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Sample records for 1-azapentadienylmetal chemistry si

  1. Antibody binding to p-Si using LANL SAM chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Aaron S

    2010-12-06

    This NMSBA-sponsored project involves the attachment of antibodies to polymeric silicon (p-Si) surfaces, with the ultimate goal of attaching antibodies to nanowires for Vista Therapeutics, Inc. (Santa Fe, NM). This presentation describes the functionalization of p-Si surfaces. the activation of terminal carboxylates on these surfaces, the conjugation of antibodies, and the analyses undertaken at each step. The results of this work show that antibody conjugation is possible on p-Si coatings using the well-known EDC/NHS activation chemistry.

  2. Structure and chemistry of passivated SiC/SiO2 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston Dycus, J.; Xu, Weizong; Lichtenwalner, Daniel J.; Hull, Brett; Palmour, John W.; LeBeau, James M.

    2016-05-01

    Here, we report on the chemistry and structure of 4H-SiC/SiO2 interfaces passivated either by nitric oxide annealing or Ba deposition. Using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy, we find that Ba and N remain localized at SiC/SiO2 interface after processing. Further, we find that the passivating species can introduce significant changes to the near-interface atomic structure of SiC. Specifically, we quantify significant strain for nitric oxide annealed sample where Si dangling bonds are capped by N. In contrast, strain is not observed at the interface of the Ba treated samples. Finally, we place these results in the context of field effect mobility.

  3. On the chemistry of a-SiO 2 deposition by plasma enhanced CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramanayaka, Sunil; Nakanishi, Y.; Hatanaka, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The chemistry in depositing a-SiO 2 using tetraethoxysilane, Si(OC 2H 5) 4, (TEOS) and tetraisocyanatesilane, Si(NCO) 4, (TICS) with an oxidant is comparatively studied. In both cases, absorption and desorption reactions of intermediate precursors are seen to be dominant. TEOS/O 2 chemistry, where there is no N atom in the source gas, yields conformal step coverage over patterned surfaces. The precursor or precursors generated in TICS/O 2 chemistry are expected to contain N atom or atoms and have no surface migration property. The N atom in the precursor is believed to limit the surface migration property. This results in an uneven step coverage over patterned surfaces similar to that of SiH 4/O 2 chemistry.

  4. Coordination chemistry of Si5Cl10 with organocyanides.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xuliang; Anderson, Kenneth J; Schulz, Douglas L; Boudjouk, Philip

    2010-12-14

    Organocyanides readily coordinate to decachlorocyclopentasilane (Si(5)Cl(10)) to form "inverse sandwich" compounds 1-3 with a planar Si(5) ring. The products were isolated in high yield and fully characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR, IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. While the spectroscopic data suggests the presence of a fairly weak interaction between the Si(5) ring and the coordinative organocyanide ligands, single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies of compound 1 and 2 show μ(5)-coordination of the apical cyano nitrogen atoms to the silicon atoms in the Si(5) ring. Distances between silicon atoms and nitrogen atoms are significantly shorter than a Si-N van der Waals bond but longer than the sum of their covalent radii. Multiple interactions between the cyano groups and equatorial Cl atoms, and intermolecular interactions were observed in the solid state for both compounds 1 and 2. PMID:20967378

  5. Planetary and meteoritic Mg/Si and δ30 Si variations inherited from solar nebula chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Poitrasson, Franck; Burkhardt, Christoph; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kosuke

    2015-10-01

    The bulk chemical compositions of planets are uncertain, even for major elements such as Mg and Si. This is due to the fact that the samples available for study all originate from relatively shallow depths. Comparison of the stable isotope compositions of planets and meteorites can help overcome this limitation. Specifically, the non-chondritic Si isotope composition of the Earth's mantle was interpreted to reflect the presence of Si in the core, which can also explain its low density relative to pure Fe-Ni alloy. However, we have found that angrite meteorites display a heavy Si isotope composition similar to the lunar and terrestrial mantles. Because core formation in the angrite parent-body (APB) occurred under oxidizing conditions at relatively low pressure and temperature, significant incorporation of Si in the core is ruled out as an explanation for this heavy Si isotope signature. Instead, we show that equilibrium isotopic fractionation between gaseous SiO and solid forsterite at ∼1370 K in the solar nebula could have produced the observed Si isotope variations. Nebular fractionation of forsterite should be accompanied by correlated variations between the Si isotopic composition and Mg/Si ratio following a slope of ∼1, which is observed in meteorites. Consideration of this nebular process leads to a revised Si concentration in the Earth's core of 3.6 (+ 6.0 / - 3.6) wt% and provides estimates of Mg/Si ratios of bulk planetary bodies.

  6. Experimental observations of the chemistry of the SiO2/Si interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Maserjian, J.

    1977-01-01

    Changes in silicon surface preparation prior to thermal oxidation are shown to leave a signature by altering the final SiO2/Si interface structure. Surface analytical techniques, including XPS, static SIMS, ion milling, and newly developed wet-chemical profiling procedures are used to obtain detailed information on the chemical structure of the interface. The oxides are shown to be essentially SiO2 down to a narrow transitional interface layer (3-7 A). A number of discrete chemical species are observed in this interface layer, including different silicon bonds (e.g., C-, OH-, H-) and a range of oxidation states of silicon (0 to +4). The effect of surface preparation and the observed chemical species are correlated with oxide growth rate, surface-state density, and flatband shifts after irradiation.

  7. Interstellar SiO as a tracer of high-temperature chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ziurys, L M; Friberg, P; Irvine, W M

    1989-08-01

    The J = 2-1 transition of SiO has been searched for toward both hot and cold molecular gas. SiO was not detected toward the dark clouds TMC-1, L134 N, and B335, down to column density upper limits of N < 2-4 x 10(10) cm-2. The species, however, has been observed toward all sources with a kinetic temperature greater than or equal to 30 K, with the largest column densities (N approximately 10(13)-10(17) cm-2) measured in the warmest (TK > or = 100 K) material. The abundance of SiO, relative to HCN, is found to be approximately 0.1-1 in the massive star-forming regions toward Orion and NGC 7538; toward the dark clouds, the upper limits to this ratio is less than 0.0002-0.004. A similar enhancement in the warmer regions is reflected in the SiO/H2 ratio as well. A linear relation was found between the natural log of the SiO concentration and 1/TK, suggesting that the species' formation involves a chemically specific process that contains an activation barrier of approximately 90 K. SiO was also found to be underabundant with respect to SO in cold clouds, with SiO/SO < 1/1000, versus SiO/SO > or =, measured in Orion-KL. The formation of SiO is therefore linked closely to the local gas kinetic temperature, rather than the oxygen abundance, and its synthesis is likely to involve high-temperature gas-phase reactions. The species thus may serve as an unambiguous indicator of high-temperature or "shock" chemistry. PMID:11538345

  8. Antireflection and SiO2 Surface Passivation by Liquid-Phase Chemistry for Efficient Black Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H. C.; Oh, J.; Zhang, Y.; Kuznetsov, O. A.; Flood, D. J.; Branz, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    We report solar cells with both black Si antireflection and SiO2 surface passivation provided by inexpensive liquid-phase chemistry, rather than by conventional vacuum-based techniques. Preliminary cell efficiency has reached 16.4%. Nanoporous black Si antireflection on crystalline Si by aqueous etching promises low surface reflection for high photon utilization, together with lower manufacturing cost compared to vacuum-based antireflection coating. Ag-nanoparticle-assisted black Si etching and post-etching chemical treatment recently developed at NREL enables excellent control over the pore diameter and pore separation. Performance of black Si solar cells, including open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and blue response, has benefited from these improvements. Prior to this study, our black Si solar cells were all passivated by thermal SiO2 produced in tube furnaces. Although this passivation is effective, it is not yet ideal for ultra-low-cost manufacturing. In this study, we report, for the first time, the integration of black Si with a proprietary liquid-phase deposition (LPD) passivation from Natcore Technology. The Natcore LPD forms a layer of <10-nm SiO2 on top of the black Si surface in a relatively mild chemical bath at room temperature. We demonstrate black Si solar cells with LPD SiO2 with a spectrum-weighted average reflection lower than 5%, similar to the more costly thermally grown SiO2 approach. However, LPD SiO2 provides somewhat better surface-passivation quality according to the lifetime analysis by the photo-conductivity decay measurement. Moreover, black Si solar cells with LPD SiO2 passivation exhibit higher spectral response at short wavelength compared to those passivated by thermally grown SiO2. With further optimization, the combination of aqueous black Si etching and LPD could provide a pathway for low-cost, high-efficiency crystalline Si solar cells.

  9. Evolution of interfacial intercalation chemistry on epitaxial graphene/SiC by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferralis, Nicola; Carraro, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    A rapid and facile evaluation of the effects of physical and chemical processes on the interfacial layer between epitaxial graphene monolayers on SiC(0 0 0 1) surfaces is essential for applications in electronics, photonics, and optoelectronics. Here, the evolution of the atomic scale epitaxial graphene-buffer-layer-SiC interface through hydrogen intercalation, thermal annealings, UV-ozone etching and oxygen exposure is studied by means of single microparticle mediated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (smSERS). The evolution of the interfacial chemistry in the buffer layer is monitored through the Raman band at 2132 cm-1 corresponding to the Sisbnd H stretch mode. Graphene quality is monitored directly by the selectively enhanced Raman signal of graphene compared to the SiC substrate signal. Through smSERS, a simultaneous correlation between optimized hydrogen intercalation in epitaxial graphene/SiC and an increase in graphene quality is uncovered. Following UV-ozone treatment, a fully hydrogen passivated interface is retained, while a moderate degradation in the quality of the hydrogen intercalated quasi-freestanding graphene is observed. While hydrogen intercalated defect free quasi-freestanding graphene is expected to be robust upon UV-ozone, thermal annealing, and oxygen exposure, ozonolytic reactivity at the edges of H-intercalated defected graphene results in enhanced amorphization of the quasi-freestanding (compared to non-intercalated) graphene, leading ultimately to its complete etching.

  10. Adsorption, ordering, and chemistry of nitrobenzene on Si(1 0 0)-2 × 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Semyon; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2004-12-01

    Surface chemistry of nitrobenzene on Si(1 0 0)-2 × 1 has been investigated using multiple internal reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (MIR-FTIR), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and thermal desorption mass spectrometry. Molecular adsorption of nitrobenzene at submonolayer coverages is dominating at cryogenic temperatures (100 K). As the surface temperature is increased to 160 K, chemical reaction involving nitro group occurs, while the phenyl entity remains intact. Thus, a barrier of approximately 40.8 kJ/mol is established for the interaction of the nitro group of nitrobenzene with the Si(1 0 0)-2 × 1 surface. Further annealing of the silicon surface leads to the decomposition of nitrobenzene. The concentration of nitrogen and oxygen remains constant on a surface within the temperature interval studied here. AES studies also suggest that the majority of carbon-containing products remain bound to the surface at temperatures as high as 1000 K. The only chemical reaction leading to the release of the gaseous products is benzene formation around 670 K. The amount of benzene accounts only for a few percent of the surface species, while the rest of the phenyl groups connected to the silicon surface via a nitrogen linker remain stable even at elevated temperatures, opening an opportunity for stable surface coatings.

  11. A Two-Zone Multigrid Model for SI Engine Combustion Simulation Using Detailed Chemistry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ge, Hai-Wen; Juneja, Harmit; Shi, Yu; Yang, Shiyou; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2010-01-01

    An efficient multigrid (MG) model was implemented for spark-ignited (SI) engine combustion modeling using detailed chemistry. The model is designed to be coupled with a level-set-G-equation model for flame propagation (GAMUT combustion model) for highly efficient engine simulation. The model was explored for a gasoline direct-injection SI engine with knocking combustion. The numerical results using the MG model were compared with the results of the original GAMUT combustion model. A simpler one-zone MG model was found to be unable to reproduce the results of the original GAMUT model. However, a two-zone MG model, which treats the burned and unburned regionsmore » separately, was found to provide much better accuracy and efficiency than the one-zone MG model. Without loss in accuracy, an order of magnitude speedup was achieved in terms of CPU and wall times. To reproduce the results of the original GAMUT combustion model, either a low searching level or a procedure to exclude high-temperature computational cells from the grouping should be applied to the unburned region, which was found to be more sensitive to the combustion model details.« less

  12. Characterization of plasma chemistry and ion energy in cathodic arc plasma from Ti-Si cathodes of different compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, A. O.; Zhirkov, I.; Dahlqvist, M.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Rosen, J.

    2013-04-28

    Arc plasma from Ti-Si compound cathodes with up to 25 at. % Si was characterized in a DC arc system with respect to chemistry and charge-state-resolved ion energy. The plasma ion composition showed a lower Si content, diverging up to 12 at. % compared to the cathode composition, yet concurrently deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. Significant contribution to film growth from neutrals is inferred besides ions, since the contribution from macroparticles, estimated by scanning electron microscopy, cannot alone account for the compositional difference between cathode, plasma, and film. The average ion charge states for Ti and Si were higher than reference data for elemental cathodes. This result is likely related to TiSi{sub x} phases of higher cohesive energies in the compound cathodes and higher effective electron temperature in plasma formation. The ion energy distributions extended up to {approx}200 and {approx}130 eV for Ti and Si, respectively, with corresponding average energies of {approx}60 and {approx}30 eV. These averages were, however, not dependent on Si content in the cathode, except for 25 at. % Si where the average energies were increased up to 72 eV for Ti and 47 eV for Si.

  13. Chemistry, bonding and fracture of grain boundaries in Ni{sub 3}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, S.; Muller, D.A.; Silcox, J.; Sass, S.L.

    1997-12-31

    To obtain insight into the effect of dopants on the bonding and cohesive energy of grain boundaries in L1{sub 2} intermetallic compounds, the chemistry and electronic structure at grain boundaries in B-free and B-doped Ni-23 at % Si alloys were examined, with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) providing information on the former and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) on the latter. Ni-enrichment was seen at large angle boundaries, both in the absence and presence of B. EELS of the Ni L{sub 3} edge showed that the bonding at Ni-rich grain boundaries was similar in both undoped and doped alloys. Comparison of the Ni L{sub 3} edge recorded at the grain boundary and in the bulk suggests that reduced hybridization and weaker bonding occurs at Ni-rich grain boundaries in both doped and undoped alloys. These changes in bonding are interpreted in terms of changes in the cohesive energy of the boundaries.

  14. TEOS-based SiO{sub 2} chemical vapor deposition: Reaction kinetics and related surface chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.

    1995-11-01

    We have developed a comprehensive understanding of thermal TEOS (tetracthylorthosificate, Si(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 4}) surface chemistry at CVD (chemical vapor deposition) temperatures and pressures. This was accomplished by examining how TEOS reaction rate are influenced by factors critical to the heterogeneous reaction. This includes determining the TEOS pressure dependence, testing if reaction by-products inhibit TEOS decomposition, identifying reaction sites on the surface, and establishing the reaction sites coverage dependencies. We evaluated the pressure dependencies and by-product inhibition with GCMS. The experiments in a cold-wall research reactor revealed that the TEOS surface reaction at 1000K (1) was first-order with respect to TEOS pressure (0.10 to 1.50Torr) and (2) was not inhibited by surface reaction by-products (ethylene, ethanol, and water). Reactivities of surface sites and their coverage dependencies were compared with FTIR. Our experiments demonstrated that two-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 2}) rings on the SiO{sub 2} surface were consumed almost instantaneously when exposed to TEOS. Our FTIR experiments also revealed that TEOS decomposition was zero-order with respect to coverages of hydroxyl groups and (by indirect evidence) three-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 3}) rings. This type of site-independent reactivity is consistent with TEOS reacting with hydroxyl groups and (Si-O){sub 3} rings via a common rate-determining step at 1000K. With respect to deposition uniformity, our results predict that deposition rates will be insensitive to the relative coverages of (Si-O){sub 3} rings and hydroxyls on SiO{sub 2} as well as the re-adsorbed by-products of the surface reaction. Therefore, it is likely that nonuniform SiO{sub 2} depositions from TEOS reactions are due to depletion of TEOS in the gas-phase and/or thermal gradients.

  15. Nanoscale physics and defect state chemistry at amorphous-Si/In0.53Ga0.47As interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, C.; El Kazzi, M.; Czornomaz, L.; Pierucci, D.; Silly, M.; Sirotti, F.; Abel, S.; Uccelli, E.; Sousa, M.; Fompeyrine, J.

    2014-02-01

    Interface and surface passivation of thin layers of III-V compound semiconductors is a key enabler of many technological applications spanning from nano-electronics to nano-photonics. The interaction between thin amorphous Si (a-Si) layers and clean, group-III-rich reconstructed In0.53Ga0.47As interfaces is studied by combining high-resolution synchrotron radiation x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-dependent surface photovoltage (SPV) experiments. From 0.6 to 2.4 monolayers (ML) of a-Si are deposited on non-intentionally doped, p- and n-type In0.53Ga0.47As. For each deposition step, the observed surface and interface chemistry is directly correlated to the measured surface Fermi level position, band bending and SPV. Group-III-reconstructed In0.53Ga0.47As surfaces are observed to be intrinsically unstable against reaction with Si and two different instability regimes have been identified. First, for low deposition temperature, Si reacts strongly and intermixes with the In0.53Ga0.47As surface inducing In and Ga out-diffusion even at a sub-monolayer amount. For 2.4 ML of a-Si, a net positive interface charge of 1.24 × 1012 #/cm2 and a band of defects close to the conduction band are detected. For post-annealing at temperatures lower than 380 °C, the interface rearranges. At temperatures higher than 380 °C, out-diffusion of As in the a-Si is found to be the main instability driver.

  16. Inductively coupled plasma etch of DUV MoSi photomasks: a designed study of etch chemistries and process results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantine, Chris; Johnson, David J.; Westerman, Russell J.; Hourd, Andrew C.

    1998-12-01

    The continuing requirements for high resolution, critical dimension control and linearity on photomasks necessitates highly anisotropic and uniform etching of the absorber material. Plasma etching has seen strong increases in popularity to improve the above mentioned requirements. Also recently popular is the inclusion of Embedded Phase Shift materials such as Molybdenum Silicide (MoSi); these materials allow for an engineered 180 degree shift in the phase of the exposure light at the wafer pane, affording enhanced contrast at the edges of a line or feature. This article studies the effect of ICP-based plasma conditions on the CD Uniformity, MoSi etch rate and post-etch Quartz roughness of 6 X 6 DUV MoSi Embedded Phase Shift mask structures through use of carefully Designed Experiments. This Design of Experiment (DOE) makes it possible to screen plasma chemistry, optimize resultant plasma parameters and present an overlayed Simultaneous Solution which is used as a centerpoint for Device Plate etch tuning. The high plasma density, independent ion energy control and low pressure operation of Inductively Coupled Plasmas make this technology well suited to minimizing undercut of the MoSi and affords a vehicle for the realization of a zero-basis etch process.

  17. Formal SiH4 chemistry using stable and easy-to-handle surrogates.

    PubMed

    Simonneau, Antoine; Oestreich, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Monosilane (SiH4) is far less well behaved than its carbon analogue methane (CH4). It is a colourless gas that is industrially relevant as a source of elemental silicon, but its pyrophoric and explosive nature makes its handling and use challenging. Consequently, synthetic applications of SiH4 in academic laboratories are extremely rare and methodologies based on SiH4 are underdeveloped. Safe and controlled alternatives to the substituent redistribution approaches of hydrosilanes are desirable and cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-ylsilanes where the cyclohexa-1,4-diene units serve as placeholders for the hydrogen atoms have been identified as potent surrogates of SiH4. We disclose here that the commercially available Lewis acid tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, B(C6F5)3, is able to promote the release of the Si-H bond catalytically while subsequently enabling the hydrosilylation of C-C multiple bonds in the same pot. The net reactions are transition-metal-free transfer hydrosilylations with SiH4 as a building block for the preparation of various hydrosilanes. PMID:26391081

  18. Formal SiH4 chemistry using stable and easy-to-handle surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonneau, Antoine; Oestreich, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Monosilane (SiH4) is far less well behaved than its carbon analogue methane (CH4). It is a colourless gas that is industrially relevant as a source of elemental silicon, but its pyrophoric and explosive nature makes its handling and use challenging. Consequently, synthetic applications of SiH4 in academic laboratories are extremely rare and methodologies based on SiH4 are underdeveloped. Safe and controlled alternatives to the substituent redistribution approaches of hydrosilanes are desirable and cyclohexa-2,5-dien-1-ylsilanes where the cyclohexa-1,4-diene units serve as placeholders for the hydrogen atoms have been identified as potent surrogates of SiH4. We disclose here that the commercially available Lewis acid tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, B(C6F5)3, is able to promote the release of the Si-H bond catalytically while subsequently enabling the hydrosilylation of C-C multiple bonds in the same pot. The net reactions are transition-metal-free transfer hydrosilylations with SiH4 as a building block for the preparation of various hydrosilanes.

  19. SiS in Orion-KL - Evidence for 'outflow' chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.

    1988-01-01

    The J = 6-5 and J = 5-4 rotational transitions at 91 and 109 GHz toward Orion-KL provide evidence for the presence of SiS at an LSR velocity of 7.5 km/sec and with a half-width at zero power of 36 km/sec. The estimated current density corresponds to a fractal abundance of about 4 x 10 to the -9th. The implied SiO/SiS ratio of about 60 is close to the cosmic O/S ratio of about 40 and is much less than that predicted by ion-molecule models. Other unidentified lines near 91 and 109 have been identified.

  20. One-pot synthesis of Au@SiO(2) catalysts: a click chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Solovyeva, Vera A; Vu, Khanh B; Merican, Zulkifli; Sougrat, Rachid; Rodionov, Valentin O

    2014-10-13

    Using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" reaction, a library of triazole amphiphiles with a variety of functional polar "heads" and hydrophobic or superhydrophobic "tails" was synthesized. The amphiphiles were evaluated for their ability to stabilize small Au nanoparticles, and, at the same time, serve as templates for nanocasting porous SiO2. One of the Au@SiO2 materials thus prepared was found to be a highly active catalyst for the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed regioselective hydroamination of alkynes. PMID:25229602

  1. Interfacial chemistry of MoS sub 2 films on Si. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, P.A.

    1989-11-10

    The adhesion of thin films to their substrates is an important factor in their use in electronics, corrosion prevention, and lubrication. In particular, adhesion may be the critical parameter that determines the wear life of solid lubricant films; it has been suggested that films fail when they are pushed out of the wear track. Systems with chemical bonds across the interface will have enhanced adhesion over systems in which only van der Waals interactions are operative. Covalent materials, such as the important engineering ceramics SiC and Si3N4 and the solid lubricant MoS2, have strong directional bonds. If the same kind of bonds could be formed between such materials, a strongly adhesive lubricant-substrate system should result. The interface between rf-sputter-deposited MoS2 films and single-crystal Si was studied by observing thin (<100 A) films with electron energy loss spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The interface is not atomically smooth; it is a broad and chemically complex region. The surface of the native oxide (SiO2) is sulfated by the plasma. The initial MoS2 in films deposited at 220 C is chemically the same as crystalline MoS2; that is, there is no chemical bonding between the film and the substrate. There is evidence that the initial MoS2 in films deposited at 70 C is chemically bonded to the crystal, perhaps through Mo-S-O or Mo-O linkages.

  2. Si and O self-diffusion in hydrous forsterite and iron-bearing olivine from the perspective of defect chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Hongzhan; Katsura, Tomoo

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the experimental results of silicon and oxygen self-diffusion coefficients in forsterite and iron-bearing olivine from the perspective of defect chemistry. Silicon diffusion is dominated by VO ··-associated VSi″″, whereas oxygen diffusion is dominated by hopping of VO ·· under anhydrous conditions, and by (OH)O · under hydrous conditions. By considering the charge neutrality condition of [(OH)O ·] = 2[VMe″] in hydrous forsterite and iron-bearing olivine, we get D Si ∝ (C_{{{{H}}2 {{O}}}})1/3 and D O ∝ (C_{{{{H}}2 {{O}}}})0, which explains the experimental results of water effects on oxygen and silicon self-diffusion rates (Fei et al. in Nature 498:213-215, 2013; J Geophys Res 119:7598-7606, 2014). The C_{{{{H}}2 {{O}}}} dependence of creep rate in the Earth's mantle should be close to that given by Si and O self-diffusion coefficients obtained under water unsaturated conditions.

  3. Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiameni, S.; Famengo, A.; Agresti, F.; Boldrini, S.; Battiston, S.; Saleemi, M.; Johnsson, M.; Toprak, M. S.; Fabrizio, M.

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium silicide (Mg2Si)-based alloys are promising candidates for thermoelectric (TE) energy conversion in the middle-high temperature range. The detrimental effect of the presence of MgO on the TE properties of Mg2Si based materials is widely known. For this reason, the conditions used for synthesis and sintering were optimized to limit oxygen contamination. The effect of Bi doping on the TE performance of dense Mg2Si materials was also investigated. Synthesis was performed by ball milling in an inert atmosphere starting from commercial Mg2Si powder and Bi powder. The samples were consolidated, by spark plasma sintering, to a density >95%. The morphology, and the composition and crystal structure of samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electronic microscopy and x-ray diffraction, respectively. Moreover, determination of Seebeck coefficients and measurement of electrical and thermal conductivity were performed for all the samples. Mg2Si with 0.1 mol% Bi doping had a ZT value of 0.81, indicative of the potential of this method for fabrication of n-type bulk material with good TE performance.

  4. Study of surface chemistry and microstructure of TiO2 nanostructures on Pt(111)/Si wafer and FTO glass substrates: a comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Moulik, Samik; Ghatak, Ankita; Ghosh, Barnali

    2016-09-01

    We report, the kinetically controlled growth of the (002)-oriented TiO2 nanorods on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated glass substrate via a cost effective hydrothermal synthesis route of binary oxides. In addition to this, the nanoflowered like growth of TiO2 nanorods using cubic structure Pt(111)/SiO2/Si substrate has also been demonstrated. Tuning of shape, crystallographic structure issues has been discussed by controlling the surface chemistry of the substrate on which the nanostructures were grown. The crystallographic structural aspects of the grown nanorods was confirmed both on ensemble and single nanowire level using spatially resolved tools and techniques. Growth mechanism for different shape, size and crystallographic structure depending on the surface chemistry of the substrate has been proposed. Understanding of growth of oriented TiO2 nanorods and interaction mechanism is quite promising and encouraging for designing optoelectronic and photocatalytic devices to enhanced electron transport and lower exciton recombination rates.

  5. Experimental evidence of bulk chemistry constraint on SiO2 solubility in clinopyroxene at high-pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Osanai, Yasuhito

    2015-06-01

    We have experimentally confirmed that the solubility of SiO2 in clinopyroxene at ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic conditions is buffered by coesite and kyanite. The present findings were derived from high-pressure experiments on metapelite glass, powdered andesite and eclogite glass under anhydrous conditions. The metapelite glass and powdered andesite were recrystallised in boron nitride capsules at 8 GPa and 1100-1500 °C. The eclogite glass was heated in an AuPd capsule, both ends of which were welded, at 3 GPa and 1000 °C. Clinopyroxene nucleated from metapelite glass, the bulk composition of which is saturated in both SiO2 and Al2SiO5 components plotting within the Jd (Na,K)(Al,Cr)(Si,Ti)2O6-Qtz (Si,Ti)O2-Grt M3(Al,Cr)2(Si,Ti)3O12-Als (Al,Cr)2(Si,Ti)O5 tetrahedron (M = Fe, Mn, Mg, Ni, Zn, Ca), coexists with garnet, coesite and kyanite. The average excess silica content of the clinopyroxene ranges from 23.4 to 35.4 mol%. In contrast, an andesite experiment saturated in SiO2 but undersaturated in Al2SiO5 within the Jd-Qtz-Aug M(Si,Ti)O3-Grt tetrahedron produced clinopyroxene, garnet and coesite but no kyanite. The average excess silica in the clinopyroxene was 9.7-15.5 mol%, which is comparable to previous experimental data. Experiment on the eclogite glass with similar composition to andesite yielded clinopyroxene, garnet and coesite. An average excess silica content in clinopyroxene counts 6.4 mol%, which is much lower than that obtained from the andesite. The SiO2 content of clinopyroxene coexisting with garnet, coesite and kyanite is much higher than that of clinopyroxene coexisting with garnet and coesite without kyanite. Although the temperature dependence is unclear, the SiO2 solubility increases with pressure and Fe/(Fe+Mg). Clinopyroxene forms the solid solution series Jd-Es □0.5M0.5Al(Si,Ti)2O6 and Aug-Es, rather than Jd-Ts MAl2(Si,Ti)O6 and Es-Ts joins. Our experimental data suggest the probable existence of octahedral Si which may accompany the M2

  6. The synthesis, characterization and formation chemistry of Si-C-N-O-M ceramic and composite powders. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Y.H.

    1998-08-01

    Brief summaries are given for the work in each of the following areas: (1) general pattern of behavior in the conversion processes of SiNC precursors; (2) thermal and oxidative stability of SiNC ceramics; and (3) modification of PMVSEDA(poly(methylvinyl)silylethylenediamine) with borane-dimethyl sulfide.

  7. Crystal chemistry of layered carbide, Ti3(Si0.43Ge0.57)C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hexiong; Manoun, B.; Downs, R. T.; Ganguly, A.; Barsoum, M. W.

    2006-12-01

    The crystal structure of a layered ternary carbide, Ti3(Si0.43Ge0.57)C2, was studied with single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compound has a hexagonal symmetry with space group P63/mmc and unit-cell parameters a=3.0823(1) Å, c=17.7702(6) Å, and V=146.21(1) Å3. The Si and Ge atoms in the structure occupy the same crystallographic site surrounded by six Ti atoms at an average distance of 2.7219 Å, and the C atoms are octahedrally coordinated by two types of symmetrically distinct Ti atoms, with an average C Ti distance of 2.1429 Å. The atomic displacement parameters for C and Ti are relatively isotropic, whereas those for A (=0.43Si+0.57Ge) are appreciably anisotropic, with U11 (=U22) being about three times greater than U33. Compared to Ti3SiC2, the substitution of Ge for Si results in an increase in both A Ti and C Ti bond distances. An electron density analysis based on the refined structure shows that each A atom is bonded to 6Ti atoms as well as to its 6 nearest neighbor A site atoms, whether the site is occupied by Si or Ge, suggesting that these bond paths may be significantly involved with electron transport properties.

  8. Defect- and electron-enhanced chemistry at silicon surfaces: Reactivity and thermal desorption of propylene on Si(100)-(2 × 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozack, M. J.; Choyke, W. J.; Muehlhoff, L.; Yates, J. T.

    1986-11-01

    The reaction of Si(100) with c 3h 6 from a molecular beam source has been studied by Auger spectroscopy and thermal desorption methods. For a thermally annealed and ordered Si(100) surface, 35% of the propylene bonds to the surface as an undissociated molecule which desorbs intact at 550 K. The remainder of the propylene dissociates. Reactivity is enhanced by prebombarding the surface with Ar + ions. Adsorption of C 3H 6 to a disordered, ion-bombarded surface results in nearly complete dissociation of C 3H 6 for Ar + fluences greater than 9 × 10 14{ions}/{cm 2}. By performing the ion irradiation before, rather than during, adsorption, it is possible to conclude that the enhancement in reactivity is due to an increase in dissociative chemisorption, which occurs at defect sites produced by ion bombardment. The increase in reactivity is also independent of gas phase radical processes and other proposed mechanisms which depend on simultaneous action of the ion beam with the chemisorbed layer. Studies of electron-stimulated chemistry of the chemisorbed overlayer showed that decomposition of adsorbed propylene occurs for electron fluences greater than 1 × 10 17{electrons}/{cm 2}. The cross section for the process was calculated to be 4 × 10 -18 cm 2. The effect of preadsorbed hydrogen on silicon surface chemistry was also investigated. Hydrogen passivates the Si(100) surface by occupation of silicon dangling bond sites, which prevents adsorption of C 3H 6. These results have fundamental implications for studies of chemical and plasma vapor deposition and reactive ion etching of semiconductor surfaces.

  9. Will Ge Ever be an Effective Proxy for Earth Chemistry or Climate? Insights from Ge Isotopes and Diatom Ge/Si Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, J.; Siebert, C.; Wheat, G.; Pisias, N.; Robinson, R.; Hammond, D.

    2006-12-01

    Previous work (Mortlock et al., 1991) has demonstrated that diatom Ge:Si ratios measured in Antarctic sediments vary systematically through glacial-interglacial periods. Interpretation of that record is, however, confounded by the fact that although Ge and Si have quite similar chemistries, there are sufficient differences in their geochemistry that the observed record does not have a unique interpretation. One potential way through this problem would be if Ge or Si isotopes could provide additional and unique information for interpreting the diatom record. Toward that end we present Ge isotope compositions for a suite of marine hydrothermal fluids, which represent a major source of Ge to the oceans. Our results from one system where the temperature is approximately 200 °C suggest that Ge isotopes in these systems are not significantly different from an in-house Columbia River basalt standard, i.e., δ74Ge = ~ 0‰. Fluids from a sediment-hosted higher temperature (~285 °C) system show moderate isotope fractionation, δ74Ge = ~ -0.5 ± 0.4‰. Fluids from cooler (i.e., less than 100 °C) ridge flank systems exhibit the greatest degree of isotope fractionation, δ74Ge = ~ -1.5 ± 0.4‰. If our results are broadly applicable, they imply that high temperature hydrothermal alteration may not produce significant Ge isotope fractionation, whereas sediment-hosted hydrothermal systems do fractionate Ge isotopes. We also present Ge:Si ratios from diatoms in the central and eastern Pacific. Our results demonstrate that surface sediment diatoms have a Ge:Si ratio that is similar to the water column ratio from this region (i.e., Ge/Si = ~ 0.7 μmol/mol); however, within a few centimeters of the sediment surface this ratio decreases to ~ 0.4 μmol/mol. We interpret these results to imply that, unlike the diatom rich sediments from the Antarctic, diatoms from these regions undergo significant diagenesis such that the initial signal becomes obscured. These particular results

  10. Unique Surface Modification of Silica Nanoparticles with Polyethylenimine (PEI) for siRNA Delivery Using Cerium Cation Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kapilov-Buchman, Yekaterina; Lellouche, Emmanuel; Michaeli, Shulamit; Lellouche, Jean-Paul

    2015-05-20

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) as a naturally occurring mechanism for gene knockdown has attracted considerable attention toward the use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for therapeutic purposes. The main obstacles of harnessing siRNAs as drugs are their inefficient delivery to cells and off-target effect making clinical applications very challenging. The positively charged, branched 25 kDa polyethylenimine (b-PEI) polymer is widely regarded as one of the most efficient nonviral commercially available transfection agents. However, it has also been shown that 25 kDa b-PEI is highly cytotoxic and can readily lead to cell death. In this specific context, this study presents the preparation and characterization of innovative 25 kDa b-PEI-decorated polycationic silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) for cellular siRNA delivery and subsequent gene silencing. A new method of b-PEI attachment onto the SiO2 NP surface has been developed that makes use of cerium(III) cations (Ce(3+)), a lanthanide group element, as an effective noncovalent inorganic linker between both polyNH2-SiO2 nanoparticle (SPA NPs) surface and polycationic 25 kDa b-PEI polymer. Two resulting novel SPA-Ce-PEI NPs consist of similar amounts of b-PEI, while possessing different amounts of Ce(3+). Various analytical techniques (TEM, DLS, ζ potential, ICP-AES, and TGA) have been used to deeply characterize NPs physicochemical qualities. The observed results of Ce(3+)-dependent gene silencing and cytotoxic activities led us to conclusions about the role of Ce(3+)-N bonding during the chemical attachment of the 25 kDa b-PEI shell onto the NP surface. PMID:25830668

  11. Structural chemistry of M2Si5N8:Eu2+ (M = Ca, Sr, Ba) phosphor via structural refinement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Kwang Bok; Lee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Ki-Bok

    2012-04-01

    Structural refinement using X-ray powder diffraction data and geometry energy calculations using quantum mechanics were used to investigate the preferential substitution sites and the amount of Eu2+ ions in the host lattice of alkaline earth elements co-doped M2Si5N8:Eu2+ (M = Ca, Sr, and Ba), which is a red color-emitting nitride phosphor prepared via a carbothermal reaction method. Of the possible preferential sites, the preferential site proposed by the structural refinement results, in which the Eu2+ ions might preferentially occupy nine coordinated sites with nitrogen in M2Si5N8:Eu2+, was confirmed via geometry energy calculations using a first-principle based on the density-functional theory. The final converged weighted R factor (R(wp)) and the goodness-of-fit indicator [S(= R(wp)/R(e))] were 9.51% and 1.77, respectively. Each occupancy of Eu2+ ions for the two non-equivalent M sites, M(1) and M(2), was 0.10(2) and 0.04(2), respectively. The final refined model described the crystal structure in a space group Pmn2, (No. 31) with Z = 2, a = 5.7424(1) angstroms, b = 6.8837(1) angstroms, c = 9.3586(1) angstroms, and alpha(= beta= gamma)= 90 degrees. PMID:22849142

  12. Crystal chemistry and optical investigations of the Cu{sub 2}Zn(Sn,Si)S{sub 4} series for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdi, Mohamed; Lafond, Alain; Guillot-Deudon, Catherine; Hlel, Faouzi; Gargouri, Mohamed; Jobic, Stéphane

    2014-12-15

    Different compounds in the Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}–Cu{sub 2}ZnSiS{sub 4} system have been prepared via ceramic route and structurally characterized via X-ray diffraction on powders and single crystals. Two solid solutions were identified along the Cu{sub 2}Zn(Sn,Si)S{sub 4} series. Namely, materials with Si-content x=Si/(Sn+Si) lower than 0.5 crystallize with the Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} kesterite structure type while materials with x higher than 0.8 adopt the Cu{sub 2}ZnSiS{sub 4} enargite structure type. In between, a miscibility gap occurs where the Cu{sub 2}ZnSn{sub 0.5}Si{sub 0.5}S{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSn{sub 0.2}Si{sub 0.8}S{sub 4} compounds co-exist. The optical bandgap increases continuously with the Si content in the whole series. This opens up the possibility to fine tune the absorption threshold and to adjust it to 1.7 eV for x∼0.5, the optimum value for the top cell of tandem solar devises to achieve high photovoltaic conversion efficiency. - Graphical abstract: Two solid solutions have been pointed out in the Cu{sub 2}Zn(Sn{sub 1−x}Si{sub x})S{sub 4} series with the kesterite and the enargite type structures. - Highlights: • New compounds in Cu{sub 2}Zn(Sn,Si)S{sub 4} series have been prepared. • Two solid solutions Cu{sub 2}ZnSn{sub 1−x}Si{sub x}S{sub 4} were identified for x≤0.5 and x≥0.8. • In the miscibility gap 2 phases co-exist with kesterite and enargite structure types. • The optical bandgap increases continuously with the Si-content in the whole series. • These materials could be envisioned as absorber in thin-film solar cells.

  13. Microcrystalline silicon thin films deposited by matrix-distributed electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using an SiF4 /H2 chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junkang; Bulkin, Pavel; Florea, Ileana; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Johnson, Erik

    2016-07-01

    For the growth of hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) thin films by low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4) has recently attracted interest as a precursor due to the resilient optoelectronic performance of the resulting material and devices. In this work, μc-Si:H films are deposited at high rates (7 Å s‑1) from a SiF4 and hydrogen (H2) gas mixture by matrix-distributed electron cyclotron resonance PECVD (MDECR-PECVD). Increased substrate temperature and moderate ion bombardment energy (IBE) are demonstrated to be of vital importance to achieve high quality μc-Si:H films under such low process pressure and high plasma density conditions, presumably due to thermally-induced and ion-induced enhancement of surface species migration. Two well-defined IBE thresholds at 12 eV and 43 eV, corresponding respectively to SiF+ ion-induced surface and bulk atomic displacement, are found to be determinant to the final film properties, namely the surface roughness, feature size and crystalline content. Moreover, a study of the growth dynamics shows that the primary challenge to producing highly crystallized μc-Si:H films by MDECR-PECVD appears to be the nucleation step. By employing a two-step method to first prepare a highly crystallized seed layer, μc-Si:H films lacking any amorphous incubation layer have been obtained. A crystalline volume fraction of 68% is achieved with a substrate temperature as low as 120 °C, which is of great interest to broaden the process window for solar cell applications.

  14. Crystal chemistry of the G-phases in the {l_brace}Ti, Zr, Hf{r_brace}-Ni-Si systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grytsiv, A.; Chen Xingqiu; Rogl, P. Podloucky, R.; Schmidt, H.; Giester, G.; Pomjakushin, V.

    2007-02-15

    Ternary compounds M{sub 6}Ni{sub 16}Si{sub 7} (M=Ti, Zr, Hf) have been investigated by X-ray powder/single crystal and neutron powder diffraction. Compounds with Zr and Hf crystallize in the ordered Th{sub 6}Mn{sub 23} type (Mg{sub 6}Cu{sub 16}Si{sub 7}-type, space group Fm3-bar m), whereas Ti{sub 6}Ni{sub 16.7}Si{sub 7} contains an additional Ni atom partially occupying the 24e site (M2 site, x=0.4637,0,0; occ.=0.119) inside a Ti octahedron; Ti atoms occupy a split position. Ti{sub 6}Ni{sub 16.7}Si{sub 7} represents a new variant of the filled Th{sub 6}Mn{sub 23} type structure. Ab initio calculations confirm the structural difference: additional Ni atoms favour the 24e site for Ti{sub 6}Ni{sub 16.7}Si{sub 7}, however, for the Zr and Hf-based compounds the unoccupied site renders an energetically lower ground state. Enthalpies of formation of Ti{sub 6}Ni{sub 17}Si{sub 7}, Zr{sub 6}Ni{sub 16}Si{sub 7}, and Hf{sub 6}Ni{sub 16}Si{sub 7} were calculated to be -68.65, -74.78, and -78.59kJ/(mol of atoms), respectively.

  15. ON THE FORMATION OF SILACYCLOPROPENYLIDENE (c-SiC{sub 2}H{sub 2}) AND ITS ROLE IN THE ORGANOSILICON CHEMISTRY IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Dorian S. N.; Wilson, Anthony V.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Mayhall, Nicholas J.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2013-06-10

    Organosilicon species such as silicon carbide and silicon dicarbide are considered as key molecular building blocks in the chemical evolution of the interstellar medium and are associated with the formation of silicon-carbide dust grains in the outflow of circumstellar envelopes of carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. However, the formation mechanisms of even the simplest silicon-bearing organic molecules have remained elusive for decades. Here, we demonstrate in crossed molecular beam experiments combined with ab initio calculations that the silacyclopropenylidene molecule (c-SiC{sub 2}H{sub 2}) can be synthesized in the gas phase under single-collision conditions via the reaction of the silylidyne radical (SiH) with acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). This system denotes the simplest representative of a previously overlooked reaction class, in which the formation of an organosilicon molecule can be initiated via barrierless and exoergic reactions of silylidyne radicals with hydrocarbon molecules in circumstellar envelopes of evolved carbon stars such as IRC+10216. Since organosilicon molecules like silacyclopropenylidene can be eventually photolyzed to carbon-silicon clusters such as silicon dicarbide (c-SiC{sub 2}), silacyclopropenylidene might even represent the missing link between simple molecular precursors and silicon-carbide-rich interstellar grains.

  16. The influence of chemistry and microstructure on the fracture toughness of V-V{sub 3}Si in-situ composites

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Strum, M.J.; Bewlay, B.P.; Sutliff, J.A.

    1994-08-19

    The room temperature fracture behavior is described for ductile-phase toughened V-V{sub 3}Si in-situ composites produced by arc melting (AM), cold-crucible induction melting (IM), and cold-crucible directional solidification (DS). Composites were produced containing a wide range of microstructures, interstitial impurity contents, and volume fractions of the ductile V-Si solid solution phase, denoted (V). The fracture toughness of these composites generally increases as the volume fraction of (V) increases. For a given volume fraction of (V), the fracture toughness increases with decreasing {open_quotes}effective{close_quotes} interstitial impurity content, [I]=[N]+1.3[O]+9[H]. In eutectic composites, as [I] decreases from 1400 ppm (AM) to 400 ppm (IM), the fracture toughness increases from 10 to 20 MPa {radical}m. The fracture toughness of the V-V{sub 3}Si composites is further correlated with the mechanical properties of the component phases, SEM observations of the fracture surface characteristics, and electron back-scattering pattern measurements of the fracture facet crystallography. These correlations are discussed with respect to conventional ductile phase {open_quotes}bridging{close_quotes} theories.

  17. The crystal chemistry of Ca(10-y)(SiO4)3(SO4)3Cl(2-x-2y)F(x) ellestadite.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanan; Ritter, Clemens; White, Tim

    2011-12-19

    Fluor-chlorellestadite solid solutions Ca(10)(SiO(4))(3)(SO(4))(3)Cl(2-x)F(x), serving as prototype crystalline matrices for the fixation of hazardous fly ash, were synthesized and characterized by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction (PXRD and PND), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The lattice parameters of the ellestadites vary linearly with composition and show the expected shrinkage of unit cell volume as fluorine (IR = 1.33 Å) displaces chlorine (IR = 1.81 Å). FTIR spectra indicate little or no OH(-) in the solid solutions. All compositions conform to P6(3)/m symmetry where F(-) is located at the 2a (0, 0, (1)/(4)) position, while Cl(-) is displaced out of the 6h Ca(2) triangle plane and occupies 4e (0, 0, z) split positions with z ranging from 0.336(3) to 0.4315(3). Si/S randomly occupy the 6h tetrahedral site. Ellestadites rich in Cl (x ≤ 1.2) show an overall deficiency in halogens (<2 atom per formula unit), particularly Cl as a result of CaCl(2) volatilization, with charge balance achieved by the creation of Ca vacancies (Ca(2+) + 2Cl(-) →□(Ca) + 2□(Cl)) leading to the formula Ca(10-y)(SiO(4))(3)(SO(4))(3)Cl(2-x-2y)F(x). For F-rich compositions the vacancies are found at Ca(2), while for Cl-rich ellestadites, vacancies are at Ca(1). It is likely the loss of CaCl(2) which leads tunnel anion vacancies promotes intertunnel positional disorder, preventing the formation of a P2(1)/b monoclinic dimorph, analogous to that reported for Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)Cl(2). Trends in structure with composition were analyzed using crystal-chemical parameters, whose systematic variations served to validate the quality of the Rietveld refinements. PMID:22111559

  18. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental chemistry is applied to estimating the exposure of ecosystems and humans to various chemical environmental stressors. Among the stressors of concern are mercury, pesticides, and arsenic. Advanced analytical chemistry techniques are used to measure these stressors ...

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  2. Surface chemistry of a Cu(I) beta-diketonate precursor and the atomic layer deposition of Cu{sub 2}O on SiO{sub 2} studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Dileep; Waechtler, Thomas; Schulz, Stefan E.; Gessner, Thomas; Lang, Heinrich; Mothes, Robert; Tuchscherer, André

    2014-07-01

    The surface chemistry of the bis(tri-n-butylphosphane) copper(I) acetylacetonate, [({sup n}Bu{sub 3}P){sub 2}Cu(acac)] and the thermal atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Cu{sub 2}O using this Cu precursor as reactant and wet oxygen as coreactant on SiO{sub 2} substrates are studied by in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Cu precursor was evaporated and exposed to the substrates kept at temperatures between 22 °C and 300 °C. The measured phosphorus and carbon concentration on the substrates indicated that most of the [{sup n}Bu{sub 3}P] ligands were released either in the gas phase or during adsorption. No disproportionation was observed for the Cu precursor in the temperature range between 22 °C and 145 °C. However, disproportionation of the Cu precursor was observed at 200 °C, since C/Cu concentration ratio decreased and substantial amounts of metallic Cu were present on the substrate. The amount of metallic Cu increased, when the substrate was kept at 300 °C, indicating stronger disproportionation of the Cu precursor. Hence, the upper limit for the ALD of Cu{sub 2}O from this precursor lies in the temperature range between 145 °C and 200 °C, as the precursor must not alter its chemical and physical state after chemisorption on the substrate. Five hundred ALD cycles with the probed Cu precursor and wet O{sub 2} as coreactant were carried out on SiO{sub 2} at 145 °C. After ALD, in-situ XPS analysis confirmed the presence of Cu{sub 2}O on the substrate. Ex-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry indicated an average film thickness of 2.5 nm of Cu{sub 2}O deposited with a growth per cycle of 0.05 Å/cycle. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations depicted a homogeneous, fine, and granular morphology of the Cu{sub 2}O ALD film on SiO{sub 2}. AFM investigations suggest that the deposited Cu{sub 2}O film is continuous on the SiO{sub 2} substrate.

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  4. Interstellar sulfur chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, S. S.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The results of a chemical model of SO, CS, and OCS chemistry in dense clouds are summarized. The results are obtained from a theoretical study of sulfur chemistry in dense interstellar clouds using a large-scale time-dependent model of gas-phase chemistry. Among the results are the following: (1) owing to activation energy, the reaction of CS with O atoms is efficient as a loss mechanism of CS during the early phases of cloud evolution or in hot and oxygen-rich sources such as the KL nebula; (2) if sulfur is not abnormally depleted in dense clouds, then the observed abundances of SO, SO2, H2S, CS, OCS, H2CS, and SiS indicate that sulfur is mostly atomic in dense clouds; and (3) OCS is stable against reactions with neutral atoms and radicals in dense clouds.

  5. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  6. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  7. Petrography and chemistry of SiO 2 filling phases in the amethyst geodes from the Serra Geral Formation deposit, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commin-Fischer, Adriane; Berger, Gilles; Polvé, Mireille; Dubois, Michel; Sardini, Paul; Beaufort, Daniel; Formoso, Milton

    2010-04-01

    The filling process of amethyst-bearing geodes from Serra Geral Formation basalts, Brazil, is investigated by different methods performed on the SiO 2 filling phases. Image analysis of quartz-amethyst deposits suggests a single growing mechanism ruled by geometric selection of randomly oriented crystals. Microthermometry of fluid inclusions reveals formation temperature lower than 100 °C, probably lower than 50 °C, and fluid salinity as high as 3 mass% NaCl eq. Composition in REE and trace-elements measured by ICP-MS on acid-digested or laser-ablated samples indicates a common genesis for amethyst, quartz and chalcedony, as well as the absence of significant variations from one geode to another. 87Sr/ 86Sr data on chalcedony shows that both the host basalt or the Botucatu sandstone are possible silica sources. These data, combined with thermo-kinetic considerations, permit us to discuss the filling process. We argue in favor of the contribution of a mineralized fluid of hydrothermal origin producing a regional silica source which decreased with time. The observed mineral sequence is related to the depletion of silica in the solution.

  8. Surface chemistry and reactivity of SiO2 polymorphs: A comparative study on α-quartz and α-cristobalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Cuihua; Zhu, Jianxi; Li, Zhaohui; Zhu, Runliang; Zhou, Qing; Wei, Jingming; He, Hongping; Tao, Qi

    2015-11-01

    Silica minerals are widely used in environmental remediation for their prevalence in soil and sediment. Two common SiO2 polymorphs, α-quartz and α-cristobalite, were investigated for the removal of a typical cationic dye, methylene blue (MB), from aqueous solutions. Their adsorption behaviors were studied in batch experiments as a function of specific surface area (SSA), pH, and temperature. The surface site density of α-quartz (10.6 sites/nm2) was higher than that of α-cristobalite (6.2 sites/nm2) with the Gran plot method, and the adsorption maxima of MB on the two were 0.84 mg/m2 and 0.49 mg/m2, respectively, at 303 K and pH 8. The potentiometric titration showed the capacity of proton-donating by α-quartz was stronger than that by α-cristobalite. A drastic increase of adsorption amount on α-quartz at pH < 3 was caused by its greater quantity of isolated silanols. The negative ΔG and positive ΔH values suggested adsorption of MB on both minerals was spontaneous and endothermic. At three different temperatures (288 K, 298 K, and 303 K), the adsorption capacities of two polymorphs increased with increasing temperature. The surface heterogeneity of α-quartz and α-cristobalite corresponds to their different adsorption behavior, and our work also provides some referential significance in evaluating the overall quality of soils and sediments.

  9. Magnetism and structural chemistry of U1-xYxCu2±ySi2∓y, U1-xYxCr2Si2, and U(Cu1-xCrx)2Si2 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebl, K.; Rogl, P.; Horvath, C.; Remschnig, K.; Noël, H.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic behavior for the three series of alloys U1-xYxCu2±ySi2∓y, U1-xYxCr2Si2, and U(Cu1-xCrx)2Si2 has been studied in the temperature range from 2 to 550 K. In all cases a complete solid solution with the ThCr2Si2 type of structure was observed from x-ray powder analysis with no ordering among the substituting atom species. Whereas YCu2Si2 did not reveal any homogeneous region on Si/Cu substitution, uranium-rich alloys show significant changes in the unit cell dimensions when comparing U1-xYxCu2Si2 and U1-xYxCu2+ySi2-y. In both latter alloy series a negative deviation of the c parameter from Vegard's rule is found almost compensated for by a positive deviation of a when Y is substituted for U. Substitution of Cu by Cr resulted in a linear dependence of the lattice dimensions. YCu2Si2 and YCr2Si2 are temperature independent Pauli paramagnets above 2 K, whereas the UCu2±ySi2∓y and the U(Cu1-xCrx)2Si2 systems are characterized by the onset of ferromagnetic ordering at TM =105 K. Above TM all samples are in the paramagnetic state in which the uranium atoms carry an effective moment larger than 2 μB. Saturation moments reveal a maximum for a copper deficiency of y˜0.1, whereas excess copper correlates with a strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy indicating the presence of narrow domain walls. Substitution of U by Y in U1-xYxCu2±ySi2∓y leads to a linear decrease of TM and for concentrations of 0.4≤x≤0.8 metamagnetic behavior is observed. The antiferromagnetic transition is followed by a ferromagnetic alignment of the U atoms below the Néel temperature. The maximum of the anisotropy energy coincides with the minimum in the c parameter at x˜0.65. The Y-rich alloys U1-xYxCu2∓ySi2±y display antiferromagnetism with a rather complex structure as indicated by the change of sign of the paramagnetic Curie-Weiss temperature θp. In the U1-xYxCr2Si2 alloys the antiferromagnetic coupling is destroyed by rather small amounts of Y.

  10. Neutral nanocluster chemistry studied by soft x-ray laser single-photon ionization: Application to soft x-ray optical surface contamination studies: Si mO n and Ti mO n

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinbuch, S.; Dong, F.; Rocca, J. J.; Bernstein, E. R.

    2007-09-01

    Metal oxide clusters are employed in studies to help understand an important, specific, type of surface chemical problem: the contamination of soft x-ray mirrors by carbon deposits. Herein we report nanocluster chemistry studies that are relevant to the use of silicon oxide and titanium oxide capping layers. Systems involving Si mO n, and Ti mO n metal oxide nanoclusters are generated in a pulsed supersonic expansion/ablation source and passed through a reactor containing any reactant desired. The reaction products of these gas phase clusters are ionized using single photon ionization from a desk-top sized 46.9 nm Ne-like Ar laser providing the advantage of little or no fragmentation of desired nanoclusters. The ionized products are analyzed by a time of flight mass spectrometer and experimental results supply useful information related to condensed phase soft x-ray optical surfaces. The results illustrate the great potential of the use of very compact soft x-ray lasers in photochemistry and photophysics studies.

  11. Technetium chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-04-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  12. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  14. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1990-01-01

    A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry is presented that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds and contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine-structure levels of the silicon atom. As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, the model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundance of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  15. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  16. Isotropic plasma etching of Ge Si and SiNx films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Henry, Michael David; Douglas, Erica Ann

    2016-05-01

    This study reports on selective isotropic dry etching of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) Ge thin film, release layers using a Shibaura chemical downstream etcher (CDE) with NF3 and Ar based plasma chemistry. Relative etch rates between Ge, Si and SiNx are described with etch rate reductions achieved by adjusting plasma chemistry with O2. Formation of oxides reducing etch rates were measured for both Ge and Si, but nitrides or oxy-nitrides created using direct injection of NO into the process chamber were measured to increase Si and SiNx etch rates while retarding Ge etching.

  17. Process dependent morphology of the Si/SiO2 interface measured with scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.; Bell, L. D.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    A new experimental technique to determine Si/SiO2 interface morphology is described. Thermal oxides of silicon are chemically removed, and the resulting surface topography is measured with scanning tunneling microscopy. Interfaces prepared by oxidation of Si (100) and (111) surfaces, followed by postoxidation anneal (POA) at different temperatures, have been characterized. Correlations between interface structure, chemistry, and electrical characteristics are described.

  18. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  20. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  1. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  2. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  3. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  4. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  5. Impact of Supplemental Instruction in Entry-Level Chemistry Courses at a Midsized Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rath, Kenneth A.; Peterfreund, Alan; Bayliss, Frank; Runquist, Elizabeth; Simonis, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of supplemental instruction (SI)--nonremedial workshops that support regularly scheduled courses--on four different chemistry courses: General Chemistry I and II, and Organic Chemistry I and II. Differences in how SI impacts student performance in these courses are discussed, particularly in terms of whether students…

  6. SI Units? A Camel is a Camel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Arthur W.

    1978-01-01

    This paper is a summary of remarks made at a recent symposium on new directions in the teaching of physical chemistry. The author takes exception to the claims made for the International System of Units (SI). (HM)

  7. Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  8. Tropospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, V. A.; Chameides, W.; Demerjian, K. L.; Lenschow, D. H.; Logan, J. A.; Mcneal, R. J.; Penkett, S. A.; Platt, U.; Schurath, U.; Dias, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry of the background troposphere, the source region, and the transition regions are discussed. The troposphere is governed by heterogeneous chemistry far more so than the stratosphere. Heterogeneous processes of interest involve scavenging of trace gases by aerosols, cloud and precipitation elements leading to aqueous phase chemical reactions and to temporary and permanent removal of material from the gas phase. Dry deposition is a major removal process for ozone, as well as for other gases of importance in tropospheric photochemistry. These processes are also discussed.

  9. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  10. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  11. Silicon chemistry in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John; Gómez-Martín, Juan Carlos; Feng, Wuhu; Janches, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in cosmic dust, and meteoric ablation injects a significant amount of Si into the atmosphere above 80 km. In this study, a new model for silicon chemistry in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere is described, based on recent laboratory kinetic studies of Si, SiO, SiO2 and Si+. Electronic structure calculations and statistical rate theory are used to show that the likely fate of SiO2 is a 2-step hydration to silicylic acid (Si(OH)4), which then polymerizes with metal oxides and hydroxides to form meteoric smoke particles. This chemistry is then incorporated into a whole atmosphere chemistry-climate model. The vertical profiles of Si+ and the Si+/Fe+ ratio are shown to be in good agreement with rocket-borne mass spectrometric measurements between 90 and 110 km. Si+ has consistently been observed to be the major meteoric ion around 110 km; this implies that the relative injection rate of Si from meteoric ablation, compared to metals such as Fe and Mg, is significantly larger than expected based on their relative chondritic abundances. Finally, the global abundances of SiO and Si(OH)4 show clear evidence of the seasonal meteoric input function, which is much less pronounced in the case of other meteoric species.

  12. Silicon chemistry in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plane, John M. C.; Gómez-Martín, Juan Carlos; Feng, Wuhu; Janches, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant elements in cosmic dust, and meteoric ablation injects a significant amount of Si into the atmosphere above 80 km. In this study, a new model for silicon chemistry in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere is described, based on recent laboratory kinetic studies of Si, SiO, SiO2, and Si+. Electronic structure calculations and statistical rate theory are used to show that the likely fate of SiO2 is a two-step hydration to silicic acid (Si(OH)4), which then polymerizes with metal oxides and hydroxides to form meteoric smoke particles. This chemistry is then incorporated into a whole atmosphere chemistry-climate model. The vertical profiles of Si+ and the Si+/Fe+ ratio are shown to be in good agreement with rocket-borne mass spectrometric measurements between 90 and 110 km. Si+ has consistently been observed to be the major meteoric ion around 110 km; this implies that the relative injection rate of Si from meteoric ablation, compared to metals such as Fe and Mg, is significantly larger than expected based on their relative chondritic abundances. Finally, the global abundances of SiO and Si(OH)4 show clear evidence of the seasonal meteoric input function, which is much less pronounced in the case of other meteoric species.

  13. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  14. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  15. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  16. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  18. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  1. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  2. Chemistry of MOS-LSI radiation hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, P.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this task was to obtain chemical information on MOS test samples. Toward this end, high resolution X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) has been the primary techniques used to characterize the chemistry and structure of the SiO2/Si interface for a variety of MOS structures with differing degrees of susceptibility to damage by ionizing radiation. The major accomplishments of this program are: (1) the identification of a structurally distinct region of SiO2 in the near-interfacial region of thermal SiO2 on Si; (2) the identification in the near-interfacial region of SiO2 structural differences between radiation hard and soft gate oxides; (3) the direct observation of radiation-induced damage sites in thermal SiO2 with XPS using in situ electron stress; (4) the correlation of suboxide state distributions at the SiO2/Si interface with processing parameters and radiation susceptibility; (5) the development of a chemical mechanism for radiation-induced interface state generation in SiO2/Si structures; and (6) the development benign chemical profiling techniques which permit the investigation of oxide/semiconductor structures using surface sensitive electron spectroscopic techniques.

  3. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  4. Silicon chemistry in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Glassgold, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Interstellar SiO was discovered shortly after CO but it has been detected mainly in high density and high temperature regions associated with outflow sources. A new model of interstellar silicon chemistry that explains the lack of SiO detections in cold clouds is presented which contains an exponential temperature dependence for the SiO abundance. A key aspect of the model is the sensitivity of SiO production by neutral silicon reactions to density and temperature, which arises from the dependence of the rate coefficients on the population of the excited fine structure levels of the silicon atom. This effect was originally pointed out in the context of neutral reactions of carbon and oxygen by Graff, who noted that the leading term in neutral atom-molecule interactions involves the quadrupole moment of the atom. Similar to the case of carbon, the requirement that Si has a quadrupole moment requires population of the J = 1 level, which lies 111K above the J = 0 ground state and has a critical density n(cr) equal to or greater than 10(6)/cu cm. The SiO abundance then has a temperature dependence proportional to exp(-111/T) and a quadratic density dependence for n less than n(cr). As part of the explanation of the lack of SiO detections at low temperatures and densities, this model also emphasizes the small efficiencies of the production routes and the correspondingly long times needed to reach equilibrium. Measurements of the abundance of SiO, in conjunction with theory, can provide information on the physical properties of interstellar clouds such as the abundances of oxygen bearing molecules and the depletion of interstellar silicon.

  5. Interfacial chemistry and structure in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Saenz, N.T.; Schilling, C.H.

    1990-09-01

    The interfacial chemistry and structure of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) play a major role in the properties of these materials. Fiber-matrix interfaces chemistries are vitally important in the fracture strength, fracture toughness, and fracture resistance of ceramic composites because they influence fiber loading and fiber pullout. Elevated-temperature properties are also linked to the interfacial characteristics through the chemical stability of the interface in corrosive environments and the creep/pullout behavior of the interface. Physical properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity are also dependent on the interface. Fiber-matrix interfaces containing a 1-{mu}m-thick multilayered interface with amorphous and graphitic C to a 1-nm-thick SiO{sub 2} layer can result from sintering operations for some composite systems. Fibers coated with C, BN, C/BC/BN, and Si are also used to produce controlled interface chemistries and structures. Growth interfaces within the matrix resulting from processing of CMCs can also be crucial to the behavior of these materials. Evaluation of the interfacial chemistry and structure of CMCs requires the use of a variety of analytical tools, including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. A review of the interfacial chemistry and structure of SiC whisker- and fiber-reinforced Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC/SiC materials is presented. Where possible, correlations with fracture properties and high-temperature stability are made. 94 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  7. Tropospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, V.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamental processes that control the chemical composition and cycles of the global troposphere and how these processes and properties affect the physical behavior of the atmosphere are examined. The long-term information needs for tropospheric chemistry are: to be able to predict tropospheric responses to perturbations, both natural and anthropogenic, of these cycles, and to provide the information required for the maintenance and effective future management of the atmospheric component of our global life support system. The processes controlling global tropospheric biogeochemical cycles include: the input of trace species into the troposphere, their long-range transport and distribution as affected by the mean wind and vertical venting, their chemical transformations, including gas to particle conversion, leading to the appearance of aerosols or aqueous phase reactions inside cloud droplets, and their removal from the troposphere via wet (precipitation) and dry deposition.

  8. Chemistry at high pressures and temperatures: in-situ synthesis and characterization of {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} by DAC X-ray/laser-heating studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.-S.; Akella, J.; Nicol, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed in-situ XRD technique at high pressures and temperatures by integrating the angle-resolved synchrotron XRD method, laser-heating system, and diamond anvil cell together. Using this technique, we have studied the direct elementary reactions of nitrogen with Si, yielding technologically important {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. These reactions do not occur at ambient temperatures at high pressures up to 50 GPa, but proceed exothermically at high temperatures at moderate pressures. It implies that the reaction is kinetically limited by a large activation barrier.

  9. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Water Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-12-15

    This shapefile contains 409 well data points on Tularosa Basin Water Chemistry, each of which have a location (UTM), temperature, quartz and Potassium/Magnesium geothermometer; as well as concentrations of chemicals like Mn, Fe, Ba, Sr, Cs, Rb, As, NH4, HCO3, SO4, F, Cl, B, SiO2, Mg, Ca, K, Na, and Li.

  10. SI Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses legislation related to SI (International Systems of Units) in the United States. Indicates that although SI metric units have been officially recognized by law in the United States, U.S. Customary Units have never received a statutory basis. (JN)

  11. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  12. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  13. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  14. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  15. Chemistry Modeling for Aerothermodynamics and TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dun-You; Stallcop, James R.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Haliciogiu, Timur; Huo, Winifred

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in supercomputers and highly scalable quantum chemistry software render computational chemistry methods a viable means of providing chemistry data for aerothermal analysis at a specific level of confidence. Four examples of first principles quantum chemistry calculations will be presented. The study of the highly nonequilibrium rotational distribution of nitrogen molecule from the exchange reaction N + N2 illustrates how chemical reactions can influence the rotational distribution. The reaction C2H + H2 is one example of a radical reaction that occurs during hypersonic entry into a methane containing atmosphere. A study of the etching of Si surface illustrates our approach to surface reactions. A recently developed web accessible database and software tool (DDD) that provides the radiation profile of diatomic molecules is also described.

  16. Chemistry Modeling for Aerothermodynamics and TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Dateo, Christopher e.; Schwenke, David W.; Halicioglu, Timur; Huo, winifred M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in supercomputers and highly scalable quantum chemistry software render computational chemistry methods a viable means of providing chemistry data for aerothermal analysis at a specific level of confidence. Four examples of first principles quantum chemistry calculations will be presented. Study of the highly nonequilibrium rotational distribution of a nitrogen molecule from the exchange reaction N + N2 illustrates how chemical reactions can influence rotational distribution. The reaction C2H + H2 is one example of a radical reaction that occurs during hypersonic entry into an atmosphere containing methane. A study of the etching of a Si surface illustrates our approach to surface reactions. A recently developed web accessible database and software tool (DDD) that provides the radiation profile of diatomic molecules is also described.

  17. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  18. Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2}, with a new twofold superstructure of the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} type: Synthesis, crystal chemistry and chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Mbarki, Mohammed; Touzani, Rachid St.; Fokwa, Boniface P.T.

    2013-07-15

    The new ternary metal-rich boride, Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2}, was synthesized by arc-melting the elements in a water-cooled copper crucible under an argon atmosphere. The compound was characterized from single-crystal X-ray data and EDX measurements. It crystallizes as a new superstructure (space group P4/mnc, no. 128) of the tetragonal U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-structure type with lattice parameters a=5.922(1) Å and c=6.879(2) Å. All of the B atoms are involved in B{sub 2} dumbbells with B–B distances of 1.89(4) Å. Structure relaxation using VASP (Vienna ab intio Simulation Package) has confirmed the space group and the lattice parameters. According to electronic structure calculations (TB–LMTO–ASA), the homoatomic B–B interactions are optimized and very strong, but relatively strong heteroatomic Os–B, Nb–B and Nb–Os bonds are also found: These interactions, which together build a three-dimensional network, are mainly responsible for the structural stability of this new phase. The density of state at the Fermi level predicts metallic behavior, as expected, from this metal-rich boride. - Graphical abstract: Nb{sub 2}OsB{sub 2} is, to the best of our knowledge, the first fully characterized phase in the ternary Nb–Os–B system. It crystallizes (space group P4/mnc, 128) with a new twofold superstructure of the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure type (space group P4/mbm, 127), and is therefore the first boride in this structure family crystallizing with a superstructure of the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure type. We show that the distortions leading to this superstructure occurs mainly in the Nb-layer, which tries to accommodate the large osmium atoms. The consequence of this puckering is the building osmium dumbbells instead of chains along [001]. - Highlights: • First compound in the Nb–Os–B system. • New twofold superstructure of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure type. • Puckering of Nb-layer responsible for superstructure occurrence. • Chemical bonding studied

  19. Nuclear chemistry progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, V.E.; Kwiatkowski, K.

    1993-08-01

    This is the annual progress report for the Indiana University nuclear chemistry program for the 1992/1993 year. Accomplishments include the construction, testing, and initial experimental runs of the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4{pi} charged particle detector. ISiS is designed to study energy dissipation and multifragmentation phenomena in light-ion-induced nuclear reactions at medium-to-high energies. Its second test run was to examine 3.6 GeV {sup 3}He beam reactions at Laboratoire National Saturne (LNS) in Saclay. The development and deployment of this system has occupied a great deal of the groups effort this reporting period. Additional work includes: calculations of isotopic IMF yields in the {sup 4}He + {sup 116,124}Sn reaction; cross sections for A = 6 - 30 fragments from the {sup 4}He + {sup 28}Si reaction at 117 and 198 MeV; charging effects of passivated silicon detectors; neck emission of intermediate-mass fragments in the fission of hot heavy nuclei.

  20. HF-(NH₄)₂S₂O₈-HCl Mixtures for HNO₃- and NOx-free Etching of Diamond Wire- and SiC-Slurry-Sawn Silicon Wafers: Reactivity Studies, Surface Chemistry, and Unexpected Pyramidal Surface Morphologies.

    PubMed

    Stapf, André; Gondek, Christoph; Lippold, Marcus; Kroke, Edwin

    2015-04-29

    The wet-chemical treatment of silicon wafers is an important production step in photovoltaic and semiconductor industries. Solutions containing hydrofluoric acid, ammonium peroxodisulfate, and hydrochloric acid were investigated as novel acidic, NOx-free etching mixtures for texturization and polishing of monocrystalline silicon wafers. Etching rates as well as generated surface morphologies and properties are discussed in terms of the composition of the etching mixture. The solutions were analyzed with Raman and UV/vis spectroscopy as well as ion chromatography (IC). The silicon surfaces were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surprisingly, pyramidal surface structures were found after etching SiC-slurry as well as diamond wire-sawn monocrystalline Si(100) wafers with hydrochloric acid-rich HF-(NH4)2S2O8-HCl mixtures. Acidic etching solutions are generally not known for anisotropic etching. Thus, the HNO3-free mixtures might allow to replace KOH/i-propanol and similar alkaline solutions for texturization of monosilicon wafers at room temperature with less surface contamination. Besides, common HNO3-based etching mixtures may be replaced by the nitrate-free system, leading to significant economic and ecological advantages. PMID:25826145

  1. Computational study on SiH4 dissociation channels and H abstraction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Toshio; Ishikawa, Kenji; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    The primary dissociation channels of SiH4 were investigated using computational chemistry. The results showed properties very similar to those of CH4. The main dissociation product was SiH2 and the second dissociation product was SiH3. SiH was produced through SiH3 to SiH + H2 dissociation by electronic excitation. H abstraction reactions by H and SiH3 were also calculated for SiH4, Si2H6, Si3H8, and Si9H14(100) cluster models. The energy barriers of H abstraction reactions were lower than those of SiH3 abstraction reactions. This result is considerably important for deposition in SiH4/H2 process plasma.

  2. Ionic Liquids Can Permanently Modify Porous Silicon Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Shruti; Coombs, Sidney G; Wagle, Durgesh V; Bhawawet, Nakara; Baker, Gary A; Bright, Frank V

    2016-08-01

    To develop ionic liquid/porous silicon (IL/pSi) microarrays we have contact pin-printed 20 hydrophobic and hydrophilic ionic liquids onto as-prepared, hydrogen-passivated porous silicon (ap-pSi) and then determined the individual IL spot size, shape and associated pSi surface chemistry. The results reveal that the hydrophobic ionic liquids oxidize the ap-pSi slightly. In contrast, the hydrophilic ionic liquids lead to heavily oxidized pSi (i.e., ox-pSi). The strong oxidation arises from residual water within the hydrophilic ILs that is delivered from these ILs into the ap-pSi matrix causing oxidation. This phenomenon is less of an issue in the hydrophobic ILs because their water solubility is substantially lower. PMID:27405109

  3. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  4. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  5. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  6. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  7. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  8. Teaching School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, D. J., Ed.

    This eight-chapter book is intended for use by chemistry teachers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and other key personnel working in the field of chemical education. The chapters are: (1) "The Changing Face of Chemistry" (J. A. Campbell); (2) "Curriculum Innovation in School Chemistry" (R. B. Ingel and A. M. Ranaweera); (3) "Some…

  9. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  10. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  11. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  12. History of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servos, John W.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the development of chemistry in the United States by considering: (1) chemistry as an evolving body of ideas/techniques, and as a set of conceptual resources affecting and affected by the development of other sciences; and (2) chemistry related to the history of American social and economic institutions and practices. (JN)

  13. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  14. Environmental Chemistry Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackland, Thomas; And Others

    The authors of this curriculum supplement believe in a laboratory approach to chemistry and express the feeling that environmental chemistry provides the students an opportunity to apply theoretical chemistry to important practical problems. There are eighteen activities presented, each accompanied with behavioral objectives, one or more suggested…

  15. Analysis of temporal evolution of quantum dot surface chemistry by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, İlker; Gresback, Ryan; Nozaki, Tomohiro; van de Sanden, Mauritius C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal evolution of surface chemistry during oxidation of silicon quantum dot (Si-QD) surfaces were probed using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A monolayer of hydrogen and chlorine terminated plasma-synthesized Si-QDs were spin-coated on silver oxide thin films. A clearly enhanced signal of surface modes, including Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes were observed from as-synthesized Si-QDs as a result of the plasmonic enhancement of the Raman signal at Si-QD/silver oxide interface. Upon oxidation, a gradual decrease of Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes, and an emergence of Si-Ox and Si-O-Hx modes have been observed. In addition, first, second and third transverse optical modes of Si-QDs were also observed in the SERS spectra, revealing information on the crystalline morphology of Si-QDs. An absence of any of the abovementioned spectral features, but only the first transverse optical mode of Si-QDs from thick Si-QD films validated that the spectral features observed from Si-QDs on silver oxide thin films are originated from the SERS effect. These results indicate that real-time SERS is a powerful diagnostic tool and a novel approach to probe the dynamic surface/interface chemistry of quantum dots, especially when they involve in oxidative, catalytic, and electrochemical surface/interface reactions. PMID:27389331

  16. Analysis of temporal evolution of quantum dot surface chemistry by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ilker; Gresback, Ryan; Nozaki, Tomohiro; van de Sanden, Mauritius C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Temporal evolution of surface chemistry during oxidation of silicon quantum dot (Si-QD) surfaces were probed using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A monolayer of hydrogen and chlorine terminated plasma-synthesized Si-QDs were spin-coated on silver oxide thin films. A clearly enhanced signal of surface modes, including Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes were observed from as-synthesized Si-QDs as a result of the plasmonic enhancement of the Raman signal at Si-QD/silver oxide interface. Upon oxidation, a gradual decrease of Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes, and an emergence of Si-Ox and Si-O-Hx modes have been observed. In addition, first, second and third transverse optical modes of Si-QDs were also observed in the SERS spectra, revealing information on the crystalline morphology of Si-QDs. An absence of any of the abovementioned spectral features, but only the first transverse optical mode of Si-QDs from thick Si-QD films validated that the spectral features observed from Si-QDs on silver oxide thin films are originated from the SERS effect. These results indicate that real-time SERS is a powerful diagnostic tool and a novel approach to probe the dynamic surface/interface chemistry of quantum dots, especially when they involve in oxidative, catalytic, and electrochemical surface/interface reactions.

  17. ICP Etching of SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Grow, J.M.; Lambers, E.S.; Ostling, M.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Shul, R.J.; Wang, J.J.; Zetterling, C.-M.

    1999-02-04

    A number of different plasma chemistries, including NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/O{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}/Ar, ICl, IBr, Cl{sub 2}/Ar, BCl{sub 3}/Ar and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar, have been investigated for dry etching of 6H and 3C-SiC in a Inductively Coupled Plasma tool. Rates above 2,000 {angstrom} cm{sup {minus}1} are found with fluorine-based chemistries at high ion currents. Surprisingly, Cl{sub 2}-based etching does not provide high rates, even though the potential etch products (SiCi{sub 4} and CCl{sub 4}) are volatile. Photoresist masks have poor selectivity over SiC in F{sub 2}-based plasmas under normal conditions, and ITO or Ni are preferred.

  18. School Chemistry vs. Chemistry in Research: An Exploratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habraken, Clarisse L.; Buijs, Wim; Borkent, Hens; Ligeon, Willy; Wender, Harry; Meijer, Marijn

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study exploring why students are not studying chemistry. Three groups of graduating high school students and their chemistry teachers stayed at a research institute working on molecular modeling and wrote essays on school chemistry versus chemistry in research. Concludes that school chemistry does not convey today's chemistry in…

  19. American Association for Clinical Chemistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... indispensable patient care tool. Learn more IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY ddPCR Quantification of Lymphoma Mutations Researchers have developed ... Online Harmonization.net Commission on Accreditation in Clinical Chemistry American Board of Clinical Chemistry Clinical Chemistry Trainee ...

  20. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making chemistry studies more relevant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project’s general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the context of industrial chemistry in order to present chemistry as a relevant topic both to the students personally as well as to the society in which they live. The learning materials that were developed during this period were in alignment with the changes and reforms that were conducted in the Israeli educational system. These developments were accompanied with intensive and comprehensive professional development courses and workshops. In addition, several research and evaluation projects were conducted with the goal to assess students’ achievements and to probe into the students’ perceptions regarding the classroom learning environment and the teachers’ and students’ attitudes towards the various instructional and learning materials techniques that were implemented in the programme throughout these years. This paper is structured attempting to describe the curricular cycle in alignment with Goodlad’s and Van den Akker’s curriculum representations.

  1. Chemistry of soil solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Elprince, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students and researchers, this book serves as an introduction to the field of soil chemistry and associated fields such as aquatic chemistry, geochemistry, environmental chemistry, oceanography, and public health. The volume includes discussions on the structure of adsorbed water, adsorption of inorganics, solubility, redox, solute transport, chemical modeling, and sampling and monitoring the soil solution. Important papers on these topics together with editor's comments place each of the carefully chosen papers in the proper context. Because the chemistry of soil solutions requires the knowledge of many aspects of science, introductory information is provided for each topic to cover its history of development, present knowledge, and future prospects.

  2. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  3. Connecting Algebra and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Correlates high school chemistry curriculum with high school algebra curriculum and makes the case for an integrated approach to mathematics and science instruction. Focuses on process integration. (DDR)

  4. Stratospheric chemistry and transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael; Garcia, Maria M.

    1990-01-01

    A Chemical Tracer Model (CTM) that can use wind field data generated by the General Circulation Model (GCM) is developed to implement chemistry in the three dimensional GCM of the middle atmosphere. Initially, chemical tracers with simple first order losses such as N2O are used. Successive models are to incorporate more complex ozone chemistry.

  5. Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Fay, Michael; Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2013-01-01

    Forty chemistry faculty from American Chemical Society-approved departments were interviewed to determine their goals for undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Faculty were stratified by type of institution, departmental success with regard to National Science Foundation funding for laboratory reform, and level of laboratory course. Interview…

  6. Movies in Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekdag, Bulent; Le Marechal, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews numerous studies on chemistry movies. Movies, or moving pictures, are important elements of multimedia and signify a privileged or motivating means of presenting knowledge. Studies on chemistry movies show that the first movie productions in this field were devoted to university lectures or documentaries. Shorter movies were…

  7. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  8. Chemistry from Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Jan; Donaldson, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Describes the "Chemistry from Issues" project at Chelsea College. Provides the background information, rationale, and overall structure of a proposed course about the importance of chemistry to common culture. Outlines one module about the British steel industry that has been taught at King's College. (TW)

  9. Opportunities in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    Because of the changes occurring in the chemical sciences, a new survey of chemistry and its intellectual and economic impact was clearly needed. This report presents a current assessment of the status of chemistry and of the future opportunities in the field. This analysis contains: (1) an introductory chapter (establishing the need for the…

  10. Cooking with Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosser, Arthur E.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests chemistry of cooking and analysis of culinary recipes as subject matter for introducing chemistry to an audience, especially to individuals with neutral or negative attitudes toward science. Includes sample recipes and experiments and a table listing scientific topics with related cooking examples. (JN)

  11. High School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Preparation for college or life, working conditions and continuing education for high school chemistry teachers, and form/function of high school chemistry textbooks were addressed in presentations at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). Workshops, lectures, and demonstrations were also presented to…

  12. Process Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callis, James B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses process analytical chemistry as a discipline designed to supply quantitative and qualitative information about a chemical process. Encourages academic institutions to examine this field for employment opportunities for students. Describes the five areas of process analytical chemistry, including off-line, at-line, on-line, in-line, and…

  13. Career Options in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloli, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a credit/no credit course which focuses on career options in chemistry. The course (consisting of 15 one-hour seminar-type sessions) includes guest speakers for several sessions and an emphasis (in introductory sessions) on graduate school in chemistry, the chemical industry, resumes, and interviews. Also briefly describes an internship…

  14. Chemistry and Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigston, David L.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between chemisty and biology in the science curriculum. Points out the differences in perception of the disciplines, which the physical scientists favoring reductionism. Suggests that biology departments offer a special course for chemistry students, just as the chemistry departments have done for biology students.…

  15. Chemistry and Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, D. W.

    1970-01-01

    In the second article of a series, the author discusses some of the interactions between chemistry and philosophy. Evaluates chemistry's role within the scientific enterprise. Traces the rise and fall of the logical atom and argues for a new way of looking at science as an educational instrument. (RR)

  16. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  17. Chemistry of Moth Repellents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    An effective way to teach chemistry is to examine the substances used in daily life from a pedagogical viewpoint, from the overlap of science, technology, and society (STS). A study aims to engage students in the topic of moth repellents and to encourage them to investigate the chemistry in this familiar product using a set of questions.

  18. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  19. Disilane-based cyclic deposition/etch of Si, Si:P and Si1-yCy:P layers: II. The CDE features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J. M.; Benevent, V.; Barnes, J. P.; Veillerot, M.; Prévitali, B.; Batude, P.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed innovative cyclic deposition/etch (CDE) processes in order to grow Si, Si:P and Si1-yCy:P raised sources and drains (RSDs) on patterned wafers. A Si2H6 + PH3 + SiCH6 chemistry was used for the 550 °C growth steps. Meanwhile, the selective etch of poly-crystalline layers on dielectrics was conducted at 600 °C with HCl + GeH4. We have first studied the specifics of those isobaric (P = 20 Torr) CDE processes on bulk, blanket Si(0 0 1) substrates. CDE-grown Si, Si:P and Si1-yCy(:P) layers were high crystalline quality and smooth, although these also contained 2-3% of Ge. Due to the preferential incorporation of P atoms in the lattice, the ‘apparent’ substitutional C content was higher for intrinsic than for in situ phosphorous-doped layers (1.29% versus 1.17% and 1.59% versus 1.47% for the two SiCH6 mass-flows probed). The atomic P concentration in our Si1-yCy:P layers was close to 2.6 × 1020 cm-3, versus 2.1 × 1020 cm-3 in the Si:P layers. The Si, Si:P and Si1-yCy(:P) thickness deposited in each CDE cycle decreased linearly as the HCl+GeH4 etch time increased, with the ‘equivalent’ etch rate (i.e. the slope of this linear decrease) being lower in intrinsic than in in situ doped layers. Higher C contents resulted in lower ‘equivalent’ etch rates. A CDE strategy suppressed the surface roughening occurring for high C content, several tens of nm thick Si1-yCy:P layers grown in one step only. We have then calibrated, for 19-23 nm thick CDE-grown Si, Si:P and Si1-yCy:P RSDs, the HCl + GeH4 etch time per step necessary to achieve full selectivity on patterned silicon-on-insulator substrates. Selectivity was obtained for intrinsic Si once 180 s etch steps were used. Longer etch times were needed for Si:P and especially Si1-yCy:P (270 and 315 s/CDE cycle, respectively). The resulting S/D areas were rather smooth and slightly facetted, but the un-protected poly-Si layers sitting on top of the gate stacks were completely removed with these etch

  20. A novel crystalline SiCO compound.

    PubMed

    Marqués, Miriam; Morales-García, Angel; Menéndez, José Manuel; Baonza, Valentín G; Recio, José Manuel

    2015-10-14

    Ab initio evolutionary structural searches have been performed on SixCyO2(x+y) compounds. A novel structure, with SiC2O6 stoichiometry and the P21/c space group is calculated to be stable against decomposition within a wide pressure window from 7.2 to 41 GPa, and metastable under ambient conditions. It consists of CO3 units, linked to SiO6 octahedra, supporting previous experimental studies. The evolution of the carbon environment towards tetrahedral CO4 units, thus resembling the crystal chemistry of silicon, is predicted at higher pressures. PMID:26345349

  1. Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    High school teachers are often challenged to motivate students who have little or no interest in a subject and are bored with traditional instruction. This unique book is designed to help educators make chemistry classes more interesting and links art curriculum to practical applications, integrating the two subjects through scores of hands-on…

  2. EVOLVING FROM GREEN CHEMISTRY TO SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The twelve principles of green chemistry provide a foundation and pathway which allows researchers to incorporate greenness into existing reactions or when developing new technologies. Research from our laboratory has adopted many of these principles and utlizes them as a major c...

  3. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  4. Expanding the Repertoire of Molecular Linkages to Silicon: Si-S, Si-Se, and Si-Te Bonds.

    PubMed

    Hu, Minjia; Liu, Fenglin; Buriak, Jillian M

    2016-05-01

    Silicon is the foundation of the electronics industry and is now the basis for a myriad of new hybrid electronics applications, including sensing, silicon nanoparticle-based imaging and light emission, photonics, and applications in solar fuels, among others. From interfacing of biological materials to molecular electronics, the nature of the chemical bond plays important roles in electrical transport and can have profound effects on the electronics of the underlying silicon itself, affecting its work function, among other things. This work describes the chemistry to produce ≡Si-E bonds (E = S, Se, and Te) through very fast microwave heating (10-15 s) and direct thermal heating (hot plate, 2 min) through the reaction of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces with dialkyl or diaryl dichalcogenides. The chemistry produces surface-bound ≡Si-SR, ≡Si-SeR, and ≡Si-TeR groups. Although the interfacing of molecules through ≡Si-SR and ≡Si-SeR bonds is known, to the best of our knowledge, the heavier chalcogenide variant, ≡Si-TeR, has not been described previously. The identity of the surface groups was determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and depth profiling with time-of-flight-secondary ionization mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Possible mechanisms are outlined, and the most likely, based upon parallels with well-established molecular literature, involve surface silyl radicals or dangling bonds that react with either the alkyl or aryl dichalcogenide directly, REER, or its homolysis product, the alkyl or aryl chalcogenyl radical, RE· (where E = S, Se, and Te). PMID:27055056

  5. Teaching Nature of Scientific Inquiry in Chemistry: How do German chemistry teachers use labwork to teach NOSI?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strippel, C. G.; Sommer, K.

    2015-12-01

    Learning about scientific inquiry (SI) is an important aspect of scientific literacy and there is a solid international consensus of what should be learned about it. Learning about SI comprises both the doing of science (process) and knowledge about the nature of scientific inquiry (NOSI). German reform documents promote inquiry generally but do not equally address these two sides of inquiry. This study explores how teachers incorporate learning about SI into laboratory work in the Chemistry classroom. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 secondary school Chemistry teachers (8 of them holding a Ph.D. in Chemistry) from Germany. The results indicate that teaching NOSI is not a primary goal for teachers. Still, some aspects of NOSI seem to be more easily incorporated in the Chemistry classroom, for example, critical testing and hypothesis and prediction. Teachers state 2 main criteria to identify suitable chemical laboratory work for teaching NOSI: adaptable parameters and low level of required content knowledge. Surprisingly, differences can be found between Ph.D. and non-Ph.D. teachers' views on teaching inquiry. The findings of this study can be used to (a) select opportunities for targeted research on teaching NOSI in the Chemistry classroom, (b) inform curriculum material development and (c) give impetus to science teacher education and professional development.

  6. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  7. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  8. Environmental chemistry. 5th edition

    SciTech Connect

    Manahan, S.E. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    This book is organized around several major sections: aquatic Chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, the geosphere and hazardous wastes, toxicological chemistry, and resources and energy. Specific topics discussed in the book include a general introduction to environment chemistry, basic principles of aquatic chemistry, water pollution and water treatment, the essential role of microorganisms in aquatic chemical phenomena, atmospheric chemistry, a discussion of major threats to the global atmosphere (particularly greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting chemicals), the geosphere and hazardous substances, soil chemistry, and the nature and sources of hazardous wastes. The environmental chemistry of hazardous wastes, their treatment, minimization, and recycling, and the effects of these hazardous substances in also presented.

  9. Seawater Chemistry Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-23

    SeaChem Seawater Chemistry package provides routines to calculate pH, carbonate chemistry, density, and other quantities for seawater, based on the latest community standards. The chemistry is adapted from fortran routines provided by the OCMIP3/NOCES project, details of which are available at http://www.ipsl.jussieu.fr/OCMIP/. The SeaChem package can generate Fortran subroutines as well as Python wrappers for those routines. Thus the same code can be used by Python or Fortran analysis packages and Fortran ocean models alike.

  10. Computational quantum chemistry website

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-22

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

  11. Frontiers in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, I.

    1988-12-15

    Doing more with less was the modus operandi of R. Buckminster Fuller, the late science genius, and inventor of such things as the geodesic dome. In late September, chemists described their own version of this maxim--learning more chemistry from less material and in less time--in a symposium titled Frontiers in Analytical Chemistry at the 196th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Symposium organizer Allen J. Bard of the University of Texas at Austin assembled six speakers, himself among them, to survey pretty widely different areas of analytical chemistry.

  12. Atomic state and characterization of nitrogen at the SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Garfunkel, E. L.; Zhu, X.; Lee, H. D.; Xu, C.; Shubeita, S. M.; Gustafsson, T.; Ahyi, A. C.; Sharma, Y.; Williams, J. R.; Lu, W.; Ceesay, S.; Tuttle, B. R.; Pantelides, S. T.; Wan, A.; Feldman, L. C.

    2014-01-21

    We report on the concentration, chemical bonding, and etching behavior of N at the SiC(0001)/SiO{sub 2} interface using photoemission, ion scattering, and computational modeling. For standard NO processing of a SiC MOSFET, a sub-monolayer of nitrogen is found in a thin inter-layer between the substrate and the gate oxide (SiO{sub 2}). Photoemission shows one main nitrogen related core-level peak with two broad, higher energy satellites. Comparison to theory indicates that the main peak is assigned to nitrogen bound with three silicon neighbors, with second nearest neighbors including carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms. Surprisingly, N remains at the surface after the oxide was completely etched by a buffered HF solution. This is in striking contrast to the behavior of Si(100) undergoing the same etching process. We conclude that N is bound directly to the substrate SiC, or incorporated within the first layers of SiC, as opposed to bonding within the oxide network. These observations provide insights into the chemistry and function of N as an interface passivating additive in SiC MOSFETs.

  13. The Basic SI Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Maureen; Jacobs, Glen; Gilbert, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the SI model is provided, including the SI philosophy, essential components of the program, program structures, key roles, outcomes, and evaluation. A review of what we have learned about the importance of planning SI sessions, providing ongoing training for leaders, conducting regular SI program assessments, and implementing…

  14. Environmental Bioinorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochiai, Ei-Ichiro

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important aspects of bioinorganic chemistry, including interactions of organisms with metallic and nonmetallic elements and compounds. Indicates that many environmental problems are created by human exploitation of nature and technologies if studied from a bioinorganic chemical viewpoint. (CC)

  15. Chemistry for Nonscientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Thomas A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the case of DDT which can be introduced to nonscience students in a chemistry course, including the development of DDT, problems associated with its adverse effects, and curtailment of its use in our environments. (CC)

  16. Chemistry with a Peel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; Larsen, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce natural product chemistry into high school classrooms. In the laboratory activities, students isolate and analyze the oil in orange peels. Students also perform a steam distillation and learn about terpenes. (DDR)

  17. Chemistry Laboratory Safety Check

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patnoe, Richard L.

    1976-01-01

    An accident prevention/safety check list for chemistry laboratories is printed. Included are checks of equipment, facilities, storage and handling of chemicals, laboratory procedures, instruction procedures, and items to be excluded from chemical laboratories. (SL)

  18. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  19. Chemistry and Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labianca, Dominick A.; Reeves, William J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary program consisting of two courses. The first course deals with the chemistry of drugs and poisons; the second course focuses on fictional works in which these drugs and poisons are central to the plots. (SK)

  20. Magnetism in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, R. W.; McFadyen, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the technical aspects of paramagnetism and an electrostatic model called Crystal Field Theory (CFT), very often used in the case of transition metal compounds. Suggests that this discussion be included as an option for college chemistry courses. (MLH)

  1. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  2. Information-Mapped Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olympia, P. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the use of information mapping in chemistry and in other related sciences. Information mapping is a way of presenting information without paragraphs and unnecessary transitional phrases. (BB)

  3. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  4. Let's Stress Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Michael J.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Two descriptive chemistry experiments are presented which foster development of students' skills in making observations and deductions. In addition, the experiments are designed to stress the importance of chemical behavior and clear presentation of experimental findings. (JN)

  5. Microcomputers in Teaching Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Ray

    1981-01-01

    Describes the development, content, and implementation of a two-credit graduate course for teachers at the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point in the use of microcomputers for teaching high school chemistry. (JJD)

  6. Water Chemistry: Seeking Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of the available literature in water chemistry is presented. Materials surveyed include: texts, reference books, bibliographic resources, journals, American Chemical Society publications, proceedings, unpublished articles, and reports. (BT)

  7. Impact of surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized. PMID:20880833

  8. Acid-base chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, C.W.; Blewit, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    The book is not a research compendium and there are no references to the literature. It is a teaching text covering the entire range of undergraduate subject matter dealing with acid-base chemistry (some of it remotely) as taught in inorganic, analytical, and organic chemistry courses. The excellent chapters VII through IX deal in detail with the quantitative aspects of aqueous acid-base equilibria (salt hydrolysis and buffer, titrations, polyprotic and amphoteric substances).

  9. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  10. Chemistry of Covalent Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Waller, Peter J; Gándara, Felipe; Yaghi, Omar M

    2015-12-15

    Linking organic molecules by covalent bonds into extended solids typically generates amorphous, disordered materials. The ability to develop strategies for obtaining crystals of such solids is of interest because it opens the way for precise control of the geometry and functionality of the extended structure, and the stereochemical orientation of its constituents. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are a new class of porous covalent organic structures whose backbone is composed entirely of light elements (B, C, N, O, Si) that represent a successful demonstration of how crystalline materials of covalent solids can be achieved. COFs are made by combination of organic building units covalently linked into extended structures to make crystalline materials. The attainment of crystals is done by several techniques in which a balance is struck between the thermodynamic reversibility of the linking reactions and their kinetics. This success has led to the expansion of COF materials to include organic units linked by these strong covalent bonds: B-O, C-N, B-N, and B-O-Si. Since the organic constituents of COFs, when linked, do not undergo significant change in their overall geometry, it has been possible to predict the structures of the resulting COFs, and this advantage has facilitated their characterization using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) techniques. It has also allowed for the synthesis of COF structures by design and for their formation with the desired composition, pore size, and aperture. In practice, the modeled PXRD pattern for a given expected COF is compared with the experimental one, and depending on the quality of the match, this is used as a starting point for solving and then refining the crystal structure of the target COF. These characteristics make COFs an attractive class of new porous materials. Accordingly, they have been used as gas storage materials for energy applications, solid supports for catalysis, and optoelectronic devices. A large and

  11. Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P; Bunting, Bruce G

    2006-09-01

    The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its

  12. Technetium Chemistry in HLW

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Xia Yuanxian

    2005-06-06

    Tc contamination is found within the DOE complex at those sites whose mission involved extraction of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel or isotopic enrichment of uranium. At the Hanford Site, chemical separations and extraction processes generated large amounts of high level and transuranic wastes that are currently stored in underground tanks. The waste from these extraction processes is currently stored in underground High Level Waste (HLW) tanks. However, the chemistry of the HLW in any given tank is greatly complicated by repeated efforts to reduce volume and recover isotopes. These processes ultimately resulted in mixing of waste streams from different processes. As a result, the chemistry and the fate of Tc in HLW tanks are not well understood. This lack of understanding has been made evident in the failed efforts to leach Tc from sludge and to remove Tc from supernatants prior to immobilization. Although recent interest in Tc chemistry has shifted from pretreatment chemistry to waste residuals, both needs are served by a fundamental understanding of Tc chemistry.

  13. Chemistry beyond positivism.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Werner W

    2003-05-01

    Chemistry is often thought to be quite factual, and therefore might be considered close to the "positivist" ideal of a value-free science. A closer look, however, reveals that the field is coupled to the invisible realm of values, meanings, and purpose in various ways, and chemists interact with that realm loosely and unevenly. Tacit knowledge is one important locus of such interactions. We are concerned in this essay with two questions. What is the nature of the knowledge when we are in the early stages of discovery? and In what ways does the hidden reality we are seeking affect our search for an understanding of it? The first question is partly answered by Polanyi's theory of tacit knowledge, while the second one leads us to realize the limitations of our language when discussing "reality"-or certain chemical experimental results. A strictly positivist approach is of little use, but so is the opposite, the complete disregard of facts. The contrast between positivism and non-formulable aspects of scientific reasoning amounts to a paradox that needs to be analyzed and can lead to a "connected" chemistry. This in turn resembles networks described by Schweber and is more concerned than the chemistry "as it is" with aspects such as the image of chemistry, the challenges chemists face as citizens, and chemistry in liberal education. PMID:12796119

  14. Collaborative Physical Chemistry Projects Involving Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisnant, David M.; Howe, Jerry J.; Lever, Lisa S.

    2000-02-01

    The physical chemistry classes from three colleges have collaborated on two computational chemistry projects using Quantum CAChe 3.0 and Gaussian 94W running on Pentium II PCs. Online communication by email and the World Wide Web was an important part of the collaboration. In the first project, students used molecular modeling to predict benzene derivatives that might be possible hair dyes. They used PM3 and ZINDO calculations to predict the electronic spectra of the molecules and tested the predicted spectra by comparing some with experimental measurements. They also did literature searches for real hair dyes and possible health effects. In the final phase of the project they proposed a synthetic pathway for one compound. In the second project the students were asked to predict which isomer of a small carbon cluster (C3, C4, or C5) was responsible for a series of IR lines observed in the spectrum of a carbon star. After preliminary PM3 calculations, they used ab initio calculations at the HF/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d) level to model the molecules and predict their vibrational frequencies and rotational constants. A comparison of the predictions with the experimental spectra suggested that the linear isomer of the C5 molecule was responsible for the lines.

  15. Variations in the Delivery of SI to the Oceans from the Continents: Implications of a Dynamic Terrestrial SI Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, P.; Conley, D. J.; Clymans, W.; Fontorbe, G.; De La Rocha, C. L.

    2014-12-01

    A common assumption is that the modern day continental Si cycle is at steady-state. However, a new paradigm is emerging regarding the terrestrial biogeochemical Si cycle and its importance. We now know that the terrestrial Si cycle is strongly biologically mediated, which creates and recycles a pool of reactive Si in soils and sediments that ultimately buffers the export of dissolved silicate (DSi) to the oceans. Our recent results show that imbalances in the continental Si pool on millennial scales may have caused systematic mis-estimation of silicate weathering rates, particularly when using river chemistry at large spatial scales to calculate weathering rates. Quantifying this imbalance is essential to understand ocean-terrestrial biogeochemical interactions. On short (human) timescales large-scale changes in land cover, erosion and eutrophication have significantly altered the fluvial flux of Si. Likewise, periods of glacial-interglacial transitions produce new weathering products from the continents with subsequent impacts on oceanic DSi. Over still longer timescales significant changes in fluvial Si fluxes have probably occurred with large-scale changes in chemical weathering due to orogeny, climate change, the emplacement of large igneous provinces, or changes in volcanic activity. We will discuss the timescale dependency of processes and the assumption of steady state. In addition, we will examine how a changing terrestrial Si cycle impacts the ocean Si cycle. Finally, we will address unresolved questions regarding the delivery of Si to the oceans from the continents.

  16. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  17. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-01

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes. PMID:26035690

  18. Atmospheric chemistry research

    SciTech Connect

    Saylor, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Global environmental changes are occurring all around us, and the energy industry is a major player in the changes that are taking place. Wise energy policy can only be generated from a position of informed enlightenment and understanding about the environmental consequences of energy production and utilization. The atmospheric chemistry research being conducted at the University of Kentucky's Center for Applied Energy Research is geared toward providing the knowledge necessary to allow industrial and legislative officials to make responsible energy decisions in the 1990's and beyond. Three programs are described: the Kentucky Acid Deposition Program Precipitation chemistry network; modeling of regional and urban photochemistry and acid deposition; and modeling of global tropospheric chemistry.

  19. Digital biology and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Witters, Daan; Sun, Bing; Begolo, Stefano; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Robles, Whitney; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2014-09-01

    This account examines developments in "digital" biology and chemistry within the context of microfluidics, from a personal perspective. Using microfluidics as a frame of reference, we identify two areas of research within digital biology and chemistry that are of special interest: (i) the study of systems that switch between discrete states in response to changes in chemical concentration of signals, and (ii) the study of single biological entities such as molecules or cells. In particular, microfluidics accelerates analysis of switching systems (i.e., those that exhibit a sharp change in output over a narrow range of input) by enabling monitoring of multiple reactions in parallel over a range of concentrations of signals. Conversely, such switching systems can be used to create new kinds of microfluidic detection systems that provide "analog-to-digital" signal conversion and logic. Microfluidic compartmentalization technologies for studying and isolating single entities can be used to reconstruct and understand cellular processes, study interactions between single biological entities, and examine the intrinsic heterogeneity of populations of molecules, cells, or organisms. Furthermore, compartmentalization of single cells or molecules in "digital" microfluidic experiments can induce switching in a range of reaction systems to enable sensitive detection of cells or biomolecules, such as with digital ELISA or digital PCR. This "digitizing" offers advantages in terms of robustness, assay design, and simplicity because quantitative information can be obtained with qualitative measurements. While digital formats have been shown to improve the robustness of existing chemistries, we anticipate that in the future they will enable new chemistries to be used for quantitative measurements, and that digital biology and chemistry will continue to provide further opportunities for measuring biomolecules, understanding natural systems more deeply, and advancing molecular and

  20. Revitalizing chemistry laboratory instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Phil Blake

    This dissertation involves research in three major domains of chemical education as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. program in chemistry at Miami University with a major emphasis on chemical education, and concurrent study in organic chemistry. Unit I, Development and Assessment of a Column Chromatography Laboratory Activity, addresses the domain of Instructional Materials Development and Testing. This unit outlines the process of developing a publishable laboratory activity, testing and revising that activity, and subsequently sharing that activity with the chemical education community. A laboratory activity focusing on the separation of methylene blue and sodium fluorescein was developed to demonstrate the effects of both the stationary and mobile phase in conducting a separation. Unit II, Bringing Industry to the Laboratory, addresses the domain of Curriculum Development and Testing. This unit outlines the development of the Chemistry of Copper Mining module, which is intended for use in high school or undergraduate college chemistry. The module uses the learning cycle approach to present the chemistry of the industrial processes of mining copper to the students. The module includes thirteen investigations (three of which are web-based and ten which are laboratory experiments) and an accompanying interactive CD-ROM, which provides an explanation of the chemistry used in copper mining with a virtual tour of an operational copper mine. Unit III, An Alternative Method of Teaching Chemistry. Integrating Lecture and the Laboratory, is a project that addresses the domain of Research in Student Learning. Fundamental Chemistry was taught at Eastern Arizona College as an integrated lecture/laboratory course that met in two-hour blocks on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The students taking this integrated course were compared with students taking the traditional 1-hour lectures held on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, with accompanying 3-hour lab on

  1. Chemistry of Transactinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratz, J. V.

    In this chapter, the chemical properties of the man-made transactinide elements rutherfordium, Rf (element 104), dubnium, Db (element 105), seaborgium, Sg (element 106), bohrium, Bh (element 107), hassium, Hs (element 108), and copernicium, Cn (element 112) are reviewed, and prospects for chemical characterizations of even heavier elements are discussed. The experimental methods to perform rapid chemical separations on the time scale of seconds are presented and comments are given on the special situation with the transactinides where chemistry has to be studied with single atoms. It follows a description of theoretical predictions and selected experimental results on the chemistry of elements 104 through 108, and element 112.

  2. Chemistry WebBook

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 69 NIST Chemistry WebBook (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemistry WebBook contains: Thermochemical data for over 7000 organic and small inorganic compounds; thermochemistry data for over 8000 reactions; IR spectra for over 16,000 compounds; mass spectra for over 33,000 compounds; UV/Vis spectra for over 1600 compounds; electronic and vibrational spectra for over 5000 compounds; constants of diatomic molecules(spectroscopic data) for over 600 compounds; ion energetics data for over 16,000 compounds; thermophysical property data for 74 fluids.

  3. Chemistry in Second Life

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Andrew SID; Bradley, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    This review will focus on the current level on chemistry research, education, and visualization possible within the multi-user virtual environment of Second Life. We discuss how Second Life has been used as a platform for the interactive and collaborative visualization of data from molecules and proteins to spectra and experimental data. We then review how these visualizations can be scripted for immersive educational activities and real-life collaborative research. We also discuss the benefits of the social networking affordances of Second Life for both chemists and chemistry students. PMID:19852781

  4. Nanophotonics and supramolecular chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hill, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has become a key area in emerging bottom-up nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, supramolecular systems that can produce a photonic output are increasingly important research targets and present various possibilities for practical applications. Accordingly, photonic properties of various supramolecular systems at the nanoscale are important in current nanotechnology. In this short review, nanophotonics in supramolecular chemistry will be briefly summarized by introducing recent examples of control of photonic responses of supramolecular systems. Topics are categorized according to the fundamental actions of their supramolecular systems: (i) self-assembly; (ii) recognition; (iii) manipulation.

  5. Chemistry in cometary comae.

    PubMed

    Irvine, W M; Dickens, J E; Lovell, A J; Schloerb, F P; Senay, M; Bergin, E A; Jewitt, D; Matthews, H E

    1998-01-01

    Significant gas-phase chemistry occurs in the comae of bright comets, as is demonstrated here for the case of Comet Hale-Bopp. The abundance ratio of the two isomers, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide, is shown to vary with heliocentric distance in a way that is consistent with production of HNC by ion-molecule chemistry initiated by the photoionization of water. Likewise, the first maps of emission from HCO+ show an abundance and an extended distribution that are consistent with the same chemical model. PMID:9809016

  6. Computational Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, So; Fan, Peng-Dong; Head-Gordon, Martin; Kamiya, Muneaki; Keçeli, Murat; Lee, Timothy J.; Shiozaki, Toru; Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin; Valeev, Edward F.; Yagi, Kiyoshi

    Computational applications of electronic and vibrational many-body theories are increasingly indispensable in interpreting and, in some instances, predicting the spectra of gas-phase molecular species of importance in interstellar chemistry as well as in atmospheric and combustion chemistry. This chapter briefly reviews our methodological developments of electronic and vibrational many-body theories that are particularly useful for these gas-phase molecular problems. Their applications to anharmonic vibrational frequencies of triatomic and tetratomic interstellar molecules and to electronic absorption spectra of the radical ions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, are also discussed.

  7. Chemistry in cometary comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Dickens, J. E.; Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Senay, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Jewitt, D.; Matthews, H. E.

    1998-01-01

    Significant gas-phase chemistry occurs in the comae of bright comets, as is demonstrated here for the case of Comet Hale-Bopp. The abundance ratio of the two isomers, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide, is shown to vary with heliocentric distance in a way that is consistent with production of HNC by ion-molecule chemistry initiated by the photoionization of water. Likewise, the first maps of emission from HCO+ show an abundance and an extended distribution that are consistent with the same chemical model.

  8. Variance in water chemistry parameters in isolated wetlands of Florida, USA, and relationships with macroinvertebrate and diatom community structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eighty small isolated wetlands throughout Florida were sampled in 2005 to explore within-site variability of water chemistry parameters and relate water chemistry to macroinvertebrate and diatom community structure. Three samples or measures of water were collected within each si...

  9. The Chemistry of Fragrances: A Group Exercise for Chemistry Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duprey, Roger; Sell, Charles S.; Lowe, Nigel D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents Fragrance Structured Learning Packages (SLPs), group activities designed to help students recognize the value of applying chemistry in a real-world setting. Developed by the Department of Chemistry at the University of York. (Author/KHR)

  10. Chemistry Cook-Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    For this activity, high school chemistry students compete in a cooking contest. They must determine the chemical and physical changes that occur in the food they prepare, present their recipe as a step-by-step procedure similar to a lab procedure, identify chemicals in the food, and present all measurements in both metric and English units. The…

  11. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry and Material Development Group maintains a capability in chemical analysis, materials R&D failure analysis and contamination control. The uniquely qualified staff and facility support the needs of flight projects, science instrument development and various technical tasks, as well as Cal Tech.

  12. Green chemistry metrics

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synthetic chemists have always had an objective to achieve reliable and high-yielding routes to the syntheses of targeted molecules. The importance of minimal waste generation has emphasized the use of green chemistry principles and sustainable development. These directions lead ...

  13. Chemistry on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mounts, Richard D.

    1996-01-01

    Gives an overview of the World Wide Web, describes what is required to access it, and highlights some of the features of interest to chemists such as Web-based chemical databases that feature user-interactive molecular structures and chemical movies. Lists Internet chemistry resources designed for Web browsers and locations for obtaining Web…

  14. Metaphorical Models in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart; Bhusan, Nalini

    1995-01-01

    What happens when students of chemistry fail to recognize the metaphorical status of certain models and interpret them literally? Suggests that such failures lead students to form perceptions of phenomena that can be misleading. Argues that the key to making good use of metaphorical models is a recognition of their metaphorical status. Examines…

  15. Evaluating Environmental Chemistry Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Ronald A.

    2001-01-01

    A director of the Indiana University Center for Environmental Science Research reviews textbooks on environmental chemistry. Highlights clear writing, intellectual depth, presence of problem sets covering both the qualitative and quantitative aspects of the material, and full coverage of the topics of concern. Discusses the director's own approach…

  16. The Lens of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalos, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry possesses a distinctive theoretical lens--a distinctive set of theoretical concerns regarding the dynamics and transformations of a perplexing variety of organic and nonorganic substances--to which it must be faithful. Even if it is true that chemical facts bear a special (reductive) relationship to physical facts, nonetheless it will…

  17. Epoxying Isoprene Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    It seems that every few months we read about another missing aspect of atmospheric chemistry: missing products, missing reactivity, missing sources, missing understanding. Thus, it is with some relief that we read in this issue the paper of Paulot et al. The paper provides more...

  18. Chemistry of Meridiani Outcrops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Yen, A.; Gellert, R.; Knoll, A.H.; Arvidson, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    The chemistry and mineralogy of the sulfate-rich sandstone outcrops at Meridiani Planum, Mars, have been inferred from data obtained by the Opportunity rover of the MER mission and reported in recent publications [1-6]. Here, we provide an update on more recent samples and results derived from this extensive data set.

  19. Array processors in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ostlund, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The field of attached scientific processors (''array processors'') is surveyed, and an attempt is made to indicate their present and possible future use in computational chemistry. The current commercial products from Floating Point Systems, Inc., Datawest Corporation, and CSP, Inc. are discussed.

  20. Water Chemistry Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, David; And Others

    This manual of laboratory experiments in water chemistry serves a dual function of illustrating fundamental chemical principles of dilute aqueous systems and of providing the student with some familiarity with the chemical measurements commonly used in water and wastewater analysis. Experiments are grouped in categories on the basis of similar…

  1. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Thomas; Semenov, Dmitry

    2013-12-01

    This comprehensive review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of gas, solids and molecular ices in protoplanetary disks. Key findings related to disk physics and chemistry, both observationally and theoretically, are highlighted. We discuss which molecular probes are used to derive gas temperature, density, ionization state, kinematics, deuterium fractionation, and study organic matter in protoplanetary disks.

  2. Chemistry in the Troposphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chameides, William L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1982-01-01

    Topics addressed in this review of chemistry in the troposphere (layer of atmosphere extending from earth's surface to altitude of 10-16km) include: solar radiation/winds; earth/atmosphere interface; kinetic studies of atmospheric reactions; tropospheric free-radical photochemistry; instruments for nitric oxide detection; sampling…

  3. Online Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janowicz, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of the many facets of an entirely online organic chemistry course. Online homework with structure-drawing capabilities was found to be more effective than written homework. Online lecture was found to be just as effective as in-person lecture, and students prefer an online lecture format with shorter Webcasts. Online…

  4. Chemistry in a Nutshell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupnow, John; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity that involves making peanut butter in the laboratory as a way to teach students the chemistry concepts of emulsification, solubility, and formulation. Enables students to realize that they can actually create or modify the physical and sensory characteristics of peanut butter and taste the differences in their work. (JRH)

  5. SMIP Chemistry Curriculum Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes Coll., Wilkes-Barre, PA.

    Included are most guides for a one-year course in senior high school chemistry. The guides may be interchanged at the teacher's discretion, following any text sequence or course outline. Each guide consists of six sections: (1) an approach, which briefly discusses the unit in terms of background material, pitfalls to be avoided, and suggested…

  6. Microscale Gas Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Bruce; Anderson, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The development of syringes having free movement while remaining gas-tight enabled methods in chemistry to be changed. Successfully containing and measuring volumes of gas without the need to trap them using liquids made it possible to work with smaller quantities. The invention of the LuerLok syringe cap also allowed the gas to be stored for a…

  7. Chemistry and Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittoria Barbarulo, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Chemistry is the central science, as it touches every aspect of the society we live in and it is intertwined with many aspects of our culture; in particular, the strong link between Chemistry and Archaeology and Art History is being explored, offering a penetrating insight into an area of growing interest from an educational point of view. A series of vital and vibrant examples (i.e., ancient bronzes composition, colour changes due to natural pigment decomposition, marble degradation) has been proposed, on one hand, to improve student understanding of the relationship between cultural and scientific issues arising from the examination, the conservation, and the maintenance of cultural Heritage, on the other, to illustrate the role of the underlying Chemistry. In some case studies, a survey of the most relevant atmospheric factors, which are involved in the deterioration mechanisms, has also been presented to the students. First-hand laboratory experiences have been providing an invaluable means of discovering the full and varied world of Chemistry. Furthermore, the promotion of an interdisciplinary investigation of a famous painting or fresco, involving the study of its nature and significance, the definition of its historical context, any related literature, the chemical knowledge of the materials used, may be an excellent occasion to experiment the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). The aim of this approach is to convey the important message that everyone has the responsibility to care for and preserve Heritage for the benefit of present and future generations.

  8. Chemistry between the stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    A unit is presented for the secondary school teacher of physics, chemistry, astronomy, or earth sciences. Included are a list of reference materials, teaching aids, and projects. Discussion questions and a glossary are also provided. Concepts developed are: the nature of interstellar space, spectroscopy, molecular signals from space and interstellar molecules and other areas of astronomy.

  9. Chemistry Between The Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammon, Richard H.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics are covered: the physical conditions in interstellar space in comparison with those of the earth, particularly in regard to gas density,…

  10. The Chemistry of Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Do people realize that chemistry plays a key role in helping solve some of the most serious problems facing the world today? Chemists want to find the building blocks of the chemical universe--the molecules that form materials, living cells and whole organisms. Many chemists are medical explorers looking for new ways to maintain and improve…

  11. Greener and Sustainable Chemistry

    EPA Science Inventory

    The special issue on Greener and Sustainable Chemistry highlights various strategies that can be adopted to address the pollution preventive measures promoting the use of energy efficient reactions that utilize benign and bio-renewable raw materials in a relatively safer reaction...

  12. The Chemistry of Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet, geared toward an advanced high school or early college-level audience, describes how basic chemistry and biochemistry research can spur a better understanding of human health. It reveals how networks of chemical reactions keep our bodies running smoothly. Some of the tools and technologies used to explore these reactions are…

  13. Get Cooking with Chemistry!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This book presents science activities investigating the chemical changes and reactions with powders that are used in baking. Activities include: (1) Mystery Powders; (2) Find the Fizz: Discover the Secret of Baking Powder; and (3) A Feast for Yeast and Cheese: Behold the Power of Chemistry. (YDS)

  14. Getting Reactions to Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.

    1983-01-01

    "COMETS on Careers" describes science-related careers, introduces activities illustrating a science concept being studied, and encourages use of professional persons as activity leaders. Several COMETS chemistry activities are described. These activities, which can be performed in school or at home, focus on colloids, acid/base indicators, and…

  15. The Pimlico Chemistry Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Describes a chemistry "trail" (similar to a nature trail) which focuses on chemical phenomena in the environment. The trail includes 20 stops in and around a local school. Types of phenomena examined include building materials, air pollution, corrosion of metals, swimming pools, and others. Additional activities are also suggested. (DH)

  16. General Chemistry, 1970 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Orson W.; Franke, Douglas C.

    This publication is a syllabus for a senior high school chemistry course designed for the average ability, nonscience major. The content of the syllabus is divided into three basic core areas: Area I: Similarities and Dissimilarities of Matter (9 weeks); Area II: Preparation and Separation of Substances (10 weeks); Area III: Structure and…

  17. Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy has awarded the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA) "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy". Zewail's work has taken the study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions to the ultimate degree of detail - the time scale of bond making and bond breaking.

  18. The Language of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Meinwald, Jerrold

    2002-01-01

    Describes a new curriculum called The Language of Chemistry designed to illustrate how problems of biological and/or medical importance can be understood on a molecular basis and to show that the logic, knowledge, and language needed are easily accessible. Among the case studies in the curriculum are the giant peacock moth, bacterial chemotaxis,…

  19. Connected Chemistry--Incorporating Interactive Simulations into the Chemistry Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Wilensky, Uri

    2003-01-01

    Describes a novel modeling and simulation package and assesses its impact on students' understanding of chemistry. Connected Chemistry was implemented inside the NetLogo modeling environment. Using Connected Chemistry, students employed problem -solving techniques characterized by stronger attempts at conceptual understanding and logical…

  20. Is Chemistry Attractive for Pupils? Czech Pupils' Perception of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiatko, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is an important subject due to understanding the composition and structure of the things around us. The main aim of the study was to find out the perception of chemistry by lower secondary school pupils. The partial aims were to find out the influence of gender, year of study and favorite subject on the perception of chemistry. The…

  1. Emphasizing Mineral Chemistry in an Analytical Chemistry Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an analytical chemistry unit in the second year of the chemistry degree course at Curtin University that was designed to reflect the numerous employment opportunities for chemistry graduates in the mineral processing industries and private analytical laboratories. Presents the lecture syllabus, the laboratory course description, and…

  2. Turkish Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Beliefs about Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boz, Yezdan; Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the beliefs of Turkish prospective chemistry teachers about teaching chemistry, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 prospective teachers. Analysis of the interviews revealed that most of the prospective teachers held intermediate (transition between constructivist and traditional) beliefs about chemistry teaching.…

  3. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 1: Review of General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet is one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland. It provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire…

  4. Chemistry: Experiments, Demonstrations and Other Activities Suggested for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication is a handbook used in conjunction with the course of study in chemistry developed through the New York State Education Department and The University of the State of New York. It contains experiments, demonstrations, and other activities for a chemistry course. Areas covered include the science of chemistry, the atomic structure of…

  5. The international system of units (SI) in historical perspective.

    PubMed Central

    van Assendelft, O W

    1987-01-01

    American medical journals are shifting to selected SI (Système International d'Unités) units for reporting measurements. Limitation of SI units deemed suitable for use in reporting clinical laboratory results stems from recommendations put forth by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. Limitations are: 1) the liter as sole recommended unit of volume in concentration measurement; 2) substance concentration (unit mole) favored over mass concentration (submultiples of the kilogram); and 3) discouraging the use of the prefixes hecto-, deca-, deci-, and centi-. Further discussion by the American Medical Association and other organizations is required before consensus in the US medical community can be reached as to extent of and time frame for conversion to SI for reporting clinical laboratory measurements. PMID:3661791

  6. Special Report: Chemistry of Comets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A'Hearn, Michael F.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the chemistry of comets. How comets provide clues to the birth of the solar system, photolytic reactions on comets involving water, chemical modeling, nuclear chemistry, and research findings are among the areas considered. (JN)

  7. The Lighter Side of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the rationale for using photochemistry to merge descriptive chemistry and molecular orbital theory in first-year chemistry courses. Includes procedures and safety information for various activities, demonstrations, and experiments involving photochemical reactions. (DH)

  8. The Status of General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, David W.

    1977-01-01

    Presents the first of a series of papers discussing the major features and underlying philosophies of general college chemistry. This first paper reviews secondary level course content as well as college level general chemistry curricula. (SL)

  9. The Birthday of Organic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benfey, Otto Theodor; Kaufman, George B.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how the synthesis of urea, 150 years ago, was a major factor in breaking the artificial barrier that existed between organic and inorganic chemistry, and this contributed to the rapid growth of organic chemistry. (GA)

  10. Thoughts on a changing SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabiati, Franco; Bich, Walter

    2009-10-01

    The trend towards an International System of Units (SI) based on fundamental constants has been confirmed and recent actions could result in the redefinition of the four units still necessary to cover all the quantities of interest for physics and chemistry. In this paper some issues whose solution is becoming critical with the approach of the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) of 2011 are discussed. The traditional kinds of definition and the new proposals are considered on the basis of their mathematical expressions and the advantageous features of the most advanced proposal are pointed out. The problem of choosing the set of fundamental constants to be adopted as reference quantities for the SI units is addressed and a general rule for verifying that the set is sufficient and non-redundant is pointed out in the form of a linear system giving also expressions of all the units as functions of the reference constants. A partial application to the most important units and different sets of constants offers some comparative criteria and shows the advantages of a set including both h and me. A general condition to be fulfilled by an experiment in order to realize an SI unit is given and a procedure suitable to optimize the availability of the best relization on a global basis is outlined. Finally, the dissemination process is analysed to show that the implied comparisons of standards at any level are not affected by the realization uncertainty, so that the process can be continued with the same standards, independently of any change in the basic reference quantities of the unit system.

  11. Interface chemistry between complex oxides and semiconductors: where chemistry and physics meet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchiori, Chiara

    2010-03-01

    Even though heavily based on semiconductors, microelectronics CMOS technology would not exist without the integration of thin oxide films which enable the exploitation of the semiconductor properties. Indeed, working principle of the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor, the main building block of such a technology, is the modulation of charges at the oxide/semiconductor interface. The quality of this interface is of fundamental importance for device performance. For over four decades, SiO2 was the gate dielectric of choice and device scaling meant improving performance while lowering production costs. However, as scaling is approaching fundamental limits, direct tunneling across the dielectric becomes unacceptable. At this point, the integration of more complex and higher dielectric constant oxides - ``high-K dielectrics''- with Si or even more complex semiconductors (Ge, III-V) is the key enabler of performance gain. I will review critical issues related to the oxide/semiconductor interfaces, starting with SiO2/Si. Then, I will discuss how the level of complexity increases with the introduction of high-K dielectrics and other semiconductors in the stack. Among the issues to be addressed to fabricate high-performance devices, I will discuss the role played by: 1) interfacial chemistry and thermodynamical stability, 2) band alignment and surface band bending, 3) presence of defects at the interface and in the oxide bulk, 4) evolution of the gate stack properties upon post-deposition treatments. The impact of these parameters on electrical performance of devices will be discussed in detail. Finally, epitaxial oxide on Si will be explored as a promising approach for ultimate EOT scaling and the parameters governing the epitaxial growth of complex crystalline oxides on Si will be addressed. I will show that the development performed in this area might enable the integration of epitaxial oxides for monolithic integration, paving the way to technological

  12. Optical Properties of Silicon Nanowires Fabricated by Environment-Friendly Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchar, Kirill A.; Zubairova, Alsu A.; Schleusener, Alexander; Osminkina, Liubov A.; Sivakov, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) were fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) where hydrofluoric acid (HF), which is typically used in this method, was changed into ammonium fluoride (NH4F). The structure and optical properties of the obtained SiNWs were investigated in details. The length of the SiNW arrays is about 2 μm for 5 min of etching, and the mean diameter of the SiNWs is between 50 and 200 nm. The formed SiNWs demonstrate a strong decrease of the total reflectance near 5-15 % in the spectral region λ < 1 μm in comparison to crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrate. The interband photoluminescence (PL) and Raman scattering intensities increase strongly for SiNWs in comparison with the corresponding values of the c-Si substrate. These effects can be interpreted as an increase of the excitation intensity of SiNWs due to the strong light scattering and the partial light localization in an inhomogeneous optical medium. Along with the interband PL was also detected the PL of SiNWs in the spectral region of 500-1100 nm with a maximum at 750 nm, which can be explained by the radiative recombination of excitons in small Si nanocrystals at nanowire sidewalls in terms of a quantum confinement model. So SiNWs, which are fabricated by environment-friendly chemistry, have a great potential for use in photovoltaic and photonics applications.

  13. Predictors of General Chemistry Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozsogomonyan, Ardas; Loftus, Drew

    1979-01-01

    Chemistry pretest scores, high school chemistry grades and, to a greater extent, math SAT scores were useful predictors of college general chemistry grades. Regression analysis of all these predictors combined was used to construct an expectancy table which is being used to identify and advise underprepared students. (BB)

  14. Six Pillars of Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Joseph J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an approach to teaching organic chemistry, which is to have students build their knowledge of organic chemistry upon a strong foundation of the fundamental concepts of the subject. Specifically, the article focuses upon a core set of concepts that I call "the six pillars of organic chemistry": electronegativity, polar…

  15. An Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, John H.

    The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory Program is a project designed to devise experiments to coordinate the use of instruments in the laboratory programs of physical chemistry, instrumental analysis, and inorganic chemistry at the advanced undergraduate level. It is intended that such experiments would incorporate an introduction to the instrument…

  16. Chemistry 200, 300 Interim Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This guide, developed for the chemistry 200, 300 program in Manitoba, is designed to articulate with previous science courses, provide concepts, processes, and skills which will enable students to continue in chemistry-related areas, and relate chemistry to practical applications in everyday life. It includes a program overview (with program goals…

  17. Characterization of Si/CoSi2/Si(111) heterostructures using Auger plasmon losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowengerdt, F. D.; Lin, T. L.; Fathauer, R. W.; Grunthaner, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    The Si/CoSi2/Si heterostructures prepared by codeposition and solid-phase epitaxy on Si(111) substrates were characterized using Auger plasmon data as a measure of Si overlayer thickness. The method of calibration is described, and the results of two studies, including a study of islanding in Si/CoSi2/Si and a study of diffusion in CoSi2/Si are presented, illustrating the utility of the Auger plasmon loss technique. It is shown that, most likely, the diffusion proceeds through residual defects in the CoSi2.

  18. Chemistry of c-trimethylsilyl-substituted main-group heterocarboranes. 6. Lead(II)-inserted. eta. sup 5 -closo-plumbacarboranes and their reactivity toward a bidentate Lewis base: Crystal structures of closo-1-Pb-2-(SiMe sub 3 )-3-(R)-2,3-C sub 2 B sub 4 H sub 4 and 1-Pb(C sub 10 H sub 8 N sub 2 )-2,3-(SiMe sub 3 ) sub 2 -2,3-C sub 2 B sub 4 H sub 4 (R = SiMe sub 3 , Me)

    SciTech Connect

    Hosmane, N.S.; Lu, Kaijuan; Zhu, Hong; Siriwardane, U.; Shet, M.S.; Maguire, J.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The monosodium salts of the carborane anions (2,3-(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}-2,3-C{sub 2}B{sub 4}H{sub 5}){sup {minus}}, (2-(SiMe{sub 3})-3-(Me)-2,3-C{sub 2}B{sub 4}H{sub 5}){sup {minus}}, and (2-(SiMe{sub 3})-2,3-C{sub 2}B{sub 4}H{sub 6}){sup {minus}} react with PbCl{sub 2} to produce the corresponding closo-plumbacarboranes, 1-Pb-2,3-(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}-2,3-C{sub 2}B{sub 4}H{sub 4} (I), 1-Pb-2-(SiMe{sub 3})-3-(Me)-2,3-C{sub 2}B{sub 4}H{sub 4} (II), and 1-Pb-2-(SiMe{sub 3})-2,3,-C{sub 2}B{sub 4}H{sub 5} (III) in 25-37% yields. The plumbacarboranes I, II, and III were characterized on the basis of {sup 1}H, {sup 11}B, and {sup 13}C pulse Fourier transform NMR, IR, and mass spectroscopy. The complexes were characterized by {sup 1}H, {sup 11}B, and {sup 13}C NMR, IR, and mass spectroscopy, and IV was also characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

  19. Supported organometallic complexes: Surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    Adsorbing organometallic molecules onto the surfaces of inorganic supports such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgCl{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, etc. can result in dramatic enhancements in catalytic activity. The reasons for this and the structures of the resulting surface organometallic centers are not well understood. We have addressed this problem using actinide and early transition metal complexes as model adsorbates. Characterization tools include catalytic and stoichiometric reaction chemistry, reaction kinetics and isotopic labeling, quantitative poisoning studies, model solution chemistry, and a wide array of surface-sensitive spectroscopies such as CPMAS NMR, EPR, and UV-VIS as well as titration calorimetry. These chemical and physical experiments are closely coupled to model solution chemistry to provide maximum information yield. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Medicinal chemistry for 2020

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D; Hill, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    Rapid advances in our collective understanding of biomolecular structure and, in concert, of biochemical systems, coupled with developments in computational methods, have massively impacted the field of medicinal chemistry over the past two decades, with even greater changes appearing on the horizon. In this perspective, we endeavor to profile some of the most prominent determinants of change and speculate as to further evolution that may consequently occur during the next decade. The five main angles to be addressed are: protein–protein interactions; peptides and peptidomimetics; molecular diversity and pharmacological space; molecular pharmacodynamics (significance, potential and challenges); and early-stage clinical efficacy and safety. We then consider, in light of these, the future of medicinal chemistry and the educational preparation that will be required for future medicinal chemists. PMID:22004084

  1. Fenton chemistry: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Wardman, P; Candeias, L P

    1996-05-01

    In 1876, Fenton described a colored product obtained on mixing tartaric acid with hydrogen peroxide and a low concentration of a ferrous salt. Full papers in 1894 and 1896 showed the product was dihydroxymaleic acid. Haber, Weiss and Willstätter proposed in 1932-1934 the involvement of free hydroxyl radicals in the iron(II)/hydrogen peroxide system, and Baxendale and colleagues around 1950 suggested that superoxide reduces the iron(III) formed on reaction, explaining the catalytic nature of the metal. Since Fridovich and colleagues discovered the importance of superoxide dismutase in 1968, numerous studies have sought to explain the deleterious effects of cellular oxidative stress in terms of superoxide-driven Fenton chemistry. There remain questions concerning the involvement of free hydroxyl radicals or reactions of metal/oxo intermediates. However, these outstanding questions may obscure a wider appreciation of the importance of Fenton chemistry involving hypohalous acids rather than hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. PMID:8619017

  2. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  3. Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Anne M.

    In thirty years of university teaching, Peter Hobbs of the Atmospheric Sciences Department at the University of Washington, has seen atmospheric chemistry grow from a relatively small branch of geosciences into one with which every student of atmospheric sciences needs familiarity Some students are captivated in their first course and make atmospheric chemistry a field of further study or a lifelong career. At the same time, courses of “global change” and emerging curricula in scientific policy require students from diverse backgrounds to develop sufficient knowledge to become well-informed policy-makers. A number of practicing atmospheric chemists are retrained on the job from other scientific backgrounds and need selfeducation in the basics of the field.

  4. [Gaubius and medical chemistry].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2011-01-01

    Hieronymus David Gaub (1705-1780) was the son of a protestant cloth merchant in Heidelberg. Disliking a pietistic boarding school in Halle, Germany, he came to stay with a paternal uncle who was a physician in Amsterdam. Hieronymus studied medicine in Harderwijk and in Leiden, under the guidance of Herman Boerhaave (1668-1738). In 1731 he was appointed reader (and in 1734 professor) in chemistry at the Leiden medical faculty. After Boerhaave's death he also taught medicine, but without access to hospital beds. Gaubius correctly envisaged that chemistry would become an important discipline in medicine, but was limited by the technical constraints of his time. In his textbook of general pathology (1758) he attributed disease to disturbances of not only fluids, but also solid parts, although symptoms remained the basis of his classification. The book would remain influential for several decades, until the advent of pathological anatomy. PMID:22217241

  5. Turbine Chemistry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Wey, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    Many of the engine exhaust species resulting in significant environmental impact exist in trace amounts. Recent research, e.g., conducted at MIT-AM, has pointed to the intra-engine environment as a possible site for important trace chemistry activity. In addition, the key processes affecting the trace species activity occurring downstream in the air passages of the turbine and exhaust nozzle are not well understood. Most recently, an effort has been initiated at NASA Glenn Research Center under the UEET Program to evaluate and further develop CFD-based technology for modeling and simulation of intra-engine trace chemical changes relevant to atmospheric effects of pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. This presentation will describe the current effort conducted at Glenn; some preliminary results relevant to the trace species chemistry in a turbine passage will also be presented to indicate the progress to date.

  6. Muons in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayden, N. J.

    2013-12-01

    Positive muons have long been used as extrinsic probes in chemistry, offering unique properties for the investigation of local magnetism, dynamics, transport and radical kinetics. Exciting new developments in muon beam lines offer the opportunity of extending these studies selectively to surfaces permitting, for example, the detection of increased mobility of polymer chains at the surface of a polymer film. So called pump and probe methods, involving external perturbations by laser irradiation to manipulate vibrational and electronic states, can be followed by muon pulses allowing the probing of the properties of these states. Muoniated radical probes are finding greater use in soft matter. Selectivity is achieved in these complex systems through an appropriate target molecule giving the chance to measure partitioning and interfacial transfer in surfactant systems. Improvements in sample environments allow the observation of muons in increasingly extreme combinations of temperature and pressure, such as supercritical water, allowing the characterization of the chemistry in these systems.

  7. Chemistry in protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    In this lecture I discuss recent progress in the understanding of the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks that resemble our Solar system during the first ten million years. At the verge of planet formation, strong variations of temperature, density, and radiation intensities in these disks lead to a layered chemical structure. In hot, dilute and heavily irradiated atmosphere only simple radicals, atoms, and atomic ions can survive, formed and destroyed by gas-phase processes. Beneath the atmosphere a partly UV-shielded, warm molecular layer is located, where high-energy radiation drives rich chemistry, both in the gas phase and on dust surfaces. In a cold, dense, dark disk midplane many molecules are frozen out, forming thick icy mantles where surface chemistry is active and where complex (organic) species are synthesized.

  8. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  9. Organic Chemistry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  10. Quo vadis, analytical chemistry?

    PubMed

    Valcárcel, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an open, personal, fresh approach to the future of Analytical Chemistry in the context of the deep changes Science and Technology are anticipated to experience. Its main aim is to challenge young analytical chemists because the future of our scientific discipline is in their hands. A description of not completely accurate overall conceptions of our discipline, both past and present, to be avoided is followed by a flexible, integral definition of Analytical Chemistry and its cornerstones (viz., aims and objectives, quality trade-offs, the third basic analytical reference, the information hierarchy, social responsibility, independent research, transfer of knowledge and technology, interfaces to other scientific-technical disciplines, and well-oriented education). Obsolete paradigms, and more accurate general and specific that can be expected to provide the framework for our discipline in the coming years are described. Finally, the three possible responses of analytical chemists to the proposed changes in our discipline are discussed. PMID:26631024