendency to think in the image form, but this was not associated with feelings of anxiety. The results are discussed with reference to psychological models of Asperger's syndrome, cognitive models of anxiety and implications for psychological therapy for this group. PMID:24811968

  15. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  16. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  17. The Periodic Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy

  18. The progressive outer retinal necrosis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Holland, G N

    1994-01-01

    The progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) syndrome is a recently described clinical variant of necrotizing herpetic retinopathy in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). It is caused by varicellazoster virus infection of the retina. Its course and clinical features distinguish it from the acute retinal necrosis syndrome and CMV retinopathy. Early disease is characterized by multifocal deep retinal opacification. Lesions rapidly coalesce and progress to total retinal necrosis over a short period of time. Despite aggressive therapy with intravenous antivirial drugs, prognosis is poor; disease progression and/or recurrence is common, and the majority of patients develop no light perception vision. Total retinal detachments are common. Prophylaxis against retinal detachment using laser retinopexy has not been useful in most cases. PORN syndrome is an uncommon, but devastating complication of AIDS. PMID:7852023

  19. Down syndrome. Clinical review of ocular features.

    PubMed

    Caputo, A R; Wagner, R S; Reynolds, D R; Guo, S Q; Goel, A K

    1989-08-01

    A total of 187 medical records of Down syndrome individuals over a 10-year period were reviewed retrospectively for strabismus, myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism, nystagmus, cataract, glaucoma, and other significant eye findings. This study showed that a higher proportion of these individuals than reported in previous studies had strabismus (57%). Refractive errors of myopia (22.5%), hyperopia (20.9%) and astigmatism (22%) were common. The primary care physician needs to be aware of the specific eye problems of Down syndrome individuals so that he or she may initiate or refer the patient for appropriate ophthalmologic care, because most of the eye findings in Down syndrome are treatable. Significant visual loss, a usually avoidable event in Down syndrome, should occur rarely. PMID:2527102

  20. Period problems: disorders of menstruation in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Peacock, A; Alvi, N S; Mushtaq, T

    2012-06-01

    Adolescence is a time of great psychological and physical change. In the UK, girls enter puberty around the age of 10 years with a median age of menarche of 12.9 years; thereafter, it may be several years before regular menstrual cycles are established. Variations in the type and the frequency of periods may create anxiety regarding ill health or serious underlying disorders. With the increase in childhood obesity and subsequent polycystic ovary syndrome, there is a greater awareness and presentation of girls with disorders of menstruation. This review focuses on normal variations of menses and common pathological causes of menstrual problems, including amenorrhoea, dysmenorrhoea and menorrhagia. Further consideration is given to the variations of presentation of polycystic ovary syndrome. It provides a guide to evaluate the various symptoms, investigations and management options. PMID:20576661

  1. Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Michael; Torchia, Daniele; Romanelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome is a severe idiosyncratic drug reaction with a long latency period. It has been described using many terms; however, drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome appears to be the most appropriate. This syndrome causes a diverse array of clinical symptoms, anywhere from 2 to 8 weeks after initiating the offending drug. Standardized criteria for the diagnosis have been developed; however, their utility remains to be validated. Unfortunately, the management of drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome is not well supported by strong evidence-based data. PMID:23882307

  2. Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome and the onset of a manic episode.

    PubMed

    Gregoire, Phillip; Tau, Michael; Robertson, David

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a rare, recently described, clinically diagnosed condition that is characterised by a chronic history of cannabis use, cyclic nausea and vomiting, symptomatic relief with hot water bathing, and resolution with cessation of use. We present a case of this syndrome concurrent in a patient with bipolar mania. We suggest that a 3-week period of vomiting in the context of this syndrome contributed to the precipitation of a manic episode by lowering mood stabiliser serum levels, and that this syndrome will have significant consequences for the patient's mental health. PMID:27122104

  3. Tourette Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lisa; Lehman, Erik; Brown, Ashley D.; Ahmad, Syeda; Berlin, Cheston

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of a 35-year single-center experience with pediatric tics and Tourette syndrome was conducted. 482 charts from 1972 to 2007 were reviewed. Follow-up surveys were mailed to last known address and 83 patients responded (17%). Response rate was affected by long interval from last visit; contact information was often incorrect as it was the address of the patient as a child. Males constituted 84%. Mean tic onset was 6.6 years. At first visit, 83% had multiple motor tics and >50% had comorbidities. 44% required only 1 visit and 90% less than 12 visits. Follow-up showed positive clinical and social outcomes in 73/83 survey responses. Of those indicating a poor outcome, mean educational level was lower and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and learning disabilities were significantly higher. Access to knowledgeable caregivers was a problem for adult patients. A shortage of specialists may in part be addressed by interested general pediatricians. PMID:25200367

  4. Parkinsonian Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David R.; Litvan, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The different parkinsonian conditions can be challenging to separate clinically. This review highlights the important clinical features that guide the diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), and corticobasal degeneration (CBD). Strategies for treatment and disease management are also discussed. Recent Findings Over the past decade there has been an increasing recognition of the broad clinical presentations of the neurodegenerative forms of parkinsonism. Nonmotor symptoms in these diseases, including psychiatric, cognitive, autonomic, and gastrointestinal dysfunction, appear to have a major impact on quality of life and disability. PSP and CBD are now considered pathologic diagnoses, with several different and varied clinical phenotypes, that overlap and share features with PDand frontotemporal dementia syndromes. PD is distinguished by its excellent response to dopaminergic medications that is maintained over many years, in contrast to the response seen in patients with MSA and PSP. New diagnostic criteria have been proposed for CBD. No new therapeutic interventions have emerged for PSP, MSA, or CBD. Infusional therapies and deep brain stimulation surgery are established therapies for advanced PD. Summary The “parkinsonian syndromes” encompass a number of nosologic entities that are grouped together on the basis of their shared clinical features but are separated on the basis of their different pathologies. Overall, the consideration of clinical signs, mode of disease onset, and nature of disease progression are all important to make a timely and definitive diagnosis. PMID:24092286

  5. [Liddle syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tamura, H; Sasaki, S

    1996-03-01

    In 1963 Liddle et al. described a disorder that simulated primary aldosteronism, characterized by severe hypertension and hypokalemia but with negligible secretion of aldosterone. They theoried that this was a disorder in which the renal tubules transport ions with such abnormal facility that the end result simulates that of a mineralcorticoid excess. Later, it was postulated that this disorder could be related to the abnormality of amiloride sensitive Na channel. The activity of amiloride-sensitive Na channels constitutes the rate limiting step for Na reabsorption in Na transporting epithelia. Recently, the primary sequence of the rat amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channel (rENaC) was determined by functional expression cloning and shown to be composed of three homologous subunits: alpha, beta, and gamma. Its expression of all three subunits in Xenopus oocytes markedly increased the magnitude of these currents. Analysis of subjects with Liddle's syndrome demonstrates the mutation of carboxy-terminal domain in alpha, beta, and gamma subunits. The mutations are either premature termination, frameshift mutation, or missense mutations. PMID:8904241

  6. Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Termine, Cristiano

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder consisting of multiple motor and one or more vocal/phonic tics. TS is increasingly recognized as a common neuropsychiatric disorder usually diagnosed in early childhood and comorbid neuropsychiatric disorders occur in approximately 90% of patients, with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) being the most common ones. Moreover, a high prevalence of depression and personality disorders has been reported. Although the mainstream of tic management is represented by pharmacotherapy, different kinds of psychotherapy, along with neurosurgical interventions (especially deep brain stimulation, DBS) play a major role in the treatment of TS. The current diagnostic systems have dictated that TS is a unitary condition. However, recent studies have demonstrated that there may be more than one TS phenotype. In conclusion, it appears that TS probably should no longer be considered merely a motor disorder and, most importantly, that TS is no longer a unitary condition, as it was previously thought. PMID:22411257

  7. Down Syndrome Myths and Truths

    MedlinePlus

    ... ndss.org Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ... Printed Materials Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids You may also ...

  8. Early onset marfan syndrome: Atypical clinical presentation of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Ozyurt, A; Baykan, A; Argun, M; Pamukcu, O; Halis, H; Korkut, S; Yuksel, Z; Gunes, T; Narin, N

    2015-01-01

    Early onset Marfan Syndrome (eoMFS) is a rare, severe form of Marfan Syndrome (MFS). The disease has a poor prognosis and most patients present with resistance to heart failure treatment during the newborn period. This report presents two cases of eoMFS with similar clinical features diagnosed in the newborn period and who died at an early age due to the complications related to the involvement of the cardiovascular system. PMID:26929908

  9. Refeeding syndrome in a vegan patient with stage IV gastric cancer: a novel case.

    PubMed

    Brown, Teresa V; Moss, Rebecca A

    2015-03-01

    The refeeding syndrome encompasses the complex physiologic state that occurs in malnourished patients who receive nutrition after a period of decreased oral intake. The hallmark of the syndrome is hypophosphatemia, though other electrolyte imbalances and severe fluid shifts are commonly involved. Patients with newly diagnosed malignancies and those undergoing treatment for malignancies are at increased risk for developing the refeeding syndrome, however there are few reported cases or other data in the oncology literature regarding this syndrome in cancer patients. PMID:25880674

  10. Kleine-Levin Syndrome Treated With Clarithromycin

    PubMed Central

    Rezvanian, Elham; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by periodic hypersomnia and various degrees of cognitive and behavioral disturbance, hyperphagia, and hypersexuality. Effective treatment is challenging. Stimulants marginally address sleepiness, but may increase irritability and do not improve cognitive and behavioral disturbances. Modafinil may shorten the symptomatic period but not the recurrence rate. Lithium and carbamazepine are beneficial in some cases, possibly related to similarities between KLS and affective disorders. Currently, no single medication is consistently successful in treating the syndrome. Here we report the short-term effect of clarithromycin in a patient with KLS. Citation: Rezvanian E; Watson NF. Kleine-Levin syndrome treated with clarithromycin. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(11):1211-1212. PMID:24235906

  11. Shaken Baby Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby syndrome. NIH Patient Recruitment for Shaken Baby Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 The Arc of the United States 1825 K Street, NW ...

  12. Facts about Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lip and Palate Craniosynostosis Down Syndrome Eye Defects Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorders Gastroschisis Heart Defects Coarctation of ... and risk for trisomy 21 assessed by the origin of chromosome nondisjunction: a report from the Atlanta ...

  13. What is Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with the syndrome. 1 The degree of intellectual disability in people with Down syndrome varies but is ... Z Topics Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Early Learning Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDDs) All related topics NICHD News and Spotlights ...

  14. [Fragile X syndrome].

    PubMed

    Femiano, F; Cozzolino, S

    1990-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome include clinical features macroorchidism, ear large, prognathism, elongated facies, speech dysfunction, mental retardation and mitral valve prolapse. The interest for this syndrome is linked to the antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial secondary endocarditis and bacteremia. PMID:2151505

  15. Dubin-Johnson syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a disorder passed down through families (inherited) in which a person has mild jaundice throughout ... Dubin-Johnson syndrome is a very rare genetic disorder. In order to inherit the condition, a child must get ...

  16. Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Felix F.

    1985-01-01

    Physical, psychological, and cytogenic characteristics of individuals with the Fragile X syndrome are reviewed. Prospects for therapy with folic acid, prenatal diagnosis, phenotype of heterozygote for the marker X, and unresolved issues about the syndrome are discussed. (CL)

  17. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    f AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ121 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) • What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? • What causes PCOS? • What is insulin resistance? • ...

  18. Miller Fisher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is considered to be a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome. It is characterized by abnormal muscle coordination, ... muscles, and absence of the tendon reflexes. Like Guillain-Barré syndrome, symptoms may be preceded by a viral ...

  19. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  20. Scalded skin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Ritter disease; Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSS) ... Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (Ritter Disease). In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 19th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders ...

  1. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Learning About Klinefelter Syndrome What is Klinefelter syndrome? What ... they are referred to a doctor to evaluate learning disabilities. The diagnosis may also be considered in ...

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be a lifelong condition. You may be suffering from cramping and loose stools, diarrhea, ... Ferri FF. Irritable bowel syndrome. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's ... . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:pages 669-70. What I ...

  3. Schwartz–Jampel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Gayathri, N.; Shivaram, Sumanth

    2015-01-01

    Schwartz–Jampel syndrome is a very rare congenital myotonic syndrome with typical phenotypic and electrophysiological features. Diagnosis is made by awareness into the typical phenotypic characters. PMID:26167227

  4. Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... present at birth. The syndrome often involves port wine stains, excess growth of bones and soft tissue, ... Symptoms of Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome include: Many port wine stains or other blood vessel problems, including dark ...

  5. Marfan syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, ...

  6. Pierre Robin syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Pierre Robin sequence; Pierre Robin complex; Pierre Robin anomaly ... The exact causes of Pierre Robin syndrome are unknown. It may be part of many genetic syndromes. The lower jaw develops slowly before birth, but may speed ...

  7. Down Syndrome: Education

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kit Financials Newsroom Shop NDSS Home » Resources » Education Education This section includes information about inclusion, elementary and ... and postsecondary options for students with Down syndrome. Education & Down Syndrome This section provides an overview and ...

  8. Thoracic outlet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... tingling of the fingers A weak grip The thoracic outlet is the area between the ribcage and collarbone. ... with the nerves cause almost all cases of thoracic outlet syndrome. ... the spine to the ribs. People with this syndrome often ...

  9. Sick sinus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chambers is a common cause of sick sinus syndrome. Coronary artery disease , high blood pressure, and aortic and ... pressure may be normal or low. Sick sinus syndrome may cause symptoms of heart failure to start or get worse. Sick sinus ...

  10. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy. Seizures usually begin before 4 years of age. ... broad program of basic and clinical research on epilepsy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. These studies are aimed ...

  11. ADHD & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources » Health Care » Associated Conditions » ADHD & Down Syndrome ADHD & Down Syndrome Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, ... traits. Does That Mean That Your Child Has ADHD? It may, but more often it means that ...

  12. HAMARTOMATOUS POLYPOSIS SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Daniel; Howe, James R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Since the histological description of the hamartomatous polyp in 1957 by Horrilleno et al., several different syndromes have been described with the propensity to develop these polyps in the upper and lower GI tracts. These include Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome, and the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndromes (Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndromes), which are autosomal-dominantly inherited, and Cronkhite-Canada syndrome, which is acquired. The clinical aspects, the molecular pathogenesis, the organ systems affected, the risks of cancer, and the management of these hamartomatous polyposis syndromes will be reviewed in this paper. Although the incidence of these syndromes is low, it is important for clinicians to recognize these disorders in order to prevent morbidity and mortality in these patients, and to perform presymptomatic testing in patients at risk. PMID:18672141

  13. Anisocoria and Horner's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... In children, Horner’s syndrome may be caused by neuroblastoma, a tumor arising in another part of the body. Although rare, the risk of neuroblastoma is significantly greater with acquired Horner’s syndrome than ...

  14. Cri du chat syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Cri du chat syndrome is a group of symptoms that result from missing a piece of chromosome number 5. ... Cri du chat syndrome is rare. It is caused by a missing piece of chromosome 5. Most cases are ...

  15. Narcotic Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Common Questions Does Pancreatitis Cause FAPS and IBS? Hirschsprung's Disease Intestinal Psuedo-obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome Other ... Treatments Nutrition and Diet Managing Secondary Effects Medications Surgery Daily Living with SBS Resources SMA Syndrome Volvulus ...

  16. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  17. Riley-Day syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Riley-Day syndrome is an inherited disorder that affects nerves throughout the body. ... Riley-Day syndrome is passed down through families (inherited). A person must inherit a copy of the defective gene ...

  18. [Ocular immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ma, N; Ye, J J

    2016-02-11

    Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is a collection of inflammatory disorders associated with paradoxical worsening of preexisting infectious processes or emerging diseases or even dead after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals in a period of recovery of immune function. Ocular immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is mainly caused by cytomegalovirus which performing a series of ocular inflammation accompanied with the increase of CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as cytomegalovirus retinitis, after HAART. With HAART widely used, the patients of IRIS gradually increased. But the clinical presentations of IRIS were various because of different pathogens. This review summarized the clinical manifestations, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment of ocular IRIS.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 51: 150-153). PMID:26906710

  19. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baujat, Geneviève; Le Merrer, Martine

    2007-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is a chondral and ectodermal dysplasia characterized by short ribs, polydactyly, growth retardation, and ectodermal and heart defects. It is a rare disease with approximately 150 cases reported worldwide. The exact prevalence is unknown, but the syndrome seems more common among the Amish community. Prenatal abnormalities (that may be detected by ultrasound examination) include narrow thorax, shortening of long bones, hexadactyly and cardiac defects. After birth, cardinal features are short stature, short ribs, polydactyly, and dysplastic fingernails and teeth. Heart defects, especially abnormalities of atrial septation, occur in about 60% of cases. Cognitive and motor development is normal. This rare condition is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with variable expression. Mutations of the EVC1 and EVC2 genes, located in a head to head configuration on chromosome 4p16, have been identified as causative. EVC belongs to the short rib-polydactyly group (SRP) and these SRPs, especially type III (Verma-Naumoff syndrome), are discussed in the prenatal differential diagnosis. Postnatally, the essential differential diagnoses include Jeune dystrophy, McKusick-Kaufman syndrome and Weyers syndrome. The management of EVC is multidisciplinary. Management during the neonatal period is mostly symptomatic, involving treatment of the respiratory distress due to narrow chest and heart failure. Orthopedic follow-up is required to manage the bones deformities. Professional dental care should be considered for management of the oral manifestations. Prognosis is linked to the respiratory difficulties in the first months of life due to thoracic narrowness and possible heart defects. Prognosis of the final body height is difficult to predict. PMID:17547743

  20. [Disseminated pigmented nevus syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cabrera, H N; Savoia, J; Pietropaolo, N; Snchez, G

    1988-01-01

    Two patients carriers of a neuro-cutaneous syndrome showing scattered pigmentary nevus and neurologic disorders are exposed, who are added to three similar cases presented in a previous publication. Differences with other syndromes that show cafe-au-lait spots, like those of Recklinghausen and Albright, and also of other known publications, are remarked. Ultrastructural studies are contributed. The denomination of "disseminated pigmentary nevus syndrome" is proposed in comparison with the epidermal nevus syndrome. PMID:3050324

  1. An integrative computational analysis provides evidence for FBN1-associated network deregulation in trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Vilardell, Mireia; Civit, Sergi; Herwig, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Summary Although approximately 50% of Down Syndrome (DS) patients have heart abnormalities, they exhibit an overprotection against cardiac abnormalities related with the connective tissue, for example a lower risk of coronary artery disease. A recent study reported a case of a person affected by DS who carried mutations in FBN1, the gene causative for a connective tissue disorder called Marfan Syndrome (MFS). The fact that the person did not have any cardiac alterations suggested compensation effects due to DS. This observation is supported by a previous DS meta-analysis at the molecular level where we have found an overall upregulation of FBN1 (which is usually downregulated in MFS). Additionally, that result was cross-validated with independent expression data from DS heart tissue. The aim of this work is to elucidate the role of FBN1 in DS and to establish a molecular link to MFS and MFS-related syndromes using a computational approach. To reach that, we conducted different analytical approaches over two DS studies (our previous meta-analysis and independent expression data from DS heart tissue) and revealed expression alterations in the FBN1 interaction network, in FBN1 co-expressed genes and FBN1-related pathways. After merging the significant results from different datasets with a Bayesian approach, we prioritized 85 genes that were able to distinguish control from DS cases. We further found evidence for several of these genes (47%), such as FBN1, DCN, and COL1A2, being dysregulated in MFS and MFS-related diseases. Consequently, we further encourage the scientific community to take into account FBN1 and its related network for the study of DS cardiovascular characteristics. PMID:23951402

  2. Recurrent giant cell fibroblastoma: Malignancy predisposition in Kabuki syndrome revisited.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Lambropoulos, Vassilios; Stergidou, Dorothea; Fryssira, Helena; Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Spyridakis, Ioannis

    2016-05-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a genetic condition characterized by distinctive facial phenotype, mental retardation, and internal organ malformations. Mutations of the epigenetic genes KMT2D and KDM6A cause dysregulation of certain developmental genes and account for the multiple congenital anomalies of the syndrome. Eight cases of malignancies have been reported in young patients with Kabuki syndrome although a causative association to the syndrome has not been established. We report a case of a 12-year-old girl with Kabuki syndrome who developed a tumor on the right side of her neck. A relapsing tumor 19 months after initial excision, proved to be giant cell fibroblastoma. Τhis is the first report of giant cell fibroblastoma -a rare tumor of childhood- in a patient with Kabuki syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26898171

  3. Hypoventilation syndromes.

    PubMed

    Piper, Amanda J; Yee, Brendon J

    2014-10-01

    In patients with impaired inspiratory muscle function or altered respiratory system mechanics, an imbalance between load and capacity can arise. The ventilatory control system normally compensates for this by increasing drive to maintain adequate alveolar ventilation levels, thereby keeping arterial CO2 within its normal range. To reduce work of breathing, a pattern of reduced tidal volume and increased respiratory rate occurs. This pattern itself may eventually reduce effective ventilation by increasing dead space ventilation. However, the impact of sleep on breathing and its role in the development of diurnal respiratory failure is often overlooked in this process. Sleep not only reduces respiratory drive, but also diminishes chemoresponsiveness to hypoxia and hypercapnia creating an environment where significant alterations in oxygenation and CO2 can occur. Acute increases in CO2 load especially during rapid eye movement sleep can initiate the process of bicarbonate retention which further depresses ventilatory responsiveness to CO2. Treatment of hypoventilation needs to be directed toward factors underlying its development. Nocturnal noninvasive positive pressure therapy is the most widely used and reliable strategy currently available to manage hypoventilation syndromes. Although this may not consistently alter respiratory muscle strength or the mechanical properties of the respiratory system, it does appear to reset chemosensitivity by reducing bicarbonate, resulting in a more appropriate ventilatory response to CO2 during wakefulness. Not only is diurnal hypoventilation reduced with noninvasive ventilation, but quality of life, functional capacity and survival are also improved. However, close attention to how therapy is set up and used are key factors in achieving clinical benefits. PMID:25428856

  4. Periodic chiral structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaggard, Dwight L.; Engheta, Nader; Pelet, Philippe; Liu, John C.; Kowarz, Marek W.; Kim, Yunjin

    1989-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of a structure that is both chiral and periodic are investigated using coupled-mode equations. The periodicity is described by a sinusoidal perturbation of the permittivity, permeability, and chiral admittance. The coupled-mode equations are derived from physical considerations and used to examine bandgap structure and reflected and transmitted fields. Chirality is observed predominantly in transmission, whereas periodicity is present in both reflection and transmission.

  5. CONSTIPATION IN RETT SYNDROME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastrointestinal problems occur frequently in girls with Rett syndrome. Constipation is a common problem in girls with Rett syndrome because of their neurological abnormalities. Research studies to better understand the abnormalities of large bowel function in our girls with Rett syndrome have not b...

  6. [Morning glory syndrome].

    PubMed

    López-Lizárraga, Erika Paulina; Bolaños-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Treviño-Alanís, M Guadalupe; Rivera-Silva, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    In 1970, Kindier described the morning glory syndrome. This syndrome is a congenital abnormality of the optic nerve with unilateral presence and very low incidence. It is characterized by an enlarged optical disc, deep excavation, presence of traces of radial glia, and arrangement of retinal vascularization. This report describes the fundoscopic image in a patient with morning glory syndrome. PMID:21412399

  7. Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome KidsHealth > For Parents > Munchausen by Proxy Syndrome Print A A A Text ... Child Getting Help for the Parent or Caregiver Munchausen by proxy syndrome (MBPS) is a relatively rare ...

  8. Munchausen syndrome by proxy

    MedlinePlus

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a mental illness and a form of child abuse . The caretaker of ... No one is sure what causes Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Sometimes, the person was abused as a child or has Munchausen syndrome (fake illness for themselves).

  9. Kleine-Levin syndrome: current status.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Shu; Lakkis, Clair; Guilleminault, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Kleine-Levin Syndrome is a periodic hypersomnia characterized by recurrent episodes of hypersomnia and other symptoms. This article reviews the research to date, outlines the clinical symptoms, and describes current testing and treatment. It concludes that the cause remains unknown and no treatment is effective in preventing recurrence, although modafinil may reduce duration of symptomatic episode. PMID:20451032

  10. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy. PMID:26971503

  11. Micro-duplications of 1q32.1 associated with neurodevelopmental delay.

    PubMed

    Olson, H E; Shen, Y; Poduri, A; Gorman, M P; Dies, K A; Robbins, M; Hundley, R; Wu, B; Sahin, M

    2012-02-01

    Distal partial trisomies involving the region 1q32 have been associated with dysmorphic features and developmental delay [1-11]. To further define the critical region for developmental delay and to investigate the genotype-phenotype association of 1q trisomy syndrome, we report two patients with much smaller (3 Mb and 3.5 Mb in size) trisomic regions on 1q32.1. The two micro-duplications largely overlap and both patients exhibited cognitive and motor delays. Case 1 is a 5-year-old boy with global developmental delay, behavioral problems, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), staring spells, headaches, and paresthesias. Case 2 is a 14-year-old girl with seizures, cognitive and motor difficulties, and minor dysmorphic features. These two cases suggest that 1q32.1 region on distal arm of 1q and genes involved are critical to cognitive and motor development in a gene dosage sensitive manner and that other neurological features are variable within this syndrome. PMID:22266072

  12. Microduplications of 1q32.1 associated with neurodevelopmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Olson, HE; Shen, Y; Poduri, A; Gorman, MP; Dies, KA; Robbins, M; Hundley, R; Wu, B; Sahin, M

    2012-01-01

    Distal partial trisomies involving the region 1q32 have been associated with dysmorphic features and developmental delay.[1–11] To further define the critical region for developmental delay and to investigate the genotype-phenotype association of 1q trisomy syndrome, we report two patients with much smaller (3 Mb and 3.5 Mb in size) trisomic regions on 1q32.1. The two microduplications largely overlap and both patients exhibited cognitive and motor delays. Case 1 is a 5-year-old boy with global developmental delay, behavioral problems, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), staring spells, headaches, and paresthesias. Case 2 is a 14-year-old girl with seizures, cognitive and motor difficulties, and minor dysmorphic features. These two cases suggest that 1q32.1 region on distal arm of 1q and genes involved are critical to cognitive and motor development in a gene dosage sensitive manner and that other neurological features are variable within this syndrome. PMID:22266072

  13. Multidimensional period doubling structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yup; Flom, Dvir; Ben-Abraham, Shelomo I

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops the formalism necessary to generalize the period doubling sequence to arbitrary dimension by straightforward extension of the substitution and recursion rules. It is shown that the period doubling structures of arbitrary dimension are pure point diffractive. The symmetries of the structures are pointed out. PMID:27126116

  14. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the

  15. The Living Periodic Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  16. Barth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS) is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM), skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA). Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE), left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC), ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical), compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ) gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and recurrent male miscarriage and stillbirth. Cardiolipin testing and TAZ sequencing now provide relatively rapid diagnostic testing, both prospectively and retrospectively, from a range of fresh or stored tissues, blood or neonatal bloodspots. TAZ sequencing also allows female carrier detection and antenatal screening. Management of BTHS includes medical therapy of CM, cardiac transplantation (in 14% of patients), antibiotic prophylaxis and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) therapy. Multidisciplinary teams/clinics are essential for minimising hospital attendances and allowing many more individuals with BTHS to live into adulthood. PMID:23398819

  17. Hypereosinophilic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Roufosse, Florence E; Goldman, Michel; Cogan, Elie

    2007-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES) constitute a rare and heterogeneous group of disorders, defined as persistent and marked blood eosinophilia (> 1.5 × 109/L for more than six consecutive months) associated with evidence of eosinophil-induced organ damage, where other causes of hypereosinophilia such as allergic, parasitic, and malignant disorders have been excluded. Prevalence is unknown. HES occur most frequently in young to middle-aged patients, but may concern any age group. Male predominance (4–9:1 ratio) has been reported in historic series but this is likely to reflect the quasi-exclusive male distribution of a sporadic hematopoietic stem cell mutation found in a recently characterized disease variant. Target-organ damage mediated by eosinophils is highly variable among patients, with involvement of skin, heart, lungs, and central and peripheral nervous systems in more than 50% of cases. Other frequently observed complications include hepato- and/or splenomegaly, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, and coagulation disorders. Recent advances in underlying pathogenesis have established that hypereosinophilia may be due either to primitive involvement of myeloid cells, essentially due to occurrence of an interstitial chromosomal deletion on 4q12 leading to creation of the FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene (F/P+ variant), or to increased interleukin (IL)-5 production by a clonally expanded T cell population (lymphocytic variant), most frequently characterized by a CD3-CD4+ phenotype. Diagnosis of HES relies on observation of persistent and marked hypereosinophilia responsible for target-organ damage, and exclusion of underlying causes of hypereosinophilia, including allergic and parasitic disorders, solid and hematological malignancies, Churg-Strauss disease, and HTLV infection. Once these criteria are fulfilled, further testing for eventual pathogenic classification is warranted using appropriate cytogenetic and functional approaches. Therapeutic management should be adjusted to disease severity and eventual detection of pathogenic variants. For F/P+ patients, imatinib has undisputedly become first line therapy. For others, corticosteroids are generally administered initially, followed by agents such as hydroxycarbamide, interferon-alpha, and imatinib, for corticosteroid-resistant cases, as well as for corticosteroid-sparing purposes. Recent data suggest that mepolizumab, an anti-IL-5 antibody, is an effective corticosteroid-sparing agent for F/P-negative patients. Prognosis has improved significantly since definition of HES, and currently depends on development of irreversible heart failure, as well as eventual malignant transformation of myeloid or lymphoid cells. PMID:17848188

  18. Hereditary Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes are a rare group of hereditary autosomal dominant disorders that comprise less than 1% of all hereditary colorectal cancers. Hamartomatous polyps, in and of themselves, are benign entities; however, these hamartomatous polyposis syndromes have a malignant potential for the development of colorectal cancer as well as extracolonic cancers. Early detection and proper surveillance are vital to minimizing the risk of carcinoma. This article provides a critical review of the clinical presentation, pathology, genetics, and screening and surveillance guidelines of juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. PMID:20567567

  19. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pandeshwar, Padma; Jayanthi, K.; Mahesh, D.

    2012-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched) gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions. PMID:23082255

  20. A Longitudinal Study of Narrative Development in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleave, Patricia; Bird, Elizabeth Kay-Raining; Czutrin, Rachael; Smith, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined narrative development in children and adolescents with Down syndrome longitudinally. Narratives were collected from 32 children and adolescents with Down syndrome three times over a 1-year period. Both micro- and macrolevel analyses were conducted. Significant growth over the 1-year period was seen in semantic complexity…

  1. A Longitudinal Study of Narrative Development in Children and Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleave, Patricia; Bird, Elizabeth Kay-Raining; Czutrin, Rachael; Smith, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined narrative development in children and adolescents with Down syndrome longitudinally. Narratives were collected from 32 children and adolescents with Down syndrome three times over a 1-year period. Both micro- and macrolevel analyses were conducted. Significant growth over the 1-year period was seen in semantic complexity

  2. Orion's Cloak - A rapidly expanding shell of gas centered on the Orion OB1 association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Songaila, A.; York, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of the interstellar gas surrounding the Orion OB1 association and the neighboring lambda Orionis association is detailed. UV absorption lime spectra of various ionization stages of C, N, Si and S in the directions of 12 stars were obtained by means of the spectrometer on board the Copernicus satellite. The presence of a shell of material surrounding the two associations and expanding at 100 to 120 km/sec, designated Orion's Cloak, was revealed, together with sporadically occurring higher column density matter at lower velocities. Results are interpreted to indicate the presence of a rapidly moving radiative shock outside the H II region of the association stars and inside this feature, a lower velocity, higher column density cloud which appears to be directly ionized by association stars. It is suggested that the gas features are caused by the effects of a recent supernova and of multiple supernovae, stellar winds and rocket-accelerated clouds in addition to stellar ionization.

  3. Young Stars in NGC 6231 and the Sco OB1 Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, B.

    2008-12-01

    NGC 6231 is a young cluster in the southern sky, around 3-5 Myr old, located at a distance of about 1.6 kpc at the near side of the Sagittarius spiral arm. It forms the nucleus of the extended Sco OB1 association. The cluster is very rich, with more than 100 massive stars, among them 15 O-stars. Radial velocity studies have revealed a very large binary fraction among these OB stars. The young low-mass population has recently been identified using deep X-ray observations. Within the large HII region Gum 55 that surrounds NGC 6231 there exists a major elephant trunk, which shows evidence for recent second-generation star formation in the form of young B-stars surrounded by reflection nebulae and a number of low-mass Hα emission stars.

  4. Grp1-associated scaffold protein regulates skin homeostasis after ultraviolet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Anand; Coleman, Daniel J.; Nevrivy, Daniel J.; Long, Tulley; Kioussi, Chrissa; Indra, Arup K.; Leid, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Grp1-associated scaffold protein (Grasp), the product of a retinoic acid-induced gene in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, is expressed primarily in brain, heart, and lung of the mouse. We report herein that Grasp transcripts are also found in mouse skin in which the Grasp gene is robustly induced following acute ultraviolet-B (UVB) exposure. Grasp−/− mice were found to exhibit delayed epidermal proliferation and a blunted apoptotic response after acute UVB exposure. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the nuclear residence time of the tumor suppressor protein p53 was reduced in Grasp−/− mice after UVB exposure. Taken together, our results suggest that a physiological role of Grasp may be to regulate skin homeostasis after UVB exposure, potentially by influencing p53-mediated apoptotic responses in skin. PMID:24407555

  5. Monozygotic twins concordant for Kleine-Levin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Kleine-Levin syndrome is a rare sleep disorder of unknown etiology. It is characterized by intermittent periods of excessive sleepiness, cognitive disturbances and behavioral abnormalities. Nine cases of familial Kleine-Levin syndrome have been identified, but there are no reported cases describing twins that are affected by the syndrome. Case presentation We report the cases of 16-year-old monozygotic twin boys who both suffered from Kleine-Levin syndrome. In both cases, the onset of the first episode was preceded by an influenza infection. During symptomatic periods they slept for the entire day except for meals and bathroom visits. Actimetry recordings revealed that during symptomatic periods, daily activity was lower than that of asymptomatic periods, on the other hand, activity during the night was significantly higher in symptomatic periods than asymptomatic periods. Polysomnography (PSG) data during symptomatic periods revealed a decrease in sleep efficiency. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing revealed no DQB1*02 loci. They were administered lithium carbonate but the beneficial effect was limited. Conclusions Our observations suggest that Kleine-Levin syndrome may be due to genetic and autoimmune processes, although etiologic relationship to specific HLA type remains controversial. PMID:22646233

  6. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  7. [Tic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Czapliński, Adam; Steck, Andreas J; Fuhr, Peter

    2002-01-01

    A tic is an involuntary, sudden, rapid, recurrent, nonrrhythmic, stereotyped, motor movement or vocalization. This paper reviews clinical, pathophysiological, epidemiological and treatment issues of tic disorders. The clinical presentation of tic disorders with simple and complex motor or vocal tics is reviewed in detail. The most common psychiatric comorbid conditions, such as personality disorder (PD), Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Self-Destructive Behavior (SDB) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are presented too. All forms of tics may be exacerbated by anger or stress, but they are usually markedly diminished during sleep. Premonitory feelings or "sensory experiences", which are distinct from the actual motor or phonic tics and precede the tics, occur in over 80% of tic-patients and in 95% of patients with Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS). The American Psychiatric Association recognizes three types of tic disorders on the basis of clinical criteria: Transient Tic Disorder, Chronic Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder and GTS. The diagnostic criteria for these types are described. According to epidemiological data, up to 10% of children have at least somewhere a transient tic disorder. The onset of tics, whether simple or multiple, occurs at approximately 7 years of age. The accepted prevalence figure for GTS is 0.05-3%. Although tics can appear as the result of brain injury, Huntington chorea or encephalitis, they are most commonly idiopathic. Genetic factors appear to be present in many but not in all cases of tic disorders. Autosomal dominant, sex-linked models or semirecessive-semidominant-oligogenic models have been considered. Based on the review of the literature we believe that tic disorders are related to altered neurotransmitter function within the CNS, especially that the functional abnormality is somehow related to dopaminergic mechanism. Several authors have recently investigated the possible role of autoimmune response to streptococcal infection in the pathogenesis of tics. The differential diagnosis of tics is reviewed in detail. Above all tics represent a social disability. The ability to tolerate tics varies greatly from one individual to another, and the need for treatment is better defined by the patient than by the physician. Mild cases do not need be treated. Ideally, management should be multidisciplinary and can range from educative to supportive means or to intricate pharmacological interventions. The major form of treatment of the motor or vocal symptoms continues to be based on high-potency "typical" neuroleptics (tiaprid, pimozide, haloperidol), which induce a wide range of potentially serious side effects. In everyday practice we prefer to start with an "atypical" neuroleptic drug--for example, olanzapin (5-10 mg/day), risperidone or clozapine. Other drugs, such as clonidin or pergolid are widely used but their efficiency is still questionable. SSRIs (sertaline, citalopram, fluoxetin, fluvoxamine) or other antidepressants (clomipramine) have been used in treatment of psychiatric comorbid conditions, too. Botulinum toxin injections have proved useful in tics, targeting at the symptoms of blepharospasm, in neck and facial muscles. PMID:12185806

  8. Hypernatremia in hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blas-Macedo, Jorge; Blas-Soto, Viridiana

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 82 year-old woman with hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) associated with hypernatremia, who was treated using 0.2 % sodium chloride in 5 % dextrose in water which resulted in the amelioration of the neurological symptoms in a short period of time, followed the decrease in serum glucose and the serum sodium, consequently the serum osmolality. We discuss the advantages and usefulness of 0.2 % sodium chloride in 5 % dextrose in water in this syndrome and emphasize its importance in the treatment. We reviewed the literature on HHS and we assume that this case reported was treated with hypotomic solution without subsequent neurological damage. PMID:21839004

  9. Do you know this syndrome?

    PubMed

    Meotti, Carolina Degen; Pulga, Raquel Fonseca Ferreira da Silva; Fernandes, Karen de Almeida Pinto; Gusmo, Paula Regazzi de; Fernandes, Karina de Almeida Pinto; Rocha, Ana Rita

    2013-01-01

    Cowden's disease or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and the main dermatological features are facial trichilemmomas (hamartomas of the follicular infundibula), oral fibroma and benign acral keratoses. The importance of this disease lays in the increased susceptibility to malignization of some lesions, especially breast, thyroid and genitourinary tract. Despite its varied phenotypic expression, this disease is generally unknown. Consequently, many cases are undiagnosed or diagnosis comes at a late stage, which reinforces the importance of an early investigation of the disease so the patient may have periodic check-ups to discover and treat malignancies. PMID:24173198

  10. Association of Sicca Syndrome with Proviral Load and Proinflammatory Cytokines in HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Clara Mônica; Santos, Silvane; Dourado, Adriana; Carvalho, Natália B.; Bittencourt, Valéria; Lessa, Marcus Miranda; Siqueira, Isadora; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2016-01-01

    The Sjögren syndrome has been diagnosed in patients with HTLV-1 associated myelopathy and dry mouth and dry eyes are documented in HTLV-1 carriers. However the diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome in these subjects has been contested. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated the role of immunological factors and proviral load, in sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1 in patients without myelopathy. Subjects were recruited in the HTLV-1 Clinic, from 2009 to 2011. The proviral load and cytokine levels (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-5, and IL-10) were obtained from a database containing the values presented by the subjects at admission in the clinic. Of the 272 participants, 59 (21.7%) had sicca syndrome and in all of them anti-Sjögren syndrome related antigen A (SSA) and antigen B (SSB) were negatives. The production of TNF-α and IFN-γ was higher in the group with sicca syndrome (P < 0.05) than in HTLV-1 infected subjects without sicca syndrome. Our data indicates that patients with sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1 do not have Sjögren syndrome. However the increased production of TNF-α and IFN-γ in this group of patients may contribute to the pathogenesis of sicca syndrome associated with HTLV-1. PMID:26904697

  11. Painful periods (dysmenorrhea) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Primary dysmenorrhea is a normal cramping of the lower abdomen caused by hormone-induced uterine contractions before the period. Secondary dysmenorrhea may be caused by abnormal conditions such as ...

  12. Delay and periodicity.

    PubMed

    Yanchuk, S; Perlikowski, P

    2009-04-01

    Systems with time delay play an important role in modeling of many physical and biological processes. In this paper we describe generic properties of systems with time delay, which are related to the appearance and stability of periodic solutions. In particular, we show that delay systems generically have families of periodic solutions, which are reappearing for infinitely many delay times. As delay increases, the solution families overlap leading to increasing coexistence of multiple stable as well as unstable solutions. We also consider stability issue of periodic solutions with large delay by explaining asymptotic properties of the spectrum of characteristic multipliers. We show that the spectrum of multipliers can be split into two parts: pseudocontinuous and strongly unstable. The pseudocontinuous part of the spectrum mediates destabilization of periodic solutions. PMID:19518326

  13. The Periodic Table CD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Alton J.; Holmes, Jon L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the characteristics of the digitized version of The Periodic Table Videodisc. Provides details about the organization of information and access to the data via Macintosh and Windows computers. (DDR)

  14. Setting the Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saturnelli, Annette

    1985-01-01

    Examines problems resulting from different forms of the periodic table, indicating that New York State schools use a form reflecting the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry's 1984 recommendations. Other formats used and reasons for standardization are discussed. (DH)

  15. Survival of patients with BRCA1-associated breast cancer diagnosed in an MRI-based surveillance program.

    PubMed

    Mller, Pl; Stormorken, Astrid; Jonsrud, Christoffer; Holmen, Marit Muri; Hagen, Anne Irene; Clark, Neal; Vab, Anita; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A; Mhle, Lovise

    2013-05-01

    We report the 5- and 10-year survival rate of women diagnosed with breast cancer in the context of an annual MRI-based surveillance program. In 2001, as part of a national initiative, women in Norway with a BRCA1 mutation were offered annual screening with breast MRI in addition to mammography. 802 women with a BRCA1 mutation were screened one or more times and followed for a mean of 4.2 years. As of December 2011, 68 of 802 women in the screening program were diagnosed with DCIS or invasive breast cancer (8.5 %), including eight prevalent, 50 incident screen-detected and eight interval cancers. Two latent cancers were detected at prophylactic mastectomy. Sixty-three of the cancers were invasive and five were in situ. The mean tumour size was 1.4 cm (range 0.2-4.5 cm), and 85 % of the patients were node-negative. Ten of the 68 patients died of cancer in the follow-up period. The 5-year breast cancer-specific survival for women with cancer was 75 % (95 % CI 56-86 %) and the 10-year survival was 69 % (95 % CI: 48-83 %). The 5-year survival for women with Stage 1 breast cancer was 82 % compared to 98 % in the population. The 5- and 10-year survival of women with a BRCA1-associated breast cancer detected in a national MRI-based screening program in BRCA1 mutation carriers Norway was less than anticipated. The benefit of annual MRI surveillance on reducing breast cancer mortality in BRCA1 mutation carriers remains to be proven. PMID:23615785

  16. Familial "hashitoxic' periodic paralysis.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A K

    1985-01-01

    Four members of a Chinese family who had thyrotoxicosis and periodic paralysis are described. Two of these patients had "hashitoxicosis' (Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis) as evidenced by the presence of thyroid antibodies in addition to elevated thyroxine (T4) levels. The other two patients were not available for testing. The association of the familial occurrence of "hashitoxicosis' and periodic paralysis does not appear to have been reported previously. PMID:3839536

  17. Familial "hashitoxic' periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Leung, A K

    1985-08-01

    Four members of a Chinese family who had thyrotoxicosis and periodic paralysis are described. Two of these patients had "hashitoxicosis' (Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis) as evidenced by the presence of thyroid antibodies in addition to elevated thyroxine (T4) levels. The other two patients were not available for testing. The association of the familial occurrence of "hashitoxicosis' and periodic paralysis does not appear to have been reported previously. PMID:3839536

  18. Effects of periodic discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, F. E.

    1977-01-01

    Periodic capacity checks are assessed as well as the effects of periodic discharges on the cycle life and the performance of cells during the cycle life. Topics discussed include the effect of the amount of electrolyte on cell capacity at 35 C; battery design for spacecraft; electrolyte starvation theory; battery separator degradation; negative electrode stability; voltage regulation; operating temperatures; and integration of reconditioning systems using microprocessors.

  19. Sick sinus syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Ector, H; Van der Hauwaert, L G

    1980-01-01

    The clinical and electrocardiographic findings in five children with the sick sinus syndrome and an otherwise normal heart are described. There were three boys and two girls. Their age at onset of either bradycardia or symptoms ranged from 1 day to 7 years. In one patient, the youngest ever reported with this syndrome, bradycardia was noted before birth. Four children presented with neurological symptoms--attacks of dizziness, fainting spells, or syncope. One boy, treated for epilepsy before the underlying arrhythmia ws diagnosed, died suddenly while playing. One child had near-fatal syncope caused by ventricular tachycardia. Continuous 24-hour electrocardiographic monitoring is the best method of assessing the severity of the condition. Sinus bradycardia, sinuatrial block, and periods of sinus arrest up to 4.8 seconds were recorded. Two patients had associated atrioventricular block and were therefore presumed to have binodal disease. Atrial fibrillation or flutter occurred in three patients. Isolated sick sinus syndrome may be a life-threatening condition in childhood for which, in selected cases, the insertion of a permanent pacemaker is indicated. Images PMID:7459152

  20. Type VI Aplasia Cutis Congenita: Bart's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kulalı, Ferit; Bas, Ahmet Yagmur; Kale, Yusuf; Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Nihal; Apaydın, Sema

    2015-01-01

    Bart's syndrome is characterized by aplasia cutis congenita and epidermolysis bullosa. We present the case of a newborn male who developed blisters on the mucous membranes and the skin following congenital localized absence of skin. Bart's syndrome (BS) is diagnosed clinically based on the disorder's unique signs and symptoms but histologic evaluation of the skin can help to confirm the final diagnosis. The patient was managed conservatively with topical antibacterial ointment and wet gauze dressing. Periodic follow-up examinations showed complete healing. We emphasized that it is important to use relatively simple methods for optimal healing without the need for complex surgical interventions. PMID:26609453

  1. Monogenic Autoinflammatory Syndromes: State of the Art on Genetic, Clinical, and Therapeutic Issues

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luisa; Atteno, Mariangela; Compagnone, Adele; Caso, Paolo; Frediani, Bruno; Galeazzi, Mauro; Punzi, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes (MAISs) are caused by innate immune system dysregulation leading to aberrant inflammasome activation and episodes of fever and involvement of skin, serous membranes, eyes, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system, predominantly with a childhood onset. To date, there are twelve known MAISs: familial Mediterranean fever, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, familial cold urticaria syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome, CINCA syndrome, mevalonate kinase deficiency, NLRP12-associated autoinflammatory disorder, Blau syndrome, early-onset sarcoidosis, PAPA syndrome, Majeed syndrome, and deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. Each of these conditions may manifest itself with more or less severe inflammatory symptoms of variable duration and frequency, associated with findings of increased inflammatory parameters in laboratory investigation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the main genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of MAISs and their most recent classification with the ultimate goal of increasing awareness of autoinflammation among various internal medicine specialists. PMID:24282415

  2. Spam1-associated transmission ratio distortion in mice: Elucidating the mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A; Zhang, Hong; Morales, Carlos R; Zhao, Yutong; Rulon, Michelle; Barnoski, Barry L; Chen, Hong; Galileo, Deni S

    2005-01-01

    Background While transmission ratio distortion, TRD, (a deviation from Mendelian ratio) is extensive in humans and well-documented in mice, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Our earlier studies on carriers of spontaneous mutations of mouse Sperm Adhesion Molecule 1 (Spam1) suggested that TRD results from biochemically different sperm, due to a lack of transcript sharing through the intercellular cytoplasmic bridges of spermatids. These bridges usually allow transcript sharing among genetically different spermatids which develop into biochemically and functionally equivalent sperm. Objectives The goals of the study were to provide support for the lack of sharing (LOS) hypothesis, using transgene and null carriers of Spam1, and to determine the mechanism of Spam1-associated TRD. Methods Carriers of Spam1-Hyal5 BAC transgenes were mated with wild-type female mice and the progeny analyzed for TRD by PCR genotyping. Sperm from transgene and Spam1 null carriers were analyzed using flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry to detect quantities of Spam1 and/or Hyal5. Transgene-bearing sperm with Spam1 overexpression were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization. In wild-type animals, EM studies of in situ transcript hybridization of testis sections and Northern analysis of biochemically fractionated testicular RNA were performed to localize Spam1 transcript. Finally, AU-rich motifs identified in the 3' UTR of Spam1 RNA were assayed by UV cross-linking to determine their ability to interact with testicular RNA binding proteins. Results The Tg8 line of transgene carriers had a significant (P < 0.001) TRD, due to reduced fertilizing ability of transgene-bearing sperm. These sperm retained large cytoplasmic droplets engorged with overexpressed Spam1 or Hyal5 protein. Caudal sperm from transgene carriers and caput sperm of null carriers showed a bimodal distribution of Spam1, indicating that the sperm in a male were biochemically different with respect to Spam1 quantities. Spam1 RNA was absent from the bridges, associated exclusively with the ER, and was shown to be anchored to the cytoskeleton. This compartmentalization of the transcript, mediated by cytoskeletal binding, occurs via protein interactions with 3' UTR AU-rich sequences that are likely involved in its stabilization. Conclusion We provide strong support for the LOS hypothesis, and have elucidated the mechanism of Spam1-associated TRD. PMID:16092963

  3. Interleukin-17 mediated differences in the pathogenesis of HIV-1-associated tuberculous and cryptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Marais, Suzaan; Meintjes, Graeme; Lesosky, Maia; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Cryptococcus neoformans are major causes of meningitis in HIV-1-infected patients. Identifying differences in the inflammatory profiles of HIV-1-associated tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and cryptococcal meningitis may inform differences in immunopathogenic mechanisms in these diseases. In this study we compared the clinical and inflammatory features of HIV-1-associated TBM, and cryptococcal meningitis. Methods: A prospective study of HIV-1-infected adults who presented with either TBM [antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive] or cryptococcal meningitis (regardless of ART prescription). Clinical and laboratory findings and concentrations of 40 inflammatory mediators measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, 33 paired with blood) were compared between TBM and cryptococcal meningitis patients regardless of ART prescription and between TBM and cryptococcal meningitis patients not receiving ART. Results: Clinical and laboratory findings were similar in TBM (n=34) and cryptococcal meningitis (n = 19; ART prescribed: n = 10, no ART prescribed: n = 9). Exceptions included a higher median CD4+ cell count [interquartile: 113 (69–199) vs. 25 (8–49) cells/μl, P = 0.0001] and higher HIV-1 median viral load [plasma: 5.46 (4.82–5.89) vs. 4.87 (4.36–5.17) log10copies/ml, P = 0.037; CSF: 6.05 (5.43–6.56) vs. 5.56 (4.52–5.80) log10copies/ml, P = 0.03] in TBM vs. cryptococcal meningitis patients not receiving ART. CSF interleukin (IL)-17A was lower in TBM compared with cryptococcal meningitis [1.00 (0.25–2.35) vs. 9.31 (1.24–23.36) pg/ml, P-adjusted = 0.03]. Conclusion: Despite presenting with higher peripheral CD4+ cell counts, TBM patients also presented with higher HIV-1 viral loads compared with cryptococcal meningitis patients, suggesting a greater propensity of M. tuberculosis compared with C. neoformans to increase HIV-1 replication in vivo. CSF IL-17A was lower in TBM; its role in the immunopathogenesis of TBM and cryptococcal meningitis deserves further research. PMID:26765934

  4. Hospitalizations of Infants and Young Children with Down Syndrome: Evidence from Inpatient Person-Records from a Statewide Administrative Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, S. A.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although individuals with Down syndrome are increasingly living into the adult years, infants and young children with the syndrome continue to be at increased risk for health problems. Using linked, statewide administrative hospital discharge records of all infants with Down syndrome born over a 3-year period, this study "follows

  5. Hospitalizations of Infants and Young Children with Down Syndrome: Evidence from Inpatient Person-Records from a Statewide Administrative Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, S. A.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although individuals with Down syndrome are increasingly living into the adult years, infants and young children with the syndrome continue to be at increased risk for health problems. Using linked, statewide administrative hospital discharge records of all infants with Down syndrome born over a 3-year period, this study "follows…

  6. Metabolic Syndrome and Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sachdev, Amit; Marmura, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Migraine and metabolic syndrome are highly prevalent and costly conditions. The two conditions coexist, but it is unclear what relationship may exist between the two processes. Metabolic syndrome involves a number of findings, including insulin resistance, systemic hypertension, obesity, a proinflammatory state, and a prothrombotic state. Only one study addresses migraine in metabolic syndrome, finding significant differences in the presentation of metabolic syndrome in migraineurs. However, controversy exists regarding the contribution of each individual risk factor to migraine pathogenesis and prevalence. It is unclear what treatment implications, if any, exist as a result of the concomitant diagnosis of migraine and metabolic syndrome. The cornerstone of migraine and metabolic syndrome treatments is prevention, relying heavily on diet modification, sleep hygiene, medication use, and exercise. PMID:23181051

  7. Neurofibromatosis type 1-associated tumours: Their somatic mutational spectrum and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Somatic gene mutations constitute key events in the malignant transformation of human cells. Somatic mutation can either actively speed up the growth of tumour cells or relax the growth constraints normally imposed upon them, thereby conferring a selective (proliferative) advantage at the cellular level. Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) affects 1/3,000-4,000 individuals worldwide and is caused by the inactivation of the NF1 tumour suppressor gene, which encodes the protein neurofibromin. Consistent with Knudson's two-hit hypothesis, NF1 patients harbouring a heterozygous germline NF1 mutation develop neurofibromas upon somatic mutation of the second, wild-type, NF1 allele. While the identification of somatic mutations in NF1 patients has always been problematic on account of the extensive cellular heterogeneity manifested by neurofibromas, the classification of NF1 somatic mutations is a prerequisite for understanding the complex molecular mechanisms underlying NF1 tumorigenesis. Here, the known somatic mutational spectrum for the NF1 gene in a range of NF1-associated neoplasms --including peripheral nerve sheath tumours (neurofibromas), malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours, gastrointestinal stromal tumours, gastric carcinoid, juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia, glomus tumours, astrocytomas and phaeochromocytomas -- have been collated and analysed. PMID:22155606

  8. Effect of Pulsed Methylprednisolone on Pain, in Patients with HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Buell, Kevin G.; Puri, Aiysha; Demontis, Maria Antonietta; Short, Charlotte L.; Adonis, Adine; Haddow, Jana; Martin, Fabiola; Dhasmana, Divya

    2016-01-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is an immune mediated myelopathy caused by the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The efficacy of treatments used for patients with HAM/TSP is uncertain. The aim of this study is to document the efficacy of pulsed methylprednisolone in patients with HAM/TSP. Data from an open cohort of 26 patients with HAM/TSP was retrospectively analysed. 1g IV methylprednisolone was infused on three consecutive days. The outcomes were pain, gait, urinary frequency and nocturia, a range of inflammatory markers and HTLV-1 proviral load. Treatment was well tolerated in all but one patient. Significant improvements in pain were: observed immediately, unrelated to duration of disease and maintained for three months. Improvement in gait was only seen on Day 3 of treatment. Baseline cytokine concentrations did not correlate to baseline pain or gait impairment but a decrease in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) concentration after pulsed methylprednisolone was associated with improvements in both. Until compared with placebo, treatment with pulsed methylprednisolone should be offered to patients with HAM/TSP for the treatment of pain present despite regular analgesia. PMID:27077747

  9. Role of resident CNS cell populations in HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lepoutre, Veronique; Jain, Pooja; Quann, Kevin; Wigdahl, Brian; Khan, Zafar K

    2009-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus discovered, is the etiologic agent for a number of disorders; the two most common pathologies include adult T cell leukemia (ATL) and a progressive demyelinating neuroinflammatory disease, HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The neurologic dysfunction associated with HAM/TSP is a result of viral intrusion into the central nervous system (CNS) and the generation of a hyperstimulated host response within the peripheral and central nervous system that includes expanded populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This robust, yet detrimental immune response likely contributes to the death of myelin producing oligodendrocytes and degeneration of neuronal axons. The mechanisms of neurological degeneration in HAM/TSP have yet to be fully delineated in vivo and may involve the immunogenic properties of the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax. This comprehensive review characterizes the available knowledge to date concerning the effects of HTLV-1 on CNS resident cell populations with emphasis on both viral and host factors contributing to the genesis of HAM/TSP. PMID:19273122

  10. Neurofibromatosis 1-associated panhypopituitarism presenting as hypoglycaemic seizures and stroke-like symptoms.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Waqar; Nathan, Muriel H; Allen, Gilman B; Borden, Neil M; Babi, M Ali; Tandan, Rup

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old man with a known history of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) presented within 2?days of diarrhoeal illness followed by encephalopathy, facial twitching, hypoglycaemia, hypotension, tachycardia and low-grade fever. Examination showed multiple caf-au-lait spots and neurofibromas over the trunk, arms and legs and receptive aphasia with right homonymous hemianopia, which resolved. Workup for cardiac, inflammatory and infectious aetiologies was unrevealing. A brain MRI showed gyral swelling with increased T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal and diffusion restriction in the left cerebral cortex. Neuroendocrine findings suggested panhypopituitarism with centrally derived adrenal insufficiency. Supportive treatment, hormone supplementation, antibiotics, antivirals and levetiracetam yielded clinical improvement. A follow-up brain MRI showed focal left parieto-occipital atrophy with findings of cortical laminar necrosis. In conclusion, we describe a case of NF1-associated panhypopituitarism presenting as hypoglycaemic seizures and stroke-like findings, hitherto unreported manifestations of NF1. Prompt recognition and treatment of these associated conditions can prevent devastating complications. PMID:26531733

  11. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 associated with parkinsonism: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bruun, Marie; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Thomsen, Carsten; Danielsen, Else; Thomsen, Lise Lykke; Pinborg, Lars Hageman; Khabbazbavani, Nastaran; Nielsen, Joergen Erik

    2015-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the CACNA1A gene on chromosome 19p13. It is well described that FHM1 can present with cerebellar signs, but parkinsonism has not previously been reported in FHM1 or EA2 even though parkinsonism has been described in SCA6. We report a 63-year-old woman with FHM1 caused by an R583Q mutation in the CACNA1A gene, clinically presenting with migraine and permanent cerebellar ataxia. Since the age of 60 years, the patient also developed parkinsonism with rigidity, bradykinesia and a resting tremor. An MRI showed a normal substantia nigra, but a bilateral loss of substance in the basal ganglia, which is in contrast to the typically normal MRI in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography demonstrated a decreased DAT-binding potential in the putamen. We wish to draw attention to FHM1 associated with parkinsonism; however, whether the reported case is a consequence of FHM1 being allelic to SCA6, unknown modifiers to the specific R583Q CACNA1A mutation or idiopathic Parkinson's disease remains unanswered. PMID:25969684

  12. Systems biology approaches reveal a specific interferon-inducible signature in HTLV-1 associated myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Tattermusch, Sonja; Skinner, Jason A; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Berry, Matthew P; McNab, Finlay W; O'Garra, Anne; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2012-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that persists lifelong in the host. In ?4% of infected people, HTLV-1 causes a chronic disabling neuroinflammatory disease known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The pathogenesis of HAM/TSP is unknown and treatment remains ineffective. We used gene expression microarrays followed by flow cytometric and functional assays to investigate global changes in blood transcriptional profiles of HTLV-1-infected and seronegative individuals. We found that perturbations of the p53 signaling pathway were a hallmark of HTLV-1 infection. In contrast, a subset of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes was over-expressed in patients with HAM/TSP but not in asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers or patients with the clinically similar disease multiple sclerosis. The IFN-inducible signature was present in all circulating leukocytes and its intensity correlated with the clinical severity of HAM/TSP. Leukocytes from patients with HAM/TSP were primed to respond strongly to stimulation with exogenous IFN. However, while type I IFN suppressed expression of the HTLV-1 structural protein Gag it failed to suppress the highly immunogenic viral transcriptional transactivator Tax. We conclude that over-expression of a subset of IFN-stimulated genes in chronic HTLV-1 infection does not constitute an efficient host response but instead contributes to the development of HAM/TSP. PMID:22291590

  13. Systems Biology Approaches Reveal a Specific Interferon-Inducible Signature in HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tattermusch, Sonja; Skinner, Jason A.; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Berry, Matthew P.; McNab, Finlay W.; O'Garra, Anne; Taylor, Graham P.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2012-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that persists lifelong in the host. In ?4% of infected people, HTLV-1 causes a chronic disabling neuroinflammatory disease known as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The pathogenesis of HAM/TSP is unknown and treatment remains ineffective. We used gene expression microarrays followed by flow cytometric and functional assays to investigate global changes in blood transcriptional profiles of HTLV-1-infected and seronegative individuals. We found that perturbations of the p53 signaling pathway were a hallmark of HTLV-1 infection. In contrast, a subset of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes was over-expressed in patients with HAM/TSP but not in asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers or patients with the clinically similar disease multiple sclerosis. The IFN-inducible signature was present in all circulating leukocytes and its intensity correlated with the clinical severity of HAM/TSP. Leukocytes from patients with HAM/TSP were primed to respond strongly to stimulation with exogenous IFN. However, while type I IFN suppressed expression of the HTLV-1 structural protein Gag it failed to suppress the highly immunogenic viral transcriptional transactivator Tax. We conclude that over-expression of a subset of IFN-stimulated genes in chronic HTLV-1 infection does not constitute an efficient host response but instead contributes to the development of HAM/TSP. PMID:22291590

  14. Circulating Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 Associates with Weight Loss and Poor Prognosis in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arner, Peter; Henjes, Frauke; Schwenk, Jochen M.; Darmanis, Spyros; Dahlman, Ingrid; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Naredi, Peter; Agustsson, Thorhallur; Lundholm, Kent; Nilsson, Peter; Rydén, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer cachexia (CC) is linked to poor prognosis. Although the mechanisms promoting this condition are not known, several circulating proteins have been proposed to contribute. We analyzed the plasma proteome in cancer subjects in order to identify factors associated with cachexia. Design/Subjects Plasma was obtained from a screening cohort of 59 patients, newly diagnosed with suspected gastrointestinal cancer, with (n = 32) or without (n = 27) cachexia. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using 760 antibodies (targeting 698 individual proteins) from the Human Protein Atlas project. The main findings were validated in a cohort of 93 patients with verified and advanced pancreas cancer. Results Only six proteins displayed differential plasma levels in the screening cohort. Among these, Carnosine Dipeptidase 1 (CNDP1) was confirmed by sandwich immunoassay to be lower in CC (p = 0.008). In both cohorts, low CNDP1 levels were associated with markers of poor prognosis including weight loss, malnutrition, lipid breakdown, low circulating albumin/IGF1 levels and poor quality of life. Eleven of the subjects in the discovery cohort were finally diagnosed with non-malignant disease but omitting these subjects from the analyses did not have any major influence on the results. Conclusions In gastrointestinal cancer, reduced plasma levels of CNDP1 associate with signs of catabolism and poor outcome. These results, together with recently published data demonstrating lower circulating CNDP1 in subjects with glioblastoma and metastatic prostate cancer, suggest that CNDP1 may constitute a marker of aggressive cancer and CC. PMID:25898255

  15. Organ-specific PTB1-associated microRNAs determine expression of pyruvate kinase isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kohei; Ito, Yuko; Sugito, Nobuhiko; Kumazaki, Minami; Shinohara, Haruka; Yamada, Nami; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Sugiyama, Tarou; Futamura, Manabu; Otsuki, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa; Akao, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    The Warburg effect is a well-known feature of cancer cells. However, its' functional significance hasn't been elucidated yet. Pyruvate kinase muscle (PKM), which is a rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme, has 2 isoforms, PKM1 and PKM2. It has been reported that PKM2 is a tumor-specific isoform and promotes the Warburg effect. Also, it has been thought that tumor cells switch their PKM isoform from PKM1 to PKM2 during tumor development. Here, we showed that this switching machinery was induced only in limited cases, based on PKM expression in normal tissues, and that brain-specific microRNA (miR)-124 and muscle-specific miR-133b regulated this machinery by controlling PKM expression through targeting polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (PTB1), which is a splicer of the PKM gene. Also, we confirmed that the PKM2/PKM1 ratio was further elevated in other PKM2-dominant organs such as colon through the down-regulation of these PTB1-associated microRNAs during tumor development. PMID:25721733

  16. Hypometabolism of watershed areas of the brain in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Akitoshi; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Ebihara, Yuka; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Shiomi, Kazutaka; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-11-01

    In previous studies of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), areas of slow blood flow in the spinal cord were related to pathological changes. While the pathological changes in the brain are milder than those in the spinal cord, they are also more significant in sites with slow blood flow. In this study, we investigated brain glucose metabolism in slow blood flow areas using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG-PET). Clinical features and brain (18)F-FDG-PET parameters were analyzed in six patients with HAM/TSP. For comparison of PET data, eight healthy volunteers were enrolled as normal controls (NLs). Glucose metabolism in the watershed areas of the middle and posterior cerebral arteries, as compared with that in the occipital lobes as a control, was significantly lower in HAM/TSP patients than in NLs. This result confirmed the relationship between slow blood flow areas and hypometabolism in HAM/TSP, and is consistent with previous findings that pathological changes are accentuated in sites with slow blood flow. PMID:26156876

  17. Global Stress Response in a Prokaryotic Model of DJ-1-Associated Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Nadia; Gautier, Valérie; Kthiri, Fatoum; Lelandais, Gaelle; Mihoub, Mouadh; Joseleau-Petit, Danièle; Caldas, Teresa; Bohn, Chantal; Tolosa, Leah; Rao, Govind; Tao, Kazuyuki; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Bouloc, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    YajL is the most closely related Escherichia coli homolog of Parkinsonism-associated protein DJ-1, a protein with a yet-undefined function in the oxidative-stress response. YajL protects cells against oxidative-stress-induced protein aggregation and functions as a covalent chaperone for the thiol proteome, including FeS proteins. To clarify the cellular responses to YajL deficiency, transcriptional profiling of the yajL mutant was performed. Compared to the parental strain, the yajL mutant overexpressed genes coding for chaperones, proteases, chemical chaperone transporters, superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxidases, components of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems, iron transporters, ferritins and FeS cluster biogenesis enzymes, DNA repair proteins, RNA chaperones, and small regulatory RNAs. It also overexpressed the RNA polymerase stress sigma factors sigma S (multiple stresses) and sigma 32 (protein stress) and activated the OxyR and SoxRS oxidative-stress transcriptional regulators, which together trigger the global stress response. The yajL mutant also overexpressed genes involved in septation and adopted a shorter and rounder shape characteristic of stressed bacteria. Biochemical experiments showed that this upregulation of many stress genes resulted in increased expression of stress proteins and improved biochemical function. Thus, protein defects resulting from the yajL mutation trigger the onset of a robust and global stress response in a prokaryotic model of DJ-1-associated Parkinsonism. PMID:23292772

  18. Nephrotic syndrome redux.

    PubMed

    Glassock, Richard J; Fervenza, Fernando C; Hebert, Lee; Cameron, J Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Redux: brought back, resurgent (Wikipedia free dictionary). This essay traces the history of the concepts that led to the usage of the term 'nephrotic syndrome' beginning ∼90 years ago. We then examined the various definitions used for this syndrome and modified them to conform to contemporary standards. Remarkably, only minor modifications were required. This analysis of a common clinical entity may be helpful in ensuring appropriate evaluation of patients suffering from nephrotic syndrome and nephrotic-range proteinuria. PMID:24723546

  19. [Paraneoplastic syndromes: a review].

    PubMed

    Berardi, R; Grilli, G; Romagnoli, E; Saladino, T; Freddari, F; Tamburrano, T; Galizia, E; Carbonari, G; Mariani, C; Braconi, C; Pierantoni, C; Battelli, N; Scartozzi, M; Cascinu, S

    2005-01-01

    Modern oncology often obtains good results against earlier neoplasms, whilst it's still in difficulties against the advanced ones. The knowledge of paraneoplastic syndromes is crucial both to cure patients and to do an earlier diagnosis. When we recognize a paraneoplastic syndrome that comes before the clinic beginning of a neoplasm, perhaps we save a life. This review discusses all the main paraneoplastic syndromes, focusing mainly on their clinical aspect and reminding the most commonly associated cancers. PMID:16463565

  20. Tropical diabetic hand syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Sangeeta; Chauhan, Ashutosh; Sethi, N T

    2008-10-01

    Tropical diabetic hand syndrome (TDHS) is a terminology used to describe a specific complication affecting patients with diabetes mellitus in the tropics. The syndrome encompasses a localized cellulitis with variable swelling and ulceration of the hands to progressive, fulminant hand sepsis, potentially fatal. Since this syndrome is less recognized it is often under-reported. Authors present two cases of TDHS and emphasize on aggressive glycemic control and surgical therapy to prevent potential crippling or fatal complications. PMID:20165601

  1. [Chilaidity syndrome. Case report].

    PubMed

    Candela, Stefano; Candela, Giancarlo; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Argano, Francesco; Romano, Ornella; Iannella, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Chilaidity syndrome is a mal position by bowel mal rotation o malfissation. It is more common in right side expecially in obese people. If asyimptomatic, the syndrome is an occasional comparison by radiology, surgical exploration by laparoscopy or autopsy, otherwise, if symptomatic, there are obstructive symptoms,abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, flatulence, breath, constipation and anorexia. Diagnosis is radiological. We present a rare case of this syndrome in a man with serious obstructive symptoms. PMID:22462337

  2. [Toxic anterior segment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cornut, P-L; Chiquet, C

    2011-01-01

    Toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) is a general term used to describe acute, sterile postoperative inflammation due to a non-infectious substance that accidentally enters the anterior segment at the time of surgery and mimics infectious endophthalmitis. TASS most commonly occurs acutely following anterior segment surgery, typically 12-72h after cataract extraction. Anterior segment inflammation is usually quite severe with hypopyon. Endothelial cell damage is common, resulting in diffuse corneal edema. No bacterium is isolated from ocular samples. The causes of TASS are numerous and difficult to isolate. Any device or substance used during the surgery or in the immediate postoperative period may be implicated. The major known causes include: preservatives in ophthalmic solutions, denatured ophthalmic viscosurgical devices, bacterial endotoxin, and intraocular lens-induced inflammation. Clinical features of infectious and non-infectious inflammation are initially indistinguishable and TASS is usually diagnosed and treated as acute endophthalmitis. It usually improves with local steroid treatment but may result in chronic elevation of intraocular pressure or irreversible corneal edema due to permanent damage of trabecular meshwork or endothelial cells. PMID:21176994

  3. Malignant Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Min-Yuen Cynthia; Shahed, Joohi; Jankovic, Joseph

    2007-09-15

    The aim of this work was to draw attention to potentially life-threatening symptoms associated with Tourette syndrome (TS) and to explore their relationship to TS comorbidities. Medical records of all patients with TS evaluated at our Movement Disorders Clinic between July 2003 and July 2006 were reviewed. Data on patients with malignant TS, defined as >or=2 emergency room (ER) visits or >or=1 hospitalizations for TS symptoms or its associated behavioral comorbidities, were entered into a dataset and analyzed. Five illustrative cases are described. Of 333 TS patients evaluated during the 3-year period, 17 (5.1%) met the criteria for malignant TS. Hospital admission or ER visits were for tic-related injuries, self-injurious behavior (SIB), uncontrollable violence and temper, and suicidal ideation/attempts. Compared with patients with nonmalignant TS, those with malignant TS were significantly more likely to have a personal history of obsessive compulsive behavior/disorder (OCB/OCD), complex phonic tics, coprolalia, copropraxia, SIB, mood disorder, suicidal ideation, and poor response to medications. Although TS is rarely a disabling disorder, about 5% of patients referred to a specialty clinic have life-threatening symptoms. Malignant TS is associated with greater severity of motor symptoms and the presence of >or=2 behavioral comorbidities. OCD/OCB in particular may play a central role in malignant TS; obsessive compulsive qualities were associated with life-threatening tics, SIB, and suicidal ideation. Malignant TS is more refractory to medical treatment than nonmalignant TS. PMID:17566119

  4. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron); 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod); antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]); antispasmodics (including peppermint oil); cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); hypnotherapy; soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation; and loperamide. PMID:21718578

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron), 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]), antispasmodics (including peppermint oil), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), hypnotherapy, loperamide, and soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation. PMID:22296841

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... premature joining of certain bones of the skull (craniosynostosis) during development and a skin condition called acanthosis ... Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome: Gene Review: Gene Review: FGFR-Related Craniosynostosis Syndromes Genetic Testing Registry: Crouzon syndrome with acanthosis ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Joubert syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Joubert syndrome Joubert syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Joubert syndrome is a disorder that affects many parts ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Muenke syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Muenke syndrome Muenke syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Muenke syndrome is a condition characterized by the premature ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: WAGR syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs and symptoms of WAGR syndrome can include childhood-onset obesity, inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), and kidney failure. When WAGR syndrome includes childhood-onset obesity, it is often referred to as WAGRO syndrome. ...

  10. How Is Marfan Syndrome Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Marfan Syndrome Treated? Marfan syndrome has no cure. However, treatments can help delay or prevent complications, especially when started early. Marfan syndrome can affect many parts of your body, including ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Jacobsen syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 11 , Jacobsen syndrome is also known as 11q terminal deletion disorder. The signs and symptoms of Jacobsen ... disorder 11q deletion syndrome 11q- deletion syndrome 11q terminal deletion disorder 11q23 deletion disorder Jacobsen thrombocytopenia Related ...

  12. Gullo’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anindya; Tandon, Vaibhav; Sahoo, Ratnakar

    2016-01-01

    Benign Pancreatic Hyperenzymemia (BPH) or Gullo’s Syndrome is a new entity with only few reported cases till date. It is characterized by persistently elevated pancreatic enzymes without any clinical or pathological evidence of pancreatic disease. Gullo’s syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion and clinician should be aware of various other conditions which can cause elevation of pancreatic enzymes. There are no reported cases of Gullo’s syndrome from Indian subcontinent till date. A 42-year-old lady presented to us with complaints of fever and cough for which she was evaluated and diagnosed to be having left upper zone pneumonia. However, her routine investigations showed persistently elevated serum amylase and lipase levels. She was extensively worked up for pancreatic hyperenzymemia but no pancreatic disease was detected. She was followed up for a period of one year and raised levels of serum lipase and amylase persisted even after a year.

  13. [The Capgras syndrome].

    PubMed

    Anikina, M A; Levin, O S

    2013-01-01

    The Capgras syndrome is one of delusional-like misidentification syndrome in which a person holds a delusion that one or several his/her friends or relatives have been replaced by an identical-looking impostor. As any other delusional disorder, the Capgras syndrome is characterized by stability despite the indisputable arguments against fault views. Initially, this syndrome was considered as a presentation of schizophrenia but later it has been described in brain organic disorders, primarily in elderly patients with dementia. PMID:23994927

  14. Chromosome instability syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 11, discusses chromosome instability syndromes. The focus is on the most extensively studied genotypic chromosomal aberrations which include Bloom syndrome, Fanconi anemia, ataxia telangiectasia, and xeroderma pigmentosum. The great interest in these syndromes is out of proportion to their rare occurrence; however, studies of genotypic chromosome breakage have been inspired by the hope of throwing light on chromosome structure and behavior. A table is given which relates chromosomal aberrations in Bloom syndrome which may cause or promote cancer. 34 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Congenital Neutropenia Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Congenital Neutropenia Syndromes Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Order publications Volunteer for Clinical Studies Help people ...

  16. Organic brain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    OBS; Organic mental disorder (OMS); Chronic organic brain syndrome ... Listed below are disorders associated with OBS. Brain injury caused by ... the brain ( subarachnoid hemorrhage ) Blood clot inside the ...

  17. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  18. Epidemiology, Treatment, and Prevention of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Denise Utsch; Proietti, Fernando Augusto; Ribas, João Gabriel Ramos; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; Guedes, Antônio Carlos; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is present in diverse regions of the world, where its infection is usually neglected in health care settings and by public health authorities. Since it is usually asymptomatic in the beginning of the infection and disease typically manifests later in life, silent transmission occurs, which is associated with sexual relations, breastfeeding, and blood transfusions. There are no prospects of vaccines, and screening of blood banks and in prenatal care settings is not universal. Therefore, its transmission is active in many areas such as parts of Africa, South and Central America, the Caribbean region, Asia, and Melanesia. It causes serious diseases in humans, including adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) and an incapacitating neurological disease (HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis [HAM/TSP]) besides other afflictions such as uveitis, rheumatic syndromes, and predisposition to helminthic and bacterial infections, among others. These diseases are not curable as yet, and current treatments as well as new perspectives are discussed in the present review. PMID:20610824

  19. TopBP1 associates with NBS1 and is involved in homologous recombination repair

    SciTech Connect

    Morishima, Ken-ichi; Sakamoto, Shuichi; Kobayashi, Junya; Izumi, Hideki; Suda, Tetsuji; Matsumoto, Yoshiyuki; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Ide, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Kenshi; Matsuura, Shinya

    2007-11-03

    TopBP1 is involved in DNA replication and DNA damage checkpoint. Recent studies have demonstrated that TopBP1 is a direct positive effecter of ATR. However, it is not known how TopBP1 recognizes damaged DNA. Here, we show that TopBP1 formed nuclear foci after exposure to ionizing radiation, but such TopBP1 foci were abolished in Nijmegen breakage syndrome cells. We also show that TopBP1 physically associated with NBS1 in vivo. These results suggested that NBS1 might regulate TopBP1 recruitment to the sites of DNA damage. TopBP1-depleted cells showed hypersensitivity to Mitomycin C and ionizing radiation, an increased frequency of sister-chromatid exchange level, and a reduced frequency of DNA double-strand break induced homologous recombination repair. Together, these results suggested that TopBP1 might be a mediator of DNA damage signaling from NBS1 to ATR and promote homologous recombination repair.

  20. Mutations in SOD1 associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cause novel protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Kunst, C B; Mezey, E; Brownstein, M J; Patterson, D

    1997-01-01

    A subset of familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-a fatal disorder characterised by progressive motor neuron degeneration) cases are due to mutations in the gene encoding Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Two mutations which have been successfully used to generate transgenic mice that develop an ALS-like syndrome are glycine 85 to arginine (G85R) and glycine 93 to alanine (G93A) with the mutant SOD1 allele overexpressed in a normal mouse genetic background. No ALS-like phenotype is observed in mice overexpressing wild-type SOD1 or mice without any SOD1 activity. These dominant mutations, which do not necessarily decrease SOD1 activity, may confer a gain of function that is selectively lethal to motor neurons. The yeast interaction trap system allowed us to determine whether these mutations in SOD1 caused novel protein interactions not observed with wild-type SOD1 and which might participate in the generation of the ALS phenotype. Two proteins, lysyl-tRNA synthetase and translocon-associated protein delta, interact with mutant forms of SOD1 but not with wild-type SOD1. The specificity of the interactions was confirmed by the coimmunoprecipitation of mutant SOD1 and the expressed proteins. These proteins are expressed in ventral cord, lending support to the relevance of this interaction to motor neuron disease. PMID:8988176

  1. Getting Your Period

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a woman to have a baby. During sexual intercourse, the egg can get fertilized by a male’s sperm and then attach to the lining of the uterus ( endometrium ) and grow into a baby. ( Read more about reproduction. ) Does your period come each month? top Menstrual ...

  2. Periodic Table of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about

  3. The National Periodicals Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huff, William H.

    1981-01-01

    Describes several studies, made by various organizations within the library community, which explored the feasibility of establishing a National Periodicals Center. The latest feasibility study is to be done at the Federal Government level and must take into consideration recent innovations in electronic communications technology. (Author/LLS)

  4. Astrophysical implications of periodicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Two remarkable discoveries of the last decade have profound implications for astrophysics and for geophysics. These are the discovery by Alvarez et al., that certain mass extinctions are caused by the impact on the earth of a large asteroid or comet, and the discovery by Raup and Sepkoski that such extinctions are periodic, with a cycle time of 26 to 30 million years. The validity of both of these discoveries is assumed and the implications are examined. Most of the phenomena described depend not on periodicity, but just on the weaker assumption that the impacts on the earth take place primarily in showers. Proposed explanations for the periodicity include galactic oscillations, the Planet X model, and the possibility of Nemesis, a solar companion star. These hypotheses are critically examined. Results of the search for the solar companion are reported. The Deccan flood basalts of India have been proposed as the impact site for the Cretaceous impact, but this hypotheisis is in contradiction with the conclusion of Courtillot et al., that the magma flow began during a period of normal magnetic field. A possible resolution of this contradiction is proposed.

  5. Periodic Table of Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  6. A Modern Periodic Table.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrenden-Harker, B. D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a modern Periodic Table based on the electron distribution in the outermost shell and the order of filling of the sublevels within the shells. Enables a student to read off directly the electronic configuration of the element and the order in which filling occurs. (JRH)

  7. Scheduling: Seven Period Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Driven by stable or declining financial resources many school districts are considering the costs and benefits of a seven-period day. While there is limited evidence that any particular scheduling model has a greater impact on student learning than any other, it is clear that the school schedule is a tool that can significantly impact teacher…

  8. Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2008-01-01

    The Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome (BVVL) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by progressive pontobulbar palsy associated with sensorineural deafness. Fifty-eight cases have been reported in just over 100 years. The female to male ratio is approximately 3:1. The age of onset of the initial symptom varies from infancy to the third decade. The syndrome most frequently presents with sensorineural deafness, which is usually progressive and severe. Lower cranial nerve involvement and lower and upper motor neuron limb signs are common neurological features. Other features include respiratory compromise (the most frequent non-neurological finding), limb weakness, slurring of speech, facial weakness, and neck and shoulder weakness. Optic atrophy, retinitis pigmentosa, macular hyperpigmentation, autonomic dysfunction, epilepsy may occur. The etiopathogenesis of the condition remains elusive. Approximately 50% of cases are familial, of which autosomal recessive is suggested. The remaining cases are sporadic. The diagnosis is usually based on the clinical presentation. Investigations (neurophysiological studies, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, muscle biopsy, cerebrospinal fluid examination) are done to exclude other causes or to confirm the clinical findings. The differential diagnoses include the Fazio-Londe syndrome, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Nathalie syndrome, Boltshauser syndrome and Madras motor neuron disease. Treatment with steroids or intravenous immunoglobulin may result in temporary stabilization of the syndrome. However, the mainstays of management are supportive and symptomatic treatment, in particular assisted ventilation and maintenance of nutrition via gastrostomy. The clinical course of BVVL is variable and includes gradual deterioration (almost half of cases), gradual deterioration with stable periods in between (a third of cases) and deterioration with abrupt periods of worsening (just under a fifth of cases). After the initial presentation, one third of patients survive for ten years or longer. PMID:18416855

  9. Tropical spastic paraparesis and HTLV-1 associated myelopathy: clinical, epidemiological, virological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Gessain, A; Mahieux, R

    2012-03-01

    In 1980, Human T cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTLV-1) was the first oncogenic human retrovirus to be discovered. HTLV-1 belongs to the Retroviridae family, the Orthoretrovirinae subfamily and to the deltaretrovirus genus. HTLV-1 preferentially infects CD4(+) lymphoid cells in vivo. Three molecules have been identified for binding and/or entry of HTLV-1: heparan sulfate proteoglycans, neuropilin-1, and glucose transporter 1. An efficient transfer of the virus from an infected cell to a target cell can occur through the formation of a viral synapse and/or by virofilm structure. As for all retroviruses, HTLV-1 genome possesses three major ORFs (gag, pol and env) encoding the structural and enzymatic proteins. HTLV-1 encodes also some regulatory and auxillary proteins including the tax protein with transforming activities and the HBZ protein which plays a role in the proliferation and maintenance of the leukemic cells. HTLV-1 is present throughout the world with clusters of high endemicity including mainly Southern Japan, the Caribbean region, areas in South America and in intertropical Africa. The worldwide HTLV-1 infected population is estimated to be around 10-20 million. HTLV-1 has three modes of transmission: (1): mother to child, mainly linked to prolonged breast-feeding; (2): sexual, mainly occurring from male to female and (3): contaminated blood products. HTLV-1 possesses a remarkable genetic stability. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of mainly two severe diseases: a malignant T CD4(+) cell lymphoproliferation, of very poor prognosis, named Adult T cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), and a chronic neuro-myelopathy named Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy (TSP/HAM). The lifetime risk among HTLV-1 carriers is estimated to be around 0.25 to 3%. TSP/HAM mainly occurs in adults, with a mean age at onset of 40-50 years and it is more common in women than in men. Blood transfusion is a major risk factor for TSP/HAM development. Clinically, TSP/HAM is mainly defined as a chronic spastic paraparesis and minor sensory signs. The onset is insidious with often gait disturbance and urinary symptoms. In more than 90% of the cases, the neurological features involve: spasticity and/or hyperreflexia of the lower extremities, urinary bladder disturbance, lower extremity muscle weakness, and in around 50% of the cases, sensory disturbances with low back pain. Central functions and cranial nerves are usually spared. The clinical course is generally progressive without remission. High levels of antibodies titers directed against HTLV-1 antigens are present in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A high HTLV-1 proviral load is frequently observed in the blood. Mild to moderate increase of proteins may be present in the CSF. However, intrathecal production of specific HTLV-1 antibody index provides additional data to support the diagnosis. Brain white matter lesions on magnetic resonance imaging are frequent. A mild atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord can also be observed. Pathologically, it is characterized by a chronic inflammation with perivascular lymphocytic cuffing and mild parenchymal lymphocytic infiltrates. The cells are mostly CD4(+) in early disease and mostly CD8(+) in latter disease. Pyramidal tract damage with myelin and axonal loss, mainly in the lower thoracic spinal cord are observed. TSP/HAM pathogenesis is still poorly understood and viral and host factors as the proviral load and the cellular immune response play a major role in disease progression. TSP/HAM can be associated with other HTLV-1 associated symptoms (uveitis, myositis, infective dermatitis). Therapy of TSP/HAM remains disappointing and symptomatic treatment remains still the mainstay of therapy. PMID:22405461

  10. Modification of BRCA1-Associated Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk by BRCA1 Interacting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Mitra, Nandita; Domchek, Susan M.; Wan, Fei; Friebel, Tara M.; Tran, Teo V.; Singer, Christian F.; Tea, Muy-Kheng Maria; Blum, Joanne L.; Tung, Nadine; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Garber, Judy E.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Peock, Susan; Evans, D. Gareth; Paterson, Joan; Kennedy, M. John; Donaldson, Alan; Dorkins, Huw; Easton, Douglas F.; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Daly, Mary B.; Isaacs, Claudine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Couch, Fergus J.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Freidman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Narod, Steven A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Greenberg, Roger; Nathanson, Katherine L.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited BRCA1 mutations confer elevated breast cancer risk. Recent studies have identified genes that encode proteins that interact with BRCA1 as modifiers of BRCA1-associated breast cancer. We evaluated a comprehensive set of genes that encode most known BRCA1 interactors to evaluate the role of these genes as modifiers of cancer risk. A cohort of 2,825 BRCA1 mutation carriers was used to evaluate the association of haplotypes at ATM, BRCC36, BRCC45 (BRE), BRIP1 (BACH1/FANCJ), CTIP, ABRA1 (FAM175A), MERIT40, MRE11A, NBS1, PALB2 (FANCN), RAD50, RAD51, RAP80, TOPBP1 and time to breast and ovarian cancer diagnosis. False Discovery Rate (FDR) adjusted p-value for overall association of haplotypes (pFDR) with breast cancer were identified at ATM (pFDR =0.029), BRCC45 (pFDR=0.0.19), BRIP1 (pFDR =0.008), CTIP (pFDR =0.017), MERIT40 (pFDR =0.019), NBS1 (pFDR=0.003), RAD50 (pFDR=0.014), and TOPBP1 (pFDR =0.011) and were associated with breast cancer risk. Haplotypes at ABRA1 (pFDR=0.007), BRCC45 (pFDR=0.016 and pFDR=0.005 in two haplotype blocks) and RAP80 (pFDR<0.001) were associated with ovarian cancer risk. Overall, the data suggest that genomic variation at multiple loci that encode proteins that interact biologically with BRCA1 are associated with modified breast cancer and ovarian cancer risk in women who carry BRCA1 mutations. PMID:21799032

  11. A Boy with Relentless Pruritus: Job's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kamran; Wozniak, Susan E; Giannone, Anna Lucia; Abdulmassih, Maria Elena

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Job's syndrome (hyper IgE syndrome) is a very rare primary immunodeficiency disease that has an annual approximate incidence of less than 1/1,000,000. This manuscript aims to provide education regarding diagnosis and management strategies of this syndrome worldwide. CASE REPORT A 6-year-old boy was seen at the clinic secondary to persistent pruritus interfering with sleep. At the age of 2 months, the patient developed diffuse eczematous and desquamating skin lesions. He was subsequently diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and managed conservatively. From 2 months to 7 years of age, intermittent exacerbations of dermatitis persisted despite an aggressive treatment regimen. The serum IgE level increased exponentially over a period of 7 years, with a peak value of 57,400 IU/ml. Molecular genetic testing revealed a dominant negative mutation within the SH2 domain of the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT3) gene. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with Job's syndrome. Management included proper skin care, prophylactic antibiotics, immunomodulating agents, and psychotherapy. CONCLUSIONS Job's syndrome can often go unrecognized and masquerade as atopic dermatitis. Therefore, genetic testing for this condition should be obtained in all patients with treatment-refractory AD. Additionally, psychotherapy can be a successful management strategy for the grating psychological impact that can be imposed on children with excessive pruritus. PMID:26897360

  12. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders. PMID:26265416

  13. Analysis of the Korean Emergency Department Syndromic Surveillance System: Mass Type Acute Diarrheal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Shin; Kim, Won; Lim, Kyung Soo

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to compare the data from the emergency department syndromic surveillance system of Korea in detection and reporting of acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) with the data from the Korea Food and Drug Administration. And to offer fundamental materials for making improvements in current surveillance system was our purpose. Methods A study was conducted by reviewing the number of cases reported as acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) from the Korean Center for Disease Control and Prevention between June, 2002 and July, 2008. And the data were compared with the number of mass food poisoning cases during the same period, reported from the Korea Food and Drug Administration. The difference between two groups was measured and their transitions were compared. Results The emergency department syndromic surveillance system's reports of the numbers of acute diarrheal syndrome (mass type) cases were different from the transition of mass food poisonings, reported by the Korea Food and Drug Administration. Their reports were not accurate and they could not follow the trends of increase in mass food poisonings since 2002. Conclusions Current problems in the emergency department syndromic surveillance system in Korea are mostly related to inaccuracies of daily data reporting system. Manual data input by the reporters could play a big role in such inaccuracies. There need to be improvements in the ways of reporting data, such as automated information transport system linking electronic medical record. PMID:21818437

  14. Cells anticipate periodic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2009-03-01

    We show that an amoeboid organism can anticipate the timing of periodic events. The plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum moves rapidly under favourable conditions, but stops moving when transferred to less-favourable conditions. Plasmodia exposed to unfavourable conditions, presented in three consecutive pulses at constant intervals, reduced their locomotive speed in response to each episode. When subsequently subjected to favourable conditions, the plasmodia spontaneously reduced their locomotive speed at the time point when the next unfavourable episode would have occurred. This implied anticipation of impending environmental change. After this behaviour had been evoked several times, the locomotion of the plasmodia returned to normal; however, the anticipatory response could subsequently be induced by a single unfavourable pulse, implying recall of the memorized periodicity. We explored the mechanisms underlying these behaviours from a dynamical systems perspective. Our results hint at the cellular origins of primitive intelligence and imply that simple dynamics might be sufficient to explain its emergence.

  15. A prospective uncontrolled trial of fermented milk drink containing viable Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota in the treatment of HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Toshio; Saito, Mineki; Usuku, Koichiro; Nose, Hirohisa; Izumo, Shuji; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro

    2005-10-15

    Ten patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) were treated in an uncontrolled preliminary trial by oral administration of viable Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) containing fermented milk. HTLV-1 provirus load, motor function, neurological findings, and immunological parameters were evaluated after 4 weeks. Although LcS did not change the frequencies or absolute numbers of all the examined cell surface phenotypes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, NK cell activity was significantly increased after 4 weeks of oral administration of LcS preparation. Improvements in spasticity (modified Ashworth Scale scores) and urinary symptoms were also seen after LcS treatment. No adverse effect was observed in all the 10 patients throughout the study period. Our results indicated that LcS may be a safe and beneficial agent for the treatment of HAM/TSP; therefore randomized controlled studies are warranted. PMID:15961107

  16. Hypertrophic neuropathy in Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines.

    PubMed

    Maridet, Claire; Sole, Guilhem; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Taieb, Alain

    2016-06-01

    RASopathies comprise several genetic syndromes with mainly cardio-facial-cutaneous manifestations. We report a patient with Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) due to a PTPN11 (p.Thr468Met) mutation associated with hypertrophic neuropathy of lumbar plexus in an adult woman, initially referred for neuropathic pain. Differential diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and other RASopathies is difficult without molecular testing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26952712

  17. Guillain-Barre syndrome due to organophosphate compound poison.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, D; Subbaraghavalu, G; Jayapandian, P

    2009-10-01

    Acute manifestations of Organophosphate Compound (OPC) poison are due to effect cholinergic excess. Others are intermediate syndrome [IMS], organophosphate induced delayed neuropathy [OPIND] and chronic organophosphate induced neuropsychiatric disorder [COPIND]. All these manifestation have specific period of occurrence and duration. There are very sparse reports of toxic demylination due to OPC poisoning. We report a case of Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) due to toxic demyelination following OPC poison. PMID:20329431

  18. Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, B.M.J

    1999-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a rare disorder in child psychiatric practice. A case of Munchausen syndrome by proxy that was managed in the Child Psychiatric clinic, Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital is reported. Factors that suggest the diagnosis are discussed. Multidisciplinary approach to the management of such cases is warranted. PMID:22589687

  19. Fanconi-Bickel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mohandas Nair K; Sakamoto, Osamu; Jagadeesh, Sujatha; Nampoothiri, Sheela

    2012-01-01

    We present the first mutation proven case of Fanconi-Bickel syndrome, a rare type of glycogen storage disease, from India. A four-year-old girl presented with severe growth retardation, genu varum and hepatomegaly. Investigations confirmed severe hypophosphatemic rickets and Fanconi syndrome. Molecular analysis confirmed a homozygous deletion insertion mutation in Glut 2 gene. PMID:21327337

  20. Unmasking Diogenes Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Kashinath; Gopinath, Hima; Kini, Hema; Kumar, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    Diogenes syndrome is characterized by extreme self-neglect, social withdrawal, and poor personal and domestic hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome presenting with dermatitis passivata. An unusual "mask" of dirt resembling a carapace, onset of neglect after awareness of a breast lump and resumption of personal grooming and social activities after removal of the lump and counseling were seen. PMID:26120158

  1. Syndrome in question*

    PubMed Central

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  2. Syndrome in Question.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, Juliano; Nazar, Fernanda Luca; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is an inherited disease characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentation changes and minor facial malformations. It has four clinical variants. We report the case of a girl who, like her mother, was affected by this syndrome. The diagnosis was made after detection and treatment of deafness. PMID:26375234

  3. Macrocytosis in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Tom J.; Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    1991-01-01

    The study, with 61 Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) adult subjects, found that macrocytosis in the absence of anemia was virtually universal and erythrocyte survival half-time was shorter than normal. Findings suggest that erythrocytes have a younger mean age in persons with Down Syndrome, possibly indicating an accelerated aging process of red blood…

  4. Macrocytosis in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtel, Tom J.; Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    1991-01-01

    The study, with 61 Down Syndrome (trisomy 21) adult subjects, found that macrocytosis in the absence of anemia was virtually universal and erythrocyte survival half-time was shorter than normal. Findings suggest that erythrocytes have a younger mean age in persons with Down Syndrome, possibly indicating an accelerated aging process of red blood

  5. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) happens when a woman's ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones than normal. One result is that cysts ( ... who are obese are more likely to have polycystic ovary syndrome. Symptoms of PCOS include: Infertility Pelvic pain Excess ...

  6. Sjogren's Syndrome Information Page

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of the disorder are dry mouth and dry eyes. In addition, Sjogren's syndrome may cause skin, nose, and vaginal dryness, and ... may be prescribed. What is the prognosis? Sjögren's syndrome can ... the mild symptoms of dry eyes and mouth, while others go through cycles of ...

  7. Congenitally palliated scimitar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cantinotti, Massimiliano; Giordano, Raffaele; Spadoni, Isabella

    2015-08-01

    We present a rare case of scimitar syndrome in which the scimitar vessel, collecting all the right pulmonary veins, was stenotic at its junction, with the inferior caval vein and two anomalous vessels, connecting to the same venous collector, draining most of the flow to the left atrium. We arbitrarily defined this rare anatomical variant as a congenitally palliated scimitar syndrome. PMID:25341362

  8. Carotid sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Mark

    2003-02-01

    This article reviews the recent literature about carotid sinus syndrome. It looks principally at the various ways in which it may present, the limited knowledge of its pathophysiology, and the role of carotid sinus massage in the investigation of carotid sinus syndrome. PMID:12619336

  9. Marshall/Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baraitser, Michael

    1982-01-01

    A family originally reported as a variant of Marshall syndrome is re-examined. The clinical picture now encompasses both the Marshall and Stickler syndromes and it is suggested that the distinction between the two should be abandoned. Images PMID:7077624

  10. Empty Sella Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... there any treatment? What is the prognosis? What research is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Empty Sella Syndrome? Empty Sella Syndrome (ESS) is a disorder that involves the sella turcica , a bony structure at the base of the brain that surrounds and protects the ...

  11. Learning about Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... GenomeTV Media Contacts Media Resources NHGRI-Related News Journal Articles from NHGRI Social Media Careers & Training Educational Programs ... Children With Turner Syndrome [pediatrics.aappublications.org] An article from ... journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics Turner Syndrome [ ...

  12. Epidemiology of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Stephanie L.; Allen, Emily G.; Bean, Lora H.; Freeman, Sallie B.

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most commonly identified genetic form of mental retardation and the leading cause of specific birth defects and medical conditions. Traditional epidemiological studies to determine the prevalence, cause, and clinical significance of the syndrome have been conducted over the last 100 years. DS has been estimated to occur…

  13. Redefining syndromic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Katz, Rebecca; May, Larissa; Baker, Julia; Test, Elisa

    2011-12-01

    With growing concerns about international spread of disease and expanding use of early disease detection surveillance methods, the field of syndromic surveillance has received increased attention over the last decade. The purpose of this article is to clarify the various meanings that have been assigned to the term syndromic surveillance and to propose a refined categorization of the characteristics of these systems. Existing literature and conference proceedings were examined on syndromic surveillance from 1998 to 2010, focusing on low- and middle-income settings. Based on the 36 unique definitions of syndromic surveillance found in the literature, five commonly accepted principles of syndromic surveillance systems were identified, as well as two fundamental categories: specific and non-specific disease detection. Ultimately, the proposed categorization of syndromic surveillance distinguishes between systems that focus on detecting defined syndromes or outcomes of interest and those that aim to uncover non-specific trends that suggest an outbreak may be occurring. By providing an accurate and comprehensive picture of this field's capabilities, and differentiating among system types, a unified understanding of the syndromic surveillance field can be developed, encouraging the adoption, investment in, and implementation of these systems in settings that need bolstered surveillance capacity, particularly low- and middle-income countries. PMID:23856373

  14. [Usefulness of gray platelets observation in ARC syndrome].

    PubMed

    Benet, Blandine; Lainey, Elodie; Fenneteau, Odile; Baudouin, Véronique; Hurtaud-Roux, Marie-Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Arthrogryposis Renal Fanconi syndrome and Cholestasis (ARC syndrome) is an extremely rare disease (62 cases) and is uneasy to diagnose. This congenital multisystem disorder affects newborns who usually die in the first year of life. The three cases here report the main clinical and biological features of this unknown disease and show how careful platelets morphology examination on blood smear can help for diagnosis. The three cases were observed at Robert Debré hospital in Paris over a twenty years period. In the first case, ARC syndrome was diagnosed after death. For the two following newborns, gray platelets detection in association with clinical symptoms allowed an earlier diagnosis. PMID:20650745

  15. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  16. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: an underdiagnosed syndrome?

    PubMed

    Engenheiro, E; Møller, R S; Pinto, M; Soares, G; Nikanorova, M; Carreira, I M; Ullmann, R; Tommerup, N; Tümer, Z

    2008-06-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder with mental retardation and variable multiple congenital abnormalities due to mutations of the ZEB2 (ZFHX1B) gene at 2q22. MWS was first described in 1998 and the causative gene was delineated in 2001. Since then, 115 different mutations of ZEB2 have been published in association with this syndrome in 161 individuals. However, recent reports suggest that due to the variability of the congenital abnormalities, this syndrome may still be underdiagnosed. We report two unrelated patients with MWS where the clinical diagnosis was established only after finding of disruption of the ZEB2 gene by a balanced translocation breakpoint and an interstitial microdeletion, respectively. PMID:18445050

  17. [The multiple hamartoma syndrome (Cowden syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Fritsch, P; Pechlaner, R; Czarnecki, N; Hintner, H

    1981-06-01

    The multiple hamartoma syndrome is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance. It is characterized by an impressive diversity and multitude of both mesodermal and epithelial hamartomas and tumors of all organ systems. The dermatological hallmarks of this probably not too rare syndrome are lichenoid centrofacial and akral papular lesions and a marked papillomatosis of the entire oral mucosa of a highly characteristic morphology which usually extends throughout the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract. The importance of this syndrome is its frequent association with malignant tumors, predominantly carcinomas of the mammary and thyroid glands. In this paper, we describe the first three cases of the German literature. No malignancies were detected; in one case, a meningeoma causing severe increase of intracranial pressure was discovered. PMID:7263233

  18. Hyperacute cognitive stroke syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ferro, J M

    2001-10-01

    Cognitive syndromes are common clinical manifestations of hyperacute stroke and may be the single or dominant presenting features. They are related to acute dysfunction of complex integrated distributed functional networks serving different cognitive domains. The most common cortical syndromes include nonfluent or fluent aphasia, neglect, collor agnosia, pure alexia and Balint's syndrome. Disturbances of declarative memory are common following posterior cerebral artery and thalamic strokes. Abulia can follow thalamic, caudate and capsular lesions. Intraventricular and subarachnoid haemorrhages can cause preeminent neuropsychological changes. Disorientation is present in about 40% of acute stroke patients and delirium complicates the course of 25% of acute strokes. Some hyperacute cognitive stroke syndromes are useful indicators of later disability. Cognitive syndromes may pose special difficulties to neurology residents, unless formal teaching in neuropsychology and psychiatry is included in their training programs. PMID:11697519

  19. Thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E; Lebus V, George F; Bible, Jesse E

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is a well-described disorder caused by thoracic outlet compression of the brachial plexus and/or the subclavian vessels. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome is the most common manifestation, presenting with pain, numbness, tingling, weakness, and vasomotor changes of the upper extremity. Vascular complications of thoracic outlet syndrome are uncommon and include thromboembolic phenomena and swelling. The clinical presentation is highly variable, and no reproducible study exists to confirm the diagnosis; instead, the diagnosis is based on a physician's judgment after a meticulous history and physical examination. Both nonsurgical and surgical treatment methods are available for thoracic outlet syndrome. Whereas nonsurgical management appears to be effective in some persons, surgical treatment has been shown to provide predictable long-term cure rates for carefully selected patients. In addition, physicians who do not regularly treat patients with thoracic outlet syndrome may not have an accurate view of this disorder, its treatment, or the possible success rate of treatment. PMID:25808686

  20. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, DN; Raval, N; Patadiya, H; Tarsariya, V

    2014-01-01

    The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS) (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the patched gene found on chromosome arm 9 q. It shows high penetrance and variable expressivity; is characterized by basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Until date, very few cases of GGS have been reported in India. Early diagnosis and treatment as well as genetic counseling are essential for this syndrome. A rare case report of a patient with characteristic features of GGS diagnosed at a rural dental college of Gujarat, India is presented here. This case report draws attention of the valuable role of dentist in diagnosis and early management of this syndrome. PMID:24761254

  1. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  2. The skinache syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bassøe, C F

    1995-01-01

    Chronic pain of unknown aetiology, and characterized by cutaneous trigger points, has been coined the skinache syndrome. The treatment of the skinache syndrome was evaluated in 94 patients by two independent methods 2 years after treatment. After one subcutaneous injection of lidocaine 68% of the patients were cured. The pain recurred in 27 patients having suffered for an average of 2 years. Surgical removal of the cutaneous trigger points cured 77% of the latter patients. The odds ratio of success of surgical treatment versus all other treatments combined was 101.3. The skinache syndrome requires a precise clinical investigation. Even when the origin of the pain in tendons, muscle and adipose tissue is excluded, the skinache syndrome remains a common, debilitating disorder. In contrast to fibromyalgia, the skinache syndrome has a simple and effective cure. PMID:8537946

  3. The yeast telomerase RNA, TLC1, participates in two distinct modes of TLC1-TLC1 association processes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Matsuguchi, Tet

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase core enzyme minimally consists of the telomerase reverse transcriptase domain-containing protein (Est2 in budding yeast S. cerevisiae) and telomerase RNA, which contains the template specifying the telomeric repeat sequence synthesized. Here we report that in vivo, a fraction of S. cerevisiae telomerase RNA (TLC1) molecules form complexes containing at least two molecules of TLC1, via two separable modes: one requiring a sequence in the 3′ region of the immature TLC1 precursor and the other requiring Ku and Sir4. Such physical TLC1-TLC1 association peaked in G1 phase and did not require telomere silencing, telomere tethering to the nuclear periphery, telomerase holoenzyme assembly, or detectable Est2-Est2 protein association. These data indicate that TLC1-TLC1 associations reflect processes occurring during telomerase biogenesis; we propose that TLC1-TLC1 associations and subsequent reorganization may be regulatory steps in telomerase enzymatic activation. PMID:27004145

  4. Velocardiofacial (Shprintzen) syndrome: an important syndrome for the dysmorphologist to recognise.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, A H; Yuille, D; Angel, M; Thompson, P G; Vandervoord, J G; Beckenham, E J

    1991-01-01

    We report the dysmorphological, genetic, and speech therapy aspects of 38 cases of velocardiofacial syndrome presenting to a craniofacial clinic and a specialised children's hospital, to indicate a relatively low incidence of clefting, good response to pharyngoplasty, considerable variability of the syndrome, and two further familial cases. We emphasise the low index of suspicion by paediatricians and paediatric subspecialists which resulted in delayed diagnosis and delayed treatment for the hypernasal speech and velopharyngeal insufficiency for periods of four months to seven years. Images PMID:1956057

  5. Controls on geyser periodicity.

    PubMed

    Ingebritsen, S E; Rojstaczer, S A

    1993-11-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates. PMID:17757358

  6. Controls on geyser periodicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Rojstaczer, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Geyser eruption frequency is not constant over time and has been shown to vary with small (???10-6) strains induced by seismic events, atmospheric loading, and Earth tides. The geyser system is approximated as a permeable conduit of intensely fractured rock surrounded by a less permeable rock matrix. Numerical simulation of this conceptual model yields a set of parameters that controls geyser existence and periodicity. Much of the responsiveness to remote seismicity and other small strains in the Earth can be explained in terms of variations in permeability and lateral recharge rates.

  7. Scaling in periodic QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, D.; Lana, G.; Schreiber, D.

    1987-11-01

    We investigate periodic QED in 2+1 dimensions by using the t expansion. This serves two purposes. It allows us to test the method as well as the model. We calculate ratios between the two lowest masses and the string tension whose weak-coupling limit is known. Starting from the strong-coupling wave function we are able to extrapolate through the crossover region without being plagued by the roughening transition in the string tension. We find that the ratios keep varying throughout the weak-coupling domain; i.e., they do not exhibit precocious scaling.

  8. Scaling in periodic QED

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, D.; Lana, G.; Schreiber, D.

    1987-11-15

    We investigate periodic QED in 2+1 dimensions by using the t expansion. This serves two purposes. It allows us to test the method as well as the model. We calculate ratios between the two lowest masses and the string tension whose weak-coupling limit is known. Starting from the strong-coupling wave function we are able to extrapolate through the crossover region without being plagued by the roughening transition in the string tension. We find that the ratios keep varying throughout the weak-coupling domain; i.e., they do not exhibit precocious scaling.

  9. Legius syndrome, an Update. Molecular pathology of mutations in SPRED1.

    PubMed

    Brems, Hilde; Legius, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Multiple caf-au-lait macules (CALMs) are the hallmark of Von Recklinghausen disease, or neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). In 2007 we reported that some individuals with multiple CALMs have a heterozygous mutation in the SPRED1 gene and have NF1-like syndrome, or Legius syndrome. Individuals with Legius syndrome have multiple CALMs with or without freckling, but they do not show the typical NF1-associated tumors such as neurofibromas or optic pathway gliomas. NF1-associated bone abnormalities and Lisch nodules are also not reported in patients with Legius syndrome. Consequently, individuals with Legius syndrome require less intense medical surveillance than those with NF1. The SPRED1 gene was identified in 2001 and codes for a protein that downregulates the RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (RAS-MAPK) pathway; as does neurofibromin, the protein encoded by the NF1 gene. It is estimated that about 1-4% of individuals with multiple CALMs have a heterozygous SPRED1 mutation. Mutational and clinical data on 209 patients with Legius syndrome are tabulated in an online database (http://www.lovd.nl/SPRED1). Mice with homozygous knockout of the Spred1 gene show learning deficits and decreased synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons similar to those seen in Nf1 heterozygous mice, underlining the importance of the RAS-MAPK pathway for learning and memory. Recently, specific binding between neurofibromin and SPRED1 was demonstrated. SPRED1 seems to play an important role in recruiting neurofibromin to the plasma membrane. PMID:24334617

  10. Sjögren syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Xerostomia-Sjögren syndrome; Keratoconjunctivitis sicca - Sjögren; Sicca syndrome ... The cause of Sjögren syndrome is unknown. It is an autoimmune disorder. This means the body attacks healthy tissue by mistake. The syndrome occurs ...

  11. Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Guillain-Barré Syndrome Information Page Condensed from Guillain-Barré Syndrome ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Guillain-Barré Syndrome? Guillain-Barré syndrome is a disorder in ...

  12. The Source for Syndromes 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different lesser-known syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Apert syndrome; (2) Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome; (3) CHARGE syndrome; (4) Cri-du-Chat…

  13. Vanishing penis syndrome: the Ife experience.

    PubMed

    Badejo, O A

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-five cases of vanishing penis syndrome as a rare cause of mechanical impotence seen over a nine year period in Ile-Ife are presented. Local aetiological factors some distinct from those earlier recorded in literature are highlighted. The prominent role which surgery can play in the management of this form of physical and mental handicap, loss of sexual function let alone becoming a social out cast is stressed. PMID:2633111

  14. Differential secretion of the mutated protein is a major component affecting phenotypic severity in CRLF1-associated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Herholz, Jana; Meloni, Alessandra; Marongiu, Mara; Chiappe, Francesca; Deiana, Manila; Herrero, Carmen Roche; Zampino, Giuseppe; Hamamy, Hanan; Zalloum, Yusra; Waaler, Per Erik; Crisponi, Giangiorgio; Crisponi, Laura; Rutsch, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Crisponi syndrome (CS) and cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CISS1) are disorders caused by mutations in CRLF1. The two syndromes share clinical characteristics, such as dysmorphic features, muscle contractions, scoliosis and cold-induced sweating, with CS patients showing a severe clinical course in infancy involving hyperthermia, associated with death in most cases in the first years of life. To evaluate a potential genotype/phenotype correlation and whether CS and CISS1 represent two allelic diseases or manifestations at different ages of the same disorder, we carried out a detailed clinical analysis of 19 patients carrying mutations in CRLF1. We studied the functional significance of the mutations found in CRLF1, providing evidence that phenotypic severity of the two disorders mainly depends on altered kinetics of secretion of the mutated CRLF1 protein. On the basis of these findings, we believe that the two syndromes, CS and CISS1, represent manifestations of the same disorder, with different degrees of severity. We suggest renaming the two genetic entities CS and CISS1 with the broader term of Sohar–Crisponi syndrome. PMID:21326283

  15. ST3GAL1-Associated Transcriptomic Program in Glioblastoma Tumor Growth, Invasion, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Yuk Kien; Sandanaraj, Edwin; Koh, Lynnette W. H.; Thangaveloo, Moogaambikai; Tan, Melanie S. Y.; Koh, Geraldene R. H.; Toh, Tan Boon; Lim, Grace G. Y.; Holbrook, Joanna D.; Kon, Oi Lian; Nadarajah, Mahendran; Ng, Ivan; Ng, Wai Hoe; Tan, Nguan Soon; Lim, Kah Leong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cell surface sialylation is associated with tumor cell invasiveness in many cancers. Glioblastoma is the most malignant primary brain tumor and is highly infiltrative. ST3GAL1 sialyltransferase gene is amplified in a subclass of glioblastomas, and its role in tumor cell self-renewal remains unexplored. Methods: Self-renewal of patient glioma cells was evaluated using clonogenic, viability, and invasiveness assays. ST3GAL1 was identified from differentially expressed genes in Peanut Agglutinin–stained cells and validated in REMBRANDT (n = 390) and Gravendeel (n = 276) clinical databases. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed upstream processes. TGFβ signaling on ST3GAL1 transcription was assessed using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Transcriptome analysis of ST3GAL1 knockdown cells was done to identify downstream pathways. A constitutively active FoxM1 mutant lacking critical anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome ([APC/C]-Cdh1) binding sites was used to evaluate ST3Gal1-mediated regulation of FoxM1 protein. Finally, the prognostic role of ST3Gal1 was determined using an orthotopic xenograft model (3 mice groups comprising nontargeting and 2 clones of ST3GAL1 knockdown in NNI-11 [8 per group] and NNI-21 [6 per group]), and the correlation with patient clinical information. All statistical tests on patients’ data were two-sided; other P values below are one-sided. Results: High ST3GAL1 expression defines an invasive subfraction with self-renewal capacity; its loss of function prolongs survival in a mouse model established from mesenchymal NNI-11 (P < .001; groups of 8 in 3 arms: nontargeting, C1, and C2 clones of ST3GAL1 knockdown). ST3GAL1 transcriptomic program stratifies patient survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.47, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.72 to 3.55, REMBRANDT P = 1.92x10-8; HR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.94 to 4.30, Gravendeel P = 1.05x10-11), independent of age and histology, and associates with higher tumor grade and T2 volume (P = 1.46x10-4). TGFβ signaling, elevated in mesenchymal patients, correlates with high ST3GAL1 (REMBRANDT gliomacor = 0.31, P = 2.29x10-10; Gravendeel gliomacor = 0.50, P = 3.63x10-20). The transcriptomic program upon ST3GAL1 knockdown enriches for mitotic cell cycle processes. FoxM1 was identified as a statistically significantly modulated gene (P = 2.25x10-5) and mediates ST3Gal1 signaling via the (APC/C)-Cdh1 complex. Conclusions: The ST3GAL1-associated transcriptomic program portends poor prognosis in glioma patients and enriches for higher tumor grades of the mesenchymal molecular classification. We show that ST3Gal1-regulated self-renewal traits are crucial to the sustenance of glioblastoma multiforme growth. PMID:26547933

  16. Association between Severity of MERS-CoV Infection and Incubation Period.

    PubMed

    Virlogeux, Victor; Park, Minah; Wu, Joseph T; Cowling, Benjamin J

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed data for 170 patients in South Korea who had laboratory-confirmed infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. A longer incubation period was associated with a reduction in the risk for death (adjusted odds ratio/1-day increase in incubation period0.83, 95% credibility interval0.68-1.03). PMID:26890291

  17. Association between Severity of MERS-CoV Infection and Incubation Period

    PubMed Central

    Virlogeux, Victor; Park, Minah; Wu, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed data for 170 patients in South Korea who had laboratory-confirmed infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. A longer incubation period was associated with a reduction in the risk for death (adjusted odds ratio/1-day increase in incubation period 0.83, 95% credibility interval 0.68–1.03). PMID:26890291

  18. Vascular compression syndromes.

    PubMed

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view. PMID:26515219

  19. Revisiting HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dusse, Luci Maria; Alpoim, Patrícia Nessralla; Silva, Juliano Teixeira; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves; Brandão, Augusto Henriques; Cabral, Antônio Carlos Vieira

    2015-12-01

    HELLP syndrome was first described in 1982 by Weinstein et al. and the term HELLP refers to an acronym used to describe the clinical condition that leads to hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets. The syndrome frequency varies from 0.5 to 0.9% pregnancies and manifests preferentially between the 27th and 37th week of gestation. Approximately 30% of cases occur after delivery. Although the etiopathogenesis of this syndrome remains unclear, histopathologic findings in the liver include intravascular fibrin deposits that presumably may lead to hepatic sinusoidal obstruction, intrahepatic vascular congestion, and increased intrahepatic pressure with ensuing hepatic necrosis, intraparenchymal and subcapsular hemorrhage, and eventually capsular rupture. Typical clinical symptoms of HELLP syndrome are pain in the right upper quadrant abdomen or epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting. However, this syndrome can present nonspecific symptoms and the diagnosis may be difficult to be established. Laboratory tests and imaging exams are essential for differential diagnosis with other clinical conditions. Treatment of HELLP syndrome with corticosteroids, targeting both lung maturation of the fetus is still an uncertain clinical value. In conclusion, three decades after the tireless efforts of Dr. Weinstein to characterize HELLP syndrome, it remains a challenge to the scientific community and several questions need to be answered for the benefit of pregnant women. PMID:26525965

  20. The cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, A; Allanson, J; Jadico, S K; Kavamura, M I; Noonan, J; Opitz, J M; Young, T; Neri, G

    2006-01-01

    The cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a condition of sporadic occurrence, with patients showing multiple congenital anomalies and mental retardation. It is characterised by failure to thrive, relative macrocephaly, a distinctive face with prominent forehead, bitemporal constriction, absence of eyebrows, hypertelorism, downward‐slanting palpebral fissures often with epicanthic folds, depressed nasal root and a bulbous tip of the nose. The cutaneous involvement consists of dry, hyperkeratotic, scaly skin, sparse and curly hair, and cavernous haemangiomata. Most patients have a congenital heart defect, most commonly pulmonic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The developmental delay usually is moderate to severe. The syndrome is caused by gain‐of‐function mutations in four different genes BRAF, KRAS, mitogen‐activated protein/extracellular signal‐regulated kinase MEK1 and MEK2, all belonging to the same RAS–extracellular signal‐regulated kinase (ERK) pathway that regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. The CFC syndrome is a member of a family of syndromes that includes the Noonan and Costello syndromes, presenting with phenotypic similarities. Noonan syndrome is caused by mutations in the protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP‐2 gene (PTPN11), with a few people having a mutation in KRAS. Costello syndrome is caused by mutations in HRAS. The protein products of these genes also belong to the RAS–ERK pathway. Thus, the clinical overlap of these three conditions, which often poses a problem of differential diagnosis, is explained by their pathogenetic relatedness. PMID:16825433

  1. The first case of adult-onset PFAPA syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Satoshi; Ohmagari, Norio; Tanizaki, Ryutaro; Hagino, Noboru; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Ujiie, Mugen; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kato, Yasuyuki; Kanagawa, Shuzo

    2016-03-01

    A 26-year-old woman presented with fever and pharyngitis. She previously experienced four periodic febrile episodes at 30- to 40-day intervals. We suspected periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome, and prescribed predisolone, thereby her fever rapidly subsided. Her febrile episodes improved after daily cimetidine treatment. Genetic testing results of genomic DNA for periodic fever syndromes were negative, although she was heterozygous for p.Glu148Gln variation in MEFV, supporting the diagnosis of PFAPA syndrome. PMID:24289199

  2. [The problems of diagnosis and correction of autism in children (an example of Asperger's syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Iovchuk, N M; Severnyĭ, A A

    2014-01-01

    Based on the analysis of literature and own clinical experience, we discuss diagnostic issues of early autistic disorders in children. Main differential-diagnostic signs that permit to differentiate mild forms of autism in childhood diagnosed as Asperger's syndrome from childhood schizophrenia, residual organic CNS damage, circular affective disorders are described. Cases of Asperger's syndrome followed up for many years and recommendations for social and psychological adaptation of children and adolescents with Asperger's syndrome in different age periods are presented. PMID:24637822

  3. Black Hole Syndrome 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-08-01

    A black hole falling into the Earth would syndrome toward the center, while it would shine through mass accretion. The author has re-examined the dynamics of such a black hole in the Earth. In the case of a non-radiating black hole, the timescale of the syndrome is inversely proportional to the initial mass of the black hole. In the case of a radiating black hole, on the other hand, the syndrome time is of the order of the Eddington time. The radiating black hole in the Earth would act as a strong heat source.

  4. Recurrent Miller Fisher syndrome.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, S; Geetha; Bhargavan, P V

    2004-07-01

    Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS) is a variant of Guillan Barre syndrome characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and areflexia. Recurrences are exceptional with Miller Fisher syndrome. We are reporting a case with two episodes of MFS within two years. Initially he presented with partial ophthalmoplegia, ataxia. Second episode was characterized by full-blown presentation characterized by ataxia, areflexia and ophthalmoplegia. CSF analysis was typical during both episodes. Nerve conduction velocity study was fairly within normal limits. MRI of brain was within normal limits. He responded to symptomatic measures initially, then to steroids in the second episode. We are reporting the case due to its rarity. PMID:15645989

  5. Anton's Syndrome and Eugenics

    PubMed Central

    Frahm-Falkenberg, Siska

    2011-01-01

    Anton's syndrome is arguably the most striking form of anosognosia. Patients with this syndrome behave as if they can see despite their obvious blindness. Although best known for his description of asomatognosia and visual anosognosia, Gabriel Anton (1858-1933) made other significant contributions to the clinical neurosciences, including pioneering work in neurosurgery, neuropsychology, and child psychiatry. However, it has not been recognized in the English literature that Anton was also a dedicated advocate of eugenics and racial hygiene. This paper provides a case of Anton's syndrome and puts the works of Gabriel Anton into their historic context. PMID:21779298

  6. Ischemic Bilateral Opercular Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Milanlioglu, Aysel; Aydın, Mehmet Nuri; Gökgül, Alper; Hamamcı, Mehmet; Erkuzu, Mehmet Atilla; Tombul, Temel

    2013-01-01

    Opercular syndrome, also known as Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome, is a paralysis of the facial, pharyngeal, masticatory, tongue, laryngeal, and brachial muscles. It is a rare cortical form of pseudobulbar palsies caused by vascular insults to bilateral operculum. Its clinical presentations include anarthria, weakness of voluntary muscles involving face, tongue, pharynx, larynx, and masticatory muscles. However, autonomic reflexes and emotional activities of these structures are preserved. In the present case, an 81-year-old male presented with acute onset of anarthria with difficulties in chewing, speaking, and swallowing that was diagnosed with opercular syndrome. PMID:23476665

  7. Syndrome In Question*

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Gabriela; Peruzzo, Juliano; Tubone, Mariana Quirino; Reinehr, Clarissa Prieto Herman; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes

    2015-01-01

    The authors describe a case of Cowden´s syndrome in a female patient with classic cutaneous lesions, plus papillomatous lesions in the gastrointestinal tract and a previous history of thyroid carcinoma. Mucocutaneous lesions occur in 90% of Cowden's syndrome cases and are characterized by facial trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomas and benign acral keratoses. Sites of extracutaneous involvement include: the thyroid, gastrointestinal tract, breast and endometrial tissue. There is risk of malignancies in these organs and they need to be monitored with imaging tests. The early diagnosis of the syndrome by a dermatologist through mucocutaneous lesions enables the investigation and diagnosis of extracutaneous involvement. PMID:25672315

  8. Melkersson-rosenthal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D R; Resident, S; Mohan, C; Minnas, R S; Mohindroo, N K; Sharma, M L

    1999-10-01

    Melkersson - Rosenthal syndrome was described by Melkersson and Rosenthal separately in the year 1928 and 1931 respectively. It is supposed to be a rare syndrome of bilateral alternating recurrent facial paralysis alongwith fissured tongue and oedema of the lips, face and eyelids. A case of Melkersson - Rosenthal syndrome is reported with all the classic findings which is a rarity. In this case there was alternating facial paralysis to begin with followed by bilateral paralysis third time, along with oedema of lips and face, fissured tongue, and dialation of sig-moid colon with absence of haustrations. PMID:23119566

  9. [Refeeding syndrome: practical issues].

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Limonta, A; Pichard, C; Stirnemann, J

    2015-10-14

    The refeeding syndrome is frequent and potentially deadly, still it is underdiagnosed. It is defined by clinical and biological manifestations that are seen upon refeeding of malnourished patients. It is the consequence of the transition from catabolism to anabolism. Ions intracellular shift caused by insulin and B1 vitamin deficiency are fundamental in the development of this syndrome. Riskconditions are well summarized by the NICE criteria. To avoid refeeding syndrome, it is fundamental to find and correct any electrolytic deficiency and to give thiamine before starting a slow and progressive oral, enteral or parenteral refeeding. PMID:26665657

  10. Redefining Rowell's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zeitouni, N C; Funaro, D; Cloutier, R A; Gagné, E; Claveau, J

    2000-02-01

    Rowell's syndrome is believed to be a distinct and rare clinical entity originally described as lupus erythematosus associated with erythema multiforme-like lesions with immunological findings of speckled antinuclear antibodies, anti-La antibodies and a positive test for rheumatoid factor. We report two additional patients with Rowell's syndrome and review all the diagnostic criteria found in the literature. In view of the inconsistent findings of some of the diagnostic features, we propose that major and minor criteria be used to diagnose Rowell's syndrome. PMID:10730772

  11. Shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spaide, R F; Swengel, R M; Scharre, D W; Mein, C E

    1990-04-01

    Violent shaking causes severe injury in infants, but the diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome is often difficult to make because of the lack of obvious external signs. Consultations by other specialists may not be helpful, since the findings of most organ systems, taken in isolation, are usually nonspecific. Shaken baby syndrome should be considered in infants presenting with seizures, failure to thrive, vomiting associated with lethargy or drowsiness, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypertension or hypotension, respiratory irregularities, coma or death. Shaken babies are usually less than one year old, and most are under six months of age. Head injury (notably subdural hemorrhage) and retinal hemorrhages are the hallmarks of the syndrome. PMID:2181831

  12. Aflibercept in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-07

    Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Surgical treatment for kyphoscoliosis in Cohen syndrome.

    PubMed

    Imagama, Shiro; Tsuji, Taichi; Ohara, Tetsuya; Katayama, Yoshito; Goto, Manabu; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kawakami, Noriaki

    2013-08-01

    Cohen syndrome is a very rare disease. Complication by spinal deformity has been reported, but management and surgery for spinal deformity in Cohen syndrome has not been previously described. The objective of this study was to examine the outcome of surgical treatment for kyphoscoliosis of Cohen syndrome with a literature review. The patient was a 14-year-old male with the characteristics of Cohen syndrome: truncal obesity, mental retardation, arachnodactyly, microcephalia, and a facial malformation. Scoliosis was conservatively treated with a brace at 13 years of age, but the spinal deformity rapidly progressed within a year. Plain radiographs before surgery showed scoliosis of 47 degrees (T5-T11) and 79 degrees (T11-L3), and kyphosis of 86 degrees (T7-L1). One-stage anteroposterior corrective fusion of T4-L3 was scheduled after 2-week Halo traction. Postoperative respiratory management was carefully performed because of Cohen syndrome-associated facial malformation, obesity, and reduced muscle tonus. Respiration was managed with intubation until the following day and no respiratory problems occurred. After surgery, thoracolumbar scoliosis was 28 degrees (correction rate: 65%). Kyphosis was markedly improved from 86 degrees to 20 degrees, achieving a favorable balance of the trunk. The outcome is favorable at 6.5 years after surgery. In conclusion, Cohen syndrome is often complicated by spinal deformity, particularly kyphosis, that is likely to progress even in adulthood. In our patient, spinal deformity progressed within a short period, even with brace treatment. Surgery should be required before progression to the severe spinal deformity with careful attention to general anesthesia. PMID:24640185

  14. A decision tree for genetic diagnosis of hereditary periodic fever in unselected patients

    PubMed Central

    Federici, L; Rittore‐Domingo, C; Koné‐Paut, I; Jorgensen, C; Rodière, M; Quellec, A Le; Touitou, I

    2006-01-01

    Background The diagnostic value of molecular analysis of the familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) gene (Mediterranean fever (MEFV)) has been well established only in patients selected on the basis of ethnic background or clinical criteria. Genetic diagnosis for other hereditary periodic fever syndromes has been poorly evaluated. Objective To determine the diagnostic contribution of genetic tests for hereditary periodic syndromes in a large, unselected series of patients. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 1941 patients referred to us for FMF genetic tests between 1997 and 2005. MEFV genotypes were compared with clinical data to appraise criteria for FMF diagnosis. Genetic tests for tumour necrosis factor receptor‐associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), hyperimmunoglobulinaemia D syndrome (HIDS) and cryopyrin‐associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) were also reviewed. Results 71% of the 1574 patients with enough data had a clinical diagnosis of FMF according to the widely used Israeli criteria. Two MEFV mutations were found in only 409 patients of this subgroup (sensitivity = 37%) and in 15 (3.3%) of the patients with an improbable clinical diagnosis of FMF (specificity = 97%). Molecular diagnosis for alternate hereditary periodic syndromes was carried out in 456 of the patients having a non‐conclusive FMF genetic test. A positive diagnosis was obtained in 31 of these patients (TRAPS (n = 19), HIDS (n = 4) and CAPS (n = 8)). Conclusions First‐line MEFV mutation screening in patients with clinically typical FMF may be appropriate only in particular areas. To optimise genetic diagnosis, we propose a decision tree, which, with the advice of an expert practitioner, could help redirect test indications towards non‐FMF hereditary periodic syndromes. PMID:16707534

  15. Quasicrystals and Almost Periodicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouéré, Jean-Baptiste

    2005-04-01

    We give in this paper topological and dynamical characterizations of mathematical quasicrystals. Let denote the space of uniformly discrete subsets of the Euclidean space. Let denote the elements of that admit an autocorrelation measure. A Patterson set is an element of such that the Fourier transform of its autocorrelation measure is discrete. Patterson sets are mathematical idealizations of quasicrystals. We prove that S ∈ is a Patterson set if and only if S is almost periodic in (,), where denotes the Besicovitch topology. Let χ be an ergodic random element of . We prove that χ is almost surely a Patterson set if and only if the dynamical system has a discrete spectrum. As an illustration, we study deformed model sets.

  16. Short-period comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Campins, Humberto

    1991-01-01

    The spacecraft flybys of Comet Halley in 1986 confirmed Whipple's icy conglomerate hypothesis for cometary nuclei and showed that comets are far richer in volatiles than any other class of solar system bodies. Water is the most abundant volatile, comprising roughly 80 percent of the gas flowing out from the nucleus. Carbon monoxide is next with a content of 15 percent relative to water, though with approximately half of that coming from an extended source in the cometary coma, i.e., hydrocarbon dust grains. The detection of large numbers of hydrocarbon CHON grains was one of the more significant discoveries of the Halley flybys, as was the ground-based observation that CN occurs in jets, again indicating an extended source. Evidence was also found for more complex hydrocarbons. Estimates of the total dust-to-gas ratio for Halley range as high as 2:1, indicating that a substantial fraction of the volatile material may be tied up in solid hydrocarbons rather than ices. The role of clathrates in trapping more volatile ices is not yet understood. If Halley can be taken to be representative of all short-period comets, then the short-period comets may provide a significant source of volatiles in near-earth space. This resource is more difficult to reach dynamically than the near-earth asteriods, but the high volatile content may justify the additional effort necessary. In addition, there is considerable evidence that at least some fraction of the near-earth asteriods are extinct cometary nuclei which have evolved into asteroid orbits, and which may contain significant volatiles buried beneath an insulating lag-deposit crust of nonvolatiles. Knowledge of comets will be greatly enhanced in the near future by the Comet Rendezvous Flyby mission now under development by NASA, and by the proposed Rosetta mission.

  17. Diagnostics of common microdeletion syndromes using fluorescence in situ hybridization: Single center experience in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Mehinovic, Lejla; Stomornjak-Vukadin, Meliha; Kurtovic-Basic, Ilvana; Catibusic, Feriha; Kozaric, Mirza; Dinarevic, Senka Mesihovic; Hasanhodzic, Mensuda; Sumanovic-Glamuzina, Darinka

    2016-01-01

    Microdeletion syndromes are caused by chromosomal deletions of less than 5 megabases which can be detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We evaluated the most commonly detected microdeletions for the period from June 01, 2008 to June 01, 2015 in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, including DiGeorge, Prader-Willi/Angelman, Wolf-Hirschhorn, and Williams syndromes. We report 4 patients with DiGeorge syndromes, 4 patients with Prader-Willi/Angelman, 4 patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, and 3 patients with Williams syndrome in the analyzed 7 year period. Based on the positive FISH results for each syndrome, the incidence was calculated for the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. These are the first reported frequencies of the microdeletion syndromes in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:26937776

  18. [Biliary atresia and polysplenia syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kerkeni, Yosra; Ksia, Amine; Zitouni, Hayet; Belghith, Mohsen; Lassad, Sahnoun; Krichene, Imed; Mekki, Mongi; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2015-01-01

    Polysplenia syndrome is a rare malformation characterized by the association of multiple rates and other congenital anomalies dominated by cardiac, vascular, intestinal and bile malformations. We report the observation of a patient operated in the neonatal period (3 days) for an upper intestinal obstruction with situs inversus. Surgical exploration noted the presence of multiple rates, a preduodenal vein, a biliary atresia and a duodenal atresia. The surgical procedures performed were a latero-lateral duodeno-duodenostomy and hepatoportoenterostomy of KASAI with simple immediate and delayed outcomes. The follow up was of 23 years. We recall the epidemiological characteristics of this malformative association and we discuss the role played by the prognosis of polysplenia syndrome in the evolution of biliary atresia. The diagnosis and treatment of biliary atresia are always urgent to increase the chances of success of the Kasai, and the chances of prolonged survival with native liver. However, almost all long-term survivors (even anicteric) have biliary cirrhosis, which requires lifelong follow up. PMID:26815511

  19. Kleine-Levin syndrome: the first typical case in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Ruangwittayawong, Thanawin; Pinroj, Yod; Saengpattrachai, Montri; Chinvarun, Yotin

    2010-11-01

    Kleine-Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare disorder characterized by periodic hypersomnia, cognitive and behavioral disturbances. Other unique symptoms in KLS are megaphagia, hypersexuality and some psychiatric disturbances such as compulsion and depression. Definite diagnosis requires the elimination of other potential etiologies. We reported a typical case of KLS in a young Thai man who suffered from seven episodes of periodic hypersomnia within 1.5 years and eventually he was diagnosed with Kleine-Levin syndrome after excluding known possible neurological conditions and sleep disorders. PMID:21280539

  20. Stockholm syndrome manifestation of Munchausen: an eye-catching misnomer.

    PubMed

    Spuijbroek, Esther J; Blom, Nicole; Braam, Arjan W; Kahn, David A

    2012-07-01

    A young woman hospitalized herself for a picture resembling Stockholm syndrome (becoming a willing captive in a cult, sympathetic to the leader). After a short period of time, it became clear that she had used a false identity and had invented the story, leading to diagnoses of both Munchausen syndrome and dissociative identity disorder. Despite a long period of treatment, she eventually suicided. The authors examine the coexistence of these two unusual disorders and their possible shared etiologies in this complex case. PMID:22805905