Science.gov

Sample records for 1-based lentiviral vector

  1. Comparative analysis of HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors bearing lyssavirus glycoproteins for neuronal gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Thais; Kutner, Robert; Zhang, Xian-Yang; Kuroda, Hitoshi; Tordo, Noël; Boulis, Nicholas M; Reiser, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Background The delivery of therapeutic genes to the central nervous system (CNS) using viral vectors represents an appealing strategy for the treatment of nerve injury and disorders of the CNS. Important factors determining CNS targeting include tropism of the viral vectors and retrograde transport of the vector particles. Retrograde transport of equine anemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the glycoprotein derived from the Rabies virus RabERA strain from peripheral muscle to spinal motor neurons (MNs) was previously reported. Despite therapeutic effects achieved in mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the efficiency of this approach needs to be improved for clinical translation. To date there has not been a quantitative assessment of pseudotyped HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors to transduce MNs. Here, we describe quantitative tests to analyze the retrograde transport capacity of HIV-1 vectors pseudotyped with the G glycoprotein derived from Rabies and Rabies-related viruses (Lyssaviruses). Methods With a view toward optimizing the retrograde transport properties of HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors, we compared the glycoproteins from different enveloped viruses belonging to the Rhabdoviridae family, genus Lyssavirus, and evaluated their ability to transduce specific cell populations and promote retrograde axonal transport. We first tested the transduction performance of these pseudotypes in vitro in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, NSC-34 neuroblastoma-spinal cord hybrid cells, and primary mixed spinal cord and pure astrocyte cultures. We then analyzed the uptake and retrograde transport of these pseudotyped vectors in vitro, using Campenot chambers. Finally, intraneural injections were performed to evaluate the in vivo retrograde axonal transport of these pseudotypes. Results Both the in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the glycoprotein derived from the

  2. Evaluation of transduction efficiency in macrophage colony-stimulating factor differentiated human macrophages using HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Monocyte-derived macrophages contribute to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Therefore, manipulating macrophage function could have significant therapeutic value. The objective of this study was to determine transduction efficiency of two HIV-based lentiviral vector configurations as delivery systems for the transduction of primary human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Results Human blood monocytes were transduced using two VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 based lentiviral vectors containing EGFP expression driven by either native HIV-LTR (VRX494) or EF1α promoters (VRX1090). Lentiviral vectors were added to cultured macrophages at different times and multiplicities of infection (MOI). Transduction efficiency was assessed using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Macrophages transduced between 2 and 120 hours after culturing showed the highest transduction efficiency at 2-hours transduction time. Subsequently, cells were transduced 2 hours after culturing at various vector concentrations (MOIs of 5, 10, 25 and 50) to determine the amount of lentiviral vector particles required to maximally transduce human monocyte-derived macrophages. On day 7, all transduced cultures showed EGFP-positive cells by microscopy. Flow cytometric analysis showed with all MOIs a peak shift corresponding to the presence of EGFP-positive cells. For VRX494, transduction efficiency was maximal at an MOI of 25 to 50 and ranged between 58 and 67%. For VRX1090, transduction efficiency was maximal at an MOI of 10 and ranged between 80 and 90%. Thus, transductions performed with VRX1090 showed a higher number of EGFP-positive cells than VRX494. Conclusions This report shows that VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-based lentiviral vectors can efficiently transduce human blood monocyte-derived macrophages early during differentiation using low particle numbers that do not interfere with differentiation of monocytes into macrophages. PMID:21281514

  3. Production of lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Hebben, Matthias; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) have seen considerably increase in use as gene therapy vectors for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. This review presents the state of the art of the production of these vectors with particular emphasis on their large-scale production for clinical purposes. In contrast to oncoretroviral vectors, which are produced using stable producer cell lines, clinical-grade LV are in most of the cases produced by transient transfection of 293 or 293T cells grown in cell factories. However, more recent developments, also, tend to use hollow fiber reactor, suspension culture processes, and the implementation of stable producer cell lines. As is customary for the biotech industry, rather sophisticated downstream processing protocols have been established to remove any undesirable process-derived contaminant, such as plasmid or host cell DNA or host cell proteins. This review compares published large-scale production and purification processes of LV and presents their process performances. Furthermore, developments in the domain of stable cell lines and their way to the use of production vehicles of clinical material will be presented. PMID:27110581

  4. Strategies for targeting lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Frecha, Cecilia; Szécsi, Judit; Cosset, Francois-Loîc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2008-12-01

    Vectors derived from retroviruses such as lentiviruses and onco-retroviruses are probably among the most suitable tools to achieve a long-term gene transfer since they allow stable integration of a transgene and its propagation in daughter cells. Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses (MLV) since in contrast to the latter they can transduce non-proliferating target cells. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer approaches in vivo. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to upgrade lentiviral vectors for tissue or cell targeting and which have potential for in vivo gene delivery. In this overview we distinguish between three types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies (Fig 1): 1) targeting of vectors at the level of vector-cell entry through lentiviral vector surface modifications; 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue specific promoters into lentiviral vectors; 3) a novel microRNA technology that rather than targeting the 'right' cells will 'detarget' transgene expression from non-target cells while achieving high expression in the target-cell. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value for several gene therapy approaches but combining these three layers of transgene expression control will offer tools to really overcome several drawbacks in the field such as side-effect of off-target expression, clearance of transgene modified cells by immune response to the transgene and lack of biosecurity and efficiency in in vivo approaches. PMID:19075628

  5. Biosafety Features of Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Schambach, Axel; Zychlinski, Daniela; Ehrnstroem, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Over the past decades, lentiviral vectors have evolved as a benchmark tool for stable gene transfer into cells with a high replicative potential. Their relatively flexible genome and ability to transduce many forms of nondividing cells, combined with the potential for cell-specific pseudotyping, provides a rich resource for numerous applications in experimental platforms and therapeutic settings. Here, we give an overview of important biosafety features of lentiviral vectors, with detailed discussion of (i) the principles of the lentiviral split-genome design used for the construction of packaging cells; (ii) the relevance of modifications introduced into the lentiviral long terminal repeat (deletion of enhancer/promoter sequences and introduction of insulators); (iii) the basic features of mRNA processing, including the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) interaction and the modifications of the 3′ untranslated region of lentiviral vectors with various post-transcriptional regulatory elements affecting transcriptional termination, polyadenylation, and differentiation-specific degradation of mRNA; and (iv) the characteristic integration pattern with the associated risk of transcriptional interference with cellular genes. We conclude with considerations regarding the importance of cell targeting via envelope modifications. Along this course, we address canonical biosafety issues encountered with any type of viral vector: the risks of shedding, mobilization, germline transmission, immunogenicity, and insertional mutagenesis. PMID:23311447

  6. Lentiviral Vectors for Immune Cells Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Steven; Tai, April; Wang, Pin

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are efficient gene delivery vehicles suitable for delivering long-term transgene expression in various cell types. Engineering lentiviral vectors to have the capacity to transduce specific cell types is of great interest to advance the translation of lentiviral vectors towards the clinic. Here we provide an overview of innovative approaches to target lentiviral vectors to cells of the immune system. In this overview we distinguish between two types of lentiviral vector targeting strategies: 1) targeting of the vectors to specific cells by lentiviral vector surface modifications, and 2) targeting at the level of transgene transcription by insertion of tissue-specific promoters to drive transgene expression. It is clear that each strategy is of enormous value but ultimately combining these approaches may help reduce the effects of off-target expression and improve the efficiency and saftey of lentiviral vectors for gene therapy. PMID:20085508

  7. Lentiviral vector gene transfer to porcine airways.

    PubMed

    Sinn, Patrick L; Cooney, Ashley L; Oakland, Mayumi; Dylla, Douglas E; Wallen, Tanner J; Pezzulo, Alejandro A; Chang, Eugene H; McCray, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated lentiviral vector development and transduction efficiencies in well-differentiated primary cultures of pig airway epithelia (PAE) and wild-type pigs in vivo. We noted gene transfer efficiencies similar to that observed for human airway epithelia (HAE). Interestingly, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based vectors transduced immortalized pig cells as well as pig primary cells more efficiently than HIV-1-based vectors. PAE express TRIM5α, a well-characterized species-specific lentiviral restriction factor. We contrasted the restrictive properties of porcine TRIM5α against FIV- and HIV-based vectors using gain and loss of function approaches. We observed no effect on HIV-1 or FIV conferred transgene expression in response to porcine TRIM5α overexpression or knockdown. To evaluate the ability of GP64-FIV to transduce porcine airways in vivo, we delivered vector expressing mCherry to the tracheal lobe of the lung and the ethmoid sinus of 4-week-old pigs. One week later, epithelial cells expressing mCherry were readily detected. Our findings indicate that pseudotyped FIV vectors confer similar tropisms in porcine epithelia as observed in human HAE and provide further support for the selection of GP64 as an appropriate envelope pseudotype for future preclinical gene therapy studies in the porcine model of cystic fibrosis (CF).Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2012) 1, e56; doi:10.1038/mtna.2012.47; published online 27 November 2012. PMID:23187455

  8. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25804479

  9. Surface-engineering of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2004-02-01

    Vectors derived from retroviridae offer particularly flexible properties in gene transfer applications given the numerous possible associations of various viral surface glycoproteins (determining cell tropism) with different types of retroviral cores (determining genome replication and integration). Lentiviral vectors should be preferred gene delivery vehicles over vectors derived from onco-retroviruses such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) that cannot transduce non-proliferating target cells. Generating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with different viral glycoproteins (GPs) may modulate the physicochemical properties of the vectors, their interaction with the host immune system and their host range. There are however important gene transfer restrictions to some non-proliferative tissues or cell types and recent studies have shown that progenitor hematopoietic stem cells in G(0), non-activated primary blood lymphocytes or monocytes were not transducible by lentiviral vectors. Moreover, lentiviral vectors that have the capacity to deliver transgenes into specific tissues are expected to be of great value for various gene transfer applications in vivo. Several innovative approaches have been explored to overcome such problems that have given rise to novel concepts in the field and have provided promising results in preliminary evaluations in vivo. Here we review the different approaches explored to upgrade lentiviral vectors, aiming at developing vectors suitable for in vivo gene delivery. PMID:14978753

  10. Immunization Delivered by Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer and Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biliang; Tai, April; Wang, Pin

    2011-01-01

    Summary The increasing level of understanding of the lentivirus biology has been instrumental in shaping the design strategy of creating therapeutic lentiviral delivery vectors. As a result, lentiviral vectors have become one of the most powerful gene transfer vehicles. They are widely used for therapeutic purposes as well as in studies of basic biology, due to their unique characteristics. Lentiviral vectors have been successfully employed to mediate durable and efficient antigen expression and presentation in dendritic cells both in vitro and in vivo, leading to the activation of cellular immunity and humoral responses. This capability makes the lentiviral vector an ideal choice for immunizations that target a wide range of cancers and infectious diseases. Further advances into optimizing the vector system and understanding the relationship between the immune system and diseases pathogenesis will only augment the potential benefits and utility of lentiviral vaccines for human health. PMID:21198664

  11. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  12. Lentiviral vectors for treating and modeling human CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Kingsman, Susan M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2004-09-01

    Vectors based on lentiviruses efficiently deliver genes into many different types of primary neurons from a broad range of species including man and the resulting gene expression is long term. These vectors are opening up new approaches for the treatment of neurological diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD), and motor neuron diseases (MNDs). Numerous animal studies have now been undertaken with these vectors and correction of disease models has been obtained. Lentiviral vectors also provide a new strategy for in vivo modeling of human diseases; for example, the lentiviral-mediated overexpression of mutated human alpha-synuclein or huntingtin genes in basal ganglia induces neuronal pathology in animals resembling PD and HD in man. These vectors have been refined to a very high level and can be produced safely for the clinic. This review will describe the general features of lentiviral vectors with particular emphasis on vectors derived from the non-primate lentivirus, equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV). It will then describe some key examples of genetic correction and generation of genetic animal models of neurological diseases. The prospects for clinical application of lentiviral vectors for the treatment of PD and MNDs will also be outlined. PMID:15352068

  13. Transduction patterns of pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang-Fong; Azzouz, Mimoun; Walmsley, Lucy E; Askham, Zoe; Wilkes, Fraser J; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-primate-based lentiviral vector based on the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) for efficient gene transfer to the central and peripheral nervous systems. Previously we have demonstrated that pseudotyping lentiviral vectors with the rabies virus glycoprotein confers retrograde axonal transport to these vectors. In the present study we have successfully produced high-titer EIAV vectors pseudotyped with envelope glycoproteins from Rhabdovirus vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) serotypes (Indiana and Chandipura strains); rabies virus [various Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth ERA strains and challenge virus standard (CVS)]; Lyssavirus Mokola virus, a rabies-related virus; and Arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). These vectors were delivered to the striatum or spinal cord of adult rats or muscle of neonatal mice by direct injection. We report that the lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with envelopes from the VSV Indiana strain, wild-type ERA, and CVS strains resulted in strong transduction in the striatum, while Mokola- and LCMV-pseudotyped vectors exhibited moderate and weak transduction, respectively. Furthermore ERA- and CVS-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors demonstrated retrograde transport and expression in distal neurons after injection in brain, spinal cord, and muscle. The differences in transduction efficiencies and retrograde transport conferred by these envelope glycoproteins present novel opportunities in designing therapeutic strategies for different neurological diseases. PMID:14741783

  14. Efficient Large Volume Lentiviral Vector Production Using Flow Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Witting, Scott R.; Li, Lin-Hong; Jasti, Aparna; Allen, Cornell; Cornetta, Kenneth; Brady, James; Shivakumar, Rama

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lentiviral vectors are beginning to emerge as a viable choice for human gene therapy. Here, we describe a method that combines the convenience of a suspension cell line with a scalable, nonchemically based, and GMP-compliant transfection technique known as flow electroporation (EP). Flow EP parameters for serum-free adapted HEK293FT cells were optimized to limit toxicity and maximize titers. Using a third generation, HIV-based, lentiviral vector system pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis glycoprotein envelope, both small- and large-volume transfections produced titers over 1×108 infectious units/mL. Therefore, an excellent option for implementing large-scale, clinical lentiviral productions is flow EP of suspension cell lines. PMID:21933028

  15. Generation of Transgenic Rats Using Lentiviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Holger M; Fischer, Henrike J

    2016-01-01

    Transgenesis is a valuable tool with which to study different aspects of gene function in the context of the intact organism. During the last two decades a tremendous number of transgenic animals have been generated, and the continuous improvement of technology and the development of new systems have fostered their widespread application in biomedical research. Generally, transgenic animals are generated by introducing foreign DNA into fertilized oocytes, which can be achieved either by injecting recombinant DNA into the pronucleus or by transferring lentiviral particles into the perivitelline space. While mice remain the favored species in many laboratories, there are a number of applications where the use of rats is advantageous. One such research area is multiple sclerosis. Here, several experimental models are available that are closely mimicking the human disease, and it is possible to induce neuroinflammation by transferring pathogenic T cells which can then be studied by flow cytometry and 2-photon live imaging. Unlike for mice, the development of transgenic rats has encountered some hurdles in the past, e.g., due to a complicated reproductive biology and the frailty of the fertilized oocytes in vitro. In this chapter we provide a protocol describing how we manipulate single cell embryos in our lab in order to efficiently generate transgenic rats in a variety of different strains using lentiviral gene transfer. PMID:25063498

  16. Development of lentiviral vectors for antiangiogenic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Shichinohe, T; Bochner, B H; Mizutani, K; Nishida, M; Hegerich-Gilliam, S; Naldini, L; Kasahara, N

    2001-11-01

    Growth and metastasis of malignant tumors requires angiogenesis. Inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis may represent an effective cytostatic strategy. We have constructed recombinant self-inactivating lentiviral vectors expressing angiostatin and endostatin, and have tested their antiangiogenic activities. As VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors showed low relative transduction titers on bovine aortic and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, it was difficult to achieve significant inhibition of endothelial cell growth by lentivirus-mediated antiangiogenic gene transfer directly to endothelial cells without concomitant vector-associated cytotoxicity. However, lentivirus vectors could efficiently and stably transduce T24 human bladder cancer cells that are relatively resistant to adenovirus infection due to loss of coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor expression. Long-term expression and secretion of angiostatin and endostatin from lentivirus-transduced T24 cells resulted in significant inhibition of cellular proliferation on coculture with endothelial cells. This report represents the first use of lentivirus-based vectors to deliver the antiangiogenic factors, angiostatin and endostatin, and suggests the potential utility of antiangiogenic gene therapy with lentiviral vectors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:11773978

  17. Efficient production of germline transgenic chickens using lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    McGrew, Michael J; Sherman, Adrian; Ellard, Fiona M; Lillico, Simon G; Gilhooley, Hazel J; Kingsman, Alan J; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Sang, Helen

    2004-07-01

    An effective method for genetic modification of chickens has yet to be developed. An efficient technology, enabling production of transgenic birds at high frequency and with reliable expression of transgenes, will have many applications, both in basic research and in biotechnology. We investigated the efficiency with which lentiviral vectors could transduce the chicken germ line and examined the expression of introduced reporter transgenes. Ten founder cockerels transmitted the vector to between 4% and 45% of their offspring and stable transmission to the G2 generation was demonstrated. Analysis of expression of reporter gene constructs in several transgenic lines showed a conserved expression profile between individuals that was maintained after transmission through the germ line. These data demonstrate that lentiviral vectors can be used to generate transgenic lines with an efficiency in the order of 100-fold higher than any previously published method, with no detectable silencing of transgene expression between generations. PMID:15192698

  18. Efficient production of germline transgenic chickens using lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    McGrew, Michael J; Sherman, Adrian; Ellard, Fiona M; Lillico, Simon G; Gilhooley, Hazel J; Kingsman, Alan J; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Sang, Helen

    2004-01-01

    An effective method for genetic modification of chickens has yet to be developed. An efficient technology, enabling production of transgenic birds at high frequency and with reliable expression of transgenes, will have many applications, both in basic research and in biotechnology. We investigated the efficiency with which lentiviral vectors could transduce the chicken germ line and examined the expression of introduced reporter transgenes. Ten founder cockerels transmitted the vector to between 4% and 45% of their offspring and stable transmission to the G2 generation was demonstrated. Analysis of expression of reporter gene constructs in several transgenic lines showed a conserved expression profile between individuals that was maintained after transmission through the germ line. These data demonstrate that lentiviral vectors can be used to generate transgenic lines with an efficiency in the order of 100-fold higher than any previously published method, with no detectable silencing of transgene expression between generations. PMID:15192698

  19. Using Pulmozyme DNase treatment in lentiviral vector production.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Aaron; Bischof, Daniela; Jasti, Aparna; Ernstberger, Aaron; Hawkins, Troy; Cornetta, Kenneth

    2012-02-01

    In the production of lentiviral vector for clinical studies the purity of the final product is of vital importance. To remove plasmid and producer cell line DNA, investigators have incubated the vector product with Benzonase, a bacterially derived DNase. As an alternative we investigated the use of Pulmozyme, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved human DNase for the treatment of cystic fibrosis, by comparing the efficiency of DNA removal from lentiviral vector preparations. A green fluorescent protein-expressing lentiviral vector was prepared by transient calcium phosphate transfection of HEK 293T cells and DNA removal was compared when treating vector after harvest or immediately after transfection. The effectiveness of DNase treatment was measured by quantitative PCR using primers for vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G viral envelope plasmid. When treating the final product, 1-hr incubations (37°C) with Pulmozyme at 20 U/ml reduced plasmid DNA to undetectable levels. Longer incubations (up to 4 hr) did not improve DNA removal at lower concentrations and the effectiveness was equivalent to or better than Benzonase at 50 U/ml. Attempting to use Pulmozyme immediately after transfection, but before final medium change, as a means to decrease Pulmozyme concentration in the final product provided a 2-log reduction in DNA but was inferior to treatment at the end of production. Pulmozyme, at concentrations up to 100 U/ml, had no measurable effect on infectious titer of the final vector product. The use of Pulmozyme is likely to increase the cost of DNase treatment when preparing vector product and should be considered when generating clinical-grade vector products. PMID:22428981

  20. Packaging of HCV-RNA into lentiviral vector

    SciTech Connect

    Caval, Vincent; Piver, Eric; Ivanyi-Nagy, Roland; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Pages, Jean-Christophe

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of HCV-RNA Core-D1 interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vivo evaluation of the packaging of HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of the role of the three basic sub-domains of D1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heterologous system involving HIV-1 vector particles to mobilise HCV genome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Full length mobilisation of HCV genome and HCV-receptor-independent entry. -- Abstract: The advent of infectious molecular clones of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has unlocked the understanding of HCV life cycle. However, packaging of the genomic RNA, which is crucial to generate infectious viral particles, remains poorly understood. Molecular interactions of the domain 1 (D1) of HCV Core protein and HCV RNA have been described in vitro. Since compaction of genetic information within HCV genome has hampered conventional mutational approach to study packaging in vivo, we developed a novel heterologous system to evaluate the interactions between HCV RNA and Core D1. For this, we took advantage of the recruitment of Vpr fusion-proteins into HIV-1 particles. By fusing HCV Core D1 to Vpr we were able to package and transfer a HCV subgenomic replicon into a HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. We next examined how deletion mutants of basic sub-domains of Core D1 influenced HCV RNA recruitment. The results emphasized the crucial role of the first and third basic regions of D1 in packaging. Interestingly, the system described here allowed us to mobilise full-length JFH1 genome in CD81 defective cells, which are normally refractory to HCV infection. This finding paves the way to an evaluation of the replication capability of HCV in various cell types.

  1. Integration-deficient Lentiviral Vectors: A Slow Coming of Age

    PubMed Central

    Wanisch, Klaus; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are very efficient at transducing dividing and quiescent cells, which makes them highly useful tools for genetic analysis and gene therapy. Traditionally this efficiency was considered dependent on provirus integration in the host cell genome; however, recent results have challenged this view. So called integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) can be produced through the use of integrase mutations that specifically prevent proviral integration, resulting in the generation of increased levels of circular vector episomes in transduced cells. These lentiviral episomes lack replication signals and are gradually lost by dilution in dividing cells, but are stable in quiescent cells. Compared to integrating lentivectors, IDLVs have a greatly reduced risk of causing insertional mutagenesis and a lower risk of generating replication-competent recombinants (RCRs). IDLVs can mediate transient gene expression in proliferating cells, stable expression in nondividing cells in vitro and in vivo, specific immune responses, RNA interference, homologous recombination (gene repair, knock-in, and knock-out), site-specific recombination, and transposition. IDLVs can be converted into replicating episomes, suggesting that if a clinically applicable system can be developed they would also become highly appropriate for stable transduction of proliferating tissues in therapeutic applications. PMID:19491821

  2. Kinetics of lentiviral vector transduction in human CD34(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoya; Green, Rashidah; Ballantine, Josiah; Skala, Luke P; Hsieh, Matthew M; Tisdale, John F

    2016-02-01

    Unlike cell lines, human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are less efficiently transduced with HIV-1 vectors, potentially limiting this approach. To investigate which step (internalization, reverse transcription, nuclear transport, and integration) limits lentiviral transduction, we evaluated the kinetics of lentiviral transduction in human CD34(+) cells. We transduced HeLa and CD34(+) cells with self-inactivating HIV-1 vector at low and tenfold higher multiplicity of infection (MOI) and evaluated vector amounts at various time points based on the rationale that if a given step was not limiting, tenfold greater vector amounts would be obtained at the tenfold higher MOI. We observed slower internalization (>60 min), a peak in reverse transcription at 24 hours, and completion of integration at 3 days in CD34(+) cells. In HeLa cells, there were approximately tenfold greater amounts at high MOI at all time points. When compared with HeLa cells, CD34(+) cells exhibited larger differences in vector amounts between high and low MOIs at 2-6 hours and a smaller difference at 12 hours to 10 days, revealing a limitation in human CD34(+) cell transduction around 12 hours, which corresponds to reverse transcription. In serial measurements of reverse transcription at 24 hours, vector amounts did not decrease once detected among CD34(+) cells. When using an HSC expansion medium, we observed less limitation for starting reverse transcription and more efficient transduction among CD34(+) cells in vitro and in xenografted mice. These data suggest that it is the initiation of reverse transcription that limits lentiviral transduction of human CD34(+) cells. Our findings provide an avenue for optimizing human CD34(+) cell transduction. PMID:26499040

  3. Lentiviral vectors for cancer immunotherapy and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Escors, David

    2013-09-01

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells. PMID:24078865

  4. Multipurpose modular lentiviral vectors for RNA interference and transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Kesireddy, Venu; van der Ven, Peter F M; Fürst, Dieter O

    2010-07-01

    We have created a multipurpose modular lentiviral vector system for expressing both transgenes and miRNA 30-based short hairpins (shRNAmirs) for RNAi. The core of the resulting vector system, pLVmir, allows a simple two step cloning procedure for expressing shRNAmirs under the control of a Pol II promoter in both a constitutive and conditional manner. The adapted cloning method includes a PCR-free method for transferring shRNAmir based RNAi clones from a publicly available library (Open Biosystems). The addition of a Pol II promoter-driven shRNAmir cassette and broadening the choice of Pol III promoters and silencing triggers offers great flexibility to this system. The combination of several preexisting and additional modules created here caters to common needs of researchers. Our modular vector system was validated regarding functionality of promoters, inducibility and reversibility. We successfully applied the system to knockdown Xirp2 mRNA expression in H2kb-tsA58 muscle cells and determined that this had no spurious effect on the expression of a closely related protein. Finally, our set of lentiviral vectors may be used to achieve synergistic effects, for simultaneous knockdown of two genes, as a rescue plasmid and for studying mutant proteins in a physiological context. PMID:19798586

  5. Development of Lentiviral Vectors for Targeted Integration and Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Schenkwein, Diana; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    The method in this chapter describes the design of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN)-fusion proteins which we have developed to transport different proteins into the nuclei of lentiviral vector (LV)-transduced cells. The IN-fusion protein cDNA is incorporated into the LV packaging plasmid, which leads to its incorporation into vector particles as part of a large Gag-Pol polyprotein. This specific feature of protein packaging enables also the incorporation of cytotoxic and proapoptotic proteins, such as frequently cutting endonucleases and P53. The vectors can hence be used for various protein transduction needs. An outline of the necessary methods is also given to study the functionality of a chosen IN-fusion protein in a cell culture assay. PMID:27317182

  6. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated RNA Silencing in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Edmund; Moon, Lawrence D.F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract RNA silencing is an established method for investigating gene function and has attracted particular interest because of the potential for generating RNA-based therapeutics. Using lentiviral vectors as an efficient delivery system that offers stable, long-term expression in postmitotic cells further enhances the applicability of an RNA-based gene therapy for the CNS. In this review we provide an overview of both lentiviral vectors and RNA silencing along with design considerations for generating lentiviral vectors capable of RNA silencing. We go on to describe the current preclinical data regarding lentiviral vector-mediated RNA silencing for CNS disorders and discuss the concerns of side effects associated with lentiviral vectors and small interfering RNAs and how these might be mitigated. PMID:24090197

  7. Initial Characterization of Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vectors for Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanoun, Naima; Gayral, Marion; Pointreau, Adeline; Buscail, Louis; Cordelier, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The vast majority (85%) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are discovered at too of a late stage to allow curative surgery. In addition, PDAC is highly resistant to conventional methods of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which only offer a marginal clinical benefit. Consequently, the prognosis of this cancer is devastating, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. In this dismal context, we recently demonstrated that PDAC gene therapy using nonviral vectors is safe and feasible, with early signs of efficacy in selected patients. Our next step is to transfer to the clinic HIV-1-based lentiviral vectors (LVs) that outshine other therapeutic vectors to treat experimental models of PDAC. However, a primary safety issue presented by LVs that may delay their use in patients is the risk of oncogenesis after vector integration in the host's cell DNA. Thus, we developed a novel anticancerous approach based on integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) and demonstrated that IDLVs can be successfully engineered to transiently deliver therapeutic genes to inhibit pancreatic cancer cells proliferation. This work stems for the use of therapeutic IDLVs for the management of PDAC, in forthcoming early phase gene therapy clinical trial for this disease with no cure. PMID:26731312

  8. Lentiviral vectors for the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Farinelli, Giada; Capo, Valentina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    In the last years important progress has been made in the treatment of several primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs) with gene therapy. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy indeed represents a valid alternative to conventional transplantation when a compatible donor is not available and recent success confirmed the great potential of this approach. First clinical trials performed with gamma retroviral vectors were promising and guaranteed clinical benefits to the patients. On the other hand, the outcome of severe adverse events as the development of hematological abnormalities highlighted the necessity to develop a safer platform to deliver the therapeutic gene. Self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors (LVVs) were studied to overcome this hurdle through their preferable integration pattern into the host genome. In this review, we describe the recent advancements achieved both in vitro and at preclinical level with LVVs for the treatment of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), ADA deficiency (ADA-SCID), Artemis deficiency, RAG1/2 deficiency, X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (γchain deficiency, SCIDX1), X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) and immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. PMID:24619149

  9. A Large U3 Deletion Causes Increased In Vivo Expression from a Nonintegrating Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Matthew; Kantor, Boris; Cockrell, Adam; Ma, Hong; Zeithaml, Brian; Li, Xiangping; McCown, Thomas; Kafri, Tal

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of employing nonintegrating lentiviral vectors has been demonstrated by recent studies showing the ability of nonintegrating lentiviral vectors to maintain transgene expression in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, HIV-1 vectors packaged with a mutated integrase were able to correct retinal disease in a mouse model. Interestingly, these results differ from earlier studies in which first-generation nonintegrating lentiviral vectors yielded insignificant levels of transduction. However, to date a rigorous characterization of transgene expression from the currently used self-inactivating (SIN) nonintegrating lentiviral vectors has not been published. Here we characterize transgene expression from SIN nonintegrating lentiviral vectors. Overall, we found that nonintegrating vectors express transgenes at a significantly lower level than their integrating counterparts. Expression from nonintegrating vectors was improved upon introducing a longer deletion in the vector’s U3 region. A unique shuttle-vector assay indicated that the relative abundance of the different episomal forms was not altered by the longer U3 deletion. Interestingly, the longer U3 deletion did not enhance expression in the corpus callosum of the rat brain, suggesting that the extent of silencing of episomal transcription is influenced by tissue-specific factors. Finally, and for the first time, episomal expression in the mouse liver was potent and sustained. PMID:18797449

  10. Optimization of the transductional efficiency of lentiviral vectors: effect of sera and polycations.

    PubMed

    Denning, Warren; Das, Suvendu; Guo, Siqi; Xu, Jun; Kappes, John C; Hel, Zdenek

    2013-03-01

    Lentiviral vectors are widely used as effective gene-delivery vehicles. Optimization of the conditions for efficient lentiviral transduction is of a high importance for a variety of research applications. Presence of positively charged polycations reduces the electrostatic repulsion forces between a negatively charged cell and an approaching enveloped lentiviral particle resulting in an increase in the transduction efficiency. Although a variety of polycations are commonly used to enhance the transduction with retroviruses, the relative effect of various types of polycations on the efficiency of transduction and on the potential bias in the determination of titer of lentiviral vectors is not fully understood. Here, we present data suggesting that DEAE-dextran provides superior results in enhancing lentiviral transduction of most tested cell lines and primary cell cultures. Specific type and source of serum affects the efficiency of transduction of target cell populations. Non-specific binding of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-containing membrane aggregates in the presence of DEAE-dextran does not significantly affect the determination of the titer of EGFP-expressing lentiviral vectors. In conclusion, various polycations and types of sera should be tested when optimizing lentiviral transduction of target cell populations. PMID:22407723

  11. Lentiviral vector mediated modification of mesenchymal stem cells & enhanced survival in an in vitro model of ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A combination of gene and cell therapies has the potential to significantly enhance the therapeutic value of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The development of efficient gene delivery methods is essential if MSCs are to be of benefit using such an approach. Achieving high levels of transgene expression for the required period of time, without adversely affecting cell viability and differentiation capacity, is crucial. In the present study, we investigate lentiviral vector-mediated genetic modification of rat bone-marrow derived MSCs and examine any functional effect of such genetic modification in an in vitro model of ischaemia. Methods Transduction efficiency and transgene persistence of second and third generation rHIV-1 based lentiviral vectors were tested using reporter gene constructs. Use of the rHIV-pWPT-EF1-α-GFP-W vector was optimised in terms of dose, toxicity, cell species, and storage. The in vivo condition of ischaemia was modelled in vitro by separation into its associated constituent parts i.e. hypoxia, serum and glucose deprivation, in which the effect of therapeutic gene over-expression on MSC survival was investigated. Results The second generation lentiviral vector rHIV-pWPT-EF1-α-GFP-W, was the most efficient and provided the most durable transgene expression of the vectors tested. Transduction with this vector did not adversely affect MSC morphology, viability or differentiation potential, and transgene expression levels were unaffected by cryopreservation of transduced cells. Over-expression of HSP70 resulted in enhanced MSC survival and increased resistance to apoptosis in conditions of hypoxia and ischaemia. MSC differentiation capacity was significantly reduced after oxygen deprivation, but was preserved with HSP70 over-expression. Conclusions Collectively, these data validate the use of lentiviral vectors for efficient in vitro gene delivery to MSCs and suggest that lentiviral vector transduction can facilitate sustained

  12. Large-scale production of lentiviral vector in a closed system hollow fiber bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Jonathan; Beltzer, Jim; Fury, Brian; Wilczek, Katarzyna; Tobin, Steve; Falconer, Danny; Nolta, Jan; Bauer, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are widely used in the field of gene therapy as an effective method for permanent gene delivery. While current methods of producing small scale vector batches for research purposes depend largely on culture flasks, the emergence and popularity of lentiviral vectors in translational, preclinical and clinical research has demanded their production on a much larger scale, a task that can be difficult to manage with the numbers of producer cell culture flasks required for large volumes of vector. To generate a large scale, partially closed system method for the manufacturing of clinical grade lentiviral vector suitable for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we developed a method employing a hollow fiber bioreactor traditionally used for cell expansion. We have demonstrated the growth, transfection, and vector-producing capability of 293T producer cells in this system. Vector particle RNA titers after subsequent vector concentration yielded values comparable to lentiviral iPSC induction vector batches produced using traditional culture methods in 225 cm2 flasks (T225s) and in 10-layer cell factories (CF10s), while yielding a volume nearly 145 times larger than the yield from a T225 flask and nearly three times larger than the yield from a CF10. Employing a closed system hollow fiber bioreactor for vector production offers the possibility of manufacturing large quantities of gene therapy vector while minimizing reagent usage, equipment footprint, and open system manipulation. PMID:26151065

  13. A comparison of foamy and lentiviral vector genotoxicity in SCID-repopulating cells shows foamy vectors are less prone to clonal dominance

    PubMed Central

    Everson, Elizabeth M; Olzsko, Miles E; Leap, David J; Hocum, Jonah D; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy using retroviral vectors has immense potential, but vector-mediated genotoxicity limits use in the clinic. Lentiviral vectors are less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors and have become the vector of choice in clinical trials. Foamy retroviral vectors have a promising integration profile and are less prone to read-through transcription than gammaretroviral or lentiviral vectors. Here, we directly compared the safety and efficacy of foamy vectors to lentiviral vectors in human CD34+ repopulating cells in immunodeficient mice. To increase their genotoxic potential, foamy and lentiviral vectors with identical transgene cassettes with a known genotoxic spleen focus forming virus promoter were used. Both vectors resulted in efficient marking in vivo and a total of 825 foamy and 460 lentiviral vector unique integration sites were recovered in repopulating cells 19 weeks after transplantation. Foamy vector proviruses were observed less often near RefSeq gene and proto-oncogene transcription start sites than lentiviral vectors. The foamy vector group were also more polyclonal with fewer dominant clones (two out of six mice) than the lentiviral vector group (eight out of eight mice), and only lentiviral vectors had integrants near known proto-oncogenes in dominant clones. Our data further support the relative safety of foamy vectors for HSC gene therapy. PMID:27579335

  14. A comparison of foamy and lentiviral vector genotoxicity in SCID-repopulating cells shows foamy vectors are less prone to clonal dominance.

    PubMed

    Everson, Elizabeth M; Olzsko, Miles E; Leap, David J; Hocum, Jonah D; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy using retroviral vectors has immense potential, but vector-mediated genotoxicity limits use in the clinic. Lentiviral vectors are less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors and have become the vector of choice in clinical trials. Foamy retroviral vectors have a promising integration profile and are less prone to read-through transcription than gammaretroviral or lentiviral vectors. Here, we directly compared the safety and efficacy of foamy vectors to lentiviral vectors in human CD34(+) repopulating cells in immunodeficient mice. To increase their genotoxic potential, foamy and lentiviral vectors with identical transgene cassettes with a known genotoxic spleen focus forming virus promoter were used. Both vectors resulted in efficient marking in vivo and a total of 825 foamy and 460 lentiviral vector unique integration sites were recovered in repopulating cells 19 weeks after transplantation. Foamy vector proviruses were observed less often near RefSeq gene and proto-oncogene transcription start sites than lentiviral vectors. The foamy vector group were also more polyclonal with fewer dominant clones (two out of six mice) than the lentiviral vector group (eight out of eight mice), and only lentiviral vectors had integrants near known proto-oncogenes in dominant clones. Our data further support the relative safety of foamy vectors for HSC gene therapy. PMID:27579335

  15. Complement regulatory proteins are incorporated into lentiviral vectors and protect particles against complement inactivation.

    PubMed

    Schauber-Plewa, C; Simmons, A; Tuerk, M J; Pacheco, C D; Veres, G

    2005-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with G glycoprotein from vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) and baculovirus gp64 are inactivated by human complement. The extent of vector inactivation in serum from individual donors was examined and results showed wide donor-dependent variation in complement sensitivity for VSV-G-pseudotyped lentivectors. Amphotropic envelope (Ampho)-pseudotyped vectors were generally resistant to serum from all donors, while gp64-pseudotyped vectors were inactivated but showed less donor-to-donor variation than VSV-G. In animal sera, the vectors were mostly resistant to inactivation by rodent complement, whereas canine complement caused a moderate reduction in titer. In a novel advance for the lentiviral vector system, human complement-resistant-pseudotyped lentivector particles were produced through incorporation of complement regulatory proteins (CRPs). Decay accelerating factor (DAF)/CD55 provided the most effective protection using this method, while membrane cofactor protein (MCP)/CD46 showed donor-dependent protection and CD59 provided little or no protection against complement inactivation. Unlike previous approaches using CRPs to produce complement-resistant viral vectors, CRP-containing lentivectors particles were generated for this study without engineering the CRP molecules. Thus, through overexpression of native DAF/CD55 in the viral producer cell, an easy method was developed for generation of lentiviral vectors that are almost completely resistant to inactivation by human complement. Production of complement-resistant lentiviral particles is a critical step toward use of these vectors for in vivo gene therapy applications. PMID:15550926

  16. Altering Entry Site Preference of Lentiviral Vectors into Neuronal Cells by Pseudotyping with Envelope Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenta; Kato, Shigeki; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Takada, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    A lentiviral vector system provides a powerful strategy for gene therapy trials against a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Pseudotyping of lentiviral vectors with different envelope glycoproteins not only confers the neurotropism to the vectors, but also alters the preference of sites of vector entry into neuronal cells. One major group of lentiviral vectors is a pseudotype with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) that enters preferentially cell body areas (somata/dendrites) of neurons and transduces them. Another group contains lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with fusion envelope glycoproteins composed of different sets of rabies virus glycoprotein and VSV-G segments that enter predominantly axon terminals of neurons and are transported through axons retrogradely to their cell bodies, resulting in enhanced retrograde gene transfer. This retrograde gene transfer takes a considerable advantage of delivering the transgene into neuronal cell bodies situated in regions distant from the injection site of the vectors. The rational use of these two vector groups characterized by different entry mechanisms will further extend the strategy for gene therapy of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26611586

  17. Oncogenesis following delivery of a nonprimate lentiviral gene therapy vector to fetal and neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Themis, Mike; Waddington, Simon N; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa G; Nivsarkar, Megha; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine V; Buckley, Suzanne M K; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine T; Mistry, Ajay; Bigger, Brian; Rahim, Ahad; Nguyen, Tuan H; Trono, Didier; Thrasher, Adrian J; Coutelle, Charles

    2005-10-01

    Gene therapy by use of integrating vectors carrying therapeutic transgene sequences offers the potential for a permanent cure of genetic diseases by stable vector insertion into the patients' chromosomes. However, three cases of T cell lymphoproliferative disease have been identified almost 3 years after retrovirus gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immune deficiency. In two of these cases vector insertion into the LMO2 locus was implicated in leukemogenesis, demonstrating that a more profound understanding is required of the genetic and molecular effects imposed on the host by vector integration or transgene expression. In vivo models to test for retro- and lentiviral vector safety prior to clinical application are therefore needed. Here we present a high incidence of lentiviral vector-associated tumorigenesis following in utero and neonatal gene transfer in mice. This system may provide a highly sensitive model to investigate integrating vector safety prior to clinical application. PMID:16084128

  18. Efficient transduction of pigtailed macaque hematopoietic repopulating cells with HIV-based lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Trobridge, Grant D.; Beard, Brian C.; Gooch, Christina; Wohlfahrt, Martin; Olsen, Philip; Fletcher, James; Malik, Punam

    2008-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are attractive for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy because they do not require mitosis for nuclear entry, they efficiently transduce hematopoietic repopulating cells, and self-inactivating (SIN) designs can be produced at high titer. Experiments to evaluate HIV-derived lentiviral vectors in nonhuman primates prior to clinical trials have been hampered by low transduction frequencies due in part to host restriction by TRIM5α. We have established conditions for efficient transduction of pigtailed macaque (Macaca nemestrina) long-term repopulating cells using VSV-G–pseudotyped HIV-based lentiviral vectors. Stable, long-term, high-level gene marking was observed in 3 macaques using relatively low MOIs (5-10) in a 48-hour ex vivo transduction protocol. All animals studied had rapid neutrophil engraftment with a median of 10.3 days to a count greater than 0.5 × 109/L (500/μL). Expression was detected in all lineages, with long-term marking levels in granulocytes at approximately 20% to 30%, and in lymphocytes at approximately 12% to 23%. All animals had polyclonal engraftment as determined by analysis of vector integration sites. These data suggest that lentiviral vectors should be highly effective for HSC gene therapy, particularly for diseases in which maintaining the engraftment potential of stem cells using short-term ex vivo transduction protocols is critical. PMID:18388180

  19. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M. Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P.; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties. PMID:26612671

  20. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties. PMID:26612671

  1. Construction of a lentiviral T/A vector for direct analysis of PCR-amplified promoters.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-xian; Zhu, Zhi-wei; Chen, Xiao-yu; Huang, Jing; Shi, Tuan-yuan; Li, Jun-xing; Pan, Jian-zhi

    2014-11-01

    The promoter plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. To analyze a promoter's activity, we developed a novel lentiviral T/A vector that contains two reporter genes, a luciferase (Luc2) gene and a green fluorescent protein (Venus) gene, that are linked via an internal ribosome entry site (IRES2). To test the performance of this vector, phosphoglycerate kinase-1 (PGK) and elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoters were amplified by PCR and inserted into this lentiviral T/A vector using T4 DNA ligase, yielding two promoter-reporter vectors: pLent-T-PGK and pLent-T-EF1α. When these vectors were transfected into 293T cells, we observed a higher level of Venus expression under a fluorescence microscopy in the case of pLent-T-EF1α as compared to pLent-T-PGK. The results of the luciferase reporter assay showed that the ratio of the promoter activities of EF1α and PGK was approximately 9:1. The two promoter-reporter vectors were also packaged as lentiviral particles to conduct promoter activity assay in cultured cells. The ratio of the promoter activities of EF1α and PGK was 4.23:1 when they were infected into 293T cells at a multiplicity of infection of 1. This value is comparable to that of a parallel experiment using the commercial luciferase reporter vector pGL4.10 with an activity ratio of 5.99:1 for EF1α and PGK. These results indicate that lentiviral T/A vector will be a useful tool for analysis of promoter activity and specificity. PMID:25091945

  2. Measurement of lentiviral vector titre and copy number by cross-species duplex quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Christodoulou, I; Patsali, P; Stephanou, C; Antoniou, M; Kleanthous, M; Lederer, C W

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses are the vectors of choice for many preclinical studies and clinical applications of gene therapy. Accurate measurement of biological vector titre before treatment is a prerequisite for vector dosing, and the calculation of vector integration sites per cell after treatment is as critical to the characterisation of modified cell products as it is to long-term follow-up and the assessment of risk and therapeutic efficiency in patients. These analyses are typically based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), but as yet compromise accuracy and comparability between laboratories and experimental systems, the former by using separate simplex reactions for the detection of endogene and lentiviral sequences and the latter by designing different PCR assays for analyses in human cells and animal disease models. In this study, we validate in human and murine cells a qPCR system for the single-tube assessment of lentiviral vector copy numbers that is suitable for analyses in at least 33 different mammalian species, including human and other primates, mouse, pig, cat and domestic ruminants. The established assay combines the accuracy of single-tube quantitation by duplex qPCR with the convenience of one-off assay optimisation for cross-species analyses and with the direct comparability of lentiviral transduction efficiencies in different species. PMID:26202078

  3. Elements of lentiviral vector design toward gene therapy for treating mucopolysaccharidosis I.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Przybilla, Michael J; Koniar, Brenda L; Whitley, Chester B

    2016-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal disease caused by α-l-iduronidase (IDUA) deficiency and accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). Lentiviral vector encoding correct IDUA cDNA could be used for treating MPS I. To optimize the lentiviral vector design, 9 constructs were designed by combinations of various promoters, enhancers, and codon optimization. After in vitro transfection into 293FT cells, 5 constructs achieved the highest IDUA activities (5613 to 7358 nmol/h/mg protein). These 5 candidate vectors were then tested by injection (1 × 10(7) TU/g) into neonatal MPS I mice. After 30 days, one vector, CCEoIDW, achieved the highest IDUA levels: 2.6% of wildtype levels in the brain, 9.9% in the heart, 200% in the liver and 257% in the spleen. CCEoIDW achieved the most significant GAG reduction: down 49% in the brain, 98% in the heart, 100% in the liver and 95% in the spleen. Further, CCEoIDW had the lowest transgene frequency, especially in the gonads (0.03 ± 0.01 copies/100 cells), reducing the risk of insertional mutagenesis and germ-line transmission. Therefore, CCEoIDW is selected as the optimal lentiviral vector for treating MPS I disease and will be applied in large animal preclinical studies. Further, taken both in vitro and in vivo comparisons together, codon optimization, use of EF-1α promoter and woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional response element (WPRE) could enhance transgene expression. These results provided a better understanding of factors contributing efficient transgene expression in lentiviral gene therapies. PMID:27556013

  4. Analysis of factor VIII mediated suppression of lentiviral vector titres.

    PubMed

    Radcliffe, P A; Sion, C J M; Wilkes, F J; Custard, E J; Beard, G L; Kingsman, S M; Mitrophanous, K A

    2008-02-01

    Effective gene therapy for haemophilia A necessitates a vector system that is not subject to a pre-existing immune response, has adequate coding capacity, gives long-term expression and preferably can target non-dividing cells. Vector systems based on lentiviruses such as equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) fulfil these criteria for the delivery of factor VIII (FVIII). We have found that B domain-deleted (BDD) FVIII protein inhibits functional viral particle production when co-expressed with the EIAV vector system. Although particle numbers (as measured by reverse transcriptase activity) are near normal, RNA genome levels are reduced and measurement of integrated copies revealed the virus is severely defective in its ability to transduce target cells. This is due to the absence of sufficient vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) envelope on viral particles derived from cells expressing FVIII. By using an internal tissue-specific promoter, that has low activity in the producer cells, to drive expression of FVIII we have overcome this inhibitory effect allowing us to generate titres approaching those obtained with vector genomes encoding reporter genes. Furthermore, we report that codon optimization of the full-length FVIII gene increased vector titres approximately 10-fold in addition to substantially improving expression per integrated vector copy. PMID:18046428

  5. Comparative analysis of lentiviral vectors and modular protein nanovectors for traumatic brain injury gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Negro-Demontel, María Luciana; Saccardo, Paolo; Giacomini, Cecilia; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael Joaquín; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vazquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Peluffo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains as one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide and there are no effective treatments currently available. Gene therapy applications have emerged as important alternatives for the treatment of diverse nervous system injuries. New strategies are evolving with the notion that each particular pathological condition may require a specific vector. Moreover, the lack of detailed comparative studies between different vectors under similar conditions hampers the selection of an ideal vector for a given pathological condition. The potential use of lentiviral vectors versus several modular protein-based nanovectors was compared using a controlled cortical impact model of TBI under the same gene therapy conditions. We show that variables such as protein/DNA ratio, incubation volume, and presence of serum or chloroquine in the transfection medium impact on both nanovector formation and transfection efficiency in vitro. While lentiviral vectors showed GFP protein 1 day after TBI and increased expression at 14 days, nanovectors showed stable and lower GFP transgene expression from 1 to 14 days. No toxicity after TBI by any of the vectors was observed as determined by resulting levels of IL-1β or using neurological sticky tape test. In fact, both vector types induced functional improvement per se. PMID:26015985

  6. Cytotoxicity associated with artemis overexpression after lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Multhaup, Megan; Karlen, Andrea D; Swanson, Debra L; Wilber, Andrew; Somia, Nikunj V; Cowan, Morton J; McIvor, R Scott

    2010-07-01

    Artemis is a hairpin-opening endonuclease involved in nonhomologous end-joining and V(D)J recombination. Deficiency of Artemis results in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) characterized by complete absence of T and B cells due to an arrest at the receptor recombination stage. We have generated several lentiviral vectors for transduction of the Artemis sequence, intending to complement the deficient phenotype. We found that transduction by a lentiviral vector in which Artemis is regulated by a strong EF-1alpha promoter resulted in a dose-dependent loss of cell viability due to perturbed cell cycle distribution, increased DNA damage, and increased apoptotic cell frequency. This toxic response was not observed in cultures exposed to identical amounts of control vector. Loss of cell viability was also observed in cells transfected with an Artemis expression construct, indicating that toxicity is independent of lentiviral transduction. Reduced toxicity was observed when cells were transduced with a moderate-strength phosphoglycerate kinase promoter to regulate Artemis expression. These results present a novel challenge in the establishment of conditions that support Artemis expression at levels that are nontoxic yet sufficient to correct the T(-)B(-) phenotype, crucial for preclinical studies and clinical application of Artemis gene transfer in the treatment of human SCID-A. PMID:20163250

  7. Cytotoxicity Associated with Artemis Overexpression After Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Multhaup, Megan; Karlen, Andrea D.; Swanson, Debra L.; Wilber, Andrew; Somia, Nikunj V.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Artemis is a hairpin-opening endonuclease involved in nonhomologous end-joining and V(D)J recombination. Deficiency of Artemis results in radiation-sensitive severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) characterized by complete absence of T and B cells due to an arrest at the receptor recombination stage. We have generated several lentiviral vectors for transduction of the Artemis sequence, intending to complement the deficient phenotype. We found that transduction by a lentiviral vector in which Artemis is regulated by a strong EF-1α promoter resulted in a dose-dependent loss of cell viability due to perturbed cell cycle distribution, increased DNA damage, and increased apoptotic cell frequency. This toxic response was not observed in cultures exposed to identical amounts of control vector. Loss of cell viability was also observed in cells transfected with an Artemis expression construct, indicating that toxicity is independent of lentiviral transduction. Reduced toxicity was observed when cells were transduced with a moderate-strength phosphoglycerate kinase promoter to regulate Artemis expression. These results present a novel challenge in the establishment of conditions that support Artemis expression at levels that are nontoxic yet sufficient to correct the T−B− phenotype, crucial for preclinical studies and clinical application of Artemis gene transfer in the treatment of human SCID-A. PMID:20163250

  8. Lentiviral Vectors for the Engineering of Implantable Cells Secreting Recombinant Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Schneider, Bernard L

    2016-01-01

    The implantation of genetically modified cells is considered for the chronic delivery of therapeutic recombinant proteins in vivo. In the context of gene therapy, the genetic engineering of cells faces two main challenges. First, it is critical to generate expandable cell sources, which can maintain stable high productivity of the recombinant protein of interest over time, both in culture and after transplantation. In addition, gene transfer techniques need to be developed to engineer cells synthetizing complex polypeptides, such as recombinant monoclonal antibodies, to broaden the range of potential therapeutic applications. Here, we provide a workflow for the use of lentiviral vectors as a flexible tool to generate antibody-producing cells. In particular, lentiviral vectors can be used to genetically engineer the cell types compatible with encapsulation devices protecting the implanted cells from the host immune system. Detailed methods are provided for the design and production of lentiviral vectors, optimization of cell transduction, as well as for the quantification and quality control of the produced recombinant antibody. PMID:27317179

  9. A bicistronic lentiviral vector-based method for differential transsynaptic tracing of neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yohei; Tsubota, Tadashi; Sato, Ayana; Koyano, Kenji W; Tamura, Keita; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    We developed a bicistronic HIV1-derived lentiviral vector system co-expressing green fluorescent protein (AcGFP1) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) mediated by picornaviral 2A peptide. This system was first applied to the analysis of the rat cerebellar efferent pathways. When the lentiviral vector was injected into a specific lobule, the local Purkinje cell population (first-order neurons) was efficiently infected and co-expressed both AcGFP1 and WGA protein. In the second-order neurons in the cerebellar and vestibular nuclei, WGA but not AcGFP1 protein was differentially detected, demonstrating that the presence of AcGFP1 protein enables discrimination of first-order neurons from second-order neurons. Furthermore, WGA protein was detected in the contralateral ventrolateral thalamic nucleus (third-order nucleus). This system also successfully labeled rat cortical pathways from the primary somatosensory cortex and monkey cerebellar efferent pathways. Thus, this bicistronic lentiviral vector system is a useful tool for differential transsynaptic tracing of neural pathways originating from local brain regions. PMID:20816792

  10. Design of a titering assay for lentiviral vectors utilizing direct extraction of DNA from transduced cells in microtiter plates

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Michele E; Vin, Chintan D; Slough, Megan M; Gombotz, Wayne R; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna

    2016-01-01

    Using lentiviral vector products in clinical applications requires an accurate method for measuring transduction titer. For vectors lacking a marker gene, quantitative polymerase chain reaction is used to evaluate the number of vector DNA copies in transduced target cells, from which a transduction titer is calculated. Immune Design previously described an integration-deficient lentiviral vector pseudotyped with a modified Sindbis virus envelope for use in cancer immunotherapy (VP02, of the ZVex platform). Standard protocols for titering integration-competent lentiviral vectors employ commercial spin columns to purify vector DNA from transduced cells, but such columns are not optimized for isolation of extrachromosomal (nonintegrated) DNA. Here, we describe a 96-well transduction titer assay in which DNA extraction is performed in situ in the transduction plate, yielding quantitative recovery of extrachromosomal DNA. Vector titers measured by this method were higher than when commercial spin columns were used for DNA isolation. Evaluation of the method’s specificity, linear range, and precision demonstrate that it is suitable for use as a lot release assay to support clinical trials with VP02. Finally, the method is compatible with titering both integrating and nonintegrating lentiviral vectors, suggesting that it may be used to evaluate the transduction titer for any lentiviral vector. PMID:26942209

  11. A replication competent lentivirus (RCL) assay for equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV)-based lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Miskin, J; Chipchase, D; Rohll, J; Beard, G; Wardell, T; Angell, D; Roehl, H; Jolly, D; Kingsman, S; Mitrophanous, K

    2006-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors are being developed to satisfy a wide range of currently unmet medical needs. Vectors destined for clinical evaluation have been rendered multiply defective by deletion of all viral coding sequences and nonessential cis-acting sequences from the transfer genome. The viral envelope and accessory proteins are excluded from the production system. The vectors are produced from separate expression plasmids that are designed to minimize the potential for homologous recombination. These features ensure that the regeneration of the starting virus is impossible. It is a regulatory requirement to confirm the absence of any replication competent virus, so we describe here the development and validation of a replication competent lentivirus (RCL) assay for equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV)-based vectors. The assay is based on the guidelines developed for testing retroviral vectors, and uses the F-PERT (fluorescent-product enhanced reverse transcriptase) assay to test for the presence of a transmissible reverse transcriptase. We have empirically modelled the replication kinetics of an EIAV-like entity in human cells and devised an amplification protocol by comparison with a replication competent MLV. The RCL assay has been validated at the 20 litre manufacturing scale, during which no RCL was detected. The assay is theoretically applicable to any lentiviral vector and pseudotype combination. PMID:16208418

  12. Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Long-Term and High Efficiency Transgene Expression in HEK 293T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingying; Yan, Renhe; Li, Andrew; Zhang, Yanling; Li, Jinlong; Du, Hongyan; Chen, Baihong; Wei, Wenjin; Zhang, Yi; Sumners, Colin; Zheng, Haifa; Li, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives:Lentiviral vectors have been used successfully to rapidly produce decigram quantities of active recombinant proteins in mammalian cell lines. To optimize the protein production platform, the roles of Ubiquitous Chromatin Opening Element (UCOE), an insulator, and selected promoters were evaluated based on efficiency and stability of foreign gene expression mediated by lentiviral vectors. Methods: Five lentiviral vectors, pFIN-EF1α-GFP-2A-mCherH-WPRE containing EF1α promoter and HS4 insulator, p'HR.cppt.3'1.2kb-UCOE-SFFV-eGFP containing SFFV promoter and UCOE, pTYF-CMV(β-globin intron)-eGFP containing CMV promoter and β-globin intron, pTYF-CMV-eGFP containing CMV promoter, and pTYF-EF1α-eGFP with EF1α promoter were packaged, titered, and then transduced into 293T cells (1000 viral genomes per cell). The transduced cells were passaged once every three days at a ratio of 1:10. Expression level and stability of the foreign gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), was evaluated using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Furthermore, we constructed a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 recombinant lentiviral vector, pLV-CMV-E1, driven by the CMV promoter. This vector was packaged and transduced into 293T cells, and the recombinant cell lines with stable expression of E1 protein were established by limiting dilution. Results:GFP expression in 293T cells transduced with the five lentiviral vectors peaked between passages 3 and 5 and persisted for more than 5 weeks. The expression was prolonged in the cells transduced with TYF-CMV (β-globin intron)-eGFP or TYF-CMV-eGFP, demonstrating less than a 50% decrease even at 9 weeks post transduction (p>0.05). The TYF-CMV-eGFP-transduced cells began with a higher level of GFP expression than other vectors did. The percentage of GFP positive cells for any of the five lentiviral vectors sustained over time. Moreover, the survival rates of all transfected cells exceeded 80% at both 5 and 9 weeks post transduction

  13. Resting lymphocyte transduction with measles virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors relies on CD46 and SLAM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Qi; Schneider, Irene C.; Gallet, Manuela; Kneissl, Sabrina; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-05-10

    The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) were recently shown to mediate transduction of resting lymphocytes by lentiviral vectors. MV vaccine strains use CD46 or signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as receptor for cell entry. A panel of H protein mutants derived from vaccine strain or wild-type MVs that lost or gained CD46 or SLAM receptor usage were investigated for their ability to mediate gene transfer into unstimulated T lymphocytes. The results demonstrate that CD46 is sufficient for efficient vector particle association with unstimulated lymphocytes. For stable gene transfer into these cells, however, both MV receptors were found to be essential.

  14. Stable gene transfer to the nervous system using a non-primate lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Mitrophanous, K; Yoon, S; Rohll, J; Patil, D; Wilkes, F; Kim, V; Kingsman, S; Kingsman, A; Mazarakis, N

    1999-11-01

    We have constructed a non-primate lentiviral vector system based on the equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV). This system is able to transduce both dividing and non-dividing cells, including primary cultured hippocampal neurons and neurons and glia in the adult rat central nervous system (CNS), at efficiencies comparable with HIV-based vectors. We demonstrate that the only EIAV proteins required for this activity are gag/pol and that the only accessory protein required for vector production is rev. In addition, we show that the pol encoded dUTPase activity that is found in all non-primate lentiviruses is not required. The vectors can be pseudotyped with a range of envelopes including rabies G and MLV 4070A and can be concentrated to high titres. The ability of EIAV to infect mitotically inactive cells makes this vector an attractive alternative to the immunodeficiency viruses for gene therapy. PMID:10602376

  15. Lentiviral vectors as tools to understand central nervous system biology in mammalian model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Parr-Brownlie, Louise C.; Bosch-Bouju, Clémentine; Schoderboeck, Lucia; Sizemore, Rachel J.; Abraham, Wickliffe C.; Hughes, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviruses have been extensively used as gene delivery vectors since the mid-1990s. Usually derived from the human immunodeficiency virus genome, they mediate efficient gene transfer to non-dividing cells, including neurons and glia in the adult mammalian brain. In addition, integration of the recombinant lentiviral construct into the host genome provides permanent expression, including the progeny of dividing neural precursors. In this review, we describe targeted vectors with modified envelope glycoproteins and expression of transgenes under the regulation of cell-selective and inducible promoters. This technology has broad utility to address fundamental questions in neuroscience and we outline how this has been used in rodents and primates. Combining viral tract tracing with immunohistochemistry and confocal or electron microscopy, lentiviral vectors provide a tool to selectively label and trace specific neuronal populations at gross or ultrastructural levels. Additionally, new generation optogenetic technologies can be readily utilized to analyze neuronal circuit and gene functions in the mature mammalian brain. Examples of these applications, limitations of current systems and prospects for future developments to enhance neuroscience knowledge will be reviewed. Finally, we will discuss how these vectors may be translated from gene therapy trials into the clinical setting. PMID:26041987

  16. Use of Lentiviral Vectors to Deliver and Express Bicistronic Transgenes in Developing Chicken Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Semple-Rowland, Susan L; Berry, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The abilities of lentiviral vectors to carry large transgenes (~ 8Kb) and to efficiently infect and integrate these genes into the genomes of both dividing and non-dividing cells make them ideal candidates for transport of genetic material into cells and tissues. Given the properties of these vectors, it is somewhat surprising that they have seen only limited use in studies of developing tissues and in particular of the developing nervous system. Over the past several years, we have taken advantage of the large capacity of these vectors to explore the expression characteristics of several dual promoter and 2A peptide bicistronic transgenes in developing chick neural retina, with the goal of identifying transgene designs that reliably express multiple proteins in infected cells. Here we summarize the activities of several of these transgenes in neural retina and provide detailed methodologies for packaging lentivirus and delivering the virus into the developing neural tubes of chicken embryos in ovo, procedures that have been optimized over the course of several years of use in our laboratory. Conditions to hatch injected embryos are also discussed. The chicken-specific techniques will be of highest interest to investigators using avian embryos, development and packaging of lentiviral vectors that reliably express multiple proteins in infected cells should be of interest to all investigators whose experiments demand manipulation and expression of multiple proteins in developing cells and tissues. PMID:23816789

  17. Whole transcriptome characterization of aberrant splicing events induced by lentiviral vector integrations

    PubMed Central

    Cesana, Daniela; Sgualdino, Jacopo; Rudilosso, Laura; Merella, Stefania; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-retroviral/lentiviral vectors (γRV/LV) with self-inactivating (SIN) long terminal repeats (LTRs) and internal moderate cellular promoters pose a reduced risk of insertional mutagenesis when compared with vectors with active LTRs. Yet, in a recent LV-based clinical trial for β-thalassemia, vector integration within the HMGA2 gene induced the formation of an aberrantly spliced mRNA form that appeared to cause clonal dominance. Using a method that we developed, cDNA linear amplification-mediated PCR, in combination with high-throughput sequencing, we conducted a whole transcriptome analysis of chimeric LV-cellular fusion transcripts in transduced human lymphoblastoid cells and primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We observed a surprising abundance of read-through transcription originating outside and inside the provirus and identified the vector sequences contributing to the aberrant splicing process. We found that SIN LV has a sharply reduced propensity to engage in aberrant splicing compared with that of vectors carrying active LTRs. Moreover, by recoding the identified vector splice sites, we reduced residual read-through transcription and demonstrated an effective strategy for improving vectors. Characterization of the mechanisms and genetic features underlying vector-induced aberrant splicing will enable the generation of safer vectors, with low impact on the cellular transcriptome. PMID:22523064

  18. Multigenic lentiviral vectors for combined and tissue-specific expression of miRNA- and protein-based antiangiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Askou, Anne Louise; Aagaard, Lars; Kostic, Corinne; Arsenijevic, Yvan; Hollensen, Anne Kruse; Bek, Toke; Jensen, Thomas Gryesten; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl

    2015-01-01

    Lentivirus-based gene delivery vectors carrying multiple gene cassettes are powerful tools in gene transfer studies and gene therapy, allowing coexpression of multiple therapeutic factors and, if desired, fluorescent reporters. Current strategies to express transgenes and microRNA (miRNA) clusters from a single vector have certain limitations that affect transgene expression levels and/or vector titers. In this study, we describe a novel vector design that facilitates combined expression of therapeutic RNA- and protein-based antiangiogenic factors as well as a fluorescent reporter from back-to-back RNApolII-driven expression cassettes. This configuration allows effective production of intron-embedded miRNAs that are released upon transduction of target cells. Exploiting such multigenic lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate robust miRNA-directed downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, leading to reduced angiogenesis, and parallel impairment of angiogenic pathways by codelivering the gene encoding pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). Notably, subretinal injections of lentiviral vectors reveal efficient retinal pigment epithelium-specific gene expression driven by the VMD2 promoter, verifying that multigenic lentiviral vectors can be produced with high titers sufficient for in vivo applications. Altogether, our results suggest the potential applicability of combined miRNA- and protein-encoding lentiviral vectors in antiangiogenic gene therapy, including new combination therapies for amelioration of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26052532

  19. Rapid generation of dendritic cell specific transgenic mice by lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyu; Zou, Liyun; Liu, Qin; Li, Jingyi; Zhou, Jingran; Wang, Yong; Li, Na; Liu, Ting; Wei, Hong; Wu, Min; Wan, Ying; Wu, Yuzhang

    2009-12-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) specific transgenic mice are a most important model for investigating dendritic cell functions in vivo. Recently, lentivirus mediated gene transfer has become a powerful and convenient method for generation of transgenic mice. We cloned a 1.2 kb CD11c promoter and constructed a lentiviral vector, which efficiently drove DC-specific expression in vitro. After microinjection of purified virus into the perivitelline space of single-cell embryo, more than 80% newborn mice were transgenic and 7 F0 founders were rapidly generated in 2 months. GFP was strictly expressed in CD11c+ cells in spleens, thymus and lymph nodes of the transgenic mice. Importantly, the physiological characteristics and functions of DCs in the transgenic mice were not altered by the specific expression. These results indicate that this vector could be used to rapidly prepare DC-specific transgenic mice. Thus, this lentiviral vector system may provide a convenient and useful tool to study the properties of DCs in vivo. PMID:19468852

  20. Highly Efficient Large-Scale Lentiviral Vector Concentration by Tandem Tangential Flow Filtration

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Aaron R.; Patel, Sanjeet; Senadheera, Shantha; Plath, Kathrin; Kohn, Donald B.; Hollis, Roger P.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale lentiviral vector (LV) concentration can be inefficient and time consuming, often involving multiple rounds of filtration and centrifugation. This report describes a simpler method using two tangential flow filtration (TFF) steps to concentrate liter-scale volumes of LV supernatant, achieving in excess of 2000-fold concentration in less than 3 hours with very high recovery (>97%). Large volumes of LV supernatant can be produced easily through the use of multi-layer flasks, each having 1720 cm2 surface area and producing ~560 mL of supernatant per flask. Combining the use of such flasks and TFF greatly simplifies large-scale production of LV. As a demonstration, the method is used to produce a very high titer LV (>1010 TU/mL) and transduce primary human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells at high final vector concentrations with no overt toxicity. A complex LV (STEMCCA) for induced pluripotent stem cell generation is also concentrated from low initial titer and used to transduce and reprogram primary human fibroblasts with no overt toxicity. Additionally, a generalized and simple multiplexed real- time PCR assay is described for lentiviral vector titer and copy number determination. PMID:21784103

  1. Correction of Methylmalonic Aciduria In Vivo Using a Codon-Optimized Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Edward S.Y.; McIntyre, Chantelle; Peters, Heidi L.; Ranieri, Enzo; Anson, Donald S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder of organic acid metabolism with limited therapeutic options, resulting in high morbidity and mortality. Positive results from combined liver/kidney transplantation suggest, however, that metabolic sink therapy may be efficacious. Gene therapy offers a more accessible approach for the treatment of methylmalonic aciduria than organ transplantation. Accordingly, we have evaluated a lentiviral vector–mediated gene transfer approach in an in vivo mouse model of methylmalonic aciduria. A mouse model of methylmalonic aciduria (Mut−/−MUTh2) was injected intravenously at 8 weeks of age with a lentiviral vector that expressed a codon-optimized human methylmalonyl coenzyme A mutase transgene, HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM. Untreated Mut−/−MUTh2 and normal mice were used as controls. HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM-treated mice achieved near-normal weight for age, and Western blot analysis demonstrated significant methylmalonyl coenzyme A enzyme expression in their livers. Normalization of liver methylmalonyl coenzyme A enzyme activity in the treated group was associated with a reduction in plasma and urine methylmalonic acid levels, and a reduction in the hepatic methylmalonic acid concentration. Administration of the HIV-1SDmEF1αmurSigHutMCM vector provided significant, although incomplete, biochemical correction of methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model, suggesting that gene therapy is a potential treatment for this disorder. PMID:24568291

  2. Pseudotyping of lentiviral vector with novel vesiculovirus envelope glycoproteins derived from Chandipura and Piry viruses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuang; Mohan Kumar, Dipu; Sax, Chelsea; Schuler, Clayton; Akkina, Ramesh

    2016-01-15

    While the envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) is widely used for pseudotyping of lentiviral vectors, sub-optimal gene transfer into certain cell types and its sensitivity to inactivation by human complement hinders its broader applications. To find alternative candidates, here we evaluated two serologically distinct novel viral envelopes derived from Chandipura (CNV-G) and Piry (PRV-G) vesiculoviruses. Both permitted generation of high titer psuedotyped lentiviral vectors with a capacity for high efficiency gene transfer into various cell types from different species. In human lymphoid and hematopoietic stem cells, their transduction efficiency was significantly lower than that of VSV-G. However, both novel envelopes were found to be more resistant to inactivation by human serum complement compared to VSV-G. Thus CNV-G and PRV-G envelopes can be harnessed for multiple uses in the future based on the cell type that needs to be gene transduced and possibly for in vivo gene transfer. PMID:26650691

  3. Lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer and RNA silencing technology in neuronal dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, Jean-Luc

    2011-02-01

    Lentiviral-mediated gene transfer in vivo or in cultured mammalian neurons can be used to address a wide variety of biological questions, to design animals models for specific neurodegenerative pathologies, or to test potential therapeutic approaches in a variety of brain disorders. Lentiviruses can infect non-dividing cells, thereby allowing stable gene transfer in post-mitotic cells such as mature neurons. An important contribution has been the use of inducible vectors: the same animal can thus be used repeatedly in the doxycycline-on or -off state, providing a powerful mean for assessing the function of a gene candidate in a disorder within a specific neuronal circuit. Furthermore, lentivirus vectors provide a unique tool to integrate siRNA expression constructs with the aim to locally knockdown expression of a specific gene, enabling to assess the function of a gene in a very specific neuronal pathway. Lentiviral vector-mediated delivery of short hairpin RNA results in persistent knockdown of gene expression in the brain. Therefore, the use of lentiviruses for stable expression of siRNA in brain is a powerful aid to probe gene functions in vivo and for gene therapy of diseases of the central nervous system. In this chapter I review the applications of lentivirus-mediated gene transfer in the investigation of specific gene candidates involved in major brain disorders and neurodegenerative processes. Major applications have been in polyglutamine disorders, such as synucleinopathies and Parkinson's disease, or in investigating gene function in Huntington's disease, dystonia, or muscular dystrophy. Recently, lentivirus gene transfer has been an invaluable tool for evaluation of gene function in behavioral disorders such as drug addiction and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or in learning and cognition. PMID:20862616

  4. [Construction and identification of recombinant lentiviral vector of hNoc4L gene].

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Wang, Shujuan; Yan, Jinghua

    2010-11-01

    Formation and nuclear export of pre-ribosomes requires many nucleolar complexes, hNoc4L which contains a conserved Noc doman is a homolog of nucleolar complex associated 4 (S. cerevisiae), but its function is completely unclear. Here, we successfully got the recombinant lentiviral vector p113.7-EF1-hNoc4L-Flag by replacing the U6 promoter in p113.7 with EF1alpha promoter, and then inserted hNoc4L to down-stream of the EF1alpha prompter. We determined the transduction efficiency in different mammalian cell lines based on lentiviral packaging system. Subsequently, we analyzed the immunogenicity of the recombinant lentivirus and stable expression of hNoc4L in RAW264.7 cells. The results showed that the recombinant lentivirus characterized a high transduction efficiency, long-term expression and low immunogenicity. Therefore, we pave the way for further identification of the biological activity of hNoc4L protein during ribosome biogenesis in mammalian. PMID:21284218

  5. Specific Targeting of Human Interleukin (IL)-13 Receptor α2-Positive Cells with Lentiviral Vectors Displaying IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Wu; Marino, Michael P.; Suzuki, Akiko; Joshi, Bharat; Husain, Syed R.; Maisner, Andrea; Galanis, Evanthia; Puri, Raj K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The ability to selectively and efficiently target transgene delivery to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. Lentiviral vectors have several advantages that make them attractive as gene delivery vehicles and their tropism can be altered through pseudotyping, allowing transgene delivery to specific populations of cells. The human interleukin-13 receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2) is uniquely overexpressed in many different human tumors, making it an attractive target for cancer therapy. In this study, we examined whether IL-13Rα2-positive tumor cells can be specifically targeted with lentiviral vector pseudotypes containing a truncated fusion (F) protein derived from measles virus (MV) and a tail-truncated and receptor-blind MV hemagglutinin (H) protein bearing IL-13 at the C terminus. The retargeted lentiviral vector efficiently transduced cells that express high levels of IL-13Rα2, but not cells expressing low levels of IL-13Rα2 in vitro. In vivo, it specifically targeted IL-13Rα2-positive glioma cell xenografts in immunodeficient mice in the context of subcutaneous and intracranial glioma models. Similar lentiviral vectors may be developed for targeting other tumors expressing specific cell surface receptors. PMID:22612657

  6. Anti-Apoptotic Effects of Lentiviral Vector Transduction Promote Increased Rituximab Tolerance in Cancerous B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Benyamin; Krogh, Louise Bechmann; Laursen, Maria Bach; Primo, Maria Nascimento; Marques, Sara Correia; Dybkær, Karen; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is characterized by great genetic and clinical heterogeneity which complicates prognostic prediction and influences treatment efficacy. The most common regimen, R-CHOP, consists of a combination of anthracycline- and immuno-based drugs including Rituximab. It remains elusive how and to which extent genetic variability impacts the response and potential tolerance to R-CHOP. Hence, an improved understanding of mechanisms leading to drug tolerance in B-cells is crucial, and modelling by genetic intervention directly in B-cells is fundamental in such investigations. Lentivirus-based gene vectors are widely used gene vehicles, which in B-cells are an attractive alternative to potentially toxic transfection-based methodologies. Here, we investigate the use of VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors in B-cells for exploring the impact of microRNAs on tolerance to Rituximab. Notably, we find that robust lentiviral transduction of cancerous B-cell lines markedly and specifically enhances the resistance of transduced germinal center B-cells (GCBs) to Rituximab. Although Rituximab works partially through complement-mediated cell lysis, increased tolerance is not achieved through effects of lentiviral transduction on cell death mediated by complement. Rather, reduced levels of PARP1 and persistent high levels of CD43 in Rituximab-treated GCBs demonstrate anti-apoptotic effects of lentiviral transduction that may interfere with the outcome and interpretation of Rituximab tolerance studies. Our findings stress that caution should be exercised exploiting lentiviral vectors in studies of tolerance to therapeutics in DLBCL. Importantly, however, we demonstrate the feasibility of using the lentiviral gene delivery platform in studies addressing the impact of specific microRNAs on Rituximab responsiveness. PMID:27045839

  7. Integrase-defective Lentiviral Vectors as a Delivery Platform for Targeted Modification of Adenosine Deaminase Locus

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Alok V; Hollis, Roger P; Kuftinec, Gabriela; Senadheera, Shantha; Chan, Rebecca; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) for transient delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) and donor templates for site-specific modification of the human adenosine deaminase (hADA) gene. Initially, we constructed IDLVs carrying ZFN monomers (Single-IDLVs) and found them to be able to deliver their gene-editing payload to K562 cells successfully upon cotransduction, with minimal cytotoxicity. To simplify delivery, we designed an IDLV construct to deliver both ZFN monomers from the same vector (Double-IDLV). However, this construct in its original state was prone to rearrangements of the vector genome, resulting in greatly reduced functionality; this was due to recombination between highly similar ZFN monomers arranged in tandem. We modified the Double-IDLV constructs to reduce recombination and restored simultaneous delivery of both ZFNs. We also tested an IDLV construct for delivery of donor templates and demonstrated its efficacy for gene modification. In summary, we highlighted the importance of modifying vector design for co-delivery of highly similar sequences inherent to genome-editing nucleases, and demonstrated significant improvement in the use of IDLVs for delivery of ZFNs and donor templates for genome modification. PMID:23857176

  8. Dual-regulated lentiviral vector for gene therapy of X-linked chronic granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Chiriaco, Maria; Farinelli, Giada; Capo, Valentina; Zonari, Erika; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Di Matteo, Gigliola; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Migliavacca, Maddalena; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Bombelli, Ferdinando; Giorda, Ezio; Kajaste-Rudnitski, Anna; Trono, Didier; Grez, Manuel; Rossi, Paolo; Finocchi, Andrea; Naldini, Luigi; Gentner, Bernhard; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    Regulated transgene expression may improve the safety and efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy. Clinical trials for X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) employing gammaretroviral vectors were limited by insertional oncogenesis or lack of persistent engraftment. Our novel strategy, based on regulated lentiviral vectors (LV), targets gp91(phox) expression to the differentiated myeloid compartment while sparing HSC, to reduce the risk of genotoxicity and potential perturbation of reactive oxygen species levels. Targeting was obtained by a myeloid-specific promoter (MSP) and posttranscriptional, microRNA-mediated regulation. We optimized both components in human bone marrow (BM) HSC and their differentiated progeny in vitro and in a xenotransplantation model, and generated therapeutic gp91(phox) expressing LVs for CGD gene therapy. All vectors restored gp91(phox) expression and function in human X-CGD myeloid cell lines, primary monocytes, and differentiated myeloid cells. While unregulated LVs ectopically expressed gp91(phox) in CD34(+) cells, transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally regulated LVs substantially reduced this off-target expression. X-CGD mice transplanted with transduced HSC restored gp91(phox) expression, and MSP-driven vectors maintained regulation during BM development. Combining transcriptional (SP146.gp91-driven) and posttranscriptional (miR-126-restricted) targeting, we achieved high levels of myeloid-specific transgene expression, entirely sparing the CD34(+) HSC compartment. This dual-targeted LV construct represents a promising candidate for further clinical development. PMID:24869932

  9. Stable and Efficient Gene Transfer into the Retina Using an HIV-Based Lentiviral Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masayo; Gage, Fred H.; Verma, Inder M.

    1997-09-01

    The development of methods for efficient gene transfer to terminally differentiated retinal cells is important to study the function of the retina as well as for gene therapy of retinal diseases. We have developed a lentiviral vector system based on the HIV that can transduce terminally differentiated neurons of the brain in vivo. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of HIV vectors to transfer genes into retinal cells. An HIV vector containing a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into the subretinal space of rat eyes. The GFP gene under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter was efficiently expressed in both photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium. However, the use of the rhodopsin promoter resulted in expression predominantly in photoreceptor cells. Most successfully transduced eyes showed that photoreceptor cells in >80% of the area of whole retina expressed the GFP. The GFP expression persisted for at least 12 weeks with no apparent decrease. The efficient gene transfer into photoreceptor cells by HIV vectors will be useful for gene therapy of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa.

  10. The human ankyrin 1 promoter insulator sustains gene expression in a β-globin lentiviral vector in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Wherley, Jennifer; Kaufman, Michael L; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Cooper, Aaron R; Hoban, Megan D; Baldwin, Kismet M; Lumaquin, Dianne; Wang, Xiaoyan; Senadheera, Shantha; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors designed for the treatment of the hemoglobinopathies require the inclusion of regulatory and strong enhancer elements to achieve sufficient expression of the β-globin transgene. Despite the inclusion of these elements, the efficacy of these vectors may be limited by transgene silencing due to the genomic environment surrounding the integration site. Barrier insulators can be used to give more consistent expression and resist silencing even with lower vector copies. Here, the barrier activity of an insulator element from the human ankyrin-1 gene was analyzed in a lentiviral vector carrying an antisickling human β-globin gene. Inclusion of a single copy of the Ankyrin insulator did not affect viral titer, and improved the consistency of expression from the vector in murine erythroleukemia cells. The presence of the Ankyrin insulator element did not change transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells in short-term erythroid culture or in vivo in primary murine transplants. However, analysis in secondary recipients showed that the lentiviral vector with the Ankyrin element preserved transgene expression, whereas expression from the vector lacking the Ankyrin insulator decreased in secondary recipients. These studies demonstrate that the Ankyrin insulator may improve long-term β-globin expression in hematopoietic stem cells for gene therapy of hemoglobinopathies. PMID:26029723

  11. SK-HEP cells and lentiviral vector for production of human recombinant factor VIII.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Nathalia Gonsales; Swiech, Kamilla; Picanço-Castro, Virgínia; Russo-Carbolante, Elisa Maria de Sousa; Soares Neto, Mario Abreu; de Castilho-Fernandes, Andrielle; Faça, Vitor Marcel; Fontes, Aparecida Maria; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2012-08-01

    Hemophilia A is caused by a deficiency in coagulation factor VIII. Recombinant factor VIII can be used as an alternative although it is unavailable for most patients. Here, we describe the production of a human recombinant B-domain-deleted FVIII (rBDDFVIII) by the human cell line SK-HEP-1, modified by a lentiviral vector rBDDFVIII was produced by recombinant SK-HEP cells (rSK-HEP) at 1.5-2.1 IU/10(6) in 24 h. The recombinant factor had increased in vitro stability when compared to commercial pdFVIII. The functionality of rBDDFVIII was shown by its biological activity and by tail-clip challenge in hemophilia A mice. The rSK-HEP cells grew in a scalable system and produced active rBDDFVIII, indicating that this platform production can be optimized to meet the commercial production scale needs. PMID:22488441

  12. Analysis of Lentiviral Vector Integration in HIV+ Study Subjects Receiving Autologous Infusions of Gene Modified CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gary P; Levine, Bruce L; Binder, Gwendolyn K; Berry, Charles C; Malani, Nirav; McGarrity, Gary; Tebas, Pablo; June, Carl H; Bushman, Frederic D

    2009-01-01

    Lentiviral vector-based gene therapy has been used to target the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using an antisense env payload. We have analyzed lentiviral-vector integration sites from three treated individuals. We compared integration sites from the ex vivo vector-transduced CD4+ cell products to sites from cells recovered at several times after infusion. Integration sites were analyzed using 454 pyrosequencing, yielding a total of 7,782 unique integration sites from the ex vivo product and 237 unique sites from cells recovered after infusion. Integrated vector copies in both data sets were found to be strongly enriched within active genes and near epigenetic marks associated with active transcription units. Analysis of integration relative to nucleosome structure on target DNA indicated favoring of integration in outward facing DNA major grooves on the nucleosome surface. There was no indication that growth of transduced cells after infusion resulted in enrichment for integration sites near proto-oncogene 5′-ends or within tumor suppressor genes. Thus, this first look at the longitudinal evolution of cells transduced with a lentiviral vector after infusion of gene modified CD4+ cells provided no evidence for abnormal expansions of cells due to vector-mediated insertional activation of proto-oncogenes. PMID:19259065

  13. Lentiviral vector-mediated over-expression of Sox9 protected chondrocytes from IL-1β induced degeneration and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huading; Zeng, Chun; Chen, Mingwei; Lian, Liyi; Dai, Yuhu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2015-01-01

    To explore whether the over-expression of Sry-related HMG box (Sox9) in degenerative chondrocytes is able to improve cell regeneration and protects cells from inflammation induced apoptosis, we generated a Sox9 over-expressing vector delivery system in which the Sox9 gene was inserted into a lentiviral vector. After infecting mouse chondrocytes with the Sox9-encoding vector, we observed a high level of gene transduction efficiency and achieved a high level of Sox9 expression in the infected chondrocytes. To explore whether over-expression of Sox9 is able to induce cell regeneration and improve cell survival, we induced Sox9 over-expression by lentiviral vector infection 48 hours before IL-1β treatment. The cells were infected with the reporter gene GFP-encoded lentiviral vector as a negative control or left uninfected. 48-hours after IL-1β treatment, the chrondrocytes treated with IL-1β alone, underwent a degenerative process, with elevated expression of MMP-3, MMP-13, ADAMTS-5 and ALP, but the cell specific anabolic proteins collagen II and aggrecan were significantly suppressed. The cells infected with the GFP reporter vector had no increased regeneration after IL-1β treatment. The results indicated that Sox9 is an important chondrocyte transcription factor, promoting chondrocyte regeneration and cell survival, which were mediated through affecting multiple cell differentiation as well as anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. PMID:26617711

  14. A Lentiviral Vector Expressing Japanese Encephalitis Virus-like Particles Elicits Broad Neutralizing Antibody Response in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Souque, Philippe; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Paulous, Sylvie; Garcìa-Nicolàs, Obdulio; Summerfield, Artur; Charneau, Pierre; Desprès, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the major cause of viral encephalitis in Southeast Asia. Vaccination of domestic pigs has been suggested as a “one health” strategy to reduce viral disease transmission to humans. The efficiency of two lentiviral TRIP/JEV vectors expressing the JEV envelope prM and E glycoproteins at eliciting protective humoral response was assessed in a mouse model and piglets. Methodology/Principal Findings A gene encoding the envelope proteins prM and E from a genotype 3 JEV strain was inserted into a lentiviral TRIP vector. Two lentiviral vectors TRIP/JEV were generated, each expressing the prM signal peptide followed by the prM protein and the E glycoprotein, the latter being expressed either in its native form or lacking its two C-terminal transmembrane domains. In vitro transduction of cells with the TRIP/JEV vector expressing the native prM and E resulted in the efficient secretion of virus-like particles of Japanese encephalitis virus. Immunization of BALB/c mice with TRIP/JEV vectors resulted in the production of IgGs against Japanese encephalitis virus, and the injection of a second dose one month after the prime injection greatly boosted antibody titers. The TRIP/JEV vectors elicited neutralizing antibodies against JEV strains belonging to genotypes 1, 3, and 5. Immunization of piglets with two doses of the lentiviral vector expressing JEV virus-like particles led to high titers of anti-JEV antibodies, that had efficient neutralizing activity regardless of the JEV genotype tested. Conclusions/Significance Immunization of pigs with the lentiviral vector expressing JEV virus-like particles is particularly efficient to prime antigen-specific humoral immunity and trigger neutralizing antibody responses against JEV genotypes 1, 3, and 5. The titers of neutralizing antibodies elicited by the TRIP/JEV vector are sufficient to confer protection in domestic pigs against different genotypes of JEV and this could be of a great

  15. Was cDNA sequences modulate transgene expression of was promoter-driven lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel G; Benabdellah, Karim; Muñoz, Pilar; Frecha, Cecilia; Cobo, Marién; Martín, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Abstract The development of vectors that express a therapeutic transgene efficiently and specifically in hematopoietic cells (HCs) is an important goal for gene therapy of hematological disorders. We have previously shown that a 500-bp fragment from the proximal Was gene promoter in a lentiviral vector (LV) was sufficient to achieve more than 100-fold higher levels of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein in HCs than in nonhematopoietic cells (non-HCs). We show now that this differential was reduced up to 10 times when the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (eGFP) was expressed instead of Was in the same LV backbone. Insertion of Was cDNA sequences downstream of eGFP in these LVs had a negative effect on transgene expression. This effect varied in different cell types but, overall, Was cDNA sequences increased the hematopoietic specificity of Was promoter-driven LV. We have characterized the minimal fragment required to increase hematopoietic specificity and have demonstrated that the mechanism involves Was promoter regulation and RNA processing. In addition, we have shown that Was cDNA sequences interfere with the enhancer activity of the woodchuck posttranscriptional regulatory element. These results represent the first data showing the role of Was intragenic sequences in gene regulation. PMID:19630517

  16. Lentiviral vectors for induction of self-differentiation and conditional ablation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pincha, M; Salguero, G; Wedekind, D; Sundarasetty, B S; Lin, A; Kasahara, N; Brugman, M H; Jirmo, A C; Modlich, U; Gutzmer, R; Büsche, G; Ganser, A; Stripecke, R

    2011-08-01

    Development of lentiviral vectors (LVs) in the field of immunotherapy and immune regeneration will strongly rely on biosafety of the gene transfer. We demonstrated previously the feasibility of ex vivo genetic programming of mouse bone marrow precursors with LVs encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), which induced autonomous differentiation of long-lived dendritic cells (DCs), referred to as self-differentiated myeloid-derived antigen-presenting-cells reactive against tumors (SMART-DCs). Here, LV biosafety was enhanced by using a DC-restricted and physiological promoter, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II promoter, and including co-expression of the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (sr39HSV-TK) conditional suicide gene. Tricistronic vectors co-expressing sr39HSV-TK, GM-CSF and IL-4 transcriptionally regulated by the MHCII promoter or the ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter were compared. Despite the different gene transfer effects, such as the kinetics, levels of transgene expression and persistency of integrated vector copies, both vectors induced highly viable SMART-DCs, which persisted for at least 70 days in vivo and could be ablated with the pro-drug Ganciclovir (GCV). SMART-DCs co-expressing the tyrosine-related protein 2 melanoma antigen administered subcutaneously generated antigen-specific, anti-melanoma protective and therapeutic responses in the mouse B16 melanoma model. GCV administration after immunotherapy did not abrogate DC vaccination efficacy. This demonstrates proof-of-principle of genetically programmed DCs that can be ablated pharmacologically. PMID:21412283

  17. Lentiviral vectors with CMV or MHCII promoters administered in vivo: immune reactivity versus persistence of expression.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takahiro; Koya, Richard C; Anselmi, Laura; Sternini, Catia; Wang, He-Jing; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Prins, Robert M; Faure-Kumar, Emmanuelle; Rozengurt, Nora; Cui, Yan; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Stripecke, Renata

    2007-07-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are potential tools for genetic vaccination. To improve the safety of LV vaccines, we evaluated the selectivity, bio-distribution, persistence of expression, and immune potency of vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped vectors transcriptionally targeted to antigen presenting cells (APCs) through a major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) promoter. Control vectors contained the ubiquitous cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. Bio-distribution studies after intravenous injections of LVs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or luciferase were conducted by a combination of flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-Q-PCR) and whole-body bioluminescence analyses. GFP-expressing vectors showed selective expression in MHCII(+) cells of spleen and LV-CMV-GFP administration produced noticeable spleen inflammation, whereas LV-MHCII-GFP did not. Long-term optical imaging analyses of C57BL/6 mice injected with LV-CMV-LUC showed diminishing luciferase expression in the liver and spleen over time. Vaccination/boost with LV-CMV expressing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2) yielded dose-dependent antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell reactivity and high protection against B16 melanoma challenge. Unexpectedly, administration of LVs containing the MHCII promoter resulted in persistence of luciferase expression and viral integration in MHCII(+) splenocytes and virtually no CD8(+) T-cell responses against TRP2. These studies reveal that APC transduction by LVs could lead to immune reactivity (LV-CMV) or persistence of transgene expression (LV-MHCII), providing a relevant paradigm for vaccination and gene replacement approaches. PMID:17505480

  18. Rescue of splicing-mediated intron loss maximizes expression in lentiviral vectors containing the human ubiquitin C promoter

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Aaron R.; Lill, Georgia R.; Gschweng, Eric H.; Kohn, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors almost universally use heterologous internal promoters to express transgenes. One of the most commonly used promoter fragments is a 1.2-kb sequence from the human ubiquitin C (UBC) gene, encompassing the promoter, some enhancers, first exon, first intron and a small part of the second exon of UBC. Because splicing can occur after transcription of the vector genome during vector production, we investigated whether the intron within the UBC promoter fragment is faithfully transmitted to target cells. Genetic analysis revealed that more than 80% of proviral forms lack the intron of the UBC promoter. The human elongation factor 1 alpha (EEF1A1) promoter fragment intron was not lost during lentiviral packaging, and this difference between the UBC and EEF1A1 promoter introns was conferred by promoter exonic sequences. UBC promoter intron loss caused a 4-fold reduction in transgene expression. Movement of the expression cassette to the opposite strand prevented intron loss and restored full expression. This increase in expression was mostly due to non-classical enhancer activity within the intron, and movement of putative intronic enhancer sequences to multiple promoter-proximal sites actually repressed expression. Reversal of the UBC promoter also prevented intron loss and restored full expression in bidirectional lentiviral vectors. PMID:25520191

  19. Targeted, homology-driven gene insertion in stem cells by ZFN-loaded ‘all-in-one’ lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yujia; Laustsen, Anders; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Chenglong; Anderson, Mads Valdemar; Li, Shengting; Uldbjerg, Niels; Luo, Yonglun; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Biased integration remains a key challenge for gene therapy based on lentiviral vector technologies. Engineering of next-generation lentiviral vectors targeting safe genomic harbors for insertion is therefore of high relevance. In a previous paper (Cai et al., 2014a), we showed the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) as carriers of complete gene repair kits consisting of zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) proteins and repair sequences, allowing gene correction by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we follow this strategy to engineer ZFN-loaded IDLVs that insert transgenes by a homology-driven mechanism into safe loci. This insertion mechanism is driven by time-restricted exposure of treated cells to ZFNs. We show targeted gene integration in human stem cells, including CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Notably, targeted insertions are identified in 89% of transduced iPSCs. Our findings demonstrate the applicability of nuclease-loaded ‘all-in-one’ IDLVs for site-directed gene insertion in stem cell-based gene therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12213.001 PMID:27278774

  20. Targeted, homology-driven gene insertion in stem cells by ZFN-loaded 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujia; Laustsen, Anders; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Chenglong; Anderson, Mads Valdemar; Li, Shengting; Uldbjerg, Niels; Luo, Yonglun; Jakobsen, Martin R; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Biased integration remains a key challenge for gene therapy based on lentiviral vector technologies. Engineering of next-generation lentiviral vectors targeting safe genomic harbors for insertion is therefore of high relevance. In a previous paper (Cai et al., 2014a), we showed the use of integrase-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) as carriers of complete gene repair kits consisting of zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) proteins and repair sequences, allowing gene correction by homologous recombination (HR). Here, we follow this strategy to engineer ZFN-loaded IDLVs that insert transgenes by a homology-driven mechanism into safe loci. This insertion mechanism is driven by time-restricted exposure of treated cells to ZFNs. We show targeted gene integration in human stem cells, including CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Notably, targeted insertions are identified in 89% of transduced iPSCs. Our findings demonstrate the applicability of nuclease-loaded 'all-in-one' IDLVs for site-directed gene insertion in stem cell-based gene therapies. PMID:27278774

  1. Design of a regulated lentiviral vector for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy of globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ungari, Silvia; Montepeloso, Annita; Morena, Francesco; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Recchia, Alessandra; Martino, Sabata; Gentner, Bernhard; Naldini, Luigi; Biffi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is a demyelinating lysosomal storage disease due to the deficiency of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) enzyme. The favorable outcome of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC)-based approaches in GLD and other similar diseases suggests HSPC gene therapy as a promising therapeutic option for patients. The path to clinical development of this strategy was hampered by a selective toxicity of the overexpressed GALC in the HSPC compartment. Here, we presented the optimization of a lentiviral vector (LV) in which miR-126 regulation was coupled to codon optimization of the human GALC cDNA to obtain a selective and enhanced enzymatic activity only upon transduced HSPCs differentiation. The safety of human GALC overexpression driven by this LV was extensively demonstrated in vitro and in vivo on human HSPCs from healthy donors. No perturbation in the content of proapoptotic sphingolipids, gene expression profile, and capability of engraftment and mutlilineage differentiation in chimeric mice was observed. The therapeutic potential of this LV was then assessed in a severe GLD murine model that benefited from transplantation of corrected HSPCs with longer survival and ameliorated phenotype as compared to untreated siblings. This construct has thus been selected as a candidate for clinical translation. PMID:26509184

  2. Development of the Nanobody display technology to target lentiviral vectors to antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, C; De Groeve, K; Dingemans, J; Van Lint, S; Robays, L; Heirman, C; Reiser, J; Zhang, X-Y; Thielemans, K; De Baetselier, P; Raes, G; Breckpot, K

    2012-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) provide unique opportunities for the development of immunotherapeutic strategies, as they transduce a variety of cells in situ, including antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Engineering LVs to specifically transduce APCs is required to promote their translation towards the clinic. We report on the Nanobody (Nb) display technology to target LVs to dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. This innovative approach exploits the budding mechanism of LVs to incorporate an APC-specific Nb and a binding-defective, fusion-competent form of VSV.G in the viral envelope. In addition to production of high titer LVs, we demonstrated selective, Nb-dependent transduction of mouse DCs and macrophages both in vitro and in situ. Moreover, this strategy was translated to a human model in which selective transduction of in vitro generated or lymph node (LN)-derived DCs and macrophages, was demonstrated. In conclusion, the Nb display technology is an attractive approach to generate LVs targeted to specific cell types. PMID:22241177

  3. Design of a regulated lentiviral vector for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ungari, Silvia; Montepeloso, Annita; Morena, Francesco; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Recchia, Alessandra; Martino, Sabata; Gentner, Bernhard; Naldini, Luigi; Biffi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is a demyelinating lysosomal storage disease due to the deficiency of the galactocerebrosidase (GALC) enzyme. The favorable outcome of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC)-based approaches in GLD and other similar diseases suggests HSPC gene therapy as a promising therapeutic option for patients. The path to clinical development of this strategy was hampered by a selective toxicity of the overexpressed GALC in the HSPC compartment. Here, we presented the optimization of a lentiviral vector (LV) in which miR-126 regulation was coupled to codon optimization of the human GALC cDNA to obtain a selective and enhanced enzymatic activity only upon transduced HSPCs differentiation. The safety of human GALC overexpression driven by this LV was extensively demonstrated in vitro and in vivo on human HSPCs from healthy donors. No perturbation in the content of proapoptotic sphingolipids, gene expression profile, and capability of engraftment and mutlilineage differentiation in chimeric mice was observed. The therapeutic potential of this LV was then assessed in a severe GLD murine model that benefited from transplantation of corrected HSPCs with longer survival and ameliorated phenotype as compared to untreated siblings. This construct has thus been selected as a candidate for clinical translation. PMID:26509184

  4. Lentiviral vector-based insertional mutagenesis identifies genes associated with liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ranzani, Marco; Cesana, Daniela; Bartholomae, Cynthia C.; Sanvito, Francesca; Pala, Mauro; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Gallina, Pierangela; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Merella, Stefania; Bulfone, Alessandro; Doglioni, Claudio; von Kalle, Christof; Kim, Yoon Jun; Schmidt, Manfred; Tonon, Giovanni; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Transposons and γ-retroviruses have been efficiently used as insertional mutagens in different tissues to identify molecular culprits of cancer. However, these systems are characterized by recurring integrations that accumulate in tumor cells, hampering the identification of early cancer-driving events amongst bystander and progression-related events. We developed an insertional mutagenesis platform based on lentiviral vectors (LVV) by which we could efficiently induce hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in 3 different mouse models. By virtue of LVV’s replication-deficient nature and broad genome-wide integration pattern, LVV-based insertional mutagenesis allowed identification of 4 new liver cancer genes from a limited number of integrations. We validated the oncogenic potential of all the identified genes in vivo, with different levels of penetrance. Our newly identified cancer genes are likely to play a role in human disease, since they are upregulated and/or amplified/deleted in human HCCs and can predict clinical outcome of patients. PMID:23314173

  5. Multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering from a single lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Kabadi, Ami M; Ousterout, David G; Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2014-10-29

    Engineered DNA-binding proteins that manipulate the human genome and transcriptome have enabled rapid advances in biomedical research. In particular, the RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been engineered to create site-specific double-strand breaks for genome editing or to direct targeted transcriptional regulation. A unique capability of the CRISPR/Cas9 system is multiplex genome engineering by delivering a single Cas9 enzyme and two or more single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) targeted to distinct genomic sites. This approach can be used to simultaneously create multiple DNA breaks or to target multiple transcriptional activators to a single promoter for synergistic enhancement of gene induction. To address the need for uniform and sustained delivery of multiplex CRISPR/Cas9-based genome engineering tools, we developed a single lentiviral system to express a Cas9 variant, a reporter gene and up to four sgRNAs from independent RNA polymerase III promoters that are incorporated into the vector by a convenient Golden Gate cloning method. Each sgRNA is efficiently expressed and can mediate multiplex gene editing and sustained transcriptional activation in immortalized and primary human cells. This delivery system will be significant to enabling the potential of CRISPR/Cas9-based multiplex genome engineering in diverse cell types. PMID:25122746

  6. Use of a Closed Culture System to Improve the Safety of Lentiviral Vector Production.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaëtan; Durand, Sarah; Lindner, Véronique; Gossé, Francine; Zona, Laetitia; Certoux, Jean-Marie; Diana, Michele; Baumert, Thomas F; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick; Robinet, Eric

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the possibility of introducing a combination of six oncogenes into primary porcine hepatocytes (PPH) using a lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer in order to develop a porcine hepatocellular carcinoma model based on autologous transplantation of ex vivo-transformed hepatocytes. The six oncogenes were introduced into three plasmids, hence enabling the production of LVs encoding a luciferase reporter gene and hTERT+p53(DD), cyclinD1+CDK4(R24C), and c-myc(T58A)+HRas(G21V) genes, respectively. In order to improve the protection of the laboratory personnel manipulating such LVs, we used a compact cell culture cassette (CliniCell(®) device) as a closed cell culture system. We demonstrated that the CliniCell device allows to produce LVs, through plasmid transfection of 293T cells, and, after transfer to a second cassette, to transduce PPH with a similar efficacy as conventional open cell culture systems such as flasks or Petri dishes. Additionally, it is possible to cryopreserve at -80°C the transduced cells, directly in the CliniCell device used for the transduction. In conclusion, the use of a closed culture system for the safe handling of oncogene-encoding LVs lays the foundation for the development of porcine tumor models based on the autologous transplantation of ex vivo-transformed primary cells. PMID:26467420

  7. Complete correction of murine Artemis immunodeficiency by lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Fabian, Attila J; Rooney, Sean; Alt, Frederick W; Mulligan, Richard C

    2006-10-31

    Artemis gene mutations are responsible for the development of a severe combined immunodeficiency [radiation-sensitive (RS) SCID] characterized by a severe B and T cell deficiency and a normal natural killer cell population. To establish the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to the treatment of RS-SCID, we generated a series of lentiviral vectors expressing human Artemis from different promoters and used them to transduce highly purified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from Artemis knockout mice. HSCs transduced by the different viruses were transplanted into either lethally irradiated Rag-1-deficient animals or Artemis knockout mice treated with a nonmyeloablative dose of Busulfan. In both models, transplantation of HSCs transduced by a vector that used a murine phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter led to a complete functional correction of the immunodeficiency. Corrected animals displayed rescue of mature B cells with normal levels of serum immunoglobulins, together with complete rescue of the T cell compartment as evidenced by the presence of mature T lymphocytes in peripheral blood as well as normal values of thymocytes in thymus. Those B and T cells were capable of activation, as shown both by in vitro stimulation responses and in vivo after immune challenge. Overall, the results indicate that a gene therapy approach for RS-SCID involving the transplantation of genetically modified HSCs is indeed feasible. Furthermore, our studies suggest the possibility that nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens might be effectively used to promote engraftment of genetically modified cells in the case of diseases where standard irradiation-based myeloablative bone marrow transplantation protocols may prove problematic. PMID:17062750

  8. Complete correction of murine Artemis immunodeficiency by lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Fabian, Attila J.; Rooney, Sean; Alt, Frederick W.; Mulligan, Richard C.

    2006-01-01

    Artemis gene mutations are responsible for the development of a severe combined immunodeficiency [radiation-sensitive (RS) SCID] characterized by a severe B and T cell deficiency and a normal natural killer cell population. To establish the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to the treatment of RS-SCID, we generated a series of lentiviral vectors expressing human Artemis from different promoters and used them to transduce highly purified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from Artemis knockout mice. HSCs transduced by the different viruses were transplanted into either lethally irradiated Rag-1-deficient animals or Artemis knockout mice treated with a nonmyeloablative dose of Busulfan. In both models, transplantation of HSCs transduced by a vector that used a murine phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter led to a complete functional correction of the immunodeficiency. Corrected animals displayed rescue of mature B cells with normal levels of serum immunoglobulins, together with complete rescue of the T cell compartment as evidenced by the presence of mature T lymphocytes in peripheral blood as well as normal values of thymocytes in thymus. Those B and T cells were capable of activation, as shown both by in vitro stimulation responses and in vivo after immune challenge. Overall, the results indicate that a gene therapy approach for RS-SCID involving the transplantation of genetically modified HSCs is indeed feasible. Furthermore, our studies suggest the possibility that nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens might be effectively used to promote engraftment of genetically modified cells in the case of diseases where standard irradiation-based myeloablative bone marrow transplantation protocols may prove problematic. PMID:17062750

  9. Transgenic sheep generated by lentiviral vectors: safety and integration analysis of surrogates and their offspring

    PubMed Central

    Cornetta, Kenneth; Tessanne, Kimberly; Long, Charles; Yao, Jing; Satterfield, Carey; Westhusin, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The safety of HIV-1 based vectors was evaluated during the production of transgenic sheep. Vectors were introduced into the perivitelline space of in vivo derived one-cell sheep embryos by microinjection then transferred into the oviducts of recipient females. At 60–70 days of gestation, a portion of the recipients were euthanized and tissues collected from both surrogates and fetuses. Other ewes were allowed to carry lambs to term. Inadvertent transfer of vector from offspring to surrogates was evaluated in 330 blood and tissue samples collected from 57 ewes that served as embryo recipients. Excluding uterine contents, none of the samples tested positive for vector, indicating that that the vector did not cross the fetal maternal interface and infect surrogate ewes. Evaluating ewes, fetuses and lambs for replication competent lentivirus (RCL); 84 serum samples analyzed for HIV-1 capsid by ELISA and over 600 blood and tissue samples analyzed by quantitative PCR for the VSV-G envelopes revealed no evidence of RCL. Results of these experiments provide further evidence as to the safety of HIV-1 based vectors in animal and human applications. PMID:23180364

  10. Lentiviral vector platform for improved erythropoietin expression concomitant with shRNA mediated host cell elastase down regulation.

    PubMed

    Dhamne, Hemant; Chande, Ajit G; Mukhopadhyaya, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviral vector (LV) mediated gene transfer holds great promise to develop stable cell lines for sustained transgene expression providing a valuable alternative to the conventional plasmid transfection based recombinant protein production methods. We report here making a third generation HIV-2 derived LV containing erythropoietin (EPO) gene expression cassette to generate a stable HEK293 cell line secreting EPO constitutively. A high producer cell clone was obtained by limiting dilution and was adapted to serum free medium. The suspension adapted cell clone stably produced milligram per liter quantities of EPO. Subsequent host metabolic engineering using lentiviral RNAi targeted to block an endogenous candidate protease elastase, identified through an in silico approach, resulted in appreciable augmentation of EPO expression above the original level. This study of LV based improved glycoprotein expression with host cell metabolic engineering for stable production of protein therapeutics thus exemplifies the versatility of LV and is of significant future biopharmaceutical importance. PMID:24325878

  11. Factors that influence VSV-G pseudotyping and transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors-in vitro and in vivo implications.

    PubMed

    Farley, Daniel C; Iqball, Sharifah; Smith, Joanne C; Miskin, James E; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2007-05-01

    Pseudotyping viral vectors with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) enables the transduction of an extensive range of cell types from different species. We have discovered two important parameters of the VSV-G-pseudotyping phenomenon that relate directly to the transduction potential of lentiviral vectors: (1) the glycosylation status of VSV-G, and (2) the quantity of glycoprotein associated with virions. We measured production-cell and virion-associated quantities of two isoform variants of VSV-G, which differ in their glycosylation status, VSV-G1 and VSV-G2, and assessed the impact of this difference on the efficiency of mammalian cell transduction by lentiviral vectors. The glycosylation of VSV-G at N336 allowed greater maximal expression of VSV-G in HEK293T cells, thus facilitating vector pseudotyping. The transduction of primate cell lines was substantially affected (up to 50-fold) by the degree of VSV-G1 or VSV-G2 incorporation, whereas other cell lines, such as D17 (canine), were less sensitive to virion-associated VSV-G1/2 quantities. These data indicate that the minimum required concentration of virion-associated VSV-G differs substantially between cell species/types. The implications of these data with regard to VSV-G-pseudotyped vector production, titration, and use in host-cell restriction studies, are discussed. PMID:17366519

  12. [Construction of human growth hormone lentiviral vector and its expression in murine skeletal myoblasts].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Lu, Yong-Xin; Xu, Yu-Lan; Li, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Juan; Li, Ai-Hua; Luo, Ping; Wan, Jian-Ping

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study is to construct a lentiviral vector encoding human growth hormone, and to achieve the long, efficient and stable expression in murine skeletal myoblasts. Primary skeletal myoblasts were isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured by enzymatic digestion. We tested them by Desmin immunohistochemistry stains and found their viability was up to 94% by Trypan blue. Human growth hormone (hGH) cDNA was subcloned into expression vector pLenti6/V5-D-TOPO to construct recombinant pLenti6/V5-hGH. The pLenti6/V5-hGH and the contructed pLenti6/V5-EGFP were transfected into murine skeletal myoblasts by the Lipofectamin 2000. Through counting by the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope, we identified the transfection efficency. We added the blasticidin to the 6-well plate with lids and obtained stable myoblasts expressing hGH. The concentration of human growth hormone (hGH) in cell culture medium was detected by Radioimmunoassay (RIA). Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and DNA sequence showed hGH cDNA had been correctly inserted into pLenti6/V5-D-TOPO vector. Bright green fluorescence of the transfected cells could be observed under the Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope after 24 h transfection with pLenti6/V5-EGFP plasmids, and the transfection rate reached 40%. The difference was distinct (P < 0.01) between the pLenti6/V5- hGH groups and control groups in the secretive level of human growth hormone. After 8 weeks, the expression of human growth hormone was still stable. Then, we validated the biological characterization of the rhGH by the enzyme-link immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of the Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1). These results demonstrate we have successfully constructed the recombinant pLenti6/V5-hGH plasmids and accomplished rhGH long, efficient and stable expression ectopic in skeletal muscle myoblasts. PMID:16607951

  13. Intraosseous Delivery of Lentiviral Vectors Targeting Factor VIII Expression in Platelets Corrects Murine Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage-Sca1+c-Kit+ hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency. PMID:25655313

  14. Vaccines delivered by integration-deficient lentiviral vectors targeting dendritic cells induces strong antigen-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biliang; Dai, Bingbing; Wang, Pin

    2010-01-01

    We report a study of an integration-deficient lentiviral vector (IDLV) enveloped with a Sindbis virus glycoprotein mutant (SVGmu) capable of selectively binding to dendritic cells (DCs) for its potential as a vaccine carrier. The in vitro assays showed that the D64V point mutation in the catalytic domain of HIV-1 integrase efficiently inhibited the integration of the transgene upon vector transduction, while the targeting specificity of the vector to preferentially transduce and mediate durable expression in DCs was maintained. Substantial immune responses in C57BL/6 mice and complete protection against a challenge with the C57BL/6 thymoma EG.7 tumor expressing a delivered ovalbumin (OVA) antigen in mice have been achieved through the direct injection of the DC-directed IDLV encoding OVA. Thus, this DC-directed IDLV system represents a promising and efficient vector platform with remarkably improved safety for the future development of DC-based immunotherapy. PMID:20709004

  15. [Expression of NANOG gene in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and construction of lentiviral vector carrying NANOG specific shRNA].

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiang; Meng, Fan-Jing; Li, Li; Lu, Chao; Zhou, Jun; Cheng, Hai; Chen, Wei; Chen, Chong; Xu, Kai-Lin

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the expression of NANOG gene in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, and to construct the lentiviral vector carrying NANOG specific shRNA. The expression of NANOG was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot in MOLT-4, CCRF-HSB2, Jurkat cells and bone marrow cells from 15 patients with ALL in our hospital. The lentiviral vector carrying NANOG specific shRNA was constructed. After infection of MOLT-4 cells with the lentivirus constructs, GFP (+) cells were harvested by flow cytometry. The efficiency of RNA interference was detected by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. The results showed that the expression of NANOG mRNA and protein was detected in MOLT-4, CCRF-HSB2 cells and 33.3% samples of bone marrow from patients with ALL. The sequencing results demonstrated that the mRNAs amplified from these leukemic cells showed higher homology to NANOGP8 than NANOG1. The lentiviral vector pLB-shNANOG-1, pLB-shNANOG-2 and pLB-shcontrol were constructed. The viral particles were harvested and concentrated by ultracentrifugation. The virus titers were (1.83-3.12) ×10(8) IU/ml. After infection of MOLT-4 cells with the lentivirus, flow cytometry detection indicated that the GFP(+) cells were harvested by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot, the assays showed that the 2 designed shRNA could significantly down-regulate expression of NANOG gene and protein. It is concluded that NANOGP8 is expressed in various types of ALL cells and in 33.3% of marrow cell samples obtained from ALL patients. After infection with the lentivirus constructs, MOLT-4 cells which stably down-regulate the expression of NANOG mRNA are obtained. PMID:24762991

  16. Enhanced Central Nervous System Transduction with Lentiviral Vectors Pseudotyped with RVG/HIV-1gp41 Chimeric Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Trabalza, Antonio; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Sgourou, Argyro; Liao, Ting-Yi; Patsali, Petros; Lee, Heyne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To investigate the potential benefits which may arise from pseudotyping the HIV-1 lentiviral vector with its homologous gp41 envelope glycoprotein (GP) cytoplasmic tail (CT), we created chimeric RVG/HIV-1gp41 GPs composed of the extracellular and transmembrane sequences of RVG and either the full-length gp41 CT or C terminus gp41 truncations sequentially removing existing conserved motifs. Lentiviruses (LVs) pseudotyped with the chimeric GPs were evaluated in terms of particle release (physical titer), biological titers, infectivity, and in vivo central nervous system (CNS) transduction. We report here that LVs carrying shorter CTs expressed higher levels of envelope GP and showed a higher average infectivity than those bearing full-length GPs. Interestingly, complete removal of GP CT led to vectors with the highest transduction efficiency. Removal of all C-terminal gp41 CT conserved motifs, leaving just 17 amino acids (aa), appeared to preserve infectivity and resulted in a significantly increased physical titer. Furthermore, incorporation of these 17 aa in the RVG CT notably enhanced the physical titer. In vivo stereotaxic delivery of LV vectors exhibiting the best in vitro titers into rodent striatum facilitated efficient transduction of the CNS at the site of injection. A particular observation was the improved retrograde transduction of neurons in connected distal sites that resulted from the chimeric envelope R5 which included the “Kennedy” sequence (Ken) and lentivirus lytic peptide 2 (LLP2) conserved motifs in the CT, and although it did not exhibit a comparable high titer upon pseudotyping, it led to a significant increase in distal retrograde transduction of neurons. IMPORTANCE In this study, we have produced novel chimeric envelopes bearing the extracellular domain of rabies fused to the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of gp41 and pseudotyped lentiviral vectors with them. Here we report novel effects on the transduction efficiency and physical titer

  17. Lentiviral Delivery of Proteins for Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yujia; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have evolved to traverse cellular barriers and travel to the nucleus by mechanisms that involve active transport through the cytoplasm and viral quirks to resist cellular restriction factors and innate immune responses. Virus-derived vector systems exploit the capacity of viruses to ferry genetic information into cells, and now - more than three decades after the discovery of HIV - lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 have become instrumental in biomedical research and gene therapies that require genomic insertion of transgenes. By now, the efficacy of lentiviral gene delivery to stem cells, cells of the immune system including T cells, hepatic cells, and many other therapeutically relevant cell types is well established. Along with nucleic acids, HIV-1 virions carry the enzymatic tools that are essential for early steps of infection. Such capacity to package enzymes, even proteins of nonviral origin, has unveiled new ways of exploiting cellular intrusion of HIV-1. Based on early findings demonstrating the packaging of heterologous proteins into virus particles as part of the Gag and GagPol polypeptides, we have established lentiviral protein transduction for delivery of DNA transposases and designer nucleases. This strategy for delivering genome-engineering proteins facilitates high enzymatic activity within a short time frame and may potentially improve the safety of genome editing. Exploiting the full potential of lentiviral vectors, incorporation of foreign protein can be combined with the delivery of DNA transposons or a donor sequence for homology-directed repair in so-called 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors. Here, we briefly describe intracellular restrictions that may affect lentiviral gene and protein delivery and review the current status of lentiviral particles as carriers of tool kits for genome engineering. PMID:27228988

  18. Development of an Equine-Tropic Replication-Competent Lentivirus Assay for Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Based Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, Richard; Leroux-Carlucci, Marie A.; Evans, Nerys E.; Miskin, James E.; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The release of lentiviral vectors for clinical use requires the testing of vector material, production cells, and, if applicable, ex vivo-transduced cells for the presence of replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). Vectors derived from the nonprimate lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have been directly administered to patients in several clinical trials, with no toxicity observed to date. Because EIAV does not replicate in human cells, and because putative RCLs derived from vector components within human vector production cells would most likely be human cell-tropic, we previously developed an RCL assay using amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) as a surrogate positive control and human cells as RCL amplification/indicator cells. Here we report an additional RCL assay that tests for the presence of theoretical “equine-tropic” RCLs. This approach provides further assurance of safety by detecting putative RCLs with an equine cell-specific tropism that might not be efficiently amplified by the human cell-based RCL assay. We tested the ability of accessory gene-deficient EIAV mutant viruses to replicate in a highly permissive equine cell line to direct our choice of a suitable EIAV-derived positive control. In addition, we report for the first time the mathematical rationale for use of the Poisson distribution to calculate minimal infectious dose of positive control virus and for use in monitoring assay positive/spike control failures in accumulating data sets. No RCLs have been detected in Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant RCL assays to date, further demonstrating that RCL formation is highly unlikely in contemporary minimal lentiviral vector systems. PMID:23121195

  19. Generation and usage of aequorin lentiviral vectors for Ca(2+) measurement in sub-cellular compartments of hard-to-transfect cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dmitry; Bertoli, Alessandro; Sorgato, M Catia; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    Targeted aequorin-based Ca(2+) probes represent an unprecedented tool for the reliable measurement of Ca(2+) concentration and dynamics in different sub-cellular compartments. The main advantages of aequorin are its proteinaceous nature, which allows attachment of a signal peptide for targeting aequorin to virtually any sub-cellular compartment; its low Ca(2+)-binding capacity; the wide range of Ca(2+) concentrations that can be measured, ranging from sub-micromolar to millimolar; its robust performance in aggressive environments, e.g., the strong acidic pH of the lysosomal lumen. Lentiviral vectors represent a popular tool to transduce post-mitotic or hard-to-transfect cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it has great potential for gene therapy. Last generation lentiviral vectors represent a perfect compromise for combining large insert size, ease of production and handling, and high degree of biosafety. Here, we describe strategies for cloning aequorin probes - targeted to the cytosol, sub-plasma membrane cytosolic domains, the mitochondrial matrix, and the endoplasmic reticulum lumen - into lentiviral vectors. We describe methods for the production of lentiviral particles, and provide examples of measuring Ca(2+) dynamics by such aequorin-encoding lentiviral vectors in sub-cellular compartments of hard-to-transfect cells, including immortalized striatal neurons, primary cerebellar granule neurons and endothelial progenitor cells, which provide suitable in vitro models for the study of different human diseases. PMID:26992273

  20. Lentiviral Protein Transfer Vectors Are an Efficient Vaccine Platform and Induce a Strong Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, Katharina M.; Schülke, Stefan; Scheuplein, Vivian A. M.; Malczyk, Anna H.; Reusch, Johannes; Kugelmann, Stefanie; Muth, Anke; Koch, Vivian; Hutzler, Stefan; Bodmer, Bianca S.; Schambach, Axel; Buchholz, Christian J.; Waibler, Zoe; Scheurer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To induce and trigger innate and adaptive immune responses, antigen-presenting cells (APCs) take up and process antigens. Retroviral particles are capable of transferring not only genetic information but also foreign cargo proteins when they are genetically fused to viral structural proteins. Here, we demonstrate the capacity of lentiviral protein transfer vectors (PTVs) for targeted antigen transfer directly into APCs and thereby induction of cytotoxic T cell responses. Targeting of lentiviral PTVs to APCs can be achieved analogously to gene transfer vectors by pseudotyping the particles with truncated wild-type measles virus (MV) glycoproteins (GPs), which use human SLAM (signaling lymphocyte activation molecule) as a main entry receptor. SLAM is expressed on stimulated lymphocytes and APCs, including dendritic cells. SLAM-targeted PTVs transferred the reporter protein green fluorescent protein (GFP) or Cre recombinase with strict receptor specificity into SLAM-expressing CHO and B cell lines, in contrast to broadly transducing vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G) pseudotyped PTVs. Primary myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) incubated with targeted or nontargeted ovalbumin (Ova)-transferring PTVs stimulated Ova-specific T lymphocytes, especially CD8+ T cells. Administration of Ova-PTVs into SLAM-transgenic and control mice confirmed the observed predominant induction of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and demonstrated the capacity of protein transfer vectors as suitable vaccines for the induction of antigen-specific immune responses. IMPORTANCE This study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of antigen transfer by SLAM-targeted and nontargeted lentiviral protein transfer vectors into antigen-presenting cells to trigger antigen-specific immune responses in vitro and in vivo. The observed predominant activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells indicates the suitability of SLAM-targeted and also nontargeted PTVs as a vaccine for the induction of

  1. Integrase-Deficient Lentiviral Vectors Mediate Efficient Gene Transfer to Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells with Minimal Genotoxic Risk

    PubMed Central

    Chick, Helen E.; Nowrouzi, Ali; Fronza, Raffaele; McDonald, Robert A.; Kane, Nicole M.; Alba, Raul; Delles, Christian; Sessa, William C.; Schmidt, Manfred; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that injury-induced neointima formation was rescued by adenoviral-Nogo-B gene delivery. Integrase-competent lentiviral vectors (ICLV) are efficient at gene delivery to vascular cells but present a risk of insertional mutagenesis. Conversely, integrase-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLV) offer additional benefits through reduced mutagenesis risk, but this has not been evaluated in the context of vascular gene transfer. Here, we have investigated the performance and genetic safety of both counterparts in primary human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and compared gene transfer efficiency and assessed the genotoxic potential of ICLVs and IDLVs based on their integration frequency and insertional profile in the human genome. Expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mediated by IDLVs (IDLV-eGFP) demonstrated efficient transgene expression in VSMCs. IDLV gene transfer of Nogo-B mediated efficient overexpression of Nogo-B in VSMCs, leading to phenotypic effects on VSMC migration and proliferation, similar to its ICLV version and unlike its eGFP control and uninfected VSMCs. Large-scale integration site analyses in VSMCs indicated that IDLV-mediated gene transfer gave rise to a very low frequency of genomic integration compared to ICLVs, revealing a close-to-random genomic distribution in VSMCs. This study demonstrates for the first time the potential of IDLVs for safe and efficient vascular gene transfer. PMID:22931362

  2. Efficient shRNA delivery into B and T lymphoma cells using lentiviral vector-mediated transfer.

    PubMed

    Anastasov, Natasa; Klier, Margit; Koch, Ina; Angermeier, Daniela; Höfler, Heinz; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2009-03-01

    RNA interference is a powerful tool for the functional analysis of proteins by specific gene knockdown. In this study, we devised a rapid and efficient way to screen suitable siRNA sequences and subsequently employ them for specific gene knockdown in usually hard-to-transfect lymphoid cell lines, using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector. Two proteins with different half-lives were chosen, cyclin D1 and STAT3. A specific lacZ reporter fusion assay was used to identify highly effective siRNA sequences. Only siRNA molecules with more than 85% of knockdown efficiency were selected for the generation of lentiviral transfer vectors. Transduction rates of 75-99% were achieved in the lymphoma cell lines Granta 519 (mantle cell lymphoma), Karpas 299, and SUDHL-1 (anaplastic large T cell lymphoma), as demonstrated by green fluorescent protein expression in fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. The high level of transduction efficiency allows RNA interference studies to be performed on transduced cells without further manipulation, such as cell sorting or cloning. The LacZ reporter system together with the lentivirus technology is a very important tool in the hematology field, which enables experiments in lymphoid cells that were not possible before. PMID:19669218

  3. Functional Analysis of Various Promoters in Lentiviral Vectors at Different Stages of In Vitro Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sunghoi; Hwang, Dong-Youn; Yoon, Soonsang; Isacson, Ole; Ramezani, Ali; Hawley, Robert G

    2008-01-01

    Given the therapeutic potential offered by embryonic stem (ES) cells, it is critical to optimize stable gene delivery and expression at different developmental stages of ES cell differentiation. Here, we systematically analyzed lentiviral vectors containing the following promoters: the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α) promoter, the human cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early region enhancer-promoter, the composite CAG promoter (consisting of the CMV immediate early enhancer and the chicken β-actin promoter), the human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK) promoter, the murine stem cell virus (MSCV) long terminal repeat (LTR), or the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) LTR. Our results show that the EF1α promoter directed robust transgene expression at every stage of mouse ES cell differentiation, whereas the CMV promoter drove transgene expression only during late stages. Similarly, the CAG and PGK promoters drove transgene expression at a significant level only during late stages. The MSCV LTR and the GALV LTR exhibited much lower promoter activities at all stages. Interestingly, mouse ES cells transduced with the EF1α promoter-containing lentiviral vector lost most of their transgene expression during in vitro differentiation to neural precursors and neuronal cells. Our results demonstrate that different cellular and viral promoters exhibit very distinct and dynamic properties not only in terms of promoter strength but also with respect to differentiation stage-specific activity. PMID:17609656

  4. [Construction of IK6 recombinant lentiviral vector and its expression and biologic feature in THP1 cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Liu, Ya-Nan; Xiao, Min; Ding, Xiao-Yi; Zhou, Jian-Feng; Li, Chun-Rui

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct a lentiviral vector carrying IK6 gene and to observe the expression of IK6 as well as related biologic feature in THP1 cells, so as to provide an effective method to further investigate the role of this gene in leukemia. The IK6 gene was obtained by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Then IK6 was recombined with the pGC-FU vector to construct a recombinant lentiviral vector named pGC-FU-IK6 gene-GFP,which was confirmed by PCR and sequencing. The 293T cells were transfected with pGC-FU- IK6-GFP by using Lipofectamine 2000. After examining the titer of the virus, pGC-FU- IK6-GFP was used to transfect THP1 cells. The transfection efficiency was detected by flow cytometry, and the expression level of mRNA and IK6-GFP fusion protein were confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. Then the impact of IK6 on apoptosis and cell cycle was analyzed. The results showed that the IK6 gene was obtained by RT-PCR and connected into the linearized lentiviral vector to successfully constructed target plasmid named pGC-FU-IK6-GFP with Amp resistant. The target plasmid was transfected into 293T cells and the virus titer was 2.0×10(9)TU/ml. Next, THP1 cells were transfected with pGC-FU-IK6-GFP and the efficiency was up to 90%. The detection of the IK6 mRNA and IK6-GFP fusion protein in target cells showed that IK6 could promote target cell clone formation and inhibit apoptosis, but had no significant effect on the cell cycle. It is concluded that virus vector carrying IK6 gene had been successfully constructed and expressed in THP1 stably. Biology studies of target THP1 cell shows that the IK6 is likely to interfere with the function of normal Ikaros protein as tumor suppressor, and it exerts a potential anti-apoptotic effect. Thus, IK6 can promote leukemia cell growth. However, there is no significant effect on the cell cycle. It provides an effective method for exploring the function of IK6 in acute

  5. Rabies virus glycoprotein pseudotyping of lentiviral vectors enables retrograde axonal transport and access to the nervous system after peripheral delivery.

    PubMed

    Mazarakis, N D; Azzouz, M; Rohll, J B; Ellard, F M; Wilkes, F J; Olsen, A L; Carter, E E; Barber, R D; Baban, D F; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J; O'Malley, K; Mitrophanous, K A

    2001-09-15

    In this report it is demonstrated for the first time that rabies-G envelope of the rabies virus is sufficient to confer retrograde axonal transport to a heterologous virus/vector. After delivery of rabies-G pseudotyped equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) based vectors encoding a marker gene to the rat striatum, neurons in regions distal from but projecting to the injection site, such as the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta, become transduced. This retrograde transport to appropriate distal neurons was also demonstrated after delivery to substantia nigra, hippocampus and spinal cord and did not occur when vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotyped vectors were delivered to these sites. In addition, peripheral administration of rabies-G pseudotyped vectors to the rat gastrocnemius muscle leads to gene transfer in motoneurons of lumbar spinal cord. In contrast the same vector pseudotyped with VSV-G transduced muscle cells surrounding the injection site, but did not result in expression in any cells in the spinal cord. Long-term expression was observed after gene transfer in the nervous system and a minimal immune response which, together with the possibility of non-invasive administration, greatly extends the utility of lentiviral vectors for gene therapy of human neurological disease. PMID:11590128

  6. Generation of a stable packaging cell line producing high-titer PPT-deleted integration-deficient lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peirong; Li, Yedda; Sands, Mark S; McCown, Thomas; Kafri, Tal

    2015-01-01

    The risk of insertional mutagenesis inherent to all integrating exogenous expression cassettes was the impetus for the development of various integration-defective lentiviral vector (IDLV) systems. These systems were successfully employed in a plethora of preclinical applications, underscoring their clinical potential. However, current production of IDLVs by transient plasmid transfection is not optimal for large-scale production of clinical grade vectors. Here, we describe the development of the first tetracycline-inducible stable IDLV packaging cell line comprising the D64E integrase mutant and the VSV-G envelope protein. A conditional self-inactivating (cSIN) vector and a novel polypurine tract (PPT)-deleted vector were incorporated into the newly developed stable packaging cell line by transduction and stable transfection, respectively. High-titer (~107 infectious units (IU)/ml) cSIN vectors were routinely generated. Furthermore, screening of single-cell clones stably transfected with PPT-deleted vector DNA resulted in the identification of highly efficient producer cell lines generating IDLV titers higher than 108 IU/mL, which upon concentration increased to 1010 IU/ml. IDLVs generated by stable producer lines efficiently transduce CNS tissues of rodents. Overall, the availability of high-titer IDLV lentivirus packaging cell line described here will significantly facilitate IDLV-based basic science research, as well as preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:26229972

  7. Generation of a Genome Scale Lentiviral Vector Library for EF1α Promoter-Driven Expression of Human ORFs and Identification of Human Genes Affecting Viral Titer

    PubMed Central

    Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer, Mareike; Purdon, Amy S.; Wilson, Benjamin M.; Ranall, Max V.; Blumenthal, Antje; Gabrielli, Brian; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The bottleneck in elucidating gene function through high-throughput gain-of-function genome screening is the limited availability of comprehensive libraries for gene overexpression. Lentiviral vectors are the most versatile and widely used vehicles for gene expression in mammalian cells. Lentiviral supernatant libraries for genome screening are commonly generated in the HEK293T cell line, yet very little is known about the effect of introduced sequences on the produced viral titer, which we have shown to be gene dependent. We have generated an arrayed lentiviral vector library for the expression of 17,030 human proteins by using the GATEWAY® cloning system to transfer ORFs from the Mammalian Gene Collection into an EF1alpha promoter-dependent lentiviral expression vector. This promoter was chosen instead of the more potent and widely used CMV promoter, because it is less prone to silencing and provides more stable long term expression. The arrayed lentiviral clones were used to generate viral supernatant by packaging in the HEK293T cell line. The efficiency of transfection and virus production was estimated by measuring the fluorescence of IRES driven GFP, co-expressed with the ORFs. More than 90% of cloned ORFs produced sufficient virus for downstream screening applications. We identified genes which consistently produced very high or very low viral titer. Supernatants from select clones that were either high or low virus producers were tested on a range of cell lines. Some of the low virus producers, including two previously uncharacterized proteins were cytotoxic to HEK293T cells. The library we have constructed presents a powerful resource for high-throughput gain-of-function screening of the human genome and drug-target discovery. Identification of human genes that affect lentivirus production may lead to improved technology for gene expression using lentiviral vectors. PMID:23251614

  8. A Simple and Effective Method to Generate Lentiviral Vectors for Ex Vivo Gene Delivery to Mature Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shicheng; Karne, Neel K.; Goff, Stephanie L.; Black, Mary A.; Xu, Hui; Bischof, Daniela; Cornetta, Kenneth; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Human ex vivo gene therapy protocols have been used successfully to treat a variety of genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and cancer. Murine oncoretroviruses (specifically, gammaretroviruses) have served as the primary gene delivery vehicles for these trials. However, in some cases, such vectors have been associated with insertional mutagenesis. As a result, alternative vector platforms such as lentiviral vectors (LVVs) are being developed. LVVs may provide advantages compared with gammaretroviral vectors, including the ability to transduce large numbers of nondividing cells, resistance to gene silencing, and a potentially safer integration profile. The aim of this study was to develop a simplified process for the rapid production of clinical-grade LVVs. To that end, we used a self-inactivating bicistronic LVV encoding an MART (melanoma antigen recognized by T cells)-1-reactive T cell receptor containing oPRE, an optimized and truncated version of woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranslational regulatory element (wPRE). Using our simplified clinical production process, 293T cells were transiently transfected in roller bottles. The LVV supernatant was collected, treated with Benzonase, and clarified by modified step filtration. LVV produced in this manner exhibited titers and a biosafety profile similar to those of cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practices) LVVs previously manufactured at the Indiana University Vector Production Facility in support of a phase I/II clinical trial. We describe a simple, efficient, and low-cost method for the production of clinical-grade LVV for ex vivo gene therapy protocols. PMID:22515320

  9. A simple and effective method to generate lentiviral vectors for ex vivo gene delivery to mature human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shicheng; Karne, Neel K; Goff, Stephanie L; Black, Mary A; Xu, Hui; Bischof, Daniela; Cornetta, Kenneth; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A

    2012-04-01

    Human ex vivo gene therapy protocols have been used successfully to treat a variety of genetic disorders, infectious diseases, and cancer. Murine oncoretroviruses (specifically, gammaretroviruses) have served as the primary gene delivery vehicles for these trials. However, in some cases, such vectors have been associated with insertional mutagenesis. As a result, alternative vector platforms such as lentiviral vectors (LVVs) are being developed. LVVs may provide advantages compared with gammaretroviral vectors, including the ability to transduce large numbers of nondividing cells, resistance to gene silencing, and a potentially safer integration profile. The aim of this study was to develop a simplified process for the rapid production of clinical-grade LVVs. To that end, we used a self-inactivating bicistronic LVV encoding an MART (melanoma antigen recognized by T cells)-1-reactive T cell receptor containing oPRE, an optimized and truncated version of woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranslational regulatory element (wPRE). Using our simplified clinical production process, 293T cells were transiently transfected in roller bottles. The LVV supernatant was collected, treated with Benzonase, and clarified by modified step filtration. LVV produced in this manner exhibited titers and a biosafety profile similar to those of cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practices) LVVs previously manufactured at the Indiana University Vector Production Facility in support of a phase I/II clinical trial. We describe a simple, efficient, and low-cost method for the production of clinical-grade LVV for ex vivo gene therapy protocols. PMID:22515320

  10. A Lentiviral Vector Allowing Physiologically Regulated Membrane-anchored and Secreted Antibody Expression Depending on B-cell Maturation Status.

    PubMed

    Fusil, Floriane; Calattini, Sara; Amirache, Fouzia; Mancip, Jimmy; Costa, Caroline; Robbins, Justin B; Douam, Florian; Lavillette, Dimitri; Law, Mansun; Defrance, Thierry; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-11-01

    The development of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for expression of a specific antibody can be achieved through the transduction of mature B-cells. This approach would provide a versatile tool for active immunotherapy strategies for infectious diseases or cancer, as well as for protein engineering. Here, we created a lentiviral expression system mimicking the natural production of these two distinct immunoglobulin isoforms. We designed a LV (FAM2-LV) expressing an anti-HCV-E2 surface glycoprotein antibody (AR3A) as a membrane-anchored Ig form or a soluble Ig form, depending on the B-cell maturation status. FAM2-LV induced high-level and functional membrane expression of the transgenic antibody in a nonsecretory B-cell line. In contrast, a plasma cell (PC) line transduced with FAM2-LV preferentially produced the secreted transgenic antibody. Similar results were obtained with primary B-cells transduced ex vivo. Most importantly, FAM2-LV transduced primary B-cells efficiently differentiated into PCs, which secreted the neutralizing anti-HCV E2 antibody upon adoptive transfer into immunodeficient NSG (NOD/SCIDγc(-/-)) recipient mice. Altogether, these results demonstrate that the conditional FAM2-LV allows preferential expression of the membrane-anchored form of an antiviral neutralizing antibody in B-cells and permits secretion of a soluble antibody following B-cell maturation into PCs in vivo. PMID:26281898

  11. Chimeric rabies SADB19-VSVg-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors mediate long-range retrograde transduction from the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Schoderboeck, L; Riad, S; Bokor, A M; Wicky, H E; Strauss, M; Bostina, M; Oswald, M J; Empson, R M; Hughes, S M

    2015-05-01

    Lentiviral vectors have proved an effective method to deliver transgenes into the brain; however, they are often hampered by a lack of spread from the site of injection. Modifying the viral envelope with a portion of a rabies envelope glycoprotein can enhance spread in the brain by using long-range axon projections to facilitate retrograde transport. In this study, we generated two chimeric envelopes containing the extra-virion and transmembrane domain of rabies SADB19 or CVS-N2c with the intra-virion domain of vesicular stomatitis virus. Viral particles were packaged containing a green fluorescent protein reporter construct under the control of the phosphoglycerokinase promoter. Both vectors produced high-titer particles with successful integration of the glycoproteins into the particle envelope and significant transduction of neurons in vitro. Injection of the SADB19 chimeric viral vector into the lumbar spinal cord of adult mice mediated a strong preference for gene transfer to local neurons and axonal terminals, with retrograde transport to neurons in the brainstem, hypothalamus and cerebral cortex. Development of this vector provides a useful means to reliably target select populations of neurons by retrograde targeting. PMID:25630949

  12. Virological and Preclinical Characterization of a Dendritic Cell Targeting, Integration-deficient Lentiviral Vector for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Odegard, Jared M.; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna; Tareen, Semih U.; Campbell, David J.; Flynn, Patrick A.; Nicolai, Christopher J.; Slough, Megan M.; Vin, Chintan D.; McGowan, Patrick J.; Nelson, Lisa T.; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Robbins, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential antigen-presenting cells for the initiation of cytotoxic T-cell responses and therefore attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. We have developed an integration-deficient lentiviral vector termed ID-VP02 that is designed to deliver antigen-encoding nucleic acids selectively to human DCs in vivo. ID-VP02 utilizes a genetically and glycobiologically engineered Sindbis virus glycoprotein to target human DCs through the C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209) and also binds to the homologue murine receptor SIGNR1. Specificity of ID-VP02 for antigen-presenting cells in the mouse was confirmed through biodistribution studies showing that following subcutaneous administration, transgene expression was only detectable at the injection site and the draining lymph node. A single immunization with ID-VP02 induced a high level of antigen-specific, polyfunctional effector and memory CD8 T-cell responses that fully protected against vaccinia virus challenge. Upon homologous readministration, ID-VP02 induced a level of high-quality secondary effector and memory cells characterized by stable polyfunctionality and expression of IL-7Rα. Importantly, a single injection of ID-VP02 also induced robust cytotoxic responses against an endogenous rejection antigen of CT26 colon carcinoma cells and conferred both prophylactic and therapeutic antitumor efficacy. ID-VP02 is the first lentiviral vector which combines integration deficiency with DC targeting and is currently being investigated in a phase I trial in cancer patients. PMID:25658613

  13. Reversion of the biochemical defects in murine embryonic Sandhoff neurons using a bicistronic lentiviral vector encoding hexosaminidase alpha and beta.

    PubMed

    Arfi, Audrey; Zisling, Rivka; Richard, Emmanuel; Batista, Lionel; Poenaru, Livia; Futerman, Anthony H; Caillaud, Catherine

    2006-03-01

    Sandhoff disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the intracellular accumulation of GM2 ganglioside, is caused by mutations in the hexosaminidase beta-chain gene resulting in a hexosaminidase A (alphabeta) and B (betabeta) deficiency. A bicistronic lentiviral vector encoding both the hexosaminidase alpha and beta chains (SIV.ASB) has previously been shown to correct the beta-hexosaminidase deficiency and to reduce GM2 levels both in transduced and cross-corrected human Sandhoff fibroblasts. Recent advances in determining the neuropathophysiological mechanisms in Sandhoff disease have shown a mechanistic link between GM2 accumulation, neuronal cell death, reduction of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity, and axonal outgrowth. To examine the ability of the SIV.ASB vector to reverse these pathophysiological events, hippocampal neurons from embryonic Sandhoff mice were transduced with the lentivector. Normal axonal growth rates were restored, as was the rate of Ca(2+) uptake via the SERCA and the sensitivity of the neurons to thapsigargin-induced cell death, concomitant with a decrease in GM2 and GA2 levels. Thus, we have demonstrated that the bicistronic vector can reverse the biochemical defects and down-stream consequences in Sandhoff neurons, reinforcing its potential for Sandhoff disease in vivo gene therapy. PMID:16441513

  14. HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors directly activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells, which in turn induce the maturation of myeloid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Maura; Gregori, Silvia; Hauben, Ehud; Brown, Brian D; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Naldini, Luigi; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia

    2011-02-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) can induce type I interferon (IFN I) production from murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), but not myeloid (my)DC. Here, we investigated whether this mechanism is conserved in human DC. MyDC and pDC were isolated from peripheral blood and transduced with increasing vector concentrations. Compared with in vitro differentiated monocyte-derived DC, the transduction efficiency of peripheral blood DC was low (ranging from <1% to 45%), with pDC showing the lowest susceptibility to LV transduction. Phenotype and function of myDC were not directly modified by LV transduction; by contrast, pDC produced significant levels of IFN-α and tumor necrosis factor-α. pDC activation was dependent on functional vector particles and was mediated by Toll-like receptor 7/9 triggering. Coculture of myDC with pDC in the presence of LV resulted in myDC activation, with CD86 up-regulation and interleukin-6 secretion. These findings demonstrate that the induction of transgene-specific immunity is triggered by an innate immune response with pDC activation and consequent myDC maturation, a response that closely resembles the one induced by functional viruses. This information is important to design strategies aimed at using LV in humans for gene therapy, where adverse immune responses must be avoided, or for cancer immunotherapy, where inducing immunity is the goal. PMID:20825284

  15. MAC-T cells as a tool to evaluate lentiviral vector construction targeting recombinant protein expression in milk.

    PubMed

    Monzani, Paulo S; Guemra, Samuel; Adona, Paulo R; Ohashi, Otavio M; Meirelles, Flávio V; Wheeler, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Prior to generating transgenic animals for bioreactors, it is important to evaluate the vector constructed to avoid poor protein expression. Mammary epithelial cells cultured in vitro have been proposed as a model to reproduce the biology of the mammary gland. In the present work, three lentiviral vectors were constructed for the human growth hormone (GH), interleukin 2 (IL2), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF3) genes driven by the bovine β-casein promoter. The lentiviruses were used to transduce mammary epithelial cells (MAC-T), and the transformed cells were cultured on polystyrene in culture medium with and without prolactin. The gene expression of transgenes was evaluated by PCR using cDNA, and recombinant protein expression was evaluated by Western-blotting using concentrated medium and cellular extracts. The gene expression, of the three introduced genes, was detected in both induced and non induced MAC-T cells. The human GH protein was detected in the concentrated medium, whereas CSF3 was detected in the cellular extract. Apparently, the cellular extract is more appropriate than the concentrated medium to detect recombinant protein, principally because concentrated medium has a high concentration of bovine serum albumin. The results suggest that MAC-T cells may be a good system to evaluate vector construction targeting recombinant protein expression in milk. PMID:25380466

  16. Transduction of Human CD34+ Repopulating Cells with a Self-Inactivating Lentiviral Vector for SCID-X1 Produced at Clinical Scale by a Stable Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lockey, Timothy; Mehta, Perdeep K.; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Eldridge, Paul W.; Gray, John T.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Self-inactivating (SIN)-lentiviral vectors have safety and efficacy features that are well suited for transduction of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but generation of vector at clinical scale has been challenging. Approximately 280 liters of an X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorder (SCID-X1) SIN-lentiviral vector in two productions from a stable cell line were concentrated to final titers of 4.5 and 7.2×108 tu/ml. These two clinical preparations and three additional development-scale preparations were evaluated in human CD34+ hematopoietic cells in vitro using colony forming cell (CFU-C) assay and in vivo using the NOD/Lt-scid/IL2Rγnull (NSG) mouse xenotransplant model. A 40-hour transduction protocol using a single vector exposure conferred a mean NSG repopulating cell transduction of 0.23 vector genomes/human genome with a mean myeloid vector copy number of 3.2 vector genomes/human genome. No adverse effects on engraftment were observed from vector treatment. Direct comparison between our SIN-lentiviral vector using a 40-hour protocol and an MFGγc γ-retroviral vector using a five-day protocol demonstrated equivalent NSG repopulating cell transduction efficiency. Clonality survey by linear amplification-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LAM-PCR) with Illumina sequencing revealed common clones in sorted myeloid and lymphoid populations from engrafted mice demonstrating multipotent cell transduction. These vector preparations will be used in two clinical trials for SCID-X1. PMID:23075105

  17. Bicistronic lentiviral vector corrects beta-hexosaminidase deficiency in transduced and cross-corrected human Sandhoff fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Arfi, Audrey; Bourgoin, Christophe; Basso, Luisa; Emiliani, Carla; Tancini, Brunella; Chigorno, Vanna; Li, Yu-Teh; Orlacchio, Aldo; Poenaru, Livia; Sonnino, Sandro; Caillaud, Catherine

    2005-11-01

    Sandhoff disease is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a GM2 ganglioside intralysosomal accumulation. It is due to mutations in the beta-hexosaminidases beta-chain gene, resulting in a beta-hexosaminidases A (alphabeta) and B (betabeta) deficiency. Mono and bicistronic lentiviral vectors containing the HEXA or/and HEXB cDNAs were constructed and tested on human Sandhoff fibroblasts. The bicistronic SIV.ASB vector enabled a massive restoration of beta-hexosaminidases activity on synthetic substrates and a 20% correction on the GM2 natural substrate. Metabolic labeling experiments showed a large reduction of ganglioside accumulation in SIV.ASB transduced cells, demonstrating a correct recombinant enzyme targeting to the lysosomes. Moreover, enzymes secreted by transduced Sandhoff fibroblasts were endocytosed in deficient cells via the mannose 6-phosphate pathway, allowing GM2 metabolism restoration in cross-corrected cells. Therefore, our bicistronic lentivector supplying both alpha- and beta-subunits of beta-hexosaminidases may provide a potential therapeutic tool for the treatment of Sandhoff disease. PMID:15953731

  18. Vaccination with lentiviral vector expressing the nfa1 gene confers a protective immune response to mice infected with Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Yang, Hee-Jong; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2013-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a pathogenic free-living amoeba, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and animals. The nfa1 gene (360 bp), cloned from a cDNA library of N. fowleri, produces a 13.1-kDa recombinant protein which is located on pseudopodia, particularly the food cup structure. The nfa1 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri infection. To examine the effect of nfa1 DNA vaccination against N. fowleri infection, we constructed a lentiviral vector (pCDH) expressing the nfa1 gene. For the in vivo mouse study, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of a viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene. To evaluate the effect of vaccination and immune responses of mice, we analyzed the IgG levels (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), cytokine induction (interleukin-4 [IL-4] and gamma interferon [IFN-γ]), and survival rates of mice that developed PAM. The levels of both IgG and IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in vaccinated mice were significantly increased. The cytokine analysis showed that vaccinated mice exhibited greater IL-4 and IFN-γ production than the other control groups, suggesting a Th1/Th2 mixed-type immune response. In vaccinated mice, high levels of Nfa1-specific IgG antibodies continued until 12 weeks postvaccination. The mice vaccinated with viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene also exhibited significantly higher survival rates (90%) after challenge with N. fowleri trophozoites. Finally, the nfa1 vaccination effectively induced protective immunity by humoral and cellular immune responses in N. fowleri-infected mice. These results suggest that DNA vaccination using a viral vector may be a potential tool against N. fowleri infection. PMID:23677321

  19. A Simple High Efficiency Intra-Islet Transduction Protocol Using Lentiviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Moreno, Carmen Maria; Herrera-Gomez, Irene de Gracia; Lopez-Noriega, Livia; Lorenzo, Petra Isabel; Cobo-Vuilleumier, Nadia; Fuente-Martin, Esther; Mellado-Gil, Jose Manuel; Parnaud, Geraldine; Bosco, Domenico; Gauthier, Benoit Raymond; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Successful normalization of blood glucose in patients transplanted with pancreatic islets isolated from cadaveric donors established the proof-of-concept that Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is a curable disease. Nonetheless, major caveats to the widespread use of this cell therapy approach have been the shortage of islets combined with the low viability and functional rates subsequent to transplantation. Gene therapy targeted to enhance survival and performance prior to transplantation could offer a feasible approach to circumvent these issues and sustain a durable functional β-cell mass in vivo. However, efficient and safe delivery of nucleic acids to intact islet remains a challenging task. Here we describe a simple and easy-to-use lentiviral transduction protocol that allows the transduction of approximately 80 % of mouse and human islet cells while preserving islet architecture, metabolic function and glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion. Our protocol will facilitate to fully determine the potential of gene expression modulation of therapeutically promising targets in entire pancreatic islets for xenotransplantation purposes. PMID:26122098

  20. Production of lentiviral vectors with enhanced efficiency to target dendritic cells by attenuating mannosidase activity of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting immune cells that interact with T cells and have been widely studied for vaccine applications. To achieve this, DCs can be manipulated by lentiviral vectors (LVs) to express antigens to stimulate the desired antigen-specific T cell response, which gives this approach great potential to fight diseases such as cancers, HIV, and autoimmune diseases. Previously we showed that LVs enveloped with an engineered Sindbis virus glycoprotein (SVGmu) could target DCs through a specific interaction with DC-SIGN, a surface molecule predominantly expressed by DCs. We hypothesized that SVGmu interacts with DC-SIGN in a mannose-dependent manner, and that an increase in high-mannose structures on the glycoprotein surface could result in higher targeting efficiencies of LVs towards DCs. It is known that 1-deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) can inhibit mannosidase, which is an enzyme that removes high-mannose structures during the glycosylation process. Thus, we investigated the possibility of generating LVs with enhanced capability to modify DCs by supplying DMJ during vector production. Results Through western blot analysis and binding tests, we were able to infer that binding of SVGmu to DC-SIGN is directly related to amount of high-mannose structures on SVGmu. We also found that the titer for the LV (FUGW/SVGmu) produced with DMJ against 293T.DCSIGN, a human cell line expressing the human DC-SIGN atnibody, was over four times higher than that of vector produced without DMJ. In addition, transduction of a human DC cell line, MUTZ-3, yielded a higher transduction efficiency for the LV produced with DMJ. Conclusion We conclude that LVs produced under conditions with inhibited mannosidase activity can effectively modify cells displaying the DC-specific marker DC-SIGN. This study offers evidence to support the utilization of DMJ in producing LVs that are enhanced carriers for the development of DC-directed vaccines. PMID:21276219

  1. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Bryan E.; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J. R.; Rayasam, Swati D. G.; Saelens, Joseph W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E.; Ng, Tony W.; Tobin, David M.; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Jacobs, William R.; Lee, Sunhee

    2015-01-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 1024-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >1068-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  2. Stable Expression of Lentiviral Antigens by Quality-Controlled Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hart, Bryan E; Asrican, Rose; Lim, So-Yon; Sixsmith, Jaimie D; Lukose, Regy; Souther, Sommer J R; Rayasam, Swati D G; Saelens, Joseph W; Chen, Ching-Ju; Seay, Sarah A; Berney-Meyer, Linda; Magtanong, Leslie; Vermeul, Kim; Pajanirassa, Priyadharshini; Jimenez, Amanda E; Ng, Tony W; Tobin, David M; Porcelli, Steven A; Larsen, Michelle H; Schmitz, Joern E; Haynes, Barton F; Jacobs, William R; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The well-established safety profile of the tuberculosis vaccine strain, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), makes it an attractive vehicle for heterologous expression of antigens from clinically relevant pathogens. However, successful generation of recombinant BCG strains possessing consistent insert expression has encountered challenges in stability. Here, we describe a method for the development of large recombinant BCG accession lots which stably express the lentiviral antigens, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp120 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag, using selectable leucine auxotrophic complementation. Successful establishment of vaccine stability stems from stringent quality control criteria which not only screen for highly stable complemented BCG ΔleuCD transformants but also thoroughly characterize postproduction quality. These parameters include consistent production of correctly sized antigen, retention of sequence-pure plasmid DNA, freeze-thaw recovery, enumeration of CFU, and assessment of cellular aggregates. Importantly, these quality assurance procedures were indicative of overall vaccine stability, were predictive for successful antigen expression in subsequent passaging both in vitro and in vivo, and correlated with induction of immune responses in murine models. This study has yielded a quality-controlled BCG ΔleuCD vaccine expressing HIV gp120 that retained stable full-length expression after 10(24)-fold amplification in vitro and following 60 days of growth in mice. A second vaccine lot expressed full-length SIV Gag for >10(68)-fold amplification in vitro and induced potent antigen-specific T cell populations in vaccinated mice. Production of large, well-defined recombinant BCG ΔleuCD lots can allow confidence that vaccine materials for immunogenicity and protection studies are not negatively affected by instability or differences between freshly grown production batches. PMID:25924766

  3. Anti-arthritic effects of FasL gene transferred intra-articularly by an inducible lentiviral vector containing improved tet-on system.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qingyu; Tian, Xuebi; Zhao, Yinlin; Luo, Huiyu; Tian, Yuke; Luo, Ailin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to construct and identify an inducible lentiviral vector containing improved tet-on system and FasL gene and observe its effects on pristane-induced arthritis (PIA). FasL gene was amplified from the spleen of Lewis rats by RT-PCR. The tet-on system was improved with insertion of a chicken chromatin insulator (cHS4) element and an rtTA-dependent, tet-responsive element containing modifications of the tetO sequence (TRE-tight1). Pro-apoptosis effect of the vector pTREFasLcHS4V16 on synovial cells was evaluated by flow cytometer in vitro. Anti-arthritis effects of the vector on PIA after intra-articular injection were observed by clinical evaluation and joint histology. Cytokines in synovial tissue were measured by ELISA. The recombinant inducible lentiviral vector pTREFasLcHS4V16 was successfully constructed. The expression response and the pro-apoptosis effects of the vector were doxycycline dose-dependent. The vector injected intra-articularly attenuated the severity of PIA and decreased the level of cytokines in inflamed joints. pTREFasLcHS4V16 with an improved tet-on system can precisely regulate the expression of FasL gene and apoptosis. Anti-arthritis effects were observed after intra-articular injection of the inducible vector. PMID:21792649

  4. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction as a method for determining lentiviral vector titers and measuring transgene expression.

    PubMed

    Lizée, Gregory; Aerts, Joeri L; Gonzales, Monica I; Chinnasamy, Nachimuthu; Morgan, Richard A; Topalian, Suzanne L

    2003-04-10

    The use of lentiviral vectors for basic research and potential future clinical applications requires methodologies that can accurately determine lentiviral titers and monitor viral transgene expression within target cells, beyond the context of reporter genes typically used for this purpose. Here we describe a quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) method that achieves both goals using primer sequences that are specific for the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE), an enhancer contained in many retroviral vectors and that is incorporated in the 3' UTR of nascent transgene transcripts. Quantitation of titers of three recombinant lentiviruses, genetically identical except for the transgene, demonstrated consistent differences in titer that were likely due to transgene-associated toxicity in producer cells and target cells. Viruses encoding the tumor-associated antigens tyrosinase and neo-poly(A) polymerase yielded reproducibly lower titers than a virus encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the viral RNA, integrated DNA, and transgene mRNA levels, as measured by WPRE qPCR. Furthermore, the magnitude of differences in expression of the three transgenes in transduced target cells could not have been predicted by measuring vector DNA integration events. Since transgene expression in target cells is the most common goal of lentiviral transduction, and since methods to quantify transgene expression on the protein level are not always readily available, qRT-PCR based on a nucleotide sequence included in the transcript provides a useful tool for titering novel recombinant lentiviruses. PMID:12718761

  5. Protection of mice against lethal rabies virus challenge using short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) delivered through lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj K; Meshram, Chetan D; Sonwane, Arvind A; Dahiya, Shyam S; Pawar, Sachin S; Chaturvedi, V K; Saini, Mohini; Singh, R P; Gupta, Praveen K

    2014-02-01

    The antiviral potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting rabies virus (RV) polymerase (L) and nucleoprotein (N) genes delivered through lentiviral vector was investigated. For in vitro evaluation, siRNAs expressing BHK-21 cell lines (BHK-L and BHK-N) were developed using transduction with Lenti-L and Lenti-N lentiviruses encoding siRNAs against RV-L and N genes, respectively. When these cell lines were challenged in vitro with RV Pasteur virus-11 (PV-11) strain, there was reduction in number of RV-specific foci and target gene transcripts indicating inhibitory effect on RV multiplication. For in vivo evaluation, mice were treated intracerebrally with lentiviruses and challenged with 20 LD50 of RV challenge virus standard-11 (CVS-11) strain by intramuscular route in masseter muscle. Five out of eight mice treated with Lenti-N survived indicating 62.5 % protection. The control and Lenti-L-treated mice died within 7-10 days indicating lethal nature of challenge virus and no protection. These results demonstrated that siRNA targeting RV-N could not only inhibit RV multiplication, but also conferred protection in mice against lethal RV challenge. These findings have implication on therapeutic use of siRNA targeting RV-N against RV infection. PMID:23877894

  6. Liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors reverses anti-factor IX pre-existing immunity in haemophilic mice.

    PubMed

    Annoni, Andrea; Cantore, Alessio; Della Valle, Patrizia; Goudy, Kevin; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Russo, Fabio; Bartolaccini, Sara; D'Angelo, Armando; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-11-01

    A major complication of factor replacement therapy for haemophilia is the development of anti-factor neutralizing antibodies (inhibitors). Here we show that liver gene therapy by lentiviral vectors (LVs) expressing factor IX (FIX) strongly reduces pre-existing anti-FIX antibodies and eradicates FIX inhibitors in haemophilia B mice. Concomitantly, plasma FIX levels and clotting activity rose to 50-100% of normal. The treatment was effective in 75% of treated mice. FIX-specific plasma cells (PCs) and memory B cells were reduced, likely because of memory B-cell depletion in response to constant exposure to high doses of FIX. Regulatory T cells displaying FIX-specific suppressive capacity were induced in gene therapy treated mice and controlled FIX-specific T helper cells. Gene therapy proved safer than a regimen mimicking immune tolerance induction (ITI) by repeated high-dose FIX protein administration, which induced severe anaphylactoid reactions in inhibitors-positive haemophilia B mice. Liver gene therapy can thus reverse pre-existing immunity, induce active tolerance to FIX and establish sustained FIX activity at therapeutic levels. These data position gene therapy as an attractive treatment option for inhibitors-positive haemophilic patients. PMID:24106222

  7. Comparison of insulators and promoters for expression of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein using lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Koldej, Rachel M; Carney, Gael; Wielgosz, Matthew M; Zhou, Sheng; Zhan, Jun; Sorrentino, Brian P; Nienhuis, Arthur W

    2013-06-01

    Gene therapy for the treatment of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) presents an alternative to the current use of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. We describe the development of a self-inactivating lentiviral vector containing chromatin insulators for treatment of WAS and compare a gammaretroviral (MND), human cellular (EF1α), and the human WASp gene promoter for expression patterns in vivo during murine hematopoiesis using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) marker. Compared with the EF1α and the WASp promoters, expression from the MND promoter in mouse transplant recipients was much higher in all lineages examined. Importantly, there was sustained expression in the platelets of secondary recipient animals, necessary to correct the thrombocytopenia defect in WAS patients. Analysis of WAS protein expression in transduced human EBV-immortalized B-cells and transduced patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells also demonstrated stronger expression per copy from the MND promoter compared with the other promoters. In addition, when analyzed in an LM02 activation assay, the addition of an insulator to MND-promoter-containing constructs reduced transactivation of the LM02 gene. We propose a clinical trial design in which cytokine-mobilized, autologous, transduced CD34(+) cells are administered after myelosuppression. PMID:23786330

  8. Doxycycline Inducible Kruppel-Like Factor 4 Lentiviral Vector Mediates Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zixuan; Wang, Yinan; Liu, Wen; Zhao, Guannan; Lee, Suechin; Balogh, Andrea; Zou, Yanan; Guo, Yuqi; Zhang, Zhan; Gu, Weiwang; Li, Chengyao; Tigyi, Gabor; Yue, Junming

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer presents therapeutic challenges due to its typically late detection, aggressive metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. The transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) has been implicated in human cancers as a tumor suppressor or oncogene, although its role depends greatly on the cellular context. The role of KLF4 in ovarian cancer has not been elucidated in mechanistic detail. In this study, we investigated the role of KLF4 in ovarian cancer cells by transducing the ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and OVCAR3 with a doxycycline-inducible KLF4 lentiviral vector. Overexpression of KLF4 reduced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. The epithelial cell marker gene E-cadherin was significantly upregulated, whereas the mesenchymal cell marker genes vimentin, twist1and snail2 (slug) were downregulated in both KLF4-expressing SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells. KLF4 inhibited the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, our data demonstrate that KLF4 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer cells by inhibiting TGFβ-induced EMT. PMID:25137052

  9. Schwann cells transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding Fgf-2 promote motor neuron regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Allodi, Ilary; Mecollari, Vasil; González-Pérez, Francisco; Eggers, Ruben; Hoyng, Stefan; Verhaagen, Joost; Navarro, Xavier; Udina, Esther

    2014-10-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is a trophic factor expressed by glial cells and different neuronal populations. Addition of FGF-2 to spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) explants demonstrated that FGF-2 specifically increases motor neuron axonal growth. To further explore the potential capability of FGF-2 to promote axon regeneration, we produced a lentiviral vector (LV) to overexpress FGF-2 (LV-FGF2) in the injured rat peripheral nerve. Cultured Schwann cells transduced with FGF-2 and added to collagen matrix embedding spinal cord or DRG explants significantly increased motor but not sensory neurite outgrowth. LV-FGF2 was as effective as direct addition of the trophic factor to promote motor axon growth in vitro. Direct injection of LV-FGF2 into the rat sciatic nerve resulted in increased expression of FGF-2, which was localized in the basal lamina of Schwann cells. To investigate the in vivo effect of FGF-2 overexpression on axonal regeneration after nerve injury, Schwann cells transduced with LV-FGF2 were grafted in a silicone tube used to repair the resected rat sciatic nerve. Electrophysiological tests conducted for up to 2 months after injury revealed accelerated and more marked reinnervation of hindlimb muscles in the animals treated with LV-FGF2, with an increase in the number of motor and sensory neurons that reached the distal tibial nerve at the end of follow-up. PMID:24989458

  10. Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Insulin Producing Cells by Using A Lentiviral Vector Carrying PDX1

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdi, Amir; Abroun, Saied; Jafarian, Arefeh; Soleimani, Masoud; Taghikhani, Mohammad; Eskandari, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective Type I diabetes is an immunologically-mediated devastation of insulin producing cells (IPCs) in the pancreatic islet. Stem cells that produce β-cells are a new promising tool. Adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self renewing multi potent cells showing capabilities to differentiate into ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal tissues. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor 1 (PDX1) is a master regulator gene required for embryonic development of the pancreas and is crucial for normal pancreatic islets activities in adults. Materials and Methods We induced the over-expression of the PDX1 gene in human bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) by Lenti-PDX1 in order to generate IPCs. Next, we examine the ability of the cells by measuring insulin/c-peptide production and INSULIN and PDX1 gene expressions. Results After transduction, MSCs changed their morphology at day 5 and gradually differentiated into IPCs. INSULIN and PDX1 expressions were confirmed by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining. IPC secreted insulin and C-peptide in the media that contained different glucose concentrations. Conclusion MSCs differentiated into IPCs by genetic manipulation. Our result showed that lentiviral vectors could deliver PDX1 gene to MSCs and induce pancreatic differentiation. PMID:26199902

  11. Inducible packaging cells for large-scale production of lentiviral vectors in serum-free suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Broussau, Sophie; Jabbour, Nadine; Lachapelle, Guillaume; Durocher, Yves; Tom, Rosanne; Transfiguracion, Julia; Gilbert, Rénald; Massie, Bernard

    2008-03-01

    We have developed new packaging cell lines (293SF-PacLV) that can produce lentiviral vectors (LVs) in serum-free suspension cultures. A cell line derived from 293SF cells, expressing the repressor (CymR) of the cumate switch and the reverse transactivator (rtTA2(S)-M2) of the tetracycline (Tet) switch, was established first. We next generated clones stably expressing the Gag/Pol and Rev genes of human immunodeficiency virus-1, and the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G). Expression of Rev and VSV-G was tightly regulated by the cumate and Tet switches. Our best packaging cells produced up to 2.6 x 10(7) transducing units (TU)/ml after transfection with the transfer vector. Up to 3.4 x 10(7) TU/ml were obtained using stable producers generated by transducing the packaging cells with conditional-SIN-LV. The 293SF-PacLV was stable, as shown by the fact that some producers maintained high-level LV production for 18 weeks without selective pressure. The utility of the 293SF-PacLV for scaling up production in serum-free medium was demonstrated in suspension cultures and in a 3.5-L bioreactor. In shake flasks, the best packaging cells produced between 3.0 and 8.0 x 10(6) TU/ml/day for 3 days, and the best producer cells, between 1.0 and 3.4 x 10(7) TU/ml/day for 5 days. In the bioreactor, 2.8 liters containing 2.0 x 10(6) TU/ml was obtained after 3 days of batch culture following the transfection of packaging cells. In summary, the 293SF-PacLV possesses all the attributes necessary to become a valuable tool for scaling up LV production for preclinical and clinical applications. PMID:18180776

  12. Intrahippocampal injection of a lentiviral vector expressing Nrf2 improves spatial learning in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanninen, Katja; Heikkinen, Riikka; Malm, Tarja; Rolova, Taisia; Kuhmonen, Susanna; Leinonen, Hanna; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Tanila, Heikki; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Koistinaho, Milla; Koistinaho, Jari

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) postulates that amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and neurotoxicity play a causative role in AD; oxidative injury is thought to be central in the pathogenesis. An endogenous defense system against oxidative stress is induced by binding of the transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the antioxidant response element (ARE) enhancer sequence. The Nrf2-ARE pathway is activated in response to reactive oxygen species to trigger the simultaneous expression of numerous protective enzymes and scavengers. To exploit the Nrf2-ARE pathway therapeutically, we delivered Nrf2 bilaterally into the hippocampus of 9-month-old transgenic AD mice (APP/PS1 mice) using a lentiviral vector encoding human Nrf2. The data indicate that significant reductions in spatial learning deficits of aged APP/PS1 mice in a Morris Water Maze can be achieved by modulating levels of Nrf2 in the brain. Memory improvement in APP/PS1 mice after Nrf2 transduction shifts the balance between soluble and insoluble Aβ toward an insoluble Aβ pool without concomitant change in total brain Aβ burden. Nrf2 gene transfer is associated with a robust reduction in astrocytic but not microglial activation and induction of Nrf2 target gene heme oxygenase 1, indicating overall activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in hippocampal neurons 6 months after injection. Results warrant further exploration of the Nrf2-ARE pathway for treatment of AD and suggest that the Nrf2-ARE pathway may represent a potential therapeutic strategy to pursue in AD in humans, particularly in view of the multiple mechanisms by which Nrf2 can exert its protective effects. PMID:19805328

  13. Lentiviral vector encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen induces potent cellular immune responses and therapeutic immunity in HBV transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shenglan; Zhuo, Meng; Song, Linlin; Chen, Xiaohua; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqing; Tang, Zhenghao

    2016-07-01

    Predominant T helper cell type 1 (Th1) immune responses accompanied by boosted HBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity are essential for the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. Ubiquitin (Ub) serves as a signal for the target protein to be recognized and degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen (Ub-HBcAg) has been proved to be efficiently degraded into the peptides, which can be presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I resulting in stimulating cell-mediated responses. In the present study, lentiviral vectors encoding Ub-HBcAg (LV-Ub-HBcAg) were designed and constructed as a therapeutic vaccine for immunotherapy. HBcAg-specific cellular immune responses and anti-viral effects induced by LV-Ub-HBcAg were evaluated in HBV transgenic mice. We demonstrated that immunization with LV-Ub-HBcAg promoted the secretion of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), generated remarkably high percentages of IFN-γ-secreting CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells, and enhanced HBcAg-specific CTL activity in HBV transgenic mice. More importantly, vaccination with LV-Ub-HBcAg could efficiently decreased the levels of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), HBV DNA and the expression of HBsAg and HBcAg in liver tissues of HBV transgenic mice. In addition, LV-Ub-HBcAg could upregulate the expression of T cell-specific T-box transcription factor (T-bet) and downregulate the expression of GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) in spleen T lymphocytes. The therapeutic vaccine LV-Ub-HBcAg could break immune tolerance, and induce potent HBcAg specific cellular immune responses and therapeutic effects in HBV transgenic mice. PMID:26874581

  14. Transfer of three transcription factors via a lentiviral vector ameliorates spatial learning and memory impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin; Yan, Qing; Wang, Songtao; Wang, Cunzu; Zhao, Peng

    2016-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible and progressive neurodegenerative disorder with observable memory impairment. The present study was performed to evaluate the beneficial effects of lentiviral vector-mediated overexpression of a combination of three transcription regulators, ABN (Ascl1, Brn2 and Ngn2), on learning and memory loss in a mouse model of AD. The AD model was established by injecting Aβ1-42 bilaterally into the mouse hippocampus. Lentiviral ABN was delivered bilaterally into the hippocampus of mice. Animals injected with LV-ABN showed significantly improved spatial learning and memory in the water maze test. Additionally, antibody array analysis indicated that intrahippocampal LV-ABN delivery significantly altered the expression levels of some proteins that were identified as inflammatory factors or neuroprotective and growth factors. In conclusion, our data suggest that LV-ABN delivery can ameliorate spatial learning and memory impairment in an AD mouse model, and the beneficial effect of ABN gene treatment could be linked to inhibition of the neuroinflammatory response and enhancement of neuroprotection and neurogenesis. Thus, these findings indicate that lentiviral ABN gene delivery has potential therapeutic applications for AD. PMID:27102892

  15. AB115. Effects of target gene expression on ex vivo differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells transfected by lentiviral vector with PDE5 of short hairpin RNA

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Heng-Jun; Yan, Weixin; Chen, Jun; Gao, Xin; Zhuan, Li; Wang, Tao; Yang, Jun; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of PDE5 in ex vivo differentiation of gene-modified BM-MSCs using the lentiviral vector containing silencing target gene PDE5 of shRNA. Methods SD rat bone marrow-derived MSCs were separated, cultured and purified in vitro by Percoll density gradient centrifugation combined with adherent culture. The third passage rat BM-MSCs were obtained, and were identified by cell surface markers with flow cytometry (FCM). The lentiviral vector carrying silencing target gene PDE5 of shRNA was constructed and then transfected into the third passage rat BM-MSCs. The gene-modified rat BM-MSCs were induced to differentiate into smooth muscle-like cells exposed to VEGF and b-FGF media in vitro. The proliferative ability of these cells was tested by cell counting kit 8 (CCK-8). Smooth muscle-like cells differentiation was assessed by immunofluorescence and then subjected to immunocytochemistry for specific markers of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis for PDE5 gene expression in differentiated smooth muscle-like cells were carried out. Results After the conducted lentiviral vector containing PDE5-shRNA was transfected into rat BM-MSCs, the expression of EGFP was detected at 24 h and it became the strongest at 72 h, which FCM showed the transfection efficiency was 91.3% at this time. The EGFP expression rates of rat BM-MSCs transfected with PDE5-shRNA at 3 d, 7 d, 14 d after transduction were 91.3%, 86.1%, and 82.7%, respectively. There was still visible green fluorescence at 28 d after transfection. The gene-modified rat BM-MSCs with PDE5-shRNA were successfully induced to differentiate into smooth muscle-like cells. Transduction of the lentiviral vector PDE5-shRNA into rat BM-MSCs led to down-regulation of PDE5. The expression of PDE5 was reduced 67.2% by PDE5-shRNA compared with the control lentiviral vector. The proliferative property of rat BM-MSCs did not

  16. Transduction of Human Antigen-Presenting Cells with Integrase-Defective Lentiviral Vector Enables Functional Expansion of Primed Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Roberta; Michelini, Zuleika; Leone, Pasqualina; Macchia, Iole; Klotman, Mary E.; Salvatore, Mirella

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonintegrating lentiviral vectors are being developed as a efficient and safe delivery system for both gene therapy and vaccine purposes. Several reports have demonstrated that a single immunization with integration-defective lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) delivering viral or tumor model antigens in mice was able to elicit broad and long-lasting specific immune responses in the absence of vector integration. At present, no evidence has been reported showing that IDLVs are able to expand preexisting immune responses in the human context. In the present study, we demonstrate that infection of human antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages with IDLVs expressing influenza matrix M1 protein resulted in effective induction of in vitro expansion of M1-primed CD8+ T cells, as evaluated by both pentamer staining and cytokine production. This is the first demonstration that IDLVs represent an efficient delivery system for gene transfer and expression in human APCs, useful for immunotherapeutic applications. PMID:20210625

  17. The construction and proliferative effects of a lentiviral vector capable of stably overexpressing SPINK1 gene in human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Dongmei; Hu, Na; Wang, Qian; Yu, Shanice; Wang, Jun

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to design and generate recombinant lentiviral vector containing the complete coding sequence (CDS) region of human serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 gene (SPINK1) and establish a human pancreatic cancer cell line (AsPC-1) stably overexpressing SPINK1. Then, to assess the proliferative and oncogenic effects of upregulated SPINK1 gene on pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells using different methods. Initially, the target coding sequence (CDS) of SPINK1 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the synthesized product was subsequently subcloned into the lentiviral vector. The construction of recombinant SPINK1 gene was verified by the restriction digestion and sequencing analysis. The lentiviral particles carrying SPINK1 gene were produced by co-transfection of the recombination lentiviral vector and the packaging mix plasmids into 293 T cells and filtered and concentrated before AsPC-1 cells were infected by the virus particles. The cells transduced were differentially selected with puromycin, and the clones that highly expressed SPINK1 were chosen by real-time PCR and confirmed by Western blot after 7 weeks. The stably transduced AsPC-1 cell line showed significantly increased metabolic and proliferative capability using CCK-8 and Trypan Blue assays (P < 0.001). Cell cycle and DNA content analysis by flow cytometry showed that upregulated SPINK1 elicited significant increase in the percentage of AsPC-1 cells in the S and G2/M phase (P < 0.001). Clone formation assay demonstrated that the number of the colonies formed in the experimental group was greater than that in the control parental cells (P < 0.001). It was concluded that a stable AsPC-1 cell line capable of overexpressing SPINK1 had been successfully created, and that the proliferative capacity of AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells was significantly raised by SPINK1 upregulation as well as the ability of a single AsPC-1 cell to grow into a colony. PMID:26586397

  18. Selection of Novel Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein Variants from a Peptide Insertion Library for Enhanced Purification of Retroviral and Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Julie H.; Schaffer, David V.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of new features or functions that are not present in an original protein is a significant challenge in protein engineering. For example, modifications to vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G), which is commonly used to pseudotype retroviral and lentiviral vectors for gene delivery, have been hindered by a lack of structural knowledge of the protein. We have developed a transposon-based approach that randomly incorporates designed polypeptides throughout a protein to generate saturated insertion libraries and a subsequent high-throughput selection process in mammalian cells that enables the identification of optimal insertion sites for a novel designed functionality. This method was applied to VSV-G in order to construct a comprehensive library of mutants whose combined members have a His6 tag inserted at likely every site in the original protein sequence. Selecting the library via iterative retroviral infections of mammalian cells led to the identification of several VSV-G-His6 variants that were able to package high-titer viral vectors and could be purified by Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Column purification of vectors reduced protein and DNA impurities more than 5,000-fold and 14,000-fold, respectively, from the viral supernatant. This substantially improved purity elicited a weaker immune response in the brain, without altering the infectivity or tropism from wild-type VSV-G-pseudotyped vectors. This work applies a powerful new tool for protein engineering to construct novel viral envelope variants that can greatly improve the safety and use of retroviral and lentiviral vectors for clinical gene therapy. Furthermore, this approach of library generation and selection can readily be extended to other challenges in protein engineering. PMID:16537595

  19. Long-term replacement of a mutated nonfunctional CNS gene: reversal of hypothalamic diabetes insipidus using an EIAV-based lentiviral vector expressing arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Bienemann, Alison S; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Cosgrave, Anna S; Glover, Colin P J; Wong, Liang-Fong; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Uney, James B

    2003-05-01

    Due to the complexity of brain function and the difficulty in monitoring alterations in neuronal gene expression, the potential of lentiviral gene therapy vectors to treat disorders of the CNS has been difficult to fully assess. In this study, we have assessed the utility of a third-generation equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in the Brattleboro rat model of diabetes insipidus, in which a mutation in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene results in the production of nonfunctional mutant AVP precursor protein. Importantly, by using this model it is possible to monitor the success of the gene therapy treatment by noninvasive assays. Injection of an EIAV-CMV-AVP vector into the supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus resulted in expression of functional AVP peptide in magnocellular neurons. This was accompanied by a 100% recovery in water homeostasis as assessed by daily water intake, urine production, and urine osmolality lasting for a 1-year measurement period. These data show that a single gene defect leading to a neurological disorder can be corrected with a lentiviral-based strategy. This study highlights the potential of using viral gene therapy for the long-term treatment of disorders of the CNS. PMID:12718901

  20. Lesion-dependent regulation of transgene expression in the rat brain using a human glial fibrillary acidic protein-lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Johan; Georgievska, Biljana; Ericson, Cecilia; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2004-02-01

    The ability to regulate transgene expression will be crucial for development of gene therapy to the brain. The most commonly used systems are based on a transactivator in combination with a drug, e.g. the tetracycline-regulated system. Here we describe a different method of transgene regulation by the use of the human glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. We constructed a lentiviral vector that directs transgene expression to astrocytes. Using toxin-induced lesions we investigated to what extent transgene expression could be regulated in accordance with the activation of the endogenous GFAP gene. In animals receiving excitotoxic lesions of the striatum we detected an eightfold increase of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing cells. The vast majority of these cells did not divide, suggesting that the transgene was indeed regulated in a similar fashion as the endogenous GFAP gene. This finding will lead to the development of lentiviral vectors with autoregulatory capacities that may be very useful for gene therapy to the brain. PMID:14984426

  1. A self-inactivating lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy that does not activate LMO2 expression in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Disha; DeRavin, Suk See; Hauer, Julia; Lu, Taihe; Ma, Zhijun; Hacein-Bey Abina, Salima; Gray, John T.; Greene, Michael R.; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Malech, Harry L.; Sorrentino, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    To develop safer and more effective vectors for gene therapy of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), we have evaluated new self-inactivating lentiviral vectors based on the HIV virus. The CL20i4-hγc-Revgen vector contains the entire human common γ chain (γc) genomic sequence driven by the γc promoter. The CL20i4-EF1α-hγcOPT vector uses a promoter fragment from the eukaryotic elongation factor alpha (EF1α) gene to express a codon-optimized human γc cDNA. Both vectors contain a 400-bp insulator fragment from the chicken β-globin locus within the self-inactivating long-terminal repeat. Transduction of bone marrow cells using either of these vectors restored T, B, and natural killer lymphocyte development and function in a mouse SCID-X1 transplantation model. Transduction of human CD34+ bone marrow cells from SCID-X1 patients with either vector restored T-cell development in an in vitro assay. In safety studies using a Jurkat LMO2 activation assay, only the CL20i4-EF1α-hγcOPT vector lacked the ability to transactivate LMO2 protein expression, whereas the CL20i4-hγc-Revgen vector significantly activated LMO2 protein expression. In addition, the CL20i4-EF1α-hγcOPT vector has not caused any tumors in transplanted mice. We conclude that the CL20i4-EF1α-hγcOPT vector may be suitable for testing in a clinical trial based on these preclinical demonstrations of efficacy and safety. PMID:20457870

  2. Gene therapy for canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency with lentiviral vectors using the murine stem cell virus and human phosphoglycerate kinase promoters.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Michael J; Zhao, Huifen; Tuschong, Laura M; Bauer, Thomas R; Burkholder, Tanya H; Persons, Derek A; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2011-06-01

    Children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) and dogs with canine LAD (CLAD) develop life-threatening bacterial infections due to mutations in the leukocyte integrin CD18. Here, we compared the human phosphoglycerate kinase (hPGK) promoter to the murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter/enhancer in a self-inactivating HIV-1-derived lentiviral vector to treat animals with CLAD. Four CLAD dogs were infused with CD34(+) cells transduced with the hPGK vector, and two CLAD dogs received MSCV vector-transduced CD34(+) cells. Infusions were preceded by a nonmyeloablative dose of 200 cGy total body irradiation. Comparable numbers of transduced cells were infused in each group of animals. Only one of four CLAD animals treated with the hPGK-cCD18 vector had reversal of CLAD, whereas both MSCV-cCD18 vector-treated dogs had reversal of the phenotype. Correction of CLAD depends both upon the percentage of CD18(+) myeloid cells and the level of expression of CD18 on individual myeloid cells. In this regard, the hPGK promoter directed low levels of expression of CD18 on neutrophils compared to the MSCV promoter, likely contributing to the suboptimal clinical outcome with the hPGK vector. PMID:21275758

  3. Preclinical Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of an Improved Lentiviral Vector for the Treatment of β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Negre, Olivier; Bartholomae, Cynthia; Beuzard, Yves; Cavazzana, Marina; Christiansen, Lauryn; Courne, Céline; Deichmann, Annette; Denaro, Maria; de Dreuzy, Edouard; Finer, Mitchell; Fronza, Raffaele; Béatrix, Gillet-Legrand; Joubert, Christophe; Kutner, Robert; Leboulch, Philippe; Maouche, Leïla; Paulard, Anaïs; Pierciey Jr., Francis J.; Rothe, Michael; Ryu, Byoung; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Payen, Emmanuel; Veres, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A previously published clinical trial demonstrated the benefit of autologous CD34+ cells transduced with a self-inactivating lentiviral vector (HPV569) containing an engineered β-globin gene (βA-T87Q globin) in a subject with β-thalassemia major. This vector has been modified to increase transduction efficacy without compromising safety. In vitro analyses indicated that the changes resulted in both increased vector titers (3 to 4 fold) and increased transduction efficacy (2 to 3 fold). An in vivo study in which 58 β-thalassemic mice were transplanted with vector- or mock-transduced syngenic bone marrow cells indicated sustained therapeutic efficacy. Secondary transplantations involving 108 recipients were performed to evaluate long-term safety. The six month study showed no hematological or biochemical toxicity. Integration site (IS) profile revealed an oligo/polyclonal hematopoietic reconstitution in the primary transplants and reduced clonality in secondary transplants. Tumor cells were detected in the secondary transplant mice in all treatment groups (including the control group), without statistical differences in the tumor incidence. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR demonstrated that tumor cells were not derived from transduced donor cells. This comprehensive efficacy and safety data provided the basis for initiating two clinical trials with this second generation vector (BB305) in Europe and in the USA in patients with β-thalassemia major and sickle cell disease. PMID:25429463

  4. A lentiviral vector with expression controlled by E2F-1: A potential tool for the study and treatment of proliferative diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Bryan E.; Vieira de Carvalho, Anna Carolina; Bajgelman, Marcio C.

    2006-10-06

    We have constructed a lentiviral vector with expression limited to cells presenting active E2F-1 protein, a potential advantage for gene therapy of proliferative diseases. For the FE2FLW vector, the promoter region of the human E2F-1 gene was utilized to drive expression of luciferase cDNA, included as a reporter of viral expression. Primary, immortalized, and transformed cells were transduced with the FE2FLW vector and cell cycle alterations were induced with serum starvation/replacement, contact inhibition or drug treatment, revealing cell cycle-dependent changes in reporter activity. Forced E2F-1 expression, but not E2F-2 or E2F-3, increased reporter activity, indicating a major role for this factor in controlling expression from the FE2FLW virus. We show the utility of this vector as a reporter of E2F-1 and proliferation-dependent cellular alterations upon cytotoxic/cytostatic treatment, such as the introduction of tumor suppressor genes. We propose that the FE2FLW vector may be a starting point for the development of gene therapy strategies for proliferative diseases, such as cancer or restinosis.

  5. Dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor delivered via tetracycline-regulated lentiviral vectors in the quinolinic acid rat model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Régulier, E; Pereira de Almeida, L; Sommer, B; Aebischer, P; Déglon, N

    2002-11-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression constitutes a prerequisite for the development of gene therapy strategies aimed at the treatment of neurologic disorders. In the present work, we used tetracycline (Tet)-regulated lentiviral vectors to investigate the dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in the quinolinic acid (QA) model of Huntington's disease (HD). The Tet system was split in two lentiviruses, the first one containing the CNTF or green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNAs under the control of the Tet-response element (TRE) and a second vector encoding the transactivator (tTA). Preliminary coinfection study demonstrated that 63.8% +/- 2.0% of infected cells contain at least two viral copies. Adult rats were then injected with CNTF- and GFP-expressing viral vectors followed 3 weeks later by an intrastriatal administration of QA. A significant reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations was observed in the CNTF-on group. In contrast, GFP-treated animals or CNTF-off rats displayed an ipsilateral turning behavior in response to apomorphine. A selective sparing of DARPP-32-, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-, and NADPH-d-positive neurons was observed in the striatum of CNTF-on rats compared to GFP animals and CNTF-off group. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed on striatal samples of rats sacrificed at the same time point indicated that this neuroprotective effect was associated with the production of 15.5 +/- 4.7 ng CNTF per milligram of protein whereas the residual CNTF expression in the off state (0.54 +/- 0.02 ng/mg of protein) was not sufficient to protect against QA toxicity. These results establish the proof of principle of neurotrophic factor dosing for neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate the feasibility of lentiviral-mediated tetracycline-regulated gene transfer in the brain. PMID:12427308

  6. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated Gradients of GDNF in the Injured Peripheral Nerve: Effects on Nerve Coil Formation, Schwann Cell Maturation and Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Ruben; de Winter, Fred; Hoyng, Stefan A.; Roet, Kasper C. D.; Ehlert, Erich M.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Verhaagen, Joost; Tannemaat, Martijn R.

    2013-01-01

    Although the peripheral nerve is capable of regeneration, only a small minority of patients regain normal function after surgical reconstruction of a major peripheral nerve lesion, resulting in a severe and lasting negative impact on the quality of life. Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent survival- and outgrowth-promoting effects on motoneurons, but locally elevated levels of GDNF cause trapping of regenerating axons and the formation of nerve coils. This phenomenon has been called the “candy store” effect. In this study we created gradients of GDNF in the sciatic nerve after a ventral root avulsion. This approach also allowed us to study the effect of increasing concentrations of GDNF on Schwann cell proliferation and morphology in the injured peripheral nerve. We demonstrate that lentiviral vectors can be used to create a 4 cm long GDNF gradient in the intact and lesioned rat sciatic nerve. Nerve coils were formed throughout the gradient and the number and size of the nerve coils increased with increasing GDNF levels in the nerve. In the nerve coils, Schwann cell density is increased, their morphology is disrupted and myelination of axons is severely impaired. The total number of regenerated and surviving motoneurons is not enhanced after the distal application of a GDNF gradient, but increased sprouting does result in higher number of motor axon in the distal segment of the sciatic nerve. These results show that lentiviral vector mediated overexpression of GDNF exerts multiple effects on both Schwann cells and axons and that nerve coil formation already occurs at relatively low concentrations of exogenous GDNF. Controlled expression of GDNF, by using a viral vector with regulatable GDNF expression, may be required to avoid motor axon trapping and to prevent the effects on Schwann cell proliferation and myelination. PMID:23951085

  7. Long-Term Fate Mapping Using Conditional Lentiviral Vectors Reveals a Continuous Contribution of Radial Glia-Like Cells to Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aelvoet, Sarah-Ann; Pascual-Brazo, Jesus; Libbrecht, Sarah; Reumers, Veerle; Gijsbers, Rik; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Newborn neurons are generated throughout life in two neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Stimulation of adult neurogenesis is considered as an attractive endogenous repair mechanism to treat different neurological disorders. Although tremendous progress has been made in our understanding of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, important questions remain unanswered, regarding the identity and the behavior of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus. We previously showed that conditional Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors can be used to label neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and to track the migration of their progeny with non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. Here, we applied these Cre-Flex lentiviral vectors to study neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus with bioluminescence imaging and histological techniques. Stereotactic injection of the Cre-Flex vectors into the dentate gyrus of transgenic Nestin-Cre mice resulted in specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells. The labeled cell population could be detected with bioluminescence imaging until 9 months post injection, but no significant increase in the number of labeled cells over time was observed with this imaging technique. Nevertheless, the specific labeling of the nestin-positive neural stem cells, combined with histological analysis at different time points, allowed detailed analysis of their neurogenic potential. This long-term fate mapping revealed that a stable pool of labeled nestin-positive neural stem cells continuously contributes to the generation of newborn neurons in the mouse brain until 9 months post injection. In conclusion, the Cre-Flex technology is a valuable tool to address remaining questions regarding neural stem cell identity and behavior in the dentate gyrus. PMID:26600383

  8. Identification of unique reciprocal and non reciprocal cross packaging relationships between HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV reveals an efficient SIV/HIV-2 lentiviral vector system with highly favourable features for in vivo testing and clinical usage

    PubMed Central

    Strappe, Padraig M; Hampton, David W; Brown, Douglas; Cachon-Gonzalez, Begona; Caldwell, Maeve; Fawcett, James W; Lever, Andrew ML

    2005-01-01

    Background Lentiviral vectors have shown immense promise as vehicles for gene delivery to non-dividing cells particularly to cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Improvements in the biosafety of viral vectors are paramount as lentiviral vectors move into human clinical trials. This study investigates the packaging relationship between gene transfer (vector) and Gag-Pol expression constructs of HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Cross-packaged vectors expressing GFP were assessed for RNA packaging, viral vector titre and their ability to transduce rat primary glial cell cultures and human neural stem cells. Results HIV-1 Gag-Pol demonstrated the ability to cross package both HIV-2 and SIV gene transfer vectors. However both HIV-2 and SIV Gag-Pol showed a reduced ability to package HIV-1 vector RNA with no significant gene transfer to target cells. An unexpected packaging relationship was found to exist between HIV-2 and SIV with SIV Gag-Pol able to package HIV-2 vector RNA and transduce dividing SV2T cells and CNS cell cultures with an efficiency equivalent to the homologous HIV-1 vector however HIV-2 was unable to deliver SIV based vectors. Conclusion This new non-reciprocal cross packaging relationship between SIV and HIV-2 provides a novel way of significantly increasing bio-safety with a reduced sequence homology between the HIV-2 gene transfer vector and the SIV Gag-Pol construct thus ensuring that vector RNA packaging is unidirectional. PMID:16168051

  9. Integration-deficient Lentiviral Vectors Expressing Codon-optimized R338L Human FIX Restore Normal Hemostasis in Hemophilia B Mice

    PubMed Central

    Suwanmanee, Thipparat; Hu, Genlin; Gui, Tong; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Kutschera, Ina; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred; Monahan, Paul E; Kafri, Tal

    2014-01-01

    Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs) have been shown to transduce a wide spectrum of target cells and organs in vitro and in vivo and to maintain long-term transgene expression in nondividing cells. However, epigenetic silencing of episomal vector genomes reduces IDLV transgene expression levels and renders these safe vectors less efficient. In this article, we describe for the first time a complete correction of factor IX (FIX) deficiency in hemophilia B mice by IDLVs carrying a novel, highly potent human FIX cDNA. A 50-fold increase in human FIX cDNA potency was achieved by combining two mechanistically independent yet synergistic strategies: (i) optimization of the human FIX cDNA codon usage to increase human FIX protein production per vector genome and (ii) generation of a highly catalytic mutant human FIX protein in which the arginine residue at position 338 was substituted with leucine. The enhanced human FIX activity was not associated with liver damage or with the formation of human FIX-directed inhibitory antibodies and rendered IDLV-treated FIX-knockout mice resistant to a challenging tail-clipping assay. A novel S1 nuclease-based B1-quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay showed low levels of IDLV integration in mouse liver. Overall, this study demonstrates that IDLVs carrying an improved human FIX cDNA safely and efficiently cure hemophilia B in a mouse model. PMID:23941813

  10. Gene Therapy for Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency with Lentiviral Vectors Using the Murine Stem Cell Virus and Human Phosphoglycerate Kinase Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huifen; Tuschong, Laura M.; Bauer, Thomas R.; Burkholder, Tanya H.; Persons, Derek A.; Hickstein, Dennis D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Children with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) and dogs with canine LAD (CLAD) develop life-threatening bacterial infections due to mutations in the leukocyte integrin CD18. Here, we compared the human phosphoglycerate kinase (hPGK) promoter to the murine stem cell virus (MSCV) promoter/enhancer in a self-inactivating HIV-1–derived lentiviral vector to treat animals with CLAD. Four CLAD dogs were infused with CD34+ cells transduced with the hPGK vector, and two CLAD dogs received MSCV vector–transduced CD34+ cells. Infusions were preceded by a nonmyeloablative dose of 200 cGy total body irradiation. Comparable numbers of transduced cells were infused in each group of animals. Only one of four CLAD animals treated with the hPGK-cCD18 vector had reversal of CLAD, whereas both MSCV-cCD18 vector–treated dogs had reversal of the phenotype. Correction of CLAD depends both upon the percentage of CD18+ myeloid cells and the level of expression of CD18 on individual myeloid cells. In this regard, the hPGK promoter directed low levels of expression of CD18 on neutrophils compared to the MSCV promoter, likely contributing to the suboptimal clinical outcome with the hPGK vector. PMID:21275758

  11. Stable Delivery of CCR5-Directed shRNA into Human Primary Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells via a Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Saki; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to achieve suppression of a specific gene expression and therefore it has tremendous potential for gene therapy applications. A number of vector systems have been developed to express short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to produce siRNAs within mammalian T-cells, primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in animal model systems. Among these, vectors based on lentivirus backbones have significantly transformed our ability to transfer shRNAs into nondividing cells, such as HSPC, resulting in high transduction efficiencies. However, delivery and long-term expression of shRNAs should be carefully optimized for efficient knock down of target gene without causing cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Here, we describe our protocols for the development of shRNA against a major HIV co-receptor/chemokine receptor CCR5 and the use of lentiviral vectors for stable shRNA delivery and expression in primary human PBMC and HSPC. PMID:26472455

  12. Stable Delivery of CCR5-Directed shRNA into Human Primary Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells via a Lentiviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Saki; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to achieve suppression of a specific gene expression and therefore it has tremendous potential for gene therapy applications. A number of vector systems have been developed to express short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to produce siRNAs within mammalian T-cells, primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in animal model systems. Among these, vectors based on lentivirus backbones have significantly transformed our ability to transfer shRNAs into nondividing cells, such as HSPC, resulting in high transduction efficiencies. However, delivery and long-term expression of shRNAs should be carefully optimized for efficient knock down of target gene without causing cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Here, we describe our protocols for the development of shRNA against a major HIV co-receptor/chemokine receptor CCR5 and the use of lentiviral vectors for stable shRNA delivery and expression in primary human PBMC and HSPC. PMID:26472455

  13. A dual promoter lentiviral vector for the in vivo evaluation of gene therapeutic approaches to axon regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Löw, K; Blesch, A; Herrmann, J; Tuszynski, M H

    2010-05-01

    The identification of axon growth-promoting genes, and overexpression of these genes in central nervous system (CNS) neurons projecting to the spinal cord, has emerged as one potential approach to enhancing CNS regeneration. Assessment of the regenerative potential of candidate genes usually requires axonal tracing of spinal projections, ideally limited to neurons that express the candidate gene. Alternatively, coexpression of a reporter gene such as enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) from an internal ribosomal entry site can be used to identify neurons expressing the candidate gene, but this strategy does not label corticospinal axons in the spinal cord. We therefore developed a dual promoter lentiviral vector in which a potentially therapeutic transgene is expressed from the cytomegalovirus-enhanced chicken beta-actin promoter and the fluorescent protein copGFP is expressed from the elongation factor-1alpha promoter. The vector was constructed to be compatible with the Gateway recombination system for efficient introduction of transgenes through entry shuttle vectors. We show both simultaneous expression of a candidate and reporter gene in corticospinal and red nucleus neurons, and efficient labeling of their axons after lesions in the cervical spinal cord. This expression system is therefore an accurate and efficient means of screening candidate genes in vivo for enhancement of axonal growth. PMID:20200564

  14. RD2-MolPack-Chim3, a Packaging Cell Line for Stable Production of Lentiviral Vectors for Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovani, Bianca Maria; Bossi, Sergio; Zucchelli, Eleonora; Corna, Stefano; Salvatori, Francesca; Mavilio, Fulvio; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Over the last two decades, several attempts to generate packaging cells for lentiviral vectors (LV) have been made. Despite different technologies, no packaging clone is currently employed in clinical trials. We developed a new strategy for LV stable production based on the HEK-293T progenitor cells; the sequential insertion of the viral genes by integrating vectors; the constitutive expression of the viral components; and the RD114-TR envelope pseudotyping. We generated the intermediate clone PK-7 expressing constitutively gag/pol and rev genes and, by adding tat and rd114-tr genes, the stable packaging cell line RD2-MolPack, which can produce LV carrying any transfer vector (TV). Finally, we obtained the RD2-MolPack-Chim3 producer clone by transducing RD2-MolPack cells with the TV expressing the anti-HIV transgene Chim3. Remarkably, RD114-TR pseudovirions have much higher potency when produced by stable compared with transient technology. Most importantly, comparable transduction efficiency in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is obtained with 2-logs less physical particles respect to VSV-G pseudovirions produced by transient transfection. Altogether, RD2-MolPack technology should be considered a valid option for large-scale production of LV to be used in gene therapy protocols employing HSC, resulting in the possibility of downsizing the manufacturing scale by about 10-fold in respect to transient technology. PMID:23767932

  15. Multicistronic lentiviral vector-mediated striatal gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and GTP cyclohydrolase I induces sustained transgene expression, dopamine production, and functional improvement in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Carter, Emma E; Rohll, Jonathan B; Kingsman, Susan M; Kingsman, Alan J; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2002-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This loss leads to complete dopamine depletion in the striatum and severe motor impairment. It has been demonstrated previously that a lentiviral vector system based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) gives rise to highly efficient and sustained transduction of neurons in the rat brain. Therefore, a dopamine replacement strategy using EIAV has been investigated as a treatment in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) animal model of PD. A self-inactivating EIAV minimal lentiviral vector that expresses tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic amino acid dopa decarboxylase (AADC), and GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (CH1) in a single transcription unit has been generated. In cultured striatal neurons transduced with this vector, TH, AADC, and CH1 proteins can all be detected. After stereotactic delivery into the dopamine-denervated striatum of the 6-OHDA-lesioned rat, sustained expression of each enzyme and effective production of catecholamines were detected, resulting in significant reduction of apomorphine-induced motor asymmetry compared with control animals (p < 0.003). Expression of each enzyme in the striatum was observed for up to 5 months after injection. These data indicate that the delivery of three catecholaminergic synthetic enzymes by a single lentiviral vector can achieve functional improvement and thus open the potential for the use of this vector for gene therapy of late-stage PD patients. PMID:12451130

  16. Daedalus: a robust, turnkey platform for rapid production of decigram quantities of active recombinant proteins in human cell lines using novel lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Bandaranayake, Ashok D.; Correnti, Colin; Ryu, Byoung Y.; Brault, Michelle; Strong, Roland K.; Rawlings, David J.

    2011-01-01

    A key challenge for the academic and biopharmaceutical communities is the rapid and scalable production of recombinant proteins for supporting downstream applications ranging from therapeutic trials to structural genomics efforts. Here, we describe a novel system for the production of recombinant mammalian proteins, including immune receptors, cytokines and antibodies, in a human cell line culture system, often requiring <3 weeks to achieve stable, high-level expression: Daedalus. The inclusion of minimized ubiquitous chromatin opening elements in the transduction vectors is key for preventing genomic silencing and maintaining the stability of decigram levels of expression. This system can bypass the tedious and time-consuming steps of conventional protein production methods by employing the secretion pathway of serum-free adapted human suspension cell lines, such as 293 Freestyle. Using optimized lentiviral vectors, yields of 20–100 mg/l of correctly folded and post-translationally modified, endotoxin-free protein of up to ~70 kDa in size, can be achieved in conventional, small-scale (100 ml) culture. At these yields, most proteins can be purified using a single size-exclusion chromatography step, immediately appropriate for use in structural, biophysical or therapeutic applications. PMID:21911364

  17. A VSV-G Pseudotyped Last Generation Lentiviral Vector Mediates High Level and Persistent Gene Transfer in Models of Airway Epithelium In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Copreni, Elena; Palmieri, Lucia; Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficiency and duration of gene expression mediated by a VSV-G pseudotyped last generation lentiviral (LV) vector. We studied LV efficiency in ex-vivo models of respiratory epithelial cells, obtained from bronchial biopsies and nasal polyps, by GFP epifluorescence and cytofluorimetry. In vivo efficiency and persistence of gene expression was investigated by GFP immunohistochemistry and luciferase activity in lung cryosections and homogenates, respectively, upon intranasal and intratracheal administration protocols in C57Bl/6 mice. Both primary bronchial and nasal epithelial cells were transduced up to 70–80% 72 hr after the LV infection. In vivo nasal luciferase expression was increased by lysophosphatidylcholine pre-treatment of the nose. Conversely, the bronchial epithelium was transduced in the absence of any pre-conditioning treatment and luciferase expression lasted for at least 6 months without any decline. We conclude that a last generation LV vector is a promising gene transfer agent in the target organ of genetic and acquired lung diseases, as in the case of cystic fibrosis. PMID:21994695

  18. Suicide gene approach using a dual-expression lentiviral vector to enhance the safety of ex vivo gene therapy for bone repair

    PubMed Central

    Alaee, F; Sugiyama, O; Virk, MS; Tang, H; Drissi, H; Lichtler, AC; Lieberman, JR

    2014-01-01

    ‘Ex vivo’ gene therapy using viral vectors to overexpress BMP-2 is shown to heal critical-sized bone defects in experimental animals. To increase its safety, we constructed a dual-expression lentiviral vector to overexpress BMP-2 or luciferase and an HSV1-tk analog, Δtk (LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2/Luc). We hypothesized that administering ganciclovir (GCV) will eliminate the transduced cells at the site of implantation. The vector-induced expression of BMP-2 and luciferase in a mouse stromal cell line (W-20-17 cells) and mouse bone marrow cells (MBMCs) was reduced by 50% compared with the single-gene vector. W-20-17 cells were more sensitive to GCV compared with MBMCs (90–95% cell death at 12 days with GCV at 1 µg ml−1 in MBMCs vs 90–95% cell death at 5 days by 0.1 µg ml−1 of GCV in W-20-17 cells). Implantation of LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2 transduced MBMCs healed a 2 mm femoral defect at 4 weeks. Early GCV treatment (days 0–14) postoperatively blocked bone formation confirming a biologic response. Delayed GCV treatment starting at day 14 for 2 or 4 weeks reduced the luciferase signal from LV-Δtk-T2A-Luc-transduced MBMCs, but the signal was not completely eliminated. These data suggest that this suicide gene strategy has potential for clinical use in the future, but will need to be optimized for increased efficiency. PMID:24285218

  19. MGMT enrichment and second gene co-expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells using separate or dual-gene lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Roth, Justin C; Alberti, Michael O; Ismail, Mourad; Lingas, Karen T; Reese, Jane S; Gerson, Stanton L

    2015-01-22

    The DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) allows efficient in vivo enrichment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Thus, linking this selection strategy to therapeutic gene expression offers the potential to reconstitute diseased hematopoietic tissue with gene-corrected cells. However, different dual-gene expression vector strategies are limited by poor expression of one or both transgenes. To evaluate different co-expression strategies in the context of MGMT-mediated HSC enrichment, we compared selection and expression efficacies in cells cotransduced with separate single-gene MGMT and GFP lentivectors to those obtained with dual-gene vectors employing either encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A elements for co-expression strategies. Each strategy was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using equivalent multiplicities of infection (MOI) to transduce 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK)-enriched murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The highest dual-gene expression (MGMT(+)GFP(+)) percentages were obtained with the FMDV-2A dual-gene vector, but half of the resulting gene products existed as fusion proteins. Following selection, dual-gene expression percentages in single-gene vector cotransduced and dual-gene vector transduced populations were similar. Equivalent MGMT expression levels were obtained with each strategy, but GFP expression levels derived from the IRES dual-gene vector were significantly lower. In mice, vector-insertion averages were similar among cells enriched after dual-gene vectors and those cotransduced with single-gene vectors. These data demonstrate the limitations and advantages of each strategy in the context of MGMT-mediated selection, and may provide insights into vector design with respect to a particular therapeutic gene or hematologic defect. PMID:25479595

  20. In Vitro Generation of IL-35-expressing Human Wharton's Jelly-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Lentiviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Amari, Afshin; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Soleimani, Masoud; Mohammadi Amirabad, Leila; Tahoori, Mohammad Taher; Massumi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    Human Wharton's Jelly-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hWJ-MSCs) are easily available cells without transplant rejection problems or ethical concerns compared to bone-marrow-derived MSCs for prospective clinical applications. These cells display immunosuppressive properties and may be able to play an important role in autoimmune disorders. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) are important to prevent autoimmune disease development. Interleukin 35 (IL-35) induces the proliferation of Treg cell populations and reduces the activity of T helper 17 (Th17) and T helper 1 (Th1) cells, which play a central role in initiation of inflammation and autoimmune disease. Recent studies identified IL-35 as a new inhibitory cytokine required for the suppressive function of Treg cells. We created IL-35-producing hWJ-MSCs as a good vehicle for reduction of inflammation and autoimmune diseases. We isolated hWJ-MSCs based on explant culture. HWJ-MSCs were transduced at MOI=50 (Multiplicity of Infection) with lentiviral particles harboring murine Interleukin 35 (mIL-35). Expression of IL-35 in hWJ-MSCs was quantified by an IL-35 ELISA kit. IL-35 bioactivity was analyzed by inhibiting the proliferation of mouse splenocytes using CFSE cell proliferation kit. Frequency of CD4+CD25+CD127 low/neg Foxp3+ Treg cells was measured by flow cytometry. There was an up to 85% GFP positive transduction rate, and the cells successfully released a high level of mIL-35 protein (750 ng/ml). IL-35 managed to inhibit CD4+ T cell proliferation with PHA, and improved the frequency of Treg cells. Our data suggest that transduced hWJ-MSCs overexpressing IL-35 may provide a useful approach for basic research on gene therapy for autoimmune disorders. PMID:26547710

  1. Comparison of toxicogenomic profiles of two murine strains treated with HIV-1-based vectors for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Yuan Keating, Kenneth; Thorpe, Robin

    2007-12-01

    Gene therapy vectors based on lentiviruses persist in the host and are ideally suited for long-term therapies of genetic disorders. However, recent incidences of T cell leukemia in X-SCID children receiving gene therapy reveal discrepancy among the preclinical and clinical studies. Divergent results on the potential oncogenic property of integrating vectors obtained from different animal models further raise concern about the relevance and sensitivity of available preclinical systems used to assess their toxicity. Evaluation of transcriptional responses to vector transduction in different in vivo models may provide us with early indications of the potential adverse effects of these vectors and comparative information on the sensitivity and suitability of these models. For this purpose, we used cDNA microarray to examine transcriptional changes in BALB/c and CD-1 (IRC) mice, the two common murine strains used in pharmacological and toxicological studies. Our results revealed a significant difference in the transcriptional responses to vector transduction between the two mouse strains. Modest gene changes, in terms of gene numbers and gene expression were observed in BALB/c mice, whereby expression of 15 oncogenes was up-regulated in CD-1 (ICR) mice. We confirmed the up-regulation of oncogenes, e.g., N-myc, A-Raf, Fli-1, Wnt-2b, and c-jun in CD-1 (IRC) mice using RT-PCR. This study provided an insight into the function of lentiviral transduction in different mouse strains. Distinctive toxicogenomic profiles of two mouse strains should be considered in the context of future development of sensitive models for toxicity evaluation of lentiviral vector products.

  2. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    PubMed Central

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  3. Identification of potential stroke targets by lentiviral vector mediated overexpression of HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha in a primary neuronal model of hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ralph, G S; Parham, S; Lee, S R; Beard, G L; Craigon, M H; Ward, N; White, J R; Barber, R D; Rayner, W; Kingsman, S M; Mundy, C R; Mazarakis, N D; Krige, D

    2004-02-01

    The identification of genes differentially regulated by ischemia will lead to an improved understanding of cell death pathways such as those involved in the neuronal loss observed following a stroke. Furthermore, the characterization of such pathways could facilitate the identification of novel targets for stroke therapy. We have used a novel approach to amplify differential gene expression patterns in a primary neuronal model of stroke by employing a lentiviral vector system to specifically bias the transcriptional activation of hypoxically regulated genes. Overexpression of the hypoxia-induced transcription factor subunits HIF-1 alpha and HIF-2 alpha elevated hypoxia-mediated transcription of many known HIF-regulated genes well above control levels. Furthermore, many potentially novel HIF-regulated genes were discovered that were not previously identified as hypoxically regulated. Most of the novel genes identified were activated by a combination of HIF-2 alpha overexpression and hypoxic insult. These included several genes with particular importance in cell survival pathways and of potential therapeutic value. Hypoxic induction of HIF-2 alpha may therefore be a critical factor in mediating protective responses against ischemic injury. Further investigation of the genes identified in this study may provide increased understanding of the neuronal response to hypoxia and may uncover novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of cerebral ischemia. PMID:14747751

  4. Pretransplant Mobilization with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Improves B-Cell Reconstitution by Lentiviral Vector Gene Therapy in SCID-X1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huston, Marshall W.; Riegman, Adriaan R.A.; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg−/− mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin−) cells or Il2rg−/− Lin− cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  5. Dendritic cell-based vaccination with lentiviral vectors encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen enhances hepatitis B virus-specific immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shenglan; Zhuo, Meng; Song, Linlin; Chen, Xiaohua; Yu, Yongsheng; Tang, Zhenghao; Zang, Guoqing

    2015-11-01

    The activity of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) plays a predominant role in the clearance of HBV. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen-presenting cells and play an important role in the initiation of immune responses. We previously verified that lentiviral vector encoding ubiquitinated hepatitis B core antigen (LV-Ub-HBcAg) effectively transduced DCs to induce maturation, and the mature DCs efficiently induced T cell polarization to Th1 and generated HBcAg-specific CTLs ex vivo. In this study, HBV-specific immune responses of LV-Ub-HBcAg in BALB/c mice (H-2Kd) were evaluated. It was shown that direct injection of LV-Ub-HBcAg increased the production of cytokines IL-2 and IFN-γ, elicited strong antibody responses, and remarkably generated a high percentage of IFN-γ+CD8+ T cells with HBV-specific CTL responses in BALB/c mice. In addition, direct injection of LV-Ub-HBcAg induced potent anti-HBV immune responses, similar to those elicited by in vitro-transduced DCs. In conclusion, the DC-based therapeutic vaccine LV-Ub-HBcAg elicited specific antibody immune responses and induced robust specific CTL activity in vivo. PMID:26373843

  6. Pretransplant mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor improves B-cell reconstitution by lentiviral vector gene therapy in SCID-X1 mice.

    PubMed

    Huston, Marshall W; Riegman, Adriaan R A; Yadak, Rana; van Helsdingen, Yvette; de Boer, Helen; van Til, Niek P; Wagemaker, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy is a demonstrated effective treatment for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), but B-cell reconstitution and function has been deficient in many of the gene therapy treated patients. Cytoreductive preconditioning is known to improve HSC engraftment, but in general it is not considered for SCID-X1 since the poor health of most of these patients at diagnosis and the risk of toxicity preclude the conditioning used in standard bone marrow stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that mobilization of HSC by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) should create temporary space in bone marrow niches to improve engraftment and thereby B-cell reconstitution. In the present pilot study supplementing our earlier preclinical evaluation (Huston et al., 2011), Il2rg(-/-) mice pretreated with G-CSF were transplanted with wild-type lineage negative (Lin(-)) cells or Il2rg(-/-) Lin(-) cells transduced with therapeutic IL2RG lentiviral vectors. Mice were monitored for reconstitution of lymphocyte populations, level of donor cell chimerism, and antibody responses as compared to 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), previously found effective in promoting B-cell reconstitution. The results demonstrate that G-CSF promotes B-cell reconstitution similar to low-dose TBI and provides proof of principle for an alternative approach to improve efficacy of gene therapy in SCID patients without adverse effects associated with cytoreductive conditioning. PMID:25222508

  7. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVex(TM)-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; Ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  8. A PCR-Based Method to Construct Lentiviral Vector Expressing Double Tough Decoy for miRNA Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Huiling; Zhong, Jiasheng; Luo, Lan; Liu, Nian; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Peng, Wenda; Gou, Deming

    2015-01-01

    DNA vector-encoded Tough Decoy (TuD) miRNA inhibitor is attracting increased attention due to its high efficiency in miRNA suppression. The current methods used to construct TuD vectors are based on synthesizing long oligonucleotides (~90 mer), which have been costly and problematic because of mutations during synthesis. In this study, we report a PCR-based method for the generation of double Tough Decoy (dTuD) vector in which only two sets of shorter oligonucleotides (< 60 mer) were used. Different approaches were employed to test the inhibitory potency of dTuDs. We demonstrated that dTuD is the most efficient method in miRNA inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Using this method, a mini dTuD library against 88 human miRNAs was constructed and used for a high-throughput screening (HTS) of AP-1 pathway-related miRNAs. Seven miRNAs (miR-18b-5p, -101-3p, -148b-3p, -130b-3p, -186-3p, -187-3p and -1324) were identified as candidates involved in AP-1 pathway regulation. This novel method allows for an accurate and cost-effective generation of dTuD miRNA inhibitor, providing a powerful tool for efficient miRNA suppression in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26624995

  9. Ex vivo gene delivery of GDNF using primary astrocytes transduced with a lentiviral vector provides neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Cecilia; Georgievska, Biljana; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2005-12-01

    Astrocytes are, as normal constituents of the brain, promising vehicles for ex vivo gene delivery to the central nervous system. In the present study, we have used a lentiviral vector encoding glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to transduce rat-derived primary astrocytes, in order to evaluate their potential for long-term transgene expression in vivo and neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Following transplantation of GDNF-transduced astrocytes to the intact striatum, the level of released GDNF was 2.93 +/- 0.28 ng/mg tissue at 1 week post-grafting, reduced to 0.42 +/- 0.12 ng/mg tissue at 4 weeks, and thereafter was maintained at this level throughout the experiment (12 weeks; 0.53 +/- 0.068 ng/mg tissue). Similarly, grafting to the substantia nigra (SN) resulted in a significant overexpression of GDNF ( approximately 0.20 ng/mg tissue) at 1 week. Intact animals receiving transplants of GDNF-transduced astrocytes displayed an increased contralateral turning (5.39 +/- 1.19 turns/min) in the amphetamine-induced rotation test, which significantly correlated with the GDNF tissue levels measured in the striatum, indicating a stimulatory effect of GDNF on the dopaminergic function. Transplantation of GDNF-transduced astrocytes to the SN 1 week prior to an intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion provided a significant protection of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells. By contrast, when the cells were transplanted to the striatum, the level of released GDNF was not sufficient to rescue the striatal fibers and, hence, to protect the nigral dopaminergic neurons. Overall, our results suggest that genetically modified astrocytes expressing GDNF can provide neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease following transplantation to the SN. PMID:16324109

  10. Silencing Status Epilepticus-Induced BDNF Expression with Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Based Amplicon Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Falcicchia, Chiara; Trempat, Pascal; Binaschi, Anna; Perrier-Biollay, Coline; Roncon, Paolo; Soukupova, Marie; Berthommé, Hervé; Simonato, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been found to produce pro- but also anti-epileptic effects. Thus, its validity as a therapeutic target must be verified using advanced tools designed to block or to enhance its signal. The aim of this study was to develop tools to silence the BDNF signal. We generated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) derived amplicon vectors, i.e. viral particles containing a genome of 152 kb constituted of concatameric repetitions of an expression cassette, enabling the expression of the gene of interest in multiple copies. HSV-1 based amplicon vectors are non-pathogenic and have been successfully employed in the past for gene delivery into the brain of living animals. Therefore, amplicon vectors should represent a logical choice for expressing a silencing cassette, which, in multiple copies, is expected to lead to an efficient knock-down of the target gene expression. Here, we employed two amplicon-based BDNF silencing strategies. The first, antisense, has been chosen to target and degrade the cytoplasmic mRNA pool of BDNF, whereas the second, based on the convergent transcription technology, has been chosen to repress transcription at the BDNF gene. Both these amplicon vectors proved to be effective in down-regulating BDNF expression in vitro, in BDNF-expressing mesoangioblast cells. However, only the antisense strategy was effective in vivo, after inoculation in the hippocampus in a model of status epilepticus in which BDNF mRNA levels are strongly increased. Interestingly, the knocking down of BDNF levels induced with BDNF-antisense was sufficient to produce significant behavioral effects, in spite of the fact that it was produced only in a part of a single hippocampus. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable effect of amplicon vectors in knocking down gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, this approach may find broad applications in neurobiological studies. PMID:26954758

  11. Recent Advances in Lentiviral Vaccines for HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Thomas D.; Miller, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine to prevent and/or cure HIV remains a global health priority. Given their central role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses, dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines are being increasingly explored as immunotherapeutic strategies to enhance HIV-specific T cells in infected individuals and, thus, promote immune responses that may help facilitate a functional cure. HIV-1-based lentiviral (LV) vectors have inherent advantages as DC vaccine vectors due to their ability to transduce non-dividing cells and integrate into the target cell genomic DNA, allowing for expression of encoded antigens over the lifespan of the cell. Moreover, LV vectors may express additional immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory proteins that enhance DC function and direct antigen-specific T cells responses. Recent basic and clinical research efforts have broadened our understanding of LV vectors as DC-based vaccines. In this review, we provide an overview of the pre-clinical and clinical LV vector vaccine studies for treating HIV to date. We also discuss advances in LV vector designs that have enhanced DC transduction efficiency, target cell specificity, and immunogenicity, and address potential safety concerns regarding LV vector-based vaccines. PMID:27446074

  12. Comparison of Lentiviral Packaging Mixes and Producer Cell Lines for RNAi Applications.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Christian; Hosiner, Stefanie; Tichy, Brigitte; Aldrian, Silke; Hajdu, Stefan; Nürnberger, Sylvia

    2015-06-01

    Lentiviral transduction is a highly efficient DNA delivery method for RNA interference applications. However, obtaining high lentiviral titers of shRNA and miRNA encoding vectors is challenging, since shRNA and miRNA cassettes have been shown to reduce lentiviral titers. In this study, we compare four commercially available packaging mixes and two producer cell lines in order to optimize lentiviral production for gene silencing experiments. Lentiviral vectors encoding a miRNA sequence and emerald green fluorescence protein were co-transfected with ViraPower™, Lenti-X™ HTX, MISSION(®) Lentiviral or Trans-Lentiviral™ packaging mix in HEK-293T or 293FT cells. After transducing HeLa cells with virus-containing supernatant, lentiviral titers were determined by flow cytomerty. In both cell lines, the highest lentiviral titer was obtained with MISSION(®) Lentiviral packaging mix, followed by ViraPower™, Lenti-X™ HTX, and Trans-Lentiviral™. On average, HEK-293T cells produced 6.2-fold higher lentiviral titers than 293FT cells (p < 0.001). With the combination of MISSION(®) Lentiviral packaging mix and HEK-293T cells, an up to 48.5-fold higher lentiviral titer was reached compared to other packaging mixes and producer cell lines. The optimized selection of packaging mix and cell line described in this work should facilitate the production of high-titer lentiviruses for gene silencing experiments. PMID:25616840

  13. Conditional RNAi Using the Lentiviral GLTR System.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffenberger, Elisabeth; Sigl, Reinhard; Geley, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an essential technology for functional gene analysis. Its success depends on the effective expression of target gene-specific RNAi-inducing small double-stranded interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs). Here, were describe the use of a recently developed lentiviral RNAi system that allows the rapid generation of stable cell lines with inducible RNAi based on conditional expression of double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA). These lentiviral vectors can be generated rapidly using the GATEWAY recombination cloning technology. Conditional cell lines can be established by using either a two-vector system in which the regulator is encoded by a separate vector or by a one-vector system. The available different lentiviral vectors for conditional shRNA expression cassette delivery co-express additional genes that allow (1) the use of fluorescent proteins for color-coded combinatorial RNAi or monitoring RNAi induction (pGLTR-FP), (2) selection of transduced cells (pGLTR-S), and (3) the generation of conditional cell lines using a one-vector system (pGLTR-X). PMID:27317178

  14. A method to assess target gene involvement in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo using lentiviral vectors expressing shRNA.

    PubMed

    Blosser, Wayne; Vakana, Eliza; Wyss, Lisa V; Swearingen, Michelle L; Stewart, Julie; Stancato, Louis; Tate, Courtney M

    2014-01-01

    Current methods to study angiogenesis in cancer growth and development can be difficult and costly, requiring extensive use of in vivo methodologies. Here, we utilized an in vitro adipocyte derived stem cell and endothelial colony forming cell (ADSC/ECFC) co-culture system to investigate the effect of lentiviral-driven shRNA knockdown of target genes compared to a non-targeting shRNA control on cord formation using High Content Imaging. Cord formation was significantly reduced following knockdown of the VEGF receptor VEGFR2 in VEGF-driven cord formation and the FGF receptor FGFR1 in basic FGF (bFGF)-driven cord formation. In addition, cord formation was significantly reduced following knockdown of the transcription factor forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1), a protein with known positive effects on angiogenesis and blood vessel stabilization in VEGF- and bFGF-driven cord formation. Lentiviral shRNA also demonstrated utility for stable knockdown of VEGFR2 and FOXO1 in ECFCs, allowing for interrogation of protein knockdown effects on in vivo neoangiogenesis in a Matrigel plug assay. In addition to interrogating the effect of gene knockdown in endothelial cells, we utilized lentiviral shRNA to knockdown specificity protein 1 (SP1), a transcription factor involved in the expression of VEGF, in U-87 MG tumor cells to demonstrate the ability to analyze angiogenesis in vitro in a tumor-driven transwell cord formation system and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. A significant reduction in tumor-driven cord formation, VEGF secretion, and in vivo tumor angiogenesis was observed upon SP1 knockdown. Therefore, evaluation of target gene knockdown effects in the in vitro co-culture cord formation assay in the ADSC/ECFC co-culture, ECFCs alone, and in tumor cells translated directly to in vivo results, indicating the in vitro method as a robust, cost-effective and efficient in vitro surrogate assay to investigate target gene involvement in endothelial or tumor cell function in

  15. Lentiviral vectors containing mouse Csf1r control elements direct macrophage-restricted expression in multiple species of birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Pridans, Clare; Lillico, Simon; Whitelaw, Bruce; Hume, David A

    2014-01-01

    The development of macrophages requires signaling through the lineage-restricted receptor Csf1r. Macrophage-restricted expression of transgenic reporters based upon Csf1r requires the highly conserved Fms-intronic regulatory element (FIRE). We have created a lentiviral construct containing mouse FIRE and promoter. The lentivirus is capable of directing macrophage-restricted reporter gene expression in mouse, rat, human, pig, cow, sheep, and even chicken. Rat bone marrow cells transduced with the lentivirus were capable of differentiating into macrophages expressing the reporter gene in vitro. Macrophage-restricted expression may be desirable for immunization or immune response modulation, and for gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases and some immunodeficiencies. The small size of the Csf1r transcription control elements will allow the insertion of large "cargo" for applications in gene therapy and vaccine delivery. PMID:26015955

  16. Certification assays for HIV-1-based vectors: frequent passage of gag sequences without evidence of replication-competent viruses.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Lakshmi; Xu, Yi; Johnson, Terry; Desai, Kunal; Rissing, David; Marsh, Jonathan; Cornetta, Kenneth

    2003-11-01

    A principal concern regarding the safety of HIV-1-based vectors is replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). We have developed two PCR assays for detecting RCL; the first detects recombination between gag regions in the transfer vector and the packaging construct (sensitivity of detection approximately 10-100 copies of target sequence). The second assay uses real-time PCR to detect vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) envelope DNA (sensitivity approximately 5-50 VSVG sequences). In an attempt to amplify any RCL, test vectors were used to transduce C8166 and 293 cells, which were then screened weekly for 3 weeks. Psi-gag recombinants were routinely detected (20 of 21 analyses) in four transductions using the RRL-CMV-GFP vector. In contrast, VSVG sequences were detected only once in 21 analyses. Interestingly, p24 levels (as measured by ELISA) were occasionally detectable after 3 weeks of culture. To determine if a true RCL was present, 21-day cell-free medium was used to transduce naïve cells. No evidence of psi-gag or VSVG transfer was detected, indicating that the recombination events were insufficient to reconstitute a true RCL. These findings have important implications for the design and safety of HIV-1-based vectors intended for clinical applications. PMID:14599817

  17. Increased Locomotor Activity and Non-Selective Attention and Impaired Learning Ability in SD Rats after Lentiviral Vector-Mediated RNA Interference of Homer 1a in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Qin; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Min; Pan, Xiao-Qin; Guo, Mei; Fei, Li; Tong, Mei-Ling; Chen, Rong-Hua; Guo, Xi-Rong; Chi, Xia

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies found that Homer 1a, a scaffolding protein localized at the post-synaptic density (PSD) of glutamatergic excitatory synapses, is significantly down-regulated in the brain of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR), an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Furthermore, a first-line treatment drug for ADHD, methylphenidate, can up-regulate the expression of Homer 1a. To investigate the possible role of Homer 1a in the etiology and pathogenesis of ADHD, a lentiviral vector containing miRNA specific for Homer 1a was constructed in this study. Intracerebroventricular injection of this vector into the brain of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats significantly decreased Homer 1a mRNA and protein expression levels. Compared to their negative controls, these rats displayed a range of abnormal behaviors, including increased locomotor activity and non-selective attention and impaired learning ability. Our results indicated that Homer 1a down-regulation results in deficits in control over behavioral output and learning similar to ADHD. PMID:23289010

  18. Lentiviral vector-mediated shRNA against AIMP2-DX2 suppresses lung cancer cell growth through blocking glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seung-Hee; Chung, Youn-Sun; Hwang, Soon-Kyung; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Kim, Sunghoon; Park, Seung Bum; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-06-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases [ARS]-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2) has been implicated in the control of cell fate and lung cell differentiation. A variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2) is expressed in different cancer cells. We previously studied the expression level of AIMP2-DX2 in several lung cell lines and reported elevated expression levels of AIMP2-DX2 in NCI-H460 and NCI-H520. Here, we report that the suppression of AIMP2-DX2 by lentivirus mediated short hairpin (sh)RNA (sh-DX2) decreased the rate of glucose uptake and glucose transporters (Gluts) in NCI-H460 cells. Down-regulation of AIMP2-DX2 reduced glycosyltransferase (GnT)-V in the Golgi apparatus, while inducing the GnT-V antagonist GnT-III. Down-regulation of AIMP2-DX2 also suppressed the epidermal growth factor receptor/mitogen activated protein kinase (EGFR/MAPK) signaling pathway, leading to the decrease of the proliferation marker Ki-67 expression in nuclei. Furthermore, dual luciferase activity reduced capdependent protein translation in cells infected with sh-DX2. These results suggest that AIMP2-DX2 may be a relevant therapeutic target for lung cancer, and that the sh-DX2 lentiviral system can be an appropriate method for lung cancer therapy. PMID:22562359

  19. Intravenous Delivery of HIV-Based Lentiviral Vectors Preferentially Transduces F4/80+ and Ly-6C+ Cells in Spleen, Important Target Cells in Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    van den Brand, Ben T.; Vermeij, Eline A.; Waterborg, Claire E. J.; Arntz, Onno J.; Kracht, Michael; Bennink, Miranda B.; van den Berg, Wim B.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Antigen presenting cells (APCs) play an important role in arthritis and APC specific gene therapeutic targeting will enable intracellular modulation of cell activity. Viral mediated overexpression is a potent approach to achieve adequate transgene expression levels and lentivirus (LV) is useful for sustained expression in target cells. Therefore, we studied the feasibility of lentiviral mediated targeting of APCs in experimental arthritis. Third generation VSV-G pseudotyped self-inactivating (SIN)-LV were injected intravenously and spleen cells were analyzed with flow cytometry for green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene expression and cell surface markers. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced by immunization with bovine collagen type II in complete Freund's adjuvant. Effect on inflammation was monitored macroscopically and T-cell subsets in spleen were analyzed by flow cytometry. Synovium from arthritic knee joints were analyzed for proinflammatory cytokine expression. Lentiviruses injected via the tail vein preferentially infected the spleen and transduction peaks at day 10. A dose escalating study showed that 8% of all spleen cells were targeted and further analysis showed that predominantly Ly6C+ and F4/80+ cells in spleen were targeted by the LV. To study the feasibility of blocking TAK1-dependent pathways by this approach, a catalytically inactive mutant of TAK1 (TAK1-K63W) was overexpressed during CIA. LV-TAK1-K63W significantly reduced incidence and arthritis severity macroscopically. Further histological analysis showed a significant decrease in bone erosion in LV-TAK1-K63W treated animals. Moreover, systemic Th17 levels were decreased by LV-TAK1-K63W treatment in addition to diminished IL-6 and KC production in inflamed synovium. In conclusion, systemically delivered LV efficiently targets monocytes and macrophages in spleen that are involved in autoimmune arthritis. Moreover, this study confirms efficacy of TAK1 targeting in arthritis. This

  20. Preconditioning Therapy with Lentiviral Vector-Programmed Dendritic Cells Accelerates the Homeostatic Expansion of Antigen-Reactive Human T Cells in NOD.Rag1−/−.IL-2rγc−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Salguero, Gustavo; Sundarasetty, Bala Sai; Borchers, Sylvia; Wedekind, Dirk; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Velaga, Sarvari; Jirmo, Adan C.; Behrens, Georg; Warnecke, Gregor; Knöfel, Ann-Kathrin; Blasczyk, Rainer; Mischak-Weissinger, Eva; Ganser, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunization is a potent strategy to direct prompt and durable immune responses against viral reactivations after transplantations. Here, we show that overnight lentiviral vector (LV) gene transfer into human monocytes co-expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor and interleukin (IL)-4 induced self-differentiated DCs (SMART-DCs) with stable DC immunophenotype over weeks in culture and secreted several inflammatory cytokines. SMART-DCs injected subcutaneously in immunodeficient NOD.Rag1−/−.IL2rγ−/− (NRG) mice 1 day after LV transduction were stable for a month in vivo. “Conventional” DCs (cDCs) and SMART-DCs were compared with regard to their potency to accelerate the expansion, biodistribution, and antigenic stimulation of autologous human T cells. Peripheral blood cells obtained from human cytomegalovirus (hCMV)-reactive donors and full-length hCMV pp65 antigenic protein or peptides were used. DCs loaded with pp65 were administered subcutaneously into NRG mice as a preconditioning treatment a week prior to intravenous infusion with T cells. Optical imaging analyses demonstrated that in mice preconditioned with SMART-DC-pp65, T cells were directly recruited to the immunization site and subsequently spread to the spleen and other organs. A dramatic expansion of both human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells could be observed within a few days after infusion, and this was associated with consistent measurable CD8+ effector memory T-cell responses against different pp65 epitopes. Thus, this mouse model demonstrates the proof-of-principle for SMART-DCs to accelerate expansion of human lymphocytes, resulting in poly-functional and antigen-specific immune responses against hCMV-pp65. PMID:21574869

  1. Airway gene transfer in a non-human primate: lentiviral gene expression in marmoset lungs.

    PubMed

    Farrow, N; Miller, D; Cmielewski, P; Donnelley, M; Bright, R; Parsons, D W

    2013-01-01

    Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis (CF) must be assessed for safety and efficacy, so testing in a non-human primate (NHP) model is invaluable. In this pilot study we determined if the conducting airways of marmosets (n = 2) could be transduced using an airway pre-treatment followed by an intratracheal bolus dose of a VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 based lentiviral (LV) vector (LacZ reporter). LacZ gene expression (X-gal) was assessed after 7 days and found primarily in conducting airway epithelia as well as in alveolar regions. The LacZ gene was not detected in liver or spleen via qPCR. Vector p24 protein bio-distribution into blood was transient. Dosing was well tolerated. This preliminary study confirmed the transducibility of CF-relevant airway cell types. The marmoset is a promising NHP model for testing and translating genetic treatments for CF airway disease towards clinical trials. PMID:23412644

  2. RD-MolPack technology for the constitutive production of self-inactivating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the nontoxic RD114-TR envelope

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Virna; Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovan, Claudia; Corna, Stefano; Bossi, Sergio; Pema, Monika; Giuliani, Erica; Scavullo, Cinzia; Zucchelli, Eleonora; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian Paolo; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    To date, gene therapy with transiently derived lentivectors has been very successful to cure rare infant genetic diseases. However, transient manufacturing is unfeasible to treat adult malignancies because large vector lots are required. By contrast, stable manufacturing is the best option for high-incidence diseases since it reduces the production cost, which is the major current limitation to scale up the transient methods. We have previously developed the proprietary RD2-MolPack technology for the stable production of second-generation lentivectors, based on the RD114-TR envelope. Of note, opposite to vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) envelope, RD114-TR does not need inducible expression thanks to lack of toxicity. Here, we present the construction of RD2- and RD3-MolPack cells for the production of self-inactivating lentivectors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a proof-of-concept of the feasibility and safety of this technology before its later therapeutic exploitation. We report that human T lymphocytes transduced with self-inactivating lentivectors derived from RD3-MolPack cells or with self-inactivating VSV-G pseudotyped lentivectors derived from transient transfection show identical T-cell memory differentiation phenotype and comparable transduction efficiency in all T-cell subsets. RD-MolPack technology represents, therefore, a straightforward tool to simplify and standardize lentivector manufacturing to engineer T-cells for frontline immunotherapy applications. PMID:27222840

  3. RD-MolPack technology for the constitutive production of self-inactivating lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the nontoxic RD114-TR envelope.

    PubMed

    Marin, Virna; Stornaiuolo, Anna; Piovan, Claudia; Corna, Stefano; Bossi, Sergio; Pema, Monika; Giuliani, Erica; Scavullo, Cinzia; Zucchelli, Eleonora; Bordignon, Claudio; Rizzardi, Gian Paolo; Bovolenta, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    To date, gene therapy with transiently derived lentivectors has been very successful to cure rare infant genetic diseases. However, transient manufacturing is unfeasible to treat adult malignancies because large vector lots are required. By contrast, stable manufacturing is the best option for high-incidence diseases since it reduces the production cost, which is the major current limitation to scale up the transient methods. We have previously developed the proprietary RD2-MolPack technology for the stable production of second-generation lentivectors, based on the RD114-TR envelope. Of note, opposite to vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) envelope, RD114-TR does not need inducible expression thanks to lack of toxicity. Here, we present the construction of RD2- and RD3-MolPack cells for the production of self-inactivating lentivectors expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a proof-of-concept of the feasibility and safety of this technology before its later therapeutic exploitation. We report that human T lymphocytes transduced with self-inactivating lentivectors derived from RD3-MolPack cells or with self-inactivating VSV-G pseudotyped lentivectors derived from transient transfection show identical T-cell memory differentiation phenotype and comparable transduction efficiency in all T-cell subsets. RD-MolPack technology represents, therefore, a straightforward tool to simplify and standardize lentivector manufacturing to engineer T-cells for frontline immunotherapy applications. PMID:27222840

  4. Lentiviral delivery of short hairpin RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, N; Haoquan, Wu; Sandesh, Subramanya; Premlata, Shankar

    2009-01-01

    In less than a decade after discovery, RNA interference-mediated gene silencing is already being tested as potential therapy in clinical trials for a number of diseases. Lentiviral vectors provide a means to express short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to induce stable and long-term gene silencing in both dividing and non-dividing cells and thus, are being intensively investigated for this purpose. However, induction of long-term shRNA expression can also cause toxicities by inducing off target effects and interference with the endogenous micro RNA (miRNA) pathway that regulates cellular gene expression. Recently, several advances have been made in the shRNA vector design to mimic cellular miRNA processing and to express multiplex siRNAs in a tightly regulated and reversible manner to overcome toxicities. In this review we describe some of these advances, focusing on the progress made in the development of lentiviral shRNA delivery strategies to combat viral infections. PMID:19341774

  5. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra; Montini, Eugenio; Lorioli, Laura; Cesani, Martina; Fumagalli, Francesca; Plati, Tiziana; Baldoli, Cristina; Martino, Sabata; Calabria, Andrea; Canale, Sabrina; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Vallanti, Giuliana; Biasco, Luca; Leo, Simone; Kabbara, Nabil; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Rizzo, William B; Mehta, Nalini A L; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Casiraghi, Miriam; Boelens, Jaap J; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Dow, David J; Schmidt, Manfred; Assanelli, Andrea; Neduva, Victor; Di Serio, Clelia; Stupka, Elia; Gardner, Jason; von Kalle, Christof; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Rovelli, Attilio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Sessa, Maria; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-08-23

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) deficiency. Patients with MLD exhibit progressive motor and cognitive impairment and die within a few years of symptom onset. We used a lentiviral vector to transfer a functional ARSA gene into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from three presymptomatic patients who showed genetic, biochemical, and neurophysiological evidence of late infantile MLD. After reinfusion of the gene-corrected HSCs, the patients showed extensive and stable ARSA gene replacement, which led to high enzyme expression throughout hematopoietic lineages and in cerebrospinal fluid. Analyses of vector integrations revealed no evidence of aberrant clonal behavior. The disease did not manifest or progress in the three patients 7 to 21 months beyond the predicted age of symptom onset. These findings indicate that extensive genetic engineering of human hematopoiesis can be achieved with lentiviral vectors and that this approach may offer therapeutic benefit for MLD patients. PMID:23845948

  6. Transduction of motor neurons and muscle fibers by intramuscular injection of HIV-1-based vectors pseudotyped with select rabies virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Gravell, Maneth; Hamilton, Rebecca; Shneider, Neil A; O'Donovan, Michael J; Schubert, Manfred

    2006-10-30

    For studies of motor neuron function or for therapeutic purposes, novel pseudotype HIV-1-based vectors were developed that are capable of expressing transgenes in motor neurons following injection into mouse hind limb muscles. To specifically target motor neurons, glycoproteins from two rabies virus (RV) isolates, the mouse-brain adapted challenge virus 24 (CVS-24) variants, CVS-N2c and CVS-B2c were evaluated for pseudotype formation with an HIV-1-based vector. Both RV glycoproteins incorporated into vector envelopes, and both pseudotypes yielded high titers with Hek293T and cortical plate neuron cultures. Increased neuronotropism by the CVS-N2c pseudotype was not observed, suggesting that vector tropism is not solely determined by the fusogenic viral glycoprotein. Vector injection into hind limb muscles resulted in EYFP reporter gene expression in the injected muscle fibers and in spinal cord motor neurons innervating the same muscle, indicating retrograde vector transport. Intramuscular vector injections into the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles transduced 26% and 16% of all motor neurons in each motor nucleus, respectively. These transduction efficiencies may allow novel approaches to functional studies of the motor system and the treatment of neuromuscular disease. PMID:16725205

  7. Surface modification via strain-promoted click reaction facilitates targeted lentiviral transduction.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yanjie; Oum, Yoon Hyeun; Carrico, Isaac S

    2016-01-01

    As a result of their ability to integrate into the genome of both dividing and non-dividing cells, lentiviruses have emerged as a promising vector for gene delivery. Targeted gene transduction of specific cells and tissues by lentiviral vectors has been a major goal, which has proven difficult to achieve. We report a novel targeting protocol that relies on the chemoselective attachment of cancer specific ligands to unnatural glycans on lentiviral surfaces. This strategy exhibits minimal perturbation on virus physiology and demonstrates remarkable flexibility. It allows for targeting but can be more broadly useful with applications such as vector purification and immunomodulation. PMID:26499046

  8. High-Titer Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Based Vector Systems for Gene Delivery into Nondividing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mochizuki, Hideki; Schwartz, Joan P.; Tanaka, Koichi; Brady, Roscoe O.; Reiser, Jakob

    1998-01-01

    Previously we designed novel pseudotyped high-titer replication defective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vectors to deliver genes into nondividing cells (J. Reiser, G. Harmison, S. Kluepfel-Stahl, R. O. Brady, S. Karlsson, and M. Schubert, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:15266–15271, 1996). Since then we have made several improvements with respect to the safety, flexibility, and efficiency of the vector system. A three-plasmid expression system is used to generate pseudotyped HIV-1 particles by transient transfection of human embryonic kidney 293T cells with a defective packaging construct, a plasmid coding for a heterologous envelope (Env) protein, and a vector construct harboring a reporter gene such as neo, ShlacZ (encoding a phleomycin resistance/β-galactosidase fusion protein), HSA (encoding mouse heat-stable antigen), or EGFP (encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein). The packaging constructs lack functional Vif, Vpr, and Vpu proteins and/or a large portion of the Env coding region as well as the 5′ and 3′ long terminal repeats, the Nef function, and the presumed packaging signal. Using G418 selection, we routinely obtained vector particles pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G) with titers of up to 8 × 107 CFU/μg of p24, provided that a functional Tat coding region was present in the vector. Vector constructs lacking a functional Tat protein yielded titers of around 4 × 106 to 8 × 106 CFU/μg of p24. Packaging constructs with a mutation within the integrase (IN) core domain profoundly affected colony formation and expression of the reporter genes, indicating that a functional IN protein is required for efficient transduction. We explored the abilities of other Env proteins to allow formation of pseudotyped HIV-1 particles. The rabies virus and Mokola virus G proteins yielded high-titer infectious pseudotypes, while the human foamy virus Env protein did not. Using the improved vector system, we

  9. High-efficiency gene transfer into CD34+ cells with a human immunodeficiency virus type 1-based retroviral vector pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein G.

    PubMed Central

    Akkina, R K; Walton, R M; Chen, M L; Li, Q X; Planelles, V; Chen, I S

    1996-01-01

    Currently, amphotropic retroviral vectors are widely used for gene transfer into CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. The relatively low levels of transduction efficiency associated with these vectors in human cells is due to low viral titers and limitations in concentrating the virus because of the inherent fragility of retroviral envelopes. Here we show that a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based retroviral vector containing the firefly luciferase reporter gene can be pseudotyped with a broad-host-range vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein G (VSV-G). Higher-efficiency gene transfer into CD34+ cells was achieved with a VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 vector than with a vector packaged in an amphotropic envelope. Concentration of virus without loss of viral infectivity permitted a higher multiplicity of infection, with a consequent higher efficiency of gene transfer, reaching 2.8 copies per cell. These vectors also showed remarkable stability during storage at 4 degrees C for a week. In addition, there was no significant loss of titer after freezing and thawing of the stock virus. The ability of VSV-G-pseudotyped retroviral vectors to achieve a severalfold increase in levels of transduction into CD34+ cells will allow high-efficiency gene transfer into hematopoietic progenitor cells for gene therapy purposes. Furthermore, since it has now become possible to infect CD34+ cells with pseudotyped HIV-1 with a high level of efficiency in vitro, many important questions regarding the effect of HIV-1 on lineage-specific differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors can now be addressed. PMID:8642689

  10. Quantitative analysis of lentiviral transgene expression in mice over seven generations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Song, Yong-tao; Liu, Qin; Liu, Cang'e; Wang, Lu-lu; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Xiao-yang; Wu, Jun; Wei, Hong

    2010-10-01

    Lentiviral transgenesis is now recognized as an extremely efficient and cost-effective method to produce transgenic animals. Transgenes delivered by lentiviral vectors exhibited inheritable expression in many species including those which are refractory to genetic modification such as non-human primates. However, epigenetic modification was frequently observed in lentiviral integrants, and transgene expression found to be inversely correlated with methylation density. Recent data showed that about one-third lentiviral integrants exhibited hypermethylation and low expression, but did not demonstrate whether those integrants with high expression could remain constant expression and hypomethylated during long term germline transmission. In this study, using lentiviral eGFP transgenic mice as the experimental animals, lentiviral eGFP expression levels and its integrant numbers in genome were quantitatively analyzed by fluorescent quantitative polymerase-chain reaction (FQ-PCR), using the house-keeping gene ribosomal protein S18 (Rps18) and the single copy gene fatty acid binding protein of the intestine (Fabpi) as the internal controls respectively. The methylation densities of the integrants were quantitatively analyzed by bisulfite sequencing. We found that the lentiviral integrants with high expression exhibited a relative constant expression level per integrant over at least seven generations. Besides, the individuals containing these integrants exhibited eGFP expression levels which were positively and almost linearly correlated with the integrant numbers in their genomes, suggesting that no remarkable position effect on transgene expression of the integrants analyzed was observed. In addition, over seven generations the methylation density of these integrants did not increase, but rather decreased remarkably, indicating that these high expressing integrants were not subjected to de novo methylation during at least seven generations of germline transmission. Taken

  11. Polybrene: Observations on cochlear hair cell necrosis and minimal lentiviral transduction of cochlear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Miaomiao; Yu, Dongzhen; Song, Qiang; Wang, Jiping; Dong, Pin; He, Jingchun

    2015-07-23

    Polybrene is widely used to enhance viral transduction; however, little is known about the utility thereof, in enhancing lentiviral transduction of cochlear cells. In the present study, we examined the cytotoxic effects of polybrene, and the further effects thereof, on lentiviral transduction of cochlear cells, especially sensory hair cells. Cochlear basilar membranes of newborn rats were cultured and treated with 0.1-10 μg/mL polybrene for 24h to explore the potential development of ototoxicity. PI staining and TUNEL detection were used to evaluate necrosis or apoptosis of hair cell. Various doses of lentivirus-GFP were added to cochlear organotypic cultures with safe concentrations of polybrene, incubated for 24h, and cultured (in the absence of the virus and polybrene) for a further 48 h. Transduction efficiencies were evaluated. The results showed that polybrene at 0.1 μg/mL was safe to cochlear cells, and 0.5-10 μg/mL concentration induced hair cell necrosis in a dose-dependent manner. However, supporting cells were not damaged. Lentiviral vectors transduced into cochlear cells and 0.1 μg/mL polybrene enhanced transduction efficiency. However, hair cells were hardly transduced with lentiviral vectors either alone or in the presence of 0.1 μg/mL polybrene. The use of polybrene to aid lentiviral transduction of cochlear hair cells requires further attention. PMID:26071903

  12. Plasmid-based shRNA lentiviral particle production for RNAi applications

    PubMed Central

    Shum, David; Djaballah, Hakim

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have become mainstream gene transfer vehicles for their ability to delivery and integrate into host cells. In RNA interference (RNAi) applications, lentiviral constructs constitutively express dsRNA molecules usually as short hairpin RNA (shRNA) enabling long-term gene silencing and when pseudotyped with a broad host glycoprotein envelope; allows a multitude of cell types to be transduced. Their successful use ultimately relies on the production of lentiviral particles in high-titer and uniformity. Typical methods require the transfection of three or more plasmids in which essential viral elements have been encoded separated so as to remain replication deficient. These transfection procedures are of critical importance; however, methods often vary among laboratories making it difficult to assess the overall efficiency of lentiviral particle production. In this report, we focused exclusively on this step and compared the overall impact of the commercial transfection reagent FuGENE 6 to FuGENE HD. We found that FuGENE HD resulted in at least 5-fold improvement in viral particle titer as assessed by the p24 standard ELISA assay. We present the complete optimized workflow and demonstrate this utility in which a single modification of this transfection step improved the lentiviral particle production. PMID:24939963

  13. A Rev-independent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based vector that exploits a codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulou, E; Kim, V N; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M; Mitrophanous, K A

    2000-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome is AU rich, and this imparts a codon bias that is quite different from the one used by human genes. The codon usage is particularly marked for the gag, pol, and env genes. Interestingly, the expression of these genes is dependent on the presence of the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) regulatory system, even in contexts other than the HIV genome. The Rev dependency has been explained in part by the presence of RNA instability sequences residing in these coding regions. The requirement for Rev also places a limitation on the development of HIV-based vectors, because of the requirement to provide an accessory factor. We have now synthesized a complete codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene. We show that expression levels are high and that expression is Rev independent. This effect is due to an increase in the amount of gag-pol mRNA. Provision of the RRE in cis did not lower protein or RNA levels or stimulate a Rev response. Furthermore we have used this synthetic gag-pol gene to produce HIV vectors that now lack all of the accessory proteins. These vectors should now be safer than murine leukemia virus-based vectors. PMID:10775623

  14. A Rev-Independent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Based Vector That Exploits a Codon-Optimized HIV-1 gag-pol Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotsopoulou, Ekaterini; Kim, V. Narry; Kingsman, Alan J.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2000-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome is AU rich, and this imparts a codon bias that is quite different from the one used by human genes. The codon usage is particularly marked for the gag, pol, and env genes. Interestingly, the expression of these genes is dependent on the presence of the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) regulatory system, even in contexts other than the HIV genome. The Rev dependency has been explained in part by the presence of RNA instability sequences residing in these coding regions. The requirement for Rev also places a limitation on the development of HIV-based vectors, because of the requirement to provide an accessory factor. We have now synthesized a complete codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene. We show that expression levels are high and that expression is Rev independent. This effect is due to an increase in the amount of gag-pol mRNA. Provision of the RRE in cis did not lower protein or RNA levels or stimulate a Rev response. Furthermore we have used this synthetic gag-pol gene to produce HIV vectors that now lack all of the accessory proteins. These vectors should now be safer than murine leukemia virus-based vectors. PMID:10775623

  15. Type II pneumocyte-restricted green fluorescent protein expression after lentiviral transduction of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Stephanie; Gruh, Ina; Winkler, Monica E; Beier, Jennifer; Radtke, Kerstin; Schmiedl, Andreas; Groos, Stephanie; Haverich, Axel; Martin, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Type II alveolar epithelial (AT2) cell-specific reporter expression has been highly useful in the study of embryology and alveolar regeneration in transgenic mice. Technologies enabling efficient gene transfer and cell type-restricted transgene expression in AT2 cells would allow for correction of AT2 cell-based diseases such as genetic surfactant deficiencies. Moreover, such approaches are urgently required to investigate differentiation of AT2 cells from adult and embryonic stem cells of other species than mouse. Using a human surfactant protein C (SP-C) promoter fragment, we have constructed lentiviral vectors enabling AT2-restricted transgene expression and identification of stem cell-derived AT2 cells. Lung epithelial cell lines M3E3/C3, H441, RLE-6TN, A549, MLE-12, and MLE-15 were characterized at the molecular and ultrastructural levels to identify cell lines useful to assess the cell type specificity of our vector constructs. After transduction, no green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was observed in nontarget cells including bronchial H441 cells, pulmonary A549 cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. In contrast, and in correlation with endogenous SP-C expression, lentiviral transduction resulted in stable GFP expression in MLE-12 and MLE-15 AT2 cells. In conclusion, we have constructed a lentiviral vector mediating SP-C promoter-dependent GFP expression. Transgene expression strictly corresponds with an AT2 phenotype of the transduced cells. In particular, the generated vector should facilitate local alveolar gene therapy and investigation of alveolar regeneration and stem cell differentiation. PMID:18052721

  16. Sustained high-level polyclonal hematopoietic marking and transgene expression 4 years after autologous transplantation of rhesus macaques with SIV lentiviral vector–transduced CD34+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Yoon-Sang; Larochelle, Andre; Renaud, Gabriel; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Adler, Rima; Donahue, Robert E.; Hematti, Peiman; Hong, Bum-Kee; Roayaei, Jean; Akagi, Keiko; Riberdy, Janice M.; Nienhuis, Arthur W.; Persons, Derek A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that lentiviral vectors derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) were efficient at transducing rhesus hematopoietic repopulating cells. To evaluate the persistence of vector-containing and -expressing cells long term, and the safety implications of SIV lentiviral vector–mediated gene transfer, we followed 3 rhesus macaques for more than 4 years after transplantation with transduced CD34+ cells. All 3 animals demonstrated significant vector marking and expression of the GFP transgene in T cells, B cells, and granulocytes, with mean GFP+ levels of 6.7% (range, 3.3%-13.0%), 7.4% (4.2%-13.4%), and 5.6% (3.1%-10.5%), respectively. There was no vector silencing in hematopoietic cells over time. Vector insertion site analysis of granulocytes demonstrated sustained highly polyclonal reconstitution, with no evidence for progression to oligoclonality. A significant number of clones were found to contribute at both 1-year and 3- or 4-year time points. No vector integrations were detected in the MDS1/EVI1 region, in contrast to our previous findings with a γ-retroviral vector. These data show that lentiviral vectors can mediate stable and efficient long-term expression in the progeny of transduced hematopoietic stem cells, with an integration profile that may be safer than that of standard Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV)–derived retroviral vectors. PMID:19339698

  17. B-cell reconstitution after lentiviral vector–mediated gene therapy in patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Castiello, Maria Carmina; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Pala, Francesca; Ferrua, Francesca; Uva, Paolo; Brigida, Immacolata; Sereni, Lucia; van der Burg, Mirjam; Ottaviano, Giorgio; Albert, Michael H.; Grazia Roncarolo, Maria; Naldini, Luigi; Aiuti, Alessandro; Villa, Anna; Bosticardo, Marita

    2015-01-01

    Background Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is a severe X-linked immunodeficiency characterized by microthrombocytopenia, eczema, recurrent infections, and susceptibility to autoimmunity and lymphomas. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice; however, administration of WAS gene–corrected autologous hematopoietic stem cells has been demonstrated as a feasible alternative therapeutic approach. Objective Because B-cell homeostasis is perturbed in patients with WAS and restoration of immune competence is one of the main therapeutic goals, we have evaluated reconstitution of the B-cell compartment in 4 patients who received autologous hematopoietic stem cells transduced with lentiviral vector after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen combined with anti-CD20 administration. Methods We evaluated B-cell counts, B-cell subset distribution, B cell–activating factor and immunoglobulin levels, and autoantibody production before and after gene therapy (GT). WAS gene transfer in B cells was assessed by measuring vector copy numbers and expression of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein. Results After lentiviral vector-mediated GT, the number of transduced B cells progressively increased in the peripheral blood of all patients. Lentiviral vector-transduced progenitor cells were able to repopulate the B-cell compartment with a normal distribution of B-cell subsets both in bone marrow and the periphery, showing a WAS protein expression profile similar to that of healthy donors. In addition, after GT, we observed a normalized frequency of autoimmune-associated CD19+CD21−CD35− and CD21low B cells and a reduction in B cell–activating factor levels. Immunoglobulin serum levels and autoantibody production improved in all treated patients. Conclusions We provide evidence that lentiviral vector-mediated GT induces transgene expression in the B-cell compartment, resulting in ameliorated B-cell development and functionality and contributing to immunologic

  18. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies. PMID:23840834

  19. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    De Ravin, Suk See; Wu, Xiaolin; Moir, Susan; Anaya-O'Brien, Sandra; Kwatemaa, Nana; Littel, Patricia; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Su, Ling; Marquesen, Martha; Hilligoss, Dianne; Lee, Janet; Buckner, Clarissa M; Zarember, Kol A; O'Connor, Geraldine; McVicar, Daniel; Kuhns, Douglas; Throm, Robert E; Zhou, Sheng; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Hanson, I Celine; Cowan, Mort J; Kang, Elizabeth; Hadigan, Coleen; Meagher, Michael; Gray, John T; Sorrentino, Brian P; Malech, Harry L

    2016-04-20

    X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1) is a profound deficiency of T, B, and natural killer (NK) cell immunity caused by mutations inIL2RGencoding the common chain (γc) of several interleukin receptors. Gamma-retroviral (γRV) gene therapy of SCID-X1 infants without conditioning restores T cell immunity without B or NK cell correction, but similar treatment fails in older SCID-X1 children. We used a lentiviral gene therapy approach to treat five SCID-X1 patients with persistent immune dysfunction despite haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplant in infancy. Follow-up data from two older patients demonstrate that lentiviral vector γc transduced autologous HSC gene therapy after nonmyeloablative busulfan conditioning achieves selective expansion of gene-marked T, NK, and B cells, which is associated with sustained restoration of humoral responses to immunization and clinical improvement at 2 to 3 years after treatment. Similar gene marking levels have been achieved in three younger patients, albeit with only 6 to 9 months of follow-up. Lentiviral gene therapy with reduced-intensity conditioning appears safe and can restore humoral immune function to posthaploidentical transplant older patients with SCID-X1. PMID:27099176

  20. Comparison of Lentiviral and Sleeping Beauty Mediated αβ T Cell Receptor Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm’s tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies. PMID:23840834

  1. Lentiviral-based approach for the validation of cancer therapeutic targets in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ambrogio, Chiara; Stern, Patrick; Scuoppo, Claudio; Kranz, Harald; Barbacid, Mariano; Santamaría, David

    2014-10-01

    Despite the pressing need for novel cancer treatments, our improved understanding of tumor biology is not being successfully translated into better therapies. Here we present a lentiviral vector that enables in vivo validation of cancer therapeutic targets when combined with existing cancer animal models that faithfully reproduce the natural history of human disease. Unlike the conventional genetic approaches with targeted alleles, the outlined experimental strategy could be used to assess the preclinical efficacy of a growing number of putative therapeutic hits in a rapid and cost-effective manner. PMID:25312087

  2. Lentiviral gene therapy using cellular promoters cures type 1 Gaucher disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Maria; Doyle, Alexander; Olsson, Karin; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Marques, André R A; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M; Ehinger, Mats; Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Karlsson, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucosylceramidase. Due to the lack of a fully functional enzyme, there is progressive build-up of the lipid component glucosylceramide. Insufficient glucosylceramidase activity results in hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, and bone disease in patients. Gene therapy represents a future therapeutic option for patients unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy and lacking a suitable bone marrow donor. By proof-of-principle experiments, we have previously demonstrated a reversal of symptoms in a murine disease model of type 1 Gaucher disease, using gammaretroviral vectors harboring strong viral promoters to drive glucosidase β-acid (GBA) gene expression. To investigate whether safer vectors can correct the enzyme deficiency, we utilized self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (SIN LVs) with the GBA gene under the control of human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and CD68 promoter, respectively. Here, we report prevention of, as well as reversal of, manifest disease symptoms after lentiviral gene transfer. Glucosylceramidase activity above levels required for clearance of glucosylceramide from tissues resulted in reversal of splenomegaly, reduced Gaucher cell infiltration and a restoration of hematological parameters. These findings support the use of SIN-LVs with cellular promoters in future clinical gene therapy protocols for type 1 Gaucher disease. PMID:25655314

  3. Lentiviral Gene Therapy Using Cellular Promoters Cures Type 1 Gaucher Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Maria; Doyle, Alexander; Olsson, Karin; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Marques, André R A; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M; Ehinger, Mats; Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Karlsson, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucosylceramidase. Due to the lack of a fully functional enzyme, there is progressive build-up of the lipid component glucosylceramide. Insufficient glucosylceramidase activity results in hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, and bone disease in patients. Gene therapy represents a future therapeutic option for patients unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy and lacking a suitable bone marrow donor. By proof-of-principle experiments, we have previously demonstrated a reversal of symptoms in a murine disease model of type 1 Gaucher disease, using gammaretroviral vectors harboring strong viral promoters to drive glucosidase β-acid (GBA) gene expression. To investigate whether safer vectors can correct the enzyme deficiency, we utilized self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (SIN LVs) with the GBA gene under the control of human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and CD68 promoter, respectively. Here, we report prevention of, as well as reversal of, manifest disease symptoms after lentiviral gene transfer. Glucosylceramidase activity above levels required for clearance of glucosylceramide from tissues resulted in reversal of splenomegaly, reduced Gaucher cell infiltration and a restoration of hematological parameters. These findings support the use of SIN-LVs with cellular promoters in future clinical gene therapy protocols for type 1 Gaucher disease. PMID:25655314

  4. Inhibition of Intracellular Antiviral Defense Mechanisms Augments Lentiviral Transduction of Human Natural Killer Cells: Implications for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sutlu, Tolga; Nyström, Sanna; Gilljam, Mari; Stellan, Birgitta; Applequist, Steven E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically modified natural killer (NK) cells is a promising approach for cancer treatment. Yet, optimization of highly efficient and clinically applicable gene transfer protocols for NK cells still presents a challenge. In this study, we aimed at identifying conditions under which optimum lentiviral gene transfer to NK cells can be achieved. Our results demonstrate that stimulation of NK cells with interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21 supports efficient transduction using a VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vector. Moreover, we have identified that inhibition of innate immune receptor signaling greatly enhances transduction efficiency. We were able to boost the efficiency of lentiviral genetic modification on average 3.8-fold using BX795, an inhibitor of the TBK1/IKKɛ complex acting downstream of RIG-I, MDA-5, and TLR3. We have also observed that the use of BX795 enhances lentiviral transduction efficiency in a number of human and mouse cell lines, indicating a broadly applicable, practical, and safe approach that has the potential of being applicable to various gene therapy protocols. PMID:22779406

  5. Optimized Lentiviral Transduction Protocols by Use of a Poloxamer Enhancer, Spinoculation, and scFv-Antibody Fusions to VSV-G.

    PubMed

    Anastasov, Nataša; Höfig, Ines; Mall, Sabine; Krackhardt, Angela M; Thirion, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors (LV) are widely used to successfully transduce cells for research and clinical applications. This optimized LV infection protocol includes a nontoxic poloxamer-based adjuvant combined with antibody-retargeted lentiviral particles. The novel poloxamer P338 demonstrates superior characteristics for enhancing lentiviral transduction over the best-in-class polybrene-assisted transduction. Poloxamer P338 exhibited dual benefits of low toxicity and high efficiency of lentiviral gene delivery into a range of different primary cell cultures. One of the major advantages of P338 is its availability in pharma grade and applicability as cell culture medium additive in clinical protocols. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) can be produced to high titers and mediate high transduction efficiencies in vitro. For clinical applications the need for optimized transduction protocols, especially for transduction of primary T and stem cells, is high. The successful use of retronectin, the second lentivirus enhancer available as GMP material, requires the application of specific coating protocols not applicable in all processes, and results in the need of a relatively high multiplicity of infection (MOI) to achieve effective transduction efficiencies for hematopoietic cells (e.g., CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells). Cell specificity of lentiviral vectors was successfully increased by displaying different ratios of scFv-fused VSV-G glycoproteins on the viral envelope. The system has been validated with human CD30+ lymphoma cells, resulting in preferential gene delivery to CD30+ cells, which was increased fourfold in mixed cell cultures, by presenting scFv antibody fragments binding to respective surface markers. A combination of spinoculation and poloxamer-based chemical adjuvant increases the transduction of primary T-cells by greater than twofold. The combination of poloxamer-based and scFv-retargeted LVs increased

  6. Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Therapy in Fanconi Anemia-A Mice Reveals Long-Term Engraftment and Continuous Turnover of Corrected HSCs.

    PubMed

    Molina-Estevez, F Javier; Nowrouzi, Ali; Lozano, M Luz; Galy, Anne; Charrier, Sabine; von Kalle, Christof; Guenechea, Guillermo; Bueren, Juan A; Schmidt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a DNA repair-deficiency syndrome mainly characterized by cancer predisposition and bone marrow failure. Trying to restore the hematopoietic function in these patients, lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy trials have recently been proposed. However, because no insertional oncogenesis studies have been conducted so far in DNA repair-deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia, we have carried out a genome-wide screening of lentiviral insertion sites after the gene correction of Fanca(-/-) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), using LAM-PCR and 454-pyrosequencing. Our studies first demonstrated that transduction of Fanca(-/-) HSCs with a lentiviral vector designed for clinical application efficiently corrects the phenotype of Fanconi anemia repopulating cells without any sign of toxicity. The identification of more than 6,500 insertion sites in primary and secondary recipients showed a polyclonal pattern of reconstitution, as well as a continuous turnover of corrected Fanca(-/-) HSC clones, without evidences of selection towards specific common integration sites. Taken together our data show, for the first time in a DNA repair-deficiency syndrome, that lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy efficiently corrects the phenotype of affected HSCs and promotes a healthy pattern of clonal turnover in vivo. These studies will have a particular impact in the development of new gene therapy trials in patients affected by DNA repair syndromes, particularly in Fanconi anemia. PMID:26415575

  7. Inhibition of HIV derived lentiviral production by TAR RNA binding domain of TAT protein

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Michael Y; Zhang, Jiying; He, Yukai

    2005-01-01

    Background A critical step in the production of new HIV virions involves the TAT protein binding to the TAR element. The TAT protein contains in close proximity its TAR RNA binding domain and protein transduction domain (PTD). The PTD domain of TAT has been identified as being instrumental in the protein's ability to cross mammalian cell and nuclear membranes. All together, this information led us to form the hypothesis that a protein containing the TAR RNA binding domain could compete with the native full length TAT protein and effectively block the TAR RNA binding site in transduced HIV infected cells. Results We synthesized a short peptide named Tat-P, which contained the TAR RNA binding and PTD domains to examine whether the peptide has the potential of inhibiting TAT dependent HIV replication. We investigated the inhibiting effects of Tat-P in vitro using a HIV derived lentiviral vector model. We found that the TAT PTD domain not only efficiently transduced test cells, but also effectively inhibited the production of lentiviral particles in a TAT dependent manner. These results were also supported by data derived from the TAT activated LTR-luciferase expression model and RNA binding assays. Conclusion Tat-P may become part of a category of anti-HIV drugs that competes with full length TAT proteins to inhibit HIV replication. In addition, this study indicates that the HIV derived lentiviral vector system is a safe and reliable screening method for anti-HIV drugs, especially for those targeting the interaction of TAT and TAR RNAs. PMID:16293193

  8. Dual-promoter lentiviral system allows inducible expression of noxious proteins in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hui; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Eruslanov, Evgeny; Kotton, Darrell N.

    2008-01-01

    In-depth studies of innate immunity require efficient genetic manipulation of macrophages, which is especially difficult in primary macrophages. We have developed a lentiviral system for inducible gene expression both in macrophage cell lines and in primary macrophages. A transgenic mouse strain C3H.TgN(SRA-rtTA) that expresses reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA) under the control of macrophage-specific promoter, a modified human scavenger receptor A (SR-A) promoter was generated. For gene delivery, we constructed a dual-promoter lentiviral vector, in which expression of a “gene-of-interest” is driven by a doxycycline-inducible promoter and the expression of a selectable surface marker is driven by an independent constitutive promoter UBC. This vector is used for transduction of bone marrow-derived macrophage precursors. The transduced cells can be enriched to 95–99% purity using marker-specific monoclonal antibodies, expanded and differentiated into mature macrophages or myeloid dendritic cells. We also successfully used this approach for inducible protein expression in hard to transfect macrophage cell lines. Because many proteins, which are expressed by activated or infected macrophages, possess cytotoxic, anti-proliferative or pro-apoptotic activities, generation of stable macrophage cell lines that constitutively express those proteins is impossible. Our method will be especially useful to study immunity-related macrophage proteins in their physiological context during macrophage activation or infection. PMID:17967462

  9. Lentiviral-mediated genetic correction of hematopoietic and mesenchymal progenitor cells from Fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Jacome, Ariana; Navarro, Susana; Río, Paula; Yañez, Rosa M; González-Murillo, Africa; Lozano, M Luz; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Sevilla, Julian; Olive, Teresa; Diaz-Heredia, Cristina; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesus; Madero, Luis; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José; Segovia, Jose C; Bueren, Juan A

    2009-06-01

    Previous clinical trials based on the genetic correction of purified CD34(+) cells with gamma-retroviral vectors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in different monogenic diseases, including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Similar protocols, however, failed to engraft Fanconi anemia (FA) patients with genetically corrected cells. In this study, we first aimed to correlate the hematological status of 27 FA patients with CD34(+) cell values determined in their bone marrow (BM). Strikingly, no correlation between these parameters was observed, although good correlations were obtained when numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs) were considered. Based on these results, and because purified FA CD34(+) cells might have suboptimal repopulating properties, we investigated the possibility of genetically correcting unselected BM samples from FA patients. Our data show that the lentiviral transduction of unselected FA BM cells mediates an efficient phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also of CD34(-) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with a reported role in hematopoietic engraftment. Our results suggest that gene therapy protocols appropriate for the treatment of different monogenic diseases may not be adequate for stem cell diseases like FA. We propose a new approach for the gene therapy of FA based on the rapid transduction of unselected hematopoietic grafts with lentiviral vectors (LVs). PMID:19277017

  10. Lentiviral-mediated Genetic Correction of Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells From Fanconi Anemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacome, Ariana; Navarro, Susana; Río, Paula; Yañez, Rosa M; González-Murillo, Africa; Luz Lozano, M; Lamana, Maria Luisa; Sevilla, Julian; Olive, Teresa; Diaz-Heredia, Cristina; Badell, Isabel; Estella, Jesus; Madero, Luis; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José; Segovia, Jose C; Bueren, Juan A

    2009-01-01

    Previous clinical trials based on the genetic correction of purified CD34+ cells with γ-retroviral vectors have demonstrated clinical efficacy in different monogenic diseases, including X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency and chronic granulomatous disease. Similar protocols, however, failed to engraft Fanconi anemia (FA) patients with genetically corrected cells. In this study, we first aimed to correlate the hematological status of 27 FA patients with CD34+ cell values determined in their bone marrow (BM). Strikingly, no correlation between these parameters was observed, although good correlations were obtained when numbers of colony-forming cells (CFCs) were considered. Based on these results, and because purified FA CD34+ cells might have suboptimal repopulating properties, we investigated the possibility of genetically correcting unselected BM samples from FA patients. Our data show that the lentiviral transduction of unselected FA BM cells mediates an efficient phenotypic correction of hematopoietic progenitor cells and also of CD34− mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with a reported role in hematopoietic engraftment. Our results suggest that gene therapy protocols appropriate for the treatment of different monogenic diseases may not be adequate for stem cell diseases like FA. We propose a new approach for the gene therapy of FA based on the rapid transduction of unselected hematopoietic grafts with lentiviral vectors (LVs). PMID:19277017

  11. Lentiviral-mediated delivery of Bcl-2 or GDNF protects against excitotoxicity in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang-Fong; Ralph, G Scott; Walmsley, Lucy E; Bienemann, Alison S; Parham, Stephen; Kingsman, Susan M; Uney, James B; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2005-01-01

    Nutrient deprivation during ischemia leads to severe insult to neurons causing widespread excitotoxic damage in specific brain regions such as the hippocampus. One possible strategy for preventing neurodegeneration is to express therapeutic proteins in the brain to protect against excitotoxicity. We investigated the utility of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)-based vectors as genetic tools for delivery of therapeutic proteins in an in vivo excitotoxicity model. The efficacy of these vectors at preventing cellular loss in target brain areas following excitotoxic insult was also assessed. EIAV vectors generated to overexpress the human antiapoptotic Bcl-2 or growth factor glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) genes protected against glutamate-induced toxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons. In an in vivo excitotoxicity model, adult Wistar rats received a unilateral dose of the glutamate receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate to the hippocampus that induced a large lesion in the CA1 region. Neuronal loss could not be protected by prior transduction of a control vector expressing beta-galactosidase. In contrast, EIAV-mediated expression of Bcl-2 and GDNF significantly reduced lesion size thus protecting the hippocampus from excitotoxic damage. These results demonstrate that EIAV vectors can be effectively used to deliver putative neuroprotective genes to target brain areas and prevent cellular loss in the event of a neurological insult. Therefore these lentiviral vectors provide potential therapeutic tools for use in cases of acute neurotrauma such as cerebral ischemia. PMID:15585409

  12. Pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in the CNS of normal and Krabbe-affected non-human primates by intracerebral lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Meneghini, Vasco; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Tiradani, Luigi; Bravo, Gabriele; Morena, Francesco; Sanvito, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Bringas, John; Fisher-Perkins, Jeanne M; Dufour, Jason P; Baker, Kate C; Doglioni, Claudio; Montini, Eugenio; Bunnell, Bruce A; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD or Krabbe disease) are severe neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and galactosylceramidase (GALC) deficiency, respectively. Our previous studies established lentiviral gene therapy (GT) as a rapid and effective intervention to provide pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in CNS tissues of MLD and GLD mice. Here, we investigated whether this strategy is similarly effective in juvenile non-human primates (NHP). To provide proof of principle for tolerability and biological efficacy of the strategy, we established a comprehensive study in normal NHP delivering a clinically relevant lentiviral vector encoding for the human ARSA transgene. Then, we injected a lentiviral vector coding for the human GALC transgene in Krabbe-affected rhesus macaques, evaluating for the first time the therapeutic potential of lentiviral GT in this unique LSD model. We showed favorable safety profile and consistent pattern of LV transduction and enzyme biodistribution in the two models, supporting the robustness of the proposed GT platform. We documented moderate inflammation at the injection sites, mild immune response to vector particles in few treated animals, no indication of immune response against transgenic products, and no molecular evidence of insertional genotoxicity. Efficient gene transfer in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes close to the injection sites resulted in robust production and extensive spreading of transgenic enzymes in the whole CNS and in CSF, leading to supraphysiological ARSA activity in normal NHP and close to physiological GALC activity in the Krabbe NHP, in which biological efficacy was associated with preliminary indication of therapeutic benefit. These results support the rationale for the clinical translation of intracerebral lentiviral GT to address CNS pathology in MLD, GLD, and other neurodegenerative LSD. PMID

  13. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Ge; Sauler, Maor; Lee, Patty J.

    2013-01-01

    The lung endothelium is a major target for inflammatory and oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction is a crucial defense mechanism during oxidant challenges, such as hyperoxia. The role of lung endothelial HO-1during hyperoxia in vivo is not well defined. We engineered lentiviral vectors with microRNA (miRNA) sequences controlled by vascular endothelium cadherin (VE-cad) to study the specific role of lung endothelial HO-1. Wild-type (WT) murine lung endothelial cells (MLECs) or WT mice were treated with lentivirus and exposed to hyperoxia (95% oxygen). We detected HO-1 knockdown (∼55%) specifically in the lung endothelium. MLECs and lungs showed approximately a 2-fold increase in apoptosis and ROS generation after HO-1 silencing. We also demonstrate for the first time that silencing endothelial HO-1 has the same effect on lung injury and survival as silencing HO-1 in multiple lung cell types and that HO-1 regulates caspase 3 activation and autophagy in endothelium during hyperoxia. These studies demonstrate the utility of endothelial-targeted gene silencing in vivo using lentiviral miRNA constructs to assess gene function and that endothelial HO-1 is an important determinant of survival during hyperoxia.—Zhang, Y., Jiang, G., Sauler, M., Lee, P. J. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury. PMID:23771928

  14. Investigating antibody neutralization of lyssaviruses using lentiviral pseudotypes: a cross-species comparison.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; Temperton, Nigel J; Marston, Denise A; McElhinney, Lorraine M; Fooks, Anthony R; Weiss, Robin A

    2008-09-01

    Cross-neutralization between rabies virus (RABV) and two European bat lyssaviruses (EBLV-1 and -2) was analysed using lentiviral pseudotypes as antigen vectors. Glycoprotein (G-protein) cDNA from RABV challenge virus standard-11 (CVS-11) and EBLV-1 and -2 were cloned and co-expressed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or murine leukemia virus (MLV) gag-pol and packageable green fluorescent protein (GFP) or luciferase reporter genes in human cells. The harvested lentiviral (HIV) vector infected over 40% of baby hamster kidney (BHK) target cells, providing high-titre pseudotype stocks. Tests on blinded antibody-positive (n=15) and -negative (n=45) sera, predetermined by the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test approved by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Office International des Epizooties (OIE), revealed that the CVS-11 pseudotype assay had 100% concordance with FAVN and strongly correlated with neutralization titres (r2=0.89). Cross-neutralization tests using sera from RABV-vaccinated humans and animals on pseudotypes with CVS-11, EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 envelopes showed that the relative neutralization titres correlated broadly with the degree of G-protein diversity. Pseudotypes have three major advantages over live-virus neutralization tests: (i) they can be handled in low-biohazard-level laboratories; (ii) the use of reporter genes such as GFP or beta-galactosidase will allow the assay to be undertaken at low cost in laboratories worldwide; (iii) each assay requires <10 microl serum. This robust microassay will improve our understanding of the protective humoral immunity that current rabies vaccines confer against emerging lyssaviruses, and will be applicable to surveillance studies, thus helping to control the spread of rabies. PMID:18753230

  15. Lentiviral Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease. PMID:25184354

  16. Molecular Determinants of Vectofusin-1 and Its Derivatives for the Enhancement of Lentivirally Mediated Gene Transfer into Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Majdoul, Saliha; Seye, Ababacar K; Kichler, Antoine; Holic, Nathalie; Galy, Anne; Bechinger, Burkhard; Fenard, David

    2016-01-29

    Gene delivery into hCD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) using human immunodeficiency virus, type 1-derived lentiviral vectors (LVs) has several promising therapeutic applications. Numerous clinical trials are currently underway. However, the efficiency, safety, and cost of LV gene therapy could be ameliorated by enhancing target cell transduction levels and reducing the amount of LV used on the cells. Several transduction enhancers already exist, such as fibronectin fragments or cationic compounds. Recently, we discovered Vectofusin-1, a new transduction enhancer, also called LAH4-A4, a short histidine-rich amphipathic peptide derived from the LAH4 family of DNA transfection agents. Vectofusin-1 enhances the infectivity of lentiviral and γ-retroviral vectors pseudotyped with various envelope glycoproteins. In this study, we compared a family of Vectofusin-1 isomers and showed that Vectofusin-1 remains the lead peptide for HSPC transduction enhancement with LVs pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoproteins and also with modified gibbon ape leukemia virus glycoproteins. By comparing the capacity of numerous Vectofusin-1 variants to promote the modified gibbon ape leukemia virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vector infectivity of HSPCs, the lysine residues on the N-terminal extremity of Vectofusin-1, a hydrophilic angle of 140° formed by the histidine residues in the Schiffer-Edmundson helical wheel representation, hydrophobic residues consisting of leucine were all found to be essential and helped to define a minimal active sequence. The data also show that the critical determinants necessary for lentiviral transduction enhancement are partially different from those necessary for efficient antibiotic or DNA transfection activity of LAH4 derivatives. In conclusion, these results help to decipher the action mechanism of Vectofusin-1 in the context of hCD34+ cell-based gene therapy. PMID:26668323

  17. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  18. Role of Transgene Regulation in Ex Vivo Lentiviral Correction of Artemis Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Multhaup, Megan M.; Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M.; Karlen, Andrea D.; Olson, Erik R.; Gunther, Roland; Somia, Nikunj V.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cowan, Morton J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Artemis is a single-stranded endonuclease, deficiency of which results in a radiation-sensitive form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-A) most effectively treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and potentially treatable by administration of genetically corrected autologous HSCs. We previously reported cytotoxicity associated with Artemis overexpression and subsequently characterized the human Artemis promoter with the intention to provide Artemis expression that is nontoxic yet sufficient to support immunodevelopment. Here we compare the human Artemis promoter (APro) with the moderate-strength human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter and the strong human elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoter to regulate expression of Artemis after ex vivo lentiviral transduction of HSCs in a murine model of SCID-A. Recipient animals treated with the PGK-Artemis vector exhibited moderate repopulation of their immune compartment, yet demonstrated a defective proliferative T lymphocyte response to in vitro antigen stimulation. Animals treated with the EF1α-Artemis vector displayed high levels of T lymphocytes but an absence of B lymphocytes and deficient lymphocyte function. In contrast, ex vivo transduction with the APro-Artemis vector supported effective immune reconstitution to wild-type levels, resulting in fully functional T and B lymphocyte responses. These results demonstrate the importance of regulated Artemis expression in immune reconstitution of Artemis-deficient SCID. PMID:25738323

  19. Role of transgene regulation in ex vivo lentiviral correction of artemis deficiency.

    PubMed

    Multhaup, Megan M; Podetz-Pedersen, Kelly M; Karlen, Andrea D; Olson, Erik R; Gunther, Roland; Somia, Nikunj V; Blazar, Bruce R; Cowan, Morton J; McIvor, R Scott

    2015-04-01

    Artemis is a single-stranded endonuclease, deficiency of which results in a radiation-sensitive form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-A) most effectively treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and potentially treatable by administration of genetically corrected autologous HSCs. We previously reported cytotoxicity associated with Artemis overexpression and subsequently characterized the human Artemis promoter with the intention to provide Artemis expression that is nontoxic yet sufficient to support immunodevelopment. Here we compare the human Artemis promoter (APro) with the moderate-strength human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter and the strong human elongation factor-1α (EF1α) promoter to regulate expression of Artemis after ex vivo lentiviral transduction of HSCs in a murine model of SCID-A. Recipient animals treated with the PGK-Artemis vector exhibited moderate repopulation of their immune compartment, yet demonstrated a defective proliferative T lymphocyte response to in vitro antigen stimulation. Animals treated with the EF1α-Artemis vector displayed high levels of T lymphocytes but an absence of B lymphocytes and deficient lymphocyte function. In contrast, ex vivo transduction with the APro-Artemis vector supported effective immune reconstitution to wild-type levels, resulting in fully functional T and B lymphocyte responses. These results demonstrate the importance of regulated Artemis expression in immune reconstitution of Artemis-deficient SCID. PMID:25738323

  20. The Fetal Mouse Is a Sensitive Genotoxicity Model That Exposes Lentiviral-associated Mutagenesis Resulting in Liver Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Cheung, Wing T; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Xuegong; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Waddington, Simon N; Osejindu, Emma; Reja, Safia; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine; Buckley, Suzanne MK; Bigger, Brian; Montini, Eugenio; Thrasher, Adrian J; Andrews, Robert; Roberts, Terry P; Newbold, Robert F; Coutelle, Charles; Schmidt, Manfred; Themis, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Genotoxicity models are extremely important to assess retroviral vector biosafety before gene therapy. We have developed an in utero model that demonstrates that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is restricted to mice receiving nonprimate (np) lentiviral vectors (LV) and does not occur when a primate (p) LV is used regardless of woodchuck post-translation regulatory element (WPRE) mutations to prevent truncated X gene expression. Analysis of 839 npLV and 244 pLV integrations in the liver genomes of vector-treated mice revealed clear differences between vector insertions in gene dense regions and highly expressed genes, suggestive of vector preference for insertion or clonal outgrowth. In npLV-associated clonal tumors, 56% of insertions occurred in oncogenes or genes associated with oncogenesis or tumor suppression and surprisingly, most genes examined (11/12) had reduced expression as compared with control livers and tumors. Two examples of vector-inserted genes were the Park 7 oncogene and Uvrag tumor suppressor gene. Both these genes and their known interactive partners had differential expression profiles. Interactive partners were assigned to networks specific to liver disease and HCC via ingenuity pathway analysis. The fetal mouse model not only exposes the genotoxic potential of vectors intended for gene therapy but can also reveal genes associated with liver oncogenesis. PMID:23299800

  1. The fetal mouse is a sensitive genotoxicity model that exposes lentiviral-associated mutagenesis resulting in liver oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Cheung, Wing T; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Xuegong; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Waddington, Simon N; Osejindu, Emma; Reja, Safia; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine; Buckley, Suzanne Mk; Bigger, Brian; Montini, Eugenio; Thrasher, Adrian J; Andrews, Robert; Roberts, Terry P; Newbold, Robert F; Coutelle, Charles; Schmidt, Manfred; Themis, Mike

    2013-02-01

    Genotoxicity models are extremely important to assess retroviral vector biosafety before gene therapy. We have developed an in utero model that demonstrates that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is restricted to mice receiving nonprimate (np) lentiviral vectors (LV) and does not occur when a primate (p) LV is used regardless of woodchuck post-translation regulatory element (WPRE) mutations to prevent truncated X gene expression. Analysis of 839 npLV and 244 pLV integrations in the liver genomes of vector-treated mice revealed clear differences between vector insertions in gene dense regions and highly expressed genes, suggestive of vector preference for insertion or clonal outgrowth. In npLV-associated clonal tumors, 56% of insertions occurred in oncogenes or genes associated with oncogenesis or tumor suppression and surprisingly, most genes examined (11/12) had reduced expression as compared with control livers and tumors. Two examples of vector-inserted genes were the Park 7 oncogene and Uvrag tumor suppressor gene. Both these genes and their known interactive partners had differential expression profiles. Interactive partners were assigned to networks specific to liver disease and HCC via ingenuity pathway analysis. The fetal mouse model not only exposes the genotoxic potential of vectors intended for gene therapy but can also reveal genes associated with liver oncogenesis. PMID:23299800

  2. Lentiviral Delivery of RNAi for In Vivo Lineage-Specific Modulation of Gene Expression in Mouse Lung Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew A; Kwok, Letty W; Porter, Emily L; Payne, Julie G; McElroy, Gregory S; Ohle, Sarah J; Greenhill, Sara R; Blahna, Matthew T; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Jean, Jyh C; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Kotton, Darrell N

    2013-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) has become a ubiquitous laboratory tool since its discovery 12 years ago, in vivo delivery to selected cell types remains a major technical challenge. Here, we report the use of lentiviral vectors for long-term in vivo delivery of RNAi selectively to resident alveolar macrophages (AMs), key immune effector cells in the lung. We demonstrate the therapeutic potential of this approach by RNAi-based downregulation of p65 (RelA), a component of the pro-inflammatory transcriptional regulator, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and a key participant in lung disease pathogenesis. In vivo RNAi delivery results in decreased induction of NF-κB and downstream neutrophilic chemokines in transduced AMs as well as attenuated lung neutrophilia following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Through concurrent delivery of a novel lentiviral reporter vector (lenti-NF-κB-luc-GFP) we track in vivo expression of NF-κB target genes in real time, a critical step towards extending RNAi-based therapy to longstanding lung diseases. Application of this system reveals that resident AMs persist in the airspaces of mice following the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation, thus allowing these localized cells to be used as effective vehicles for prolonged RNAi delivery in disease settings. PMID:23403494

  3. 'Advanced' generation lentiviruses as efficient vectors for cardiomyocyte gene transduction in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bonci, D; Cittadini, A; Latronico, M V G; Borello, U; Aycock, J K; Drusco, A; Innocenzi, A; Follenzi, A; Lavitrano, M; Monti, M G; Ross, J; Naldini, L; Peschle, C; Cossu, G; Condorelli, G

    2003-04-01

    Efficient gene transduction in cardiomyocytes is a task that can be accomplished only by viral vectors. Up to now, the most commonly used vectors for this purpose have been adenoviral-derived ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that lentiviral vectors can transduce growth-arrested cells, such as hematopoietic stem cells. Moreover, a modified form of lentiviral vector (the 'advanced' generation), containing an mRNA-stabilizer sequence and a nuclear import sequence, has been shown to significantly improve gene transduction in growth-arrested cells as compared to the third-generation vector. Therefore, we tested whether the 'advanced' generation lentivirus is capable of infecting and transducing cardiomyocytes both in vitro and in vivo, comparing efficacy in vitro against the third-generation of the same vector. Here we report that 'advanced' generation lentiviral vectors infected most (>80%) cardiomyocytes in culture, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence and FACS analyses: in contrast the percentage of cardiomyocytes infected by third-generation lentivirus was three- to four-fold lower. Moreover, 'advanced' generation lentivirus was also capable of infecting and inducing stable gene expression in adult myocardium in vivo. Thus, 'advanced' generation lentiviral vectors can be used for both in vitro and in vivo gene expression studies in the cardiomyocyte. PMID:12692591

  4. Phase I study protocol for ex-vivo lentiviral gene therapy for the inherited skin disease, Netherton Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei-Li; Mellerio, Jemima E; Bernadis, Catina; Harper, John; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Ghani, Sumera; Martinez-Queipo, Magdalena; Hara, Havinder; McNicol, Anne-Marie; McGrath, John; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-10-18

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a serious inherited skin disorder caused by mutations in the gene SPINK5 (serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 5) which encodes for a serine protease inhibitor LEKTI (lymphoepithelial Kazal type-related inhibitor). Patients with NS have defective keratinization, hair shaft defects, recurrent infections, atopy and a predisposition to skin malignancies. Historically, one in ten infants has died before their first birthday. Currently there are no proven treatments to cure this condition. A SIN-lentiviral vector encoding the codon optimized SPINK5 gene under the control of a 572bp element derived from the human involucrin promoter (INVO) can confer compartment specific LEKTI expression in NS keratinocytes with restoration of normal skin architecture. Here we detail a study protocol for a phase I trial for feasibility and safety evaluations of autologous epidermal sheets generated from ex-vivo gene corrected keratinocyte stem cells, which will be grafted onto patients with mutation proven NS. PMID:24138501

  5. Phase I study protocol for ex vivo lentiviral gene therapy for the inherited skin disease, Netherton syndrome.

    PubMed

    Di, Wei-Li; Mellerio, Jemima E; Bernadis, Catina; Harper, John; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Ghani, Sumera; Chan, Lucas; Martinez-Queipo, Magdalena; Hara, Havinder; McNicol, Anne-Marie; Farzaneh, Farzin; McGrath, John; Thrasher, Adrian; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-12-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a serious inherited skin disorder caused by mutations in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 5 gene (SPINK5), which encodes for a serine protease inhibitor lymphoepithelial Kazal type-related inhibitor (LEKTI). Patients with NS have defective keratinization, hair shaft defects, recurrent infections, atopy, and a predisposition to skin malignancies. Historically, 1 in 10 infants has died before their first birthday. Currently, there are no proven treatments to cure this condition. A SIN-lentiviral vector encoding the codon-optimized SPINK5 gene under the control of a 572 bp element derived from the human involucrin promoter can confer compartment-specific LEKTI expression in NS keratinocytes with restoration of normal skin architecture. Here we detail a study protocol for a phase I trial for feasibility and safety evaluations of autologous epidermal sheets generated from ex vivo gene-corrected keratinocyte stem cells, which will be grafted onto patients with mutation-proven NS. PMID:24329107

  6. Inhibition of storage pathology in prenatal CLN5-deficient sheep neural cultures by lentiviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephanie M; Hope, Katie M; Xu, Janet Boyu; Mitchell, Nadia L; Palmer, David N

    2014-02-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs, Batten disease) are inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases caused by mutations in several different genes. Mutations in CLN5 cause a variant late-infantile human disease and some cases of juvenile and adult clinical disease. NCLs also occur in animals, and a flock of New Zealand Borderdale sheep with a CLN5 splice-site mutation has been developed for model studies. Dissociated mixed neural cells from CLN5-deficient foetal sheep brains contained no obvious storage bodies at plating but these accumulated rapidly in culture, mainly in microglial cells and also in neurons and astrocytes. Accumulation was very obvious after a week, as monitored by fluorescent microscopy and immunostaining for subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase. Photography at intervals revealed the dynamic nature of the cultures and a flow of storage bodies between cells, specifically the phagocytosis of storage-body containing cells by microglia and incorporation of the storage bodies into the host cells. No storage was observed in cultured control cells. Transduction of cell cultures with a lentiviral vector expressing a C-terminal Myc tagged CLN5 resulted in secretion of post-translationally glycosylated and processed CLN5. Transduction of CLN5-deficient cultures with this construct rapidly reversed storage body accumulation, to less than half in only six days. These results show that storage body accumulation is reversible with enzyme correction and support the use of these cultures for testing of therapeutics prior to whole animal studies. PMID:24269732

  7. Lentiviral Engineered Fibroblasts Expressing Codon-Optimized COL7A1 Restore Anchoring Fibrils in RDEB

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Christos; Syed, Farhatullah; Petrova, Anastasia; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Lwin, Su M.; Farzaneh, Farzin; Chan, Lucas; Ghani, Sumera; Fleck, Roland A.; Glover, Leanne; McMillan, James R.; Chen, Mei; Thrasher, Adrian J.; McGrath, John A.; Di, Wei-Li; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Cells therapies, engineered to secrete replacement proteins, are being developed to ameliorate otherwise debilitating diseases. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by defects of type VII collagen, a protein essential for anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction. Whereas allogeneic fibroblasts injected directly into the dermis can mediate transient disease modulation, autologous gene-modified fibroblasts should evade immunological rejection and support sustained delivery of type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction. We demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach using a therapeutic grade, self-inactivating-lentiviral vector, encoding codon-optimized COL7A1, to transduce RDEB fibroblasts under conditions suitable for clinical application. Expression and secretion of type VII collagen was confirmed with transduced cells exhibiting supranormal levels of protein expression, and ex vivo migration of fibroblasts was restored in functional assays. Gene-modified RDEB fibroblasts also deposited type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction of human RDEB skin xenografts placed on NOD-scid IL2Rgammanull recipients, with reconstruction of human epidermal structure and regeneration of anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Fibroblast-mediated restoration of protein and structural defects in this RDEB model strongly supports proposed therapeutic applications in man. PMID:26763448

  8. Lentiviral Engineered Fibroblasts Expressing Codon-Optimized COL7A1 Restore Anchoring Fibrils in RDEB.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, Christos; Syed, Farhatullah; Petrova, Anastasia; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Lwin, Su M; Farzaneh, Farzin; Chan, Lucas; Ghani, Sumera; Fleck, Roland A; Glover, Leanne; McMillan, James R; Chen, Mei; Thrasher, Adrian J; McGrath, John A; Di, Wei-Li; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Cells therapies, engineered to secrete replacement proteins, are being developed to ameliorate otherwise debilitating diseases. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by defects of type VII collagen, a protein essential for anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction. Whereas allogeneic fibroblasts injected directly into the dermis can mediate transient disease modulation, autologous gene-modified fibroblasts should evade immunological rejection and support sustained delivery of type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction. We demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach using a therapeutic grade, self-inactivating-lentiviral vector, encoding codon-optimized COL7A1, to transduce RDEB fibroblasts under conditions suitable for clinical application. Expression and secretion of type VII collagen was confirmed with transduced cells exhibiting supranormal levels of protein expression, and ex vivo migration of fibroblasts was restored in functional assays. Gene-modified RDEB fibroblasts also deposited type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction of human RDEB skin xenografts placed on NOD-scid IL2Rgamma(null) recipients, with reconstruction of human epidermal structure and regeneration of anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Fibroblast-mediated restoration of protein and structural defects in this RDEB model strongly supports proposed therapeutic applications in man. PMID:26763448

  9. Introducing a single-cell-derived human mesenchymal stem cell line expressing hTERT after lentiviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Wolfgang; Yin, Zhanhai; Drosse, Inga; Haasters, Florian; Rossmann, Oliver; Wierer, Matthias; Popov, Cvetan; Locher, Melanie; Mutschler, Wolf; Docheva, Denitsa; Schieker, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be readily isolated from bone marrow and differentiate into multiple tissues, making them a promising target for future cell and gene therapy applications. The low frequency of hMSCs in bone marrow necessitates their isolation and expansion in vitro prior to clinical use, but due to senescence-associated growth arrest during culture, limited cell numbers can be generated. The lifespan of hMSCs has been extended by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) using retroviral vectors. Since malignant transformation was observed in hMSCs and retroviral vectors cause insertional mutagenesis, we ectopically expressed hTERT using lentiviral gene transfer. Single-cell-derived hMSC clones expressing hTERT did not show malignant transformation in vitro and in vivo after extended culture periods. There were no changes observed in the expression of tumour suppressor genes and karyotype. Cultured hMSCs lack telomerase activity, but it was significantly increased by ectopic expression of hTERT. HTERT expression prevented hMSC senescence and the cells showed significantly higher and unlimited proliferation capacity. Even after an extended culture period, hMSCs expressing hTERT preserved their stem cells character as shown by osteogenic, adipogenic and chon-drogenic differentiation. In summary, extending the lifespan of human mesenchymal stem cells by ectopic expression of hTERT using lentiviral gene transfer may be an attractive and safe way to generate appropriate cell numbers for cell and gene therapy applications. PMID:18318690

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) derived vectors: safety considerations and controversy over therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Tonini, Tiziana; Giordano, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The latest generation of lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 is one of the most efficient tools for gene transduction of mammalian cells. However, the possible employment of HIV-based vectors in clinical trials is a very controversial issue, mainly due to safety and ethical concerns. HIV-1 is a lethal pathogenic agent, which induces AIDS. Genetic vectors must derive either from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans, or that eventually just cause mild illnesses. Patients exposed to HIV-based vectors will test seropositive to certain components of HIV-1. In addition, there might be other possible adverse effects in patients that cannot be predicted, as many aspects of the pathogenesis of AIDS have not been completely understood yet. On these grounds, it seems necessary to improve the design of other lentiviral vectors, which derive from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans and are distantly related to primate retroviridae. PMID:14693483

  11. Functional validation of a human CAPN5 exome variant by lentiviral transduction into mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Wert, Katherine J; Skeie, Jessica M; Bassuk, Alexander G; Olivier, Alicia K; Tsang, Stephen H; Mahajan, Vinit B

    2014-05-15

    Exome sequencing indicated that the gene encoding the calpain-5 protease, CAPN5, is the likely cause of retinal degeneration and autoimmune uveitis in human patients with autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, OMIM #193235). To explore the mechanism of ADNIV, a human CAPN5 disease allele was expressed in mouse retinas with a lentiviral vector created to express either the wild-type human (h) CAPN5 or the ADNIV mutant hCAPN5-R243L allele under a rhodopsin promoter with tandem green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. Vectors were injected into the subretinal space of perinatal mice. Mouse phenotypes were analyzed using electroretinography, histology and inflammatory gene expression profiling. Mouse calpain-5 showed high homology to its human ortholog with >98% sequence identity that includes the ADNIV mutant residue. Calpain-5 protein was expressed in the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptors and in the outer plexiform layer. Expression of the hCAPN5-R243L allele caused loss of the electroretinogram b-wave, photoreceptor degeneration and induction of immune cell infiltration and inflammatory genes in the retina, recapitulating major features of the ADNIV phenotype. Intraocular neovascularization and fibrosis were not observed during the study period. Our study shows that expression of the hCAPN5-R243L disease allele elicits an ADNIV-like disease in mice. It further suggests that ADNIV is due to CAPN5 gain-of-function rather than haploinsufficiency, and retinal expression may be sufficient to generate an autoimmune response. Genetic models of ADNIV in the mouse can be used to explore protease mechanisms in retinal degeneration and inflammation as well as preclinical therapeutic testing. PMID:24381307

  12. Functional validation of a human CAPN5 exome variant by lentiviral transduction into mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Skeie, Jessica M.; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Olivier, Alicia K.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing indicated that the gene encoding the calpain-5 protease, CAPN5, is the likely cause of retinal degeneration and autoimmune uveitis in human patients with autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, OMIM #193235). To explore the mechanism of ADNIV, a human CAPN5 disease allele was expressed in mouse retinas with a lentiviral vector created to express either the wild-type human (h) CAPN5 or the ADNIV mutant hCAPN5-R243L allele under a rhodopsin promoter with tandem green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. Vectors were injected into the subretinal space of perinatal mice. Mouse phenotypes were analyzed using electroretinography, histology and inflammatory gene expression profiling. Mouse calpain-5 showed high homology to its human ortholog with >98% sequence identity that includes the ADNIV mutant residue. Calpain-5 protein was expressed in the inner and outer segments of the photoreceptors and in the outer plexiform layer. Expression of the hCAPN5-R243L allele caused loss of the electroretinogram b-wave, photoreceptor degeneration and induction of immune cell infiltration and inflammatory genes in the retina, recapitulating major features of the ADNIV phenotype. Intraocular neovascularization and fibrosis were not observed during the study period. Our study shows that expression of the hCAPN5-R243L disease allele elicits an ADNIV-like disease in mice. It further suggests that ADNIV is due to CAPN5 gain-of-function rather than haploinsufficiency, and retinal expression may be sufficient to generate an autoimmune response. Genetic models of ADNIV in the mouse can be used to explore protease mechanisms in retinal degeneration and inflammation as well as preclinical therapeutic testing. PMID:24381307

  13. Practical Considerations for Using Pooled Lentiviral CRISPR Libraries.

    PubMed

    McDade, Joel R; Waxmonsky, Nicole C; Swanson, Lianna E; Fan, Melina

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology is ideally suited for genome-wide screening applications due to the ease of generating guide RNAs (gRNAs) and the versatility of Cas9 or Cas9 derivatives to knockout, repress, or activate expression of target genes. Several pooled lentiviral CRISPR libraries have been developed and are now publicly available, but while using CRISPR/Cas9 for genetic experiments has become widely adopted, genome-wide screening experiments remain technically challenging. This review covers the basics of CRISPR/Cas9, describes several publicly available CRISPR libraries, and provides a general protocol for conducting genome-wide screening experiments using CRISPR/Cas9. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27366891

  14. Correction of murine β-thalassemia after minimal lentiviral gene transfer and homeostatic in vivo erythroid expansion

    PubMed Central

    Negre, Olivier; Fusil, Floriane; Colomb, Charlotte; Roth, Shoshannah; Gillet-Legrand, Beatrix; Henri, Annie; Beuzard, Yves; Bushman, Frederic; Leboulch, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for gene therapy of genetic diseases is to maintain corrected cell populations in subjects undergoing transplantation in cases in which the corrected cells do not have intrinsic selective advantage over nontransduced cells. For inherited hematopoietic disorders, limitations include inefficient transduction of stem cell pools, the requirement for toxic myelosuppression, and a lack of optimal methods for cell selection after transduction. Here, we have designed a lentiviral vector that encodes human β-globin and a truncated erythropoietin receptor, both under erythroid-specific transcriptional control. This truncated receptor confers enhanced sensitivity to erythropoietin and a benign course in human carriers. Transplantation of marrow transduced with the vector into syngenic thalassemic mice, which have elevated plasma erythropoietin levels, resulted in long-term correction of the disease even at low ratios of transduced/untransduced cells. Amplification of the red over the white blood cell lineages was self-controlled and averaged ∼ 100-fold instead of ∼ 5-fold for β-globin expression alone. There was no detectable amplification of white blood cells or alteration of hematopoietic homeostasis. Notwithstanding legitimate safety concerns in the context of randomly integrating vectors, this approach may prove especially valuable in combination with targeted integration or in situ homologous recombination/repair and may lower the required level of pretransplantation myelosuppression. PMID:21436071

  15. Introducing Vectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  16. Analysis of autophagosome formation using lentiviral biosensors for live fluorescent cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Long, Kevin; Mohan, Chandra; Anderl, Janet; Huryn-Selvar, Karyn; Liu, Haizhen; Su, Kevin; Santos, Mark; Hsu, Matthew; Armstrong, Lucas; Ma, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a highly regulated homeostatic degradative process, allows cells to reallocate nutrients from less important to more essential processes under extreme conditions of starvation. Autophagy also prevents the buildup of damaged proteins and organelles that cause chronic tissue damage and disease. Although a topic of great interest with involvement of multiple signaling pathways, there are limitations in real-time detection of the autophagic process. EMD Millipore has developed technologies where prepackaged, ready-to-use, high-titer lentiviral particles, "lentiviral biosensors," encoding GFP- or RFP-tagged proteins provide a convenient and robust solution for fluorescent imaging of cells undergoing autophagy. Compared to nonviral transfection methods, lentiviral transduction, in many cases, offers higher transfection efficiency and more homogeneous protein expression, particularly for traditionally hard-to-transfect primary cell types. Lentiviral biosensors are ideal for use with fixed and live cell fluorescent microscopy, and are nondisruptive towards cellular function. GFP- or RFP-protein localization matches well with antibody-based immunostaining and demonstrates altered patterns of expression upon treatment with modulators of cell function and phenotype. Lentiviral biosensors provide a broadly effective, convenient method for visualization of cell behavior under a variety of physiological and pathological treatment conditions, in both endpoint and real-time imaging modalities. In this study, we focus on lentiviral biosensors containing GFP-LC3 and RFP-LC3 to study the formation of autophagosomes. PMID:25308268

  17. Chikungunya Virus Glycoproteins Pseudotype with Lentiviral Vectors and Reveal a Broad Spectrum of Cellular Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Shuangchun; Yu, Lianhua; Sun, Lingfen; Qu, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection has been documented in over 40 countries, resulting in clinical symptoms characterized by fever and joint pain. Diagnosing CHIKV in a clinical lab setting is often omitted because of the high lab safety requirement. An infection system that mimics CHIKV infection will permit clinical evaluation of the production of neutralizing antibody for both disease diagnostics and treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated a CHIKV construct expressing CHIKV structural proteins. This construct permits the production of CHIKV pseudo-viral particles with a luciferase reporter. The pseudo-virus was able to infect a wide range of cell lines. The pseudovirus could be neutralized by the addition of neutralizing antibodies from patients. Conclusions Taken together, we have developed a powerful system that can be handled at biosafety level 2 laboratories for evaluation of existence of CHIKV neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25333782

  18. Insulin producing cells established using non-integrated lentiviral vector harboring PDX1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Boroujeni, Zahra Niki; Aleyasin, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate reprogramming of human adipose tissue derived stem cells into insulin producing cells using non-integrated lentivirus harboring PDX1 gene. METHODS: In this study, human adipose tissue derived stem cells (hADSCs) were obtained from abdominal adipose tissues by liposuction, selected by plastic adhesion, and characterized by flow cytometric analysis. Human ADSCs were differentiated into adipocytes and osteocytes using differentiating medium to confirm their multipotency. Non-integrated lentiviruses harboring PDX1 (Non-integrated LV-PDX1) were constructed using specific plasmids (pLV-HELP, pMD2G, LV-105-PDX1-1). Then, hADSCs were transduced with non-integrated LV-PDX1. After transduction, ADSCsPDX1+ were cultured in high glucose DMEM medium supplement by B27, nicotinamide and βFGF for 21 d. Expressions of PDX1 and insulin were detected at protein level by immunofluorescence analysis. Expressions of PDX1, neurogenin3 (Ngn3), glucagon, glucose transporter2 (Glut2) and somatostatin as specific marker genes were investigated at mRNA level by quantitative RT-PCR. Insulin secretion of hADSCsPDX1+ in the high-glucose medium was detected by electrochemiluminescence test. Human ADSCsPDX1+ were implanted into hyperglycemic rats. RESULTS: Human ADSCs exhibited their fibroblast-like morphology and made colonies after 7-10 d of culture. Determination of hADSCs identified by FACS analysis showed that hADSCs were positive for mesenchymal cell markers and negative for hematopoietic cell markers that guaranteed the lack of hematopoietic contamination. In vitro differentiation of hADSCs into osteocytes and adipocytes were detected by Alizarin red and Oil red O staining and confirmed their multilineage differentiation ability. Transduced hADSCs+PDX1 became round and clusters in the differentiation medium. The appropriate expression of PDX1 and insulin proteins was confirmed using immunocytochemistry analysis. Significant expressions of PDX1, Ngn3, glucagon, Glut2 and somatostatin were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. hADSCsPDX1+ revealed the glucose sensing ability by expressing Glut2 when they were cultured in the medium containing high glucose concentration. The insulin secretion of hADSCsPDX1+ in the high glucose medium was 2.32 μU/mL. hADSCsPDX1+ implantation into hyperglycemic rats cured it two days after injection by reducing blood glucose levels from 485 mg/dL to the normal level. CONCLUSION: Human ADSCs can differentiate into IPCs by non-integrated LV-PDX1 transduction and have the potential to be used as a resource in type 1 diabetes cell therapy. PMID:24179609

  19. The effect of myostatin silencing by lentiviral-mediated RNA interference on goat fetal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Xiaoning; Xu, Lingyang; Zhang, Shifang; Liu, Jiasen; Cao, Jiaxue; Zhao, Fuping; Zhang, Li; Li, Bichun; Du, Lixin

    2013-06-01

    Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-β family member that acts as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. To identify possible myostatin inhibitors that may promote muscle growth, we used RNA interference mediated by a lentiviral vector to knockdown myostatin in goat fetal fibroblast cells. We also investigated the expression changes in relevant myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and adipogenic regulatory factors in the absence of myostatin in goat fetal fibroblasts. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that myostatin transcripts were significantly reduced by 75 % (P < 0.01). Western blot showed that myostatin protein expression was reduced by 95 % (P < 0.01). We also found that the mRNA expression of activin receptor IIB (ACVR2B) significantly increased by 350 % (P < 0.01), and p21 increased 172 % (P < 0.01). Furthermore, myostatin inhibition decreased Myf5 and increased MEF2C mRNA expression in goat fetal fibroblasts, suggesting that myostatin regulates MRFs differently in fibroblasts compared to muscle. In addition, the expression of adipocyte marker genes peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ and leptin, but not CCAAT/enhance-binding protein (C/EBP) α and C/EBPβ, were upregulated at the transcript level after myostatin silencing. These results suggest that we have generated a novel way to block myostatin in vitro, which could be used to improve livestock meat production and gene therapy of musculoskeletal diseases. This also suggests that myostatin plays a negative role in regulating the expression of adipogenesis related genes in goat fetal fibroblasts. PMID:23604693

  20. Oviduct-specific expression of human neutrophil defensin 4 in lentivirally generated transgenic chickens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxin; Wu, Hanyu; Cao, Dainan; Li, Qingyuan; Zhang, Yaqiong; Li, Ning; Hu, Xiaoxiang

    2015-01-01

    The expression of oviduct-specific recombinant proteins in transgenic chickens is a promising technology for the production of therapeutic biologics in eggs. In this study, we constructed a lentiviral vector encoding an expression cassette for human neutrophil defensin 4 (HNP4), a compound that displays high activity against Escherichia coli, and produced transgenic chickens that expressed the recombinant HNP4 protein in egg whites. After the antimicrobial activity of the recombinant HNP4 protein was tested at the cellular level, a 2.8-kb ovalbumin promoter was used to drive HNP4 expression specifically in oviduct tissues. From 669 injected eggs, 218 chickens were successfully hatched. Ten G0 roosters, with semens identified as positive for the transgene, were mated with wild-type hens to generate G1 chickens. From 1,274 total offspring, fifteen G1 transgenic chickens were positive for the transgene, which was confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The results of the Southern blotting and genome walking indicated that a single copy of the HNP4 gene was integrated into chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 24 of the chickens. As expected, HNP4 expression was restricted to the oviduct tissues, and the levels of both transcriptional and translational HNP4 expression varied greatly in transgenic chickens with different transgene insertion sites. The amount of HNP4 protein expressed in the eggs of G1 and G2 heterozygous transgenic chickens ranged from 1.65 μg/ml to 10.18 μg/ml. These results indicated that the production of transgenic chickens that expressed HNP4 protein in egg whites was successful. PMID:26020529

  1. Scaffold-mediated lentiviral transduction for functional tissue engineering of cartilage.

    PubMed

    Brunger, Jonathan M; Huynh, Nguyen P T; Guenther, Caitlin M; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Moutos, Franklin T; Sanchez-Adams, Johannah; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-03-01

    The ability to develop tissue constructs with matrix composition and biomechanical properties that promote rapid tissue repair or regeneration remains an enduring challenge in musculoskeletal engineering. Current approaches require extensive cell manipulation ex vivo, using exogenous growth factors to drive tissue-specific differentiation, matrix accumulation, and mechanical properties, thus limiting their potential clinical utility. The ability to induce and maintain differentiation of stem cells in situ could bypass these steps and enhance the success of engineering approaches for tissue regeneration. The goal of this study was to generate a self-contained bioactive scaffold capable of mediating stem cell differentiation and formation of a cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) using a lentivirus-based method. We first showed that poly-L-lysine could immobilize lentivirus to poly(ε-caprolactone) films and facilitate human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) transduction. We then demonstrated that scaffold-mediated gene delivery of transforming growth factor β3 (TGF-β3), using a 3D woven poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold, induced robust cartilaginous ECM formation by hMSCs. Chondrogenesis induced by scaffold-mediated gene delivery was as effective as traditional differentiation protocols involving medium supplementation with TGF-β3, as assessed by gene expression, biochemical, and biomechanical analyses. Using lentiviral vectors immobilized on a biomechanically functional scaffold, we have developed a system to achieve sustained transgene expression and ECM formation by hMSCs. This method opens new avenues in the development of bioactive implants that circumvent the need for ex vivo tissue generation by enabling the long-term goal of in situ tissue engineering. PMID:24550481

  2. Fibrin hydrogels for lentiviral gene delivery in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Martha; Shin, Seungjin; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2011-01-01

    Gene delivery from hydrogels represents a versatile approach for localized expression of tissue inductive factors than can promote cellular processes that lead to regeneration. Lentiviral gene therapy vectors were entrapped within fibrin hydrogels, either alone or complexes with hydroxylapatite (HA) nanoparticles. The inclusion of HA into the hydrogel led to the formation of small aggregates distributed throughout the hydrogel, with no obvious alteration of the pore structure outside the aggregates. The presence of HA slowed hydrogel degradation by collagenase and plasmin relative to fibrin alone, and also decreased the rate of cell migration. Lentivirus had similar release from the fibrin hydrogels formed with or without HA. The altered hydrogel properties suggest an interaction between the nanoparticle and fibrin, which may displace the virus from the particle leading to similar release profiles. Transgene expression by cells migrating into the hydrogel in vitro was reduced in the presence of HA, consistent with the role of cell migration on transgene expression. In vivo, lentivirus loaded fibrin hydrogels promoted localized transgene expression that increased through day 9 and decreased through day 14. For the fibrin only hydrogels, expression continued to decline after day 14. However, hydrogels with HA maintained this transgene expression level for an additional two weeks before declining. Immunostaining identified transgene primarily outside the fibrin-HA gel at day 9; however, at day 21, transgene expression was observed primarily within the fibrin-HA gel. The localized delivery of lentivirus provides an opportunity to enhance the bioactivity of fibrin hydrogels for a wide range of applications in regenerative medicine. PMID:21907251

  3. Generation of Islet-like Cell Aggregates from Human Adipose Tissue-derived Stem Cells by Lentiviral Overexpression of PDX-1

    PubMed Central

    Bahrebar, M.; Soleimani, M.; Karimi, M. H.; Vahdati, A.; Yaghobi, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic duodenal homeobox1 (PDX-1) is a transcription factor that is important in regulating pancreas development and maintaining β-cell function. β-cell replacement is an effective approach for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Human adipose-mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) are the ideal population cells for differentiating into insulin-producing cells. Objective: To determine if islet-like cell aggregates production could be generated from hAMSCs by lentiviral overexpression of PDX-1. Methods: After isolation of hAMSCs, characteristics of these cells were identified by flow-cytometic analysis and multilineage differentiation studies. PDX-1 gene delivered into hAMSCs through lentiviral vector for differentiating hAMSCs into insulin-producing cells (IPCs) at the utilized protocol for 14 days. Characteristics of IPCs were evaluated by immunocytofluorescence, dithizone staining, and quantitative reverse transcription PCR. In response to high glucose medium, insulin release was detected by chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay. Results: The islet-like cell aggregates appeared about 10 days after introduction of PDX-1 into hAMSCs. PDX-1 induced its own expression (auto-induction), a number of islet-related genes such as Ngn3, Nkx2-2, and insulin. The insulin-positive cells were detected in the PDX-1 transduced cells. In response to glucose challenge test, secretion of insulin hormone in the medium with high glucose concentration significantly increased in the PDX-1-transduced cells related to medium with low glucose concentration. Conclusion: Introduction of lentiviral PDX-1 significantly induces hAMSCs to differentiate into islet-like cell aggregates, which may provide a source of adipose stem cells-derived insulin-producing cells for cell replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26082830

  4. Large Animal Models for Foamy Virus Vector Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Trobridge, Grant D.; Horn, Peter A.; Beard, Brian C.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Foamy virus (FV) vectors have shown great promise for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy. Their ability to efficiently deliver transgenes to multi-lineage long-term repopulating cells in large animal models suggests they will be effective for several human hematopoietic diseases. Here, we review FV vector studies in large animal models, including the use of FV vectors with the mutant O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, MGMTP140K to increase the number of genetically modified cells after transplantation. In these studies, FV vectors have mediated efficient gene transfer to polyclonal repopulating cells using short ex vivo transduction protocols designed to minimize the negative effects of ex vivo culture on stem cell engraftment. In this regard, FV vectors appear superior to gammaretroviral vectors, which require longer ex vivo culture to effect efficient transduction. FV vectors have also compared favorably with lentiviral vectors when directly compared in the dog model. FV vectors have corrected leukocyte adhesion deficiency and pyruvate kinase deficiency in the dog large animal model. FV vectors also appear safer than gammaretroviral vectors based on a reduced frequency of integrants near promoters and also near proto-oncogenes in canine repopulating cells. Together, these studies suggest that FV vectors should be highly effective for several human hematopoietic diseases, including those that will require relatively high percentages of gene-modified cells to achieve clinical benefit. PMID:23223198

  5. In vitro generation of glucose-responsive insulin producing cells using lentiviral based pdx-1 gene transduction of mouse (C57BL/6) mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Saman; Alijani, Najva; Kadivar, Mehdi

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of this type of recombinant lentivirus to generate glucose-responsive insulin producing cells in vitro. All steps of cloning were confirmed using restriction digests. After the transduction, mesenchymal stem cells gradually began to change their morphology and showed differentiation into islet like structures. RT-PCR results confirmed the expression of insulin1, insulin2 and pdx-1 in differentiated cells. Dithizone staining of mouse MSCs showed the concentration of glucose in islet like structures. ELISA analysis validated the insulin secretion of islet like structures which in the high-glucose medium (25mmol/l) was 7.44 fold higher than that secreted in the low-glucose medium (5mmol/l). Our results demonstrated that mouse mesenchymal stem cells can be differentiated into effective glucose-responsive insulin producing cells through our new recombinant lentiviral transduction of pdx-1 gene in vitro. This new lentiviral vector could be suggested as an effective candidate for using in gene therapy of type-1 diabetes. PMID:23831626

  6. Foamy virus vectors for gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Trobridge, Grant D.

    2009-01-01

    Foamy virus (FV) vectors are efficient gene delivery vehicles that have shown great promise for gene therapy in preclinical animal models. FVs or spumaretroviruses are not endemic in humans, but are prevalent in nonhuman primates and in other mammals. They have evolved means for efficient horizontal transmission in their host species without pathology. FV vectors have several unique properties that make them well-suited for therapeutic gene transfer including a desirable safety profile, a broad tropism, a large transgene capacity, and the ability to persist in quiescent cells. They mediate efficient and stable gene transfer to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in mouse models, and in the canine large animal model. Analysis of FV vector integration sites in vitro and in hematopoietic repopulating cells shows they have a unique integration profile, and suggests they may be safer than gammaretroviruses or lentiviral vectors. Here properties of FVs relevant to the safety and efficacy of FV vectors are discussed. The development of FV vector systems is described, and studies evaluating their potential in vitro, and in small and large animal models is reviewed. PMID:19743892

  7. Efficient transduction of feline neural progenitor cells for delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor using a feline immunodeficiency virus-based lentiviral construct.

    PubMed

    You, X Joann; Gu, Ping; Wang, Jinmei; Song, Tianran; Yang, Jing; Liew, Chee Gee; Klassen, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Work has shown that stem cell transplantation can rescue or replace neurons in models of retinal degenerative disease. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) modified to overexpress neurotrophic factors are one means of providing sustained delivery of therapeutic gene products in vivo. To develop a nonrodent animal model of this therapeutic strategy, we previously derived NPCs from the fetal cat brain (cNPCs). Here we use bicistronic feline lentiviral vectors to transduce cNPCs with glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) together with a GFP reporter gene. Transduction efficacy is assessed, together with transgene expression level and stability during induction of cellular differentiation, together with the influence of GDNF transduction on growth and gene expression profile. We show that GDNF overexpressing cNPCs expand in vitro, coexpress GFP, and secrete high levels of GDNF protein-before and after differentiation-all qualities advantageous for use as a cell-based approach in feline models of neural degenerative disease. PMID:20936061

  8. A robust lentiviral pseudotype neutralisation assay for in-field serosurveillance of rabies and lyssaviruses in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wright, Edward; McNabb, Suzanne; Goddard, Trudy; Horton, Daniel L; Lembo, Tiziana; Nel, Louis H; Weiss, Robin A; Cleaveland, Sarah; Fooks, Anthony R

    2009-11-27

    The inflexibility of existing serological techniques for detection of rabies in surveillance constrains the benefit to be gained from many current control strategies. We analysed 304 serum samples from Tanzanian dogs for the detection of rabies antibodies in a pseudotype assay using lentiviral vectors bearing the CVS-11 envelope glycoprotein. Compared with the widely used gold standard fluorescent antibody virus neutralisation assay, a specificity of 100% and sensitivity of 94.4% with a strong correlation of antibody titres (r=0.915) were observed with the pseudotype assay. To increase the assay's surveillance specificity in Africa we incorporated the envelope glycoprotein of local viruses, Lagos bat virus, Duvenhage virus or Mokola virus and also cloned the lacZ gene to provide a reporter element. Neutralisation assays using pseudotypes bearing these glycoproteins reveal that they provide a greater sensitivity compared to similar live virus assays and will therefore allow a more accurate determination of the distribution of these highly pathogenic infections and the threat they pose to human health. Importantly, the CVS-11 pseudotypes were highly stable during freeze-thaw cycles and storage at room temperature. These results suggest the proposed pseudotype assay is a suitable option for undertaking lyssavirus serosurveillance in areas most affected by these infections. PMID:19925950

  9. Lentiviral-mediated multiple gene transfer to chondrocytes promotes chondrocyte differentiation and bone formation in rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Sun, Liang; Chen, Hui; Sun, Shui; Zhou, Dongsheng; Pang, Bo; Wang, Jian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide a theoretical and experimental foundation on the differentiation of stem cells through the induction of multiple genes. The lentiviral vector carrying TGF-β1 and IL-10 genes was transfected to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) which differentiated into chondrogenesis. Healthy New Zealand white rabbits, 2-3 months of age were used in the present study. A 6-8 ml of bone marrow was isolated from the iliac and tibial shaft of each rabbit. The BMSCs suspension was aspired following centrifugation of the bone marrow by percoll separating medium. The BMSCs were primarily cultured and subcultured in vitro, then divided into four groups according to the difference of lentivirus vectors: group A, receiving transforming growth factor β1 (TGF‑β1); group B, receiving TGF-β1 and Interleukin-10 (IL-10); group C, empty vector transfection; and group D, receiving no cell growth factor. Fluorescence expression was detected 12 h after transfecting the lentiviral vector carrying the TGF-β1 and IL-10 gene to BMSCs. The transfection efficiency was approximately 70% with a MOI=100 after 96 h. Expression of SOX-9 aggrecan and Type Ⅱ collagen in groups A-E on day 7 and 14 was detected by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The expression level of three genes expressed in groups A and C were higher compared to the expression in groups B, D and E. The expression level of the three genes expressed in group B was higher compared to the expression in group D. The expression level of three genes expressed in group A and C showed no statistical difference. Cytokines therefore play an important role in cell proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. TGF-β1 has a synergistic effect in the differentiation. In addition, IL-10 may have a protective role in the restoration of cartilaginous tissue. PMID:26328747

  10. Vector Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, David P.

    2001-01-01

    Vector addition is an important skill for introductory physics students to master. For years, I have used a fun example to introduce vector addition in my introductory physics classes based on one with which my high school physics teacher piqued my interest many years ago.

  11. Improved Hepatocyte Engraftment After Portal Vein Occlusion in LDL Receptor-Deficient WHHL Rabbits and Lentiviral-Mediated Phenotypic Correction In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tranchart, Hadrien; Groyer-Picard, Marie-Thérèse; Lainas, Panagiotis; Saloum Diop, Papa; Holopherne, Delphine; Gonin, Patrick; Benihoud, Karim; Ba, Nathalie; Gauthier, Olivier; Franco, Dominique; Guettier, Catherine; Pariente, Danièle; Weber, Anne; Dagher, Ibrahim; Huy Nguyen, Tuan

    2012-02-01

    Innovative cell-based therapies are considered as alternatives to liver transplantation. Recent progress in lentivirus-mediated hepatocyte transduction has renewed interest in cell therapy for the treatment of inherited liver diseases. However, hepatocyte transplantation is still hampered by inefficient hepatocyte engraftment. We previously showed that partial portal vein embolization (PVE) improved hepatocyte engraftment in a nonhuman primate model. We developed here an ex vivo approach based on PVE and lentiviral-mediated transduction of hepatocytes from normal (New Zealand White, NZW) and Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits: the large animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia type IIa (FH). FH is a life-threatening human inherited autosomal disease caused by a mutation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, which leads to severe hypercholesterolemia and premature coronary heart disease. Rabbit hepatocytes were isolated from the resected left liver lobe, and the portal branches of the median lobes were embolized with Histoacryl® glue under radiologic guidance. NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were each labeled with Hoechst dye or transduced with lentivirus expressing GFP under the control of a liver-specific promoter (mTTR, a modified murine transthyretin promoter) and were then immediately transplanted back into donor animals. In our conditions, 65-70% of the NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were transduced. Liver repopulation after transplantation with the Hoechst-labeled hepatocytes was 3.5 ± 2%. It was 1.4 ± 0.6% after transplantation with either the transduced NZW hepatocytes or the transduced WHHL hepatocytes, which was close to that obtained with Hoechst-labeled cells, given the mean transduction efficacy. Transgene expression persisted for at least 8 weeks posttransplantation. Transduction of WHHL hepatocytes with an LDLR-encoding vector resulted in phenotypic correction in vitro as assessed by internalization of fluorescent LDL ligands

  12. Improved Hepatocyte Engraftment After Portal Vein Occlusion in LDL Receptor-Deficient WHHL Rabbits and Lentiviral-Mediated Phenotypic Correction In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tranchart, Hadrien; Groyer-Picard, Marie-Thérèse; Lainas, Panagiotis; Saloum Diop, Papa; Holopherne, Delphine; Gonin, Patrick; Benihoud, Karim; Ba, Nathalie; Gauthier, Olivier; Franco, Dominique; Guettier, Catherine; Pariente, Danièle; Weber, Anne; Dagher, Ibrahim; Huy Nguyen, Tuan

    2012-01-01

    Innovative cell-based therapies are considered as alternatives to liver transplantation. Recent progress in lentivirus-mediated hepatocyte transduction has renewed interest in cell therapy for the treatment of inherited liver diseases. However, hepatocyte transplantation is still hampered by inefficient hepatocyte engraftment. We previously showed that partial portal vein embolization (PVE) improved hepatocyte engraftment in a nonhuman primate model. We developed here an ex vivo approach based on PVE and lentiviral-mediated transduction of hepatocytes from normal (New Zealand White, NZW) and Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits: the large animal model of familial hypercholesterolemia type IIa (FH). FH is a life-threatening human inherited autosomal disease caused by a mutation in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene, which leads to severe hypercholesterolemia and premature coronary heart disease. Rabbit hepatocytes were isolated from the resected left liver lobe, and the portal branches of the median lobes were embolized with Histoacryl® glue under radiologic guidance. NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were each labeled with Hoechst dye or transduced with lentivirus expressing GFP under the control of a liver-specific promoter (mTTR, a modified murine transthyretin promoter) and were then immediately transplanted back into donor animals. In our conditions, 65–70% of the NZW and WHHL hepatocytes were transduced. Liver repopulation after transplantation with the Hoechst-labeled hepatocytes was 3.5 ± 2%. It was 1.4 ± 0.6% after transplantation with either the transduced NZW hepatocytes or the transduced WHHL hepatocytes, which was close to that obtained with Hoechst-labeled cells, given the mean transduction efficacy. Transgene expression persisted for at least 8 weeks posttransplantation. Transduction of WHHL hepatocytes with an LDLR-encoding vector resulted in phenotypic correction in vitro as assessed by internalization of fluorescent LDL

  13. Embryo development, fetal growth and postnatal phenotype of eGFP lambs generated by lentiviral transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Crispo, M; Vilariño, M; dos Santos-Neto, P C; Núñez-Olivera, R; Cuadro, F; Barrera, N; Mulet, A P; Nguyen, T H; Anegón, I; Menchaca, A

    2015-02-01

    Lentiviral technology has been recently proposed to generate transgenic farm animals more efficiently and easier than traditional techniques. The objective was to evaluate several parameters of lambs obtained by lentiviral transgenesis in comparison with non-transgenic counterparts. In vitro produced embryos were microinjected (TG group) at two-cell stage with a lentiviral construct containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene, while embryos produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF group) or intrauterine insemination (IUI group) were not microinjected. Microinjection technique efficiently generated eight-cell transgenic embryos (97.4%; 114/117). Development rate on day 5 after fertilization was similar for TG (39.3%, 46/117) and IVF embryos (39.6%, 44/111). Pregnancy rate was detected in 50.0% (6/12) of recipient ewes with TG embryos, in 46.7% (7/15) with IVF embryos, and in 65.0% (13/20) of IUI ewes (P = NS). Nine lambs were born in TG group, six lambs in IVF group, and 16 lambs in IUI group. All TG lambs (9/9) were GFP positive to real-time PCR and eight (88.9%) showed a strong and evident GFP expression in mucosae, eyes and keratin tissues. Fetal growth monitored every 15 day by ultrasonography did not show significant differences. Transgenic lambs neither differ in morphometric variables in comparison with non transgenic IVF lambs within 3 months after birth. Transmission of the transgene to the progeny was observed in green fluorescent embryos produced by IVF using semen from the TG founder lambs. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the high efficiency of lentiviral technology to produce transgenic sheep, with no clinic differences in comparison with non transgenic lambs. PMID:25048992

  14. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  15. Cloning vector

    DOEpatents

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  16. Generating Transgenic Mice by Lentiviral Transduction of Spermatozoa Followed by In Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekran, Anil; Casimir, Colin; Dibb, Nick; Readhead, Carol; Winston, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Most transgenic technologies rely on the oocyte as a substrate for genetic modification. Transgenics animals are usually generated by the injection of the gene constructs (including lentiviruses encoding gene constructs or modified embryonic stem cells) into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg followed by the transfer of the injected embryos into the uterus of a foster mother. Male germ cells also have potential as templates for transgenic development. We have previously shown that mature sperm can be utilized as template for lentiviral transduction and as such used to generate transgenic mice efficiently with germ line capabilities. We provide here a detailed protocol that is relatively simple, to establish transgenic mice using lentivirally transduced spermatozoa. This protocol employs a well-established lentiviral gene delivery system (usual for somatic cells) delivering a variety of transgenes to be directly used with sperm, and the subsequent use of these modified sperm in in vitro fertilization studies and embryo transfer into foster female mice, for the establishment of transgenic mice. PMID:27317176

  17. Cellular Cofactors of Lentiviral Integrase: From Target Validation to Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Taltynov, Oliver; Desimmie, Belete A.; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger

    2012-01-01

    To accomplish their life cycle, lentiviruses make use of host proteins, the so-called cellular cofactors. Interactions between host cell and viral proteins during early stages of lentiviral infection provide attractive new antiviral targets. The insertion of lentiviral cDNA in a host cell chromosome is a step of no return in the replication cycle, after which the host cell becomes a permanent carrier of the viral genome and a producer of lentiviral progeny. Integration is carried out by integrase (IN), an enzyme playing also an important role during nuclear import. Plenty of cellular cofactors of HIV-1 IN have been proposed. To date, the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is the best studied cofactor of HIV-1 IN. Moreover, small molecules that block the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction have recently been developed for the treatment of HIV infection. The nuclear import factor transportin-SR2 (TRN-SR2) has been proposed as another interactor of HIV IN-mediating nuclear import of the virus. Using both proteins as examples, we will describe approaches to be taken to identify and validate novel cofactors as new antiviral targets. Finally, we will highlight recent advances in the design and the development of small-molecule inhibitors binding to the LEDGF/p75-binding pocket in IN (LEDGINs). PMID:22928108

  18. Therapeutic benefit of lentiviral-mediated neonatal intracerebral gene therapy in a mouse model of globoid cell leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lattanzi, Annalisa; Salvagno, Camilla; Maderna, Claudio; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Morena, Francesco; Kulik, Willem; Naldini, Luigi; Montini, Eugenio; Martino, Sabata; Gritti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC) deficiency. Gene therapy (GT) should provide rapid, extensive and lifetime GALC supply in central nervous system (CNS) tissues to prevent or halt irreversible neurologic progression. Here we used a lentiviral vector (LV) to transfer a functional GALC gene in the brain of Twitcher mice, a severe GLD model. A single injection of LV.GALC in the external capsule of Twitcher neonates resulted in robust transduction of neural cells with minimal and transient activation of inflammatory and immune response. Importantly, we documented a proficient transduction of proliferating and post-mitotic oligodendroglia, a relevant target cell type in GLD. GALC activity (30–50% of physiological levels) was restored in the whole CNS of treated mice as early as 8 days post-injection. The early and stable enzymatic supply ensured partial clearance of storage and reduction of psychosine levels, translating in amelioration of histopathology and enhanced lifespan. At 6 months post-injection in non-affected mice, LV genome persisted exclusively in the injected region, where transduced cells overexpressed GALC. Integration site analysis in transduced brain tissues showed no aberrant clonal expansion and preferential targeting of neural-specific genes. This study establishes neonatal LV-mediated intracerebral GT as a rapid, effective and safe therapeutic intervention to correct CNS pathology in GLD and provides a strong rationale for its application in this and similar leukodystrophies, alone or in combination with therapies targeting the somatic pathology, with the final aim of providing an effective and timely treatment of these global disorders. PMID:24463623

  19. Equivalent Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The cross-product is a mathematical operation that is performed between two 3-dimensional vectors. The result is a vector that is orthogonal or perpendicular to both of them. Learning about this for the first time while taking Calculus-III, the class was taught that if AxB = AxC, it does not necessarily follow that B = C. This seemed baffling. The…

  20. Vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    During the past ten years Vector Quantization (VQ) has developed from a theoretical possibility promised by Shannon's source coding theorems into a powerful and competitive technique for speech and image coding and compression at medium to low bit rates. In this survey, the basic ideas behind the design of vector quantizers are sketched and some comments made on the state-of-the-art and current research efforts.

  1. Evaluating the Safety of Retroviral Vectors Based on Insertional Oncogene Activation and Blocked Differentiation in Cultured Thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sheng; Fatima, Soghra; Ma, Zhijun; Wang, Yong-Dong; Lu, Taihe; Janke, Laura J; Du, Yang; Sorrentino, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    Insertional oncogenesis due to retroviral (RV) vector integration has caused recurrent leukemia in multiple gene therapy trials, predominantly due to vector integration effects at the LMO2 locus. While currently available preclinical safety models have been used for evaluating vector safety, none have predicted or reproduced the recurrent LMO2 integrations seen in previous X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) and Wiskott–Aldrich clinical gene therapy trials. We now describe a new assay for assessing vector safety that recapitulates naturally occurring insertions into Lmo2 and other T-cell proto-oncogenes leading to a preleukemic developmental arrest in primary murine thymocytes cultured in vitro. This assay was used to compare the relative oncogenic potential of a variety of gamma-RV and lentiviral vectors and to assess the risk conferred by various transcriptional elements contained in these genomes. Gamma-RV vectors that contained full viral long-terminal repeats were most prone to causing double negative 2 (DN2) arrest and led to repeated cases of Lmo2 pathway activation, while lentiviral vectors containing these same elements were significantly less prone to activate proto-oncogenes or cause DN2 arrest. This work provides a new preclinical assay that is especially relevant for assessing safety in SCID disorders and provides a new tool for designing safer RV vectors. PMID:26957223

  2. Vector platforms for gene therapy of inherited retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Trapani, Ivana; Puppo, Agostina; Auricchio, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Inherited retinopathies (IR) are common untreatable blinding conditions. Most of them are inherited as monogenic disorders, due to mutations in genes expressed in retinal photoreceptors (PR) and in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). The retina’s compatibility with gene transfer has made transduction of different retinal cell layers in small and large animal models via viral and non-viral vectors possible. The ongoing identification of novel viruses as well as modifications of existing ones based either on rational design or directed evolution have generated vector variants with improved transduction properties. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in IR animal models with both viral and non-viral vectors, and some of them have been relayed to clinical trials. To date, recombinant vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) represent the most promising tool for retinal gene therapy, given their ability to efficiently deliver therapeutic genes to both PR and RPE and their excellent safety and efficacy profiles in humans. However, AAVs’ limited cargo capacity has prevented application of the viral vector to treatments requiring transfer of genes with a coding sequence larger than 5 kb. Vectors with larger capacity, i.e. nanoparticles, adenoviral and lentiviral vectors are being exploited for gene transfer to the retina in animal models and, more recently, in humans. This review focuses on the available platforms for retinal gene therapy to fight inherited blindness, highlights their main strengths and examines the efforts to overcome some of their limitations. PMID:25124745

  3. VISPA: a computational pipeline for the identification and analysis of genomic vector integration sites.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Andrea; Leo, Simone; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Cesana, Daniela; Spinozzi, Giulio; Orsini, Massimilano; Merella, Stefania; Stupka, Elia; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Montini, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the genomic distribution of viral vector genomic integration sites is a key step in hematopoietic stem cell-based gene therapy applications, allowing to assess both the safety and the efficacy of the treatment and to study the basic aspects of hematopoiesis and stem cell biology. Identifying vector integration sites requires ad-hoc bioinformatics tools with stringent requirements in terms of computational efficiency, flexibility, and usability. We developed VISPA (Vector Integration Site Parallel Analysis), a pipeline for automated integration site identification and annotation based on a distributed environment with a simple Galaxy web interface. VISPA was successfully used for the bioinformatics analysis of the follow-up of two lentiviral vector-based hematopoietic stem-cell gene therapy clinical trials. Our pipeline provides a reliable and efficient tool to assess the safety and efficacy of integrating vectors in clinical settings. PMID:25342980

  4. Construction of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors and its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Dong, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Qing-Ping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Lin; Zhai, Xue-Song

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to observe the inhibitive effects of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors on the expression of p66Shc, and to explore its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia. Methods The gene sequences were cloned into the pLenR-GPH-shRNA lentiviral vector, which was selected by Genebank searches. The pLenR-GPH-shRNA and lentiviral vector packaging plasmid mix were cotransfected into 293T cells to package lentiviral particles. Culture virus supernatant was harvested, and then the virus titer was determined by serial dilution assay. A549 cells were transduced with the constructed lentiviral vectors, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to evaluate p66Shc expression. This study is divided into a control group, a hyperoxia group, an A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, and a negative lentivirus group. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry after 24 hours; the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-9 were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The production of reactive oxygen species and cellular mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescence microscopy. Results We successfully established the p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors, A549-p66ShcshRNA. The A549-p66ShcshRNA was transfected into alveolar epithelial cells, and the inhibitive effects on the expression of p66Shc were observed. Both RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated downregulation of p66Shc expression in A549 cells. In the A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, we found dampened oxidative stress. A549-p66ShcshRNA can cause p66Shc gene silencing, reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, reduce membrane potential decrease, reduce the apoptosis of A549 cells, and reduce alveolar epithelial cell injury, while the lentiviral empty vector group had no such changes. Conclusion p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vector can affect the

  5. Lentiviral Small Hairpin RNA Knockdown of Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1γ Ameliorates Experimentally Induced Osteoarthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Po-Chuan; Lu, Chia-Sing; Shiau, Ai-Li; Lee, Che-Hsin; Jou, I-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Immune cells are involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). CD4+ T cells were activated during the onset of OA and induced macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1γ expression and subsequent osteoclast formation. We evaluated the effects of local knockdown of MIP-1γ in a mouse OA model induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection. The mouse macrophage cell lines and osteoclast-like cells generated from immature hematopoietic monocyte/macrophage progenitors of murine bone marrow were cocultured with either receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) or CD4+ T cells. The levels of MIP-1γ and RANKL in cells and mice were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The osteoclastogenesis was evaluated using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K staining. OA was induced in one hind-leg knee joint of B6 mice. Lentiviral vector encoding MIP-1γ small hairpin RNA (shRNA) and control vector were individually injected intra-articularly into the knee joints, which were histologically assessed for manifestations of OA. The expression of MIP-1γ and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and the infiltration of CD4+ T cells, macrophages, and osteoclastogenesis in tissues were examined using immunohistochemistry. CD4+ T cells were involved in OA by inducing MIP-1γ expression in osteoclast progenitors and the subsequent osteoclast formation. Neutralizing MIP-1γ with a specific antibody abolishes RANKL-stimulated and CD4+ T-cell-stimulated osteoclast formation. MIP-1γ levels were significantly higher in synovium and the chondro-osseous junction of joints 90 days postsurgery. The number of infiltrated CD4+ T cells and macrophages and IL-1β expression were reduced in the synovial tissues of mice treated with MIP-1γ shRNA. Histopathological examinations revealed that mice treated with MIP-1γ shRNA had less severe OA than control mice had, as well as decreased osteoclast formation and MMP-13 expression. Locally inhibiting MIP-1

  6. Lentiviral miR30-based RNA Interference against Heparanase Suppresses Melanoma Metastasis with Lower Liver and Lung Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-yan; Tang, Qiu-su; Chen, Hong-chao; Jiang, Xiao-ling; Fang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To construct short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) and miR30-based shRNAs against heparanase (HPSE) to compare their safety and their effects on HPSE down-modulation in vitro and in vivo to develop a more ideal therapeutic RNA interference (RNAi) vector targeting HPSE. Methods: First, we constructed shRNAs and miR30-based shRNAs against HPSE (HPSE-shRNAs and HPSE-miRNAs) and packed them into lentiviral vectors. Next, we observed the effects of the shRNAs on knockdown for HPSE expression, adhesion, migration and invasion abilities in human malignant melanoma A375 cells in vitro. Furthermore, we compared the effects of the shRNAs on melanoma growth, metastasis and safety in xenograft models. Results: Our data showed that these artificial miRNAs targeting HPSE could be effective RNAi agents mediated by Pol II promoters in vitro and in vivo, although these miRNAs were not more potent than the HPSE-shRNAs. It was noted that obvious lung injuries, rarely revealed previously, as well as hepatotoxicity could be caused by lentivirus-mediated shRNAs (LV shRNAs) rather than lentivirus-mediated miRNAs (LV miRNAs) in vivo. Furthermore, enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TGF-β1 and endogenous mmu-miR-21a-5p were detected in lung tissues of shRNAs groups, whereas the expression of mmu-let-7a-5p, mmu-let-7b-5p and mmu-let-7c-5p were down-regulated. Conclusion: These findings suggest that artificial miRNAs display an improved safety profile of lowered lung injury or hepatotoxicity relative to shRNAs in vivo. The mechanism of lung injuries caused by shRNAs may be correlated with changes of endogenous miRNAs in the lung. Our data here increase the flexibility of a miRNA-based RNAi system for functional genomic and gene therapy applications. PMID:23847439

  7. High-level production of replication-defective human immunodeficiency type 1 virus vector particles using helper-dependent adenovirus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yani; O’Boyle, Kaitlin; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Sutton, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based upon human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) are widely used in bench research applications and increasingly in clinical investigations, both to introduce novel genes but also to reduce expression of unwanted genes of the host and pathogen. At present, the vast majority of HIV-based vector supernatants are produced in 293T cells by cotransfection of up to five DNA plasmids, which is subject to variability and difficult to scale. Here we report the development of a HIV-based vector production system that utilizes helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd). All necessary HIV vector components were inserted into one or more HDAds, which were then amplified to very high titers of ~1013 vp/ml. These were then used to transduce 293-based cells to produce HIV-based vector supernatants, and resultant VSV G-pseudotyped lentiviral vector (LV) titers and total IU were 10- to 30-fold higher, compared to plasmid transfection. Optimization of HIV-based vector production depended upon maximizing expression of all HIV vector components from HDAd. Supernatants contained trace amounts of HDAd but were free of replication-competent lentivirus. This production method should be applicable to other retroviral vector systems. Scalable production of HIV-based vectors using this two-step procedure should facilitate their clinical advancement. PMID:26029715

  8. The integration profile of EIAV-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Caroline V; Vink, Conrad A; Wardell, Theresa W; Lee, Sheena; Treasure, Peter; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Miskin, James E

    2006-10-01

    Lentiviral vectors based on equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) stably integrate into dividing and nondividing cells such as neurons, conferring long-term expression of their transgene. The integration profile of an EIAV vector was analyzed in dividing HEK293T cells, alongside an HIV-1 vector as a control, and compared to a random dataset generated in silico. A multivariate regression model was generated and the influence of the following parameters on integration site selection determined: (a) within/not within a gene, (b) GC content within 20 kb, (c) within 10 kb of a CpG island, (d) gene density within a 2-Mb window, and (e) chromosome number. The majority of the EIAV integration sites (68%; n = 458) and HIV-1 integration sites (72%; n = 162) were within a gene, and both vectors favored AT-rich regions. Sites within genes were examined using a second model to determine the influence of the gene-specific parameters, gene region, and transcriptional activity. Both EIAV and HIV-1 vectors preferentially integrated within active genes. Unlike the gammaretrovirus MLV, EIAV and HIV-1 vectors do not integrate preferentially into the promoter region or the 5' end of the transcription unit. PMID:16950499

  9. Primate lentiviral Nef proteins deregulate T-cell development by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A nef gene is present in all primate lentiviral genomes and is important for high viral loads and progression to AIDS in human or experimental macaque hosts of HIV or SIV, respectively. In these hosts, infection of the thymus results in a decreased output of naive T cells that may contribute to the development of immunodeficiency. We have previously shown that HIV-1 subtype B Nef proteins can block human T-cell development. However, the underlying mechanism(s) and the conservation of this Nef function between different groups of HIV and SIV remained to be determined. Results We investigated whether reduction of thymic output is a conserved function of highly divergent lentiviral Nef proteins including those from both types of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2), their direct simian counterparts (SIVcpz, SIVgor and SIVsmm, respectively), and some additional SIV strains. We found that expression of most of these nef alleles in thymocyte progenitors impaired T-cell development and reduced thymic output. For HIV-1 Nef, binding to active p21 protein (Cdc42/Rac)-activated kinase (PAK2) was a major determinant of this function. In contrast, selective disruption of PAK2 binding did not eliminate the effect on T-cell development of SIVmac239 Nef, as was shown by expressing mutants in a newly discovered PAK2 activating structural motif (PASM) constituted by residues I117, H121, T218 and Y221, as well as previously described mutants. Rather, down-modulation of cell surface CD3 was sufficient for reduced thymic output by SIVmac Nef, while other functions of SIV Nefs contributed. Conclusions Our results indicate that primate lentiviral Nef proteins impair development of thymocyte precursors into T cells in multiple ways. The interaction of HIV-1 Nef with active PAK2 by HIV-1 seem to be most detrimental, and downregulation of CD3 by HIV-2 and most SIV Nef proteins sufficient for reduced thymic output. Since the reduction of thymic output by Nef is a

  10. Therapeutic effect of recombinant lentiviral vector containing succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein on the treatment of experimental autoimmunity myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Han, Lina; Wang, Chunxi; Guo, Shuli; Liu, Siyu; Yang, Liming

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac autoimmune reaction takes part in myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Existing literature has confirmed that the occurrence of cardiomyopathy belongs to mitochondrial diseases and is related to the oxidative respiratory chain subunit. The special structure of iron-sulfur protein (ISP) is responsible for the oxidative stress in oxidative phosphorylation, which is also a target that is easily attacked by various damage factors. Using gene therapy technology to restore succinate dehydrogenase iron-sulfur protein (SDISP) function- and thus resume myocardial mitochondria function and myocardial function is hypothesized to alleviate the experimental autoimmunity myocarditis (EAM). PMID:27372865

  11. Analysis of neuronal proliferation, migration and differentiation in the postnatal brain using equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, BV; Patel, M; Iyengar, M; Liang, H; Therit, B; Salinas-Mondragon, R; Lai, C; Olsen, JC; Anton, ES; Ghashghaei, HT

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing neurogenesis in discrete sectors of the adult central nervous system depends on the mitotic activity of an elusive population of adult stem cells. The existence of adult neural stem cells provides an alternative approach to transplantation of embryonic stem cells in cell-based therapies. Owing to the limited intrinsic fate of adult stem cells and inhibitory nature of the adult brain for neurogenesis, accommodation for circuit replacement in the brain will require genetic and epigenetic manipulation. Here, we show that a replication-incompetent Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) is highly suitable for stable and persistent gene transfer to adult neural stem cells. The transduced regions were free of long-lasting neuroimmune responses to EIAV. Transduction in the subventricular zone was specific to the stem cell niche, but spared the progeny of adult neural stem cells that includes transit amplifying progenitors (TAPs) and migrating neuroblasts. With time, EIAV-transduced stem cells passed on the transgene to TAPs and migrating neuroblasts, which ultimately differentiated into neurons in the olfactory bulbs. We show that EIAV is highly suitable for discovery and assessment of mechanisms that regulate proliferation, migration and differentiation in the postnatal brain. PMID:19474809

  12. Expression Profiles of Vpx/Vpr Proteins Are Co-related with the Primate Lentiviral Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yosuke; Miyake, Ariko; Doi, Naoya; Sasada, Hikari; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Adachi, Akio; Nomaguchi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Viruses of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) lineages carry a unique accessory protein called Vpx. Vpx is essential or critical for viral replication in natural target cells such as macrophages and T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that a poly-proline motif (PPM) located at the C-terminal region of Vpx is required for its efficient expression in two strains of HIV-2 and SIVmac, and that the Vpx expression levels of the two clones are significantly different. Notably, the PPM sequence is conserved and confined to Vpx and Vpr proteins derived from certain lineages of HIV-2/SIVs. In this study, Vpx/Vpr proteins from diverse primate lentiviral lineages were experimentally and phylogenetically analyzed to obtain the general expression picture in cells. While both the level and PPM-dependency of Vpx/Vpr expression in transfected cells varied among viral strains, each viral group, based on Vpx/Vpr amino acid sequences, was found to exhibit a characteristic expression profile. Moreover, phylogenetic tree analyses on Gag and Vpx/Vpr proteins gave essentially the same results. Taken together, our study described here suggests that each primate lentiviral lineage may have developed a unique expression pattern of Vpx/Vpr proteins for adaptation to its hostile cellular and species environments in the process of viral evolution. PMID:27536295

  13. Expression Profiles of Vpx/Vpr Proteins Are Co-related with the Primate Lentiviral Lineage.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yosuke; Miyake, Ariko; Doi, Naoya; Sasada, Hikari; Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Adachi, Akio; Nomaguchi, Masako

    2016-01-01

    Viruses of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) and some simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) lineages carry a unique accessory protein called Vpx. Vpx is essential or critical for viral replication in natural target cells such as macrophages and T lymphocytes. We have previously shown that a poly-proline motif (PPM) located at the C-terminal region of Vpx is required for its efficient expression in two strains of HIV-2 and SIVmac, and that the Vpx expression levels of the two clones are significantly different. Notably, the PPM sequence is conserved and confined to Vpx and Vpr proteins derived from certain lineages of HIV-2/SIVs. In this study, Vpx/Vpr proteins from diverse primate lentiviral lineages were experimentally and phylogenetically analyzed to obtain the general expression picture in cells. While both the level and PPM-dependency of Vpx/Vpr expression in transfected cells varied among viral strains, each viral group, based on Vpx/Vpr amino acid sequences, was found to exhibit a characteristic expression profile. Moreover, phylogenetic tree analyses on Gag and Vpx/Vpr proteins gave essentially the same results. Taken together, our study described here suggests that each primate lentiviral lineage may have developed a unique expression pattern of Vpx/Vpr proteins for adaptation to its hostile cellular and species environments in the process of viral evolution. PMID:27536295

  14. Lack of evidence of conserved lentiviral sequences in pigs with post weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bratanich, A; Lairmore, M; Heneine, W; Konoby, C; Harding, J; West, K; Vasquez, G; Allan, G; Ellis, J

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of retroviruses in the recently described porcine postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) serum and leukocytes were screened for reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, and tissues were examined for the presence of conserved lentiviral sequences using degenerate primers in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Serum and stimulated leukocytes from the blood and lymph nodes from pigs with PMWS, as well as from control pigs had RT activity that was detected by the sensitive Amp-RT assay. A 257-bp fragment was amplified from DNA from the blood and bone marrow of pigs with PMWS. This fragment was identical in size to conserved lentiviral sequences that were amplified from plasmids containing DNA from several lentiviruses. Cloning and sequencing of the fragment from affected pigs, however, did not reveal homology with the recognized lentiviruses. Together the results of these analyses suggest that the RT activity present in tissues from control and affected pigs is the result of endogenous retrovirus expression, and that a lentivirus is not a primary pathogen in PMWS. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10480463

  15. Lentiviral transgenesis in mice via a simple method of viral concentration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pei-Hsun; Chang, Yu-Fan; Mao, Su-Han; Lin, Hsiu-Lien; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Yang, Shang-Hsun

    2016-10-01

    Transgenic animals are important in vivo models for biological research. However, low transgenic rates are commonly reported in the literature. Lentiviral transgenesis is a promising method that has greater efficiency with regard to generating transgenic animals, although the transgenic rate of this approach is highly dependent on different transgenes and concentrated lentiviruses. In this study, we modified a method to concentrate lentiviruses using a table centrifuge, commonly available in most laboratories, and carried out analysis of the transgenic efficiency in mice. Based on 26 individual constructs and 627 live pups, we found that the overall transgenic rate was more than 30%, which is higher than obtained with pronuclear microinjection. In addition, we did not find any significant differences in transgenic efficiency when the size of inserts was less than 5000 bp. These results not only show that our modified method can successfully generate transgenic mice but also suggest that this approach could be generally applied to different constructs when the size of inserts is less than 5000 bp. It is anticipated that the results of this study can help encourage the wider laboratory use of lentiviral transgenesis in mice. PMID:27264740

  16. Preparation and characterization of a new monoclonal antibody against CXCR4 using lentivirus vector.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyi; Kuang, Yu; Huang, Xiaojun; Zou, Linlin; Huang, Liuye; Yang, Ting; Li, Wanyi; Yang, Yuan

    2016-07-01

    CXCR4 is a member of chemokine receptors and plays a vital role in numerous diseases and cancer processes, which makes the CXCR4/CXCL12 chemotactic axis a potential therapeutic target. In this study, we used lentiviral vectors as a novel technology to produce a monoclonal antibody against CXCR4. Lentivirus vector pLV-CXCR4-Puro was successfully constructed and a hybridoma cell line 1A4 was generated. The CXCR4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) 1A4 had high titer and affinity, and the isotype was identified as IgG1a. The recombinant lentivirus vector could effectively stimulate the production of 39kDa CXCR4 antibody in vivo after immunization. Western blot analysis showed that the MAb could recognize the CXCR4 antigen expressed on transfected 293T cells as well as various human cancer cell lines. Immunofluorescence assays showed that MAb 1A4 mainly localized and strongly stained on the membrane of transfected 293T cells. Immunohistochemistry assays demonstrated that 1A4 could recognize strong expression of CXCR4 on the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thus, the method using lentiviral vectors may have application on effective and large-scale production of the CXCR4 monoclonal antibody, which will be a potential tool for the diagnosis and treatment of human cancers. PMID:27124560

  17. Self-inactivating MLV vectors have a reduced genotoxic profile in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Cavazza, A; Cocchiarella, F; Bartholomae, C; Schmidt, M; Pincelli, C; Larcher, F; Mavilio, F

    2013-09-01

    Transplantation of epithelia derived from keratinocyte stem cells transduced by retroviral vectors is a potential therapy for epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a family of inherited skin adhesion defects. The biosafety characteristics of retroviral vectors in keratinocytes are, however, poorly defined. We developed self-inactivating (SIN) vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia (MLV) and the human immunodeficiency (HIV) viruses expressing therapeutic levels of LAMB3, a transgene defective in junctional EB, and tested their integration profile in human primary keratinocytes. The SIN-HIV vector showed the expected preference for transcribed genes while the SIN-MLV vector integrated preferentially in regulatory elements, but showed a significantly lower tendency to target cell growth-related genes, transcription start sites and epigenetically defined promoters compared with a wild-type MLV vector in an epithelial cell context. A quantitative gene expression assay in individual keratinocyte clones showed that MLV-derived vectors deregulate expression of targeted genes at a lower frequency than in hematopoietic cells, and that the SIN-MLV design has the lowest activity compared to both MLV and SIN-HIV vectors. This study indicates that SIN-MLV vectors may have a better safety profile in keratinocyte than in hematopoietic cells, and be a reasonable alternative to lentiviral vectors for gene therapy of inherited skin disorders. PMID:23615186

  18. Strategies for targeting primate neural circuits with viral vectors.

    PubMed

    El-Shamayleh, Yasmine; Ni, Amy M; Horwitz, Gregory D

    2016-07-01

    Understanding how the brain works requires understanding how different types of neurons contribute to circuit function and organism behavior. Progress on this front has been accelerated by optogenetics and chemogenetics, which provide an unprecedented level of control over distinct neuronal types in small animals. In primates, however, targeting specific types of neurons with these tools remains challenging. In this review, we discuss existing and emerging strategies for directing genetic manipulations to targeted neurons in the adult primate central nervous system. We review the literature on viral vectors for gene delivery to neurons, focusing on adeno-associated viral vectors and lentiviral vectors, their tropism for different cell types, and prospects for new variants with improved efficacy and selectivity. We discuss two projection targeting approaches for probing neural circuits: anterograde projection targeting and retrograde transport of viral vectors. We conclude with an analysis of cell type-specific promoters and other nucleotide sequences that can be used in viral vectors to target neuronal types at the transcriptional level. PMID:27052579

  19. CD19 and CD20 Targeted Vectors Induce Minimal Activation of Resting B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schwenkert, Michael; Cosset, François-Loic; Verhoeyen, Els; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are an important cell population of the immune system. However, until recently it was not possible to transduce resting B lymphocytes with retro- or lentiviral vectors, making them unsusceptible for genetic manipulations by these vectors. Lately, we demonstrated that lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with modified measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin, responsible for receptor recognition, and fusion protein were able to overcome this transduction block. They use either the natural MV receptors, CD46 and signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM), for cell entry (MV-LV) or the vector particles were further modified to selectively enter via the CD20 molecule, which is exclusively expressed on B lymphocytes (CD20-LV). It has been shown previously that transduction by MV-LV does not induce B lymphocyte activation. However, if this is also true for CD20-LV is still unknown. Here, we generated a vector specific for another B lymphocyte marker, CD19, and compared its ability to transduce resting B lymphocytes with CD20-LV. The vector (CD19ds-LV) was able to stably transduce unstimulated B lymphocytes, albeit with a reduced efficiency of about 10% compared to CD20-LV, which transduced about 30% of the cells. Since CD20 as well as CD19 are closely linked to the B lymphocyte activation pathway, we investigated if engagement of CD20 or CD19 molecules by the vector particles induces activating stimuli in resting B lymphocytes. Although, activation of B lymphocytes often involves calcium influx, we did not detect elevated calcium levels. However, the activation marker CD71 was substantially up-regulated upon CD20-LV transduction and most importantly, B lymphocytes transduced with CD20-LV or CD19ds-LV entered the G1b phase of cell cycle, whereas untransduced or MV-LV transduced B lymphocytes remained in G0. Hence, CD20 and CD19 targeting vectors induce activating stimuli in resting B lymphocytes, which most likely renders them susceptible for lentiviral

  20. A quasi-lentiviral green fluorescent protein reporter exhibits nuclear export features of late human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transcripts

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Marcus; Ludwig, Christine; Kehlenbeck, Sylvia; Jungert, Kerstin; Wagner, Ralf . E-mail: ralf.wagner@klinik.uni-regensburg.de

    2006-09-01

    We have previously shown that Rev-dependent expression of HIV-1 Gag from CMV immediate early promoter critically depends on the AU-rich codon bias of the gag gene. Here, we demonstrate that adaptation of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene to HIV codon bias is sufficient to turn this hivGFP RNA into a quasi-lentiviral message following the rules of late lentiviral gene expression. Accordingly, GFP expression was significantly decreased in transfected cells strictly correlating with reduced RNA levels. In the presence of the HIV 5' major splice donor, the hivGFP RNAs were stabilized in the nucleus and efficiently exported to the cytoplasm following fusion of the 3' Rev-responsive element (RRE) and coexpression of HIV-1 Rev. This Rev-dependent translocation was specifically inhibited by leptomycin B suggesting export via the CRM1-dependent pathway used by late lentiviral transcripts. In conclusion, this quasi-lentiviral reporter system may provide a new platform for developing sensitive Rev screening assays.

  1. Nucleus accumbens lentiviral-mediated gain of function of the oxytocin receptor regulates anxiety- and ethanol-related behaviors in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine; Al Mansouri, Shamma; Al Maamari, Elyazia

    2016-10-01

    Anxiety is believed to influence ethanol use human in alcoholics. Studies using laboratory animals suggested an interaction between oxytocin and the behavioral effects of ethanol. Our previous study implicated a potential role for the oxytocin receptor (OxtR) in regulating ethanol-conditioned place preference. Here, we examined anxiety and the behavioral responses to ethanol in C57BL/6 mice stereotaxically injected in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) with lentiviral vectors expressing an empty vector (Mock) or the OxtR cDNA. For anxiety we used the elevated-plus maze, the open-field and the marble-burying tests and for ethanol we used the two-bottle choice paradigm, the wire-hanging and ethanol-induced loss-of-righting-reflex tests. We found that, compared to Mock, OxtR overexpression led to anxiolytic-like behavior without altering spontaneous locomotor activity. Most importantly, we found that, relative to Mock controls, increased expression of the OxtR in the NAcc led to decreased ethanol consumption and preference in the two-bottle choice protocol and increased resistance to ethanol-induced sedation. We also compared the consequence of OxtR modulation on the consumption and preference of saccharin and quinine and found that the two experimental groups did not differ for any tastant. These results provide further evidence that the oxytocin system contributes to the regulation of ethanol drinking and sensitivity and position OxtR as a central molecular mediator of ethanol's effects within the mesolimbic system. Taken together, the current findings suggest that OxtR manipulation may be a relevant strategy to address ethanol use disorders. PMID:27306084

  2. Induction of Pluripotent Stem Cells from a Cynomolgus Monkey Using a Polycistronic Simian Immunodeficiency Virus–Based Vector, Differentiation Toward Functional Cardiomyocytes, and Generation of Stably Expressing Reporter Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Stephanie; Haase, Alexandra; Merkert, Sylvia; Beier, Jennifer; Schwanke, Kristin; Schambach, Axel; Glage, Silke; Göhring, Gudrun; Curnow, Eliza C.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent a novel cell source for regenerative therapies. Many emerging iPSC-based therapeutic concepts will require preclinical evaluation in suitable large animal models. Among the large animal species frequently used in preclinical efficacy and safety studies, macaques show the highest similarities to humans at physiological, cellular, and molecular levels. We have generated iPSCs from cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) as a segue to regenerative therapy model development in this species. Because typical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based lentiviral vectors show poor transduction of simian cells, a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-based vector was chosen for efficient transduction of cynomolgus skin fibroblasts. A corresponding polycistronic vector with codon-optimized reprogramming factors was constructed for reprogramming. Growth characteristics as well as cell and colony morphology of the resulting cynomolgus iPSCs (cyiPSCs) were demonstrated to be almost identical to cynomolgus embryonic stem cells (cyESCs), and cyiPSCs expressed typical pluripotency markers including OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG. Furthermore, differentiation in vivo and in vitro into derivatives of all three germ layers, as well as generation of functional cardiomyocytes, could be demonstrated. Finally, a highly efficient technique for generation of transgenic cyiPSC clones with stable reporter expression in undifferentiated cells as well as differentiated transgenic cyiPSC progeny was developed to enable cell tracking in recipient animals. In conclusion, our data indicate that cyiPSCs represent a valuable cell source for establishment of macaque-based allogeneic and autologous preclinical cell transplantation models for various fields of regenerative medicine. PMID:23194451

  3. Thrombospondin-1-Based Antiangiogenic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sims, Jennifer N; Lawler, Jack

    2015-09-01

    Ocular angiogenesis is one of the underlying causes of blindness and vision impairment and may occur in a spectrum of disorders, including diabetic retinopathy, neovascular age-related macular degeneration, retinal artery or vein occlusion, and retinopathy of prematurity. As such, strategies to inhibit angiogenesis by suppressing vascular endothelial growth factor activity have proven to be effective in the clinic for the treatment of eye diseases. A complementary approach would be to increase the level of naturally occurring inhibitors of angiogenesis, such as thrombospondin (TSP)-1. This article summarizes the development of TSP-1-based inhibitors of angiogenesis. PMID:26352160

  4. Neuroprotection in a rat Parkinson model by GDNF gene therapy using EIAV vector.

    PubMed

    Azzouz, Mimoun; Ralph, Scott; Wong, Liang-Fong; Day, Denise; Askham, Zoe; Barber, Robert D; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Kingsman, Susan M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2004-04-29

    Vectors based on lentiviruses are opening up new approaches for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, the equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) vector is one of the most attractive gene delivery systems with respect to neuronal tropism. The aim was to validate EIAV-lentiviral vectors as a gene delivery system for neurotrophic factor genes in an animal model of Parkinson's disease. EIAV carrying the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene was unilaterally injected into rat striatum and above the substantia nigra (SN). One week later, the rats received a 6-OHDA lesion into the ipsilateral striatum. GDNF delivery led to extensive expression of GDNF protein within the striatum. In addition, near complete protection against dopaminergic cell death was observed in the GDNF-treated group. PMID:15076720

  5. In vivo evaluation of an EIAV vector for the systemic genetic delivery of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lamikanra, A; Myers, K A; Ferris, N; Mitrophanous, K A; Carroll, M W

    2005-06-01

    Lentiviral-based vectors hold great promise as gene delivery vehicles for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases. We have previously reported the development of a nonprimate lentiviral vector system based on the equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV), which is able to efficiently transduce dividing and nondividing cells both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report on the application of EIAV vectors for the systemic delivery of an antibody fusion protein designed for the treatment of cancer. The therapeutic potential of a single chain antibody against the tumour-associated antigen, 5T4, fused to immune enhancer moieties has been demonstrated in vitro and here we evaluate the genetic delivery of a 5T4 scFv fused to B7.1 (scFvB7) using an EIAV vector. The kinetics and concentration of protein produced following both intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) administration was determined in immune competent adult mice. In addition, the immune response to the EIAV vector and the transgene were determined. Here, we show that a single injection of EIAV expressing scFv-B7 can give rise to concentrations of protein in the range of 1-5 microg/ml that persist in the sera for more than 50 days. After a second injection, concentrations of scFv-B7.1 rose as high as 20 microg/ml and levels greater than 2 microg/ml were present in the sera of all mice injected i.v. after 210 days despite the detection of antibodies against both the transgene and viral envelope for the duration of this study. These results demonstrate the potential of EIAV as a gene therapy vector for long-term production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. PMID:15772687

  6. Cleavage of Hemagglutinin-Bearing Lentiviral Pseudotypes and Their Use in the Study of Influenza Virus Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Sawoo, Olivier; Dublineau, Amélie; Batéjat, Christophe; Zhou, Paul; Manuguerra, Jean-Claude; Leclercq, India

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are a major cause of infectious respiratory human diseases and their transmission is dependent upon the environment. However, the role of environmental factors on IAV survival outside the host still raises many questions. In this study, we used lentiviral pseudotypes to study the influence of the hemagglutinin protein in IAV survival. High-titered and cleaved influenza-based lentiviral pseudoparticles, through the use of a combination of two proteases (HAT and TMPRSS2) were produced. Pseudoparticles bearing hemagglutinin proteins derived from different H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1 IAV strains were subjected to various environmental parameters over time and tested for viability through single-cycle infectivity assays. We showed that pseudotypes with different HAs have different persistence profiles in water as previously shown with IAVs. Our results also showed that pseudotypes derived from H1N1 pandemic virus survived longer than those derived from seasonal H1N1 virus from 1999, at high temperature and salinity, as previously shown with their viral counterparts. Similarly, increasing temperature and salinity had a negative effect on the survival of the H3N2 and H5N1 pseudotypes. These results showed that pseudotypes with the same lentiviral core, but which differ in their surface glycoproteins, survived differently outside the host, suggesting a role for the HA in virus stability. PMID:25166303

  7. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer. PMID:26290434

  8. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  9. Foamy virus vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, D W; Miller, A D

    1996-01-01

    Human foamy virus (HFV) is a retrovirus of the spumavirus family. We have constructed vectors based on HFV that encode neomycin phosphotransferase and alkaline phosphatase. These vectors are able to transduce a wide variety of vertebrate cells by integration of the vector genome. Unlike vectors based on murine leukemia virus, HFV vectors are not inactivated by human serum, and they transduce stationary-phase cultures more efficiently than murine leukemia virus vectors. These properties, as well as their large packaging capacity, make HFV vectors promising gene transfer vehicles. PMID:8523528

  10. Reversal of Diabetes Through Gene Therapy of Diabetic Rats by Hepatic Insulin Expression via Lentiviral Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Elsner, Matthias; Terbish, Taivankhuu; Jörns, Anne; Naujok, Ortwin; Wedekind, Dirk; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2012-01-01

    Due to shortage of donor tissue a cure for type 1 diabetes by pancreas organ or islet transplantation is an option only for very few patients. Gene therapy is an alternative approach to cure the disease. Insulin generation in non-endocrine cells through genetic engineering is a promising therapeutic concept to achieve insulin independence in patients with diabetes. In the present study furin-cleavable human insulin was expressed in the liver of autoimmune-diabetic IDDM rats (LEW.1AR1/Ztm-iddm) and streptozotocin-diabetic rats after portal vein injection of INS-lentivirus. Within 5–7 days after the virus injection of 7 × 109 INS-lentiviral particles the blood glucose concentrations were normalized in the treated animals. This glucose lowering effect remained stable for the 1 year observation period. Human C-peptide as a marker for hepatic release of human insulin was in the range of 50–100 pmol/ml serum. Immunofluorescence staining of liver tissue was positive for insulin showing no signs of transdifferentiation into pancreatic β-cells. This study shows that the diabetic state can be efficiently reversed by insulin release from non-endocrine cells through a somatic gene therapy approach. PMID:22354377

  11. Large granular lymphocytes are universally increased in human, macaque, and feline lentiviral infection.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Wendy S; Apetrei, Cristian; Avery, Anne C; Peskind, Robert L; Vandewoude, Sue

    2015-10-15

    Large granular lymphocytes (LGLs) have only been anecdotally reported in HIV infection. We previously reported an LGL lymphocytosis in FIV-infected cats associated with a rise in FIV proviral loads and a marked neutropenia that persisted during chronic infection. Extensive immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in cats chronically infected with FIV were identified LGLs as CD8lo(+)FAS(+); this cell population expanded commensurate with viral load. CD8lo(+)FAS(+) cells expressed similar levels of interferon-γ compared to CD8lo(+)FAS(+) cells from FIV-naive control animals, yet CD3ɛ expression, which was increased on total CD8(+) T cells in FIV-infected cats, was decreased on CD8lo(+)FAS(+) cells. Down-modulation of CD3 expression was reversed after culturing PBMC for 3 days in culture with ConA/IL-2. We identified CD8lo(+)FAS(+) LGLs to be polyclonal T cells lacking CD56 expression. Blood smears from HIV-infected individuals and SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques revealed increased LGLs compared to HIV/SIV negative counterparts. In humans, there was no correlation with viral load or treatment and in macaques the LGLs arose in acute SIV infection with increases in viremia. This is the first report describing and partially characterizing LGL lymphocytosis in association with lentiviral infections in three different species. PMID:26292765

  12. Association with PAK2 Enables Functional Interactions of Lentiviral Nef Proteins with the Exocyst Complex

    PubMed Central

    Imle, Andrea; Abraham, Libin; Tsopoulidis, Nikolaos; Hoflack, Bernard; Saksela, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Nef enhances virus replication and contributes to immune evasion in vivo, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Nef interferes with host cell actin dynamics to restrict T lymphocyte responses to chemokine stimulation and T cell receptor engagement. This relies on the assembly of a labile multiprotein complex including the host kinase PAK2 that Nef usurps to phosphorylate and inactivate the actin-severing factor cofilin. Components of the exocyst complex (EXOC), an octameric protein complex involved in vesicular transport and actin remodeling, were recently reported to interact with Nef via the same molecular surface that mediates PAK2 association. Exploring the functional relevance of EXOC in Nef-PAK2 complex assembly/function, we found Nef-EXOC interactions to be specifically mediated by the PAK2 interface of Nef, to occur in infected human T lymphocytes, and to be conserved among lentiviral Nef proteins. In turn, EXOC was dispensable for direct downstream effector functions of Nef-associated PAK2. Surprisingly, PAK2 was essential for Nef-EXOC association, which required a functional Rac1/Cdc42 binding site but not the catalytic activity of PAK2. EXOC was dispensable for Nef functions in vesicular transport but critical for inhibition of actin remodeling and proximal signaling upon T cell receptor engagement. Thus, Nef exploits PAK2 in a stepwise mechanism in which its kinase activity cooperates with an adaptor function for EXOC to inhibit host cell actin dynamics. PMID:26350970

  13. Characterization of common marmoset dysgerminoma-like tumor induced by the lentiviral expression of reprogramming factors

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Saori; Marumoto, Tomotoshi; Nii, Takenobu; Kawano, Hirotaka; Liao, Jiyuan; Nagai, Yoko; Okada, Michiyo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Erika; Fujii, Hiroshi; Okano, Shinji; Ebise, Hayao; Sato, Tetsuya; Suyama, Mikita; Okano, Hideyuki; Miura, Yoshie; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2014-01-01

    Recent generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPSCs) has made a significant impact on the field of human regenerative medicine. Prior to the clinical application of iPSCs, testing of their safety and usefulness must be carried out using reliable animal models of various diseases. In order to generate iPSCs from common marmoset (CM; Callithrix jacchus), one of the most useful experimental animals, we have lentivirally transduced reprogramming factors, including POU5F1 (also known as OCT3/4), SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC into CM fibroblasts. The cells formed round colonies expressing embryonic stem cell markers, however, they showed an abnormal karyotype denoted as 46, X, del(4q), +mar, and formed human dysgerminoma-like tumors in SCID mice, indicating that the transduction of reprogramming factors caused unexpected tumorigenesis of CM cells. Moreover, CM dysgerminoma-like tumors were highly sensitive to DNA-damaging agents, irradiation, and fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor, and their growth was dependent on c-MYC expression. These results indicate that DNA-damaging agents, irradiation, fibroblast growth factor receptor inhibitor, and c-MYC-targeted therapies might represent effective treatment strategies for unexpected tumors in patients receiving iPSC-based therapy. PMID:24521492

  14. Editing T cell specificity towards leukemia by zinc-finger nucleases and lentiviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Angelo; Magnani, Zulma; Liu, Pei-Qi; Reik, Andreas; Chu, Victoria; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Kuball, Jurgen; Camisa, Barbara; Bondanza, Attilio; Casorati, Giulia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Greenberg, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Naldini, Luigi; Bonini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of high-avidity T-cell receptor (TCR) genes isolated from rare tumor-specific lymphocytes into polyclonal T cells is an attractive cancer immunotherapy strategy. However, TCR gene transfer results in competition for surface expression and inappropriate pairing between the exogenous and endogenous TCR chains, resulting in suboptimal activity and potentially harmful unpredicted specificities. We designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) promoting the disruption of endogenous TCR β and α chain genes. ZFN-treated lymphocytes lacked CD3/TCR surface expression and expanded with IL-7 and IL-15. Upon lentiviral transfer of a TCR for the WT1 tumor antigen, these TCR-edited cells expressed the new TCR at high levels, were easily expanded to near-purity, and proved superior in specific antigen recognition to matched TCR-transferred cells. In contrast to TCR-transferred cells, TCR edited lymphocytes did not mediate off-target reactivity while maintaining anti-tumor activity in vivo, thus demonstrating that complete editing of T-cell specificity generate tumor-specific lymphocytes with improved biosafety profile. PMID:22466705

  15. Inducible and Reversible Lentiviral and Recombination Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) Systems for Controlling Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bersten, David C.; Sullivan, Adrienne E.; Li, Dian; Bhakti, Veronica; Bent, Stephen J.; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of gene expression to invoke loss of function (LoF) or gain of function (GoF) phenotypes is important for interrogating complex biological questions both in vitro and in vivo. Doxycycline (Dox)-inducible gene expression systems are commonly used although success is often limited by high background and insufficient sensitivity to Dox. Here we develop broadly applicable platforms for reliable, tightly controlled and reversible Dox-inducible systems for lentiviral mediated generation of cell lines or FLP Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) into the Collagen 1a1 (Col1a1) locus (FLP-In Col1a1) in mouse embryonic stem cells. We significantly improve the flexibility, usefulness and robustness of the Dox-inducible system by using Tetracycline (Tet) activator (Tet-On) variants which are more sensitive to Dox, have no background activity and are expressed from single Gateway-compatible constructs. We demonstrate the usefulness of these platforms in ectopic gene expression or gene knockdown in multiple cell lines, primary neurons and in FLP-In Col1a1 mouse embryonic stem cells. We also improve the flexibility of RMCE Dox-inducible systems by generating constructs that allow for tissue or cell type-specific Dox-inducible expression and generate a shRNA selection algorithm that can effectively predict potent shRNA sequences able to knockdown gene expression from single integrant constructs. These platforms provide flexible, reliable and broadly applicable inducible expression systems for studying gene function. PMID:25768837

  16. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB. PMID:24773322

  17. Identification of entry inhibitors of Ebola virus pseudotyped vectors from a myxobacterial compound library.

    PubMed

    Beck, Simon; Henß, Lisa; Weidner, Tatjana; Herrmann, Jennifer; Müller, Rolf; Chao, Yu-Kai; Grimm, Christian; Weber, Christopher; Sliva, Katja; Schnierle, Barbara S

    2016-08-01

    Myxobacteria produce secondary metabolites many of which were described to have various biological effects including anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and anti-viral activity. The majority of these metabolites are novel scaffolds with unique modes-of-action and hence might be potential leads for drug discovery. Here, we tested a myxobacterial natural product library for compounds with inhibitory activity against Ebola virus (EBOV). The assay was performed with a surrogate system using Ebola envelope glycoprotein (GP) pseudotyped lentiviral vectors. EBOV specificity was proven by counter-screening with vesicular stomatitis virus G protein pseudotyped vectors. Two compounds were identified that preferentially inhibited EBOV GP mediated cell entry: Chondramides that act on the actin skeleton but might be too toxic and noricumazole A, a potassium channel inhibitor, which might constitute a novel pathway to inhibit Ebola virus cell entry. PMID:27241689

  18. Reduced Vector Preisach Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new vector Preisach model, called the Reduced Vector Preisach model (RVPM), was developed for fast computations. This model, derived from the Simplified Vector Preisach model (SVPM), has individual components that like the SVPM are calculated independently using coupled selection rules for the state vector computation. However, the RVPM does not require the rotational correction. Therefore, it provides a practical alternative for computing the magnetic susceptibility using a differential approach. A vector version, using the framework of the DOK model, is implemented. Simulation results for the reduced vector Preisach model are also presented.

  19. Restrictions to cross-species transmission of lentiviral infection gleaned from studies of FIV.

    PubMed

    VandeWoude, Sue; Troyer, Jennifer; Poss, Mary

    2010-03-15

    More than 40 species of primates and over 20 species of cats harbor antibodies that sero-react to lentiviral antigens. In nearly all cases where viral genetic analysis has been conducted, each host species is infected with a unique lentivirus. Though lentivirus clades within a species can be substantially divergent, they are typically monophyletic within that species. A notable significant departure from this observation is apparent cross-species transmission of FIV between bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in Southern California that has occurred at least three times; evidence from one bobcat sequence suggests this cross-over may have also occurred in Florida between bobcats and the endangered Florida panther. Several other isolated reports demonstrate cross-species transmission of FIV isolates among captive animals housed in close proximity, and it is well established that HIV-1 and HIV-2 arose from human contact with SIV-infected non-human primates. Using an experimental model, we have determined that domestic cats (Felis catus) are susceptible to FIVs originating from pumas or lions. While infections are initially replicative, and animals seroconvert, within a relatively short period of time circulating virus is reduced to nearly undetectable levels in a majority of animals. This diminution of viral load is proportional to initial viral peak. Although viral reservoirs can be identified in gastrointestinal tissues, most viral genomes recovered peripherally are highly mutated, suggesting that the non-adapted host successfully inhibits normal viral replication, leading to replication incompetent viral progeny. Mechanisms possible for such restriction of cross-species infections in natural settings include: (1) Lack of contact conducive to lentiviral transmission between infected and shedding animals of different species; (2) Lack of suitable receptor repertoire to allow viral entry to susceptible cells of a new species; (3) Cellular machinery in the

  20. Structural basis of lentiviral subversion of a cellular protein degradation pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, David; Groom, Harriet C. T.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Bishop, Kate N.; Taylor, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviruses contain accessory genes that have evolved to counteract the effects of host cellular defence proteins that inhibit productive infection. One such restriction factor, SAMHD1, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection of myeloid-lineage cells as well as resting CD4+ T cells by reducing the cellular deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate (dNTP) concentration to a level at which the viral reverse transcriptase cannot function. In other lentiviruses, including HIV-2 and related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs), SAMHD1 restriction is overcome by the action of viral accessory protein x (Vpx) or the related viral protein r (Vpr) that target and recruit SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation. The molecular mechanism by which these viral proteins are able to usurp the host cell's ubiquitination machinery to destroy the cell's protection against these viruses has not been defined. Here we present the crystal structure of a ternary complex of Vpx with the human E3 ligase substrate adaptor DCAF1 and the carboxy-terminal region of human SAMHD1. Vpx is made up of a three-helical bundle stabilized by a zinc finger motif, and wraps tightly around the disc-shaped DCAF1 molecule to present a new molecular surface. This adapted surface is then able to recruit SAMHD1 via its C terminus, making it a competent substrate for the E3 ligase to mark for proteasomal degradation. The structure reported here provides a molecular description of how a lentiviral accessory protein is able to subvert the cell's normal protein degradation pathway to inactivate the cellular viral defence system.

  1. Structural basis of lentiviral subversion of a cellular protein degradation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schwefel, David; Groom, Harriet C. T.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Bishop, Kate N.; Taylor, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Lentiviruses contain accessory genes that have evolved to counteract the effects of host cellular defence proteins that inhibit productive infection. One such restriction factor, SAMHD1, inhibits HIV-1 infection of myeloid-lineage cells 1,2 as well as resting CD4+ T cells 3,4 by reducing the cellular dNTP concentration to a level where the viral reverse transcriptase cannot function 5,6. In other lentiviruses, including HIV-2 and related SIVs, SAMHD1 restriction is overcome by the action of viral accessory protein x (Vpx) or the related viral protein r (Vpr) that target and recruit SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation 7,8. The molecular mechanism by which these viral proteins are able to usurp the host cell’s ubiquitination machinery to destroy the cell’s protection against these viruses has not been defined. We present here the crystal structure of a ternary complex of Vpx with the host cell’s E3 ligase substrate adaptor DCAF1 and the C-terminal region of SAMHD1. Vpx is made up of a three-helical bundle, stabilised by a zinc finger motif and wraps tightly around the disc-shaped DCAF1 molecule to present a new molecular surface. This adapted surface is then able to recruit SAMHD1 via its C-terminus making it a competent substrate for the E3 ligase to mark for proteasomal degradation. The structure provides the first description of how a lentiviral accessory protein is able to subvert the cell’s normal protein degradation pathway to inactivate the cellular viral defence system. PMID:24336198

  2. Investigation of the Mesenchymal Stem Cell Compartment by Means of a Lentiviral Barcode Library.

    PubMed

    Bigildeev, A E; Cornils, K; Aranyossy, T; Sats, N V; Petinati, N A; Shipounova, I N; Surin, V L; Pshenichnikova, O S; Riecken, K; Fehse, B; Drize, N I

    2016-04-01

    The hematopoietic bone marrow microenvironment is formed by proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The MSC compartment has been less studied than the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. To characterize the structure of the MSC compartment, it is necessary to trace the fate of distinct mesenchymal cells. To do so, mesenchymal progenitors need to be marked at the single-cell level. A method for individual marking of normal and cancer stem cells based on genetic "barcodes" has been developed for the last 10 years. Such approach has not yet been applied to MSCs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using such barcoding strategy to mark MSCs and their descendants, colony-forming units of fibroblasts (CFU-Fs). Adherent cell layers (ACLs) of murine long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMCs) were transduced with a lentiviral library with barcodes consisting of 32 + 3 degenerate nucleotides. Infected ACLs were suspended, and CFU-F derived clones were obtained. DNA was isolated from each individual colony, and barcodes were analyzed in marked CFU-F-derived colonies by means of conventional polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. Barcodes were identified in 154 marked colonies. All barcodes appeared to be unique: there were no two distinct colonies bearing the same barcode. It was shown that ACLs included CFU-Fs with different proliferative potential. MSCs are located higher in the hierarchy of mesenchymal progenitors than CFU-Fs, so the presented data indicate that MSCs proliferate rarely in LTBMCs. A method of stable individual marking and comparing the markers in mesenchymal progenitor cells has been developed in this work. We show for the first time that a barcoded library of lentiviruses is an effective tool for studying stromal progenitor cells. PMID:27293094

  3. Understanding Singular Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Botteron, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    matrix yields a surprisingly simple, heuristical approximation to its singular vectors. There are correspondingly good approximations to the singular values. Such rules of thumb provide an intuitive interpretation of the singular vectors that helps explain why the SVD is so…

  4. The vector ruling protractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    The theory, structure and working of a vector slide rule is presented in this report. This instrument is used for determining a vector in magnitude and position when given its components and its moment about a point in their plane.

  5. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells. PMID:20164855

  6. In vitro functional correction of Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome type-1 by lentiviral-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Yasuhiro; Hess, Richard; Dorward, Heidi; Cullinane, Andrew R; Huizing, Marjan; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Gahl, William A; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a genetic disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding tendency and susceptibility to pulmonary fibrosis. No curative therapy is available. Genetic correction directed to the lungs, bone marrow and/or gastro-intestinal tract might provide alternative forms of treatment for the diseases multi-systemic complications. We demonstrate that lentiviral-mediated gene transfer corrects the expression and function of the HPS1 gene in patient dermal melanocytes, which opens the way to development of gene therapy for HPS. PMID:25468649

  7. Restart 68000 vector remapping

    SciTech Connect

    Gustin, J.

    1984-05-03

    The circuit described allows power-on-reset (POR) vector fetch from ROM for a 68000 microprocessor. It offers programmability of exception vectors, including the restart vector. This method eliminates the need for high-resolution, address-decoder peripheral circuitry.

  8. Rhotrix Vector Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminu, Abdulhadi

    2010-01-01

    By rhotrix we understand an object that lies in some way between (n x n)-dimensional matrices and (2n - 1) x (2n - 1)-dimensional matrices. Representation of vectors in rhotrices is different from the representation of vectors in matrices. A number of vector spaces in matrices and their properties are known. On the other hand, little seems to be…

  9. MATRIX AND VECTOR SERVICES

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-18

    PETRA V2 provides matrix and vector services and the ability construct, query, and use matrix and vector objects that are used and computed by TRILINOS solvers. It provides all basic matr5ix and vector operations for solvers in TRILINOS.

  10. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  11. Covariantized vector Galileons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Matthew; Koyama, Kazuya; Tasinato, Gianmassimo

    2016-03-01

    Vector Galileons are ghost-free systems containing higher derivative interactions of vector fields. They break the vector gauge symmetry, and the dynamics of the longitudinal vector polarizations acquire a Galileon symmetry in an appropriate decoupling limit in Minkowski space. Using an Arnowitt-Deser-Misner approach, we carefully reconsider the coupling with gravity of vector Galileons, with the aim of studying the necessary conditions to avoid the propagation of ghosts. We develop arguments that put on a more solid footing the results previously obtained in the literature. Moreover, working in analogy with the scalar counterpart, we find indications for the existence of a "beyond Horndeski" theory involving vector degrees of freedom that avoids the propagation of ghosts thanks to secondary constraints. In addition, we analyze a Higgs mechanism for generating vector Galileons through spontaneous symmetry breaking, and we present its consistent covariantization.

  12. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-05-20

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3' UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  13. MicroRNA-regulated viral vectors for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Anja; Fechner, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Safe and effective gene therapy approaches require targeted tissue-specific transfer of a therapeutic transgene. Besides traditional approaches, such as transcriptional and transductional targeting, microRNA-dependent post-transcriptional suppression of transgene expression has been emerging as powerful new technology to increase the specificity of vector-mediated transgene expression. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs and often expressed in a tissue-, lineage-, activation- or differentiation-specific pattern. They typically regulate gene expression by binding to imperfectly complementary sequences in the 3’ untranslated region (UTR) of the mRNA. To control exogenous transgene expression, tandem repeats of artificial microRNA target sites are usually incorporated into the 3’ UTR of the transgene expression cassette, leading to subsequent degradation of transgene mRNA in cells expressing the corresponding microRNA. This targeting strategy, first shown for lentiviral vectors in antigen presenting cells, has now been used for tissue-specific expression of vector-encoded therapeutic transgenes, to reduce immune response against the transgene, to control virus tropism for oncolytic virotherapy, to increase safety of live attenuated virus vaccines and to identify and select cell subsets for pluripotent stem cell therapies, respectively. This review provides an introduction into the technical mechanism underlying microRNA-regulation, highlights new developments in this field and gives an overview of applications of microRNA-regulated viral vectors for cardiac, suicide gene cancer and hematopoietic stem cell therapy, as well as for treatment of neurological and eye diseases. PMID:27226955

  14. Primary Human Hepatocytes Repopulate Livers of Mice After In Vitro Culturing and Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    PubMed

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Volz, Tassilo; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Allweiss, Lena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Warlich, Michael; Fehse, Boris; Kalff, Joerg C; Dandri, Maura; Pollok, Joerg-Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Cell-based therapies represent a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. However, therapeutic effects are limited by low cell engraftment rates. We recently introduced a technique creating human hepatocyte spheroids for potential therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether these spheroids are suitable for engraftment in diseased liver tissues. Intrasplenic spheroid transplantation into immunodeficient uPA/SCID/beige mice was performed. Hepatocyte transduction ability prior to transplantation was tested by lentiviral labeling using red-green-blue (RGB) marking. Eight weeks after transplantation, animals were sacrificed and livers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. To investigate human hepatocyte-specific gene expression profiles in mice, quantitative real-time-PCR was applied. Human albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations in mouse serum were quantified to assess the levels of human chimerism. Precultured human hepatocytes reestablished their physiological liver tissue architecture and function upon transplantation in mice. Positive immunohistochemical labeling of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that human hepatocytes retained their in vivo proliferation capacity. Expression profiles of human genes analyzed in chimeric mouse livers resembled levels determined in native human tissue. Extensive vascularization of human cell clusters was detected by demonstration of von Willebrand factor activity. To model gene therapy approaches, lentiviral transduction was performed ex vivo and fluorescent microscopic imaging revealed maintenance of RGB marking in vivo. Altogether, this is the first report demonstrating that cultured and retroviral transduced human hepatocyte spheroids are able to engraft and maintain their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:27068494

  15. Low dNTP levels are necessary but may not be sufficient for lentiviral restriction by SAMHD1.

    PubMed

    Welbourn, Sarah; Strebel, Klaus

    2016-01-15

    SAMHD1 is a cellular dNTPase that restricts lentiviral infection presumably by lowering cellular dNTP levels to below a critical threshold required for reverse transcription; however, lowering cellular dNTP levels may not be the sole mechanism of restriction. In particular, an exonuclease activity of SAMHD1 was reported to contribute to virus restriction. We further investigated the requirements for SAMHD1 restriction activity in both differentiated U937 and cycling HeLa cells. Using hydroxyurea treatment to lower baseline dNTP levels in HeLa cells, we were able to document efficient SAMHD1 restriction without significant further reduction in dNTP levels by SAMHD1. These results argue against a requirement for additional myeloid-specific host factors for SAMHD1 function but further support the notion that SAMHD1 possesses an additional dNTP-independent function contributing to lentiviral restriction. However, our own experiments failed to associate this presumed additional SAMHD1 antiviral activity with a reported nuclease activity. PMID:26655245

  16. Primary Human Hepatocytes Repopulate Livers of Mice After In Vitro Culturing and Lentiviral-Mediated Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Bierwolf, Jeanette; Volz, Tassilo; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Allweiss, Lena; Riecken, Kristoffer; Warlich, Michael; Fehse, Boris; Kalff, Joerg C.; Dandri, Maura

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies represent a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation. However, therapeutic effects are limited by low cell engraftment rates. We recently introduced a technique creating human hepatocyte spheroids for potential therapeutic application. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether these spheroids are suitable for engraftment in diseased liver tissues. Intrasplenic spheroid transplantation into immunodeficient uPA/SCID/beige mice was performed. Hepatocyte transduction ability prior to transplantation was tested by lentiviral labeling using red-green-blue (RGB) marking. Eight weeks after transplantation, animals were sacrificed and livers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. To investigate human hepatocyte-specific gene expression profiles in mice, quantitative real-time-PCR was applied. Human albumin and alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations in mouse serum were quantified to assess the levels of human chimerism. Precultured human hepatocytes reestablished their physiological liver tissue architecture and function upon transplantation in mice. Positive immunohistochemical labeling of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that human hepatocytes retained their in vivo proliferation capacity. Expression profiles of human genes analyzed in chimeric mouse livers resembled levels determined in native human tissue. Extensive vascularization of human cell clusters was detected by demonstration of von Willebrand factor activity. To model gene therapy approaches, lentiviral transduction was performed ex vivo and fluorescent microscopic imaging revealed maintenance of RGB marking in vivo. Altogether, this is the first report demonstrating that cultured and retroviral transduced human hepatocyte spheroids are able to engraft and maintain their regenerative potential in vivo. PMID:27068494

  17. Production of Retrovirus-Based Vectors in Mildly Acidic pH Conditions.

    PubMed

    Holic, Nathalie; Fenard, David

    2016-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on retroviridae are increasingly becoming a tool of choice for biomedical research and for the development of biotherapies in rare diseases or cancers. To meet the challenges of preclinical and clinical production, different steps of the production process of self-inactivating γ-retroviral (RVs) and lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been improved (e.g., transfection, media optimization, cell culture conditions). However, the increasing need for mass production of such vectors is still a challenge and could hamper their availability for therapeutic use. Recently, we observed that the use of a neutral pH during vector production is not optimal. The use of mildly acidic pH conditions (pH 6) can increase by two- to threefold the production of RVs and LVs pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) or gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) glycoproteins. Here, we describe the production protocol in mildly acidic pH conditions of GALVTR- and VSV-G-pseudotyped LVs using the transient transfection of HEK293T cells and the production protocol of GALV-pseudotyped RVs produced from a murine producer cell line. These protocols should help to achieve higher titers of vectors, thereby facilitating experimental research and therapeutic applications. PMID:27317171

  18. Increased Engraftment of Human Short Term Repopulating Hematopoietic Cells in NOD/SCID/IL2rγnull Mice by Lentiviral Expression of NUP98-HOXA10HD

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huifen; Humphries, Keith; Persons, Derek A.

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to expand human hematopoietic stem cells ex-vivo could be beneficial to the fields of clinical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and gene therapy targeted at hematopoietic stem cells. NUP98-HOXA10HD is a relatively newly discovered fusion gene that in mouse transplant experiments has been shown to increase numbers of hematopoietic stem cells. We evaluated whether this fusion gene could be used to expand engrafting human primitive CD34+ cells in an immunodeficient mouse model. Gene transfer was achieved using a lentiviral based vector. The engraftment of mobilized peripheral blood human CD34+ cells grown in culture for one week after gene transfer was evaluated 3–4 months after transplant and found to be 2–3 fold higher in the NUP98-HOXA10HD groups as compared to controls. These data suggest an expansive effect at least at the short term human repopulating cell level. Further evaluation in long term repopulating models and investment in a NUP98-HOXA10HD protein seems worthy of consideration. Additionally, the results here provide strong impetus to utilize NUP98-HOXA10HD as a tool to search for underlying genes and pathways involved in hematopoietic stem cell expansion that can be enhanced and have an even more potent expansive effect. PMID:26761813

  19. Index Sets and Vectorization

    SciTech Connect

    Keasler, J A

    2012-03-27

    Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

  20. Pancreatic cancer modeling using retrograde viral vector delivery and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic genome editing.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shin-Heng; Winters, Ian P; Wang, Jing; Naranjo, Santiago; Dudgeon, Crissy; Tamburini, Fiona B; Brady, Jennifer J; Yang, Dian; Grüner, Barbara M; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Caswell, Deborah R; Zeng, Hong; Chu, Pauline; Kim, Grace E; Carpizo, Darren R; Kim, Seung K; Winslow, Monte M

    2015-07-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a genomically diverse, prevalent, and almost invariably fatal malignancy. Although conventional genetically engineered mouse models of human PDAC have been instrumental in understanding pancreatic cancer development, these models are much too labor-intensive, expensive, and slow to perform the extensive molecular analyses needed to adequately understand this disease. Here we demonstrate that retrograde pancreatic ductal injection of either adenoviral-Cre or lentiviral-Cre vectors allows titratable initiation of pancreatic neoplasias that progress into invasive and metastatic PDAC. To enable in vivo CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene inactivation in the pancreas, we generated a Cre-regulated Cas9 allele and lentiviral vectors that express Cre and a single-guide RNA. CRISPR-mediated targeting of Lkb1 in combination with oncogenic Kras expression led to selection for inactivating genomic alterations, absence of Lkb1 protein, and rapid tumor growth that phenocopied Cre-mediated genetic deletion of Lkb1. This method will transform our ability to rapidly interrogate gene function during the development of this recalcitrant cancer. PMID:26178787

  1. Vpx mediated degradation of SAMHD1 has only a very limited effect on lentiviral transduction rate in ex vivo cultured HSPCs☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Duo; Schlaepfer, Erika; Audigé, Annette; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Ivic, Sandra; Knowlton, Caitlin N.; Kim, Baek; Keppler, Oliver T.; Speck, Roberto F.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how to achieve efficient transduction of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), while preserving their long-term ability to self-reproduce, is key for applying lentiviral-based gene engineering methods. SAMHD1 is an HIV-1 restriction factor in myeloid and resting CD4+ T cells that interferes with reverse transcription by decreasing the nucleotide pools or by its RNase activity. Here we show that SAMHD1 is expressed at high levels in HSPCs cultured in a medium enriched with cytokines. Thus, we hypothesized that degrading SAMHD1 in HSPCs would result in more efficient lentiviral transduction rates. We used viral like particles (VLPs) containing Vpx, shRNA against SAMHD1, or provided an excess of dNTPs or dNs to study this question. Regardless of the method applied, we saw no increase in the lentiviral transduction rate. The result was different when we used viruses (HR-GFP-Vpx+) which carry Vpx and encode GFP. These viruses allow assessment of the effects of Vpx specifically in the transduced cells. Using HR-GFP-Vpx+ viruses, we observed a modest but significant increase in the transduction efficiency. These data suggest that SAMHD1 has some limited efficacy in blocking reverse transcription but the major barrier for efficient lentiviral transduction occurs before reverse transcription. PMID:26207584

  2. Vpx mediated degradation of SAMHD1 has only a very limited effect on lentiviral transduction rate in ex vivo cultured HSPCs.

    PubMed

    Li, Duo; Schlaepfer, Erika; Audigé, Annette; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Ivic, Sandra; Knowlton, Caitlin N; Kim, Baek; Keppler, Oliver T; Speck, Roberto F

    2015-09-01

    Understanding how to achieve efficient transduction of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), while preserving their long-term ability to self-reproduce, is key for applying lentiviral-based gene engineering methods. SAMHD1 is an HIV-1 restriction factor in myeloid and resting CD4+ T cells that interferes with reverse transcription by decreasing the nucleotide pools or by its RNase activity. Here we show that SAMHD1 is expressed at high levels in HSPCs cultured in a medium enriched with cytokines. Thus, we hypothesized that degrading SAMHD1 in HSPCs would result in more efficient lentiviral transduction rates. We used viral like particles (VLPs) containing Vpx, shRNA against SAMHD1, or provided an excess of dNTPs or dNs to study this question. Regardless of the method applied, we saw no increase in the lentiviral transduction rate. The result was different when we used viruses (HR-GFP-Vpx+) which carry Vpx and encode GFP. These viruses allow assessment of the effects of Vpx specifically in the transduced cells. Using HR-GFP-Vpx+ viruses, we observed a modest but significant increase in the transduction efficiency. These data suggest that SAMHD1 has some limited efficacy in blocking reverse transcription but the major barrier for efficient lentiviral transduction occurs before reverse transcription. PMID:26207584

  3. Symbolic computer vector analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoutemyer, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A MACSYMA program is described which performs symbolic vector algebra and vector calculus. The program can combine and simplify symbolic expressions including dot products and cross products, together with the gradient, divergence, curl, and Laplacian operators. The distribution of these operators over sums or products is under user control, as are various other expansions, including expansion into components in any specific orthogonal coordinate system. There is also a capability for deriving the scalar or vector potential of a vector field. Examples include derivation of the partial differential equations describing fluid flow and magnetohydrodynamics, for 12 different classic orthogonal curvilinear coordinate systems.

  4. Prevention of Lethal Murine Hypophosphatasia by Neonatal Ex Vivo Gene Therapy Using Lentivirally Transduced Bone Marrow Cells.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Osamu; Miyake, Koichi; Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyake, Noriko; Igarashi, Tsutomu; Kanokoda, Chizu; Nakamura-Takahashi, Aki; Kinoshita, Hideaki; Noguchi, Taku; Abe, Shinichi; Narisawa, Sonoko; Millán, José Luis; Okada, Takashi; Shimada, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inherited skeletal and dental disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene that encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNALP). The major symptoms of severe forms of the disease are bone defects, respiratory insufficiency, and epileptic seizures. In 2015, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant bone-targeted TNALP with deca-aspartate (D10) motif was approved to treat pediatric HPP patients in Japan, Canada, and Europe. However, the ERT requires repeated subcutaneous administration of the enzyme because of the short half-life in serum. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of neonatal ex vivo gene therapy in TNALP knockout (Akp2(-/-)) HPP mice using lentivirally transduced bone marrow cells (BMC) expressing bone-targeted TNALP in which a D10 sequence was linked to the C-terminus of soluble TNALP (TNALP-D10). The Akp2(-/-) mice usually die within 20 days because of growth failure, epileptic seizures, and hypomineralization. However, an intravenous transplantation of BMC expressing TNALP-D10 (ALP-BMC) into neonatal Akp2(-/-) mice prolonged survival of the mice with improved bone mineralization compared with untransduced BMC-transplanted Akp2(-/-) mice. The treated Akp2(-/-) mice were normal in appearance and experienced no seizures during the experimental period. The lentivirally transduced BMC were efficiently engrafted in the recipient mice and supplied TNALP-D10 continuously at a therapeutic level for at least 3 months. Moreover, TNALP-D10 overexpression did not affect multilineage reconstitution in the recipient mice. The plasma ALP activity was sustained at high levels in the treated mice, and tissue ALP activity was selectively detected on bone surfaces, not in the kidneys or other organs. No ectopic calcification was observed in the ALP-BMC-treated mice. These results indicate that lentivirally transduced BMC can serve as a reservoir for stem cell-based ERT to rescue the Akp2

  5. Vector theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Pitrou, Cyril; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2010-03-15

    This article provides a general study of the Hamiltonian stability and the hyperbolicity of vector field models involving both a general function of the Faraday tensor and its dual, f(F{sup 2},FF-tilde), as well as a Proca potential for the vector field, V(A{sup 2}). In particular it is demonstrated that theories involving only f(F{sup 2}) do not satisfy the hyperbolicity conditions. It is then shown that in this class of models, the cosmological dynamics always dilutes the vector field. In the case of a nonminimal coupling to gravity, it is established that theories involving Rf(A{sup 2}) or Rf(F{sup 2}) are generically pathologic. To finish, we exhibit a model where the vector field is not diluted during the cosmological evolution, because of a nonminimal vector field-curvature coupling which maintains second-order field equations. The relevance of such models for cosmology is discussed.

  6. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  7. Vector generator scan converter

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  8. Alpharetroviral Vector-mediated Gene Therapy for X-CGD: Functional Correction and Lack of Aberrant Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Brendel, Christian; Suerth, Julia D.; Mueller-Kuller, Uta; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Schwäble, Joachim; Pahujani, Shweta; Kunkel, Hana; Schambach, Axel; Baum, Christopher; Grez, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Comparative integrome analysis has revealed that the most neutral integration pattern among retroviruses is attributed to alpharetroviruses. We chose X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) as model to evaluate the potential of self-inactivating (SIN) alpharetroviral vectors for gene therapy of monogenic diseases. Therefore, we combined the alpharetroviral vector backbone with the elongation factor-1α short promoter, both considered to possess a low genotoxic profile, to drive transgene (gp91phox) expression. Following efficient transduction transgene expression was sustained and provided functional correction of the CGD phenotype in a cell line model at low vector copy number. Further analysis in a murine X-CGD transplantation model revealed gene-marking of bone marrow cells and oxidase positive granulocytes in peripheral blood. Transduction of human X-CGD CD34+ cells provided functional correction up to wild-type levels and long-term expression upon transplantation into a humanized mouse model. In contrast to lentiviral vectors, no aberrantly spliced transcripts containing cellular exons fused to alpharetroviral sequences were found in transduced cells, implying that the safety profile of alpharetroviral vectors may extend beyond their neutral integration profile. Taken together, this highlights the potential of this SIN alpharetroviral system as a platform for new candidate vectors for future gene therapy of hematopoietic disorders. PMID:23207695

  9. Lentiviral hepatitis B pseudotype entry requires sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and additional hepatocyte-specific factors.

    PubMed

    Meredith, L W; Hu, K; Cheng, X; Howard, C R; Baumert, T F; Balfe, P; van de Graaf, K F; Protzer, U; McKeating, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the world's major unconquered infections, resulting in progressive liver disease, and current treatments rarely cure infection. A limitation to discovering new therapies is our limited knowledge of HBV entry and dissemination pathways that hinders the development of in vitro culture systems. To address this gap in our understanding we optimized the genesis of infectious lentiviral pseudoparticles (HBVpps). The recent discovery that the bile salt transporter sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) acts as a receptor for HBV enabled us to assess the receptor dependency of HBVpp infection. HBVpps preferentially infect hepatoma cells expressing NTCP, whereas other non-liver cells engineered to express NTCP do not support infection, suggesting that additional hepatocyte-specific factors are required for HBVpp internalization. These results highlight the value of the HBVpp system to dissect the pathways of HBV entry and dissemination. PMID:26474824

  10. Line Integral of a Vector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balabanian, Norman

    This programed booklet is designed for the engineering student who understands and can use vector and unit vector notation, components of a vector, parallel law of vector addition, and the dot product of two vectors. Content begins with work done by a force in moving a body a certain distance along some path. For each of the examples and problem…

  11. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  12. Lentiviral vector-mediated down-regulation of Notch1 in endometrial stem cells results in proliferation and migration in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Liu, Rong; Xiong, Wei; Pu, Demin; Wang, Shixuan; Li, Tian

    2016-10-15

    The recent characterization of stem/progenitor cells in the endometrium has shed new light for pathogenesis of endometriosis. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of Notch1, known as a cell fate regulator, in the mechanism of endometriosis. Influence of Notch1 on endometrial stem cells proliferation and migration was evaluated by knocking down Notch1 expression using shRNA. Furthermore, human endometrial stromal and epithelial stem cells with or without LV-Notch1-shRNA were injected into the peritoneal cavity of nude mice, to assess the in vivo effects of a specific antagonist of Notch1 on the progression of endometriosis. The results showed that LV-Notch1-shRNA led to a significant decline of clonogenicity and migration in human endometrial stem cells in vitro, as well as the size of endometriotic lesions in murine models. These data provide evidence that specific inhibition of Notch1 alters endometriotic tissue growth and progression, and may represent a promising potential therapeutic avenue. PMID:27389878

  13. Understanding Vector Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curjel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities that help students understand the idea of a vector field. Included are definitions, flow lines, tangential and normal components along curves, flux and work, field conservation, and differential equations. (KR)

  14. Bloch vector projection noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Bacon, A. M.; Zhao, H.-Z.; Thomas, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    In the optical measurement of the Bloch vector components describing a system of N two-level atoms, the quantum fluctuations in these components are coupled into the measuring optical field. This paper develops the quantum theory of optical measurement of Bloch vector projection noise. The preparation and probing of coherence in an effective two-level system consisting of the two ground states in an atomic three-level lambda-scheme are analyzed.

  15. Poynting-vector filter

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.

    2011-08-02

    A determination is made of frequency components associated with a particular bearing or location resulting from sources emitting electromagnetic-wave energy for which a Poynting-Vector can be defined. The broadband frequency components associated with a specific direction or location of interest are isolated from other components in the power spectrum that are not associated with the direction or location of interest. The collection of pointing vectors can be used to characterize the source.

  16. [Expression and identification of eukaryotic expression vectors of Brucella melitensis lipoprotein OMP19].

    PubMed

    He, Zuoping; Luo, Peifang; Hu, Feihuan; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Chengyao

    2016-04-01

    Objective To construct eukaryotic expression vectors carrying Brucella melitensis outer membrane protein 19 (OMP19), express them in transfected Huh7.5.1 and JEG-3 cells, and analyze their role in cell apoptosis. Methods Brucella melitensis lipidated OMP19 (L-OMP19) gene and unlipidated OMP19 (U-OMP19) gene were amplified by PCR and inserted into the vector pZeroBack/blunt. The correct L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 genes verified by XbaI and BamHI double digestion and sequencing were cloned into the lentivirus expression vector pHAGE-CMV-MCS-IZsGreen to construct vectors pHAGE-L-OMP19 and pHAGE-U-OMP19, which were separately transfected into 293FT cells, Huh7.5.1 and JEG-3 cells. L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 in the cells were detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence technique. Flow cytometry combined with annexin V-PE/7-AAD staining was used to detect the cell apoptosis. Results The lentiviral vectors pHAGE-L-OMP19 and pHAGE-U-OMP19 were constructed correctly and the recombinant lipoproteins L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 expressed in the above cells were well recognized by the specific antibodies against L-OMP19 in Western blotting and immunofluorescence technique. L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 induced JEG-3 cell death, but did not induce the apoptosis of Huh7.5.1 cells. Conclusion The eukaryotic expression vectors of L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 have been constructed successfully. Recombinant lipoproteins L-OMP19 and U-OMP19 expressed in cells have a good antigenicity, which could be used as experimental materials for the research on the relationship between host cells and lipoproteins in Brucella infection. PMID:27053612

  17. Suppressing the malignant phenotypes of glioma cells by lentiviral delivery of small hairpin RNA targeting hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chang Gui; Wu, William K K; Feng, Su Yin; Yu, Jun; Shao, Jun Fei; He, Gui Mei

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic microenvironment of solid tumors is known to shape malignant phenotypes of cancer cells through the dimeric transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1. In the present study, the therapeutic effect of targeting α subunit of HIF-1 in glioma cells via lentiviral delivery of small hairpin RNA (shRNA) was evaluated. Data from quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that HIF-1α was progressively upregulated during the development of gliomas. Lentiviral shRNA targeting HIF-1α led to substantial loss of cell viability, G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and impairment of cell motility and invasiveness in human glioma U87MG cells. Xenograft experiments in nude mice further showed that HIF-1α-shRNA inhibited tumor growth and caused persistent repression of HIF-1α and its target genes, including VEGF, GLUT1 and MMP2, up to 25 days post-inoculation. Taken together, lentiviral delivery of shRNA is a promising therapeutic approach for targeting HIF-1α in glioma. PMID:24228093

  18. Development of a murine ocular posterior segment explant culture for the study of intravitreous vector delivery

    PubMed Central

    Denk, Nora; Misra, Vikram; Sandmeyer, Lynne S.; Bauer, Bianca B.; Singh, Jaswant; Forsyth, George W.; Grahn, Bruce H.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a murine retinal/choroidal/scleral explant culture system to facilitate the intravitreous delivery of vectors. Posterior segment explants from adult mice of 2 different age groups (4 wk and 15 wk) were cultured in serum-free medium for variable time periods. Tissue viability was assessed by gross morphology, cell survival quantification, activated caspase-3 expression, and immunohistochemistry. To model ocular gene therapy, explants were exposed to varying transducing units of a lentiviral vector expressing the gene for green fluorescent protein for 48 h. Explant retinal cells remained viable for approximately 1 wk, although the ganglion cell layer developed apoptosis between 4 and 7 d. Following vector infusion into the posterior segment cups, viral transduction was noted in multiple retinal layers in both age groups. An age of donor mouse influence was noted and older mice did not transduce as well as younger mice. This explant offers an easily managed posterior segment ocular culture with minimum disturbance of the tissue, and may be useful for investigating methods of enhancing retinal gene therapy under controlled conditions. PMID:25673906

  19. Vector WIMP miracle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Kakizaki, Mitsuru; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Seto, Osamu

    2012-07-01

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) is well known to be a good candidate for dark matter, and it is also predicted by many new physics models beyond the standard model at the TeV scale. We found that, if the WIMP is a vector particle (spin-one particle) which is associated with some gauge symmetry broken at the TeV scale, the Higgs mass is often predicted to be 120-125 GeV, which is very consistent with the result of Higgs searches recently reported by ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the Large Hadron Collider experiment. In this Letter, we consider the vector WIMP using a non-linear sigma model in order to confirm this result as general as possible in a bottom-up approach. Near-future prospects to detect the vector WIMP at both direct and indirect detection experiments of dark matter are also discussed.

  20. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  1. Vectorized garbage collection

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, A.W.; Bendiksen, A.

    1988-01-01

    Garbage collection can be done in vector mode on supercomputers like the Cray-2 and the Cyber 205. Both copying collection and mark-and-sweep can be expressed as breadth-first searches in which the queue can be processed in parallel. The authors have designed a copying garbage collector whose inner loop works entirely in vector mode. The only significant limitation of the algorithm is that if the size of the records is not constant, the implementation becomes much more complicated. The authors give performance measurements of the algorithm as implemented for Lisp CONS cells on the Cyber 205. Vector-mode garbage collection performs up to 9 times faster than scalar-mode collection.

  2. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Kate McElroy; Vanlandingham, Dana L.

    2014-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family. PMID:25402172

  3. Scalar-vector bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejon-Barrera, Fernando; Robbins, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We work out all of the details required for implementation of the conformal bootstrap program applied to the four-point function of two scalars and two vectors in an abstract conformal field theory in arbitrary dimension. This includes a review of which tensor structures make appearances, a construction of the projectors onto the required mixed symmetry representations, and a computation of the conformal blocks for all possible operators which can be exchanged. These blocks are presented as differential operators acting upon the previously known scalar conformal blocks. Finally, we set up the bootstrap equations which implement crossing symmetry. Special attention is given to the case of conserved vectors, where several simplifications occur.

  4. Lentiviral silencing of GSK-3β in adult dentate gyrus impairs contextual fear memory and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Chew, Benjamin; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Ng, Teclise; Ma, Dongliang; Dasgupta, Ananya; Neo, Sin Hui; Zhao, Jing; Zhong, Zhong; Bichler, Zoë; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2015-01-01

    Attempts have been made to use glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β) inhibitors for prophylactic treatment of neurocognitive conditions. However the use of lithium, a non-specific inhibitor of GSK3β results in mild cognitive impairment in humans. The effects of global GSK3β inhibition or knockout on learning and memory in healthy adult mice are also inconclusive. Our study aims to better understand the role of GSK3β in learning and memory through a more regionally, targeted approach, specifically performing lentiviral-mediated knockdown of GSK3β within the dentate gyrus (DG). DG-GSK3β-silenced mice showed impaired contextual fear memory retrieval. However, cue fear memory, spatial memory, locomotor activity and anxiety levels were similar to control. These GSK3β-silenced mice also showed increased induction and maintenance of DG long-term potentiation (DG-LTP) compared to control animals. Thus, this region-specific, targeted knockdown of GSK3β in the DG provides better understanding on the role of GSK3β in learning and memory. PMID:26157370

  5. Variability in assays used for detection of lentiviral infection in bobcats (Lynx rufus), pumas (Puma concolor), and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Kays, R.W.; Riley, S.P.D.; Boyce, W.M.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    Although lentiviruses similar to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are known to infect numerous felid species, the relative utility of assays used for detecting lentiviral infection has not been compared for many of these hosts. We tested bobcats (Lynx rufus), pumas (Felis concolor), and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) for exposure to lentivirus using five different assays: puma lentivirus (PLV), African lion lentivirus (LLV), and domestic cat FIV-based immunoblots, a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Puma lentivirus immunoblots identified more seropositive individuals than the other antibody-detection assays. The commercial ELISA provided a fair ability to recognize seropositive samples when compared with PLV immunoblot for screening bobcats and ocelots, but not pumas. Polymerase chain reaction identified fewer positive samples than PLV immunoblot for all three species. Immunoblot results were equivalent whether the sample tested was serum, plasma, or whole blood. The results from this study and previous investigations suggest that the PLV immunoblot has the greatest ability to detect reactive samples when screening wild felids of North America and is unlikely to produce false positive results. However, the commercial ELISA kit may provide ap adequate alternative for screening of some species and is more easily adapted to field conditions. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  6. Live Cell Imaging of Primary Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes Following Adenoviral and Lentiviral Transduction Using Confocal Spinning Disk Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Takashi; Lanahan, Anthony; Woolls, Melissa J.; Li, Na; Tirziu, Daniela; Murakami, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes are useful in basic in vitro cardiovascular research because they can be easily isolated in large numbers in a single procedure. Due to advances in microscope technology it is relatively easy to capture live cell images for the purpose of investigating cellular events in real time with minimal concern regarding phototoxicity to the cells. This protocol describes how to take live cell timelapse images of primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes using a confocal spinning disk microscope following lentiviral and adenoviral transduction to modulate properties of the cell. The application of two different types of viruses makes it easier to achieve an appropriate transduction rate and expression levels for two different genes. Well focused live cell images can be obtained using the microscope’s autofocus system, which maintains stable focus for long time periods. Applying this method, the functions of exogenously engineered proteins expressed in cultured primary cells can be analyzed. Additionally, this system can be used to examine the functions of genes through the use of siRNAs as well as of chemical modulators. PMID:24998400

  7. Lentivirally Engineered DC activate AFP-specific T cells which Inhibit Hepatocellular Carcinoma Growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Fu, Xiaohui; Song, Zhenshun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Lu, Chongde; Ding, Guanghui; Wu, Mengchao

    2012-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a tumor-associated antigen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is an established biomarker for HCC. In this study, we created a lentivirus expressing the AFP antigen and investigated the antitumor activity of AFP-specific CD8+ T cells, with and without CD4+ T cells, which were activated by either AFP peptide-pulsed or Lenti-AFP-engineered DC in vitro and in vivo. AFP-specific T cells could efficiently kill HepG2 HCC cells, and produced IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, perforin and granzyme B, with minimal production of IL-10 (a negative regulator of T cell activation). Both strategies activated AFP-specific T cells, but the lentiviral strategy was superior by several measures. Data also support an impact of CD4+ T cells in supporting anti-tumor activity. In vivo studies in a xenograft HCC tumor model also showed that AFP-specific T cells could markedly suppress HCC tumor formation and morbidity in tumor-bearing nude mice, as well as regulate serum levels of related cytokines and antitumor molecules. In parallel with human in vitro T cell cultures, the in vivo model demonstrated superior anti-tumor effects and Th1-skewing with Lenti-AFP-DC. This study supports the superiority of a full-length antigen lentivirus-based DC vaccine strategy over peptides, and provides new insight into the design of DC-based vaccines. PMID:21491085

  8. Variability in assays used for detection of lentiviral infection in bobcats (Lynx rufus), pumas (Puma concolor), and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis).

    PubMed

    Franklin, Samuel P; Troyer, Jennifer L; Terwee, Julie A; Lyren, Lisa M; Kays, Roland W; Riley, Seth P D; Boyce, Walter M; Crooks, Kevin R; Vandewoude, Sue

    2007-10-01

    Although lentiviruses similar to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are known to infect numerous felid species, the relative utility of assays used for detecting lentiviral infection has not been compared for many of these hosts. We tested bobcats (Lynx rufus), pumas (Felis concolor), and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) for exposure to lentivirus using five different assays: puma lentivirus (PLV), African lion lentivirus (LLV), and domestic cat FIV-based immunoblots, a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Puma lentivirus immunoblots identified more seropositive individuals than the other antibody-detection assays. The commercial ELISA provided a fair ability to recognize seropositive samples when compared with PLV immunoblot for screening bobcats and ocelots, but not pumas. Polymerase chain reaction identified fewer positive samples than PLV immunoblot for all three species. Immunoblot results were equivalent whether the sample tested was serum, plasma, or whole blood. The results from this study and previous investigations suggest that the PLV immunoblot has the greatest ability to detect reactive samples when screening wild felids of North America and is unlikely to produce false positive results. However, the commercial ELISA kit may provide an adequate alternative for screening of some species and is more easily adapted to field conditions. PMID:17984266

  9. Live cell imaging of primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes following adenoviral and lentiviral transduction using confocal spinning disk microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takashi; Lanahan, Anthony; Woolls, Melissa J; Li, Na; Tirziu, Daniela; Murakami, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes are useful in basic in vitro cardiovascular research because they can be easily isolated in large numbers in a single procedure. Due to advances in microscope technology it is relatively easy to capture live cell images for the purpose of investigating cellular events in real time with minimal concern regarding phototoxicity to the cells. This protocol describes how to take live cell timelapse images of primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes using a confocal spinning disk microscope following lentiviral and adenoviral transduction to modulate properties of the cell. The application of two different types of viruses makes it easier to achieve an appropriate transduction rate and expression levels for two different genes. Well focused live cell images can be obtained using the microscope's autofocus system, which maintains stable focus for long time periods. Applying this method, the functions of exogenously engineered proteins expressed in cultured primary cells can be analyzed. Additionally, this system can be used to examine the functions of genes through the use of siRNAs as well as of chemical modulators. PMID:24998400

  10. Lentiviral silencing of GSK-3β in adult dentate gyrus impairs contextual fear memory and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Benjamin; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Ng, Teclise; Ma, Dongliang; Dasgupta, Ananya; Neo, Sin Hui; Zhao, Jing; Zhong, Zhong; Bichler, Zoë; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Goh, Eyleen L. K.

    2015-01-01

    Attempts have been made to use glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β) inhibitors for prophylactic treatment of neurocognitive conditions. However the use of lithium, a non-specific inhibitor of GSK3β results in mild cognitive impairment in humans. The effects of global GSK3β inhibition or knockout on learning and memory in healthy adult mice are also inconclusive. Our study aims to better understand the role of GSK3β in learning and memory through a more regionally, targeted approach, specifically performing lentiviral-mediated knockdown of GSK3β within the dentate gyrus (DG). DG-GSK3β-silenced mice showed impaired contextual fear memory retrieval. However, cue fear memory, spatial memory, locomotor activity and anxiety levels were similar to control. These GSK3β-silenced mice also showed increased induction and maintenance of DG long-term potentiation (DG-LTP) compared to control animals. Thus, this region-specific, targeted knockdown of GSK3β in the DG provides better understanding on the role of GSK3β in learning and memory. PMID:26157370

  11. Support vector machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garay, Michael J.; Mazzoni, Dominic; Davies, Roger; Wagstaff, Kiri

    2004-01-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are a type of supervised learning algorith,, other examples of which are Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), Decision Trees, and Naive Bayesian Classifiers. Supervised learning algorithms are used to classify objects labled by a 'supervisor' - typically a human 'expert.'.

  12. Singular Vectors' Subtle Secrets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David; Lachance, Michael; Remski, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Social scientists use adjacency tables to discover influence networks within and among groups. Building on work by Moler and Morrison, we use ordered pairs from the components of the first and second singular vectors of adjacency matrices as tools to distinguish these groups and to identify particularly strong or weak individuals.

  13. Killing vectors and anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Krisch, J. P.; Glass, E. N.

    2009-08-15

    We consider an action that can generate fluids with three unequal stresses for metrics with a spacelike Killing vector. The parameters in the action are directly related to the stress anisotropies. The field equations following from the action are applied to an anisotropic cosmological expansion and an extension of the Gott-Hiscock cosmic string.

  14. Vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    2009-08-01

    Vector-borne diseases have been the scourge of man and animals since the beginning of time. Historically, these are the diseases that caused the great plagues such as the 'Black Death' in Europe in the 14th Century and the epidemics of yellow fever that plagued the development of the New World. Others, such as Nagana, contributed to the lack of development in Africa for many years. At the turn of the 20th Century, vector-borne diseases were among the most serious public and animal health problems in the world. For the most part, these diseases were controlled by the middle of the 20th Century through the application of knowledge about their natural history along with the judicious use of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) and other residual insecticides to interrupt the transmission cycle between arthropod and vertebrate host. However, this success initiated a period of complacency in the 1960s and 1970s, which resulted in the redirection of resources away from prevention and control of vector-borne diseases. The 1970s was also a time in which there were major changes to public health policy. Global trends, combined with changes in animal husbandry, urbanisation, modern transportation and globalisation, have resulted in a global re-emergence of epidemic vector-borne diseases affecting both humans and animals over the past 30 years. PMID:20128467

  15. Research in vector control

    PubMed Central

    Quarterman, K. D.

    1963-01-01

    Current research on vector control is directed mainly at finding answers to the problem of resistance. Despite considerable advances in knowledge of the genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and ecology of resistant vectors, the only practical answer found so far has been the development of new, substitute insecticides. At present the operational needs of existing large-scale control or eradication programmes swallow up much of the funds, personnel and facilities that might otherwise be devoted to basic research. Moreover, to back up these programmes, there is a continuing need for applied research on such questions as the packaging of pesticides, improvements in equipment and the development of new formulations. The author gives examples of applied research already carried out or in progress and indicates some areas of both basic and applied research demanding urgent attention. Like other participants in the seminar, he stresses the fundamental importance of ecological studies. He also examines the concept of integrated vector control and points out that the realization of this concept presupposes close co-ordination between basic and applied research, laboratory and field studies, and investigations on chemical and non-chemical vector control measures. PMID:20604177

  16. Direct Lentiviral-Cyclooxygenase 2 Application to the Tendon-Bone Interface Promotes Osteointegration and Enhances Return of the Pull-Out Tensile Strength of the Tendon Graft in a Rat Model of Biceps Tenodesis

    PubMed Central

    Wergedal, Jon E.; Stiffel, Virginia; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine if direct application of the lentiviral (LV)-cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) vector to the tendon-bone interface would promote osteointegration of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy was chosen for investigation because a similar COX2 gene transfer strategy promoted bony bridging of the fracture gap during bone repair, which involves similar histologic transitions that occur in osteointegration. Briefly, a 1.14-mm diameter tunnel was drilled in the mid-groove of the humerus of adult Fischer 344 rats. The LV-COX2 or βgal control vector was applied directly into the bone tunnel and onto the end of the tendon graft, which was then pulled into the bone tunnel. A poly-L-lactide pin was press-fitted into the tunnel as interference fixation. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 5, or 8 weeks for histology analysis of osteointegration. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy enhanced neo-chondrogenesis at the tendon-bone interface but with only marginal effect on de novo bone formation. The tendon-bone interface of the LV-COX2-treated tenodesis showed the well-defined tendon-to-fibrocartilage-to-bone histologic transitions that are indicative of osteointegration of the tendon graft. The LV-COX2 in vivo gene transfer strategy also significantly enhanced angiogenesis at the tendon-bone interface. To determine if the increased osteointegration was translated into an improved pull-out mechanical strength property, the pull-out tensile strength of the LV-COX2-treated tendon grafts was determined with a pull-out mechanical testing assay. The LV-COX2 strategy yielded a significant improvement in the return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft after 8 weeks. In conclusion, the COX2-based in vivo gene transfer strategy enhanced angiogenesis, osteointegration and improved return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft. Thus, this strategy has great potential to be developed into an effective therapy to

  17. Direct lentiviral-cyclooxygenase 2 application to the tendon-bone interface promotes osteointegration and enhances return of the pull-out tensile strength of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis.

    PubMed

    Rundle, Charles H; Chen, Shin-Tai; Coen, Michael J; Wergedal, Jon E; Stiffel, Virginia; Lau, Kin-Hing William

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to determine if direct application of the lentiviral (LV)-cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) vector to the tendon-bone interface would promote osteointegration of the tendon graft in a rat model of biceps tenodesis. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy was chosen for investigation because a similar COX2 gene transfer strategy promoted bony bridging of the fracture gap during bone repair, which involves similar histologic transitions that occur in osteointegration. Briefly, a 1.14-mm diameter tunnel was drilled in the mid-groove of the humerus of adult Fischer 344 rats. The LV-COX2 or βgal control vector was applied directly into the bone tunnel and onto the end of the tendon graft, which was then pulled into the bone tunnel. A poly-L-lactide pin was press-fitted into the tunnel as interference fixation. Animals were sacrificed at 3, 5, or 8 weeks for histology analysis of osteointegration. The LV-COX2 gene transfer strategy enhanced neo-chondrogenesis at the tendon-bone interface but with only marginal effect on de novo bone formation. The tendon-bone interface of the LV-COX2-treated tenodesis showed the well-defined tendon-to-fibrocartilage-to-bone histologic transitions that are indicative of osteointegration of the tendon graft. The LV-COX2 in vivo gene transfer strategy also significantly enhanced angiogenesis at the tendon-bone interface. To determine if the increased osteointegration was translated into an improved pull-out mechanical strength property, the pull-out tensile strength of the LV-COX2-treated tendon grafts was determined with a pull-out mechanical testing assay. The LV-COX2 strategy yielded a significant improvement in the return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft after 8 weeks. In conclusion, the COX2-based in vivo gene transfer strategy enhanced angiogenesis, osteointegration and improved return of the pull-out strength of the tendon graft. Thus, this strategy has great potential to be developed into an effective therapy to

  18. Preloadable vector sensitive latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acres, William R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A preloadable vector-sensitive latch which automatically releases when the force vector from a latch memebr reaches a specified release angle is presented. In addition, it contains means to remove clearance between the latched members and to preload the latch to prevent separation at angles less than the specified release angle. The latch comprises a triangular main link, a free link connected between a first corner of the main link and a yoke member, a housing, and an actuator connected between the yoke member and the housing. A return spring bias means connects the main link to a portion of the housing. A second corner of the main link is slidably and pivotally connected to the housing via a slot in a web portion of the housing. The latch housing has a rigid docking ring alignable with a mating locking ring which is engageable by a locking roller journalled on the third corner of the triangular main link.

  19. Vector Magnetograph Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1996-01-01

    This report covers work performed during the period of November 1994 through March 1996 on the design of a Space-borne Solar Vector Magnetograph. This work has been performed as part of a design team under the supervision of Dr. Mona Hagyard and Dr. Alan Gary of the Space Science Laboratory. Many tasks were performed and this report documents the results from some of those tasks, each contained in the corresponding appendix. Appendices are organized in chronological order.

  20. Some experiences with Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roy R., Jr.; Su, Tzu-Jeng; Kim, Hyoung M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors for reduced-order modeling in structural dynamics and for control of flexible structures. Krylov vectors and Lanczos vectors are defined and illustrated, and several applications that have been under study at The University of Texas at Austin are reviewed: model reduction for undamped structural dynamics systems, component mode synthesis using Krylov vectors, model reduction of damped structural dynamics systems, and one-sided and two-sided unsymmetric block-Lanczos model-reduction algorithms.

  1. Isomap based supporting vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, W. N.

    2015-12-01

    This research presents a new isomap based supporting vector machine method. Isomap is a dimension reduction method which is able to analyze nonlinear relationship of data on manifolds. Accordingly, support vector machine is established on the isomap manifold to classify given and predict unknown data. A case study of the isomap based supporting vector machine for environmental planning problems is conducted.

  2. Modulators of the microRNA biogenesis pathway via arrayed lentiviral enabled RNAi screening for drug and biomarker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Shum, David; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Djaballah, Hakim

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous and conserved non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. Although the first miRNA was discovered well over sixteen years ago, little is known about their biogenesis and it is only recently that we have begun to understand their scope and diversity. For this purpose, we performed an RNAi screen aimed at identifying genes involved in their biogenesis pathway with a potential use as biomarkers. Using a previously developed miRNA 21 (miR-21) EGFP-based biosensor cell based assay monitoring green fluorescence enhancements, we performed an arrayed short hairpin RNA (shRNA) screen against a lentiviral particle ready TRC1 library covering 16,039 genes in 384-well plate format, and interrogating the genome one gene at a time building a panoramic view of endogenous miRNA activity. Using the BDA method for RNAi data analysis, we nominate 497 gene candidates the knockdown of which increased the EGFP fluorescence and yielding an initial hit rate of 3.09%; of which only 22, with reported validated clones, are deemed high-confidence gene candidates. An unexpected and surprising result was that only DROSHA was identified as a hit out of the seven core essential miRNA biogenesis genes; suggesting that perhaps intracellular shRNA processing into the correct duplex may be cell dependent and with differential outcome. Biological classification revealed several major control junctions among them genes involved in transport and vesicular trafficking. In summary, we report on 22 high confidence gene candidate regulators of miRNA biogenesis with potential use in drug and biomarker discovery. PMID:23977983

  3. Vector representation of tourmaline compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Donald M.

    1989-01-01

    The vector method for representing mineral compositions of amphibole and mica groups is applied to the tourmaline group. Consideration is given to the methods for drawing the relevant vector diagrams, relating the exchange vectors to one another, and contouring the diagrams for constant values of Na, Ca, Li, Fe, Mg, Al, Si, and OH. The method is used to depict a wide range of possible tourmaline end-member compositions and solid solutions, starting from a single point. In addition to vector depictions of multicomponent natural tourmalines, vectors are presented for simpler systems such as (Na,Al)-tourmalines, alkali-free tourmalines, and elbaites.

  4. Vector Theory of Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. S.

    So far, works on ultrasonic diffraction imaging are based on scalar theory of sound wave. This is not correct as sound has vector nature. But when sound propagates in solids, its vector nature has to be considered as polarization occurs and transverse wave as well as longitudinal wave will appear. Vector theory is especially needed when the obstacle size is smaller than the wavelength. We use the Smythe-Kirchhoff approach for the vector theory of diffraction. We derive the image formation theory based on the vector diffraction theory. The effect of polarization on acoustical imaging is discussed.

  5. Robust RNAi enhancement via human Argonaute-2 overexpression from plasmids, viral vectors and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Börner, Kathleen; Niopek, Dominik; Cotugno, Gabriella; Kaldenbach, Michaela; Pankert, Teresa; Willemsen, Joschka; Zhang, Xian; Schürmann, Nina; Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Serva, Andrius; Hiet, Marie-Sophie; Wiedtke, Ellen; Castoldi, Mirco; Starkuviene, Vytaute; Erfle, Holger; Gilbert, Daniel F.; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Boutros, Michael; Binder, Marco; Streetz, Konrad; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Grimm, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    As the only mammalian Argonaute protein capable of directly cleaving mRNAs in a small RNA-guided manner, Argonaute-2 (Ago2) is a keyplayer in RNA interference (RNAi) silencing via small interfering (si) or short hairpin (sh) RNAs. It is also a rate-limiting factor whose saturation by si/shRNAs limits RNAi efficiency and causes numerous adverse side effects. Here, we report a set of versatile tools and widely applicable strategies for transient or stable Ago2 co-expression, which overcome these concerns. Specifically, we engineered plasmids and viral vectors to co-encode a codon-optimized human Ago2 cDNA along with custom shRNAs. Furthermore, we stably integrated this Ago2 cDNA into a panel of standard human cell lines via plasmid transfection or lentiviral transduction. Using various endo- or exogenous targets, we demonstrate the potential of all three strategies to boost mRNA silencing efficiencies in cell culture by up to 10-fold, and to facilitate combinatorial knockdowns. Importantly, these robust improvements were reflected by augmented RNAi phenotypes and accompanied by reduced off-targeting effects. We moreover show that Ago2/shRNA-co-encoding vectors can enhance and prolong transgene silencing in livers of adult mice, while concurrently alleviating hepatotoxicity. Our customizable reagents and avenues should broadly improve future in vitro and in vivo RNAi experiments in mammalian systems. PMID:24049077

  6. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Scoles, Glen A; Ueti, Massaro W

    2015-01-01

    Equine piroplasmosis is a disease of Equidae, including horses, donkeys, mules, and zebras, caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick vectors, and although they have inherent differences they are categorized together because they cause similar pathology and have similar morphologies, life cycles, and vector relationships. To complete their life cycle, these parasites must undergo a complex series of developmental events, including sexual-stage development in their tick vectors. Consequently, ticks are the definitive hosts as well as vectors for these parasites, and the vector relationship is restricted to a few competent tick species. Because the vector relationship is critical to the epidemiology of these parasites, we highlight current knowledge of the vector ecology of these tick-borne equine pathogens, emphasizing tick transmissibility and potential control strategies to prevent their spread. PMID:25564746

  7. A versatile modular vector system for rapid combinatorial mammalian genetics.

    PubMed

    Albers, Joachim; Danzer, Claudia; Rechsteiner, Markus; Lehmann, Holger; Brandt, Laura P; Hejhal, Tomas; Catalano, Antonella; Busenhart, Philipp; Gonçalves, Ana Filipa; Brandt, Simone; Bode, Peter K; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Wild, Peter J; Frew, Ian J

    2015-04-01

    Here, we describe the multiple lentiviral expression (MuLE) system that allows multiple genetic alterations to be introduced simultaneously into mammalian cells. We created a toolbox of MuLE vectors that constitute a flexible, modular system for the rapid engineering of complex polycistronic lentiviruses, allowing combinatorial gene overexpression, gene knockdown, Cre-mediated gene deletion, or CRISPR/Cas9-mediated (where CRISPR indicates clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) gene mutation, together with expression of fluorescent or enzymatic reporters for cellular assays and animal imaging. Examples of tumor engineering were used to illustrate the speed and versatility of performing combinatorial genetics using the MuLE system. By transducing cultured primary mouse cells with single MuLE lentiviruses, we engineered tumors containing up to 5 different genetic alterations, identified genetic dependencies of molecularly defined tumors, conducted genetic interaction screens, and induced the simultaneous CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of 3 tumor-suppressor genes. Intramuscular injection of MuLE viruses expressing oncogenic H-RasG12V together with combinations of knockdowns of the tumor suppressors cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (Cdkn2a), transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53), and phosphatase and tensin homolog (Pten) allowed the generation of 3 murine sarcoma models, demonstrating that genetically defined autochthonous tumors can be rapidly generated and quantitatively monitored via direct injection of polycistronic MuLE lentiviruses into mouse tissues. Together, our results demonstrate that the MuLE system provides genetic power for the systematic investigation of the molecular mechanisms that underlie human diseases. PMID:25751063

  8. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  9. "RCL-Pooling Assay": A Simplified Method for the Detection of Replication-Competent Lentiviruses in Vector Batches Using Sequential Pooling.

    PubMed

    Corre, Guillaume; Dessainte, Michel; Marteau, Jean-Brice; Dalle, Bruno; Fenard, David; Galy, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Nonreplicative recombinant HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors (LV) are increasingly used in gene therapy of various genetic diseases, infectious diseases, and cancer. Before they are used in humans, preparations of LV must undergo extensive quality control testing. In particular, testing of LV must demonstrate the absence of replication-competent lentiviruses (RCL) with suitable methods, on representative fractions of vector batches. Current methods based on cell culture are challenging because high titers of vector batches translate into high volumes of cell culture to be tested in RCL assays. As vector batch size and titers are continuously increasing because of the improvement of production and purification methods, it became necessary for us to modify the current RCL assay based on the detection of p24 in cultures of indicator cells. Here, we propose a practical optimization of this method using a pairwise pooling strategy enabling easier testing of higher vector inoculum volumes. These modifications significantly decrease material handling and operator time, leading to a cost-effective method, while maintaining optimal sensibility of the RCL testing. This optimized "RCL-pooling assay" ameliorates the feasibility of the quality control of large-scale batches of clinical-grade LV while maintaining the same sensitivity. PMID:26886834

  10. Deciphering the impact of parameters influencing transgene expression kinetics after repeated cell transduction with integration-deficient retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Schott, Juliane W; Jaeschke, Nico M; Hoffmann, Dirk; Maetzig, Tobias; Ballmaier, Matthias; Godinho, Tamaryin; Cathomen, Toni; Schambach, Axel

    2015-05-01

    Lentiviral and gammaretroviral vectors are state-of-the-art tools for transgene expression within target cells. The integration of these vectors can be deliberately suppressed to derive a transient gene expression system based on extrachromosomal circular episomes with intact coding regions. These episomes can be used to deliver DNA templates and to express RNA or protein. Importantly, transient gene transfer avoids the genotoxic side effects of integrating vectors. Restricting their applicability, episomes are rapidly lost upon dilution in dividing target cells. Addressing this limitation, we could establish comparably stable percentages of transgene-positive cells over prolonged time periods in proliferating cells by repeated transductions. Flow cytometry was applied for kinetic analyses to decipher the impact of individual parameters on the kinetics of fluoroprotein expression after episomal retransduction and to visualize sequential and simultaneous transfer of heterologous fluoroproteins. Expression windows could be exactly timed by the number of transduction steps. The kinetics of signal loss was affected by the cell proliferation rate. The transfer of genes encoding fluoroproteins with different half-lives revealed a major impact of protein stability on temporal signal distribution and accumulation, determining optimal retransduction intervals. In addition, sequential transductions proved broad applicability in different cell types and using different envelope pseudotypes without receptor overload. Stable percentages of cells coexpressing multiple transgenes could be generated upon repeated coadministration of different episomal vectors. Alternatively, defined patterns of transgene expression could be recapitulated by sequential transductions. Altogether, we established a methodology to control and adjust a temporally defined window of transgene expression using retroviral episomal vectors. Combined with the highly efficient cell entry of these vectors while

  11. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronan, Micheal T.

    1989-04-01

    Measurements of exclusive untagged ρ0ρ0,ρφ,K*K¯*, and ρω production and tagged ρ0ρ0 production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented.

  12. Small ruminant lentiviral Vif proteins commonly utilize cyclophilin A, an evolutionarily and structurally conserved protein, to degrade ovine and caprine APOBEC3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Izumi, Taisuke; Nakano, Yusuke; Yamada, Eri; Moriwaki, Miyu; Misawa, Naoko; Ren, Fengrong; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Sato, Kei

    2016-06-01

    Mammals have co-evolved with retroviruses, including lentiviruses, over a long period. Evidence supporting this contention is that viral infectivity factor (Vif) encoded by lentiviruses antagonizes the anti-viral action of cellular apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) of the host. To orchestrate E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for APOBEC3 degradation, Vifs utilize mammalian proteins such as core-binding factor beta (CBFB; for primate lentiviruses) or cyclophilin A (CYPA; for Maedi-Visna virus [MVV]). However, the co-evolutionary relationship between lentiviral Vif and the mammalian proteins associated with Vif-mediated APOBEC3 degradation is poorly understood. Moreover, it is unclear whether Vif proteins of small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs), including MVV and caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV), commonly utilize CYPA to degrade the APOBEC3 of their hosts. In this study, molecular phylogenetic and protein homology modeling revealed that Vif co-factors are evolutionarily and structurally conserved. It was also found that not only MVV but also CAEV Vifs degrade APOBEC3 of both sheep and goats and that CAEV Vifs interact with CYPA. These findings suggest that lentiviral Vifs chose evolutionarily and structurally stable proteins as their partners (e.g., CBFB or CYPA) for APOBEC3 degradation and, particularly, that SRLV Vifs evolved to utilize CYPA as their co-factor in degradation of ovine and caprine APOBEC3. PMID:27193350

  13. Disease modeling and lentiviral gene transfer in patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from late-onset Pompe disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yohei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Yohta; Era, Takumi; Kimura, Shigemi; Eto, Yoshikatsu; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA). Glycogen accumulation is seen in the affected organ such as skeletal muscle, heart, and liver. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is frequently seen in the infantile onset Pompe disease. On the other hand, cardiovascular complication of the late-onset Pompe disease is considered as less frequent and severe than that of infantile onset. There are few investigations which show cardiovascular complication of late onset Pompe disease due to the shortage of appropriate disease model. We have generated late-onset Pompe disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) and differentiated them into cardiomyocytes. Differentiated cardiomyocyte shows glycogen accumulation and lysosomal enlargement. Lentiviral GAA rescue improves GAA enzyme activity and glycogen accumulation in iPSC. The efficacy of gene therapy is maintained following the cardiomyocyte differentiation. Lentiviral GAA transfer ameliorates the disease-specific change in cardiomyocyote. It is suggested that Pompe disease iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte is replicating disease-specific changes in the context of disease modeling, drug screening, and cell therapy. PMID:26199952

  14. Involvement of a C-terminal motif in the interference of primate lentiviral Vpu proteins with CD1d-mediated antigen presentation

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Susanna M.; Sauter, Daniel; Sibitz, Sabrina; Sandberg, Johan K.; Kirchhoff, Frank; Moll, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu is emerging as a critical factor for viral evasion from innate immunity. We have previously shown that the Vpu proteins of two HIV-1 group M subtype B strains (NL4-3 and BaL) down-regulate CD1d from the surface of infected dendritic cells (DCs) and inhibit their crosstalk with the innate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. In the present study, we have investigated the ability of a comprehensive set of primate lentiviral Vpu proteins to interfere with CD1d-mediated immunity. We found that CD1d down-regulation is a conserved function of Vpu proteins from HIV-1 groups M, O and P as well as their direct precursors SIVcpzPtt and SIVgor. At the group M subtype level, subtype C Vpu proteins were significantly weaker CD1d antagonists than subtype B Vpu proteins. Functional characterization of different mutants and chimeras derived from active subtype B and inactive subtype C Vpu proteins revealed that residues in the cytoplasmic domain are important for CD1d down-regulation. Specifically, we identified a C-terminal APW motif characteristic for group M subtype B Vpu proteins necessary for interference with CD1d surface expression. These findings support the notion that Vpu plays an important role in lentiviral evasion from innate immunity. PMID:25872908

  15. Enhanced Potency of a Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody In Vitro Improves Protection against Lentiviral Infection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Kwon, Young Do; Ko, Sung-Youl; Pegu, Amarendra; Louder, Mark K.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Xuejun; Shi, Wei; Yang, Zhi-yong; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McKee, Krisha; O'Dell, Sijy; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Soto, Cinque; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Todd, John-Paul; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Eudailey, Joshua; Roberts, Kyle E.; Donald, Bruce R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Ledgerwood, Julie; Mullikin, James C.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Koup, Richard A.; Graham, Barney S.; Nason, Martha C.; Connors, Mark; Haynes, Barton F.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Roederer, Mario; Kwong, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Over the past 5 years, a new generation of highly potent and broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies has been identified. These antibodies can protect against lentiviral infection in nonhuman primates (NHPs), suggesting that passive antibody transfer would prevent HIV-1 transmission in humans. To increase the protective efficacy of such monoclonal antibodies, we employed next-generation sequencing, computational bioinformatics, and structure-guided design to enhance the neutralization potency and breadth of VRC01, an antibody that targets the CD4 binding site of the HIV-1 envelope. One variant, VRC07-523, was 5- to 8-fold more potent than VRC01, neutralized 96% of viruses tested, and displayed minimal autoreactivity. To compare its protective efficacy to that of VRC01 in vivo, we performed a series of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge experiments in nonhuman primates and calculated the doses of VRC07-523 and VRC01 that provide 50% protection (EC50). VRC07-523 prevented infection in NHPs at a 5-fold lower concentration than VRC01. These results suggest that increased neutralization potency in vitro correlates with improved protection against infection in vivo, documenting the improved functional efficacy of VRC07-523 and its potential clinical relevance for protecting against HIV-1 infection in humans. IMPORTANCE In the absence of an effective HIV-1 vaccine, alternative strategies are needed to block HIV-1 transmission. Direct administration of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies may be able to prevent HIV-1 infections in humans. This approach could be especially useful in individuals at high risk for contracting HIV-1 and could be used together with antiretroviral drugs to prevent infection. To optimize the chance of success, such antibodies can be modified to improve their potency, breadth, and in vivo half-life. Here, knowledge of the structure of a potent neutralizing antibody, VRC01, that targets the CD4-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope

  16. Developing a potentially immunologically inert tetracycline-regulatable viral vector for gene therapy in the peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, S A; Gnavi, S; de Winter, F; Eggers, R; Ozawa, T; Zaldumbide, A; Hoeben, R C; Malessy, M J A; Verhaagen, J

    2014-06-01

    Viral vector-mediated gene transfer of neurotrophic factors is an emerging and promising strategy to promote the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. Unfortunately, the chronic exposure to neurotrophic factors results in local trapping of regenerating axons or other unwanted side effects. Therefore, tight control of therapeutic gene expression is required. The tetracycline/doxycycline-inducible system is considered to be one of the most promising systems for regulating heterologous gene expression. However, an immune response directed against the transactivator protein rtTA hampers further translational studies. Immunogenic proteins fused with the Gly-Ala repeat of the Epstein-Barr virus Nuclear Antigen-1 protein have been shown to successfully evade the immune system. In this article, we used this strategy to demonstrate that a chimeric transactivator, created by fusing the Gly-Ala repeat with rtTA and embedded in a lentiviral vector (i) retained its transactivator function in vitro, in muscle explants, and in vivo following injection into the rat peripheral nerve, (ii) exhibited a reduced leaky expression, and (iii) had an immune-evasive advantage over rtTA as shown in a novel bioassay for human antigen presentation. The current findings are an important step toward creating a clinically applicable potentially immune-evasive tetracycline-regulatable viral vector system. PMID:24694534

  17. Multiscale hierarchical support vector clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Michael Saas; Holm, David Alberg; Sjöstrand, Karl; Ley, Carsten Dan; Rowland, Ian John; Larsen, Rasmus

    2008-03-01

    Clustering is the preferred choice of method in many applications, and support vector clustering (SVC) has proven efficient for clustering noisy and high-dimensional data sets. A method for multiscale support vector clustering is demonstrated, using the recently emerged method for fast calculation of the entire regularization path of the support vector domain description. The method is illustrated on artificially generated examples, and applied for detecting blood vessels from high resolution time series of magnetic resonance imaging data. The obtained results are robust while the need for parameter estimation is reduced, compared to support vector clustering.

  18. VLSI Processor For Vector Quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1995-01-01

    Pixel intensities in each kernel compared simultaneously with all code vectors. Prototype high-performance, low-power, very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuit designed to perform compression of image data by vector-quantization method. Contains relatively simple analog computational cells operating on direct or buffered outputs of photodetectors grouped into blocks in imaging array, yielding vector-quantization code word for each such block in sequence. Scheme exploits parallel-processing nature of vector-quantization architecture, with consequent increase in speed.

  19. Localization and vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes the following localization property for vector spherical harmonics: a wide class of non-local, vector-valued operators reduce to local, multiplication-type operations when applied to a vector spherical harmonic. As localization occurs in a very precise, quantifiable and explicitly computable fashion, the localization property provides a set of useful formulae for analyzing vector-valued fractional diffusion and non-local differential equations defined on S d - 1. As such analyses require a detailed understanding of operators for which localization occurs, we provide several applications of the result in the context of non-local differential equations.

  20. The MSFC Vector Magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Cumings, N. P.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.

    1982-09-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's solar vector magnetograph system is described; this system allows measurements of all components of the Sun's photospheric magnetic field over a 5 × 5 or 2.0 × 2.0 arc min square field-of-view with an optimum time resolution of ˜ 100 s and an optimum signal-to-noise of ˜1600. The basic system components are described, including the optics, detector, digital system and associated electronics. Automatic sequencing and control functions are outlined as well as manual selections of system parameters which afford unique system flexibility. Results of system calibration and performance are presented, including linearity, dynamic range, uniformity, spatial and spectral resolutions, signal-to-noise, electro-optical retardation and polarization calibration. Scientific investigations which utilize the unique characteristics of the instrument are described and typical results are presented.

  1. The MSFC vector magnetograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Cumings, N. P.; West, E. A.

    1981-02-01

    The NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's solar vector magnetograph system allows measurements of all components of the Sun's photospheric magnetic field over a 5 x 5 or 2.5 x 2.5 arc min square field of view with an optimum time resolution of approximately 100 sec and an optimum signal-to-noise of approximately 1000. The basic system components are described, including the optics, detector, digital system, and associated electronics. Automatic sequencing and control functions are outlined as well as manual selections of system parameters which afford unique system flexibility. Results of system calibration and performance are presented, including linearity, dynamic range, uniformity, spatial and spectral resolutions, signal-to-noise, electro-optical retardation and polarization calibration.

  2. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-12-10

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  3. Solar imaging vector magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an instrument which has been constructed at the University of Hawaii to make observations of the magnetic field in solar active regions. Detailed knowledge of active region magnetic structures is crucial to understanding many solar phenomena, because the magnetic field both defines the morphology of structures seen in the solar atmosphere and is the apparent energy source for solar flares. The new vector magnetograph was conceived in response to a perceived discrepancy between the capabilities of X ray imaging telescopes to be operating during the current solar maximum and those of existing magnetographs. There were no space-based magnetographs planned for this period; the existing ground-based instruments variously suffered from lack of sensitivity, poor time resolution, inadequate spatial resolution or unreliable sites. Yet the studies of flares and their relationship to the solar corona planned for the 1991-1994 maximum absolutely required high quality vector magnetic field measurements. By 'vector' measurements we mean that the observation attempts to deduce the complete strength and direction of the field at the measurement site, rather than just the line of sight component as obtained by a traditional longitudinal magnetograph. Knowledge of the vector field permits one to calculate photospheric electric currents, which might play a part in heating the corona, and to calculate energy stored in coronal magnetic fields as the result of such currents. Information about the strength and direction of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere can be obtained in a number of ways, but quantitative data is best obtained by observing Zeeman-effect polarization in solar spectral lines. The technique requires measuring the complete state of polarization at one or more wavelengths within a magnetically sensitive line of the solar spectrum. This measurement must be done for each independent spatial point for which one wants magnetic field data. All the

  4. An efficient method for recovering Lyapunov vectors from singular vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Christopher L.; Samelson, Roger M.

    2007-05-01

    Lyapunov vectors are natural generalizations of normal modes for linear disturbances to aperiodic deterministic flows and offer insights into the physical mechanisms of aperiodic flow and the maintenance of chaos. Most standard techniques for computing Lyapunov vectors produce results which are norm-dependent and lack invariance under the linearized flow (except for the leading Lyapunov vector) and these features can make computation and physical interpretation problematic. An efficient, norm-independent method for constructing the n most rapidly growing Lyapunov vectors from n - 1 leading forward and n leading backward asymptotic singular vectors is proposed. The Lyapunov vectors so constructed are invariant under the linearized flow in the sense that, once computed at one time, they are defined, in principle, for all time through the tangent linear propagator. An analogous method allows the construction of the n most rapidly decaying Lyapunov vectors from n decaying forward and n - 1 decaying backward singular vectors. This method is demonstrated using two low-order geophysical models.

  5. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  6. Bubble vector in automatic merging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pamidi, P. R.; Butler, T. G.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that it is within the capability of the DMAP language to build a set of vectors that can grow incrementally to be applied automatically and economically within a DMAP loop that serves to append sub-matrices that are generated within a loop to a core matrix. The method of constructing such vectors is explained.

  7. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  8. Divergence-based vector quantization.

    PubMed

    Villmann, Thomas; Haase, Sven

    2011-05-01

    Supervised and unsupervised vector quantization methods for classification and clustering traditionally use dissimilarities, frequently taken as Euclidean distances. In this article, we investigate the applicability of divergences instead, focusing on online learning. We deduce the mathematical fundamentals for its utilization in gradient-based online vector quantization algorithms. It bears on the generalized derivatives of the divergences known as Fréchet derivatives in functional analysis, which reduces in finite-dimensional problems to partial derivatives in a natural way. We demonstrate the application of this methodology for widely applied supervised and unsupervised online vector quantization schemes, including self-organizing maps, neural gas, and learning vector quantization. Additionally, principles for hyperparameter optimization and relevance learning for parameterized divergences in the case of supervised vector quantization are given to achieve improved classification accuracy. PMID:21299418

  9. Rice Reoviruses in Insect Vectors.

    PubMed

    Wei, Taiyun; Li, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rice reoviruses, transmitted by leafhopper or planthopper vectors in a persistent propagative manner, seriously threaten the stability of rice production in Asia. Understanding the mechanisms that enable viral transmission by insect vectors is a key to controlling these viral diseases. This review describes current understanding of replication cycles of rice reoviruses in vector cell lines, transmission barriers, and molecular determinants of vector competence and persistent infection. Despite recent breakthroughs, such as the discoveries of actin-based tubule motility exploited by viruses to overcome transmission barriers and mutually beneficial relationships between viruses and bacterial symbionts, there are still many gaps in our knowledge of transmission mechanisms. Advances in genome sequencing, reverse genetics systems, and molecular technologies will help to address these problems. Investigating the multiple interaction systems among the virus, insect vector, insect symbiont, and plant during natural infection in the field is a central topic for future research on rice reoviruses. PMID:27296147

  10. A neural support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Jändel, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Support vector machines are state-of-the-art pattern recognition algorithms that are well founded in optimization and generalization theory but not obviously applicable to the brain. This paper presents Bio-SVM, a biologically feasible support vector machine. An unstable associative memory oscillates between support vectors and interacts with a feed-forward classification pathway. Kernel neurons blend support vectors and sensory input. Downstream temporal integration generates the classification. Instant learning of surprising events and off-line tuning of support vector weights trains the system. Emotion-based learning, forgetting trivia, sleep and brain oscillations are phenomena that agree with the Bio-SVM model. A mapping to the olfactory system is suggested. PMID:20092978

  11. Evaluation and prediction of the HIV-1 central polypurine tract influence on foamy viral vectors to transduce dividing and growth-arrested cells.

    PubMed

    Shityakov, Sergey; Förster, Carola; Rethwilm, Axel; Dandekar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral vectors are potent tools for gene delivery and various biomedical applications. To accomplish a gene transfer task successfully, retroviral vectors must effectively transduce diverse cell cultures at different phases of a cell cycle. However, very promising retroviral vectors based on the foamy viral (FV) backbone lack the capacity to efficiently transduce quiescent cells. It is hypothesized that this phenomenon might be explained as the inability of foamy viruses to form a pre-integration complex (PIC) with nuclear import activity in growth-arrested cells, which is the characteristic for lentiviruses (HIV-1). In this process, the HIV-1 central polypurine tract (cPPT) serves as a primer for plus-strand synthesis to produce a "flap" element and is believed to be crucial for the subsequent double-stranded cDNA formation of all retroviral RNA genomes. In this study, the effects of the lentiviral cPPT element on the FV transduction potential in dividing and growth-arrested (G1/S phase) adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial (A549) cells are investigated by experimental and theoretical methods. The results indicated that the HIV-1 cPPT element in a foamy viral vector background will lead to a significant reduction of the FV transduction and viral titre in growth-arrested cells due to the absence of PICs with nuclear import activity. PMID:25009830

  12. Vector Network Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-10-20

    Vector network analyzers are a convenient way to measure scattering parameters of a variety of microwave devices. However, these instruments, unlike oscilloscopes for example, require a relatively high degree of user knowledge and expertise. Due to the complexity of the instrument and of the calibration process, there are many ways in which an incorrect measurement may be produced. The Microwave Project, which is part of Sandia National Laboratories Primary Standards Laboratory, routinely uses check standardsmore » to verify that the network analyzer is operating properly. In the past, these measurements were recorded manually and, sometimes, interpretation of the results was problematic. To aid our measurement assurance process, a software program was developed to automatically measure a check standard and compare the new measurements with an historical database of measurements of the same device. The program acquires new measurement data from selected check standards, plots the new data against the mean and standard deviation of prior data for the same check standard, and updates the database files for the check standard. The program is entirely menu-driven requiring little additional work by the user.« less

  13. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M.T.

    1988-12-09

    Measurements of exclusive untagged /rho//sup 0//rho//sup 0/, /rho//phi/, K/sup *//bar K//sup */, and /rho/..omega.. production and tagged /rho//sup 0//rho//sup 0/ production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ronan, M. T.

    1989-04-25

    Measurements of exclusive untagged /rho//sup 0//rho0/,/rho//phi/,/ital K//sup *//ital K/bar /*/, and /rho/..omega.. production and tagged /rho//sup 0//rho0/ production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented.

  15. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  16. Enhancing poxvirus vectors vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Esteban, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated recombinant poxvirus vectors expressing heterologous antigens from pathogens are currently at various stages in clinical trials with the aim to establish their efficacy. This is because these vectors have shown excellent safety profiles, significant immunogenicity against foreign expressed antigens and are able to induce protective immune responses. In view of the limited efficacy triggered by some poxvirus strains used in clinical trials (i.e, ALVAC in the RV144 phase III clinical trial for HIV), and of the restrictive replication capacity of the highly attenuated vectors like MVA and NYVAC, there is a consensus that further improvements of these vectors should be pursuit. In this review we considered several strategies that are currently being implemented, as well as new approaches, to improve the immunogenicity of the poxvirus vectors. This includes heterologous prime/boost protocols, use of co-stimulatory molecules, deletion of viral immunomodulatory genes still present in the poxvirus genome, enhancing virus promoter strength, enhancing vector replication capacity, optimizing expression of foreign heterologous sequences, and the combined use of adjuvants. An optimized poxvirus vector triggering long-lasting immunity with a high protective efficacy against a selective disease should be sought. PMID:25424927

  17. Gene Therapy of the β-Hemoglobinopathies by Lentiviral Transfer of the β(A(T87Q))-Globin Gene.

    PubMed

    Negre, Olivier; Eggimann, Anne-Virginie; Beuzard, Yves; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Bourget, Philippe; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Hongeng, Suradej; Hacein-Bey, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina; Leboulch, Philippe; Payen, Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    β-globin gene disorders are the most prevalent inherited diseases worldwide and result from abnormal β-globin synthesis or structure. Novel therapeutic approaches are being developed in an effort to move beyond palliative management. Gene therapy, by ex vivo lentiviral transfer of a therapeutic β-globin gene derivative (β(AT87Q)-globin) to hematopoietic stem cells, driven by cis-regulatory elements that confer high, erythroid-specific expression, has been evaluated in human clinical trials over the past 8 years. β(AT87Q)-globin is used both as a strong inhibitor of HbS polymerization and as a biomarker. While long-term studies are underway in multiple centers in Europe and in the United States, proof-of-principle of efficacy and safety has already been obtained in multiple patients with β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:26886832

  18. Gene Therapy of the β-Hemoglobinopathies by Lentiviral Transfer of the βA(T87Q)-Globin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Negre, Olivier; Eggimann, Anne-Virginie; Beuzard, Yves; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Bourget, Philippe; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Hongeng, Suradej; Hacein-Bey, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina; Leboulch, Philippe; Payen, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    β-globin gene disorders are the most prevalent inherited diseases worldwide and result from abnormal β-globin synthesis or structure. Novel therapeutic approaches are being developed in an effort to move beyond palliative management. Gene therapy, by ex vivo lentiviral transfer of a therapeutic β-globin gene derivative (βAT87Q-globin) to hematopoietic stem cells, driven by cis-regulatory elements that confer high, erythroid-specific expression, has been evaluated in human clinical trials over the past 8 years. βAT87Q-globin is used both as a strong inhibitor of HbS polymerization and as a biomarker. While long-term studies are underway in multiple centers in Europe and in the United States, proof-of-principle of efficacy and safety has already been obtained in multiple patients with β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. PMID:26886832

  19. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases - Incidence through Vectors.

    PubMed

    Savić, Sara; Vidić, Branka; Grgić, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests - ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples

  20. Generation of β cell-specific human cytotoxic T cells by lentiviral transduction and their survival in immunodeficient human leucocyte antigen-transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Babad, J; Mukherjee, G; Follenzi, A; Ali, R; Roep, B O; Shultz, L D; Santamaria, P; Yang, O O; Goldstein, H; Greiner, D L; DiLorenzo, T P

    2015-01-01

    Several β cell antigens recognized by T cells in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) are also T cell targets in the human disease. While numerous antigen-specific therapies prevent diabetes in NOD mice, successful translation of rodent findings to patients has been difficult. A human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-transgenic mouse model incorporating human β cell-specific T cells might provide a better platform for evaluating antigen-specific therapies. The ability to study such T cells is limited by their low frequency in peripheral blood and the difficulty in obtaining islet-infiltrating T cells from patients. We have worked to overcome this limitation by using lentiviral transduction to ‘reprogram’ primary human CD8 T cells to express three T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for a peptide derived from the β cell antigen islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP265–273) and recognized in the context of the human class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-A2. The TCRs bound peptide/MHC multimers with a range of avidities, but all bound with at least 10-fold lower avidity than the anti-viral TCR used for comparison. One exhibited antigenic recognition promiscuity. The β cell-specific human CD8 T cells generated by lentiviral transduction with one of the TCRs released interferon (IFN)-γ in response to antigen and exhibited cytotoxic activity against peptide-pulsed target cells. The cells engrafted in HLA-A2-transgenic NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice and could be detected in the blood, spleen and pancreas up to 5 weeks post-transfer, suggesting the utility of this approach for the evaluation of T cell-modulatory therapies for T1D and other T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25302633

  1. Vector statistics of LANDSAT imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R., Jr.; Underwood, D.

    1977-01-01

    A digitized multispectral image, such as LANDSAT data, is composed of numerous four dimensional vectors, which quantitatively describe the ground scene from which the data are acquired. The statistics of unique vectors that occur in LANDSAT imagery are studied to determine if that information can provide some guidance on reducing image processing costs. A second purpose of this report is to investigate how the vector statistics are changed by various types of image processing techniques and determine if that information can be useful in choosing one processing approach over another.

  2. Baculovirus as a vaccine vector

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsin-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hsuan; Liu, Hung-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Baculovirus is extensively utilized as an excellent tool for production of recombinant protein in insect cells. Baculovirus infects insects in nature and is non-pathogenic to humans. In addition to insect cells, baculovirus is capable of transducing a broad range of animal cells. Due to its biosafety, large cloning capacity, low cytotoxicity, and non-replication nature in the transduced cells as well as the ease of manipulation and production, baculovirus has been utilized as RNA interference mediators, gene delivery vectors, and vaccine vectors for a wide variety of applications. This article focuses on the utilization of baculoviruses as vaccine vectors to prepare antigen or subunit vaccines. PMID:22705893

  3. Relativistic Gamow vectors: State vectors for unstable particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldas, Hany Kamel Halim

    The relativistic Gamow vectors are derived from the analytic continuation of the angular momentum velocity kets to the resonance pole of the S- matrix. This construction is justifiable within a Rigged Hilbert Space of Hardy class functions. The kets obtained | p j3[ sRjR ]-> are characterized by a spin jR and a complex mass square sR = (MR - iΓ R/2)2. Our use of the velocity kets renders the Gamow vectors | p j3[ sRjR ]-> ``minimally complex'', as the 4-velocities p̂μ = p μ/ s are taken real and they remain real under Lorentz transformations. When the symmetry transformations of the Gamow vectors are considered, it is found that they obey a semigroup time evolution in the forward light cone for the subgroup of P with causal space- time translations, i.e., for space-time translations with 4-vectors x such that x2 >= 0. This semigroup evolution, which is a consequence of the characterization obtained for the Gamow vectors as functionals in a Rigged Hilbert Space, is in conformity with the time directedness associated with decay phenomena. The Gamow vectors, with a Breit-Wigner distribution and exponential decay law, provide a description of decaying particles with a wide range of Γ/ M. Moreover, the Gamow vectors, being members of a complex basis vector expansion, allow the Wigner-Weisskopf's based effective theories, such as the Lee-Oehme-Yang theory for the neutral K-mesons, to be obtained as an approximation in an exact formalism.

  4. Are Bred Vectors The Same As Lyapunov Vectors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnay, E.; Corazza, M.; Cai, M.

    Regional loss of predictability is an indication of the instability of the underlying flow, where small errors in the initial conditions (or imperfections in the model) grow to large amplitudes in finite times. The stability properties of evolving flows have been studied using Lyapunov vectors (e.g., Alligood et al, 1996, Ott, 1993, Kalnay, 2002), singular vectors (e.g., Lorenz, 1965, Farrell, 1988, Molteni and Palmer, 1993), and, more recently, with bred vectors (e.g., Szunyogh et al, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). Bred vectors (BVs) are, by construction, closely related to Lyapunov vectors (LVs). In fact, after an infinitely long breeding time, and with the use of infinitesimal ampli- tudes, bred vectors are identical to leading Lyapunov vectors. In practical applications, however, bred vectors are different from Lyapunov vectors in two important ways: a) bred vectors are never globally orthogonalized and are intrinsically local in space and time, and b) they are finite-amplitude, finite-time vectors. These two differences are very significant in a dynamical system whose size is very large. For example, the at- mosphere is large enough to have "room" for several synoptic scale instabilities (e.g., storms) to develop independently in different regions (say, North America and Aus- tralia), and it is complex enough to have several different possible types of instabilities (such as barotropic, baroclinic, convective, and even Brownian motion). Bred vectors share some of their properties with leading LVs (Corazza et al, 2001a, 2001b, Toth and Kalnay, 1993, 1997, Cai et al, 2001). For example, 1) Bred vectors are independent of the norm used to define the size of the perturba- tion. Corazza et al. (2001) showed that bred vectors obtained using a potential enstro- phy norm were indistinguishable from bred vectors obtained using a streamfunction squared norm, in contrast with singular vectors. 2) Bred vectors are independent of the length of the rescaling period as long as the

  5. Solid rocket thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Thrust vector control systems that superimpose a side force on the motor thrust, steering being achieved by the side force causing a moment about the vehicle center of gravity are described. A brief review of thrust vector control systems is presented, and two systems, flexible joint and liquid injection, are treated in detail. Treatment of the flexible-joint thrust vector control system is limited to the design of the flexible joint and its insulation against hot motor gases. Treatment of the liquid injection thrust vector control system is limited to discussion of the injectant, valves, piping, storage tanks, and pressurization system; no evaluation is presented of the nozzle except for (1) the effect of the injectant and erosion at the injection port and (2) the effect of injection on pressure distribution within the nozzle.

  6. Experiments With Magnetic Vector Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, J. W.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental apparatus and method for the study of magnetic vector potential (MVP). Includes a discussion of inherent errors in the calculations involved, precision of the results, and further applications of MVP. (GS)

  7. Effective Masses of Vector Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foell, Charles; Clougherty, Dennis

    2006-03-01

    We consider the vector polarons of a one-dimensional model of an electron in a doubly (or nearly) degenerate band that couples to two elastic distortions, as described previously by Clougherty and Foell [1]. A variational approach is used to analytically and numerically calculate effective masses of the three types of vector polarons. [1] D. P. Clougherty and C. A. Foell, Phys. Rev. B 70, 052301 (2004).

  8. Coulomb problem for vector bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchiev, M.Yu.; Flambaum, V.V.

    2006-05-01

    The Coulomb problem for vector bosons W{sup {+-}} incorporates a well-known difficulty; the charge of the boson localized in a close vicinity of the attractive Coulomb center proves to be infinite. The paradox is shown to be resolved by the QED vacuum polarization, which brings in a strong effective repulsion that eradicates the infinite charge of the boson on the Coulomb center. This property allows one to define the Coulomb problem for vector bosons properly.

  9. Molecular dynamics on vector computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, F.; Mountain, R. D.; Oconnell, J.

    1985-10-01

    An algorithm called the method of lights (MOL) has been developed for the computerized simulation of molecular dynamics. The MOL, implemented on the CYBER 205 computer, is based on sorting and reformulating the manner in which neighbor lists are compiled, and it uses data structures compatible with specialized vector statements that perform parallel computations. The MOL is found to reduce running time over standard methods in scalar form, and vectorization is shown to produce an order-of-magnitude reduction in execution time.

  10. Hybrid lentivirus-phiC31-int-NLS vector allows site-specific recombination in murine and human cells but induces DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Grandchamp, Nicolas; Altémir, Dorothée; Philippe, Stéphanie; Ursulet, Suzanna; Pilet, Héloïse; Serre, Marie-Claude; Lenain, Aude; Serguera, Che; Mallet, Jacques; Sarkis, Chamsy

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer allows transient or permanent genetic modifications of cells for experimental or therapeutic purposes. Gene delivery by HIV-derived lentiviral vector (LV) is highly effective but the risk of insertional mutagenesis is important and the random/uncontrollable integration of the DNA vector can deregulate the cell transcriptional activity. Non Integrative Lentiviral Vectors (NILVs) solve this issue in non-dividing cells, but they do not allow long term expression in dividing cells. In this context, obtaining stable expression while avoiding the problems inherent to unpredictable DNA vector integration requires the ability to control the integration site. One possibility is to use the integrase of phage phiC31 (phiC31-int) which catalyzes efficient site-specific recombination between the attP site in the phage genome and the chromosomal attB site of its Streptomyces host. Previous studies showed that phiC31-int is active in many eukaryotic cells, such as murine or human cells, and directs the integration of a DNA substrate into pseudo attP sites (pattP) which are homologous to the native attP site. In this study, we combined the efficiency of NILV for gene delivery and the specificity of phiC31-int for DNA substrate integration to engineer a hybrid tool for gene transfer with the aim of allowing long term expression in dividing and non-dividing cells preventing genotoxicity. We demonstrated the feasibility to target NILV integration in human and murine pattP sites with a dual NILV vectors system: one which delivers phiC31-int, the other which constitute the substrate containing an attB site in its DNA sequence. These promising results are however alleviated by the occurrence of significant DNA damages. Further improvements are thus required to prevent chromosomal rearrangements for a therapeutic use of the system. However, its use as a tool for experimental applications such as transgenesis is already applicable. PMID:24956106

  11. Axisymmetric Coanda-assisted vectoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Dustin; Smith, Barton L.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental demonstration of a jet vectoring technique used in our novel spray method called Coanda-assisted Spray Manipulation (CSM) is presented. CSM makes use of the Coanda effect on axisymmetric geometries through the interaction of two jets: a primary jet and a control jet. The primary jet has larger volume flow rate but generally a smaller momentum flux than the control jet. The primary jet flows through the center of a rounded collar. The control jet is parallel to the primary and is adjacent to the convex collar. The Reynolds number range for the primary jet at the exit plane was between 20,000 and 80,000. The flow was in the incompressible Mach number range (Mach < 0.3). The control jet attaches to the convex wall and vectors according to known Coanda effect principles, entraining and vectoring the primary jet, resulting in controllable r - θ directional spraying. Several annular control slots and collar radii were tested over a range of momentum flux ratios to determine the effects of these variables on the vectored jet angle and spreading. Two and Three-component Particle Image Velocimetry systems were used to determine the vectoring angle and the profile of the combined jet in each experiment. The experiments show that the control slot and expansion radius, along with the momentum ratios of the two jets predominantly affected the vectoring angle and profile of the combined jets.

  12. Vectoring of parallel synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Tim; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram; Gomit, Guillaume

    2015-11-01

    A pair of parallel synthetic jets can be vectored by applying a phase difference between the two driving signals. The resulting jet can be merged or bifurcated and either vectored towards the actuator leading in phase or the actuator lagging in phase. In the present study, the influence of phase difference and Strouhal number on the vectoring behaviour is examined experimentally. Phase-locked vorticity fields, measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), are used to track vortex pairs. The physical mechanisms that explain the diversity in vectoring behaviour are observed based on the vortex trajectories. For a fixed phase difference, the vectoring behaviour is shown to be primarily influenced by pinch-off time of vortex rings generated by the synthetic jets. Beyond a certain formation number, the pinch-off timescale becomes invariant. In this region, the vectoring behaviour is determined by the distance between subsequent vortex rings. We acknowledge the financial support from the European Research Council (ERC grant agreement no. 277472).

  13. Combinatorial Incorporation of Enhancer Blocking Components of the Chicken β-Globin 5′HS4 and Human T-Cell Receptor α/δ BEAD-1 Insulators in Self-Inactivating Retroviral Vectors Reduces their Genotoxic Potential

    PubMed Central

    RAMEZANI, ALI; HAWLEY, TERESA S.; HAWLEY, ROBERT G.

    2008-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis by retroviral vectors has emerged as a serious impediment to the widespread application of hematopoietic stem cell gene transfer for the treatment of hematologic diseases. Here we report the development of a 77-bp element, FII/BEAD-A (FB), which contains the minimal enhancer blocking components of the chicken β-globin 5′HS4 insulator and a homologous region from the human T-cell receptor α/δ BEAD-1 insulator. With a new flow cytometry-based assay, we show that the FB element is as effective in enhancer blocking activity as the prototypical 1.2-kb 5′HS4 insulator fragment. When incorporated into the residual U3 region of the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) of a self-inactivating (SIN) gammaretroviral vector, the FB element was stably transferred to the 5′ LTR during reverse transcription, flanking the integrated transgene expression cassette. Notably, using a recently established in vitro insertional mutagenesis assay involving primary murine hematopoietic cells, we found that SIN gammaretroviral vectors as well as SIN lentiviral vectors containing the FB element exhibited greatly reduced transforming potential—to background levels under the experimental conditions used—compared to their unshielded counterparts. These results suggest that the FB element-mediated enhancer blocking modification is a promising approach to dramatically improve the safety of retroviral vectors for therapeutic gene transfer. PMID:18787211

  14. Equine infectious anemia viral vector-mediated codelivery of endostatin and angiostatin driven by retinal pigmented epithelium-specific VMD2 promoter inhibits choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kachi, Shu; Binley, Katie; Yokoi, Katsutoshi; Umeda, Naoyasu; Akiyama, Hideo; Muramatu, Daisuke; Iqball, Sharifah; Kan, On; Naylor, Stuart; Campochiaro, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) is a nonprimate lentivirus that does not cause human disease. Subretinal injection into mice of a recombinant EIAV lentiviral vector in which lacZ is driven by a CMV promoter (EIAV CMV LacZ) resulted in rapid and strong expression of LacZ in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and some other cells including ganglion cells, resulting in the presence of 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside within the optic nerve. Substitution of the RPE-specific promoter from the vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2) gene for the CMV promoter resulted in prolonged (at least 1 year) expression of LacZ that was restricted to RPE cells, albeit reduced 6- to 10-fold compared with the CMV promoter. Similarly, the amount of FLAG-tagged endostatin detected in eyes injected with the EIAV VMD2 Endo(FLAG) vector was similar to that seen in eyes injected with a vector that expressed both endostatin and angiostatin [EIAV VMD2 Endo(FLAG)/Angio]; expression was approximately 6-fold lower than with identical vectors in which the CMV promoter drove expression. Compared with murine eyes treated with a control EIAV vector, subretinal injection of EIAV vectors expressing murine endostatin alone or in combination with angiostatin driven by either the CMV or VMD2 promoter caused significant suppression of choroidal neovascularization (NV) at laser-induced rupture sites in Bruch's membrane. These data support proceeding toward clinical studies with EIAV-based gene therapy for choroidal NV, using the VMD2 promoter to selectively drive expression of a combination of endostatin and angiostatin in RPE cells. PMID:20377369

  15. Persistent Gene Expression in Mouse Nasal Epithelia following Feline Immunodeficiency Virus-Based Vector Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Patrick L.; Burnight, Erin R.; Hickey, Melissa A.; Blissard, Gary W.; McCray, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    Gene transfer development for treatment or prevention of cystic fibrosis lung disease has been limited by the inability of vectors to efficiently and persistently transduce airway epithelia. Influenza A is an enveloped virus with natural lung tropism; however, pseudotyping feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector with the hemagglutinin envelope protein proved unsuccessful. Conversely, pseudotyping FIV with the envelope protein from influenza D (Thogoto virus GP75) resulted in titers of 106 transducing units (TU)/ml and conferred apical entry into well-differentiated human airway epithelial cells. Baculovirus GP64 envelope glycoproteins share sequence identity with influenza D GP75 envelope glycoproteins. Pseudotyping FIV with GP64 from three species of baculovirus resulted in titers of 107 to 109 TU/ml. Of note, GP64 from Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus resulted in high-titer FIV preparations (∼109 TU/ml) and conferred apical entry into polarized primary cultures of human airway epithelia. Using a luciferase reporter gene and bioluminescence imaging, we observed persistent gene expression from in vivo gene transfer in the mouse nose with A. californica GP64-pseudotyped FIV (AcGP64-FIV). Longitudinal bioluminescence analysis documented persistent expression in nasal epithelia for ∼1 year without significant decline. According to histological analysis using a LacZ reporter gene, olfactory and respiratory epithelial cells were transduced. In addition, methylcellulose-formulated AcGP64-FIV transduced mouse nasal epithelia with much greater efficiency than similarly formulated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped FIV. These data suggest that AcGP64-FIV efficiently transduces and persistently expresses a transgene in nasal epithelia in the absence of agents that disrupt the cellular tight junction integrity. PMID:16188984

  16. Vectors for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Russell, S J

    1996-09-01

    Many viral and non-viral vector systems have now been developed for gene therapy applications. In this article, the pros and cons of these vector systems are discussed in relation to the different cancer gene therapy strategies. The protocols used in cancer gene therapy can be broadly divided into six categories including gene transfer to explanted cells for use as cell-based cancer vaccines; gene transfer to a small number of tumour cells in situ to achieve a vaccine effect; gene transfer to vascular endothelial cells (VECs) lining the blood vessels of the tumour to interfere with tumour angiogenesis; gene transfer to T lymphocytes to enhance their antitumour effector capability; gene transfer to haemopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to enhance their resistance to cytotoxic drugs and gene transfer to a large number of tumour cells in situ to achieve nonimmune tumour reduction with or without bystander effect. Each of the six strategies makes unique demands on the vector system and these are discussed with reference to currently available vectors. Aspects of vector biology that are in need of further development are discussed in some detail. The final section points to the potential use of replicating viruses as delivery vehicles for efficient in vivo gene transfer to disseminated cancers. PMID:9034598

  17. A generalized nonlocal vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alali, Bacim; Liu, Kuo; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-10-01

    A nonlocal vector calculus was introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) that has proved useful for the analysis of the peridynamics model of nonlocal mechanics and nonlocal diffusion models. A formulation is developed that provides a more general setting for the nonlocal vector calculus that is independent of particular nonlocal models. It is shown that general nonlocal calculus operators are integral operators with specific integral kernels. General nonlocal calculus properties are developed, including nonlocal integration by parts formula and Green's identities. The nonlocal vector calculus introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) is shown to be recoverable from the general formulation as a special example. This special nonlocal vector calculus is used to reformulate the peridynamics equation of motion in terms of the nonlocal gradient operator and its adjoint. A new example of nonlocal vector calculus operators is introduced, which shows the potential use of the general formulation for general nonlocal models.

  18. Vector Encoding in Biochemical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    Encoding of environmental cues via biochemical signaling pathways is of vital importance in the transmission of information for cells in a network. The current literature assumes a single cell state is used to encode information, however, recent research suggests the optimal strategy utilizes a vector of cell states sampled at various time points. To elucidate the optimal sampling strategy for vector encoding, we take an information theoretic approach and determine the mutual information of the calcium signaling dynamics obtained from fibroblast cells perturbed with different concentrations of ATP. Specifically, we analyze the sampling strategies under the cases of fixed and non-fixed vector dimension as well as the efficiency of these strategies. Our results show that sampling with greater frequency is optimal in the case of non-fixed vector dimension but that, in general, a lower sampling frequency is best from both a fixed vector dimension and efficiency standpoint. Further, we find the use of a simple modified Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process as a model qualitatively captures many of our experimental results suggesting that sampling in biochemical networks is based on a few basic components.

  19. Symbolic vector analysis in plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W. M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1999-01-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the underlying coordinate systems. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. Besides the basic vector analysis functions, the package provides asymptotic capabilities, 2D vector analysis notation, and a simple interface for users to define their own coordinate systems. These features will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis in complicated coordinate systems is required. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  20. Extrapolation methods for vector sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David A.; Ford, William F.; Sidi, Avram

    1987-01-01

    This paper derives, describes, and compares five extrapolation methods for accelerating convergence of vector sequences or transforming divergent vector sequences to convergent ones. These methods are the scalar epsilon algorithm (SEA), vector epsilon algorithm (VEA), topological epsilon algorithm (TEA), minimal polynomial extrapolation (MPE), and reduced rank extrapolation (RRE). MPE and RRE are first derived and proven to give the exact solution for the right 'essential degree' k. Then, Brezinski's (1975) generalization of the Shanks-Schmidt transform is presented; the generalized form leads from systems of equations to TEA. The necessary connections are then made with SEA and VEA. The algorithms are extended to the nonlinear case by cycling, the error analysis for MPE and VEA is sketched, and the theoretical support for quadratic convergence is discussed. Strategies for practical implementation of the methods are considered.

  1. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  2. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  3. Boosting with Averaged Weight Vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    AdaBoost is a well-known ensemble learning algorithm that constructs its constituent or base models in sequence. A key step in AdaBoost is constructing a distribution over the training examples to create each base model. This distribution, represented as a vector, is constructed to be orthogonal to the vector of mistakes made by the previous base model in the sequence. The idea is to make the next base model's errors uncorrelated with those of the previous model. Some researchers have pointed out the intuition that it is probably better to construct a distribution that is orthogonal to the mistake vectors of all the previous base models, but that this is not always possible. We present an algorithm that attempts to come as close as possible to this goal in an efficient manner. We present experimental results demonstrating significant improvement over AdaBoost and the Totally Corrective boosting algorithm, which also attempts to satisfy this goal.

  4. Bred vectors, singular vectors, and Lyapunov vectors in simple and complex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, Adrienne

    We compute and compare three types of vectors frequently used to explore the instability properties of dynamical models, Lyapunov vectors (LVs), singular vectors (SVs), and bred vectors (BVs). The first model is the Lorenz (1963) three-variable model. We find BVs align with the locally fastest growing LV, which is often the second fastest growing global LV. The growth rates of the three types of vectors reveal all predict regime changes and durations of new regimes, as shown for BVs by Evans et al. (2004). The second model is the toy 'atmosphere-ocean model' developed by Pena and Kalnay (2004) coupling three Lorenz (1963) models with different time scales to test the effects of fast and slow modes of growth on the dynamical vectors. A fast 'extratropical atmosphere' is weakly coupled to a fast 'tropical atmosphere' which is strongly coupled to a slow 'ocean' system, the latter coupling imitating the tropical El Nino--Southern Oscillation. BVs separate the fast and slow modes of growth through appropriate selection of the breeding parameters. LVs successfully separate the fast 'extratropics' but cannot completely decouple the 'tropics' from the 'ocean,' leading to 'coupled' LVs that are affected by both systems but mainly dominated by one. SVs identify the fast modes but cannot capture the slow modes until the fast 'extratropics' are replaced with faster 'convection.' The dissimilar behavior of the three types of vectors degrades the similarities of the subspaces they inhabit (Norwood et al. 2013). The third model is a quasi-geostrophic channel model (Rotunno and Bao 1996) that is a simplification of extratropical synoptic-scale motions with baroclinic instabilities only. We were unable to successfully compute LVs for it. However, randomly initialized BVs quickly converge to a single vector that is the leading LV. The last model is the SPEEDY model created by Molteni (2003). It is a simplified general atmospheric circulation model with several types of instabilities

  5. Helper-Dependent Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Rosewell, Amanda; Vetrini, Francesco; Ng, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vectors are devoid of all viral coding sequences, possess a large cloning capacity, and can efficiently transduce a wide variety of cell types from various species independent of the cell cycle to mediate long-term transgene expression without chronic toxicity. These non-integrating vectors hold tremendous potential for a variety of gene transfer and gene therapy applications. Here, we review the production technologies, applications, obstacles to clinical translation and their potential resolutions, and the future challenges and unanswered questions regarding this promising gene transfer technology. PMID:24533227

  6. Vector Acoustics, Vector Sensors, and 3D Underwater Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindwall, D.

    2007-12-01

    Vector acoustic data has two more dimensions of information than pressure data and may allow for 3D underwater imaging with much less data than with hydrophone data. The vector acoustic sensors measures the particle motions due to passing sound waves and, in conjunction with a collocated hydrophone, the direction of travel of the sound waves. When using a controlled source with known source and sensor locations, the reflection points of the sound field can be determined with a simple trigonometric calculation. I demonstrate this concept with an experiment that used an accelerometer based vector acoustic sensor in a water tank with a short-pulse source and passive scattering targets. The sensor consists of a three-axis accelerometer and a matched hydrophone. The sound source was a standard transducer driven by a short 7 kHz pulse. The sensor was suspended in a fixed location and the hydrophone was moved about the tank by a robotic arm to insonify the tank from many locations. Several floats were placed in the tank as acoustic targets at diagonal ranges of approximately one meter. The accelerometer data show the direct source wave as well as the target scattered waves and reflections from the nearby water surface, tank bottom and sides. Without resorting to the usual methods of seismic imaging, which in this case is only two dimensional and relied entirely on the use of a synthetic source aperture, the two targets, the tank walls, the tank bottom, and the water surface were imaged. A directional ambiguity inherent to vector sensors is removed by using collocated hydrophone data. Although this experiment was in a very simple environment, it suggests that 3-D seismic surveys may be achieved with vector sensors using the same logistics as a 2-D survey that uses conventional hydrophones. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, program element 61153N.

  7. S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Zhou, Yan; Min, Ke; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Ni

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). METHODS: We extracted reported endpoints, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time-to-treatment failure (TTF), objective response rate (ORR) and adverse effects, from randomized controlled trials identified in PubMed, the Cochrane library, Science Direct, EMBASE and American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings. Stata software was used to calculate the pooled values. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials involving 2176 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Compared to non-S-1-based regimens, the use of S-1-based regimens were associated with an increase in ORR (RR = 1.300; 95%CI: 1.028-1.645); OS (HR = 0.89; 95%CI: 0.81-0.99; P = 0.025), TTF (HR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.75-0.92; P = 0.000), and a lower risk of febrile neutropenia (RR = 0.225; P = 0.000) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032). OS, PFS and TTF were prolonged, especially in the Asian population. In subgroup analysis, statistically significant increases in ORR (RR = 1.454; P = 0.029), OS (HR = 0.895; P = 0.041) and TTF (HR = 0.832; P = 0.000) were found when S-1-based chemotherapy was compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. The incidence of leukopenia (RR = 0.584; P = 0.002) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032) was higher in the 5-FU-based arm. S-1-based regimens had no advantage in ORR, OS, PFS, TTF and grade 3 or 4 adverse events over capecitabine-based regimens. CONCLUSION: S-1-based chemotherapy may be a good choice for AGC because of longer survival times, better tolerance and more convenient use. PMID:25206296

  8. Hydrogen as an energy vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing hydrogen as an energy vector is considered, with special attention given to means of hydrogen production. The state-of-the-art in thermochemical processes is reviewed, and criteria for the technical and economic feasibility of large-scale thermochemical water splitting processes are presented. The production of hydrogen from coal and from photolysis of water is discussed.

  9. Portfolio Analysis for Vector Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Classic stock portfolio analysis provides an applied context for Lagrange multipliers that undergraduate students appreciate. Although modern methods of portfolio analysis are beyond the scope of vector calculus, classic methods reinforce the utility of this material. This paper discusses how to introduce classic stock portfolio analysis in a…

  10. Primer vector theory and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezewski, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A method developed to compute two-body, optimal, N-impulse trajectories was presented. The necessary conditions established define the gradient structure of the primer vector and its derivative for any set of boundary conditions and any number of impulses. Inequality constraints, a conjugate gradient iterator technique, and the use of a penalty function were also discussed.

  11. Transcriptomics and disease vector control

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing can be used to compare transcriptomes under different conditions. A study in BMC Genomics applies this approach to investigating the effects of exposure to a range of xenobiotics on changes in gene expression in the larvae of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue fever. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/216 PMID:20525113

  12. Vector ecology of equine piroplasmosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is a disease of equidae including horses, donkeys, mules and zebras caused by either of two protozoan parasites, Theileria equi or Babesia caballi. These parasites are biologically transmitted between hosts via tick-vectors and although they have inherent differences, they ...

  13. Beam quality measure for vector beams.

    PubMed

    Ndagano, Bienvenu; Sroor, Hend; McLaren, Melanie; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Vector beams have found a myriad of applications, from laser materials processing to microscopy, and are now easily produced in the laboratory. They are usually differentiated from scalar beams by qualitative measures, for example, visual inspection of beam profiles after a rotating polarizer. Here we introduce a quantitative beam quality measure for vector beams and demonstrate it on cylindrical vector vortex beams. We show how a single measure can be defined for the vector quality, from 0 (purely scalar) to 1 (purely vector). Our measure is derived from a quantum toolkit, which we show applies to classical vector beams. PMID:27472580

  14. A new xenograft model of myeloma bone disease demonstrating the efficacy of human mesenchymal stem cells expressing osteoprotegerin by lentiviral gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Rabin, N; Kyriakou, C; Coulton, L; Gallagher, O M; Buckle, C; Benjamin, R; Singh, N; Glassford, J; Otsuki, T; Nathwani, A C; Croucher, P I; Yong, K L

    2007-10-01

    We describe a new model of myeloma bone disease in which beta2m NOD/SCID mice injected with KMS-12-BM cells develop medullary disease after tail vein administration. Micro-computed tomography analysis demonstrated significant bone loss in the tibiae and vertebrae of diseased animals compared to controls, with loss of cortical bone (P<0.01), as well as trabecular bone volume, thickness and number (P<0.05 for all). Bone marrow of diseased animals demonstrated an increase in osteoclasts (P<0.01) and reduction in osteoblasts (P<0.01) compared to control animals. Both bone loss and osteoclast increase correlated with the degree of disease involvement. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were lentivirally transduced to express human osteoprotegerin (hOPG). Systemic administration of OPG expressing MSC reduced osteoclast activation (P<0.01) and trabecular bone loss in the vertebrae (P<0.05) and tibiae of diseased animals, to levels comparable to non-diseased controls. Because of its predominantly medullary involvement and quantifiable parameters of bone disease, the KMS-12-BM xenogeneic model provides unique opportunities to test therapies targeted at the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:17657224

  15. Lentiviral-mediated over-expression of hyaluronan synthase-1 (HAS-1) decreases the cellular inflammatory response and results in regenerative wound repair.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Robert C; Allukian, Myron; Lind, Robert C; Herdrich, Benjamin J; Xu, Junwang; Radu, Antoneta; Mitchell, Marc E; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2013-01-01

    Fetal wounds have been found to have increased levels of high-molecular-weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA) compared with those of adults. The primary enzyme responsible for producing HMW-HA is hyaluronic acid synthase-1 (HAS-1). We hypothesized that over-expression of HAS-1 in adult dermal wounds would decrease inflammation and promote regenerative healing. To test this hypothesis, the flanks of adult C57Bl/6 mice were treated with a lentiviral construct containing either HAS-1-GFP or GFP transgenes. After 48 h, a 4-mm excisional wound was made at the site of treatment. Wounds were harvested at days 3, 7, or 28 after wounding. Wound phenotype was assessed by histology to examine tissue architecture and immunohistochemistry for CD45. At 7 and 28 days, lenti-HAS-1-treated wounds demonstrated the restoration of the normal dermal elements and organized collagen fiber orientation. In contrast, the lenti-GFP-treated wounds lacked normal dermal architecture and demonstrated a disorganized collagen scar. At 3 and 7 days, wounds treated with lenti-HAS-1 exhibited a significant decrease in the number of inflammatory cells when compared with wounds treated with lenti-GFP. Thus, HAS-1 over-expression promotes dermal regeneration, in part by decreasing the inflammatory response and by recapitulation of fetal extracellular matrix HMW-HA content. PMID:23149717

  16. 43 CFR 4110.2-1 - Base property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Base property. 4110.2-1 Section 4110.2-1... and Preference § 4110.2-1 Base property. (a) The authorized officer shall find land or water owned or... lessee's interest in water previously recognized as base property on public land shall be...

  17. 43 CFR 4110.2-1 - Base property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Base property. 4110.2-1 Section 4110.2-1... and Preference § 4110.2-1 Base property. (a) The authorized officer shall find land or water owned or... lessee's interest in water previously recognized as base property on public land shall be...

  18. 43 CFR 4110.2-1 - Base property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Base property. 4110.2-1 Section 4110.2-1... and Preference § 4110.2-1 Base property. (a) The authorized officer shall find land or water owned or... lessee's interest in water previously recognized as base property on public land shall be...

  19. 43 CFR 4110.2-1 - Base property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... base property and be available through application and transfer procedures at 43 CFR 4110.2-3, to the... and Preference § 4110.2-1 Base property. (a) The authorized officer shall find land or water owned or... lessee's interest in water previously recognized as base property on public land shall be...

  20. Normal vector magnetocardiogram. I. Correlation with the normal vector ECG.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, J; Oja, S; Malmivuo, J

    1994-07-01

    The vector magnetocardiogram (VMCG) has been measured with the corrected unipositional VMCG lead system and analyzed statistically in 290 normal subjects. The morphologic study of the QRS waveforms showed that in the right-to-left (X) component, the triphasic qRs waveform appeared in 55% of the subjects. The superoinferior (Y) component was characterized by a prominent S wave in 96% of the subjects, and the anteroposterior (Z) component was also characterized by a prominent S wave in 95% . The VMGs were compared with the vector electrocardiograms (VECG) recorded in a subgroup of 200 subjects, in whom both the VMCG and VECG were available for computer analysis. The normal variability of the spatial vector magnitude measurements was significantly greater in the VMCG than in the VECG. Some similarities were observed in the waveforms of the time-averaged QRS complexes between the VMCG and VECG. Multiple linear regression analysis between the VMCG and VECG showed that maximally 27, 45, and 41% of the variation in the instantaneous QRS X, Y, and Z amplitudes of the VMCG, respectively, could be explained by the instantaneous X, Y, and Z amplitudes of the VECG. PMID:7930985

  1. Utilizing a TLR5-Adjuvanted Cytomegalovirus as a Lentiviral Vaccine in the Nonhuman Primate Model for AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Deere, Jesse D.; Chang, W. L. William; Castillo, Luis D.; Schmidt, Kim A.; Kieu, Hung T.; Renzette, Nicholas; Kowalik, Timothy; Barthold, Stephen W.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Barry, Peter A.; Sparger, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite tremendous progress in our understanding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) natural history and advances in HIV treatment, there is neither an approved vaccine nor a cure for infection. Here, we describe the development and characterization of a novel replicating vaccine vector utilizing Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and a TLR5 adjuvant. After partial truncation of the central, immunodominant hypervariable domain, flagellin (fliC) from Salmonella was cloned downstream of a codon optimized gag gene from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and transiently expressed in telomerized rhesus fibroblast (TeloRF) cells in culture. Lysates generated from these transfected cells induced the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), in a mouse macrophage cell line, in a TLR5-dependent manner. The Gag/FliC expression construct was cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the rhesus CMV (RhCMV) genome, and infectious RhCMV was generated following transfection of TeloRF cells. This virus stably expressed an SIV Gag/FliC fusion protein through four serial passages. Lysates generated from infected cells induced TNF-α in a TLR5-dependent manner. Western blot analysis of infected cell lysates verified expression of a Gag/FliC fusion protein using a SIV p27 capsid monoclonal antibody. Lastly, rhesus macaques inoculated with this novel RhCMV virus demonstrated increased inflammatory responses at the site of inoculation seven days post-infection when compared to the parental RhCMV. These results demonstrate that an artificially constructed replicating RhCMV expressing an SIV Gag/FliC fusion protein is capable of activating TLR5 in a macrophage cell line in vitro and induction of an altered inflammatory response in vivo. Ongoing animals studies are aimed at determining vaccine efficacy, including subsequent challenge with pathogenic SIV. PMID:27182601

  2. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  3. Vectorized Jiles-Atherton hysteresis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymański, Grzegorz; Waszak, Michał

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with vector hysteresis modeling. A vector model consisting of individual Jiles-Atherton components placed along principal axes is proposed. The cross-axis coupling ensures general vector model properties. Minor loops are obtained using scaling method. The model is intended for efficient finite element method computations defined in terms of magnetic vector potential. Numerical efficiency is ensured by differential susceptibility approach.

  4. CRAY-1S integer vector utility library

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Tooman, T.P.

    1982-06-01

    This report describes thirty-five integer or packed vector utility routines, and documents their testing. These routines perform various vector searches, linear algebra functions, memory resets, and vector boolean operations. They are written in CAL, the assembly language on the CRAY-1S computer. By utilizing the vector processing features of that machine, they are optimized in terms of run time. Each routine has been extensively tested.

  5. On spinors and null vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinich, Marco

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relations between spinors and null vectors in Clifford algebra of any dimension with particular emphasis on the conditions that a spinor must satisfy to be simple (also: pure). In particular, we prove: (i) a new property for null vectors: each of them bisects spinor space into two subspaces of equal size; (ii) that simple spinors form one-dimensional subspaces of spinor space; (iii) a necessary and sufficient condition for a spinor to be simple that generalizes a theorem of Cartan and Chevalley which becomes a corollary of this result. We also show how to write down easily the most general spinor with a given associated totally null plane. This paper is dedicated to the memory of my father Paolo Budinich who passed away in November 2013 not before transferring to me his enthusiasm for simple spinors.

  6. Vector fields in holographic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B. Hartle, James; Hawking, S. W.; Hertog, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We extend the holographic formulation of the semiclassical no-boundary wave function (NBWF) to models with Maxwell vector fields. It is shown that the familiar saddle points of the NBWF have a representation in which a regular, Euclidean asymptotic AdS geometry smoothly joins onto a Lorentzian asymptotically de Sitter universe through a complex transition region. The tree level probabilities of Lorentzian histories are fully specified by the action of the AdS region of the saddle points. The scalar and vector matter profiles in this region are complex from an AdS viewpoint, with universal asymptotic phases. The dual description of the semiclassical NBWF thus involves complex deformations of Euclidean CFTs.

  7. Viral vectors for vaccine applications

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youngjoo

    2013-01-01

    Traditional approach of inactivated or live-attenuated vaccine immunization has resulted in impressive success in the reduction and control of infectious disease outbreaks. However, many pathogens remain less amenable to deal with the traditional vaccine strategies, and more appropriate vaccine strategy is in need. Recent discoveries that led to increased understanding of viral molecular biology and genetics has rendered the used of viruses as vaccine platforms and as potential anti-cancer agents. Due to their ability to effectively induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, viral vectors are deemed as an attractive alternative to the traditional platforms to deliver vaccine antigens as well as to specifically target and kill tumor cells. With potential targets ranging from cancers to a vast number of infectious diseases, the benefits resulting from successful application of viral vectors to prevent and treat human diseases can be immense. PMID:23858400

  8. Medium Modification of Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Chaden Djalali, Michael Paolone, Dennis Weygand, Michael H. Wood, Rakhsha Nasseripour

    2011-03-01

    The theory of the strong interaction, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), has been remarkably successful in describing high-energy and short-distance-scale experiments involving quarks and gluons. However, applying QCD to low energy and large-distance scale experiments has been a major challenge. Various QCD-inspired models predict a partial restoration of chiral symmetry in nuclear matter with modifications of the properties of hadrons from their free-space values. Measurable changes such as a shift in mass and/or a change of width are predicted at normal nuclear density. Photoproduction of vector mesons off nuclei have been performed at different laboratories. The properties of the ρ, ω and φ mesons are investigated either directly by measuring their mass spectra or indirectly through transparency ratios. The latest results regarding medium modifications of the vector mesons in the nuclear medium will be discussed.

  9. Gene targeting with retroviral vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.; Bernstein, A. )

    1989-04-01

    The authors have designed and constructed integration-defective retroviral vectors to explore their potential for gene targeting in mammalian cells. Two nonoverlapping deletion mutants of the bacterial neomycin resistance (neo) gene were used to detect homologous recombination events between viral and chromosomal sequences. Stable neo gene correction events were selected at a frequency of approximately 1 G418/sup r/ cell per 3 x 10/sup 6/ infected cells. Analysis of the functional neo gene in independent targeted cell clones indicated that unintegrated retroviral linear DNA recombined with the target by gene conversion for variable distances into regions of nonhomology. In addition, transient neo gene correction events which were associated with the complete loss of the chromosomal target sequences were observed. These results demonstrated that retroviral vectors can recombine with homologous chromosomal sequences in rodent and human cells.

  10. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  11. Vector computer memory bank contention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    A number of vector supercomputers feature very large memories. Unfortunately the large capacity memory chips that are used in these computers are much slower than the fast central processing unit (CPU) circuitry. As a result, memory bank reservation times (in CPU ticks) are much longer than on previous generations of computers. A consequence of these long reservation times is that memory bank contention is sharply increased, resulting in significantly lowered performance rates. The phenomenon of memory bank contention in vector computers is analyzed using both a Markov chain model and a Monte Carlo simulation program. The results of this analysis indicate that future generations of supercomputers must either employ much faster memory chips or else feature very large numbers of independent memory banks.

  12. GAPS IN SUPPORT VECTOR OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    STEINWART, INGO; HUSH, DON; SCOVEL, CLINT; LIST, NICOLAS

    2007-01-29

    We show that the stopping criteria used in many support vector machine (SVM) algorithms working on the dual can be interpreted as primal optimality bounds which in turn are known to be important for the statistical analysis of SVMs. To this end we revisit the duality theory underlying the derivation of the dual and show that in many interesting cases primal optimality bounds are the same as known dual optimality bounds.

  13. Biological rhythms and vector insects

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Mirian David

    2013-01-01

    The adjustment of all species, animals and plants, to the Earth’s cyclic environments is ensured by their temporal organisation. The relationships between parasites, vectors and hosts rely greatly upon the synchronisation of their biological rhythms, especially circadian rhythms. In this short note, parasitic infections by Protozoa and by microfilariae have been chosen as examples of the dependence of successful transmission mechanisms on temporal components. PMID:24473803

  14. Systolic architectures for vector quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Grant A.; Cappello, Peter R.; Gersho, Allen

    1988-01-01

    A family of architectural techniques are proposed which offer efficient computation of weighted Euclidean distance measures for nearest-neighbor codebook searching. The general approach uses a single metric comparator chip in conjunction with a linear array of inner product processor chips. Very high vector-quantization (VQ) throughput can be achieved for many speech and image-processing applications. Several alternative configurations allow reasonable tradeoffs between speed and VLSI chip area required.

  15. Visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helman, James L.; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1991-01-01

    Methods of automating the analysis and display of vector field topology in general and flow topology in particular are discussed. Two-dimensional vector field topology is reviewed as the basis for the examination of topology in three-dimensional separated flows. The use of tangent surfaces and clipping in visualizing vector field topology in fluid flows is addressed.

  16. Problems with the Method of Correlated Vectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashton, M.C.; Lee, K.

    2005-01-01

    The method of correlated vectors has been used widely to identify variables that are associated with general intelligence (g). Briefly, this method involves finding the correlation between the vector of intelligence subtests' g-loadings and the vector of those subtests' correlations with the variable in question. We describe two major problems…

  17. MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-10

    MISR Level 3 Cloud Motion Vector Level 3 Wednesday, November 7, 2012 ... A new version, F02_0002, of the MISR L3 CMV (Cloud Motion Vector) data product is now available. This new release provides finer ... coverage. These enhancements are the result of reorganizing motion vector information present in the recent Level 2 Cloud product as ...

  18. Gaussian statistics for palaeomagnetic vectors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.J.; Constable, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of treating the statistics of palaeomagnetic directions and intensities jointly and consistently, we represent the mean and the variance of palaeomagnetic vectors, at a particular site and of a particular polarity, by a probability density function in a Cartesian three-space of orthogonal magnetic-field components consisting of a single (unimoda) non-zero mean, spherically-symmetrical (isotropic) Gaussian function. For palaeomagnetic data of mixed polarities, we consider a bimodal distribution consisting of a pair of such symmetrical Gaussian functions, with equal, but opposite, means and equal variances. For both the Gaussian and bi-Gaussian distributions, and in the spherical three-space of intensity, inclination, and declination, we obtain analytical expressions for the marginal density functions, the cumulative distributions, and the expected values and variances for each spherical coordinate (including the angle with respect to the axis of symmetry of the distributions). The mathematical expressions for the intensity and off-axis angle are closed-form and especially manageable, with the intensity distribution being Rayleigh-Rician. In the limit of small relative vectorial dispersion, the Gaussian (bi-Gaussian) directional distribution approaches a Fisher (Bingham) distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a normal distribution. In the opposite limit of large relative vectorial dispersion, the directional distributions approach a spherically-uniform distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a Maxwell distribution. We quantify biases in estimating the properties of the vector field resulting from the use of simple arithmetic averages, such as estimates of the intensity or the inclination of the mean vector, or the variances of these quantities. With the statistical framework developed here and using the maximum-likelihood method, which gives unbiased estimates in the limit of large data numbers, we demonstrate how to

  19. Generation of X-CGD cells for vector evaluation from healthy donor CD34(+) HSCs by shRNA-mediated knock down of gp91(phox).

    PubMed

    Brendel, Christian; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Krattenmacher, Anja; Pahujani, Shweta; Grez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Innovative approaches for the treatment of rare inherited diseases are hampered by limited availability of patient derived samples for preclinical research. This also applies for the evaluation of novel vector systems for the gene therapy of monogenic hematological diseases like X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD), a severe primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the gp91(phox) subunit of the phagocytic NADPH oxidase. Since current gene therapy protocols involve ex vivo gene modification of autologous CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the ideal preclinical model should simulate faithfully this procedure. However, the low availability of patient-derived CD34(+) cells limits the feasibility of this approach. Here, we describe a straightforward experimental strategy that circumvents this limitation. The knock down of gp91(phox) expression upon lentiviral delivery of shRNAs into CD34(+) cells from healthy donors generates sufficient amounts of X-CGD CD34(+) cells which subsequently can be used for the evaluation of novel gene therapeutic strategies using a codon-optimized gp91(phox) transgene. We have used this strategy to test the potential of a novel gene therapy vector for X-CGD. PMID:26015977

  20. Sustained lentiviral-mediated overexpression of microRNA124a in the dentate gyrus exacerbates anxiety- and autism-like behaviors associated with neonatal isolation in rats.

    PubMed

    Bahi, Amine

    2016-09-15

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are highly disabling psychiatric disorders. Despite a strong genetic etiology, there are no efficient therapeutic interventions that target the core symptoms of ASD. Emerging evidence suggests that dysfunction of microRNA (miR) machinery may contribute to the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in ASD. Here, we report a stress model demonstrating that neonatal isolation-induced long-lasting hippocampal elevation of miR124a was associated with reduced expression of its target BDNF mRNA. In addition, we investigated the impact of lentiviral-mediated overexpression of miR124a into the dentate gyrus (DG) on social interaction, repetitive- and anxiety-like behaviors in the neonatal isolation (Iso) model of autism. Rats isolated from the dams on PND 1 to PND 11 were assessed for their social interaction, marble burying test (MBT) and repetitive self-grooming behaviors as adults following miR124a overexpression. Also, anxiety-like behavior and locomotion were evaluated in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and open-field (OF) tests. Results show that, consistent with previously published reports, Iso rats displayed decreased social interaction contacts but increased repetitive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Interestingly, across both autism- and anxiety-like behavioral assays, miR124a overexpression in the DG significantly exacerbated repetitive behaviors, social impairments and anxiety with no effect on locomotor activity. Our novel findings attribute neonatal isolation-inducible cognitive impairments to induction of miR124a and consequently suppressed BDNF mRNA, opening venues for intercepting these miR124a-mediated damages. They also highlight the importance of studying microRNAs in the context of ASD and identify miR124a as a novel potential therapeutic target for improving mood disorders. PMID:27211062

  1. Enhancement of CYP3A4 Activity in Hep G2 Cells by Lentiviral Transfection of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1 Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Tsai-Shin; Yang, Kai-Chiang; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2014-01-01

    Human hepatoma cell lines are commonly used as alternatives to primary hepatocytes for the study of drug metabolism in vitro. However, the phase I cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme activities in these cell lines occur at a much lower level than their corresponding activities in primary hepatocytes, and thus these cell lines may not accurately predict drug metabolism. In the present study, we selected hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 alpha (HNF1α) from six transcriptional regulators for lentiviral transfection into Hep G2 cells to optimally increase their expression of the CYP3A4 enzyme, which is the major CYP enzyme in the human body. We subsequently found that HNF1α-transfected Hep G2 enhanced the CYP3A4 expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner and the activity was noted to increase with time and peaked 7 days. With a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100, CYP3A4 expression increased 19-fold and enzyme activity more than doubled at day 7. With higher MOI (1,000 to 3,000), the activity increased 8- to 10-fold; however, it was noted the higher MOI, the higher cell death rate and lower cell survival. Furthermore, the CYP3A4 activity in the HNF1α-transfected cells could be induced by CYP3A4-specific inducer, rifampicin, and metabolized nifedipine in a dose-dependent manner. With an MOI of 3,000, nifedipine-metabolizing activity was 6-fold of control and as high as 66% of primary hepatocytes. In conclusion, forceful delivery of selected transcriptional regulators into human hepatoma cells might be a valuable method to enhance the CYP activity for a more accurate determination of drug metabolism in vitro. PMID:24733486

  2. Vaccine Design: Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Xiang, Zhiquan; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2016-01-01

    Replication-defective adenovirus (Ad) vectors were initially developed for gene transfer for correction of genetic diseases. Although Ad vectors achieved high levels of transgene product expression in a variety of target cells, expression of therapeutic proteins was found to be transient as vigorous T cell responses directed to components of the vector as well as the transgene product rapidly eliminate Ad vector-transduced cells. This opened the use of Ad vectors as vaccine carriers and by now a multitude of preclinical as well as clinical studies has shown that Ad vectors induce very potent and sustained transgene product-specific T and B cell responses. This chapter provides guidance on developing E1-deleted Ad vectors based on available viral molecular clones. Specifically, it describes methods for cloning, viral rescue and purification as well as quality control studies. PMID:27076309

  3. Multiscale vector fields for image pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, Kah-Chan; Coggins, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A uniform processing framework for low-level vision computing in which a bank of spatial filters maps the image intensity structure at each pixel into an abstract feature space is proposed. Some properties of the filters and the feature space are described. Local orientation is measured by a vector sum in the feature space as follows: each filter's preferred orientation along with the strength of the filter's output determine the orientation and the length of a vector in the feature space; the vectors for all filters are summed to yield a resultant vector for a particular pixel and scale. The orientation of the resultant vector indicates the local orientation, and the magnitude of the vector indicates the strength of the local orientation preference. Limitations of the vector sum method are discussed. Investigations show that the processing framework provides a useful, redundant representation of image structure across orientation and scale.

  4. Comparative investigation of multiplane thrust vectoring nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F.; Smereczniak, P.; Spetnagel, D.; Thayer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inflight aerodynamic performance of multiplane vectoring nozzles is critical to development of advanced aircraft and flight control systems utilizing thrust vectoring. To investigate vectoring nozzle performance, subscale models of two second-generation thrust vectoring nozzle concepts currently under development for advanced fighters were integrated into an axisymmetric test pod. Installed drag and vectoring performance characteristics of both concepts were experimentally determined in wind tunnel testing. CFD analyses were conducted to understand the impact of internal flow turning on thrust vectoring characteristics. Both nozzles exhibited drag comparable with current nonvectoring axisymmetric nozzles. During vectored-thrust operations, forces produced by external flow effects amounted to about 25 percent of the total force measured.

  5. A novel dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector, encoding Ag85A-ESAT6 fusion gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mehdi; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Ghanei, Mostafa; Arashkia, Arash; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), leading to high mortality worldwide. It is well-established that cellular immunity plays a critical role to control Mtb infection. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells, which play an important role to prime cell-mediated immune responses. In vivo targeting of DCs has been shown to induce both strong cellular immunity and protection against tumor challenges. The aim of the present study was not only to assess the immunizing potential of a novel DC-targeted recombinant lentivirus expressing fusion antigen Ag85A-ESAT6 of Mtb, but also to compare it with a recombinant lentivirus with broad cellular tropism expressing the same antigen in mice. The findings demonstrated that our novel recombinant DC-targeted lentivector was able to successfully transduce and express the fusion antigen Ag85A-E6 in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, a single footpad injection of targeted lentivectors could elicit strong T-helper 1 (Th1) immunity against the above mentioned antigen, as indicated by the specific high-level production of IFN-γ and IL-2 using spleen lymphocytes and lymphoproliferative responses. Despite of these promising results, more attempts are required to elucidate the protective and therapeutic efficacy of this approach in future. PMID:27267270

  6. The spin vector of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Chandler, J. F.; Campbell, D. B.; Hine, A. A.; Stacy, N. J. S.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of radar observations from 1964 through 1983 yields the following values for the components of the spin vector of Venus: P = 243.026 + or - 0.006 d (retrograde); alpha = 272.75 + or - 0.09 deg; and delta = 67.10 + or - 0.09 deg, where the standard errors quoted are three- to five-fold larger than the statistical standard errors and encompass the changes in results obtained by various tests designed to expose possible systematic errors. These values demonstrate conclusively that the spin state of Venus is not in resonance with the relative orbital motions of Venus and earth.

  7. The Magsat precision vector magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the Magsat precision vector magnetometer which is designed to measure projections of the ambient field in three orthogonal directions. The system contains a highly stable and linear triaxial fluxgate magnetometer with a dynamic range of + or - 2000 nT (1 nT = 10 to the -9 weber per sq m). The magnetometer electronics, analog-to-digital converter, and digitally controlled current sources are implemented with redundant designs to avoid a loss of data in case of failures. Measurements are carried out with an accuracy of + or - 1 part in 64,000 in magnitude and 5 arcsec in orientation (1 arcsec = 0.00028 deg).

  8. Vector quantization for volume rendering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ning, Paul; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    Volume rendering techniques typically process volumetric data in raw, uncompressed form. As algorithmic and architectural advances improve rendering speeds, however, larger data sets will be evaluated requiring consideration of data storage and transmission issues. In this paper, we analyze the data compression requirements for volume rendering applications and present a solution based on vector quantization. The proposed system compresses volumetric data and then renders images directly from the new data format. Tests on a fluid flow data set demonstrate that good image quality may be achieved at a compression ratio of 17:1 with only a 5 percent cost in additional rendering time.

  9. Vector wind profile gust model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelfang, S. I.; Smith, O. E.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a vector wind gust model that is suitable for orbital flight test operations and trade studies was studied. Verification of the hypothesis that gust component variables are gamma distributed, gust modulus is approximately Weibull distributed, and zonal and meridional gust components are bivariate gamma distributed is emphasized. A method of testing for bivariate gamma distributed variables, and two distributions for gust modulus are described. The results of extensive hypothesis testing of one of the distributions are presented, and the validity of the gamma distribution for representation of gust component variables is established.

  10. Jet vectoring through nozzle asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Rosakis, Alexandros; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    Previously, we explored the functionality of a tri-leaflet anal valve of a dragonfly larva. We saw that the dragonfly larva is capable of controlling the three leaflets independently to asymmetrically open the nozzle. Such control resulted in vectoring of the jet in various directions. To further understand the effect of asymmetric nozzle orifice, we tested jet flow through circular asymmetric nozzles. We report the relationship between nozzle asymmetry and redirecting of the jet at various Reynolds numbers. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  11. Vector field theories in cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, A.; Radicella, N.

    2007-10-15

    Recently proposed theories based on the cosmic presence of a vectorial field are compared and contrasted. In particular the so-called Einstein aether theory is discussed in parallel with a recent proposal of a strained space-time theory (cosmic defect theory). We show that the latter fits reasonably well the cosmic observed data with only one, or at most two, adjustable parameters, while other vector theories use much more. The Newtonian limits are also compared. Finally we show that the cosmic defect theory may be considered as a special case of the aether theories, corresponding to a more compact and consistent paradigm.

  12. Nonviral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    The development of nonviral vectors for safe and efficient gene delivery has been gaining considerable attention recently. An ideal nonviral vector must protect the gene against degradation by nuclease in the extracellular matrix, internalize the plasma membrane, escape from the endosomal compartment, unpackage the gene at some point and have no detrimental effects. In comparison to viruses, nonviral vectors are relatively easy to synthesize, less immunogenic, low in cost, and have no limitation in the size of a gene that can be delivered. Significant progress has been made in the basic science and applications of various nonviral gene delivery vectors; however, the majority of nonviral approaches are still inefficient and often toxic. To this end, two nonviral gene delivery systems using either biodegradable poly(D,L-lactide- co-glycolide) (PLG) nanoparticles or cell penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes have been designed and studied using A549 human lung epithelial cells. PLG nanoparticles were optimized for gene delivery by varying particle surface chemistry using different coating materials that adsorb to the particle surface during formation. A variety of cationic coating materials were studied and compared to more conventional surfactants used for PLG nanoparticle fabrication. Nanoparticles (˜200 nm) efficiently encapsulated plasmids encoding for luciferase (80-90%) and slowly released the same for two weeks. After a delay, moderate levels of gene expression appeared at day 5 for certain positively charged PLG particles and gene expression was maintained for at least two weeks. In contrast, gene expression mediated by polyethyleneimine (PEI) ended at day 5. PLG particles were also significantly less cytotoxic than PEI suggesting the use of these vehicles for localized, sustained gene delivery to the pulmonary epithelium. On the other hand, a more simple method to synthesize 50-200 nm complexes capable of high transfection efficiency or high gene knockdown was

  13. Quantum Electrodynamics for Vector Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Djukanovic, Dalibor; Schindler, Matthias R.; Scherer, Stefan; Gegelia, Jambul

    2005-07-01

    Quantum electrodynamics for {rho} mesons is considered. It is shown that, at the tree level, the value of the gyromagnetic ratio of the {rho}{sup +} is fixed to 2 in a self-consistent effective quantum field theory. Further, the mixing parameter of the photon and the neutral vector meson is equal to the ratio of electromagnetic and strong couplings, leading to the mass difference M{sub {rho}}{sub {sup 0}}-M{sub {rho}}{sub {sup {+-}}}{approx}1 MeV at tree order.

  14. Properties of Vector Preisach Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, Gary R.; Patel, Umesh D.; Torre, Edward Della

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses rotational anisotropy and rotational accommodation of magnetic particle tape. These effects have a performance impact during the reading and writing of the recording process. We introduce the reduced vector model as the basis for the computations. Rotational magnetization models must accurately compute the anisotropic characteristics of ellipsoidally magnetizable media. An ellipticity factor is derived for these media that computes the two-dimensional magnetization trajectory for all applied fields. An orientation correction must be applied to the computed rotational magnetization. For isotropic materials, an orientation correction has been developed and presented. For anisotropic materials, an orientation correction is introduced.

  15. Vector-tensor and vector-vector decay amplitude analysis of B0-->phiK*0.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Sanchez, P del Amo; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Lodovico, F Di; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Nardo, G De; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Buono, L Del; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Marco, E Di; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Ricca, G Della; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-02-01

    We perform an amplitude analysis of the decays B(0)-->phiK*(2)(1430)(0), phiK*(892)(0), and phi(Kpi)(0)(S-wave) with a sample of about 384x10(6) BB[over ] pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. The fractions of longitudinal polarization f(L) of the vector-tensor and vector-vector decay modes are measured to be 0.853(-0.069+0.061)+/-0.036 and 0.506+/-0.040+/-0.015, respectively. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay and seven parameters for the vector-tensor decay, including the branching fractions and parameters sensitive to CP violation. PMID:17358843

  16. Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Higa, Yukiko

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is affected by climatic factors. In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution. The different responses of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus to various environments result in a difference in spatial distribution along north-south and urban-rural gradients, and between the indoors and outdoors. In the north-south gradient, climate associated with survival is an important factor in spatial distribution. In the urban-rural gradient, different distribution reflects a difference in adult niches and is modified by geographic and human factors. The direct response of the two species to the environment around houses is related to different spatial distribution indoors and outdoors. Dengue viruses circulate mainly between human and vector mosquitoes, and the vector presence is a limiting factor of transmission. Therefore, spatial distribution of dengue vectors is a significant concern in the epidemiology of the disease. Current technologies such as GIS, satellite imagery and statistical models allow researchers to predict the spatial distribution of vectors in the changing environment. Although it is difficult to confirm the actual effect of environmental and climate changes on vector abundance and vector-borne diseases, environmental changes caused by humans and human behavioral changes due to climate change can be expected to exert an impact on dengue vectors. Longitudinal monitoring of dengue vectors and viruses is therefore necessary. PMID:22500133

  17. Genetics of Mosquito Vector Competence

    PubMed Central

    Beerntsen, Brenda T.; James, Anthony A.; Christensen, Bruce M.

    2000-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are responsible for significant human morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Efforts to control mosquito-borne diseases have been impeded, in part, by the development of drug-resistant parasites, insecticide-resistant mosquitoes, and environmental concerns over the application of insecticides. Therefore, there is a need to develop novel disease control strategies that can complement or replace existing control methods. One such strategy is to generate pathogen-resistant mosquitoes from those that are susceptible. To this end, efforts have focused on isolating and characterizing genes that influence mosquito vector competence. It has been known for over 70 years that there is a genetic basis for the susceptibility of mosquitoes to parasites, but until the advent of powerful molecular biological tools and protocols, it was difficult to assess the interactions of pathogens with their host tissues within the mosquito at a molecular level. Moreover, it has been only recently that the molecular mechanisms responsible for pathogen destruction, such as melanotic encapsulation and immune peptide production, have been investigated. The molecular characterization of genes that influence vector competence is becoming routine, and with the development of the Sindbis virus transducing system, potential antipathogen genes now can be introduced into the mosquito and their effect on parasite development can be assessed in vivo. With the recent successes in the field of mosquito germ line transformation, it seems likely that the generation of a pathogen-resistant mosquito population from a susceptible population soon will become a reality. PMID:10704476

  18. Viral vectors for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Harrop, Richard; Carroll, Miles W

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade, immunotherapy approaches for the treatment of cancer have been investigated with renewed vigour, perhaps catalyzed by the clinical successes seen with monoclonal antibody and cytokine based therapies. The identification of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) in multiple cancer types has enabled the development of targeted immunotherapies and allayed some of the safety concerns associated with the induction of deleterious autoimmune reactions. In addition to the TAA or therapeutic gene, the antigen delivery system is equally as important for the development of a successful cancer vaccine. One approach to induce a potent and targeted antitumor response is to use viruses to deliver the TAA to cells of the immune system. A diverse array of oncolytic viruses and recombinant viral vectors encoding numerous therapeutic genes or TAAs have been tested in pre-clinical studies and produced results which, in some cases, justify their clinical development as potential cancer immunotherapies. Within the last 5-10 years, many such recombinant vectors have made the transition from pre-clinical research to clinical development and it is these, which are given most weight in this review. PMID:16146772

  19. Volumetric Acoustic Vector Intensity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klos, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    A new measurement tool capable of imaging the acoustic intensity vector throughout a large volume is discussed. This tool consists of an array of fifty microphones that form a spherical surface of radius 0.2m. A simultaneous measurement of the pressure field across all the microphones provides time-domain near-field holograms. Near-field acoustical holography is used to convert the measured pressure into a volumetric vector intensity field as a function of frequency on a grid of points ranging from the center of the spherical surface to a radius of 0.4m. The volumetric intensity is displayed on three-dimensional plots that are used to locate noise sources outside the volume. There is no restriction on the type of noise source that can be studied. The sphere is mobile and can be moved from location to location to hunt for unidentified noise sources. An experiment inside a Boeing 757 aircraft in flight successfully tested the ability of the array to locate low-noise-excited sources on the fuselage. Reference transducers located on suspected noise source locations can also be used to increase the ability of this device to separate and identify multiple noise sources at a given frequency by using the theory of partial field decomposition. The frequency range of operation is 0 to 1400Hz. This device is ideal for the study of noise sources in commercial and military transportation vehicles in air, on land and underwater.

  20. Coexistence and interaction of vector and bound vector solitons in a dispersion-managed fiber laser mode locked by graphene.

    PubMed

    Song, Y F; Zhang, H; Zhao, L M; Shen, D Y; Tang, D Y

    2016-01-25

    We report on the experimental observation of vector and bound vector solitons in a fiber laser passively mode locked by graphene. Localized interactions between vector solitons, vector soliton with bound vector solitons, and vector soliton with a bunch of vector solitons are experimentally investigated. We show that depending on the soliton interactions, various stable and dynamic multiple vector soliton states could be formed. PMID:26832559

  1. Production and neurotropism of lentivirus vectors pseudotyped with lyssavirus envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Desmaris, N; Bosch, A; Salaün, C; Petit, C; Prévost, M C; Tordo, N; Perrin, P; Schwartz, O; de Rocquigny, H; Heard, J M

    2001-08-01

    We investigated the production efficiency and the gene transfer capacity in the central nervous system of HIV-1-based vectors pseudotyped with either the G protein of the Mokola lyssaviruses (MK-G), a neurotropic virus causing rabies disease, or the vesiculo-stomatitis G protein (VSV-G). Both envelopes induced syncitia in cell cultures. They were incorporated into vector particles and mature virions were observed by electron microscopy. Vector production was two- to sixfold more efficient with VSV-G than with MK-G. For equivalent amounts of physical particles, vector titration was 5- to 25-fold higher with VSV-G than with MK-G pseudotypes on cultured cells, and in vivo gene expression in mouse brain was more intense. Thus, VSV-G pseudotypes were produced more efficiently and were more infectious than MK-G pseudotypes. Tropism for brain cells was analyzed by intrastriatal injections in rats. Both pseudotypes preferentially transduced neurons (70-90% of transduced cells). Retrograde axonal transport was investigated by instilling vector suspensions in the rat nasal cavity. Both pseudotypes were efficiently transported to olfactive neuron bodies. Thus, although coating HIV-1 particles with rabdhovirus envelope glycoproteins enables them to enter neuronal cells efficiently, pseudotyping is not sufficient to confer the powerful neurotropism of lyssaviruses to lentivirus vectors. PMID:11482987

  2. Overview of vector sensors for undersea applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEachern, James F.

    2003-10-01

    An overview of vector sensors for sonar applications is presented. The most prolific use of vector or pressure gradient sensors has been in directional sonobuoys to accomplish effective directional measurements with a sensor that is much smaller than the signal wavelength. Common characteristics, implementation issues, and self noise sources of directional hydrophones are reviewed. Arrays of vector sensors began to emerge in the 1980s and have the attractive property of being able to provide substantially higher directivity for a smaller equivalent aperture than that required for a scalar (omnidirectional) sensor array. Dyadic sensors bring additional directivity but development is required to realize them in a compact configuration. Future applications of vector sensors are discussed. The limited amount of information relative to the ocean acoustic vector fields is noted as a corollary technological requirement for the widespread adoption of vector sensors in sonar systems.

  3. Transforming Vectors Measured By Noncoaligned Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, James R.; Dahlstrom, Eric L.

    1993-01-01

    Method for computing relationships between coordinate axes of two vector-measuring instruments not aligned with each other, one need only measure two nonparallel vectors u and v simultaneously in both coordinate systems. These measurements provide all data needed to compute transformation of any vector from one coordinate system to other. Particularly useful in computing alignments and transformations between accelerometers, gyroscopes, and instruments mounted on platforms subjected to vibrations, thermal strains, and other distortions causing alignments to vary unpredictably with time.

  4. A surface-towed vector magnetometer