Science.gov

Sample records for 1-degree digital elevation

  1. Comparison of 7.5-minute and 1-degree digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Dennis L.; Ripple, William J.

    1995-01-01

    We compared two digital elevation models (DEM's) for the Echo Mountain SE quadrangle in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Comparisons were made between 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) and 1-degree (1:250,000-scale) images using the variables of elevation, slope aspect, and slope gradient. Both visual and statistical differences are presented.

  2. Comparison of 7.5-minute and 1-degree digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Dennis L.; Ripple, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Two digital elevation models are compared for the Echo Mountain SE quadrangle in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Comparisons were made between 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) and 1-degree (1:250,000-scale) images using the variables of elevation, slope aspect, and slope gradient. Both visual and statistical differences are presented.

  3. SHADED RELIEF, HILLSHADE, DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL (DEM), NEVADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shaded relief of the state of Nevada developed from 1-degree US Geological Survey (USGS) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). DEM is a terminology adopted by the USGS to describe terrain elevation data sets in a digital raster form.

  4. SHADED RELIEF, HILLSHADE, DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL (DEM), ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Shaded relief of the state of Arizona developed from 1-degree US Geological Survey (USGS) Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). DEM is a terminology adopted by the USGS to describe terrain elevation data sets in a digital raster form.

  5. Digital Elevation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1993-01-01

    The Earth Science Information Center (ESIC) distributes digital cartographic/geographic data files produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Mapping Program. Digital cartographic data files may be grouped into four basic types. The first of these, called a Digital Line Graph (DLG), is the line map information in digital form. These data files include information on base data categories, such as transportation, hypsography, hydrography, and boundaries. The second type, called a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), consists of a sampled array of elevations for a number of ground positions at regularly spaced intervals. The third type is Land Use and Land Cover digital data which provides information on nine major classes of land use such as urban, agricultural, or forest as well as associated map data such as political units and Federal land ownership. The fourth type, the Geographic Names Information System, provides primary information for all known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name.

  6. Fingerprinting digital elevation maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Hongmei; Wu, Min

    2006-02-01

    Digital elevation maps (DEMs) provide a digital representation of 3-D terrain information. In civilian applications, high-precision DEMs carry a high commercial value owing to the large amount of effort in acquiring them; and in military applications, DEMs are often used to represent critical geospatial information in sensitive operations. These call for new technologies to prevent unauthorized distribution and to trace traitors in the event of information leak related to DEMs. In this paper, we propose a new digital fingerprinting technique to protect DEM data from illegal re-distribution. The proposed method enables reliable detection of fingerprints from both 3-D DEM data set and its 2-D rendering, whichever format that is available to a detector. Our method starts with extracting from a DEM a set of critical contours either corresponding to important topographic features of the terrain or having application-dependent importance. Fingerprints are then embedded into these critical contours by employing parametric curve modeling and spread spectrum embedding. Finally, a fingerprinted DEM is constructed to incorporate the marked 2-D contours. Through experimental results, we demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method against a number of challenging attacks applied to either DEMs or their contour representations.

  7. US GeoData Digital Elevation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2000-01-01

    Digital elevation model (DEM) data are arrays of regularly spaced elevation values referenced horizontally either to a Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection or to a geographic coordinate system. The grid cells are spaced at regular intervals along south to north profiles that are ordered from west to east. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produces five primary types of elevation data: 7.5-minute DEM, 30-minute DEM, 1-degree DEM, 7.5-minute Alaska DEM, and 15-minute Alaska DEM.

  8. US GeoData digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1997-01-01

    Digital elevation model (DEM) data consist of a sampled array of regularly spaced elevation values referenced horizontally either to a Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) projection or to a geographic coordinate system. The grid cells are spaced at regular intervals along south to north profiles that are ordered from west to east. the U.S> Geological Survey (USGS) produces five primary types of elevation data: 7.5-minute DEM, 30-minute DEM, 1-degree DEM, 7.5-minute Alaska DEM, and 15-minute Alaska DEM.

  9. 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model specification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha T.; Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Phillips, Lori A.; Roche, Brittany L.; Constance, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center began producing the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model data product. This new product was developed to provide high resolution bare-earth digital elevation models from light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data and other elevation data collected over the conterminous United States (lower 48 States), Hawaii, and potentially Alaska and the U.S. territories. The 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model consists of hydroflattened, topographic bare-earth raster digital elevation models, with a 1-meter x 1-meter cell size, and is available in 10,000-meter x 10,000-meter square blocks with a 6-meter overlap. This report details the specifications required for the production of the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model.

  10. Digital Elevation Model Mosaic of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. C.; Watters, T. R.; Robinson, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    At CEPS (Center for Earth and Planetary Studies) work has been underway since 2000 to semi-automatically stereo match all Mariner 10 stereo pairs. The resulting matched image coordinates are converted into longitude, latitude, and height points and then combined to form a map projected Digital Elevation Model (DEM) mosaic of the planet's surface. Stereo images from Mariner 10 cover one quarter of the planet's surface, mostly in the southern hemisphere. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. Stochastic Downscaling of Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasera, Luiz Gustavo; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Lane, Stuart N.

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution digital elevation models (HR-DEMs) are extremely important for the understanding of small-scale geomorphic processes in Alpine environments. In the last decade, remote sensing techniques have experienced a major technological evolution, enabling fast and precise acquisition of HR-DEMs. However, sensors designed to measure elevation data still feature different spatial resolution and coverage capabilities. Terrestrial altimetry allows the acquisition of HR-DEMs with centimeter to millimeter-level precision, but only within small spatial extents and often with dead ground problems. Conversely, satellite radiometric sensors are able to gather elevation measurements over large areas but with limited spatial resolution. In the present study, we propose an algorithm to downscale low-resolution satellite-based DEMs using topographic patterns extracted from HR-DEMs derived for example from ground-based and airborne altimetry. The method consists of a multiple-point geostatistical simulation technique able to generate high-resolution elevation data from low-resolution digital elevation models (LR-DEMs). Initially, two collocated DEMs with different spatial resolutions serve as an input to construct a database of topographic patterns, which is also used to infer the statistical relationships between the two scales. High-resolution elevation patterns are then retrieved from the database to downscale a LR-DEM through a stochastic simulation process. The output of the simulations are multiple equally probable DEMs with higher spatial resolution that also depict the large-scale geomorphic structures present in the original LR-DEM. As these multiple models reflect the uncertainty related to the downscaling, they can be employed to quantify the uncertainty of phenomena that are dependent on fine topography, such as catchment hydrological processes. The proposed methodology is illustrated for a case study in the Swiss Alps. A swissALTI3D HR-DEM (with 5 m resolution

  12. A global digital elevation model - GTOP030

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    GTOP030, the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) digital elevation model (DEM) of the Earth, provides the flrst global coverage of moderate resolution elevation data.  The original GTOP30 data set, which was developed over a 3-year period through a collaborative effort led by the USGS, was completed in 1996 at the USGS EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.  The collaboration involved contributions of staffing, funding, or source data from cooperators including the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the United Nations Environment Programme Global Resource Information Database (UNEP/GRID), the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografia e Informatica (INEGI) of Mexico, the Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) of Japan, Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research of New Zealand, and the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR). In 1999, work was begun on an update to the GTOP030 data set. Additional data sources are being incorporated into GTOP030 with an enhanced and improved data set planned for release in 2000.

  13. Digital Elevation Models of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. C.; Robinson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Several digital elevation models (DEMs) have been produced at a scale of 1km/pixel and covering approximately one-fifth of the lunar surface. These were produced mostly by semiautomatically matching the stereo available between Clementine UV/VIS images, although some localized DEMs have been produced by applying this technique to Apollo Metric stereo pairs, or by digitizing an existing Apollo Metric contour map. The DEMS that result from Clementine UV/VIS images, although Of Poorer height accuracy (1300-600 in for a single matched point) than the Clementine laser altimeter point measurements (<+/-100 m), do provide considerably higher spatial resolution (e.g., every kilometer vs. every tens of kilometers) and allow topography in the polar regions to be determined. Nadir-pointing Clementine UV-VIS stereo pairs are automatically stereo matched using a patch-based matcher and fed through A stereo intersection camera model to yield a digital terrain model (DTM) of longitude, latitude, and height points. The DTM for each stereo pair is then replotted and interpolated to form map-projected DEM tiles. The DEM files can then be fitted to absolute height laser altimeter points, or iteratively to each other, to form a DEM mosaic. Uncertainties in UV-VIS camera pointing and the need to accumulate a sufficiently good topographic S/N ratio necessitates the use of 1 km pixels for the UV-VIS derived DEMs. For Apollo Metric stereo, an internal camera geometry correction and a full photogrammetric block adjustment must be performed using ground- control points to derive a DEM. The image scale of Apollo Metric, as well as the stereo angle, allow for a DEM with 100 m pixels and a height accuracy of +/- 25m. Apollo Metric imagery had previously been used to derive contour maps for much of the lunar equatorial regions; however, to recover this information in digital form these maps must be digitized. Most of the mare areas mapped contain noticeable topographic noise. This results from

  14. Digital Elevation Models of the Lunar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, A. C.; Robinson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Several digital elevation models (DEMs) have been produced at a scale of 1km/pixel and covering approximately one-fifth of the lunar surface. These were produced mostly by semiautomatically matching the stereo available between Clementine UV/VIS images, although some localized DEMs have been produced by applying this technique to Apollo Metric stereo pairs, or by digitizing an existing Apollo Metric contour map. The DEMS that result from Clementine UV/VIS images, although Of Poorer height accuracy (1300-600 in for a single matched point) than the Clementine laser altimeter point measurements (<+/-100 m), do provide considerably higher spatial resolution (e.g., every kilometer vs. every tens of kilometers) and allow topography in the polar regions to be determined. Nadir-pointing Clementine UV-VIS stereo pairs are automatically stereo matched using a patch-based matcher and fed through A stereo intersection camera model to yield a digital terrain model (DTM) of longitude, latitude, and height points. The DTM for each stereo pair is then replotted and interpolated to form map-projected DEM tiles. The DEM files can then be fitted to absolute height laser altimeter points, or iteratively to each other, to form a DEM mosaic. Uncertainties in UV-VIS camera pointing and the need to accumulate a sufficiently good topographic S/N ratio necessitates the use of 1 km pixels for the UV-VIS derived DEMs. For Apollo Metric stereo, an internal camera geometry correction and a full photogrammetric block adjustment must be performed using ground- control points to derive a DEM. The image scale of Apollo Metric, as well as the stereo angle, allow for a DEM with 100 m pixels and a height accuracy of +/- 25m. Apollo Metric imagery had previously been used to derive contour maps for much of the lunar equatorial regions; however, to recover this information in digital form these maps must be digitized. Most of the mare areas mapped contain noticeable topographic noise. This results from

  15. Evaluation Digital Elevation Model Generated by Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makineci, H. B.; Karabörk, H.

    2016-06-01

    Digital elevation model, showing the physical and topographical situation of the earth, is defined a tree-dimensional digital model obtained from the elevation of the surface by using of selected an appropriate interpolation method. DEMs are used in many areas such as management of natural resources, engineering and infrastructure projects, disaster and risk analysis, archaeology, security, aviation, forestry, energy, topographic mapping, landslide and flood analysis, Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Digital elevation models, which are the fundamental components of cartography, is calculated by many methods. Digital elevation models can be obtained terrestrial methods or data obtained by digitization of maps by processing the digital platform in general. Today, Digital elevation model data is generated by the processing of stereo optical satellite images, radar images (radargrammetry, interferometry) and lidar data using remote sensing and photogrammetric techniques with the help of improving technology. One of the fundamental components of remote sensing radar technology is very advanced nowadays. In response to this progress it began to be used more frequently in various fields. Determining the shape of topography and creating digital elevation model comes the beginning topics of these areas. It is aimed in this work , the differences of evaluation of quality between Sentinel-1A SAR image ,which is sent by European Space Agency ESA and Interferometry Wide Swath imaging mode and C band type , and DTED-2 (Digital Terrain Elevation Data) and application between them. The application includes RMS static method for detecting precision of data. Results show us to variance of points make a high decrease from mountain area to plane area.

  16. Digital elevation modeling via curvature interpolation for lidar data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Digital elevation model (DEM) is a three-dimensional (3D) representation of a terrain's surface - for a planet (including Earth), moon, or asteroid - created from point cloud data which measure terrain elevation. Its modeling requires surface reconstruction for the scattered data, which is an ill-p...

  17. Carving and adaptive drainage enforcement of grid digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soille, Pierre; Vogt, Jürgen; Colombo, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    An effective and widely used method for removing spurious pits in digital elevation models consists of filling them until they overflow. However, this method sometimes creates large flat regions which in turn pose a problem for the determination of accurate flow directions. In this study, we propose to suppress each pit by creating a descending path from it to the nearest point having a lower elevation value. This is achieved by carving, i.e., lowering, the terrain elevations along the detected path. Carving paths are identified through a flooding simulation starting from the river outlets. The proposed approach allows for adaptive drainage enforcement whereby river networks coming from other data sources are imposed to the digital elevation model only in places where the automatic river network extraction deviates substantially from the known networks. An improvement to methods for routing flow over flat regions is also introduced. Detailed results are presented over test areas of the Danube basin.

  18. Failure prediction in automatically generated digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooch, M. J.; Chandler, J. H.

    2001-10-01

    Developments in digital photogrammetry have provided the ability to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) automatically and are increasingly used by geoscientists. Using overlapping imagery, dense grids of digital elevations can be collected at high speeds (150 points per second) with a high level of accuracy. The trend towards using PC-based hardware, the widespread use of geographical information systems, and the forthcoming availability of high-resolution satellite imagery over the Internet at ever lower costs mean that the use of automated digital photogrammetry for elevation modelling is likely to become more widespread. Automation can reduce the need for an in-depth knowledge of the subject thus rendering the technology an option for more users. One criticism of the trend towards the automated "black box" approach is the lack of quality control procedures within the software, particularly with reference to identifying areas of the DEM with low accuracy. The traditional method of accuracy assessment is through the use of check point data (data collected by an independent method which has a higher level of accuracy against which the DEM can be compared). Check point data are, however, rarely available and it is typically recommended that the user manually check and edit the data using stereo viewing methods, a potentially lengthy process which can negate the obvious speed advantages brought about by automation. A data processing model has been developed that is capable of identifying areas where elevations are unreliable and to which the user should pay attention when editing and checking the data. The software model developed will be explained and described in detail in the paper. Results from tests on different scales of imagery, different types of imagery and other software packages will also be presented to demonstrate the efficacy and significantly the generality of the technique with other digital photogrammetric software systems.

  19. The effects of wavelet compression on Digital Elevation Models (DEMs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oimoen, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of lossy compression on floating-point digital elevation models using the discrete wavelet transform. The compression of elevation data poses a different set of problems and concerns than does the compression of images. Most notably, the usefulness of DEMs depends largely in the quality of their derivatives, such as slope and aspect. Three areas extracted from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Elevation Dataset were transformed to the wavelet domain using the third order filters of the Daubechies family (DAUB6), and were made sparse by setting 95 percent of the smallest wavelet coefficients to zero. The resulting raster is compressible to a corresponding degree. The effects of the nulled coefficients on the reconstructed DEM are noted as residuals in elevation, derived slope and aspect, and delineation of drainage basins and streamlines. A simple masking technique also is presented, that maintains the integrity and flatness of water bodies in the reconstructed DEM.

  20. Orthographic terrain views using data derived from digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubayah, R. O.; Dozier, J.

    1986-01-01

    A fast algorithm for producing three-dimensional orthographic terrain views uses digital elevation data and co-registered imagery. These views are created using projective geometry and are designed for display on high-resolution raster graphics devices. The algorithm's effectiveness is achieved by (1) the implementation of two efficient gray-level interpolation routines that offer the user a choice between speed and smoothness, and (2) a unique visible surface determination procedure based on horizon angles derived from the elevation data set.

  1. The Rational Polynomial Coefficients Modification Using Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidoost, F.; Azizi, A.; Arefi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The high-resolution satellite imageries (HRSI) are as primary dataset for different applications such as DEM generation, 3D city mapping, change detection, monitoring, and deformation detection. The geo-location information of HRSI are stored in metadata called Rational Polynomial Coefficients (RPCs). There are many methods to improve and modify the RPCs in order to have a precise mapping. In this paper, an automatic approach is presented for the RPC modification using global Digital Elevation Models. The main steps of this approach are: relative digital elevation model generation, shift parameters calculation, sparse point cloud generation and shift correction, and rational polynomial fitting. Using some ground control points, the accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated based on statistical descriptors in which the results show that the geo-location accuracy of HRSI can be improved without using Ground Control Points (GCPs).

  2. Extraction of terrain features from digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, Curtis V.; Wolock, David M.; Ayers, Mark A.

    1989-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are being used to determine variable inputs for hydrologic models in the Delaware River basin. Recently developed software for analysis of DEMs has been applied to watershed and streamline delineation. The results compare favorably with similar delineations taken from topographic maps. Additionally, output from this software has been used to extract other hydrologic information from the DEM, including flow direction, channel location, and an index describing the slope and shape of a watershed.

  3. Digital elevation model visibility including Earth's curvature and atmosphere refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santossilva, Ewerton; Vieiradias, Luiz Alberto

    1990-03-01

    There are some instances in which the Earth's curvature and the atmospheric refraction, optical or electronic, are important factors when digital elevation models are used for visibility calculations. This work deals with this subject, suggesting a practical approach to solve this problem. Some examples, from real terrain data, are presented. The equipment used was an IBM-PC like computer with a SITIM graphic card.

  4. Sparse Representation and Multiscale Methods - Application to Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanescu, R. E. R.; Patra, A. K.; Bursik, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    In general, a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is produced either digitizing existing maps and elevation values are interpolated from the contours, or elevation information is collected from stereo imagery on digital photogrammetric workstations. Both methods produce a DEM to the required specification, but each method contains a variety of possible production scenarios, and each method results in DEM cells with totally different character. Common artifacts found in DEM are missing-values at different location which can influence the output of the application that uses this particular DEM. In this work we introduce a numerically-stable multiscale scheme to evaluate the missing-value DEM's quantity of interest (elevation, slope, etc.). This method is very efficient for the case when dealing with large high resolution DEMs that cover large area, resulting in O(106-1010) data points. Our scheme relies on graph-based algorithms and low-rank approximations of the entire adjacency matrix of the DEM's graph. When dealing with large data sets such as DEMs, the Laplacian or kernel matrix resulted from the interaction of the data points is stupendously big. One needs to identify a subspace that capture most of the action of the kernel matrix. By the application of a randomized projection on the graph affinity matrix, a well-conditioned basis is identified for it numerical range. This basis is later used in out-of-sample extension at missing-value location. In many cases, this method beats its classical competitors in terms of accuracy, speed, and robustness.

  5. Improving merge methods for grid-based digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, J. P.; Prodanović, D.; Maksimović, Č.

    2016-03-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are used to represent the terrain in applications such as, for example, overland flow modelling or viewshed analysis. DEMs generated from digitising contour lines or obtained by LiDAR or satellite data are now widely available. However, in some cases, the area of study is covered by more than one of the available elevation data sets. In these cases the relevant DEMs may need to be merged. The merged DEM must retain the most accurate elevation information available while generating consistent slopes and aspects. In this paper we present a thorough analysis of three conventional grid-based DEM merging methods that are available in commercial GIS software. These methods are evaluated for their applicability in merging DEMs and, based on evaluation results, a method for improving the merging of grid-based DEMs is proposed. DEMs generated by the proposed method, called MBlend, showed significant improvements when compared to DEMs produced by the three conventional methods in terms of elevation, slope and aspect accuracy, ensuring also smooth elevation transitions between the original DEMs. The results produced by the improved method are highly relevant different applications in terrain analysis, e.g., visibility, or spotting irregularities in landforms and for modelling terrain phenomena, such as overland flow.

  6. Accuracy and reliability of the Hungarian digital elevation model (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detrekoi, Akos; Melykuti, Gabor; Szabo, Gyorgy

    1994-08-01

    In the period 1991-92 a 50 X 50 meter grid digital elevation model (DEM) was created in Hungary. The design and the quality control of DEM are discussed in this paper. The paper has three parts: (1) the data acquisition methods for DEM by scanning and photogrammetry are discussed, (2) a general overview about the accuracy and reliability of DEMs is given, and (3) the algorithm for the checking of data and some general conclusions about the control activity of the Hungarian DEM are reviewed.

  7. Validation of Orthorectified Interferometric Radar Imagery and Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith Charles M.

    2004-01-01

    This work was performed under NASA's Verification and Validation (V&V) Program as an independent check of data supplied by EarthWatch, Incorporated, through the Earth Science Enterprise Scientific Data Purchase (SDP) Program. This document serves as the basis of reporting results associated with validation of orthorectified interferometric interferometric radar imagery and digital elevation models (DEM). This validation covers all datasets provided under the first campaign (Central America & Virginia Beach) plus three earlier missions (Indonesia, Red River: and Denver) for a total of 13 missions.

  8. Registering Thematic Mapper imagery to digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frew, J.

    1984-01-01

    The problems encountered when attempting to register Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to U.S. geological survey digital elevation models (DEMs) are examined. It is shown that TM and DEM data are not available in the same map projection, necessitating geometric transformation of one of the data type, that the TM data are not accurately located in their nominal projection, and that TM data have higher resolution than most DEM data, but oversampling the DEM data to TM resolution introduces systematic noise. Further work needed in this area is discussed.

  9. Applications of hydrologic information automatically extracted from digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) can be used to derive a wealth of information about the morphology of a land surface. Traditional raster analysis methods can be used to derive slope, aspect, and shaded relief information; recently-developed computer programs can be used to delineate depressions, overland flow paths, and watershed boundaries. These methods were used to delineate watershed boundaries for a geochemical stream sediment survey, to compare the results of extracting slope and flow paths from DEMs of varying resolutions, and to examine the geomorphology of a Martian DEM. -Author

  10. Void-Filled SRTM Digital Elevation Model of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Barrios, Boris

    2005-01-01

    EXPLANATION The purpose of this data set is to provide a single consistent elevation model to be used for national scale mapping, GIS, remote sensing applications, and natural resource assessments for Afghanistan's reconstruction. For 11 days in February of 2000, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency ian Space Agency (ASI) flew X-band and C-band radar interferometry onboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor. The mission covered the Earth between 60?N and 57?S and will provide interferometric digital elevation models (DEMs) of approximately 80% of the Earth's land mass when processing is complete. The radar-pointing angle was approximately 55? at scene center. Ascending and descending orbital passes generated multiple interferometric data scenes for nearly all areas. Up to eight passes of data were merged to form the final processed Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEMs. The effect of merging scenes averages elevation values recorded in coincident scenes and reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the amount of area with layover and terrain shadow effects. The most significant form of data processing for the Afghanistan DEM was gap-filling areas where the SRTM data contained a data void. These void areas are as a result of radar shadow, layover, standing water, and other effects of terrain as well as technical radar interferometry phase unwrapping issues. To fill these gaps, topographic contours were digitized from 1:200,000 - scale Soviet General Staff Topographic Maps which date from the middle to late 1980's. Digital contours were gridded to form elevation models for void areas and subsequently were merged with the SRTM data through GIS and image processing techniques. The data contained in this publication includes SRTM DEM quadrangles projected and clipped in geographic coordinates for the entire country. An index of all available SRTM DEM quadrangles is displayed here: Index_Geo_DD.pdf. Also

  11. Geometric correction and digital elevation extraction using multiple MTI datasets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercier, Jeffrey A.; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Storey, James C.; Smith, Jody L.

    2007-01-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are traditionally acquired from a stereo pair of aerial photographs sequentially captured by an airborne metric camera. Standard DEM extraction techniques can be naturally extended to satellite imagery, but the particular characteristics of satellite imaging can cause difficulties. The spacecraft ephemeris with respect to the ground site during image collects is the most important factor in the elevation extraction process. When the angle of separation between the stereo images is small, the extraction process typically produces measurements with low accuracy, while a large angle of separation can cause an excessive number of erroneous points in the DEM from occlusion of ground areas. The use of three or more images registered to the same ground area can potentially reduce these problems and improve the accuracy of the extracted DEM. The pointing capability of some sensors, such as the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), allows for multiple collects of the same area from different perspectives. This functionality of MTI makes it a good candidate for the implementation of a DEM extraction algorithm using multiple images for improved accuracy. Evaluation of this capability and development of algorithms to geometrically model the MTI sensor and extract DEMs from multi-look MTI imagery are described in this paper. An RMS elevation error of 6.3-meters is achieved using 11 ground test points, while the MTI band has a 5-meter ground sample distance.

  12. Digital elevation extraction from multiple MTI data sets.

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Smith, Jody Lynn; Storey, James C.

    2003-06-01

    The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) extraction process traditionally uses a stereo pair of aerial photographs that are sequentially captured using an airborne metric camera. Standard DEM extraction techniques have been naturally extended to utilize satellite imagery. However, the particular characteristics of satellite imaging can cause difficulties in the DEM extraction process. The ephemeris of the spacecraft during the collects, with respect to the ground test site, is the most important factor in the elevation extraction process. When the angle of separation between the stereo images is small, the extraction process typically produces measurements with low accuracy. A large angle of separation can cause an excessive number of erroneous points in the output DEM. There is also a possibility of having occluded areas in the images when drastic topographic variation is present, making it impossible to calculate elevation in the blind spots. The use of three or more images registered to the same ground area can potentially reduce these problems and improve the accuracy of the extracted DEM. The pointing capability of the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) allows for multiple collects of the same area to be taken from different perspectives. This functionality of MTI makes it a good candidate for the implementation of DEM extraction using multiple images for improved accuracy. This paper describes a project to evaluate this capability and the algorithms used to extract DEMs from multi-look MTI imagery.

  13. Geometric correction and digital elevation extraction using multiple MTI datasets.

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Schowengerdt, Robert A.; Smith, Jody Lynn; Storey, James C.

    2004-08-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are traditionally acquired from a stereo pair of aerial photographs sequentially captured by an airborne metric camera. Standard DEM extraction techniques can be naturally extended to satellite imagery, but the particular characteristics of satellite imaging can cause difficulties. The spacecraft ephemeris with respect to the ground site during image collects is the most important factor in the elevation extraction process. When the angle of separation between the stereo images is small, the extraction process typically produces measurements with low accuracy, while a large angle of separation can cause an excessive number of erroneous points in the DEM from occlusion of ground areas. The use of three or more images registered to the same ground area can potentially reduce these problems and improve the accuracy of the extracted DEM. The pointing capability of some sensors, such as the Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), allows for multiple collects of the same area from different perspectives. This functionality of MTI makes it a good candidate for the implementation of a DEM extraction algorithm using multiple images for improved accuracy. Evaluation of this capability and development of algorithms to geometrically model the MTI sensor and extract DEMs from multi-look MTI imagery are described in this paper. An RMS elevation error of 6.3-meters is achieved using 11 ground test points, while the MTI band has a 5-meter ground sample distance.

  14. Ice Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Altimetry and Digital Elevation Models in the Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabajal, C. C.; Boy, J.

    2012-12-01

    A global set of Ground Control Points (GCPs) from altimetry measurements from the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) has been produced with the support of the NASA's Earth Surface and Interior Program. The highest quality altimetry measurements that can be used for ground control have been selected by applying rigorous editing criteria. This database represents a key means to establishing a much-needed global topography reference frame to aid solid Earth application studies, particularly useful at high latitudes, where other topographic control is scarce. ICESat GCPs were used to characterize and quantify spatially varying elevation biases in Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) in the polar regions, assessing the horizontal and vertical accuracy of valuable topographic datasets produced by sensors like ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) missions, and datasets like GMTED2010 (Global Multi-resolution Terrain Elevation Data), developed by the USGS (United States Geological Survey) and NGA (National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency), a large improvement over the global GTOPO30 dataset. We have analyzed error statistics globally and per continent, in conjunction with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and MERIS (Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) land cover products, relief, topography and other DEM and altimetry specific parameters, and will present the results of these evaluations.

  15. Analysis of accuracy of digital elevation models created from captured data by digital photogrammetry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, P.

    2011-12-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) is an important part of many geoinformatic applications. For the creation of DEM, spatial data collected by geodetic measurements in the field, photogrammetric processing of aerial survey photographs, laser scanning and secondary sources (analogue maps) are used. It is very important from a user's point of view to know the vertical accuracy of a DEM. The article describes the verification of the vertical accuracy of a DEM for the region of Medzibodrožie, which was created using digital photogrammetry for the purposes of water resources management and modeling and resolving flood cases based on geodetic measurements in the field.

  16. Online, On Demand Access to Coastal Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, J.; Bristol, S.; Long, D.; Thompson, S.

    2014-12-01

    Process-based numerical models for coastal waves, water levels, and sediment transport are initialized with digital elevation models (DEM) constructed by interpolating and merging bathymetric and topographic elevation data. These gridded surfaces must seamlessly span the land-water interface and may cover large regions where the individual raw data sources are collected at widely different spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition, the datasets are collected from different instrument platforms with varying accuracy and may or may not overlap in coverage. The lack of available tools and difficulties in constructing these DEMs lead scientists to 1) rely on previously merged, outdated, or over-smoothed DEMs; 2) discard more recent data that covers only a portion of the DEM domain; and 3) use inconsistent methodologies to generate DEMs. The objective of this work is to address the immediate need of integrating land and water-based elevation data sources and streamline the generation of a seamless data surface that spans the terrestrial-marine boundary. To achieve this, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is developing a web processing service to format and initialize geoprocessing tasks designed to create coastal DEMs. The web processing service is maintained within the USGS ScienceBase data management system and has an associated user interface. Through the map-based interface, users define a geographic region that identifies the bounds of the desired DEM and a time period of interest. This initiates a query for elevation datasets within federal science agency data repositories. A geoprocessing service is then triggered to interpolate, merge, and smooth the data sources creating a DEM based on user-defined configuration parameters. Uncertainty and error estimates for the DEM are also returned by the geoprocessing service. Upon completion, the information management platform provides access to the final gridded data derivative and saves the configuration parameters

  17. How processing digital elevation models can affect simulated water budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuniansky, E.L.; Lowery, M.A.; Campbell, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    For regional models, the shallow water table surface is often used as a source/sink boundary condition, as model grid scale precludes simulation of the water table aquifer. This approach is appropriate when the water table surface is relatively stationary. Since water table surface maps are not readily available, the elevation of the water table used in model cells is estimated via a two-step process. First, a regression equation is developed using existing land and water table elevations from wells in the area. This equation is then used to predict the water table surface for each model cell using land surface elevation available from digital elevation models (DEM). Two methods of processing DEM for estimating the land surface for each cell are commonly used (value nearest the cell centroid or mean value in the cell). This article demonstrates how these two methods of DEM processing can affect the simulated water budget. For the example presented, approximately 20% more total flow through the aquifer system is simulated if the centroid value rather than the mean value is used. This is due to the one-third greater average ground water gradients associated with the centroid value than the mean value. The results will vary depending on the particular model area topography and cell size. The use of the mean DEM value in each model cell will result in a more conservative water budget and is more appropriate because the model cell water table value should be representative of the entire cell area, not the centroid of the model cell.

  18. Registratiom of TM data to digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Several problems arise when attempting to register LANDSAT thematic mapper data to U.S. B Geological Survey digital elevation models (DEMs). The TM data are currently available only in a rotated variant of the Space Oblique Mercator (SOM) map projection. Geometric transforms are thus; required to access TM data in the geodetic coordinates used by the DEMs. Due to positional errors in the TM data, these transforms require some sort of external control. The spatial resolution of TM data exceeds that of the most commonly DEM data. Oversampling DEM data to TM resolution introduces systematic noise. Common terrain processing algorithms (e.g., close computation) compound this problem by acting as high-pass filters.

  19. Preparation of the Digital Elevation Model for Orthophoto CR Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švec, Z.; Pavelka, K.

    2016-06-01

    The Orthophoto CR is produced in co-operation with the Land Survey Office and the Military Geographical and Hydrometeorological Office. The product serves to ensure a defence of the state, integrated crisis management, civilian tasks in support of the state administration and the local self-government of the Czech Republic as well. It covers the whole area of the Republic and for ensuring its up-to-datedness is reproduced in the biennial period. As the project is countrywide, it keeps the project within the same parameters in urban and rural areas as well. Due to economic reasons it cańt be produced as a true ortophoto because it requires large side and forward overlaps of the aerial photographs and a preparation of the digital surface model instead of the digital terrain model. Use of DTM without some objects of DSM for orthogonalization purposes cause undesirable image deformations in the Orthophoto. There are a few data sets available for forming a suitable elevation model. The principal source should represent DTMs made from data acquired by the airborne laser scanning of the entire area of the Czech Republic that was carried out in the years 2009-2013, the DMR4G in the grid form and the DMR5G in TIN form respectively. It can be replenished by some vector objects (bridges, dams, etc.) taken from the geographic base data of the Czech Republic or obtained by new stereo plotting. It has to be taken into account that the option of applying DSM made from image correlation is also available. The article focuses on the possibilities of DTM supplement for ortogonalization. It looks back to the recent transition from grid to hybrid elevation models, problems that occurred, its solution and getting some practical remarks. Afterwards it assesses the current state and deals with the options for updating the model. Some accuracy analysis are included.

  20. Watershed boundaries and digital elevation model of Oklahoma derived from 1:100,000-scale digital topographic maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cederstrand, J.R.; Rea, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a general description of the procedures used to develop the data sets included on this compact disc. This compact disc contains watershed boundaries for Oklahoma, a digital elevation model, and other data sets derived from the digital elevation model. The digital elevation model was produced using the ANUDEM software package, written by Michael Hutchinson and licensed from the Centre for Resource and Environmental Studies at The Australian National University. Elevation data (hypsography) and streams (hydrography) from digital versions of the U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps were used by the ANUDEM package to produce a hydrologically conditioned digital elevation model with a 60-meter cell size. This digital elevation model is well suited for drainage-basin delineation using automated techniques. Additional data sets include flow-direction, flow-accumulation, and shaded-relief grids, all derived from the digital elevation model, and the hydrography data set used in producing the digital elevation model. The watershed boundaries derived from the digital elevation model have been edited to be consistent with contours and streams from the U.S. Geological Survey 1:100,000-scale topographic maps. The watershed data set includes boundaries for 11-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes (watersheds) within Oklahoma, and 8-digit Hydrologic Unit Codes (cataloging units) outside Oklahoma. Cataloging-unit boundaries based on 1:250,000-scale maps outside Oklahoma for the Arkansas, Red, and White River basins are included. The other data sets cover Oklahoma, and where available, portions of 1:100,000-scale quadrangles adjoining Oklahoma.

  1. ACE2 Global Digital Elevation Model : User Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. G.; Berry, P. A. M.; Benveniste, J.

    2013-12-01

    Altimeter Corrected Elevations 2 (ACE2), first released in October 2009, is the Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) created by fusing the high accuracy of over 100 million altimeter retracked height estimates, derived primarily from the ERS-1 Geodetic Mission, with the high frequency content available within the near-global Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. This novel ACE2 GDEM is freely available at 3”, 9”, 30” and 5' and has been distributed via the web to over 680 subscribers. This paper presents the results of a detailed analysis of geographical distribution of subscribed users, along with fields of study and potential uses. Investigations have also been performed to determine the most popular spatial resolutions and the impact these have on the scope of data downloaded. The analysis has shown that, even though the majority of users have come from Europe and America, a significant number of website hits have been received from South America, Africa and Asia. Registered users also vary widely, from research institutions and major companies down to individual hobbyists looking at data for single projects.

  2. Incremental terrain processing for large digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Incremental terrain processing for large digital elevation models Zichuan Ye, Dean Djokic, Lori Armstrong Esri, 380 New York Street, Redlands, CA 92373, USA (E-mail: zye@esri.com, ddjokic@esri.com , larmstrong@esri.com) Efficient analyses of large digital elevation models (DEM) require generation of additional DEM artifacts such as flow direction, flow accumulation and other DEM derivatives. When the DEMs to analyze have a large number of grid cells (usually > 1,000,000,000) the generation of these DEM derivatives is either impractical (it takes too long) or impossible (software is incapable of processing such a large number of cells). Different strategies and algorithms can be put in place to alleviate this situation. This paper describes an approach where the overall DEM is partitioned in smaller processing units that can be efficiently processed. The processed DEM derivatives for each partition can then be either mosaicked back into a single large entity or managed on partition level. For dendritic terrain morphologies, the way in which partitions are to be derived and the order in which they are to be processed depend on the river and catchment patterns. These patterns are not available until flow pattern of the whole region is created, which in turn cannot be established upfront due to the size issues. This paper describes a procedure that solves this problem: (1) Resample the original large DEM grid so that the total number of cells is reduced to a level for which the drainage pattern can be established. (2) Run standard terrain preprocessing operations on the resampled DEM to generate the river and catchment system. (3) Define the processing units and their processing order based on the river and catchment system created in step (2). (4) Based on the processing order, apply the analysis, i.e., flow accumulation operation to each of the processing units, at the full resolution DEM. (5) As each processing unit is processed based on the processing order defined

  3. Advances in the data compression of digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidner, David B.; Smith, Derek H.

    2003-10-01

    The maintenance and dissemination of spatial databases requires efficient strategies for handling the large volumes of data that are now publicly available. In particular, satellite and aerial imagery, radar, LiDAR, and digital elevation models (DEMs) are being utilised by a sizeable user-base, for predominantly environmental applications. The efficient dissemination of such datasets has become a key issue in the development of web-based and distributed computing environments. However, the physical size of these datasets is a major bottleneck in their storage and transmission. The problem is often exaggerated when the data is supplied in less efficient, proprietary or national data formats. This paper presents a methodology for the lossless compression of DEMs, based on the statistical correlation of terrain data in local neighbourhoods. Most data and image compression algorithms fail to capitalise fully on the inherent redundancy in spatial data. At the same time, users often prefer a uniform solution to all their data compression requirements, but these solutions may be far from optimal. The approach presented here can be thought of as a simple pre-processing of the elevation data before the use of traditional data compression software frequently applied to spatial data sets, such as GZIP. Identification and removal of the spatial redundancy in terrain data, with the use of optimal predictors for DEMs and optimal statistical encoders such as Arithmetic Coding, gives even higher compression ratios. Both GZIP and our earlier approach of combining a simple linear prediction algorithm with Huffman Coding are shown to be far from optimal in identifying and removing the spatial redundancy in DEMs. The new approaches presented here typically halve the file sizes of our earlier approach, and give a 40-62% improvement on GZIP-compressed DEMs.

  4. 3D Color Digital Elevation Map of AFM Sample

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This color image is a three dimensional (3D) view of a digital elevation map of a sample collected by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope (AFM).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate, which is the background plane shown in red. This image has been processed to reflect the levelness of the substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The particle was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress' delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008). The AFM is part of Phoenix's microscopic station called MECA, or the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Fast Ray Tracing of Lunar Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Evans, L. G.; Starr, R. D.; Mitrofanov, I.

    2009-01-01

    Ray-tracing (RT) of Lunar Digital Elevation Models (DEM)'s is performed to virtually derive the degree of radiation incident to terrain as a function of time, orbital and ephemeris constraints [I- 4]. This process is an integral modeling process in lunar polar research and exploration due to the present paucity of terrain information at the poles and mission planning activities for the anticipated spring 2009 launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). As part of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) and Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) preparations RI methods are used to estimate the critical conditions presented by the combined effects of high latitude, terrain and the moons low obliquity [5-7]. These factors yield low incident solar illumination and subsequently extreme thermal, and radiation conditions. The presented research uses RT methods both for radiation transport modeling in space and regolith related research as well as to derive permanently shadowed regions (PSR)'s in high latitude topographic minima, e.g craters. These regions are of scientific and human exploration interest due to the near constant low temperatures in PSRs, inferred to be < 100 K. Hydrogen is thought to have accumulated in PSR's through the combined effects of periodic cometary bombardment and/or solar wind processes, and the extreme cold which minimizes hydrogen sublimation [8-9]. RT methods are also of use in surface position optimization for future illumination dependent on surface resources e.g. power and communications equipment.

  6. Hydrological landscape analysis based on digital elevation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, J.; McGlynn, B.; Grabs, T.; Jensco, K.

    2008-12-01

    Topography is a major factor controlling both hydrological and soil processes at the landscape scale. While this is well-accepted qualitatively, quantifying relationships between topography and spatial variations of hydrologically relevant variables at the landscape scale still remains a challenging research topic. In this presentation, we describe hydrological landscape analysis HLA) as a way to derive relevant topographic indicies to describe the spatial variations of hydrological variables at the landscape scale. We demonstrate our HLA approach with four high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) from Sweden, Switzerland and Montana (USA). To investigate scale effects HLA metrics, we compared DEMs of different resolutions. These LiDAR-derived DEMs of 3m, 10m, and 30m, resolution represent catchments of ~ 5 km2 ranging from low to high relief. A central feature of HLA is the flowpath-based analysis of topography and the separation of hillslopes, riparian areas, and the stream network. We included the following metrics: riparian area delineation, riparian buffer potential, separation of stream inflows into right and left bank components, travel time proxies based on flowpath distances and gradients to the channel, and as a hydrologic similarity to the hypsometric curve we suggest the distribution of elevations above the stream network (computed based on the location where a certain flow pathway enters the stream). Several of these indices depended clearly on DEM resolution, whereas this effect was minor for others. While the hypsometric curves all were S-shaped the 'hillslope-hypsometric curves' had the shape of a power function with exponents less than 1. In a similar way we separated flow pathway lengths and gradients between hillslopes and streams and compared a topographic travel time proxy, which was based on the integration of gradients along the flow pathways. Besides the comparison of HLA-metrics for different catchments and DEM resolutions we present

  7. Online Mars Digital Elevation Model Derived from Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacourt, C.; Gros, N.; Allemand, P.; Baratoux, D.

    The topography of Mars is a key parameter for understanding the geological evolution of the planet. Since 1997, the Mars Orbital Laser Altimeter (MOLA), launched in the frame of Mars Global Surveyor, has acquired more than 600 million topographic measurements. However, despite the high vertical accuracy of those profiles, the main limitation of this technique appears when topographic maps are required. To create a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) or a topographic map, an interpolation on individual MOLA measurements on regular grids is required. Calculating the global full-resolution Martian DEM requires very intensive computation and large disk capacities. Only a few teams throughout the world have computed a full resolution DEM from MOLA data. Even if a scientist is interested in a small area of Mars, numerous profiles have to be processed and extracted from 44 CD-ROMs. To facilitate the exploitation of the high potential of MOLA data, we propose an Internet application that allows any user to extract the individual MOLA measurements from all profiles over a given area and to process local DEMs of the surface of Mars with adjustable parameters of computation. This facility, developed in Interactive Data Language by Research Systems, Inc., allows users to select the zone of interest and the resolution of the output DEM. After online processing, various products in standard formats can be downloaded on the user's computer, including DEMs, individual MOLA points, list and map of the MOLA ground tracks used for the DEM generation, and a quality map. This map is computed by evaluating the distance between each point of the DEM and the closest measurements of the altimeter. Furthermore, IDL tools are supplied to facilitate data integration and use.

  8. Dune Morphometry in the Age of Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, N.

    2014-12-01

    Dune patterns can be characterized in many different ways. Relationships between dune height, width and spacing, and the spatial variation in these parameters have been widely employed to provide quantitative information that can be used to describe dune patterns and make comparisons between dunes in widely separated areas, as well as to identify different generations of dunes. Digital elevation models (e.g. ASTER GDEM) provide a rich resource of data for analyses of dune patterns at landscape scales in several ways, including: (1) more extensive analyses using traditional measures, such as relationships between dune height and spacing, and the spatial variation in these parameters; and (2) estimation of sediment thickness on a regional scale. Analyses of data for Arabian and Namibian sand seas and dune fields show that dune height and spacing relationships are much more variable than previously reported and call into question existing models. Regional patterns of sediment thickness reveal areas of erosion, bypass, and accumulation that can be related to transport pathways and wind regimes. The widespread occurrence of complex dune patterns as well as the magnitude of the newly available data sets however requires more sophisticated analyses than simple extraction of dune morphometric parameters using GIS approaches. Geostatistical analyses using spatial autocorrelation, Fourier, and Wavelet methods have been employed in analyses of sub-aqueous bedforms and show promise for dune systems. Automated or semi-automated identification of dune length, width, spacing, and trends using advanced image analysis techniques such as linear segment detection is a potentially transformative approach. The strengths and weaknesses of these methods to provide pertinent geomorphic information are currently being evaluated, but they have the potential to provide new insights into the nature of dune patterns.

  9. The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) -for societal benefit -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hato, M.; Tsu, H.; Tachikawa, T.; Abrams, M.; Bailey, B.

    2009-12-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) was developed jointly by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) of Japan and the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) under the agreement of contribution to GEOSS and a public release was started on June 29th. ASTER GDEM can be downloaded to users from the Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC) of Japan and NASA’s Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) free of charge. The ASTER instrument was built by METI and launched onboard NASA’s Terra spacecraft in December 1999. It has an along-track stereoscopic capability using its near infrared spectral band (NIR) and its nadir-viewing and backward-viewing telescopes to acquire stereo image data with a base-to-height ratio of 0.6. The ASTER GDEM was produced by applying newly-developed automated algorithm to more than 1.2 million NIR data Produced DEMs of all scene data was stacked after cloud masking and finally partitioned into 1° x 1°unit (called ‘tile’) data for convenience of distribution and handling by users. Before start of public distribution, ERSDAC and USGS/NASA together with many volunteers did validation and characterization by using a preliminary product of the ASTER GDEM. As a result of validation, METI and NASA evaluated that Version 1 of the ASTER GDEM has enough quality to be used as “experimental” or “research grade” data and consequently decided to release it. The ASTER GDEM covering almost all land area of from 83N to 83S on the earth represents as an important contribution to the global earth observation community. We will show our effort of development of ASTER GDEM and its accuracy and character.

  10. High Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Pristine Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.; Krabill, W.; Garvin, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    In order to effectively capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained high resolution digital elevation models of several pristine explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM), operated by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to obtain DEMs with 1 m spacing and 10 cm vertical errors of 4 main craters and many other craters and collapse pits. The main craters that were mapped are Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, and Danny Boy. The 370 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of a controlled detonation of a 100 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a simple crater. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also mapped by ATM. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m) craters were also important targets for ATM as they were excavated in hard basalt and therefore have much rougher ejecta. This will allow study of ejecta patterns in hard rock as well as engineering tests of crater and rock avoidance and rover trafficability. In addition to the high resolution DEMs, crater geometric characteristics, RMS roughness maps, and other higher-order derived data products will be generated using these data. These will provide constraints for models of landing hazards on Mars and for rover trafficability. Other planned studies will include ejecta size-frequency distribution at the resolution of the DEM and at finer resolution through air photography and field measurements

  11. A quality control system for digital elevation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Thomas; Kokkendorf, Simon; Flatman, Andrew; Nielsen, Thorbjørn; Rosenkranz, Brigitte; Keller, Kristian

    2015-04-01

    In connection with the introduction of a new version of the Danish national coverage Digital Elevation Model (DK-DEM), the Danish Geodata Agency has developed a comprehensive quality control (QC) and metadata production (MP) system for LiDAR point cloud data. The architecture of the system reflects its origin in a national mapping organization where raw data deliveries are typically outsourced to external suppliers. It also reflects a design decision of aiming at, whenever conceivable, doing full spatial coverage tests, rather than scattered sample checks. Hence, the QC procedure is split in two phases: A reception phase and an acceptance phase. The primary aim of the reception phase is to do a quick assessment of things that can typically go wrong, and which are relatively simple to check: Data coverage, data density, strip adjustment. If a data delivery passes the reception phase, the QC continues with the acceptance phase, which checks five different aspects of the point cloud data: Vertical accuracy Vertical precision Horizontal accuracy Horizontal precision Point classification correctness The vertical descriptors are comparatively simple to measure: The vertical accuracy is checked by direct comparison with previously surveyed patches. The vertical precision is derived from the observed variance on well defined flat surface patches. These patches are automatically derived from the road centerlines registered in FOT, the official Danish map data base. The horizontal descriptors are less straightforward to measure, since potential reference material for direct comparison is typically expected to be less accurate than the LiDAR data. The solution selected is to compare photogrammetrically derived roof centerlines from FOT with LiDAR derived roof centerlines. These are constructed by taking the 3D Hough transform of a point cloud patch defined by the photogrammetrical roof polygon. The LiDAR derived roof centerline is then the intersection line of the two primary

  12. An algorithm for treating flat areas and depressions in digital elevation models using linear interpolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Digital elevation model (DEM) data are essential to hydrological applications and have been widely used to calculate a variety of useful topographic characteristics, e.g., slope, flow direction, flow accumulation area, stream channel network, topographic index, and others. Excep...

  13. Quantifying Slopes with Digital Elevation Models of the Verdugo Hills, California: Effects of Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Burbank, D. W.; Duncan, C. C.

    1996-01-01

    Quantification of surface slope angles is valuable in a wide variety of earth sciences. Slopes measured from digital elevation models (DEMs) or other topographic data sets depend strongly on the length scale or window size used in the slope calculations.

  14. Levee crest elevation profiles derived from airborne lidar-based high resolution digital elevation models in south Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Palaseanu-Lovejoy, Monica; Thatcher, Cindy A.; Barras, John A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the feasibility of using airborne lidar surveys to derive high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) and develop an automated procedure to extract levee longitudinal elevation profiles for both federal levees in Atchafalaya Basin and local levees in Lafourche Parish. Generally, the use of traditional manual surveying methods to map levees is a costly and time consuming process that typically produces cross-levee profiles every few hundred meters, at best. The purpose of our paper is to describe and test methods for extracting levee crest elevations in an efficient, comprehensive manner using high resolution lidar generated DEMs. In addition, the vertical uncertainty in the elevation data and its effect on the resultant estimate of levee crest heights is addressed in an assessment of whether the federal levees in our study meet the USACE minimum height design criteria.

  15. Tectonic development of the Northwest Bonaparte Basin, Australia by using Digital Elevation Model (DEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Ali; Salim, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed; Ragab Gaafar, Gamal; Yusoff, AP Wan Ismail Wan

    2016-02-01

    The Bonaparte Basin consist of majorly offshore part is situated at Australia's NW continental margin, covers an area of approx. 270,000km2. Bonaparte Basin having a number of sub-basins and platform areas of Paleozoic and Mesozoic is structurally complex. This research established the geologic and geomorphologic studies using Digital Elevation Model (DEM) as a substitute approach in morphostructural analysis to unravel the geological complexities. Although DEMs have been in practice since 1990s, they still have not become common tool for mapping studies. The research work comprised of regional structural analysis with the help of integrated elevation data, satellite imageries, available open topograhic images and internal geological maps with interpreted seismic. The structural maps of the study area have been geo-referenced which further overlaid onto SRTM data and satellite images for combined interpretation which facilitate to attain Digital Elevation Model of the study area. The methodology adopts is to evaluate and redefine development of geodynamic processes involved in formation of Bonaparte Basin. The main objectives is to establish the geological histories by using digital elevation model. The research work will be useful to incorporate different tectonic events occurred at different Geological times in a digital elevation model. The integrated tectonic analysis of different digital data sets benefitted substantially from combining them into a common digital database. Whereas, the visualization software facilitates the overlay and combined interpretation of different data sets which is helpful to reveal hidden information not obvious or accessible otherwise for regional analysis.

  16. Calculation and Error Analysis of a Digital Elevation Model of Hofsjokull, Iceland from SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, Jonathan S.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Sigurosson, Oddur; Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Smith, Laurence C.; Garvin, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Two ascending European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Resources Satellites (ERS)-1/-2 tandem-mode, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) pairs are used to calculate the surface elevation of Hofsjokull, an ice cap in central Iceland. The motion component of the interferometric phase is calculated using the 30 arc-second resolution USGS GTOPO30 global digital elevation product and one of the ERS tandem pairs. The topography is then derived by subtracting the motion component from the other tandem pair. In order to assess the accuracy of the resultant digital elevation model (DEM), a geodetic airborne laser-altimetry swath is compared with the elevations derived from the interferometry. The DEM is also compared with elevations derived from a digitized topographic map of the ice cap from the University of Iceland Science Institute. Results show that low temporal correlation is a significant problem for the application of interferometry to small, low-elevation ice caps, even over a one-day repeat interval, and especially at the higher elevations. Results also show that an uncompensated error in the phase, ramping from northwest to southeast, present after tying the DEM to ground-control points, has resulted in a systematic error across the DEM.

  17. Development and Utilization of High Precision Digital Elevation Data taken by Airborne Laser Scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akutsu, Osamu; Ohta, Masataka; Isobe, Tamio; Ando, Hisamitsu, Noguchi, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masayuki

    2005-03-01

    Disasters caused by heavy rain in urban areas bring a damage such as chaos in the road and railway transport systems, power failure, breakdown of the telephone system and submersion of built up areas, subways and underground shopping arcades, etc. It is important to obtain high precision elevation data which shows the detailed landform because a slight height difference affects damages by flood very considerably. Therefore, The Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) is preparing 5m grid digital terrain model (DTM) based on precise ground elevation data taken by using airborne laser scanner. This paper describes the process and an example of the use of a 5m grid digital data set.

  18. Elevating student potential: creating digital video to teach neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Jarvinen, Michael K; Jarvinen, Lamis Z

    2012-01-01

    Students today have unprecedented access to technology, the Internet, and social media. Their nearly ubiquitous use of these platforms is well documented. Given that today's students may be primed to learn using a different medium, incorporating various technological elements into the classroom in a manner compatible with traditional approaches to teaching becomes a challenge. We recently designed and implemented a strategy that capitalized on this knowledge. Students in their first neuroscience course were required to create a 3-5 minute digital video using video-making freeware available on any Mac or PC. They used images, text, animation, as well as downloaded music to describe the fundamental process of neurotransmission as it applies to a topic of their choice. In comparison to students taught using other more traditional approaches to demonstrate the process of neurotransmission, we observed that students who took part in the video-making project exhibited better understanding of the neurological process at multiple levels, as defined by Bloom's revised taxonomy. This was true even of students who had no aspirations of pursuing a Neuroscience career, thus suggesting that there was an overall increased level of student engagement regardless of personal career interests. The utility of our approach was validated by both direct and indirect assessments. Importantly, this particular strategy to teaching difficult concepts offers a high degree of flexibility allowing it to potentially be incorporated into any upper-level Neuroscience course. PMID:23493934

  19. Object representations at multiple scales from digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Drăguţ, Lucian; Eisank, Clemens

    2011-06-15

    In the last decade landform classification and mapping has developed as one of the most active areas of geomorphometry. However, translation from continuous models of elevation and its derivatives (slope, aspect, and curvatures) to landform divisions (landforms and landform elements) is filtered by two important concepts: scale and object ontology. Although acknowledged as being important, these two issues have received surprisingly little attention.This contribution provides an overview and prospects of object representation from DEMs as a function of scale. Relationships between object delineation and classification or regionalization are explored, in the context of differences between general and specific geomorphometry. A review of scales issues in geomorphometry-ranging from scale effects to scale optimization techniques-is followed by an analysis of pros and cons of using cells and objects in DEM analysis. Prospects for coupling multi-scale analysis and object delineation are then discussed. Within this context, we propose discrete geomorphometry as a possible approach between general and specific geomorphometry. Discrete geomorphometry would apply to and describe land-surface divisions defined solely by the criteria of homogeneity in respect to a given land-surface parameter or a combination of several parameters. Homogeneity, in its turn, should always be relative to scale. PMID:21760655

  20. Object representations at multiple scales from digital elevation models

    PubMed Central

    Drăguţ, Lucian; Eisank, Clemens

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade landform classification and mapping has developed as one of the most active areas of geomorphometry. However, translation from continuous models of elevation and its derivatives (slope, aspect, and curvatures) to landform divisions (landforms and landform elements) is filtered by two important concepts: scale and object ontology. Although acknowledged as being important, these two issues have received surprisingly little attention. This contribution provides an overview and prospects of object representation from DEMs as a function of scale. Relationships between object delineation and classification or regionalization are explored, in the context of differences between general and specific geomorphometry. A review of scales issues in geomorphometry—ranging from scale effects to scale optimization techniques—is followed by an analysis of pros and cons of using cells and objects in DEM analysis. Prospects for coupling multi-scale analysis and object delineation are then discussed. Within this context, we propose discrete geomorphometry as a possible approach between general and specific geomorphometry. Discrete geomorphometry would apply to and describe land-surface divisions defined solely by the criteria of homogeneity in respect to a given land-surface parameter or a combination of several parameters. Homogeneity, in its turn, should always be relative to scale. PMID:21760655

  1. Digital elevation model (DEM) of Cascadia, latitude 39N-53N, longitude 116W-133W

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, Ralph A.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a 250-meter digital elevation model (DEM) for Cascadia (latitude 39N - 53N, longitude 116W - 133W), a region that encompasses the Cascade volcanic arc, the Cascadia subduction zone, and the Juan de Fuca Ridge system. The DEM is distributed as file cascdem.tar.gz (39 MB; 78MB uncompressed).

  2. 90-METER DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL (DEM) FOR THE MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT (MAIA) STUDY AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This data set is a geographic information system (GIS) coverage of the 90-meter digital elevation model (DEM) for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) Project region. The coverage was produced using US Geological Su...

  3. Lunar Topography and Basins Mapped Using a Clementine Stereo Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. C.; Spudis, P. D.; Robinson, M. S.; Watters, T. R.

    2002-01-01

    Planet-wide (1 km/pixel and 5 km/pixel) Digital Elevation Models (DEM) of the Moon have been produced using Clementine UVVIS (Ultraviolet-Visible) stereo. Six new basins have been discovered, two suspected basins have been confirmed, and the dimensions of existing basins better defined. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar and the Data Collection System Digital Terrain Elevation Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidelbach, Robert; Bolus, R.; Chadwick, J.

    1994-08-01

    Digital Terrain Elevations (DTE) that can be rapidly generated, and that have better fidelity and accuracy than Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) Levels 1 or 2, would be extremely beneficial to Department of Defense (DOD) military operations, civil works programs, and various commercial applications. As a result, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), along with the U.S. Army Topographic Engineering Center (TEC), are developing an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) elevation mapping capability. This system, the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar for Digital Radar Elevations (IFSARE), is capable of collecting and providing data in all weather (reasonable), in day or night scenarios, and where obscurants are present. The IFSARE, which is currently undergoing Integration and Test, will allow for rapid on-line automatic processing of the collected digital radar data into DTE and high quality imagery. The prime contractor is the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM). This paper addresses the proof of concept for civil works applications by analyzing a data set taken by the Wright Labs/ERIM Data Collection System (DCS). The objective was to demonstrate the capability of an IFSAR system to provide high fidelity, fine resolution DTE that can be employed in hydraulic models of the Mississippi River watershed. The demonstration was sponsored by ARPA and TEC.

  5. Digital elevation data as an aid to land use and land cover classification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colvocoresses, Alden P.

    1981-01-01

    In relatively well mapped areas such as the United States and Europe, digital data can be developed from topographic maps or from the stereo aerial photographic movie. For poorer mapped areas (which involved most of the world's land areas), a satellite designed to obtain stereo data offers the best hope for a digital elevation database. Such a satellite, known as Mapsat, has been defined by the U.S. Geological Survey. Utilizing modern solid state technology, there is no reason why such stereo data cannot be acquired simultaneously with the multispectral response, thus simplifying the overall problem of land use and land cover classification.

  6. Lossless data compression of grid-based digital elevation models: A png image format evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarmana, G.

    2014-05-01

    At present, computers, lasers, radars, planes and satellite technologies make possible very fast and accurate topographic data acquisition for the production of maps. However, the problem of managing and manipulating this data efficiently remains. One particular type of map is the elevation map. When stored on a computer, it is often referred to as a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). A DEM is usually a square matrix of elevations. It is like an image, except that it contains a single channel of information (that is, elevation) and can be compressed in a lossy or lossless manner by way of existing image compression protocols. Compression has the effect of reducing memory requirements and speed of transmission over digital links, while maintaining the integrity of data as required. In this context, this paper investigates the effects of the PNG (Portable Network Graphics) lossless image compression protocol on floating-point elevation values for 16-bit DEMs of dissimilar terrain characteristics. The PNG is a robust, universally supported, extensible, lossless, general-purpose and patent-free image format. Tests demonstrate that the compression ratios and run decompression times achieved with the PNG lossless compression protocol can be comparable to, or better than, proprietary lossless JPEG variants, other image formats and available lossless compression algorithms.

  7. Rapid calculation of terrain parameters for radiation modeling from digital elevation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Frew, James

    1990-01-01

    Digital elevation models are now widely used to calculate terrain parameters to determine incoming solar and longwave radiation for use in surface climate models, interpretation of remote-sensing data, and parameters in hydrologic models. Because of the large number of points in an elevation grid, fast algorithms are useful to save computation time. A description is given of rapid methods for calculating slope and azimuth, solar illumination angle, horizons, and view factors for radiation from sky and terrain. Calculation time is reduced by fast algorithms and lookup tables.

  8. A seamless, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the north-central California coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    A seamless, 2-meter resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the north-central California coast has been created from the most recent high-resolution bathymetric and topographic datasets available. The DEM extends approximately 150 kilometers along the California coastline, from Half Moon Bay north to Bodega Head. Coverage extends inland to an elevation of +20 meters and offshore to at least the 3 nautical mile limit of state waters. This report describes the procedures of DEM construction, details the input data sources, and provides the DEM for download in both ESRI Arc ASCII and GeoTIFF file formats with accompanying metadata.

  9. Validating Flood Mapping Products Using a Digital Elevation Model Comparison Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayne, J.

    2014-12-01

    This preliminary study assessed the validity of a pixel analysis elevation comparison technique and determined necessary steps for improvement. The pixel analysis sought to assess the probability of a flood occurring in a particular area by comparing the spatial extent of flood mapping products to the local elevation. The method was developed to determine if the physical relationship between elevation and floods as shown in satellite images is accurately represented in a flood mapping product. The data incorporated in this study are raster digital elevation model (DEM) tiles, a scene from Landsat 5 during a flood period, and a scene from the NASA DEVELOP Flood Disasters Team Flood Product. Pixels representing flooded areas were compared to the elevation height pixels using horizontal transect lines to create pixel value profiles across a 727 km transect of Vietnam and Cambodia. The elevation model comparison validates the Flood Product by depicting water presence in alignment with areas of low elevation. Initial findings indicate that the technique can be used to improve the assessment of flood mapping products in transects less than 10 km. Future research will focus on streamlining the pixel analysis process to yield comprehensive results for larger areas.

  10. Analyzing remote sensing geobotanical trends in Quetico Provincial Park, Ontario, Canada, using digital elevation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Timothy A.; Campagna, David J.; Levandowski, Don W.; Cetin, Haluk; Evans, Carla S.

    1991-01-01

    A 10 x 13-km area in Quetico Provincial Park, Canada has been studied using a digital elevation model to separate different drainage classes and to examine the influence of site factors and lithology on vegetation. Landsat Thematic Mapper data have been classified into six forest classes of varying deciduous-coniferous cover through nPDF, a procedure based on probability density functions. It is shown that forests growing on mafic lithologies are enriched in deciduous species, compared to those growing on granites. Of the forest classes found on mafics, the highest coniferous component was on north facing slopes, and the highest deciduous component on south facing slopes. Granites showed no substantial variation between site classes. The digital elevation derived site data is considered to be an important tool in geobotanical investigations.

  11. 1:100,000-scale topographic contours derived from digital elevation models, San Francisco Bay region, California: a digital database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.; Wentworth, Carl M.

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a consistent set of 1:100,000-scale vector topographic contours for all eleven 30x60-minute quadrangles in the San Francisco Bay region for use in visualizing the topography and preparing maps of the region. The contours were prepared by contouring an areally continuous 30-m altitude grid (National Elevation Dataset, Jan., 1999), and differ from USGS hypsographic DLG's (available for only part of the region). The report consists of 26 numbered parts, which represent text, spatial data, and 1:100,000-scale map graphics. Most of the files are provided in two or three different digital formats. All files are available for download here.

  12. An evaluation of onshore digital elevation models for modelling tsunami inundation zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Jonathan; Latief, Hamzah; Kongko, Widjo; Harig, Sven; Horspool, Nick; Hanung, Raditya; Rojali, Aditia; Maher, Nicola; Fuchs, Annika; Hossen, Jakir; Upi, Supriyati; Edi, Dewanto; Rakowsky, Natalja; Cummins, Phil

    2015-06-01

    A sensitivity study is undertaken to assess the utility of different onshore digital elevation models (DEM) for simulating the extent of tsunami inundation using case studies from two locations in Indonesia. We compare airborne IFSAR, ASTER and SRTM against high resolution LiDAR and stereo-camera data in locations with different coastal morphologies. Tsunami inundation extents modelled with airborne IFSAR DEMs are comparable with those modelled with the higher resolution datasets and are also consistent with historical run-up data, where available. Large vertical errors and poor resolution of the coastline in the ASTER and SRTM elevation datasets cause the modelled inundation extent to be much less compared with the other datasets and observations. Therefore ASTER and SRTM should not be used to underpin tsunami inundation models. a model mesh resolution of 25 m was sufficient for estimating the inundated area when using elevation data with high vertical accuracy in the case studies presented here. Differences in modelled inundation between digital terrain models (DTM) and digital surface models (DSM) for LiDAR and IFSAR are greater than differences between the two data types. Models using DTM may overestimate inundation while those using DSM may underestimate inundation when a constant Manning’s roughness value is used. We recommend using DTM for modelling tsunami inundation extent with further work needed to resolve the scale at which surface roughness should be parameterised.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Global Digital Elevation Models and Ultra-Prominent Mountain Peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, Carlos H.

    2016-06-01

    Global Digital Elevation Models (GDEMs) are datasets of vital importance for regional-scale analysis in areas such as geomorphology, [paleo]climatology, oceanography and biodiversity. In this work I present a comparative assessment of the datasets ETOPO1 (1' resolution), GTOPO30, GLOBE, SRTM30 PLUS, GMTED2010 and ACE2 (30") against the altitude of the world's ultra prominent peaks. GDEMs' elevations show an expected tendency of underestimating the peak's altitude, but differences reach 3,500 m. None of the GDEMs captures the full range of elevation on Earth and they do not represent well the altitude of the most prominent peaks. Some of these problems could be addressed with the release of NASADEM, but the smoothing effect caused by moving-window resampling can only be tackled by using new techniques, such as scale-adaptative kernels and curvature-based terrain generalisation.

  14. Assessment of Required Accuracy of Digital Elevation Data for Hydrologic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenward, T.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of vertical accuracy of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) on hydrologic models is evaluated by comparing three DEMs and resulting hydrologic model predictions applied to a 7.2 sq km USDA - ARS watershed at Mahantango Creek, PA. The high resolution (5 m) DEM was resempled to a 30 m resolution using method that constrained the spatial structure of the elevations to be comparable with the USGS and SIR-C DEMs. This resulting 30 m DEM was used as the reference product for subsequent comparisons. Spatial fields of directly derived quantities, such as elevation differences, slope, and contributing area, were compared to the reference product, as were hydrologic model output fields derived using each of the three DEMs at the common 30 m spatial resolution.

  15. Quality assessment of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) in view of the Altiplano hydrological modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satgé, F.; Arsen, A.; Bonnet, M.; Timouk, F.; Calmant, S.; Pilco, R.; Molina, J.; Lavado, W.; Crétaux, J.; HASM

    2013-05-01

    Topography is crucial data input for hydrological modeling but in many regions of the world, the only way to characterize topography is the use of satellite-based Digital Elevation Models (DEM). In some regions, the quality of these DEMs remains poor and induces modeling errors that may or not be compensated by model parameters tuning. In such regions, the evaluation of these data uncertainties is an important step in the modeling procedure. In this study, which focuses on the Altiplano region, we present the evaluation of the two freely available DEM. The shuttle radar topographic mission (SRTM), a product of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Advanced Space Born Thermal Emission and Reflection Global Digital Elevation Map (ASTER GDEM), data provided by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan (MESI) in collaboration with the NASA, are widely used. While the first represents a resolution of 3 arc seconds (90m) the latter is 1 arc second (30m). In order to select the most reliable DEM, we compared the DEM elevation with high qualities control points elevation. Because of its large spatial coverture (track spaced of 30 km with a measure of each 172 m) and its high vertical accuracy which is less than 15 cm in good weather conditions, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on board on the Ice, Cloud and Land elevation Satellite of NASA (ICESat) represent the better solution to establish a high quality elevation database. After a quality check, more than 150 000 ICESat/GLAS measurements are suitable in terms of accuracy for the Altiplano watershed. This data base has been used to evaluate the vertical accuracy for each DEM. Regarding to the full spatial coverture; the comparison has been done for both, all kind of land coverture, range altitude and mean slope.

  16. ICESat Lidar and Global Digital Elevation Models: Application to DESDynI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carabajal, Claudia C.; Harding, David J.; Suchdeo, Vijay P.

    2010-01-01

    Geodetic control is extremely important in the production and quality control of topographic data sets, enabling elevation results to be referenced to an absolute vertical datum. Global topographic data with improved geodetic accuracy achieved using global Ground Control Point (GCP) databases enable more accurate characterization of land topography and its change related to solid Earth processes, natural hazards and climate change. The multiple-beam lidar instrument that will be part of the NASA Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) mission will provide a comprehensive, global data set that can be used for geodetic control purposes. Here we illustrate that potential using data acquired by NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICEsat) that has acquired single-beam, globally distributed laser altimeter profiles (+/-86deg) since February of 2003 [1, 2]. The profiles provide a consistently referenced elevation data set with unprecedented accuracy and quantified measurement errors that can be used to generate GCPs with sub-decimeter vertical accuracy and better than 10 m horizontal accuracy. Like the planned capability for DESDynI, ICESat records a waveform that is the elevation distribution of energy reflected within the laser footprint from vegetation, where present, and the ground where illuminated through gaps in any vegetation cover [3]. The waveform enables assessment of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) with respect to the highest, centroid, and lowest elevations observed by ICESat and in some cases with respect to the ground identified beneath vegetation cover. Using the ICESat altimetry data we are developing a comprehensive database of consistent, global, geodetic ground control that will enhance the quality of a variety of regional to global DEMs. Here we illustrate the accuracy assessment of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) DEM produced for Australia, documenting spatially varying elevation biases of several meters

  17. Digital Elevation Models of TYCHO Crater and the Lunar Polar Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, J. L.; Campbell, D. B.; Jurgens, R. F.; Slade, M. A.

    1998-09-01

    Earth-based radar interferometry [1] has been used to map the lunar polar regions and Tycho Crater at high spatial ( ~ 100 m) and height ( ~ 50 m) resolutions. Compared to existing topographic data sets, the radar observations offer digital elevation models with dense horizontal spacing and improved height resolution. Earth-based radars can also provide measurements of the largely unknown topography in the polar regions. Elevation data and radar imagery obtained with the Goldstone X-band system (lambda = 3.5 cm) are presented for the Tycho Crater area, with a spatial resolution of 200 m and a height resolution of 30 m. A careful comparison of the radar-derived topography with Clementine altimetry points [2] reveals a very good agreement between the two techniques. Rms deviations between the radar-derived heights and 87 Clementine points available over the 200 x 200 km scene are ~ 100 m. The digital elevation model allows detailed morphometry of the 85 km diameter crater: the floor of Tycho lies 3970 m below a 1738 km radius sphere, and the crater's central peak rises 2400 m above the floor. The average rim crest elevation is 730 m above the 1738 km datum, giving a mean rim to floor depth of 4700 m. The floor has two distinct units with the western section being higher in elevation by ~ 200 m. This dichotomy is consistent with an asymmetry in the crater shape which reveals that maximum wall slumping occured in the western and southwestern regions of the crater. Digital elevation models of the polar regions are being used to estimate the location of permanently shadowed areas which may harbor ice deposits [3]. The range of illumination conditions over the lunar polar regions could be sampled by an imaging instrument in a polar orbit during a full terrestrial year. Alternatively, topographic maps obtained with Earth-based radar can be used to model the illumination conditions over the entire solar illumination cycle. [1] I. I. Shapiro et al. (1972). Science, 178, 939

  18. A flooding algorithm for extracting drainage networks from unprocessed digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Antonio; Noguera, José M.; Martínez-Cruz, Carmen

    2013-09-01

    A new method for extracting the drainage network from a digital elevation model (DEM) is presented. It is based on the well-known D8 approach that simulates the overland flow but uses a more elaborate water transfer model that is inspired by the natural behaviour of water. The proposed solution has several advantages: it works on unprocessed DEMs avoiding the problems caused by pits and flats, can generate watercourses with a width greater than one cell and detects fluvial landforms like lakes, marshes or river islands that are not directly handled by most previous solutions.

  19. Geomorphological feature extraction from a digital elevation model through fuzzy knowledge-based classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argialas, Demetre P.; Tzotsos, Angelos

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this research was the investigation of advanced image analysis methods for geomorphological mapping. Methods employed included multiresolution segmentation of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) GTOPO30 and fuzzy knowledge based classification of the segmented DEM into three geomorphological classes: mountain ranges, piedmonts and basins. The study area was a segment of the Basin and Range Physiographic Province in Nevada, USA. The implementation was made in eCognition. In particular, the segmentation of GTOPO30 resulted into primitive objects. The knowledge-based classification of the primitive objects based on their elevation and shape parameters, resulted in the extraction of the geomorphological features. The resulted boundaries in comparison to those by previous studies were found satisfactory. It is concluded that geomorphological feature extraction can be carried out through fuzzy knowledge based classification as implemented in eCognition.

  20. Revealing topographic lineaments through IHS enhancement of DEM data. [Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdock, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Intensity-hue-saturation (IHS) processing of slope (dip), aspect (dip direction), and elevation to reveal subtle topographic lineaments which may not be obvious in the unprocessed data are used to enhance digital elevation model (DEM) data from northwestern Nevada. This IHS method of lineament identification was applied to a mosiac of 12 square degrees using a Cray Y-MP8/864. Square arrays from 3 x 3 to 31 x 31 points were tested as well as several different slope enhancements. When relatively few points are used to fit the plane, lineaments of various lengths are observed and a mechanism for lineament classification is described. An area encompassing the gold deposits of the Carlin trend and including the Rain in the southeast to Midas in the northwest is investigated in greater detail. The orientation and density of lineaments may be determined on the gently sloping pediment surface as well as in the more steeply sloping ranges.

  1. Initial Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) Digital Elevation Model Research and Development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) offers a consistent and documented dataset that can be used to guide large-scale field operations, to integrate hydrologic and ecological responses, and to support biological and ecological assessments that measure ecosystem responses to the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (Telis, 2006). To produce historic and near-real time maps of water depths, the EDEN requires a system-wide digital elevation model (DEM) of the ground surface. Accurate Everglades wetland ground surface elevation data were non-existent before the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) undertook the collection of highly accurate surface elevations at the regional scale. These form the foundation for EDEN DEM development. This development process is iterative as additional high accuracy elevation data (HAED) are collected, water surfacing algorithms improve, and additional ground-based ancillary data become available. Models are tested using withheld HAED and independently measured water depth data, and by using DEM data in EDEN adaptive management applications. Here the collection of HAED is briefly described before the approach to DEM development and the current EDEN DEM are detailed. Finally future research directions for continued model development, testing, and refinement are provided.

  2. A geomorphology based approach for digital elevation model fusion - case study in Danang City, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T. A.; Raghavan, V.; Masumoto, S.; Vinayaraj, P.; Yonezawa, G.

    2014-04-01

    Global Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is considered as vital spatial information and finds wide use in several applications. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global DEM (GDEM) and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) DEM offer almost global coverage and provide elevation data for geospatial analysis. However, GDEM and SRTM still contain some height errors that affect the quality of elevation data significantly. This study aims to examine methods to improve the resolution as well as accuracy of available free DEMs by data fusion technique and evaluating the results with high quality reference DEM. The DEM fusion method is based on the accuracy assessment of each global DEM and geomorphological characteristics of the study area. Land cover units were also considered to correct the elevation of GDEM and SRTM with respect to the bare earth surface. Weighted averaging method was used to fuse the input DEMs based on landform classification map. According to the landform types, the different weights were used for GDEM and SRTM. Finally, a denoising algorithm (Sun et al., 2007) was applied to filter the output fused DEM. This fused DEM shows excellent correlation to the reference DEM having correlation coefficient R2 = 0.9986 and the accuracy was also improved from Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) 14.9 m in GDEM and 14.8 m in SRTM into 11.6 m in fused DEM.

  3. State of Texas - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation of Texas and a grayscale relief of the surrounding areas. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. The NED source data for this map consists of a mixture of 30-meter- and 10-meter-resolution DEMs. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2002. Shaded relief over Mexico was obtained from the USGS National Atlas.

  4. Enhancing a RADARSAT/ICESat Digital Elevation Model of West Antarctica Using MODIS Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haran, T. M.; Scambos, T. A.

    2007-12-01

    An image enhancement approach is used to develop a new digital elevation map of West Antarctica, combining multiple MODIS images and both radar altimetry and ICESat laser altimetry Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data. The method combines the wide image coverage of MODIS, and its high radiometric sensitivity (which equates to high sunward slope sensitivity), with the high precision and accuracy of ICESat and combined ICESat and radar altimetry DEMs. We calibrate brightness-to-slope relationships for several MODIS images of the central West Antarctic using smoothed DEMs derived from both sources. Using the calibrations, we then created, first, a slope map of the ice sheet surface from the image data (regressing slope information from many images), and then integrated this absolute slope map to yield complete DEMs for the region. ICESat (as of September 2007) has acquired a series of eleven near-repeat tracks over the Antarctic during the period September 2003 to April 2007, covering the continent to 86 deg S. ICESat data are acquired as a series of spot elevations, averaging a ~60m diameter surface region every ~172m. However, ICESat track paths have spacings wide enough (2 km at 85 deg; 20 - 50 km at 75 deg) that some surface ice dynamical features (e.g. flowlines, undulations, ice rises) are missed by the track data used to construct the ICESat DEM. Radar altimetry can provide some of the missing data north of 81.5 deg, but only to a maximum resolution of about 5 km. A set of cloud-cleared MODIS band 1 data from both the Aqua and Terra platforms acquired during the 2003-2004 austral summer, used in generating the Mosaic of Antarctica, MOA, surface morphology image map, were used for the image enhancement. Past analyses of the slope-brightness relationship for MODIS have shown ice surface slope precisions of +/- 0.00015. ICESat spot elevations have nominal precisions of ~5 cm under ideal conditions, although thin-cloud effects and mislocation errors can magnify these

  5. Delineating small karst watersheds based on digital elevation model and eco-hydrogeological principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie Luo, Guang; Jie Wang, Shi; Bai, Xiao Yong; Liu, Xiu Ming; Cheng, An Yun

    2016-03-01

    Dominated by specific eco-hydrogeological backgrounds, a small watershed delineated by using the traditional method is always inauthentic in karst regions because it cannot accurately reflect the eco-hydrological process of the dual structure of the surface and subsurface. This study proposes a new method for the delineation of small watersheds based on digital elevation models (DEMs) and eco-hydrogeological principles in karst regions. This method is applied to one section of the tributary area (Sancha River) of the Yangtze River in China. By comparing the quantity, shape, superimposition, and characteristics of the internal hydrological process of a small watershed extracted by using the digital elevation model with that extracted by using the proposed method of this study, we conclude that the small karst watersheds extracted by the new method accurately reflect the hydrological process of the river basin. Furthermore, we propose that the minimum unit of the river basin in karst regions should be the watershed, whose exit is the corrosion and corrasion baselevel and a further division of watershed may cause a significant inconsistency with the true eco-hydrological process.

  6. Construction of a 3-arcsecond digital elevation model for the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twomey, Erin R.; Signell, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    A system-wide description of the seafloor topography is a basic requirement for most coastal oceanographic studies. The necessary detail of the topography obviously varies with application, but for many uses, a nominal resolution of roughly 100 m is sufficient. Creating a digital bathymetric grid with this level of resolution can be a complex procedure due to a multiplicity of data sources, data coverages, datums and interpolation procedures. This report documents the procedures used to construct a 3-arcsecond (approximately 90-meter grid cell size) digital elevation model for the Gulf of Maine (71°30' to 63° W, 39°30' to 46° N). We obtained elevation and bathymetric data from a variety of American and Canadian sources, converted all data to the North American Datum of 1983 for horizontal coordinates and the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 for vertical coordinates, used a combination of automatic and manual techniques for quality control, and interpolated gaps using a surface-fitting routine.

  7. Perspectives on open access high resolution digital elevation models to produce global flood hazard layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeffrey; Trigg, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Global flood hazard models have recently become a reality thanks to the release of open access global digital elevation models, the development of simplified and highly efficient flow algorithms, and the steady increase in computational power. In this commentary we argue that although the availability of open access global terrain data has been critical in enabling the development of such models, the relatively poor resolution and precision of these data now limit significantly our ability to estimate flood inundation and risk for the majority of the planet's surface. The difficulty of deriving an accurate 'bare-earth' terrain model due to the interaction of vegetation and urban structures with the satellite-based remote sensors means that global terrain data are often poorest in the areas where people, property (and thus vulnerability) are most concentrated. Furthermore, the current generation of open access global terrain models are over a decade old and many large floodplains, particularly those in developing countries, have undergone significant change in this time. There is therefore a pressing need for a new generation of high resolution and high vertical precision open access global digital elevation models to allow significantly improved global flood hazard models to be developed.

  8. Analytical basis for determining slope lines in grid digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlandini, Stefano; Moretti, Giovanni; Gavioli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    An analytical basis for the determination of slope lines in grid digital elevation models is provided by using the D8-LTD method (eight slope directions, least transverse deviation). The D8-LTD method's capability to predict consistently exact slope lines as the grid cell size goes to zero is shown analytically by applying mathematical analysis methods. The use of cumulative, least transverse deviations is found to be the key factor allowing for globally unbiased approximations of slope lines. The D8-LTD method's properties are also demonstrated numerically by using digital elevation models of a synthetic sloping surface obtained from the Himmelblau function. It is shown that slope lines obtained from the D8-LTD method can approximate the exact slope lines as close as desired by selecting a grid cell size that is small enough. In contrast, the standard D8 method is found to produce significantly biased results even when small grid cells are used. The D8-LTD method outperforms the D8 method over a wide range of grid cell sizes (up to 20 m in this application), beyond which grid cell size becomes too large to validly represent the underlying sloping surface. It is therefore concluded that the D8-LTD method should be used in preference to the standard D8 method in order to obtain slope lines that are only limited in reliability by the detail of topographic data, and not by the accuracy of the slope direction method applied.

  9. Estimating net solar radiation using Landsat Thematic Mapper and digital elevation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubayah, R.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative transfer algorithm is combined with digital elevation and satellite reflectance data to model spatial variability in net solar radiation at fine spatial resolution. The method is applied to the tall-grass prairie of the 16 x 16 sq km FIFE site (First ISLSCP Field Experiment) of the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project. Spectral reflectances as measured by the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) are corrected for atmospheric and topographic effects using field measurements and accurate 30-m digital elevation data in a detailed model of atmosphere-surface interaction. The spectral reflectances are then integrated to produce estimates of surface albedo in the range 0.3-3.0 microns. This map of albedo is used in an atmospheric and topographic radiative transfer model to produce a map of net solar radiation. A map of apparent net solar radiation is also derived using only the TM reflectance data, uncorrected for topography, and the average field-measured downwelling solar irradiance. Comparison with field measurements at 10 sites on the prairie shows that the topographically derived radiation map accurately captures the spatial variability in net solar radiation, but the apparent map does not.

  10. Quantification of soil losses from tourist trails - use of Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, Aleksandra

    2010-05-01

    Tourism impacts in protected mountain areas are one of the main concerns for land managers. Impact to environment is most visible at locations of highly concentrated activities like tourist trails, campsites etc. The main indicators of the tourist trail degradation are: vegetation loss (trampling of vegetation cover), change of vegetation type and composition, widening of the trails, muddiness and soil erosion. The last one is especially significant, since it can cause serious transformation of the land surface. Such undesirable changes cannot be repaired without high-cost management activities, and, in some cases they can made the trails difficult and unsafe to use. Scientific understanding of soil erosion related to human impact can be useful for more effective management of the natural protected areas. The aim of this study was to use of digital elevation models (DEMs) to precisely quantify of soil losses from tourist trails. In the study precise elevation data were gathered in several test fields of 4 by 5 m spatial dimension. Measurements were taken in 13 test fields, located in two protected natural areas in south Poland: Gorce National Park and Popradzki Landscape Park. The measuring places were located on trails characterized by different slope, type of vegetation and type of use. Each test field was established by four special marks, firmly dug into the ground. Elevation data were measured with the electronic total station. Irregular elevation points were surveying with essential elements of surrounding terrain surface being included. Moreover, surveys in fixed profile lines were done. For each test field a set of 30 measurements in control points has been collected and these data provide the base for verification of digital elevation models. Average density of the surveying was 70 points per square meter (1000 - 1500 elevation points per each test fields). Surveys in each test field were carried out in August and September of 2008, June 2009 and August

  11. State of Louisiana - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation highlighting the State of Louisiana and depicts the surrounding areas using muted elevation colors. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data are a mixture of data and were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Approximately one-half of the area shown on this map has DEM source data at a 30-meter resolution, with the remaining half consisting of mostly 10-meter contour-derived DEM data and some small areas of higher-resolution LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) data along parts of the coastline. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and parish boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2007.

  12. Assessing the quality for hydrological applications of digital elevation models derived from contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Stephen

    2000-07-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) are becoming increasingly important tools in hydrological research and in water resources management. The quality of DEMs, however, normally is reported simply as the root mean square error of elevation, a statistic that fails to capture the numerous sources of error in DEMs or to predict their effect on the result of using the DEM. This paper presents a review of other approaches to assessing DEM quality, and argues that a full assessment of DEM quality must focus on the accuracy and reliability of the final product of the DEM analysis. A number of DEMs for the Slapton Ley catchments in Devon derived from digitized contour data are compared in an initial assessment of their sustainability for use in hydrological work. Two are available for purchase from data suppliers, and five more were created using a variety of interpolation techniques in widely available geographical information system software. The different interpretation methods produce DEMs with different artefacts, although analyses of the distribution of elevation values, and visual techniques, suggested that none of these were of a particularly pronounced nature. The results of using the DEMs to derive drainage networks and catchment areas showed that at the broad scale there was a high level of agreement between the DEMs. There were, however, important differences of detail. For example, some DEMs predicted drainage lines that occasionally crossed the original contours. The results of calculating the TOPMODEL topographic index showed far more variation, because the index is calculated for each pixel in the area, rather than being an aggregate result derived from numerous pixels. The main conclusion was that care should always be taken to assess the quality of a DEM before attempting to use it, and that results should always be checked to ensure that they appear to be reasonable.

  13. Application of Low-Cost Digital Elevation Models to Detect Change in Forest Carbon Sequestration Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Glenn MacDicken

    2007-07-31

    This two-year study evaluated advanced multispectral digital imagery applications for assessment of forest carbon stock change. A series of bench and field studies in North Carolina and Ohio tested aerial assessments of forest change between two time periods using two software packages (ERDAS and TERREST) for Digital Elevation Model (DEM) creation, automated classification software (eCognition) for canopy segmentation and a multiple ranging laser designed to improve quality of elevation data. Results of the DEM software comparison showed that while TERREST has the potential to produce much higher resolution DEM than ERDAS, it is unable to resolve crucial canopy features adequately. Lab tests demonstrated that additional laser data improves image registration and Z-axis DEM quality. Data collected in the field revealed difficult challenges in correctly modeling the location of laser strike and subsequently determining elevations in both software packages. Automated software segmentation of tree canopies provided stem diameter and biomass carbon estimates that were within 3% of comparable ground based estimates in the Ohio site and produced similar biomass estimates for a limited number of plots in the Duke forest. Tree height change between time periods and canopy segmentation from multispectral imagery allowed calculation of forest carbon stock change at costs that are comparable to those for ground-based methods. This work demonstrates the potential of lower cost imagery systems enhanced with laser data to collect high quality imagery and paired laser data for forestry and environmental applications. Additional research on automated canopy segmentation and multi-temporal image registration is needed to refine these methods for commercial use.

  14. The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model version 2.0 - Early Validation Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. J.; Tachikawa, T.; Abrams, M.; Tsu, H.; Hato, M.; Gesch, D. B.; Crippen, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra spacecraft is capable of collecting in-track stereo using nadir- and aft looking near infrared cameras. Since 2001, these stereo pairs have been used to produce single-scene (60 x 60 km) digital elevation models having vertical (root-mean-squared-error) accuracies generally between 10 m and 25 m. On June 29, 2009, NASA and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) of Japan released a Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) to users worldwide at no charge as a contribution to the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). This "version 1.0" ASTER GDEM (GDEM v1.0) was compiled from over 1.2 million scene-based DEMs covering land surface between 83°N and 83°S latitudes. This GDEM is a 1 arc-second elevation grid divided and distributed as 1°-by-1° tiles. ** A joint US-Japan validation team assessed the accuracy of the GDEM v1.0, augmented by a team of 20 cooperators selected through an Announcement of Opportunity (AO). In summary, the GDEM v1.0 was found to have an overall accuracy of around 20 meters at the 95% confidence interval. The team also noted several artifacts associated with poor coverage, cloud contamination, water masking issues and the stacking process used to produce the GDEM from individual scene-based DEMs. An independent horizontal resolution study estimated the effective spatial resolution of the GDEM v1.0 to be on the order of 120 meters. ** NASA & METI will release a second version of the ASTER GDEM (v2.0) in mid-October, 2011. The GDEM v2.0 has the same gridding and tile structure as v1.0, but benefits from the inclusion of 300,000 additional scenes to improve coverage, a smaller correlation kernel (5x5 versus 9x9 for v1.0) yielding higher spatial resolution, and improved water masking. This abstract presents early validation results available at the time of submission. Early results indicate: (1) the overall accuracy (both horizontal and

  15. A Seamless, High-Resolution, Coastal Digital Elevation Model (DEM) for Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Hoover, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A seamless, 3-meter digital elevation model (DEM) was constructed for the entire Southern California coastal zone, extending 473 km from Point Conception to the Mexican border. The goal was to integrate the most recent, high-resolution datasets available (for example, Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) topography, multibeam and single beam sonar bathymetry, and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IfSAR) topography) into a continuous surface from at least the 20-m isobath to the 20-m elevation contour. This dataset was produced to provide critical boundary conditions (bathymetry and topography) for a modeling effort designed to predict the impacts of severe winter storms on the Southern California coast (Barnard and others, 2009). The hazards model, run in real-time or with prescribed scenarios, incorporates atmospheric information (wind and pressure fields) with a suite of state-of-the-art physical process models (tide, surge, and wave) to enable detailed prediction of water levels, run-up, wave heights, and currents. Research-grade predictions of coastal flooding, inundation, erosion, and cliff failure are also included. The DEM was constructed to define the general shape of nearshore, beach and cliff surfaces as accurately as possible, with less emphasis on the detailed variations in elevation inland of the coast and on bathymetry inside harbors. As a result this DEM should not be used for navigation purposes.

  16. Spatial disaggregation of satellite-derived irradiance using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquin; Cebecauer, Tomas; Suri, Marcel

    2010-09-15

    Downscaling of the Meteosat-derived solar radiation ({proportional_to}5 km grid resolution) is based on decomposing the global irradiance and correcting the systematic bias of its components using the elevation and horizon shadowing that are derived from the SRTM-3 digital elevation model (3 arc sec resolution). The procedure first applies the elevation correction based on the difference between coarse and high spatial resolution. Global irradiance is split into direct, diffuse circumsolar and diffuse isotropic components using statistical models, and then corrections due to terrain shading and sky-view fraction are applied. The effect of reflected irradiance is analysed only in the theoretical section. The method was applied in the eastern Andalusia, Spain, and the validation was carried out for 22 days on April, July and December 2006 comparing 15-min estimates of the satellite-derived solar irradiance and observations from nine ground stations. Overall, the corrections of the satellite estimates in the studied region strongly reduced the mean bias of the estimates for clear and cloudy days from roughly 2.3% to 0.4%. (author)

  17. Digital Elevation Model from Non-Metric Camera in Uas Compared with LIDAR Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayamit, O. M.; Pedro, M. F.; Ernesto, R. R.; Fernando, B. L.

    2015-08-01

    Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data as a representation of surface topography is highly demanded for use in spatial analysis and modelling. Aimed to that issue many methods of acquisition data and process it are developed, from traditional surveying until modern technology like LIDAR. On the other hands, in a past four year the development of Unamend Aerial System (UAS) aimed to Geomatic bring us the possibility to acquire data about surface by non-metric digital camera on board in a short time with good quality for some analysis. Data collectors have attracted tremendous attention on UAS due to possibility of the determination of volume changes over time, monitoring of the breakwaters, hydrological modelling including flood simulation, drainage networks, among others whose support in DEM for proper analysis. The DEM quality is considered as a combination of DEM accuracy and DEM suitability so; this paper is aimed to analyse the quality of the DEM from non-metric digital camera on UAS compared with a DEM from LIDAR corresponding to same geographic space covering 4 km2 in Artemisa province, Cuba. This area is in a frame of urban planning whose need to know the topographic characteristics in order to analyse hydrology behaviour and decide the best place for make roads, building and so on. Base on LIDAR technology is still more accurate method, it offer us a pattern for test DEM from non-metric digital camera on UAS, whose are much more flexible and bring a solution for many applications whose needs DEM of detail.

  18. Three-dimensional displays for natural hazards analysis, using classified Landsat Thematic Mapper digital data and large-scale digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, David R.; Walsh, Stephen J.; Brown, Daniel G.

    1991-01-01

    Methods are described for using Landsat Thematic Mapper digital data and digital elevation models for the display of natural hazard sites in a mountainous region of northwestern Montana, USA. Hazard zones can be easily identified on the three-dimensional images. Proximity of facilities such as highways and building locations to hazard sites can also be easily displayed. A temporal sequence of Landsat TM (or similar) satellite data sets could also be used to display landscape changes associated with dynamic natural hazard processes.

  19. Preliminary development of digital elevation and relief models for ICESat-2 onboard processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, H. W.; Magruder, L. A.; Carabajal, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    ATLAS (Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System) is a photon-counting laser ranging instrument that will fly onboard NASA's ICESat-2 mission to collect global altimetry data for the primary purpose of determining volumetric changes in the Polar Regions. While photon-counting systems provide the advantage of using small, low power lasers, they are typically much more susceptible to noise and require the use of sophisticated algorithms both onboard and in ground based processing to ensure capture of valid data and production of accurate data products. An onboard receiver algorithm is being developed for ATLAS to ensure that valid data is returned while adhering to the 577 Gb/day limit on data telemetry. The onboard receiver algorithm makes use of multiple onboard databases, two of which are the DEM (Digital Elevation Model) and the DRM (Digital Relief Map). The DEM provides start and stop times for software-induced range gating on the ATLAS detectors, and is a nested, three-tiered grid to account for a 6 km overall constraint on the allowable limit for ranging acquisition. The DRM contains the maximum values of relief seen across 140m- and 700m-long flight path segments, which are used in statistically determining the presence of a valid surface return and in deciding which bands to telemeter. Both onboard databases are to be primarily constructed from existing digital elevation models and must provide global coverage referenced to latitude and longitude. Production of the grids is complicated by the lack of global data products of sufficient resolution and accuracy such that preliminary analysis is required for DEM selection and usage in addition to the determination of how to intelligently merge differing data sets. This initial investigation is also focused on determining the impact of the selected DEM quality on the ICESat-2 onboard algorithms as well as the precipitated error induced on the DRM. These results are required in order to determine the expected

  20. A geomorphology-based approach for digital elevation model fusion - case study in Danang city, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T. A.; Raghavan, V.; Masumoto, S.; Vinayaraj, P.; Yonezawa, G.

    2014-07-01

    Global digital elevation models (DEM) are considered a source of vital spatial information and find wide use in several applications. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global DEM (GDEM) and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) DEM offer almost global coverage and provide elevation data for geospatial analysis. However, GDEM and SRTM still contain some height errors that affect the quality of elevation data significantly. This study aims to examine methods to improve the resolution as well as accuracy of available free DEMs by data fusion techniques and evaluating the results with a high-quality reference DEM. The DEM fusion method is based on the accuracy assessment of each global DEM and geomorphological characteristics of the study area. Land cover units were also considered to correct the elevation of GDEM and SRTM with respect to the bare-earth surface. The weighted averaging method was used to fuse the input DEMs based on a landform classification map. According to the landform types, the different weights were used for GDEM and SRTM. Finally, a denoising algorithm (Sun et al., 2007) was applied to filter the output-fused DEM. This fused DEM shows excellent correlation to the reference DEM, having a correlation coefficient R2 = 0.9986, and the accuracy was also improved from a root mean square error (RMSE) of 14.9 m in GDEM and 14.8 m in SRTM to 11.6 m in the fused DEM. The results of terrain-related parameters extracted from this fused DEM such as slope, curvature, terrain roughness index and normal vector of topographic surface are also very comparable to reference data.

  1. Google Earth's derived digital elevation model: A comparative assessment with Aster and SRTM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusli, N.; Majid, M. R.; Din, A. H. M.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a statistical analysis showing additional evidence that Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from Google Earth is commendable and has a good correlation with ASTER (Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) and SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) elevation data. The accuracy of DEM elevation points from Google Earth was compared against that of DEMs from ASTER and SRTM for flat, hilly and mountainous sections of a pre-selected rural watershed. For each section, a total of 5,000 DEM elevation points were extracted as samples from each type of DEM data. The DEM data from Google Earth and SRTM for flat and hilly sections are strongly correlated with the R2 of 0.791 and 0.891 respectively. Even stronger correlation is shown for the mountainous section where the R2 values between Google Earth's DEM and ASTER's and between Google Earth's DEM and SRTM's DEMs are respectively 0.917 and 0.865. Further accuracy testing was carried out by utilising the DEM dataset to delineate Muar River's watershed boundary using ArcSWAT2009, a hydrological modelling software. The result shows that the percentage differences of the watershed size delineated from Google Earth's DEM compared to those derived from Department of Irrigation and Drainage's data (using 20m-contour topographic map), ASTER and SRTM data are 9.6%, 10.6%, and 7.6% respectively. It is therefore justified to conclude that the DEM derived from Google Earth is relatively as acceptable as DEMs from other sources.

  2. Gulf of Mexico Region - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation of the area surrounding the Gulf of Mexico. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s data) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Approximately one-half of the area shown on this map has DEM source data at a 30-meter resolution, with the remaining half consisting of 10-meter contour-derived DEM data or higher-resolution LIDAR data. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2005.

  3. Side-specific effect of yolk testosterone elevation on second-to-fourth digit ratio in a wild passerine.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gergely; Blázi, György; Hegyi, Gergely; Török, János

    2016-02-01

    Second-to-fourth digit ratio is a widely investigated sexually dimorphic morphological trait in human studies and could reliably indicate the prenatal steroid environment. Conducting manipulative experiments to test this hypothesis comes up against ethical limits in humans. However, oviparous tetrapods may be excellent models to experimentally investigate the effects of prenatal steroids on offspring second-to-fourth digit ratio. In this field study, we injected collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis) eggs with physiological doses of testosterone. Fledglings from eggs with elevated yolk testosterone, regardless of their sex, had longer second digits on their left feet than controls, while the fourth digit did not differ between groups. Therefore, second-to-fourth digit ratio was higher in the testosterone-injected group, but only on the left foot. This is the first study which shows experimentally that early testosterone exposure can affect second-to-fourth digit ratio in a wild population of a passerine bird. PMID:26732381

  4. Side-specific effect of yolk testosterone elevation on second-to-fourth digit ratio in a wild passerine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Gergely; Blázi, György; Hegyi, Gergely; Török, János

    2016-02-01

    Second-to-fourth digit ratio is a widely investigated sexually dimorphic morphological trait in human studies and could reliably indicate the prenatal steroid environment. Conducting manipulative experiments to test this hypothesis comes up against ethical limits in humans. However, oviparous tetrapods may be excellent models to experimentally investigate the effects of prenatal steroids on offspring second-to-fourth digit ratio. In this field study, we injected collared flycatcher ( Ficedula albicollis) eggs with physiological doses of testosterone. Fledglings from eggs with elevated yolk testosterone, regardless of their sex, had longer second digits on their left feet than controls, while the fourth digit did not differ between groups. Therefore, second-to-fourth digit ratio was higher in the testosterone-injected group, but only on the left foot. This is the first study which shows experimentally that early testosterone exposure can affect second-to-fourth digit ratio in a wild population of a passerine bird.

  5. Back to the Future: Have Remotely Sensed Digital Elevation Models Improved Hydrological Parameter Extraction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarihani, B.

    2015-12-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that accurately replicate both landscape form and processes are critical to support modeling of environmental processes. Pre-processing analysis of DEMs and extracting characteristics of the watershed (e.g., stream networks, catchment delineation, surface and subsurface flow paths) is essential for hydrological and geomorphic analysis and sediment transport. This study investigates the status of the current remotely-sensed DEMs in providing advanced morphometric information of drainage basins particularly in data sparse regions. Here we assess the accuracy of three available DEMs: (i) hydrologically corrected "H-DEM" of Geoscience Australia derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data; (ii) the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Global Digital Elevation Model (ASTER GDEM) version2 1-arc-second (~30 m) data; and (iii) the 9-arc-second national GEODATA DEM-9S ver3 from Geoscience Australia and the Australian National University. We used ESRI's geospatial data model, Arc Hydro and HEC-GeoHMS, designed for building hydrologic information systems to synthesize geospatial and temporal water resources data that support hydrologic modeling and analysis. A coastal catchment in northeast Australia was selected as the study site where very high resolution LiDAR data are available for parts of the area as reference data to assess the accuracy of other lower resolution datasets. This study provides morphometric information for drainage basins as part of the broad research on sediment flux from coastal basins to Great Barrier Reef, Australia. After applying geo-referencing and elevation corrections, stream and sub basins were delineated for each DEM. Then physical characteristics for streams (i.e., length, upstream and downstream elevation, and slope) and sub-basins (i.e., longest flow lengths, area, relief and slopes) were extracted and compared with reference datasets from LiDAR. Results showed that

  6. Bathymetry and digital elevation models of Coyote Creek and Alviso Slough, South San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Finlayson, David P.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Fregoso, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    The bathymetry surveys were conducted using the state-of-the-art research vessel R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with an interferometric sidescan sonar for swath mapping in extremely shallow water. We provide high-resolution bathymetric data collected by the USGS. For the 2010 baseline survey we have merged the bathymetry with aerial lidar data that were collected for the USGS during the same time period to create a seamless, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the study area. The series of bathymetry datasets are provided at 1 m resolution and the 2010 bathymetric/topographic DEM at 2 m resolution. The data are formatted as both X, Y, Z text files and ESRI Arc ASCII files that are accompanied by FGDC compliant metadata.

  7. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry for Digital Elevation Model of Kuwait Desert - Analysis of Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassar, H. K. Al; Rao, K. S.

    2012-07-01

    Using different combinations of 29 Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) images, 43 Digital Elevations Models (DEM) were generated adopting SAR Interferometry (InSAR) technique. Due to sand movement in desert terrain, there is a poor phase correlation between different SAR images. Therefore, suitable methodology for generating DEMs of Kuwait desert terrain using InSAR technique were worked out. Time series analysis was adopted to derive the best DEM out of 43 DEMs. The problems related to phase de-correlation over desert terrain are discussed. Various errors associated with the DEM generation are discussed which include atmospheric effects, penetration into soil medium, sand movement. The DEM of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is used as a reference. The noise levels of DEM of SRTM are presented.

  8. Hydrologic analysis of a flood based on a new Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, M.; Mori, M.

    2015-06-01

    These The present study aims to simulate the hydrologic processes of a flood, based on a new, highly accurate Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The DEM is provided by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) of Japan, and has a spatial resolution of five meters. It was generated by the new National Project in 2012. The Hydrologic Engineering Center - Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) is used to simulate the hydrologic process of a flood of the Onga River in Iizuka City, Japan. A large flood event in the typhoon season in 2003 caused serious damage around the Iizuka City area. Precise records of rainfall data from the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMeDAS) were input into the HEC-HMS. The estimated flood area of the simulation results by HEC-HMS was identical to the observed flood area. A watershed aggregation map is also generated by HEC-HMS around the Onga River.

  9. Digital Elevation Model, 0.25 m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cathy Wilson; Garrett Altmann

    2015-11-20

    This 0.25m horizontal resolution digital elevation model, DEM, was developed from Airborne Laser Altimetry flown by Aerometric Inc, now known as Quantum Spatial, Inc. on 12 July, 2013. One Mission was flown and the data jointly processed with LANL personnel to produce a 0.25m DEM covering a region approximately 2.8km wide and 12.4km long extending from the coast above North Salt Lagoon to south of Gas Well Road. This DEM encompasses a diverse range of hydrologic, geomorphic, geophysical and biological features typical of the Barrow Peninsula. Vertical accuracy at the 95% confidence interval was computed as 0.143m. The coordinate system, datum, and geoid for this DEM are UTM Zone 4N, NAD83 (2011), NAVD88 (GEOID09).

  10. Extracting low-resolution river networks from high-resolution digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olivera, F.; Lear, M.S.; Famiglietti, J.S.; Asante, Kwasi

    2002-01-01

    Including a global river network in the land component of global climate models (GCMs) is necessary in order to provide a more complete representation of the hydrologic cycle. The process of creating these networks is called river network upscaling and consists of lowering the resolution of already available fine networks to make them compatible with GCMs. Fine-resolution river networks have a level of detail appropriate for analysis at the watershed scale but are too intensive for global hydrologic studies. A river network upscaling algorithm, which processes fine-resolution digital elevation models to determine the flow directions that best describe the flow patterns in a coarser user-defined scale, is presented. The objectives of this study were to develop an algorithm that advances the previous work in the field by being applicable at a global scale, allowing for the upscaling to be performed in a projected environment, and generating evenly distributed flow directions.

  11. A digital elevation model of the Greenland ice sheet and validation with airborne laser altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamber, Jonathan L.; Ekholm, Simon; Krabill, William B.

    1997-01-01

    A 2.5 km resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Greenland ice sheet was produced from the 336 days of the geodetic phase of ERS-1. During this period the altimeter was operating in ice-mode over land surfaces providing improved tracking around the margins of the ice sheet. Combined with the high density of tracks during the geodetic phase, a unique data set was available for deriving a DEM of the whole ice sheet. The errors present in the altimeter data were investigated via a comparison with airborne laser altimeter data obtained for the southern half of Greenland. Comparison with coincident satellite data showed a correlation with surface slope. An explanation for the behavior of the bias as a function of surface slope is given in terms of the pattern of surface roughness on the ice sheet.

  12. Robust Mosaicking of Stereo Digital Elevation Models from the Ames Stereo Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Tae Min; Moratto, Zachary M.; Nefian, Ara Victor

    2010-01-01

    Robust estimation method is proposed to combine multiple observations and create consistent, accurate, dense Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from lunar orbital imagery. The NASA Ames Intelligent Robotics Group (IRG) aims to produce higher-quality terrain reconstructions of the Moon from Apollo Metric Camera (AMC) data than is currently possible. In particular, IRG makes use of a stereo vision process, the Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP), to automatically generate DEMs from consecutive AMC image pairs. However, the DEMs currently produced by the ASP often contain errors and inconsistencies due to image noise, shadows, etc. The proposed method addresses this problem by making use of multiple observations and by considering their goodness of fit to improve both the accuracy and robustness of the estimate. The stepwise regression method is applied to estimate the relaxed weight of each observation.

  13. Vegetation Cover Mapping Based on Remote Sensing and Digital Elevation Model Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korets, M. A.; Ryzhkova, V. A.; Danilova, I. V.; Prokushkin, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    An algorithm of forest cover mapping based on combined GIS-based analysis of multi-band satellite imagery, digital elevation model, and ground truth data was developed. Using the classification principles and an approach of Russian forest scientist Kolesnikov, maps of forest types and forest growing conditions (FGC) were build. The first map is based on RS-composite classification, while the second map is constructed on the basis of DEM-composite classification. The spatial combination of this two layers were also used for extrapolation and mapping of ecosystem carbon stock values (kgC/m2). The proposed approach was applied for the test site area (~3600 km2), located in the Northern Siberia boreal forests of Evenkia near Tura settlement.

  14. Alluvial Fan Delineation from SAR and LIDAR-Derived Digital Elevation Models in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, D. T.; Ortiz, I.; Timbas, N.; Gacusan, R.; Montalbo, K.; Eco, R. C.; Lagmay, A.

    2013-12-01

    Occurrence of floods and debris flows leading to the formation of alluvial fans at the base of mountains naturally improve fertility of alluvial plains. However, these formations also have detrimental effects to communities within these zones like the case of Barangay (village) Andap, New Bataan, Compostela Valley where the whole village was wiped out by debris flow when it was hit by Supertyphoon Bopha in 2012. Hence, demarcating the boundaries of alluvial fans is crucial in disaster preparedness and mitigation. This study describes a method to delineate alluvial fans through contour maps from SAR and LiDAR-derived digital elevation models. Based on this data, we used hydrographic apex point polygons to plot the outflow points of upstream watersheds. The watershed and alluvial fan polygons were used to simulate debris flows in the study sites. The fans generated from the flood simulation were consistent with the polygons delineated from the digital elevation model. Satellite imagery and evidences of alluvial deposits found on site revealed 392 alluvial fans in the country. Widest among these is the sprawling 760 sq km fan identified in Cagayan Valley threatening about 434,329 persons at risk of debris flow. Other fans include those identified in Calapan, Mindoro (531 sq km), Kaliwanagan, Pangasinan (436 sq km), Pampanga Alluvial Fan (325 sq km), Mina, Iloilo (315 sq km), Lamsugod, S. Cotabato (286 sq km), in Tignaman, Oton and Alimodian in Iloilo (272 sq km), and the bajada, a series of alluvial fan coalescing to form a larger fan, identified in Ilocos Norte (218 sq km).

  15. A Digital Elevation Model for Seaside, Oregon: Procedures, Data Sources, and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturato, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    As part of a pilot study to modernize Flood Insurance Rate Maps for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), a digital elevation model (DEM) was developed for the purpose of modeling tsunami inundation for Seaside, Oregon. The DEM consists of elevation data values with a horizontal grid spacing of 1/3 arc seconds, or approximately 10 meters. The DEM was generated from several topographic and bathymetric data sources, requiring significant processing challenges. These challenges included conversion to a single specified projection, units, horizontal datum, and vertical datum; analysis and removal of errant data from hydrographic, topographic, and LIDAR surveys; and a point-by-point analysis of overlapping data sources. Data were collected from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Ocean Service and National Geophysical Data Center, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Oregon Geospatial Data Center, the University of Oregon, and the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries. Data were converted into formats compatible with ESRI ArcGIS 3.3 software. ArcGIS was used for spatial analysis, error correction, and surface grid development using triangular irregular networking. Post-processing involved a consistency analysis and comparison with original data and control data sources. The final DEM was compared with a previous DEM developed for tsunami inundation modeling in 1997. Significant shoreline differences were found between the DEMs, resulting in an analysis of the shoreline changes around the mouth of the Necanicum River. The shoreline analysis includes a spatial analysis of digital orthophotos over the recent past and a review of historical accretion and erosion rates along the Columbia River littoral cell.

  16. New Techniques and Metrics for Describing Rivers Using High Resolution Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, P.; McKean, J. A.; Poulsen, F.; Ochoski, N.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Techniques for collecting high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) of fluvial environments are cheaper and more widely accessible than ever before. These DEMs improve over traditional transect-based approaches because they represent the channel bed as a continuous surface. Advantages beyond the obvious more accurate representations of channel area and volume include the three dimensional representation of geomorphic features that directly influence the behavior of river organisms. It is possible to identify many of these habitats using topography alone, but when combined with the spatial arrangement of these areas within the channel, a more holistic view of biologic existence can be gleaned from the three dimensional representation of the channel. We present a new approach for measuring and describing channels that leverages the continuous nature of digital elevation model surfaces. Delivered via the River Bathymetry Toolkit (RBT) this approach is capable of not only reproducing the traditional transect-based metrics, but also includes novel techniques for generating stage independent channel measurements, regardless of the flow that occurred at the time of data capture. The RBT also possesses the capability of measuring changes over time, accounting for uncertainty using approaches adopted from the Geomorphic Change Detection (GCD) literature and producing maps and metrics for erosion and deposition. This new approach is available via the River Bathymetry Toolit that is structured to enable repeat systematic measurements over an unlimited number of sites. We present how this approach has been applied to over 500 sites in the Pacific Northwest as part of the Columbia Habitat Mapping Program (CHaMP). We demonstrate the new channel metrics for a range of these sites, both at the observed and simulated flows as well as examples of changes in channel morphology over time. We present an analysis comparing these new metrics against traditional transect based

  17. Digital elevation model and orthophotographs of Greenland based on aerial photographs from 1978-1987.

    PubMed

    Korsgaard, Niels J; Nuth, Christopher; Khan, Shfaqat A; Kjeldsen, Kristian K; Bjørk, Anders A; Schomacker, Anders; Kjær, Kurt H

    2016-01-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) play a prominent role in glaciological studies for the mass balance of glaciers and ice sheets. By providing a time snapshot of glacier geometry, DEMs are crucial for most glacier evolution modelling studies, but are also important for cryospheric modelling in general. We present a historical medium-resolution DEM and orthophotographs that consistently cover the entire surroundings and margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet 1978-1987. About 3,500 aerial photographs of Greenland are combined with field surveyed geodetic ground control to produce a 25 m gridded DEM and a 2 m black-and-white digital orthophotograph. Supporting data consist of a reliability mask and a photo footprint coverage with recording dates. Through one internal and two external validation tests, this DEM shows an accuracy better than 10 m horizontally and 6 m vertically while the precision is better than 4 m. This dataset proved successful for topographical mapping and geodetic mass balance. Other uses include control and calibration of remotely sensed data such as imagery or InSAR velocity maps. PMID:27164457

  18. Digital elevation model and orthophotographs of Greenland based on aerial photographs from 1978–1987

    PubMed Central

    Korsgaard, Niels J.; Nuth, Christopher; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Schomacker, Anders; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2016-01-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) play a prominent role in glaciological studies for the mass balance of glaciers and ice sheets. By providing a time snapshot of glacier geometry, DEMs are crucial for most glacier evolution modelling studies, but are also important for cryospheric modelling in general. We present a historical medium-resolution DEM and orthophotographs that consistently cover the entire surroundings and margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet 1978–1987. About 3,500 aerial photographs of Greenland are combined with field surveyed geodetic ground control to produce a 25 m gridded DEM and a 2 m black-and-white digital orthophotograph. Supporting data consist of a reliability mask and a photo footprint coverage with recording dates. Through one internal and two external validation tests, this DEM shows an accuracy better than 10 m horizontally and 6 m vertically while the precision is better than 4 m. This dataset proved successful for topographical mapping and geodetic mass balance. Other uses include control and calibration of remotely sensed data such as imagery or InSAR velocity maps. PMID:27164457

  19. TecDEM: A MATLAB Based Toolbox for understanding Tectonics from Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, F.; Mahmood, S. A.; Gloaguen, R.

    2009-04-01

    TecDEM is a MATLAB based tool box for understanding the tectonics from digital elevation models (DEMs) of any area. These DEMs can be derived from data of any spatial resolution (Low, medium and High). In the first step we extract drainage network from the DEMs using flow grid approach. Drainage network is a group of streams having elevation and catchment area information as a function of spatial locations. We implement an array of stream structure to study this drainage network. Knickpoints can be identified on each stream of the drainage network by a graphical user interface and are helpful for understanding stream morphology. Stream profile analysis in steady state condition is applied on all streams to calculate geomorphic parameters and regional uplift rates. Hack index is calculated for all the profiles at a certain interval and over the change of knickpoints. Reports menu of this tool box generates detailed statistics report, complete tabulated report, graphical output of each analyzed stream profile and Hack index profile. All the calculated values are part of stream structure and is saved as .mat file for later use with this tool box. The spatial distribution of geomorphic parameters, uplift rates and knickpoints are exported as a shape files for visualization in professional GIS software. We test this tool box on DEMs from different tectonic settings worldwide and received verifiable results with other studies.

  20. Comparison of Multi-Scale Digital Elevation Models for Defining Waterways and Catchments Over Large Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, B.; McDougall, K.; Barry, M.

    2012-07-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) allow for the efficient and consistent creation of waterways and catchment boundaries over large areas. Studies of waterway delineation from DEMs are usually undertaken over small or single catchment areas due to the nature of the problems being investigated. Improvements in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques, software, hardware and data allow for analysis of larger data sets and also facilitate a consistent tool for the creation and analysis of waterways over extensive areas. However, rarely are they developed over large regional areas because of the lack of available raw data sets and the amount of work required to create the underlying DEMs. This paper examines definition of waterways and catchments over an area of approximately 25,000 km2 to establish the optimal DEM scale required for waterway delineation over large regional projects. The comparative study analysed multi-scale DEMs over two test areas (Wivenhoe catchment, 543 km2 and a detailed 13 km2 within the Wivenhoe catchment) including various data types, scales, quality, and variable catchment input parameters. Historic and available DEM data was compared to high resolution Lidar based DEMs to assess variations in the formation of stream networks. The results identified that, particularly in areas of high elevation change, DEMs at 20 m cell size created from broad scale 1:25,000 data (combined with more detailed data or manual delineation in flat areas) are adequate for the creation of waterways and catchments at a regional scale.

  1. Digital Elevation Models and Derived Products from Lroc Nac Stereo Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, K. N.; Speyerer, E. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Tran, T.; Rosiek, M. R.; Archinal, B. A.; Howington-Kraus, E.; the LROC Science Team

    2012-08-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) is to acquire stereo observations with the Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) to enable production of high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs). This work describes the processes and techniques used in reducing the NAC stereo observations to DEMs through a combination of USGS integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) and SOCET SET® from BAE Systems by a team at Arizona State University (ASU). LROC Science Operations Center personnel have thus far reduced 130 stereo observations to DEMs of more than 130 stereo pairs for 11 Constellation Program (CxP) sites and 53 other regions of scientific interest. The NAC DEM spatial sampling is typically 2 meters, and the vertical precision is 1-2 meters. Such high resolution provides the three-dimensional view of the lunar surface required for site selection, hazard avoidance and planning traverses that minimize resource consumption. In addition to exploration analysis, geologists can measure parameters such as elevation, slope, and volume to place constraints on composition and geologic history. The NAC DEMs are released and archived through NASA's Planetary Data System.

  2. Investigation of potential sea level rise impact on the Nile Delta, Egypt using digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Emad; Khan, Sadiq Ibrahim; Hong, Yang

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the future impact of Sea Level Rise (SLR) on the Nile Delta region in Egypt is assessed by evaluating the elevations of two freely available Digital Elevation Models (DEMs): the SRTM and the ASTER-GDEM-V2. The SLR is a significant worldwide dilemma that has been triggered by recent climatic changes. In Egypt, the Nile Delta is projected to face SLR of 1 m by the end of the 21th century. In order to provide a more accurate assessment of the future SLR impact on Nile Delta's land and population, this study corrected the DEM's elevations by using linear regression model with ground elevations from GPS survey. The information for the land cover types and future population numbers were derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and the Gridded Population of the Worlds (GPWv3) datasets respectively. The DEM's vertical accuracies were assessed using GPS measurements and the uncertainty analysis revealed that the SRTM-DEM has positive bias of 2.5 m, while the ASTER-GDEM-V2 showed a positive bias of 0.8 m. The future inundated land cover areas and the affected population were illustrated based on two SLR scenarios of 0.5 m and 1 m. The SRTM DEM data indicated that 1 m SLR will affect about 3900 km(2) of cropland, 1280 km(2) of vegetation, 205 km(2) of wetland, 146 km(2) of urban areas and cause more than 6 million people to lose their houses. The overall vulnerability assessment using ASTER-GDEM-V2 indicated that the influence of SLR will be intense and confined along the coastal areas. For instance, the data indicated that 1 m SLR will inundate about 580 Km(2) (6%) of the total land cover areas and approximately 887 thousand people will be relocated. Accordingly, the uncertainty analysis of the DEM's elevations revealed that the ASTER-GDEM-V2 dataset product was considered the best to determine the future impact of SLR on the Nile Delta region. PMID:26410824

  3. High Resolution Photogrammetric Digital Elevation Models Across Calving Fronts and Meltwater Channels in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bel, D. A.; Brown, S.; Zappa, C. J.; Bell, R. E.; Frearson, N.; Tinto, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Photogrammetric digital elevation models (DEMs) are a powerful approach for understanding elevation change and dynamics along the margins of the large ice sheets. The IcePod system, mounted on a New York Air National Guard LC-130, can measure high-resolution surface elevations with a Riegl VQ580 scanning laser altimeter and Imperx Bobcat IGV-B6620 color visible-wavelength camera (6600x4400 resolution); the surface temperature with a Sofradir IRE-640L infrared camera (spectral response 7.7-9.5 μm, 640x512 resolution); and the structure of snow and ice with two radar systems. We show the use of IcePod imagery to develop DEMs across calving fronts and meltwater channels in Greenland. Multiple over-flights of the Kangerlussaq Airport ramp have provided a test of the technique at a location with accurate, independently-determined elevation. Here the photogrammetric DEM of the airport, constrained by ground control measurements, is compared with the Lidar results. In July 2014 the IcePod ice-ocean imaging system surveyed the calving fronts of five outlet glaciers north of Jakobshavn Isbrae. We used Agisoft PhotoScan to develop a DEM of each calving front using imagery captured by the IcePod systems. Adjacent to the ice sheet, meltwater plumes foster mixing in the fjord, moving warm ocean water into contact with the front of the ice sheet where it can undercut the ice front and trigger calving. The five glaciers provide an opportunity to examine the calving front structure in relation to ocean temperature, fjord circulation, and spatial scale of the meltwater plumes. The combination of the accurate DEM of the calving front and the thermal imagery used to constrain the temperature and dynamics of the adjacent plume provides new insights into the ice-ocean interactions. Ice sheet margins provide insights into the connections between the surface meltwater and the fate of the water at the ice sheet base. Surface meltwater channels are visualized here for the first time using

  4. Morphological convexity measures for terrestrial basins derived from digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sin Liang; Daya Sagar, B. S.; Chet Koo, Voon; Tien Tay, Lea

    2011-09-01

    Geophysical basins of terrestrial surfaces have been quantitatively characterized through a host of indices such as topological quantities (e.g. channel bifurcation and length ratios), allometric scaling exponents (e.g. fractal dimensions), and other geomorphometric parameters (channel density, Hack's and Hurst exponents). Channel density, estimated by taking the ratio between the length of channel network ( L) and the area of basin ( A) in planar form, provides a quantitative index that has hitherto been related to various geomorphologically significant processes. This index, computed by taking the planar forms of channel network and its corresponding basin, is a kind of convexity measure in the two-dimensional case. Such a measure - estimated in general as a function of basin area and channel network length, where the important elevation values of the topological region within a basin and channel network are ignored - fails to capture the spatial variability between homotopic basins possessing different altitude-ranges. Two types of convexity measures that have potential to capture the terrain elevation variability are defined as the ratio of (i) length of channel network function and area of basin function and (ii) areas of basin and its convex hull functions. These two convexity measures are estimated in three data sets that include (a) synthetic basin functions, (b) fractal basin functions, and (c) realistic digital elevation models (DEMs) of two regions of peninsular Malaysia. It is proven that the proposed convexity measures are altitude-dependent and that they could capture the spatial variability across the homotopic basins of different altitudes. It is also demonstrated on terrestrial DEMs that these convexity measures possess relationships with other quantitative indexes such as fractal dimensions and complexity measures (roughness indexes).

  5. Validation of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 over the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Zhang, Zheng; Meyer, David J.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 2 (GDEM v2) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v2 was calculated by comparison with more than 18,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v2 is 8.68 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 9.34 meters for GDEM v1. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v2 mean error of -0.20 meters is a significant improvement over the GDEM v1 mean error of -3.69 meters. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover to examine the effects of cover types on measured errors. The GDEM v2 mean errors by land cover class verify that the presence of aboveground features (tree canopies and built structures) cause a positive elevation bias, as would be expected for an imaging system like ASTER. In open ground classes (little or no vegetation with significant aboveground height), GDEM v2 exhibits a negative bias on the order of 1 meter. GDEM v2 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v2 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM.

  6. A time series of TanDEM-X digital elevation models to monitor a glacier surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Anja; Mayer, Christoph; Lambrecht, Astrid; Floricioiu, Dana

    2016-04-01

    Bivachny Glacier, a tributary of the more than 70 km long Fedchenko Glacier in the Pamir Mountains, Central Asia, is a surge-type glacier with three known surges during the 20th century. In 2011, the most recent surge started which, in contrast to the previous ones, evolved down the whole glacier and reached the confluence with Fedchenko Glacier. Spatial and temporal glacier volume changes can be derived from high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) based on bistatic InSAR data from the TanDEM-X mission. There are nine DEMs available between 2011 and 2015 covering the entire surge period in time steps from few months up to one year. During the surge, the glacier surface elevation increased by up to 130 m in the lower part of the glacier; and change rates of up to 0.6 m per day were observed. The surface height dataset was complemented with glacier surface velocity information from TerraSAR-X/ TanDEM-X data as well as optical Landsat imagery. While the glacier was practically stagnant in 2000 after the end of the previous surge in the 1990s, the velocity increase started in 2011 in the upper reaches of the ablation area and successively moved downwards and intensified, reaching up to 4.0 m per day. The combination of surface elevation changes and glacier velocities, both of high temporal and spatial resolution, provides the unique opportunity to describe and analyse the evolution of the surge in unprecedented detail. Especially the relation between the mobilization front and the local mass transport provides insight into the surge dynamics.

  7. Bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Little Holland Tract, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Alexander G.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Stevens, Andrew W.; Carlson, Emily M.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a bathymetric survey in Little Holland Tract, a flooded agricultural tract, in the northern Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the “Delta”) during the summer of 2015. The new bathymetric data were combined with existing data to generate a digital elevation model (DEM) at 1-meter resolution. Little Holland Tract (LHT) was historically diked off for agricultural uses and has been tidally inundated since an accidental levee breach in 1983. Shallow tidal regions such as LHT have the potential to improve habitat quality in the Delta. The DEM of LHT was developed to support ongoing studies of habitat quality in the area and to provide a baseline for evaluating future geomorphic change. The new data comprise 138,407 linear meters of real-time-kinematic (RTK) Global Positioning System (GPS) elevation data, including both bathymetric data collected from personal watercraft and topographic elevations collected on foot at low tide. A benchmark (LHT15_b1) was established for geodetic control of the survey. Data quality was evaluated both by comparing results among surveying platforms, which showed systematic offsets of 1.6 centimeters (cm) or less, and by error propagation, which yielded a mean vertical uncertainty of 6.7 cm. Based on the DEM and time-series measurements of water depth, the mean tidal prism of LHT was determined to be 2,826,000 cubic meters. The bathymetric data and DEM are available at http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7RX9954. 

  8. Visual and Statistical Analysis of Digital Elevation Models Generated Using Idw Interpolator with Varying Powers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asal, F. F.

    2012-07-01

    Digital elevation data obtained from different Engineering Surveying techniques is utilized in generating Digital Elevation Model (DEM), which is employed in many Engineering and Environmental applications. This data is usually in discrete point format making it necessary to utilize an interpolation approach for the creation of DEM. Quality assessment of the DEM is a vital issue controlling its use in different applications; however this assessment relies heavily on statistical methods with neglecting the visual methods. The research applies visual analysis investigation on DEMs generated using IDW interpolator of varying powers in order to examine their potential in the assessment of the effects of the variation of the IDW power on the quality of the DEMs. Real elevation data has been collected from field using total station instrument in a corrugated terrain. DEMs have been generated from the data at a unified cell size using IDW interpolator with power values ranging from one to ten. Visual analysis has been undertaken using 2D and 3D views of the DEM; in addition, statistical analysis has been performed for assessment of the validity of the visual techniques in doing such analysis. Visual analysis has shown that smoothing of the DEM decreases with the increase in the power value till the power of four; however, increasing the power more than four does not leave noticeable changes on 2D and 3D views of the DEM. The statistical analysis has supported these results where the value of the Standard Deviation (SD) of the DEM has increased with increasing the power. More specifically, changing the power from one to two has produced 36% of the total increase (the increase in SD due to changing the power from one to ten) in SD and changing to the powers of three and four has given 60% and 75% respectively. This refers to decrease in DEM smoothing with the increase in the power of the IDW. The study also has shown that applying visual methods supported by statistical

  9. Accuracy assessment of photogrammetric digital elevation models generated for the Schultz Fire burn area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muise, Danna K.

    This paper evaluates the accuracy of two digital photogrammetric software programs (ERDAS Imagine LPS and PCI Geomatica OrthoEngine) with respect to high-resolution terrain modeling in a complex topographic setting affected by fire and flooding. The site investigated is the 2010 Schultz Fire burn area, situated on the eastern edge of the San Francisco Peaks approximately 10 km northeast of Flagstaff, Arizona. Here, the fire coupled with monsoon rains typical of northern Arizona drastically altered the terrain of the steep mountainous slopes and residential areas below the burn area. To quantify these changes, high resolution (1 m and 3 m) digital elevation models (DEMs) were generated of the burn area using color stereoscopic aerial photographs taken at a scale of approximately 1:12000. Using a combination of pre-marked and post-marked ground control points (GCPs), I first used ERDAS Imagine LPS to generate a 3 m DEM covering 8365 ha of the affected area. This data was then compared to a reference DEM (USGS 10 m) to evaluate the accuracy of the resultant DEM. Findings were then divided into blunders (errors) and bias (slight differences) and further analyzed to determine if different factors (elevation, slope, aspect and burn severity) affected the accuracy of the DEM. Results indicated that both blunders and bias increased with an increase in slope, elevation and burn severity. It was also found that southern facing slopes contained the highest amount of bias while northern facing slopes contained the highest proportion of blunders. Further investigations compared a 1 m DEM generated using ERDAS Imagine LPS with a 1 m DEM generated using PCI Geomatica OrthoEngine for a specific region of the burn area. This area was limited to the overlap of two images due to OrthoEngine requiring at least three GCPs to be located in the overlap of the imagery. Results indicated that although LPS produced a less accurate DEM, it was much more flexible than OrthoEngine. It was also

  10. Using Selective Drainage Methods to Extract Continuous Surface Flow from 1-Meter Lidar-Derived Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppenga, Sandra K.; Worstell, Bruce B.; Stoker, Jason M.; Greenlee, Susan K.

    2010-01-01

    Digital elevation data commonly are used to extract surface flow features. One source for high-resolution elevation data is light detection and ranging (lidar). Lidar can capture a vast amount of topographic detail because of its fine-scale ability to digitally capture the surface of the earth. Because elevation is a key factor in extracting surface flow features, high-resolution lidar-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) provide the detail needed to consistently integrate hydrography with elevation, land cover, structures, and other geospatial features. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed selective drainage methods to extract continuous surface flow from high-resolution lidar-derived digital elevation data. The lidar-derived continuous surface flow network contains valuable information for water resource management involving flood hazard mapping, flood inundation, and coastal erosion. DEMs used in hydrologic applications typically are processed to remove depressions by filling them. High-resolution DEMs derived from lidar can capture much more detail of the land surface than courser elevation data. Therefore, high-resolution DEMs contain more depressions because of obstructions such as roads, railroads, and other elevated structures. The filling of these depressions can significantly affect the DEM-derived surface flow routing and terrain characteristics in an adverse way. In this report, selective draining methods that modify the elevation surface to drain a depression through an obstruction are presented. If such obstructions are not removed from the elevation data, the filling of depressions to create continuous surface flow can cause the flow to spill over an obstruction in the wrong location. Using this modified elevation surface improves the quality of derived surface flow and retains more of the true surface characteristics by correcting large filled depressions. A reliable flow surface is necessary for deriving a consistently connected drainage

  11. Statistical Evaluation of Fitting Accuracy of Global and Local Digital Elevation Models in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidoost, F.; Samadzadegan, F.

    2013-09-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are one of the most important data for various applications such as hydrological studies, topography mapping and ortho image generation. There are well-known DEMs of the whole world that represent the terrain's surface at variable resolution and they are also freely available for 99% of the globe. However, it is necessary to assess the quality of the global DEMs for the regional scale applications.These models are evaluated by differencing with other reference DEMs or ground control points (GCPs) in order to estimate the quality and accuracy parameters over different land cover types. In this paper, a comparison of ASTER GDEM ver2, SRTM DEM with more than 800 reference GCPs and also with a local elevation model over the area of Iran is presented. This study investigates DEM's characteristics such as systematic error (bias), vertical accuracy and outliers for DEMs using both the usual (Mean error, Root Mean Square Error, Standard Deviation) and the robust (Median, Normalized Median Absolute Deviation, Sample Quantiles) descriptors. Also, the visual assessment tools are used to illustrate the quality of DEMs, such as normalized histograms and Q-Q plots. The results of the study confirmed that there is a negative elevation bias of approximately 5 meters of GDEM ver2. The measured RMSE and NMAD for elevation differences of GDEM-GCPs are 7.1 m and 3.2 m, respectively, while these values for SRTM and GCPs are 9.0 m and 4.4 m. On the other hand, in comparison with the local DEM, GDEM ver2 exhibits the RMSE of about 6.7 m, a little higher than the RMSE of SRTM (5.1 m).The results of height difference classification and other statistical analysis of GDEM ver2-local DEM and SRTM-local DEM reveal that SRTM is slightly more accurate than GDEM ver2. Accordingly, SRTM has no noticeable bias and shift from Local DEM and they have more consistency to each other, while GDEM ver2 has always a negative bias.

  12. ASTER-Derived 30-Meter-Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Afghanistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Warner, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is an imaging instrument aboard the Terra satellite, launched on December 19, 1999, as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS). The ASTER sensor consists of three subsystems: the visible and near infrared (VNIR), the shortwave infrared (SWIR), and the thermal infrared (TIR), each with a different spatial resolution (VNIR, 15 meters; SWIR, 30 meters, TIR 90 meters). The VNIR system has the capability to generate along-track stereo images that can be used to create digital elevation models (DEMs) at 30-meter resolution. Currently, the only available DEM dataset for Afghanistan is the 90-meter-resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data. This dataset is appropriate for macroscale DEM analysis and mapping. However, ASTER provides a low cost opportunity to generate higher resolution data. For this publication, study areas were identified around populated areas and areas where higher resolution elevation data were desired to assist in natural resource assessments. The higher resolution fidelity of these DEMs can also be used for other terrain analysis including landform classification and geologic structure analysis. For this publication, ASTER scenes were processed and mosaicked to generate 36 DEMs which were created and extracted using PCI Geomatics' OrthoEngine 3D Stereo software. The ASTER images were geographically registered to Landsat data with at least 15 accurate and well distributed ground control points with a root mean square error (RMSE) of less that one pixel (15 meters). An elevation value was then assigned to each ground control point by extracting the elevation from the 90-meter SRTM data. The 36 derived DEMs demonstrate that the software correlated on nearly flat surfaces and smooth slopes accurately. Larger errors occur in cloudy and snow-covered areas, lakes, areas with steep slopes, and

  13. Predicting Bed Grain Size in Threshold Channels Using Lidar Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, N. P.; Nesheim, A. O.; Wilkins, B. C.; Edmonds, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, researchers have developed GIS-based algorithms to extract channel networks and measure longitudinal profiles from digital elevation models (DEMs), and have used these to study stream morphology in relation to tectonics, climate and ecology. The accuracy of stream elevations from traditional DEMs (10-50 m pixels) is typically limited by the contour interval (3-20 m) of the rasterized topographic map source. This is a particularly severe limitation in low-relief watersheds, where 3 m of channel elevation change may occur over several km. Lidar DEMs (~1 m pixels) allow researchers to resolve channel elevation changes of ~0.5 m, enabling reach-scale calculations of gradient, which is the most important parameter for understanding channel processes at that scale. Lidar DEMs have the additional advantage of allowing users to make estimates of channel width. We present a process-based model that predicts median bed grain size in threshold gravel-bed channels from lidar slope and width measurements using the Shields and Manning equations. We compare these predictions to field grain size measurements in segments of three Maine rivers. Like many paraglacial rivers, these have longitudinal profiles characterized by relatively steep (gradient >0.002) and flat (gradient <0.0005) segments, with length scales of several km. This heterogeneity corresponds to strong variations in channel form, sediment supply, bed grain size, and aquatic habitat characteristics. The model correctly predicts bed sediment size within a factor of two in ~70% of the study sites. The model works best in single-thread channels with relatively low sediment supply, and poorly in depositional, multi-thread and/or fine (median grain size <20 mm) reaches. We evaluate the river morphology (using field and lidar measurements) in the context of the Parker et al. (2007) hydraulic geometry relations for single-thread gravel-bed rivers, and find correspondence in the locations where both

  14. Quantifying depression storage of snowmelt runoff over frozen ground using aerial photography and digital elevation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Donovan, K.; Sjogren, D.

    2004-05-01

    The northern prairie region of North America is characterized by undulating terrains with very low regional gradient, underlain by clay-rich glacial tills. The soils derived from clay-rich tills have very low permeability when they are frozen. As a result a large amount of snowmelt runoff is generated over frozen ground. Numerous depressions on the undulating terrains trap snowmelt water and focus the infiltration flux under the depressions. Therefore, the depressions have important hydrologic functions regarding runoff retention and groundwater recharge. Previous studies have investigated the storage of snowmelt runoff and subsequent infiltration at a scale of each depression (102-103 m2). However, to understand the roles of depressions in regional hydrology, depression storage needs to be evaluated at a much larger scale. Our ultimate goal is to quantify depression storage at the scale of watersheds (102-103km 2) and represent it properly in a large-scale hydrologic model. As the first step towards this goal, we quantified depression storage at 1-km2 scale using infrared (IR) aerial photographs and digital elevation model combined with the measurement of water depth in depressions. Two parcels of land were selected for the study in the watershed of West Nose Creek, located immediately north of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Each site contained a subsection of native prairie grass and cultivated field. Snow surveys were conducted at each site to estimate the average snow water equivalent (SWE) on the ground prior to melt. SWE ranged between 26 mm and 39 mm. Water depth was measured in 111 depressions when they were filled up to the peak level, and IR photographs were taken simultaneously at a scale of 1:10,000. The soil was frozen to a depth of 1 m or greater as indicated by several thermocouple arrays installed at the site. Detailed elevation survey was conducted in summer using a total station and differential global positioning system for 10 selected depressions to

  15. Volume Change Rates of Southeast Alaskan Icefields from Stacked Digital Elevation Models, 2000-2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkonian, A. K.; Elliott, J.; Willis, M. J.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    We derive volume change rates (dV/dt) for the three major temperate icefields of Southeast Alaska. The Juneau, Stikine, and Glacier Bay icefields cover approximately 14,300 km2 and have recently been contributing disproportionately to sea level rise. In this study we provide estimates of volume change rates between 2000 and 2009/2010 based on near-complete spatial coverage from stacked digital elevations models (DEMs) acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). Our method applies a weighted linear regression to elevations on a pixel-by-pixel basis over each icefield, and we filter out elevations based on deviation from the first elevation (which is SRTM about 90% of the time) to exclude ASTER elevations influenced by clouds, shadow, etc. The maximum positive deviation allowed is ~5 m a-1, which comes from estimates of precipitation in this region and probably overestimates the amount of thickening actually occurring. This large positive constraint means our volume change rates are likely more representative of lower bounds on volume loss. All three icefields are losing volume - the combined rate is approximately -7.7±0.9 km3 a-1, equivalent to a mass loss rate of 6.9±0.8 Gt a-1 assuming a density of 900 kg m3 for the lost material. The area-averaged elevation change rate (dh/dt) is -0.44±0.05 m a-1 w.e., with most loss occurring at the Glacier Bay and Stikine Icefields. Juneau Icefield (~3,900 km2) has a small dV/dt, at -0.3±0.1 km3 a-1. This is due to the positive dV/dt of the Taku Glacier, the largest outlet glacier of the Juneau Icefield. Our results are consistent with previous studies that document the recent advance of Taku and its status as the glacier with the highest positive volume change rate in Alaska. The dh/dt pattern we observe elsewhere over the Juneau Icefield is similar to previous studies, with practically every outlet glacier except Taku experiencing

  16. Scoria cones on Mars: Detailed investigation of morphometry based on high-resolution digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brož, Petr; Čadek, Ondřej; Hauber, Ernst; Rossi, Angelo Pio

    2015-09-01

    We analyze the shapes of 28 hypothesized scoria cones in three regions on Mars, i.e., Ulysses and Hydraotes Colles and Coprates Chasma. Using available High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment and Context Camera (CTX) digital elevation models, we determine the basic morphometric characteristics of the cones and estimate from ballistic modeling the physical parameters of volcanic eruptions that could have formed them. When compared to terrestrial scoria cones, most of the studied cones show larger volumes (up to 4.2 × 109 m3), larger heights (up to 573 m), and smaller average slopes. The average slopes of the Ulysses, Hydraotes, and Coprates cones range between 7° and 25°, and the maximum slopes only rarely exceed 30°, which suggests only a minor role of scoria redistribution by avalanching. Ballistic analysis indicates that all cones were formed in a similar way, and their shapes are consistent with an ejection velocity about 2 times larger and a particle size about 20 times smaller than on Earth. Our results support the hypothesis that the investigated edifices were formed by low-energy Strombolian volcanic eruptions and hence are equivalent to terrestrial scoria cones. The cones in Hydraotes Colles and Coprates Chasma are on average smaller and steeper than the cones in Ulysses Colles, which is likely due to the difference in topographic elevation and the associated difference in atmospheric pressure. This study provides the expected morphometric characteristics of Martian scoria cones, which can be used to identify landforms consistent with this type of activity elsewhere on Mars and distinguish them from other conical edifices.

  17. Comparison of Surface Flow Features from Lidar-Derived Digital Elevation Models with Historical Elevation and Hydrography Data for Minnehaha County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppenga, Sandra K.; Worstell, Bruce B.; Stoker, Jason M.; Greenlee, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has taken the lead in the creation of a valuable remote sensing product by incorporating digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) into the National Elevation Dataset (NED), the elevation layer of 'The National Map'. High-resolution lidar-derived DEMs provide the accuracy needed to systematically quantify and fully integrate surface flow including flow direction, flow accumulation, sinks, slope, and a dense drainage network. In 2008, 1-meter resolution lidar data were acquired in Minnehaha County, South Dakota. The acquisition was a collaborative effort between Minnehaha County, the city of Sioux Falls, and the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. With the newly acquired lidar data, USGS scientists generated high-resolution DEMs and surface flow features. This report compares lidar-derived surface flow features in Minnehaha County to 30- and 10-meter elevation data previously incorporated in the NED and ancillary hydrography datasets. Surface flow features generated from lidar-derived DEMs are consistently integrated with elevation and are important in understanding surface-water movement to better detect surface-water runoff, flood inundation, and erosion. Many topographic and hydrologic applications will benefit from the increased availability of accurate, high-quality, and high-resolution surface-water data. The remotely sensed data provide topographic information and data integration capabilities needed for meeting current and future human and environmental needs.

  18. Validation of the Aster Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 Over the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesch, D.; Oimoen, M.; Danielson, J.; Meyer, D.

    2016-06-01

    The ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model Version 3 (GDEM v3) was evaluated over the conterminous United States in a manner similar to the validation conducted for the original GDEM Version 1 (v1) in 2009 and GDEM Version 2 (v2) in 2011. The absolute vertical accuracy of GDEM v3 was calculated by comparison with more than 23,000 independent reference geodetic ground control points from the U.S. National Geodetic Survey. The root mean square error (RMSE) measured for GDEM v3 is 8.52 meters. This compares with the RMSE of 8.68 meters for GDEM v2. Another important descriptor of vertical accuracy is the mean error, or bias, which indicates if a DEM has an overall vertical offset from true ground level. The GDEM v3 mean error of -1.20 meters reflects an overall negative bias in GDEM v3. The absolute vertical accuracy assessment results, both mean error and RMSE, were segmented by land cover type to provide insight into how GDEM v3 performs in various land surface conditions. While the RMSE varies little across cover types (6.92 to 9.25 meters), the mean error (bias) does appear to be affected by land cover type, ranging from -2.99 to +4.16 meters across 14 land cover classes. These results indicate that in areas where built or natural aboveground features are present, GDEM v3 is measuring elevations above the ground level, a condition noted in assessments of previous GDEM versions (v1 and v2) and an expected condition given the type of stereo-optical image data collected by ASTER. GDEM v3 was also evaluated by differencing with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset. In many forested areas, GDEM v3 has elevations that are higher in the canopy than SRTM. The overall validation effort also included an evaluation of the GDEM v3 water mask. In general, the number of distinct water polygons in GDEM v3 is much lower than the number in a reference land cover dataset, but the total areas compare much more closely.

  19. Computation of spatial significance of mountain objects extracted from multiscale digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyamoorthy, Dinesh

    2014-06-01

    The derivation of spatial significance is an important aspect of geospatial analysis and hence, various methods have been proposed to compute the spatial significance of entities based on spatial distances with other entities within the cluster. This paper is aimed at studying the spatial significance of mountain objects extracted from multiscale digital elevation models (DEMs). At each scale, the value of spatial significance index SSI of a mountain object is the minimum number of morphological dilation iterations required to occupy all the other mountain objects in the terrain. The mountain object with the lowest value of SSI is the spatially most significant mountain object, indicating that it has the shortest distance to the other mountain objects. It is observed that as the area of the mountain objects reduce with increasing scale, the distances between the mountain objects increase, resulting in increasing values of SSI. The results obtained indicate that the strategic location of a mountain object at the centre of the terrain is more important than its size in determining its reach to other mountain objects and thus, its spatial significance.

  20. Shoreline extraction from light detection and ranging digital elevation model data and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Karim, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased demand for understanding the accurate position of the shorelines. The automatic extraction of shorelines utilizing the digital elevation models (DEMs) obtained from light detection and ranging (LiDAR), aerial images, and multispectral images has become very promising. In this article, we develop two innovative algorithms that can effectively extract shorelines depending on the available data sources. The first is a multistep morphological technique that works on LiDAR DEM with respect to a tidal datum, whereas the second depends on the availability of training data to extract shorelines from LiDAR DEM fused with aerial images. Unlike similar techniques, the morphological approach detects and eliminates the outliers that result from waves, etc., by means of an anomaly test with neighborhood constraints. Additionally, it eliminates docks, bridges, and fishing piers along the extracted shorelines by means of Hough transform. The second approach extracts the shoreline by means of color space conversion of the aerial images and the support vector machines classifier to segment the fused data into water and land. We perform Monte-Carlo simulations to estimate the confidence interval for the error in shoreline position. Compared with other relevant techniques in literature, the proposed methods offer better accuracy in shoreline extraction.

  1. Synergy of Image and Digital Elevation Models (DEMS) Information for Virtual Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, C.; Datcu, M.

    2004-09-01

    In the framework of 3D visualization and real-time rendering of large remote sensing image databases, several signal processing techniques are presented and evaluated to filter/enhance SAR Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). Through the SRTM DEM, the interest of InSAR data for such applications is illustrated. A non stationary bayesian filter is presented to remove noise and small artefacts which pervade the SAR DEM while preserving structures and information content. Results obtained are very good, nevertheless large artefacts cannot be filtered and some artefacts remain. Therefore, image information have to be inserted to produce more realistic views. This second step is done by using a segmentation algorithm on the image data. By a topology analysis, the extracted objects are classified/stored in a tree structure to describe the topologic relations between the objects and reflect their interdependencies. An interactive learning procedure is done through a Graphical User Interface to link the signal classes to the semantic ones, i.e. to include human knowledge in the system. The selected information in form of objets are merged/fused in the DEM by assigning regularisation constraints.

  2. The Need of Nested Grids for Aerial and Satellite Images and Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, G.; Mas, S.; Fernández-Villarino, X.; Martínez-Luceño, J.; Ojeda, J. C.; Pérez-Martín, B.; Tejeiro, J. A.; García-González, C.; López-Romero, E.; Soteres, C.

    2016-06-01

    Usual workflows for production, archiving, dissemination and use of Earth observation images (both aerial and from remote sensing satellites) pose big interoperability problems, as for example: non-alignment of pixels at the different levels of the pyramids that makes it impossible to overlay, compare and mosaic different orthoimages, without resampling them and the need to apply multiple resamplings and compression-decompression cycles. These problems cause great inefficiencies in production, dissemination through web services and processing in "Big Data" environments. Most of them can be avoided, or at least greatly reduced, with the use of a common "nested grid" for mutiresolution production, archiving, dissemination and exploitation of orthoimagery, digital elevation models and other raster data. "Nested grids" are space allocation schemas that organize image footprints, pixel sizes and pixel positions at all pyramid levels, in order to achieve coherent and consistent multiresolution coverage of a whole working area. A "nested grid" must be complemented by an appropriate "tiling schema", ideally based on the "quad-tree" concept. In the last years a "de facto standard" grid and Tiling Schema has emerged and has been adopted by virtually all major geospatial data providers. It has also been adopted by OGC in its "WMTS Simple Profile" standard. In this paper we explain how the adequate use of this tiling schema as common nested grid for orthoimagery, DEMs and other types of raster data constitutes the most practical solution to most of the interoperability problems of these types of data.

  3. A new lunar digital elevation model from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and SELENE Terrain Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Haruyama, J.; Smith, D. E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an improved lunar digital elevation model (DEM) covering latitudes within ±60°, at a horizontal resolution of 512 pixels per degree (∼60 m at the equator) and a typical vertical accuracy ∼3 to 4 m. This DEM is constructed from ∼ 4.5 ×109 geodetically-accurate topographic heights from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, to which we co-registered 43,200 stereo-derived DEMs (each 1° × 1°) from the SELENE Terrain Camera (TC) (∼1010 pixels total). After co-registration, approximately 90% of the TC DEMs show root-mean-square vertical residuals with the LOLA data of <5 m compared to ∼ 50% prior to co-registration. We use the co-registered TC data to estimate and correct orbital and pointing geolocation errors from the LOLA altimetric profiles (typically amounting to <10 m horizontally and <1 m vertically). By combining both co-registered datasets, we obtain a near-global DEM with high geodetic accuracy, and without the need for surface interpolation. We evaluate the resulting LOLA + TC merged DEM (designated as "SLDEM2015") with particular attention to quantifying seams and crossover errors.

  4. Quality Assessment for the First Part of the Tandem-X Global Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brautigam, B.; Martone, M.; Rizzoli, P.; Gonzalez, C.; Wecklich, C.; Borla Tridon, D.; Bachmann, M.; Schulze, D.; Zink, M.

    2015-04-01

    TanDEM-X is an innovative synthetic aperture radar (SAR) mission with the main goal to generate a global and homogeneous digital elevation model (DEM) of the Earth's land masses. The final DEM product will reach a new dimension of detail with respect to resolution and quality. The absolute horizontal and vertical accuracy shall each be less than 10 m in a 90% confidence interval at a pixel spacing of 12 m. The relative vertical accuracy specification for the TanDEM-X mission foresees a 90% point-to-point error of 2 m (4 m) for areas with predominant terrain slopes smaller than 20% (greater than 20%) within a 1° longitude by 1° latitude cell. The global DEM is derived from interferometric SAR acquisitions performed by two radar satellites flying in close orbit formation. Interferometric performance parameters like the coherence between the two radar images have been monitored and evaluated throughout the mission. In a further step, over 500,000 single SAR scenes are interferometrically processed, calibrated, and mosaicked into a global DEM product which will be completely available in the second half of 2016. This paper presents an up-todate quality status of the single interferometric acquisitions as well as of 50% of the final DEM. The overall DEM quality of these first products promises accuracies well within the specification, especially in terms of absolute height accuracy.

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Uav-Photogrammetry for Creating Digital Elevation Models (dem)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rock, G.; Ries, J. B.; Udelhoven, T.

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates the potential that lies in the photogrammetric processing of aerial images captured by unmanned aerial vehicles. UAV-Systems have gained increasing attraction during the last years. Miniaturization of electronic components often results in a reduction of quality. Especially the accuracy of the GPS/IMU navigation unit and the camera are of the utmost importance for photogrammetric evaluation of aerial images. To determine the accuracy of digital elevation models (DEMs), an experimental setup was chosen similar to the situation of data acquisition during a field campaign. A quarry was chosen to perform the experiment, because of the presence of different geomorphologic units, such as vertical walls, piles of debris, vegetation and even areas. In the experimental test field, 1042 ground control points (GCPs) were placed, used as input data for the photogrammetric processing and as high accuracy reference data for evaluating the DEMs. Further, an airborne LiDAR dataset covering the whole quarry and additional 2000 reference points, measured by total station, were used as ground truth data. The aerial images were taken using a MAVinci Sirius I - UAV equipped with a Canon 300D as imaging system. The influence of the number of GCPs on the accuracy of the indirect sensor orientation and the absolute deviation's dependency on different parameters of the modelled DEMs was subject of the investigation. Nevertheless, the only significant factor concerning the DEMs accuracy that could be isolated was the flying height of the UAV.

  6. TERRAIN: A computer program to process digital elevation models for modeling surface flow

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, P.M.; Levine, D.A.; Hunsaker, C.T.; Timmins, S.P.

    1995-08-01

    This document provides a step by step procedure, TERRAIN, for processing digital elevation models to calculate overland flow paths, watershed boundaries, slope, and aspect. The algorithms incorporated into TERRAIN have been used at two different geographic scales: first for small research watersheds where surface wetness measurements are made, and second for regional water modeling for entire counties. For small areas methods based on flow distribution may be more desirable, especially if time-dependent flow models are to be used. The main improvement in TERRAIN compared with earlier programs on which it is based is that it combines the conditioning routines, which remove depressions to avoid water storage, into a single process. Efficiency has also been improved, reducing run times as much as 10:1 and enabling the processing of very large grids in strips for regional modeling. Additionally, the ability to calculate the nutrient load delivered any cell in a watershed has been added. These improvements make TERRAIN a powerful tool for modeling surface flow.

  7. Prediction of Wind Speeds Based on Digital Elevation Models Using Boosted Regression Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Etienne, C.; Tian, J.; Krauß, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a new approach is presented to predict maximum wind speeds using Gradient Boosted Regression Trees (GBRT). GBRT are a non-parametric regression technique used in various applications, suitable to make predictions without having an in-depth a-priori knowledge about the functional dependancies between the predictors and the response variables. Our aim is to predict maximum wind speeds based on predictors, which are derived from a digital elevation model (DEM). The predictors describe the orography of the Area-of-Interest (AoI) by various means like first and second order derivatives of the DEM, but also higher sophisticated classifications describing exposure and shelterness of the terrain to wind flux. In order to take the different scales into account which probably influence the streams and turbulences of wind flow over complex terrain, the predictors are computed on different spatial resolutions ranging from 30 m up to 2000 m. The geographic area used for examination of the approach is Switzerland, a mountainious region in the heart of europe, dominated by the alps, but also covering large valleys. The full workflow is described in this paper, which consists of data preparation using image processing techniques, model training using a state-of-the-art machine learning algorithm, in-depth analysis of the trained model, validation of the model and application of the model to generate a wind speed map.

  8. Grid digital elevation model based algorithms for determination of hillslope width functions through flow distance transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jintao; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Xingnan; Hoagland, Kyle D.

    2012-04-01

    Recently developed hillslope storage dynamics theory can represent the essential physical behavior of a natural system by accounting explicitly for the plan shape of a hillslope in an elegant and simple way. As a result, this theory is promising for improving catchment-scale hydrologic modeling. In this study, grid digital elevation model (DEM) based algorithms for determination of hillslope geometric characteristics (e.g., hillslope units and width functions in hillslope storage dynamics models) are presented. This study further develops a method for hillslope partitioning, established by Fan and Bras (1998), by applying it on a grid network. On the basis of hillslope unit derivation, a flow distance transforms method (TD∞) is suggested in order to decrease the systematic error of grid DEM-based flow distance calculation caused by flow direction approximation to streamlines. Hillslope width transfer functions are then derived to convert the probability density functions of flow distance into hillslope width functions. These algorithms are applied and evaluated on five abstract hillslopes, and detailed tests and analyses are carried out by comparing the derivation results with theoretical width functions. The results demonstrate that the TD∞ improves estimations of the flow distance and thus hillslope width function. As the proposed procedures are further applied in a natural catchment, we find that the natural hillslope width function can be well fitted by the Gaussian function. This finding is very important for applying the newly developed hillslope storage dynamics models in a real catchment.

  9. 2010 bathymetric survey and digital elevation model of Corte Madera Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foxgrover, Amy C.; Finlayson, David P.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Takekawa, John Y.; Thorne, Karen M.; Spragens, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    A high-resolution bathymetric survey of Corte Madera Bay, California, was collected in early 2010 in support of a collaborative research project initiated by the San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The primary objective of the Innovative Wetland Adaptation in the Lower Corte Madera Creek Watershed Project is to develop shoreline adaptation strategies to future sea-level rise based upon sound science. Fundamental to this research was the development of an of an up-to-date, high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) extending from the subtidal environment through the surrounding intertidal marsh. We provide bathymetric data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey and have merged the bathymetry with a 1-m resolution aerial lidar data set that was collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration during the same time period to create a seamless, high-resolution DEM of Corte Madera Bay and the surrounding topography. The bathymetric and DEM surfaces are provided at both 1 m and 10 m resolutions formatted as both X, Y, Z text files and ESRI Arc ASCII files, which are accompanied by Federal Geographic Data Committee compliant metadata.

  10. Automated delineation of karst sinkholes from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiusheng; Deng, Chengbin; Chen, Zuoqi

    2016-08-01

    Sinkhole mapping is critical for understanding hydrological processes and mitigating geological hazards in karst landscapes. Current methods for identifying sinkholes are primarily based on visual interpretation of low-resolution topographic maps and aerial photographs with subsequent field verification, which is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The increasing availability of high-resolution LiDAR-derived digital elevation data allows for an entirely new level of detailed delineation and analyses of small-scale geomorphologic features and landscape structures at fine scales. In this paper, we present a localized contour tree method for automated extraction of sinkholes in karst landscapes. One significant advantage of our automated approach for sinkhole extraction is that it may reduce inconsistencies and alleviate repeatability concerns associated with visual interpretation methods. In addition, the proposed method has contributed to improving the sinkhole inventory in several ways: (1) detection of non-inventoried sinkholes; (2) identification of previously inventoried sinkholes that have been filled; (3) delineation of sinkhole boundaries; and (4) characterization of sinkhole morphometric properties. We applied the method to Fillmore County in southeastern Minnesota, USA, and identified three times as many sinkholes as the existing database for the same area. The results suggest that previous visual interpretation method might significantly underestimate the number of potential sinkholes in the region. Our method holds great potential for creating and updating sinkhole inventory databases at a regional scale in a timely manner.

  11. Topographic Phase Recovery from Stacked ERS Interferometry and a Low-Resolution Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Sichoix, Lydie; Frey, Herbert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A hybrid approach to topographic recovery from ERS interferometry is developed and assessed. Tropospheric/ionospheric artifacts, imprecise orbital information, and layover are key issues in recovering topography and surface deformation from repeat-pass interferometry. Previously, we developed a phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms to reduce these errors and also to reduce the short-wavelength phase noise (see Sandwell arid Price [1998] and Appendix A). Here the method is extended to use a low-resolution digital elevation model to constrain long-wavelength phase errors and an iteration scheme to minimize errors in the computation of phase gradient. We demonstrate the topographic phase recovery on 16-m postings using 25 ERS synthetic aperture radar images from an area of southern California containing 2700 m of relief. On the basis of a comparison with 81 GPS monuments, the ERS derived topography has a typical absolute accuracy of better than 10 m except in areas of layover. The resulting topographic phase enables accurate two-pass, real-time interferometry even in mountainous areas where traditional phase unwrapping schemes fail. As an example, we form a topography-free (127-m perpendicular baseline) interferogram spanning 7.5 years; fringes from two major earthquakes and a seismic slip on the San Andreas Fault are clearly isolated.

  12. A marked point process of rectangles and segments for automatic analysis of digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Ortner, Mathias; Descombe, Xavier; Zerubia, Josiane

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a framework for automatic feature extraction from images using stochastic geometry. Features in images are modeled as realizations of a spatial point process of geometrical shapes. This framework allows the incorporation of a priori knowledge on the spatial repartition of features. More specifically, we present a model based on the superposition of a process of segments and a process of rectangles. The former is dedicated to the detection of linear networks of discontinuities, while the latter aims at segmenting homogeneous areas. An energy is defined, favoring connections of segments, alignments of rectangles, as well as a relevant interaction between both types of objects. The estimation is performed by minimizing the energy using a simulated annealing algorithm. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). These images are raster data representing the altimetry of a dense urban area. We present results on real data provided by the IGN (French National Geographic Institute) consisting in low quality DEMs of various types. PMID:18000328

  13. A method for the processing and analysis of digital terrain elevation data. [Shiprock and Gallup Quadrangles, Arizona and New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkin, B. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A method is presented for the processing and analysis of digital topography data that can subsequently be entered in an interactive data base in the form of slope, slope length, elevation, and aspect angle. A discussion of the data source and specific descriptions of the data processing software programs are included. In addition, the mathematical considerations involved in the registration of raw digitized coordinate points to the UTM coordinate system are presented. Scale factor considerations are also included. Results of the processing and analysis are illustrated using the Shiprock and Gallup Quadrangle test data.

  14. The use of Digital Elevation Models for sediment connectivity assessment: state of the art and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalli, Marco; Borselli, Lorenzo; Crema, Stefano; Marchi, Lorenzo; Vigiak, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Geomorphic coupling, i.e. linkages between geomorphic system components, and sediment connectivity, i.e. the degree of linkage that controls sediment fluxes throughout landscape, have important implications for the behavior of geomorphic systems and have become key issues in the study of sediment transfer processes. The detailed characterization of the topographic surface plays a fundamental role for studying sediment dynamics in a catchment. Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) can both improve geomorphological interpretation (e.g. individuation of sediment source areas) and enable the quantitative modeling of sediment fluxes and connectivity. In particular, the availability of LiDAR-derived high-resolution Digital Terrain Models (DTMs), exploited using geomorphometric analysis, extends the applicability and potentialities of topography-based modeling approaches. Indeed, geomorphometry allows to derive detailed characterization of drainage pattern and surface roughness, which are two of the most important parameters in the study of sediment delivery. Since the late 1990s, some GIS-based approaches mainly based on stream-power have been developed for modeling the topographic potential for erosion and deposition and evaluating the impedance to sediment conveyance. But it is in the more recent years that an increasing interest for the quantitative characterization of the linkage between landscape units can be observed in literature. The development of geomorphometric indices, such as the sediment connectivity index (IC) by Borselli et al. (2008) and the version of IC proposed by Cavalli et al. (2013), and related freeware applications, has certainly contributed to this increased interest. In this work, the state of the art on the use of DEMs for sediment connectivity assessment, with a specific focus on the sediment connectivity index and following applications, will be presented. Future perspectives will be also discussed. References Borselli L., Cassi P., Torri D., 2008

  15. Building a 2.5D Digital Elevation Model from 2D Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, Curtis W.; Ansar, Adnan I.; Brennan, Shane; Cheng, Yang; Clouse, Daniel S.; Almeida, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    When projecting imagery into a georeferenced coordinate frame, one needs to have some model of the geographical region that is being projected to. This model can sometimes be a simple geometrical curve, such as an ellipse or even a plane. However, to obtain accurate projections, one needs to have a more sophisticated model that encodes the undulations in the terrain including things like mountains, valleys, and even manmade structures. The product that is often used for this purpose is a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The technology presented here generates a high-quality DEM from a collection of 2D images taken from multiple viewpoints, plus pose data for each of the images and a camera model for the sensor. The technology assumes that the images are all of the same region of the environment. The pose data for each image is used as an initial estimate of the geometric relationship between the images, but the pose data is often noisy and not of sufficient quality to build a high-quality DEM. Therefore, the source imagery is passed through a feature-tracking algorithm and multi-plane-homography algorithm, which refine the geometric transforms between images. The images and their refined poses are then passed to a stereo algorithm, which generates dense 3D data for each image in the sequence. The 3D data from each image is then placed into a consistent coordinate frame and passed to a routine that divides the coordinate frame into a number of cells. The 3D points that fall into each cell are collected, and basic statistics are applied to determine the elevation of that cell. The result of this step is a DEM that is in an arbitrary coordinate frame. This DEM is then filtered and smoothed in order to remove small artifacts. The final step in the algorithm is to take the initial DEM and rotate and translate it to be in the world coordinate frame [such as UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator), MGRS (Military Grid Reference System), or geodetic] such that it can be saved in

  16. Coastal Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) for tsunami hazard assessment on the French coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maspataud, Aurélie; Biscara, Laurie; Hébert, Hélène; Schmitt, Thierry; Créach, Ronan

    2015-04-01

    Building precise and up-to-date coastal DEMs is a prerequisite for accurate modeling and forecasting of hydrodynamic processes at local scale. Marine flooding, originating from tsunamis, storm surges or waves, is one of them. Some high resolution DEMs are being generated for multiple coast configurations (gulf, embayment, strait, estuary, harbor approaches, low-lying areas…) along French Atlantic and Channel coasts. This work is undertaken within the framework of the TANDEM project (Tsunamis in the Atlantic and the English ChaNnel: Definition of the Effects through numerical Modeling) (2014-2017). DEMs boundaries were defined considering the vicinity of French civil nuclear facilities, site effects considerations and potential tsunamigenic sources. Those were identified from available historical observations. Seamless integrated topographic and bathymetric coastal DEMs will be used by institutions taking part in the study to simulate expected wave height at regional and local scale on the French coasts, for a set of defined scenarii. The main tasks were (1) the development of a new capacity of production of DEM, (2) aiming at the release of high resolution and precision digital field models referred to vertical reference frameworks, that require (3) horizontal and vertical datum conversions (all source elevation data need to be transformed to a common datum), on the basis of (4) the building of (national and/or local) conversion grids of datum relationships based on known measurements. Challenges in coastal DEMs development deal with good practices throughout model development that can help minimizing uncertainties. This is particularly true as scattered elevation data with variable density, from multiple sources (national hydrographic services, state and local government agencies, research organizations and private engineering companies) and from many different types (paper fieldsheets to be digitized, single beam echo sounder, multibeam sonar, airborne laser

  17. Differences in topographic characteristics computed from 100- and 1000-m resolution digital elevation model data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolock, D.M.; McCabe, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Topographic characteristics computed from 100- and 1000-m resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data are compared for 50 locations representing varied terrain in the conterminous USA. The topographic characteristics are three parameters used extensively in hydrological research and modelling - slope (S), specific catchment area (A(s)) and a wetness index computed as the logarithm of the specific catchment area divided by slope [ln(A(s)/S)]. Slope values computed from 1000-m DEMs are smaller than those computed from 100-m DEMs; specific catchment area and the wetness index are larger for the 1000-m DEMs compared with the 100-m DEMs. Most of the differences between the 100- and 1000-m resolution DEMs can be attributed to terrain-discretization effects in the computation of the topographic characteristics and are not the result of smoothing or loss of terrain detail in the coarse data. In general, the terrain-discretization effects are greatest on flat terrain with long length-scale features, and the smoothing effects are greatest on steep terrain with short length-scale features. For the most part, the differences in the average values of the topographic characteristics computed from 100- and 1000-m resolution DEMs are predictable; that is, biases in the mean values for the characteristics computed from a 1000-m DEM can be corrected with simple linear equations. Copyright (C) 2000 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.Topographic characteristics computed from 100- and 1000-m resolution digital elevation model (DEM) data are compared for 50 locations representing varied terrain in the conterminous USA. The topographic characteristics are three parameters used extensively in hydrological research and modelling - slope (S), specific catchment area (As) and a wetness index computed as the logarithm of the specific catchment area divided by slope [In(As/S)]. Slope values computed from 1000-m DEMs are smaller than those computed from 100-m DEMs; specific catchment area and the

  18. Structural analysis of Turtle Mountain (Alberta) using digital elevation model: Toward a progressive failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaboyedoff, Michel; Couture, Réjean; Locat, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    In 1903, the eastern slope of Turtle Mountain (Alberta) was affected by a 30 M m 3-rockslide named Frank Slide that resulted in more than 70 casualties. Assuming that the main discontinuity sets, including bedding, control part of the slope morphology, the structural features of Turtle Mountain were investigated using a digital elevation model (DEM). Using new landscape analysis techniques, we have identified three main joint and fault sets. These results are in agreement with those sets identified through field observations. Landscape analysis techniques, using a DEM, confirm and refine the most recent geology model of the Frank Slide. The rockslide was initiated along bedding and a fault at the base of the slope and propagated up slope by a regressive process following a surface composed of pre-existing discontinuities. The DEM analysis also permits the identification of important geological structures along the 1903 slide scar. Based on the so called Sloping Local Base Level (SLBL) an estimation was made of the present unstable volumes in the main scar delimited by the cracks, and around the south area of the scar (South Peak). The SLBL is a method permitting a geometric interpretation of the failure surface based on a DEM. Finally we propose a failure mechanism permitting the progressive failure of the rock mass that considers gentle dipping wedges (30°). The prisms or wedges defined by two discontinuity sets permit the creation of a failure surface by progressive failure. Such structures are more commonly observed in recent rockslides. This method is efficient and is recommended as a preliminary analysis prior to field investigation.

  19. Hazard Mapping of Structurally Controlled Landslide in Southern Leyte, Philippines Using High Resolution Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzon, Paul Kenneth; Rochelle Montalbo, Kristina; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    The 2006 Guinsaugon landslide in St. Bernard, Southern Leyte is the largest known mass movement of soil in the Philippines. It consisted of a 15 million m3 rockslide-debris avalanche from an approximately 700 m high escarpment produced by continuous movement of the Philippine fault at approximately 2.5 cm/year. The landslide was preceded by continuous heavy rainfall totaling 571.2 mm from February 8 to 12, 2006. The catastrophic landslide killed more than 1,000 people and displaced 19,000 residents over its 6,400 km path. To investigate the present-day morphology of the scar and potential failure that may occur, an analysis of a high-resolution digital elevation model (10 m resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar images in 2013) was conducted, leading to the generation of a structurally controlled landslide hazard map of the area. Discontinuity sets that could contribute to any failure mechanism were identified using Coltop 3D software which uses a unique lower Schmidt-Lambert color scheme for any given dip and dip direction. Thus, finding main morpho-structural orientations became easier. Matterocking, a software designed for structural analysis, was used to generate possible planes that could slide due to the identified discontinuity sets. Conefall was then utilized to compute the extent to which the rock mass will run out. The results showed potential instabilities in the scarp area of the 2006 Guinsaguon landslide and in adjacent slopes because of the presence of steep discontinuities that range from 45-60°. Apart from the 2006 Guinsaugon potential landslides, conefall simulation generated farther rock mass extent in adjacent slopes. In conclusion, there is a high probability of landslides in the municipality of St. Bernard Leyte, where the 2006 Guinsaugon Landslide occurred. Concerned agencies may use maps produced from this study for disaster preparedness and to facilitate long-term recovery planning for hazardous areas.

  20. The geometric signature: Quantifying landslide-terrain types from digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Topography of various types and scales can be fingerprinted by computer analysis of altitude matrices (digital elevation models, or DEMs). The critical analytic tool is the geometric signature, a set of measures that describes topographic form well enough to distinguish among geomorphically disparate landscapes. Different surficial processes create topography with diagnostic forms that are recognizable in the field. The geometric signature abstracts those forms from contour maps or their DEMs and expresses them numerically. This multivariate characterization enables once-in-tractable problems to be addressed. The measures that constitute a geometric signature express different but complementary attributes of topographic form. Most parameters used here are statistical estimates of central tendency and dispersion for five major categories of terrain geometry; altitude, altitude variance spectrum, slope between slope reversals, and slope and its curvature at fixed slope lengths. As an experimental application of geometric signatures, two mapped terrain types associated with different processes of shallow landsliding in Marin County, California, were distinguished consistently by a 17-variable description of topography from 21??21 DEMs (30-m grid spacing). The small matrix is a statistical window that can be used to scan large DEMs by computer, thus potentially automating the mapping of contrasting terrain types. The two types in Marin County host either (1) slow slides: earth flows and slump-earth flows, or (2) rapid flows: debris avalanches and debris flows. The signature approach should adapt to terrain taxonomy and mapping in other areas, where conditions differ from those in Central California. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  1. Submarine Melting of Icebergs from Repeat High-Resolution Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enderlin, E. M.; Hamilton, G. S.; Straneo, F.; Cenedese, C.

    2014-12-01

    Icebergs calved from tidewater glaciers act as distributed freshwater sources as they transit through fjords to the surrounding ocean basins. Glacier discharge estimates provide a crude approximation of the total iceberg discharge on inter-annual timescales, but the liquid freshwater flux from icebergs in glacial fjords is largely unknown. Here we use repeat high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to derive meltwater fluxes for 18 icebergs in Sermilik Fjord, East Greenland, during the 2011-2013 boreal summers, and for 33 comparably-sized icebergs in Ilulissat Fjord, West Greenland, during March-April 2011 and July 2012. We find that iceberg melt rates for Sermilik Fjord are in good agreement with simulated melt rates along the vertical terminus of Helheim Glacier in winter, i.e. when melting at the glacier front is not enhanced by subglacial discharge, providing an independent validation of our technique. Variations in meltwater fluxes from icebergs are primarily related to differences in the submerged area of individual icebergs, which is consistent with theory. The stratification of water masses in fjords has a noticeable effect on summertime-derived melt estimates, with lower melt rates (and meltwater fluxes) observed in the relatively cold and fresh Polar Water layer and higher melt rates in the underlying warmer and more saline Atlantic Water layer. The meltwater flux dependence on submerged area, particularly within the deeper Atlantic Water layer, suggests that changes in the characteristics of icebergs (size/shape/keel-depth) calved from a tidewater glacier will alter the magnitude and distribution of meltwater fluxes within the fjord, which may in turn influence fjord circulation and the heat content delivered to the glacier terminus.

  2. A robust interpolation method for constructing digital elevation models from remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuanfa; Liu, Fengying; Li, Yanyan; Yan, Changqing; Liu, Guolin

    2016-09-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) derived from remote sensing data often suffers from outliers due to various reasons such as the physical limitation of sensors and low contrast of terrain textures. In order to reduce the effect of outliers on DEM construction, a robust algorithm of multiquadric (MQ) methodology based on M-estimators (MQ-M) was proposed. MQ-M adopts an adaptive weight function with three-parts. The weight function is null for large errors, one for small errors and quadric for others. A mathematical surface was employed to comparatively analyze the robustness of MQ-M, and its performance was compared with those of the classical MQ and a recently developed robust MQ method based on least absolute deviation (MQ-L). Numerical tests show that MQ-M is comparative to the classical MQ and superior to MQ-L when sample points follow normal and Laplace distributions, and under the presence of outliers the former is more accurate than the latter. A real-world example of DEM construction using stereo images indicates that compared with the classical interpolation methods, such as natural neighbor (NN), ordinary kriging (OK), ANUDEM, MQ-L and MQ, MQ-M has a better ability of preserving subtle terrain features. MQ-M replaces thin plate spline for reference DEM construction to assess the contribution to our recently developed multiresolution hierarchical classification method (MHC). Classifying the 15 groups of benchmark datasets provided by the ISPRS Commission demonstrates that MQ-M-based MHC is more accurate than MQ-L-based and TPS-based MHCs. MQ-M has high potential for DEM construction.

  3. Coupling of digital elevation model and rainfall-runoff model in storm drainage network design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbo, Bekithemba; Munyamba, Nelson; Sithole, George; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    Often planners and engineers are faced with various options and questions in storm drainage network design e.g. flow pattern, direction, runoff quantity and therefore size of drain, or scenario after a road, airfield or building has been constructed. In most instances planning without drainage in mind has caused failure or extensive damage to property including the storm water drains which channel the water away. With the advent of various modelling and geographic information systems (GIS) tools this problem can be averted. The University of Zimbabwe’s (UZ) main campus had its storm drainage network reconstructed at a cost of about US$100 000, because of persistent flooding. This paper describes a method of assessing the effectiveness of storm drainage networks by combining a digital elevation model (DEM) with a rainfall-runoff model based on the Soil Conservation Service South African manual (SCS-SA). The UZ campus was used as the test site. The DEM was generated from aerial photographs and the data imported into ArcView. The 3.0 km 2 basin was then delineated into sub-catchments using ArcView Hydro extension tools. The land-use, watershed and soil map of the UZ were merged in ArcView and initial curve numbers (CN) assigned. Using three years of daily rainfall data, runoff and peak flows were calculated for each sub-catchment. By overlaying the natural flow lines derived from the DEM with the reconstructed physical drains a comparison of the flow direction and the orientation of the drains was achieved. Peak flows where calculated for each delineated watershed and the results used to check the adequacy of the trapezoidal concrete lined drains. A combination of a DEM and rainfall-runoff model within a GIS platform proves to be useful in estimating runoff on partly urbanised watersheds and in determining the size and orientation of storm drains. It is particularly useful for new areas where development is being contemplated.

  4. Assessment of multiresolution segmentation for delimiting drumlins in digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisank, Clemens; Smith, Mike; Hillier, John

    2014-06-01

    Mapping or "delimiting" landforms is one of geomorphology's primary tools. Computer-based techniques such as land-surface segmentation allow the emulation of the process of manual landform delineation. Land-surface segmentation exhaustively subdivides a digital elevation model (DEM) into morphometrically-homogeneous irregularly-shaped regions, called terrain segments. Terrain segments can be created from various land-surface parameters (LSP) at multiple scales, and may therefore potentially correspond to the spatial extents of landforms such as drumlins. However, this depends on the segmentation algorithm, the parameterization, and the LSPs. In the present study we assess the widely used multiresolution segmentation (MRS) algorithm for its potential in providing terrain segments which delimit drumlins. Supervised testing was based on five 5-m DEMs that represented a set of 173 synthetic drumlins at random but representative positions in the same landscape. Five LSPs were tested, and four variants were computed for each LSP to assess the impact of median filtering of DEMs, and logarithmic transformation of LSPs. The testing scheme (1) employs MRS to partition each LSP exhaustively into 200 coarser scales of terrain segments by increasing the scale parameter (SP), (2) identifies the spatially best matching terrain segment for each reference drumlin, and (3) computes four segmentation accuracy metrics for quantifying the overall spatial match between drumlin segments and reference drumlins. Results of 100 tests showed that MRS tends to perform best on LSPs that are regionally derived from filtered DEMs, and then log-transformed. MRS delineated 97% of the detected drumlins at SP values between 1 and 50. Drumlin delimitation rates with values up to 50% are in line with the success of manual interpretations. Synthetic DEMs are well-suited for assessing landform quantification methods such as MRS, since subjectivity in the reference data is avoided which increases the

  5. Testing 3D landform quantification methods with synthetic drumlins in a real digital elevation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, John K.; Smith, Mike J.

    2012-06-01

    Metrics such as height and volume quantifying the 3D morphology of landforms are important observations that reflect and constrain Earth surface processes. Errors in such measurements are, however, poorly understood. A novel approach, using statistically valid ‘synthetic' landscapes to quantify the errors is presented. The utility of the approach is illustrated using a case study of 184 drumlins observed in Scotland as quantified from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) by the ‘cookie cutter' extraction method. To create the synthetic DEMs, observed drumlins were removed from the measured DEM and replaced by elongate 3D Gaussian ones of equivalent dimensions positioned randomly with respect to the ‘noise' (e.g. trees) and regional trends (e.g. hills) that cause the errors. Then, errors in the cookie cutter extraction method were investigated by using it to quantify these ‘synthetic' drumlins, whose location and size is known. Thus, the approach determines which key metrics are recovered accurately. For example, mean height of 6.8 m is recovered poorly at 12.5 ± 0.6 (2σ) m, but mean volume is recovered correctly. Additionally, quantification methods can be compared: A variant on the cookie cutter using an un-tensioned spline induced about twice (× 1.79) as much error. Finally, a previously reportedly statistically significant (p = 0.007) difference in mean volume between sub-populations of different ages, which may reflect formational processes, is demonstrated to be only 30-50% likely to exist in reality. Critically, the synthetic DEMs are demonstrated to realistically model parameter recovery, primarily because they are still almost entirely the original landscape. Results are insensitive to the exact method used to create the synthetic DEMs, and the approach could be readily adapted to assess a variety of landforms (e.g. craters, dunes and volcanoes).

  6. Assessment of multiresolution segmentation for delimiting drumlins in digital elevation models

    PubMed Central

    Eisank, Clemens; Smith, Mike; Hillier, John

    2014-01-01

    Mapping or “delimiting” landforms is one of geomorphology's primary tools. Computer-based techniques such as land-surface segmentation allow the emulation of the process of manual landform delineation. Land-surface segmentation exhaustively subdivides a digital elevation model (DEM) into morphometrically-homogeneous irregularly-shaped regions, called terrain segments. Terrain segments can be created from various land-surface parameters (LSP) at multiple scales, and may therefore potentially correspond to the spatial extents of landforms such as drumlins. However, this depends on the segmentation algorithm, the parameterization, and the LSPs. In the present study we assess the widely used multiresolution segmentation (MRS) algorithm for its potential in providing terrain segments which delimit drumlins. Supervised testing was based on five 5-m DEMs that represented a set of 173 synthetic drumlins at random but representative positions in the same landscape. Five LSPs were tested, and four variants were computed for each LSP to assess the impact of median filtering of DEMs, and logarithmic transformation of LSPs. The testing scheme (1) employs MRS to partition each LSP exhaustively into 200 coarser scales of terrain segments by increasing the scale parameter (SP), (2) identifies the spatially best matching terrain segment for each reference drumlin, and (3) computes four segmentation accuracy metrics for quantifying the overall spatial match between drumlin segments and reference drumlins. Results of 100 tests showed that MRS tends to perform best on LSPs that are regionally derived from filtered DEMs, and then log-transformed. MRS delineated 97% of the detected drumlins at SP values between 1 and 50. Drumlin delimitation rates with values up to 50% are in line with the success of manual interpretations. Synthetic DEMs are well-suited for assessing landform quantification methods such as MRS, since subjectivity in the reference data is avoided which increases the

  7. Assessment of multiresolution segmentation for delimiting drumlins in digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Eisank, Clemens; Smith, Mike; Hillier, John

    2014-06-01

    Mapping or "delimiting" landforms is one of geomorphology's primary tools. Computer-based techniques such as land-surface segmentation allow the emulation of the process of manual landform delineation. Land-surface segmentation exhaustively subdivides a digital elevation model (DEM) into morphometrically-homogeneous irregularly-shaped regions, called terrain segments. Terrain segments can be created from various land-surface parameters (LSP) at multiple scales, and may therefore potentially correspond to the spatial extents of landforms such as drumlins. However, this depends on the segmentation algorithm, the parameterization, and the LSPs. In the present study we assess the widely used multiresolution segmentation (MRS) algorithm for its potential in providing terrain segments which delimit drumlins. Supervised testing was based on five 5-m DEMs that represented a set of 173 synthetic drumlins at random but representative positions in the same landscape. Five LSPs were tested, and four variants were computed for each LSP to assess the impact of median filtering of DEMs, and logarithmic transformation of LSPs. The testing scheme (1) employs MRS to partition each LSP exhaustively into 200 coarser scales of terrain segments by increasing the scale parameter (SP), (2) identifies the spatially best matching terrain segment for each reference drumlin, and (3) computes four segmentation accuracy metrics for quantifying the overall spatial match between drumlin segments and reference drumlins. Results of 100 tests showed that MRS tends to perform best on LSPs that are regionally derived from filtered DEMs, and then log-transformed. MRS delineated 97% of the detected drumlins at SP values between 1 and 50. Drumlin delimitation rates with values up to 50% are in line with the success of manual interpretations. Synthetic DEMs are well-suited for assessing landform quantification methods such as MRS, since subjectivity in the reference data is avoided which increases the

  8. Digital elevation model based geomorphological mapping in the lower River Boyne valley, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Gez; Turner, Jonathan; Gallagher, Colman; Lewis, Helen

    2010-05-01

    Interpretation of digital elevation models (DEMs) is rapidly becoming a valuable extension to field-based geomorphic mapping. High-resolution LiDAR data (Light Detection and Ranging; point spacing 1m, vertical accuracy 0.1m) is ideally-suited for mapping areas of complex and subtle geomorphology, such as fluvial landscapes. This poster outlines how LiDAR data are being used to map and characterise the postglacial fluvial terraces of the lower Boyne valley, Co. Meath, Ireland. Comprehensive mapping, together with longitudinal profiles, demonstrate that the valley contains a suite, or ‘staircase', of six main fluvial terraces, spanning an altitude range of ca. 20m. These terraces represent a chronosequence of ‘palaeo' floodplains, with the highest (T1) being the oldest level, and the lowest (T6) the youngest. The evolution of the valley has thus involved progressive erosion, punctuated by episodes of vertical stability or re-filling. Classified maps of the river terrace sequence indicate that terrace T1 is closely associated with glacial landforms, while T2 exhibits multiple channels with large bar-forms, and could mark a braided river system that conveyed huge water and sediment loads during deglaciation ca. 20-17 ka BP. The ‘modern' floodplain (T6) is ubiquitous, and preliminary field studies have dated two of its palaeochannels to >1,000 cal. BP. The LiDAR based model of geomorphic evolution in the lower Boyne valley is being used to underpin field-based geomorphological and sediment studies, focusing on the acquisition of OSL and radiocarbon dates to secure the timing of river terrace formation and to assess the relationships between fluvial development and environmental change since the Late Glacial period.

  9. Digital Elevation Models Aid the Analysis of Flows at Hrad Vallis, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Hamilton, C.; Garbeil, H.

    2015-12-01

    We have identified several landforms in the Hrad Vallis region of Mars (33.0o - 35.5oN, 216o - 218oW), which suggest that this area was covered by an ice sheet concurrent with volcanic eruptions. Using digital elevation models derived from High Resolution Imaging Science (HiRISE) and Context Camera (CTX) data, a reexamination of the area reveals a complex history including flow inflation and topographic control by transient topographic barriers. Among Amazonian-age outflow channels, Hrad Vallis is exceptional as it exhibits good evidence of magma/water interactions. It is inferred to have formed in association with a shallow igneous sill that melted part of the martian cryosphere and/or released water from an extensive aquifer to produce enormous lahar-like mud flows. Exposed ~30 m high dikes, 20 m high eroded mounds, and flow paths that are inconsistent with present-day topographic gradients, lead us to speculate that this area was covered by at least ~40 m of material (eolian deposits or ice) at the time of volcanic dike intrusion and flow emplacement. This material was subsequently removed leaving no clear morphologic signs (e.g., wind streaks, if eolian material; moraines, if ice). We favor the ice model because if this area was once ice-covered, it offers a plausible mode of formation (as pingoes) for some enigmatic 30 m high domes in the vicinity. At least one 120 km long flow from Hrad Vallis was emplaced as a pahoehoe-like flow that was confined by topographic obstacles and subsequently inflated to thickness of ~45 m. Although the direct relationship between this flow and Hrad Vallis remains to be determined, the inflated flow suggests a longer period of eruption/emplacement at a slower effusion rate than was previously believed.

  10. Combining MESSENGER Data in Production and Analysis of Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Howington-Kraus, E.; Thomas, O. H.; Neumann, G. A.; Mazarico, E.; Kirk, R. L.; Weller, L. A.; Edmundson, K. L.; Stephens, J. S.; Sawyers, R. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is combining image and laser altimetry data of Mercury acquired from instruments on the MESSENGER [1] spacecraft for the production and analysis of digital elevation models (DEMs). Precise image measurements that tie Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) [2] point data to Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) [3] stereo pairs are obtained using the SOCET SET (®BAE Systems) digital photogrammetry software suite. These measurements will be added to existing Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers [4] control networks used to produce global cartographic basemaps and a global DEM [5]. The MLA points serve as three-dimensional control points in a least-squares bundle adjustment [6] that improves image attitude and/or position parameters and generates improved triangulated ground coordinates for all tie and control points. The resulting point cloud is used to create an updated global DEM controlled to the MLA data. The MLA-to-MDIS image comparison also provides the boresight relationship between the two instruments. For quality assurance, several regional DEMs are created with SOCET SET for selected sites on Mercury that provide variation in terrain and observation conditions. These sites are used in the analysis and comparison of DEMs produced with a variety of methods and data sources (photogrammetry, photoclinometry, stereo techniques, and MLA), similar to comparisons that have been done for HRSC [7] and LRO [8] DEMs. Ultimately orthorectified cartographic products will be created by projecting MDIS images using the highest quality shape model available. [1] Solomon, S.C. et al., 2001. The MESSENGER mission to Mercury: Scientific objectives and implementation, Planet. Space Sci., 49, 1445-1465. [2] Zuber, M.T. et al., 2011. Orbital observations of Mercury with the Mercury Laser Altimeter, EPSC-DPS Joint Meeting, 6, abstract EPSC-DPS2011-278. [3] Hawkins, S.E. III et al., 2007. The Mercury Dual Imaging System on the MESSENGER spacecraft

  11. The use of UAV to document sloping landscapes to produce digital elevation models to examine environmental degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Themistocleous, K.; Agapiou, A.; Papadavid, G.; Christoforou, M.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper focuses on the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) over the study area of Pissouri in Cyprus to document the sloping landscapes of the area. The study area has been affected by overgrazing, which has led to shifts in the vegetation patterns and changing microtopography of the soil. The UAV images were used to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) to examine the changes in microtopography. Next to that orthophotos were used to detect changes in vegetation patterns. The combined data of the digital elevation models and the orthophotos will be used to detect the occurrence of catastrophic shifts and mechanisms for desertification in the study area due to overgrazing. This study is part of the "CASCADE- Catastrophic shifts in dryland" project.

  12. A new method for the determination of flow directions and upslope areas in grid digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarboton, David G.

    A new procedure for the representation of flow directions and calculation of upslope areas using rectangular grid digital elevation models is presented. The procedure is based on representing flow direction as a single angle taken as the steepest downward slope on the eight triangular facets centered at each grid point. Upslope area is then calculated by proportioning flow between two downslope pixels according to how close this flow direction is to the direct angle to the downslope pixel. This procedure offers improvements over prior procedures that have restricted flow to eight possible directions (introducing grid bias) or proportioned flow according to slope (introducing unrealistic dispersion). The new procedure is more robust than prior procedures based on fitting local planes while retaining a simple grid based structure. Detailed algorithms are presented and results are demonstrated through test examples and application to digital elevation data sets.

  13. The Importance of Precise Digital Elevation Models (DEM) in Modelling Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Gokben; Akyurek, Zuhal

    2016-04-01

    Digital elevation Models (DEM) are important inputs for topography for the accurate modelling of floodplain hydrodynamics. Floodplains have a key role as natural retarding pools which attenuate flood waves and suppress flood peaks. GPS, LIDAR and bathymetric surveys are well known surveying methods to acquire topographic data. It is not only time consuming and expensive to obtain topographic data through surveying but also sometimes impossible for remote areas. In this study it is aimed to present the importance of accurate modelling of topography for flood modelling. The flood modelling for Samsun-Terme in Blacksea region of Turkey is done. One of the DEM is obtained from the point observations retrieved from 1/5000 scaled orthophotos and 1/1000 scaled point elevation data from field surveys at x-sections. The river banks are corrected by using the orthophotos and elevation values. This DEM is named as scaled DEM. The other DEM is obtained from bathymetric surveys. 296 538 number of points and the left/right bank slopes were used to construct the DEM having 1 m spatial resolution and this DEM is named as base DEM. Two DEMs were compared by using 27 x-sections. The maximum difference at thalweg of the river bed is 2m and the minimum difference is 20 cm between two DEMs. The channel conveyance capacity in base DEM is larger than the one in scaled DEM and floodplain is modelled in detail in base DEM. MIKE21 with flexible grid is used in 2- dimensional shallow water flow modelling. The model by using two DEMs were calibrated for a flood event (July 9, 2012). The roughness is considered as the calibration parameter. From comparison of input hydrograph at the upstream of the river and output hydrograph at the downstream of the river, the attenuation is obtained as 91% and 84% for the base DEM and scaled DEM, respectively. The time lag in hydrographs does not show any difference for two DEMs and it is obtained as 3 hours. Maximum flood extents differ for the two DEMs

  14. Digital Elevation Models of the Earth derived from space-based observations: Advances and potential for geomorphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouratidis, Antonios

    2013-04-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are an inherently interdisciplinary topic, both due to their production and validation methods, as well as their significance for numerous disciplines. The most utilized contemporary topographic datasets worldwide are those of global DEMs. Several space-based sources have been used for the production of (almost) global DEMs, namely satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Interferometry/InSAR, stereoscopy of multispectral satellite images and altimetry, producing several versions of autonomous or mixed products (i.e. SRTM, ACE, ASTER-GDEM). Complementary space-based observations, such as those of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), are also used, mainly for validation purposes. The apparent positive impact of these elevation datasets so far has been consolidated by the plethora of related scientific, civil and military applications. Topography is a prominent element for almost all Earth sciences, but in Geomorphology it is even more fundamental. In geomorphological studies, elevation data and thus DEMs can be extensively used for the extraction of both qualitative and quantitative information, such as relief classification, determination of slope and slope orientation, delineation of drainage basins, extraction of drainage networks and much more. Global DEMs are constantly becoming finer, i.e. of higher spatial resolution and more "sensitive" to elevation changes, i.e. of higher vertical accuracy and these progresses are undoubtedly considered as a major breakthrough, each time a new improved global DEM is released. Nevertheless, for Geomorphology in particular, if not already there, we are close to the point in time, where the need for discrimination between DSM (Digital Surface Model) and DTM (Digital Terrain Model) is becoming critical; if the distinction between vegetation and man-made structures on one side (DSM), and actual terrain elevation on the other side (DTM) cannot be made, then, in many cases, any further

  15. Digital Elevation Models From ground-Based GPS As Validation For Satellite Altimetry On The Greenland Inland Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, Manfred; Hepperle, Jorg; Rawiel, Paul

    2011-02-01

    A long-term geodetic project on the Greenland inland ice is performed in order to determine elevations, elevation change, flow velocity, and deformation of the ice surface in the western part of the Greenland ice sheet. There are two main research areas: Swiss Camp (ETH/CU-Camp) which was started in 1991, and ST2, started in 2004. Until 2008 a total of 10 measuring campaigns were carried out at Swiss Camp. The 3D-coordinates of the snow and ice surfaces were measured by ground-based static and kinematical GPS survey. As a result very precise digital elevation models of the research areas are available. The digital terrain models can be used as ground control areas for satellite altimetry. As an example, they were used for validation of ICESat satellite elevation data. Height comparisons along one track show in average a discrepancy of 0.13 m ± 0.06 m. Due to their very high accuracy, the measured areas can also be used as control areas for CryoSat. The next field measurements are planned in summer 2011. The location of the ground measurements will be coordinated with predicted tracks for CryoSat.

  16. The effects of digital elevation model resolution on the calculation and predictions of topographic wetness indices.

    SciTech Connect

    Drover, Damion, Ryan

    2011-12-01

    One of the largest exports in the Southeast U.S. is forest products. Interest in biofuels using forest biomass has increased recently, leading to more research into better forest management BMPs. The USDA Forest Service, along with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Georgia and Oregon State University are researching the impacts of intensive forest management for biofuels on water quality and quantity at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Surface runoff of saturated areas, transporting excess nutrients and contaminants, is a potential water quality issue under investigation. Detailed maps of variable source areas and soil characteristics would therefore be helpful prior to treatment. The availability of remotely sensed and computed digital elevation models (DEMs) and spatial analysis tools make it easy to calculate terrain attributes. These terrain attributes can be used in models to predict saturated areas or other attributes in the landscape. With laser altimetry, an area can be flown to produce very high resolution data, and the resulting data can be resampled into any resolution of DEM desired. Additionally, there exist many maps that are in various resolutions of DEM, such as those acquired from the U.S. Geological Survey. Problems arise when using maps derived from different resolution DEMs. For example, saturated areas can be under or overestimated depending on the resolution used. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of DEM resolution on the calculation of topographic wetness indices used to predict variable source areas of saturation, and to find the best resolutions to produce prediction maps of soil attributes like nitrogen, carbon, bulk density and soil texture for low-relief, humid-temperate forested hillslopes. Topographic wetness indices were calculated based on the derived terrain attributes, slope and specific catchment area, from five different DEM resolutions. The DEMs were resampled from LiDAR, which is a

  17. Digital Elevation Models Aid the Analysis of Double Layered Ejecta (DLE) Impact Craters on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Boyce, J. M.; Garbeil, H.

    2014-12-01

    Considerable debate has recently taken place concerning the origin of the inner and outer ejecta layers of double layered ejecta (DLE) craters on Mars. For craters in the diameter range ~10 to ~25 km, the inner ejecta layer of DLE craters displays characteristic grooves extending from the rim crest, and has led investigators to propose three hypotheses for their formation: (1) deposition of the primary ejecta and subsequent surface scouring by either atmospheric vortices or a base surge; (2) emplacement through a landslide of the near-rim crest ejecta; and (3) instabilities (similar to Gortler vortices) generated by high flow-rate, and high granular temperatures. Critical to resolving between these models is the topographic expression of both the ejecta layer and the groove geometry. To address this problem, we have made several digital elevation models (DEMs) from CTX and HiRISE stereo pairs using the Ames Stereo Pipeline at scales of 24 m/pixel and 1 m/pixel, respectively. These DEMs allow several key observations to be made that bear directly upon the origin of the grooves associated with DLE craters: (1) Grooves formed on the sloping ejecta layer surfaces right up to the preserved crater rim; (2) There is clear evidence that grooves traverse the topographic boundary between the inner and outer ejecta layers; and (3) There are at least two different sets of radial grooves, with smaller grooves imprinted upon the larger grooves. There are "deep-wide" grooves that have a width of ~200 m and a depth of ~10 m, and there are "shallow-narrow" grooves with a width of <50 m and depth <5 m. These two scales of grooves are not consistent with their formation analogous to a landslide. Two different sets of grooves would imply that, simultaneously, two different depths to the flow would have to exist if the grooves were formed by shear within the flow, something that is not physically possible. All three observations can only be consistent with a model of groove formation

  18. Stable isotopes and Digital Elevation Models to study nutrient inputs in high-Arctic lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calizza, Edoardo; Rossi, David; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Careddu, Giulio; Rossi, Loreto

    2016-04-01

    Ice cover, run-off from the watershed, aquatic and terrestrial primary productivity, guano deposition from birds are key factors controlling nutrient and organic matter inputs in high-Arctic lakes. All these factors are expected to be significantly affected by climate change. Quantifying these controls is a key baseline step to understand what combination of factors subtends the biological productivity in Arctic lakes and will drive their ecological response to environmental change. Basing on Digital Elevation Models, drainage maps, and C and N elemental content and stable isotope analysis in sediments, aquatic vegetation and a dominant macroinvertebrate species (Lepidurus arcticus Pallas 1973) belonging to Tvillingvatnet, Storvatnet and Kolhamna, three lakes located in North Spitsbergen (Svalbard), we propose an integrated approach for the analysis of (i) nutrient and organic matter inputs in lakes; (ii) the role of catchment hydro-geomorphology in determining inter-lake differences in the isotopic composition of sediments; (iii) effects of diverse nutrient inputs on the isotopic niche of Lepidurus arcticus. Given its high run-off and large catchment, organic deposits in Tvillingvatnet where dominated by terrestrial inputs, whereas inputs were mainly of aquatic origin in Storvatnet, a lowland lake with low potential run-off. In Kolhamna, organic deposits seem to be dominated by inputs from birds, which actually colonise the area. Isotopic signatures were similar between samples within each lake, representing precise tracers for studies on the effect of climate change on biogeochemical cycles in lakes. The isotopic niche of L. aricticus reflected differences in sediments between lakes, suggesting a bottom-up effect of hydro-geomorphology characterizing each lake on nutrients assimilated by this species. The presented approach proven to be an effective research pathway for the identification of factors subtending to nutrient and organic matter inputs and transfer

  19. Calibration of Watershed Lag Time Equation for Philippine Hydrology using RADARSAT Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriano, F. R.; Lagmay, A. M. A.; Horritt, M.; Mendoza, J.; Sabio, G.; Punay, K. N.; Taniza, H. J.; Uichanco, C.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread flooding is a major problem in the Philippines. The country experiences heavy amount of rainfall throughout the year and several areas are prone to flood hazards because of its unique topography. Human casualties and destruction of infrastructure are just some of the damages caused by flooding and the Philippine government has undertaken various efforts to mitigate these hazards. One of the solutions was to create flood hazard maps of different floodplains and use them to predict the possible catastrophic results of different rain scenarios. To produce these maps with accurate output, different input parameters were needed and one of those is calculating hydrological components from topographical data. This paper presents how a calibrated lag time (TL) equation was obtained using measurable catchment parameters. Lag time is an essential input in flood mapping and is defined as the duration between the peak rainfall and peak discharge of the watershed. The lag time equation involves three measurable parameters, namely, watershed length (L), maximum potential retention (S) derived from the curve number, and watershed slope (Y), all of which were available from RADARSAT Digital Elevation Models (DEM). This approach was based on a similar method developed by CH2M Hill and Horritt for Taiwan, which has a similar set of meteorological and hydrological parameters with the Philippines. Rainfall data from fourteen water level sensors covering 67 storms from all the regions in the country were used to estimate the actual lag time. These sensors were chosen by using a screening process that considers the distance of the sensors from the sea, the availability of recorded data, and the catchment size. The actual lag time values were plotted against the values obtained from the Natural Resource Conservation Management handbook lag time equation. Regression analysis was used to obtain the final calibrated equation that would be used to calculate the lag time

  20. Geomorphic Map of Worcester County, Maryland, Interpreted from a LIDAR-Based, Digital Elevation Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newell, Wayne L.; Clark, Inga

    2008-01-01

    A recently compiled mosaic of a LIDAR-based digital elevation model (DEM) is presented with geomorphic analysis of new macro-topographic details. The geologic framework of the surficial and near surface late Cenozoic deposits of the central uplands, Pocomoke River valley, and the Atlantic Coast includes Cenozoic to recent sediments from fluvial, estuarine, and littoral depositional environments. Extensive Pleistocene (cold climate) sandy dune fields are deposited over much of the terraced landscape. The macro details from the LIDAR image reveal 2 meter-scale resolution of details of the shapes of individual dunes, and fields of translocated sand sheets. Most terrace surfaces are overprinted with circular to elliptical rimmed basins that represent complex histories of ephemeral ponds that were formed, drained, and overprinted by younger basins. The terrains of composite ephemeral ponds and the dune fields are inter-shingled at their margins indicating contemporaneous erosion, deposition, and re-arrangement and possible internal deformation of the surficial deposits. The aggregate of these landform details and their deposits are interpreted as the products of arid, cold climate processes that were common to the mid-Atlantic region during the Last Glacial Maximum. In the Pocomoke valley and its larger tributaries, erosional remnants of sandy flood plains with anastomosing channels indicate the dynamics of former hydrology and sediment load of the watershed that prevailed at the end of the Pleistocene. As the climate warmed and precipitation increased during the transition from late Pleistocene to Holocene, dune fields were stabilized by vegetation, and the stream discharge increased. The increased discharge and greater local relief of streams graded to lower sea levels stimulated down cutting and created the deeply incised valleys out onto the continental shelf. These incised valleys have been filling with fluvial to intertidal deposits that record the rising sea

  1. High-resolution digital elevation models of the Flade Iceblink feature in NE Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. J.; Juntunen, T.; Porter, C. C.; Morin, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    We produce a time series of high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) to examine the recent evolution of an 8.7 km2 sub-glacial lake collapse feature near the southern summit of the 8500 km2 Flade Isblink Ice Cap (FIIC) in northeastern Greenland [Figure 1]. Visible imagery from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) indicates the collapse occurred between August 16th and September 6th, 2011 at the site of a recurring moulin. DEMs are extracted using the NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline for the period between June 2012 and late 2013 from 0.5 m resolution along-track stereo image pairs available via the NGA commercial imagery program. The DEMs are compared to a 1996 ERS InSAR derived DEM [Palmer et al., 2010], and to a contemporary airborne laser altimeter swath flown by NASA Icebridge in mid-April 2013 to derive the volume of the feature and the uncertainties on the high-resolution DEMs. The 'mitten' shaped feature is bounded by crevasses on three sides, with a shallow ramp to the south. It is ~70 m deep, 3.7 km north-to-south and 3 km east-to-west and has a volume of ~0.3 km3. Ice penetrating radar from a nearby Icebridge mission in May 2011, indicates the ice is approximately 550 m thick and that the bed is very flat and smooth about 1 km to the southeast of the feature. The nearby bed topography, local geology and lack of recorded seismicity in the area indicate it is unlikely that the feature is the result of either subglacial volcanic activity or the collapse of a limestone karst feature below the ice cap - the neighboring Princess Elizabeth Alps are composed of 420 Ma Caledonide fold belt gneisses. The presence of recurring supraglacial meltwater streams and drainage into the feature, its rapid formation and its steep sided nature instead suggest that it formed during the rapid drainage of a sub-glacial lake - which is, as far as we are aware, the first recorded instance of such an occurrence in Greenland. Meltwater observed using 250 m

  2. Analysis of the influence of the digital elevation model characteristics on hydrodynamic simulations: the case of the Tagus River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Ana Paula; Pestana, Rita; Matias, Magda P.; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Heleno, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    Floods are one of the major and hazardous natural events, with the potential to cause fatalities, displacement of people and damage to the environment, to severely compromise economic development and to undermine the economic activities, as the Floods Directive of the European Union clearly recalls (Directive 2007/60/EC). This Directive establishes a framework for the assessment and management of flood risks. As such, it relies on hydrodynamic simulation of floods. For this a single digital elevation model valid for the whole study area is a requirement and its construction usually implies the use of topographic and bathymetric data collected by distinct equipment and methods, at different times and acquired with a variety of spatial resolutions and accuracies. In this paper we present a comparison of hydrodynamic simulation results, in flood extension and water elevation level, of a Tagus River flood event cover the period between 5pm of December 29th, 2000 until 1am of January 9th, 2001, by using the combined digital elevation model resampled at a cell size of 15m, 30m and 50m. The study area is a section of 70 km of the Tagus River, between Tramagal and Santarém. The Tagus River is the longest of the Iberian Peninsula and is responsible for periodical floods in one of the most important agricultural areas in Portugal. For this area a digital elevation model acquired in 2008 by advanced interferometric techniques is available (5m of spatial resolution), accurate in the floodplain area but with no information in river channel since the radar signal has no ability to penetrate into water, and 29 cross-sections acquired by eco-sounder equipment in 2012, with 3km intervals are available. In order to analyse and validate those differences, a dataset with SAR imagery, provided by ESA, and the water levels measured at Almourol hydrometric station were used.

  3. Topographic analysis for tectonic geomorphology using digital image processing of elevation data from the Mississippi embayment and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Image processing of digital elevation data provides a framework within which to evaluate the relative importance of tectonic and erosional signatures on the landscape. Shaded relief imaging of the elevation data illuminates regional topographic features coincident with the physiographic provinces bounding the Mississippi embayment portion of the Coastal Plain: the Ozark Plateaus and Ouachitas on the west, the Central Lowland on the north, and the Interior Low Plateaus on the east. Grayscale or colors from custom color lookup tables are assigned based on elevation. Stretching can be used to enhance a particular elevation range while spatial convolution kernels can be used to provide a robust and rapid means of designing high- and low-pass filters for the purpose of restricting the frequency range examined. Thresholding the elevation ranges and assigning boundaries of the resultant binary images allow for the rapid delineation of topographic contour lines and permits quantization of planform geometry. Forty one-degree by 30-minute quadrangles have been imaged for the purpose of delineating topographic features of possible tectonic origin.

  4. Elevation contours of the bedrock surface, North Platte 1- by 2-degree Quadrangle, Nebraska, digitized from a published 1:250,000-scale geologic map

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Ronald B.

    1995-01-01

    A geologic map showing the configuration of the bedrock surface for the North Platte, Nebraska, 1- by 2-degree quadrangle was published at a scale of 1:250,000 in 1991. This report describes the conversion of the bedrock-surface elevation map into a digital geographic data set and includes those data at a nominal scale of 1:500,000. A film separation of the published elevation contours was scanned to produce a file of digital graphics data. The digital graphics data were processed further to produce a digital geographic data set. Geographic feature attributes and data-set documentation also are included in the digital data set. The digital geographic data are formatted for distribution in accordance with the Spatial Data Transfer Standard approved by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  5. Optimization of computer-based technology of creating large reservoir's Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikunova, Ekaterina; Pavlovsky, Andrew; Zemlyanov, Igor; Gorelits, Olga

    2010-05-01

    Using Digital Elevation Model of bottom and coastal zone for large-scale anthropogenic water reservoirs is very important for sustainable water management in actual conditions of Global Climate Change. DEM is unified monitoring base for different types of reservoirs in varied types of ecosystems in various environmental and economical conditions. It may be used for getting current morphometric characteristics, pollution and biodiversity analysis, monitoring bottom relief changing and making management decisions. In 2008-2009 State Oceanography Institute (SOI) carried out the DEMs for reservoirs of Volga river system. In 2008 in SOI was created DEM of Uglichsky reservoir, which is typical Russian reservoir. Methodology and computer-based technology were developed and evaluated. In 2009 in SOI were created DEMs of Gorkovsky, Volgogradsky and six reservoirs of Moscow region. Such result was achieved by optimization of DEM's creating process. Initially we used complex of GIS programs, which include GIS Map-2008 Panorama, ArcMap v.9.3.1, ArcView v.3.2a, Golden Surfer v.8, Global Mapper v.10. The input data are bathymetric survey data, large-scale maps (scale 1:10 000, 1:25 000) and remote sensing data of high resolution. Office analysis consists of several main milestones. 1. Vectorization of coastline and relief data from maps and remote sensing data using GIS Map-2008 by Panorama; ArcView v.3.2a. 2. Maps data elaboration with using bathymetric survey data. Because some maps are longstanding it is necessary to renew them. 3. Creating point's array including all data from maps, RSD and bathymetric survey. 4. Separation small calculation zones including four survey cross-sections. 5. Determine of anisotropy parameters, which depend on channel orientation. 6. Create shapes for clipping of correct grid zones. Each shape includes 2 cross-sections. Milestones 2-6 realize in ArcView v.3.2a. 7. Creating grid's array using Golden Surfer v.8 for each zone by interpolation method

  6. Determining the Suitability of Different Digital Elevation Models and Satellite Images for Fancy Maps. An Example of Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drachal, J.; Kawel, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    The article describes the possibility of developing an overall map of the selected area on the basis of publicly available data. Such a map would take the form designed by the author with the colors that meets his expectations and a content, which he considers to be appropriate. Among the data available it was considered the use of satellite images of the terrain in real colors and, in the form of shaded relief, digital terrain models with different resolutions of the terrain mesh. Specifically the considered data were: MODIS, Landsat 8, GTOPO-30, SRTM-30, SRTM-1, SRTM-3, ASTER. For the test area the island of Cyprus was chosen because of the importance in tourism, a relatively small area and a clearly defined boundary. In the paper there are shown and discussed various options of the Cyprus terrain image obtained synthetically from variants of Modis, Landsat and digital elevation models of different resolutions.

  7. Synergetic merging of Cartosat-1 and RAMP to generate improved digital elevation model of Schirmacher oasis, east Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawak, S. D.; Luis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Available digital elevation models (DEMs) of Antarctic region generated by using radar altimetry and the Antarctic digital database (ADD) indicate elevation variations of up to hundreds of meters, which necessitates the generation of local DEM and its validation by using ground reference. An enhanced digital elevation model (eDEM) of the Schirmacher oasis region, east Antarctica, is generated synergistically by using Cartosat-1 stereo pair-derived photogrammetric DEM (CartoDEM)-based point elevation dataset and multitemporal radarsat Antarctic mapping project version 2 (RAMPv2) DEM-based point elevation dataset. In this study, we analyzed suite of interpolation techniques for constructing a DEM from RAMPv2 and CartoDEM-based point elevation datasets, in order to determine the level of confidence with which the interpolation techniques can generate a better interpolated continuous surface, and eventually improves the elevation accuracy of DEM from synergistically fused RAMPv2 and CartoDEM point elevation datasets. RAMPv2 points and CartoDEM points were used as primary data for various interpolation techniques such as ordinary kriging (OK), simple kriging (SK), universal kriging (UK), disjunctive kriging (DK) techniques, inverse distance weighted (IDW), global polynomial (GP) with power 1 and 2, local polynomial (LP) and radial basis functions (RBF). Cokriging of 2 variables with second dataset was used for ordinary cokriging (OCoK), simple cokriging (SCoK), universal cokriging (UCoK) and disjunctive cokriging (DCoK). The IDW, GP, LP, RBF, and kriging methods were applied to one variable, while Cokriging experiments were employed on two variables. The experiment of dataset and its combination produced two types of point elevation map categorized as (1) one variable (RAMPv2 Point maps and CartoDEM Point maps) and (2) two variables (RAMPv2 Point maps + CartoDEM Point maps). Interpolated surfaces were evaluated with the help of differential global positioning system

  8. Appraisal of digital terrain elevation data for low-altitude flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, Richard E.; Swenson, Harry N.

    1992-01-01

    The use of terrain elevation databases in advanced guidance and navigation systems has greatly expanded. However, the limitations and accuracies of these databases must be considered and established prior to safe system flight evaluation. A simple approach to quantify reasonable flight limits is presented and evaluated for a helicopter guidance system dependent on a terrain database. The flight test evaluated involved a helicopter equipped with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and radar altimeter, and a ground station GPS receiver which provided improved helicopter positioning. The precision navigation and radar altimeter data was acquired while flying low-altitude missions in south-central Pennsylvania. The aircraft-determined terrain elevations were compared with the terrain predicted by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) Level 1 terrain elevation data for the same area. The results suggest a safe set clearance altitude of 220 ft for flight testing of a DMA-based guidance avionic in the same area.

  9. A computational-grid based system for continental drainage network extraction using SRTM digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curkendall, David W.; Fielding, Eric J.; Pohl, Josef M.; Cheng, Tsan-Huei

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new effort for the computation of elevation derivatives using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) results. Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) SRTM has produced a near global database of highly accurate elevation data. The scope of this database enables computing precise stream drainage maps and other derivatives on Continental scales. We describe a computing architecture for this computationally very complex task based on NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG), a distributed high performance computing network based on the GLOBUS infrastructure. The SRTM data characteristics and unique problems they present are discussed. A new algorithm for organizing the conventional extraction algorithms [1] into a cooperating parallel grid is presented as an essential component to adapt to the IPG computing structure. Preliminary results are presented for a Southern California test area, established for comparing SRTM and its results against those produced using the USGS National Elevation Data (NED) model.

  10. On the methods for the construction of seabed digital elevation models (using the example of the White Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, S. L.; Koshel, S. M.; Frol, V. V.; Popov, O. E.; Levchenko, O. V.

    2015-03-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) of the White Sea has been constructed based on navigational maps on different scales. The maps have been scanned, and their raster images have been processed. The isobaths have been vectorized, and attribute tables have been created. The vector layers have been transformed from map projections to geographical coordinates. The sheets have been edited and stapled. The geometry and attributes have been corrected. When constructing a DEM, it is important to choose an algorithm that will make it possible to maintain the bed forms expressed in the raw isobaths with maximum detail in the model. An original algorithm developed and implemented by the authors is used. It is based on the fast computation of the distances to the two nearest isobaths at different levels. Its main feature is the interpretation of the contour lines as linear vector objects. The comparison of the depths based on the constructed seabed DEM with depths measured during echo sounding in natural conditions shows their good agreement. Currently, not only the constructed seabed digital elevation model but also methodical and methodological bases of numerical simulations, including the new classification approaches to the terrain description, are relevant.

  11. Catchment properties in the Kruger National Park derived from the new TanDEM-X Intermediate Digital Elevation Model (IDEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, J.; Schmullius, C.

    2015-04-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEM) represent fundamental data for a wide range of Earth surface process studies. Over the past years the German TanDEM-X mission acquired data for a new, truly global Digital Elevation Model with unpreceded geometric resolution, precision and accuracy. First processed data sets (i. e. IDEM) with a geometric resolution of 0.4 to 3 arcsec have been made available for scientific purposes. This includes four 1° x 1° tiles covering the Kruger National Park in South Africa. Here we document the results of a local scale IDEM validation exercise utilizing RTK-GNSS-based ground survey points from a dried out reservoir basin and its vicinity characterized by pristine open Savanna vegetation. Selected precursor data sets (SRTM1, SRTM90, ASTER-GDEM2) were included in the analysis and highlight the immense progress in satellite-based Earth surface surveying over the past two decades. Surprisingly, the high precision and accuracy of the IDEM data sets have only little impact on the delineation of watersheds and the calculation of catchment size. But, when it comes to the derivation of topographic catchment properties (e.g. mean slope, etc.) the high resolution of the IDEM04 is of crucial importance, if - from a geomorphologist's view - it was not for the disturbing vegetation.

  12. Application of the Shuttle Laser Altimeter in an Accuracy Assessment of Global 1-Kilometer Digital Elevation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Gesch, Dean B.

    1998-01-01

    Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) data have been used to evaluate the accuracy of GTOPO30, the first comprehensive, 1 km resolution, global topographic data set. GTOPO30 was developed by the USGS Eros Data Center (EDC), in part, to address NASA's needs for a global topographic model in support of remote sensing instruments aboard the Earth Observing System AM-1 spacecraft. SLA flew as a part of the STS-72 mission in January, 1996 observing the latitude band from +/- 28.5 deg, and on STS-85 in August, 1997 extending the observations to +/- 57 deg. Combining the SLA ranging data with shuttle position and pointing knowledge yields surface elevation data of very high vertical accuracy in an Earth-centered, absolute reference frame (2.8 m rms difference for SLA-01 with respect to ocean reference surface). Use of the well-determined mean sea surface reference for calibration allows propagation of high accuracy altimetry onto the continents. 436,635 SLA-01 land elevations were compared to the GTOPO30 grid after conversion to a mean sea level vertical datum using the Earth Geoid Model 96, jointly developed by Goddard and NIMA. The comparison reveals systematic elevation biases in southern Asia, Africa, Australia, and south America on the order 10's to 100 meters in the GTOPO30 compilation on spatial scales of 100's to 1000's of kilometers. These biases are likely due to vertical datum errors in the topographic source materials used to compile GTOPO30, which primarily consist of Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) digital elevation and topographic map products. These biases imply that elevation corrections applied to land gravity measurements using these DMA source materials will be biased, leading to errors in geoid models incorporating these land gravity data.

  13. 3D-geological structures with digital elevation models using GPU programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo Lázaro, Jesús; Sánchez Navarro, José Ángel; García Gil, Alejandro; Edo Romero, Vanesa

    2014-09-01

    We present an application that visualises three-dimensional geological structures with digital terrain models. The three-dimensional structures are displayed as their intersections with two-dimensional surfaces that may be defined analytically (e.g., sections) or with grid meshes in the case of irregular surfaces such as the digital terrain models. The process begins with classic techniques of terrain visualisation using hypsometric shading with textures. Then, geometric transformations that are easily conceived and programmed are added, thus representing the three-dimensional structures with their location and orientation. Functions of three variables are used to define the geological structures, and data from digital terrain models are used as one of the variables. This provides a simple source code and results in a short calculation time. Additionally, the process of generating new textures can be performed by a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), thereby making real-time processing very effective and providing the possibility of displaying the simulation of geological structures in motion.

  14. Geologic map of the Dillon 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Idaho and Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, E.T.; Lopez, D.A.; O'Neill, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The digital ARC/INFO databases included in this website provide a GIS database for the geologic map of the Dillon 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle of southwest Montana and east-central Idaho. The geologic map was originally published as U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1803-H. This website directory contains ARC/INFO format files that can be used to query or display the geology of USGS Map I-1803-H with GIS software.

  15. Implications of different digital elevation models and preprocessing techniques to delineate debris flow inundation hazard zones in El Salvador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, E. R.; Griffin, R.; Irwin, D.

    2013-12-01

    Heavy rains and steep, volcanic slopes in El Salvador cause numerous landslides every year, posing a persistent threat to the population, economy and environment. Although potential debris inundation hazard zones have been delineated using digital elevation models (DEMs), some disparities exist between the simulated zones and actual affected areas. Moreover, these hazard zones have only been identified for volcanic lahars and not the shallow landslides that occur nearly every year. This is despite the availability of tools to delineate a variety of landslide types (e.g., the USGS-developed LAHARZ software). Limitations in DEM spatial resolution, age of the data, and hydrological preprocessing techniques can contribute to inaccurate hazard zone definitions. This study investigates the impacts of using different elevation models and pit filling techniques in the final debris hazard zone delineations, in an effort to determine which combination of methods most closely agrees with observed landslide events. In particular, a national DEM digitized from topographic sheets from the 1970s and 1980s provide an elevation product at a 10 meter resolution. Both natural and anthropogenic modifications of the terrain limit the accuracy of current landslide hazard assessments derived from this source. Global products from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer Global DEM (ASTER GDEM) offer more recent data but at the cost of spatial resolution. New data derived from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) in 2013 provides the opportunity to update hazard zones at a higher spatial resolution (approximately 6 meters). Hydrological filling of sinks or pits for current hazard zone simulation has previously been achieved through ArcInfo spatial analyst. Such hydrological processing typically only fills pits and can lead to drastic modifications of original elevation values

  16. A fast topographic characterization of seismic station locations in Iran through integrated use of digital elevation models and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimzadeh, Sadra; Miyajima, Masakatsu; Kamel, Batoul; Pessina, Vera

    2015-10-01

    We present topographic slope positions of seismic stations within four independent networks (IGUT, IIEES, GSI, and BHRC) in Iran through integrated use of digital elevation models and GIS. Since topographic amplification factor (TAF) due to ground surface irregularity could be one of the reasons of earthquake wave amplification and unexpected damage of structures located on the top of ridges in many previous studies, the ridge stations in the study area are recognized using topographic position index (TPI) as a spatial-based scale-dependent approach that helps in classification of topographic positions. We also present the correlation between local topographic positions and V {/s 30} along with Voronoi tiles of two networks (IGUT and IIEES). The obtained results can be profitably used in seismology to establish homogeneous subnetworks based on Voronoi tiles with precise feedback and in the formulation of new ground motion prediction equations with respect to topographic position and topographic amplification factor.

  17. An automated approach for extracting Barrier Island morphology from digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernette, Phillipe; Houser, Chris; Bishop, Michael P.

    2016-06-01

    The response and recovery of a barrier island to extreme storms depends on the elevation of the dune base and crest, both of which can vary considerably alongshore and through time. Quantifying the response to and recovery from storms requires that we can first identify and differentiate the dune(s) from the beach and back-barrier, which in turn depends on accurate identification and delineation of the dune toe, crest and heel. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a multi-scale automated approach for extracting beach, dune (dune toe, dune crest and dune heel), and barrier island morphology. The automated approach introduced here extracts the shoreline and back-barrier shoreline based on elevation thresholds, and extracts the dune toe, dune crest and dune heel based on the average relative relief (RR) across multiple spatial scales of analysis. The multi-scale automated RR approach to extracting dune toe, dune crest, and dune heel based upon relative relief is more objective than traditional approaches because every pixel is analyzed across multiple computational scales and the identification of features is based on the calculated RR values. The RR approach out-performed contemporary approaches and represents a fast objective means to define important beach and dune features for predicting barrier island response to storms. The RR method also does not require that the dune toe, crest, or heel are spatially continuous, which is important because dune morphology is likely naturally variable alongshore.

  18. Extracting topographic structure from digital elevation data for geographic information-system analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenson, Susan K.; Domingue, Julia O.

    1988-01-01

    The first phase of analysis is a conditioning phase that generates three data sets: the original OEM with depressions filled, a data set indicating the flow direction for each cell, and a flow accumulation data set in which each cell receives a value equal to the total number of cells that drain to it. The original OEM and these three derivative data sets can then be processed in a variety of ways to optionally delineate drainage networks, overland paths, watersheds for userspecified locations, sub-watersheds for the major tributaries of a drainage network, or pour point linkages between watersheds. The computer-generated drainage lines and watershed polygons and the pour point linkage information can be transferred to vector-based geographic information systems for futher analysis. Comparisons between these computergenerated features and their manually delineated counterparts generally show close agreement, indicating that these software tools will save analyst time spent in manual interpretation and digitizing.

  19. Digital elevation model of King Edward VII Peninsula, West Antarctica, from SAR interferometry and ICESat laser altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baek, S.; Kwoun, Oh-Ig; Braun, Andreas; Lu, Zhiming; Shum, C.K.

    2005-01-01

    We present a digital elevation model (DEM) of King Edward VII Peninsula, Sulzberger Bay, West Antarctica, developed using 12 European Remote Sensing (ERS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scenes and 24 Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) laser altimetry profiles. We employ differential interferograms from the ERS tandem mission SAR scenes acquired in the austral fall of 1996, and four selected ICESat laser altimetry profiles acquired in the austral fall of 2004, as ground control points (GCPs) to construct an improved geocentric 60-m resolution DEM over the grounded ice region. We then extend the DEM to include two ice shelves using ICESat profiles via Kriging. Twenty additional ICESat profiles acquired in 2003-2004 are used to assess the accuracy of the DEM. After accounting for radar penetration depth and predicted surface changes, including effects due to ice mass balance, solid Earth tides, and glacial isostatic adjustment, in part to account for the eight-year data acquisition discrepancy, the resulting difference between the DEM and ICESat profiles is -0.57 ?? 5.88 m. After removing the discrepancy between the DEM and ICESat profiles for a final combined DEM using a bicubic spline, the overall difference is 0.05 ?? 1.35 m. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  20. A Digital Elevation Model of the Greenland Ice Sheet based on Envisat and CryoSat-2 Radar Altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinsen, J. F.; Smith, B. E.; Sandberg Sørensen, L.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Forsberg, R.

    2014-12-01

    With the launch of the first radar altimeter by ESA in 1992, more than two decades of radar altimetry data are now available. Therefore, one goal of ESA's Ice Sheet Climate Change Initiative is the estimation of surface elevation changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) based on ERS-1, -2, Envisat, CryoSat-2, and, in the longer term, Sentinel-3 data. This will create a data record from 1992 until present date. In addition to elevation-change records, such data can be processed to produce digital elevation models, or DEMs, of the ice sheets. The DEMs can be used to correct radar altimetry data for slope-induced errors resulting from the large footprint (e.g. 2-10 km for Envisat vs. 60 m for ICESat laser altimetry) or to correct for the underlying surface topography when applying the repeat-track method. DEMs also provide key information in e.g. SAR remote sensing of ice velocities to remove the interferograms' topographic signal or in regional climate modeling. This work focuses on the development of a GrIS DEM from Envisat and CryoSat-2 altimetry, corrected with temporally and spatially coincident NASA ICESat, ATM, and LVIS laser data. The spatial resolution is 2 x 2 km and the reference year 2010. It is based on 2009 and 2010 data, the 2009 data adjusted to 2010 by accounting for the intermediate elevation changes. This increases the spatial data coverage and reduces data errors. The GIMP DEM has been corrected for negative elevations and errors in the north, and used to constrain the final DEM. The recently acquired observations and increased data coverage give a strong advantage to this DEM relative to previous models, based on lower-resolution, more temporally scattered data (e.g. a decade of observations or only ICESat data, limited to three annual 35-day acquisition periods). Furthermore, as surface changes occur continuously, an up-to-date DEM is necessary to correctly constrain the observations, thereby ensuring an accurate change detection or modeling

  1. A digital elevation model of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from combined laser and radar altimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna; Smith, Ben; Sørensen, Louise S.; Forsberg, René

    2014-05-01

    When estimating elevation changes of ice-covered surfaces from radar altimetry, it is important to correct for slope-induced errors. They cause the reflecting point of the pulse to move up-slope and thus return estimates in the wrong coordinates. Slope-induced errors can be corrected for by introducing a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). In this work, such a DEM is developed for the Greenland Ice Sheet using a combination of Envisat radar and ICESat laser altimetry. If time permits, CryoSat radar altimetry will be included as well. The reference year is 2010 and the spatial resolution 2.5 x 2.5 km. This is in accordance with the results obtained in the ESA Ice Sheets CCI project showing that a 5 x 5 km grid spacing is reasonable for ice sheet-wide change detection (Levinsen et al., 2013). Separate DEMs will be created for the given data sets, and the geostatistical spatial interpolation method collocation will be used to merge them, thus adjusting for potential inter-satellite biases. The final DEM is validated with temporally and spatially agreeing airborne lidar data acquired in the NASA IceBridge and ESA CryoVex campaigns. The motivation for developing a new DEM is based on 1) large surface changes presently being observed, and mainly in margin regions, hence necessitating updated topography maps for accurately deriving and correcting surface elevation changes, and 2) although radar altimetry is subject to surface penetration of the signal into the snowpack, data is acquired continuously in time. This is not the case with e.g. ICESat, where laser altimetry data were obtained in periods of active lasers, i.e. three times a year with a 35-day repeat track. Previous DEMs e.g. have 2007 as the nominal reference year, or they are built merely from ICESat data. These have elevation errors as small as 10 cm, which is lower than for Envisat and CryoSat. The advantage of an updated DEM consisting of combined radar and laser altimetry therefore is the possibility of

  2. Assessing the quality of digital elevation models obtained from mini unmanned aerial vehicles for overland flow modelling in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, João P.; Moy de Vitry, Matthew; Scheidegger, Andreas; Rieckermann, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Precise and detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) are essential to accurately predict overland flow in urban areas. Unfortunately, traditional sources of DEM, such as airplane light detection and ranging (lidar) DEMs and point and contour maps, remain a bottleneck for detailed and reliable overland flow models, because the resulting DEMs are too coarse to provide DEMs of sufficient detail to inform urban overland flows. Interestingly, technological developments of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) suggest that they have matured enough to be a competitive alternative to satellites or airplanes. However, this has not been tested so far. In this study we therefore evaluated whether DEMs generated from UAV imagery are suitable for urban drainage overland flow modelling. Specifically, 14 UAV flights were conducted to assess the influence of four different flight parameters on the quality of generated DEMs: (i) flight altitude, (ii) image overlapping, (iii) camera pitch, and (iv) weather conditions. In addition, we compared the best-quality UAV DEM to a conventional lidar-based DEM. To evaluate both the quality of the UAV DEMs and the comparison to lidar-based DEMs, we performed regression analysis on several qualitative and quantitative metrics, such as elevation accuracy, quality of object representation (e.g. buildings, walls and trees) in the DEM, which were specifically tailored to assess overland flow modelling performance, using the flight parameters as explanatory variables. Our results suggested that, first, as expected, flight altitude influenced the DEM quality most, where lower flights produce better DEMs; in a similar fashion, overcast weather conditions are preferable, but weather conditions and other factors influence DEM quality much less. Second, we found that for urban overland flow modelling, the UAV DEMs performed competitively in comparison to a traditional lidar-based DEM. An important advantage of using UAVs to generate DEMs in urban areas is

  3. Use of TOPSAR digital elevation data to determine the 3-dimensional shape of an alluvial fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Tom G.

    1995-01-01

    Landforms in arid regions record the interplay between tectonic forces and climate. Alluvial fans are a common landform in desert regions where the rate of uplift is greater than weathering or sedimentation. Changes in uplift rate or climatic conditions can lead to isolation of the currently forming fan surface through entrenchment and construction of another fan either further from the mountain front (decreased uplift or increased runoff) or closer to the mountain front (increased uplift or decreased runoff). Thus, many alluvial fans are made up of a mosaic of fan units of different age, some older than 1 million years. For this reason, determination of the stages of fan evolution can lead to a history of uplift and runoff. In an attempt to separate the effects of tectonic (uplift) and climatic (weathering, runoff, sedimentation) processes on the shapes of alluvial fan units, a modified conic equation developed by Troeh (1965) was fitted to TOPSAR digital topographic data for the Trail Canyon alluvial fan in Death Valley, California. This allows parameters for the apex position, slope, and radial curvature to be compared with unit age.

  4. Determination of fractal dimensions of digital elevation models for the watershed of Lake Jocasse, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Wagenseil, R.

    1991-01-01

    There are persistent difficulties in monitoring nonpoint source pollution and in the related field of hydrology. The problems stem from variations in spatial distribution which are poorly understood and difficult to model with established methods. Two recent developments may offer a solution, if they are combined with care. The first development is the increasing capability of computer mapping, called geographic information systems (GIS). These systems can store, retrieve, and manipulate data with an explicit spatial structure. The second development is the field of fractal mathematics. Fractal mathematics includes geometric sets which have simple descriptions, despite complex appearances. One family of such fractal sets are the Brownian surfaces, which capture many of the qualities of natural land surfaces in a simple statistical model. Up until now, the Brownian models have been constrained by the assumption that the same statistical relationship holds over the entire surface. This is called the constraint of stationarity. The need to study how the landscape differs by location leads to relaxing the constraint of stationarity. This, in turn, causes some profound changes in the model. A special computer program applies the new model to a set of three-dimensional digital maps of natural terrain (DEMs). The model performs well, and highlights differences in landforms. This suggests several new approaches to spatial variation.

  5. Hydrologically Correct, Global Paleo-Digital Elevation Models (DEMs): a Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwick, P. J.

    2001-12-01

    The past surface relief of the Earth is an essential boundary condition for computer-based atmosphere and ocean modeling. It also provides the geographic context for understanding surface processes and biotic distributions and interactions. However, with increased model resolution and the addition of vegetation, soil (weathering) and chemical modules, there is now a need for more robust, detailed paleo-topographies and bathymetries that are fully integrated with the processes being modeled, especially the hydrological system (hydrologically correct). Here I present a new GIS-based, hydrologically correct, paleo-DEM for the Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous). This project was initiated in 1995 while the author was a graduate at the University of Chicago using the plate reconstructions of Rowley (1995, unpublished). The Maastrichtian paleogeography used in this study is one of a series of 27 global maps, representing the Cretaceous and Cenozoic, being compiled simultaneously to ensure continuity between each time interval. Each map is generated at a scale of 1:30 million in ArcView GIS and ArcInfo, using data from the author's own databases of lithologic, tectonic and fossil information, the lithologic databases of the Paleogeographic Atlas Project (The University of Chicago), a survey of published literature, and DSDP / ODP data. Interpretations of elevation are derived following the methods outlined in Ziegler et al (1985), an understanding of the tectonic regime and evolution of each geographic feature, and the age-depth relationship for the ocean. The Maastrichtian has been completed first to provide the boundary conditions for a coupled atmosphere-ocean experiment. The hydrologically correct global DEM was derived using the elevation contours from the paleogeography and the suite of hydrological tools now available in ArcInfo GRID. The DEM has been constrained by defining areas of paleo-internal drainage, paleo-river mouths and known paleo-river courses. When

  6. Drainage networks and watersheds delineation derived from TIN-based digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Henrique Rennó de Azeredo; Freitas, Corina da Costa; Rosim, Sergio; Oliveira, João Ricardo de Freitas

    2016-07-01

    Triangulated Irregular Networks (TIN) efficiently define terrain models from which drainage networks and watersheds can be extracted with important applications in hydrology. In this work, the TIN model is represented by a constrained Delaunay triangulation obtained from contour lines and sampled points. Paths of steepest descent calculated from the TIN are connected by processing the triangles according to an associated priority, then forming a drainage graph structure proposed to generate drainage networks from accumulated flows. Major problems such as flat areas and pits that create inconsistencies in the terrain model and discontinuities in flows are removed with procedures that interpolate the elevation values of particular points on the TIN. Drainage networks are defined by arbitrary threshold values, and their associated watersheds and subwatersheds are then delineated. TIN results are qualitatively and quantitatively compared to an available reference drainage network, and also to regular grid results generated with the TerraHidro system. The drainage networks automatically obtained from the drainage graph highly agree to the main courses of water on the terrain, indicating that the TIN is an attractive alternative terrain model for hydrological purposes, and that the proposed drainage graph can be used for the automatic extraction of drainage networks that are consistent with real-world hydrological patterns.

  7. Digital Elevation Models of Differences (DODs): implementation for assessment of soil erosion on recreational trails.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, A.; Ewertowski, M.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction: Tourism's negative impact on protected mountain areas is one of the main concerns for land managers. The impact on the natural environment is the most visible at locations of highly concentrated activities such as tourist trails, campsites, etc. The main indicators of the tourist trail degradation are vegetation loss (trampling of vegetation cover), change of vegetation type and composition, trail widening, muddiness and soil erosion. The last one is especially significant, since it can cause serious transformation to the land surface. Such undesirable changes cannot be repaired without high-cost management activities and in some cases they can made the trails difficult and unsafe to use. The scientific understanding of soil erosion in relation to human impact can be useful for a more effective management of protected natural areas (PNAs). The main objectives of this study are: (1) to analyse the spatial aspect of surface changes in microscale; (2) to quantify precisely the short-term rate of soil loss and deposition. Study area and methods: To gather precise and objective elevation data, an electronic total station with microprism were used. Measurements were taken in 12 test fields, located in two protected natural areas in south Poland: the Gorce National Park and Popradzki Landscape Park. The measuring places were located on the trails characterized by different slope, types of vegetation, and types of use. Each of the test fields was established by four special marks, firmly dug into the ground. Five sessions of measurement was carried out for each test field: August/September 2008, June 2009, August/September 2009, June 2010, August/September 2010. Generated DEMs (based on field surveys' results) were subtracted from each other, and thus we obtained a spatial picture of the loss or deposition of soil in each cell of the model, from one survey session to another. The subtraction of DEMs from subsequent time periods (DEMs of Difference - DoDs gave

  8. Channel profiles around Himalayan river anticlines: Constraints on their formation from digital elevation model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, JöRg; Stüwe, Kurt; Hergarten, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    We present a comparison between measured and numerically modeled channel profiles of rivers in two important drainage basins of Central Nepal: the Kali-Gandaki and the Arun drainage basins. Modeled channel profiles are based on a simple stream power approach using best fit exponents defining the nonlinearities in the relative contributions of local channel gradient and water flux to erosion rate. Our analysis of the stream power in the whole river network confirms the work of other authors that a 50- to 80-km-wide zone, roughly corresponding to the High Himalayan topography, is subjected to rapid rock uplift. We suggest a model where the uplift of this zone is driven by erosion and isostatic response, so that centers of maximum uplift are located within the main channels of the north-south draining rivers. We also suggest that the rate of uplift slows down with increasing distance to the main channels. Such a spatial distribution of the uplift leads ultimately to the formation of river anticlines as observed along all major Himalayan rivers. We propose that the formation of river anticlines along south draining Himalayan rivers was accelerated by a sudden increase of the drainage area and discharge when the rivers captured orogen-parallel drainages on the north side of the range. This may follow successive headward cutting into the Tibetan Plateau. The model is confirmed by differences between main channels and east-west running tributaries. Time-dependent numerical models predict that capture events cause strongly elevated erosion rates in the main channel.

  9. Delineation of Flood Prone Areas using Digital Elevation Models: Scale Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Leo, M.; Manfreda, S.; Sole, A.; Fiorentino, M.

    2009-04-01

    The delineation of the areas subject to flood inundations raises complex problems regarding the definition of hydrological forcing and the parametrization of models for flood wave propagation (e.g., Horritt & Bates, 2000, 2002). The increasing availability of new technologies for the measurement of surface elevation (eg GPS, SAR interferometry, radar and laser altimetry) led to an increase in the attraction of DEM-based procedures for the delineation of floodplains. In recent years, much effort has gone into the identification of flood prone areas through the use of hydrological and hydraulic studies carried out by River Basin Authorities (public institutions dedicated to river basins management). These studies are generally based on topographic surveys and numerical modelling for the flood wave propagation providing an enormous database rarely used for post processing. Manfreda et al. (2006) have recently used the technical documentation, produced during the definition of Hydrogeological Management Plan by the River Basin Authorities, to define a synthetic procedure for the delineation of flood inundation exposure. The relevance of such techniques lies in the ability to characterize, at least at first approximation, portions of the territory where is not possible to run expensive hydrological-hydraulic simulations. The development of simplified methodologies is taken further in the present study to investigate the relationship between areas exposed to flood inundation and the geomorphologic characteristics of the terrain (contributing area, local slope of the surface, curvature, TOPMODEL topographic index) showing a strong correlation with the TOPMODEL topographic index. Manfreda et al. (2006) also defined a new expression of the topographical index more suited to the task of delineating flood exposure directly from a DEM analysis. This permitted the definition of a fast procedure for the calculation of flood inundation areas using a threshold level (ITms) to

  10. Accuracy of interpolation techniques for the derivation of digital elevation models in relation to landform types and data density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplot, Vincent; Darboux, Frédéric; Bourennane, Hocine; Leguédois, Sophie; Silvera, Norbert; Phachomphon, Konngkeo

    2006-07-01

    One of the most important scientific challenges of digital elevation modeling is the development of numerical representations of large areas with a high resolution. Although there have been many studies on the accuracy of interpolation techniques for the generation of digital elevation models (DEMs) in relation to landform types and data quantity or density, there is still a need to evaluate the performance of these techniques on natural landscapes of differing morphologies and over a large range of scales. To perform such an evaluation, we investigated a total of six sites, three in the mountainous region of northern Laos and three in the more gentle landscape of western France, with various surface areas from micro-plots, hillslopes, and catchments. The techniques used for the interpolation of point height data with density values from 4 to 10 9 points/km 2 include: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), universal kriging (UK), multiquadratic radial basis function (MRBF), and regularized spline with tension (RST). The study sites exhibited coefficients of variation (CV) of altitude between 12% and 78%, and isotropic to anisotropic spatial structures with strengths from weak (with a nugget/sill ratio of 0.8) to strong (0.01). Irrespective of the spatial scales or the variability and spatial structure of altitude, few differences existed between the interpolation methods if the sampling density was high, although MRBF performed slightly better. However, at lower sampling densities, kriging yielded the best estimations for landscapes with strong spatial structure, low CV and low anisotropy, while RST yielded the best estimations for landscapes with low CV and weak spatial structure. Under conditions of high CV, strong spatial structure and strong anisotropy, IDW performed slightly better than the other method. The prediction errors in height estimation are discussed in relation to the possible interactions with spatial scale, landform types, and

  11. Topogrid Derived 10 Meter Resolution Digital Elevation Model of Charleston, and Parts of Berkeley, Colleton, Dorchester and Georgetown Counties, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.

    2005-01-01

    EXPLANATION The purpose of developing a new 10m resolution digital elevation model (DEM) of the Charleston Region was to more accurately depict geologic structure, surfical geology, and landforms of the Charleston County Region. Previously, many areas northeast and southwest of Charleston were originally mapped with a 20 foot contour interval. As a result, large areas within the National Elevation Dataset (NED) depict flat terraced topography where there was a lack of higher resolution elevation data. To overcome these data voids, the new DEM is supplemented with additional elevation data and break-lines derived from aerial photography and topographic maps. The resultant DEM is stored as a raster grid at uniform 10m horizontal resolution. The elevation model contained in this publication was prodcued utilizing the ANUDEM algorthim. ANUDEM allows for the inclusion of contours, streams, rivers, lake and water body polygons as well as spot height data to control the development of the elevation model. A preliminary statistical analysis using over 788 vertical elevation check points, primarily located in the northeastern part of the study area, derived from USGS 7.5 Minute Topographic maps reveals that the final DEM, has a vertical accuracy of ?3.27 meters. A table listing the elevation comparison between the elevation check points and the final DEM is provided.

  12. Digital Elevation Model Creation Using SfM on High-Altitude Snow-Covered Surfaces at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millstein, J. D.; Hawley, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) provides a means through which a digital elevation model (DEM) can be constructed with data acquired at a relatively low cost when compared to other current alternatives. Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), a large area can be efficiently covered at high spatial resolution to quantify regional topography. Structure from Motion applied to photogrammetric techniques from a UAV has proven to be a successful tool, but challenges to UAV-based SfM include high-altitude locations with few distinctive surface features and minor textural differences. In June 2015, we piloted a small UAV (Quest) in order to conduct a topographical survey of Summit Camp, Greenland using SfM. Summit Camp sits at a surface elevation of 3200 meters above sea level, and occupies a snow-covered surface. The flat, very uniform terrain proved to be a challenge when flying the UAV and processing imagery using SfM techniques. In this presentation we discuss the issues both with operating a UAV instrument platform at high-altitude in the polar regions and interpreting the resulting DEM from a snow-covered region. The final DEM of Summit Camp covers a large portion of the surface area directly impacted by camp activities. In particular, volume calculations of drifting snow gauge an estimate of the equipment hours that will be required to clear and unearth structures. Investigation of surface roughness at multiple length scales can similarly provide insight on the accuracy of the DEM when observing texturally uniform surfaces.

  13. Extraction of cross sections from digital elevation model for one-dimensional dam-break wave propagation in mountain valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilotti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Shallow Water Equations (SWE) provide a fundamental component for the quantification and mapping of hydraulic hazard. In steep mountain valleys, the use of one-dimensional SWE (also known as St. Venant Equations, SVE) is often legitimate and computationally competitive against two-dimensional solvers. However, in the same environment, the solution of SVE is hindered by the need of an accurate bathymetric reconstruction, which implies a number of cross sections which cannot be readily acquired by conventional field surveys. On the other hand, Digital Elevation Models (DEM) with resolution adequate for studies of flood propagation are available in many areas of the world. In this paper, I propose to compute cross sections automatically by operating along the channel network derived from a valley's raster DEM, on the basis of algorithms that hitherto have been used for geomorphological and hydrological purposes. The extraction process can be refined by varying cross section inter-distance and width, in order to prevent superimpositions that might occur due to the sinuosity of the thalweg and to better capture the valley's local topography. At the end of this process, the geometric functions needed by SVE solvers can be computed for each cross section. A software tool that implements the described algorithm is provided to the scientific community.

  14. Error analysis in the digital elevation model of Kuwait desert derived from repeat pass synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Kota S.; Al Jassar, Hala K.

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the errors in the Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) derived through repeat pass SAR interferometry (InSAR). Out of 29 ASAR images available to us, 8 are selected for this study which has unique data set forming 7 InSAR pairs with single master image. The perpendicular component of baseline (B highmod) varies between 200 to 400 m to generate good quality DEMs. The Temporal baseline (T) varies from 35 days to 525 days to see the effect of temporal decorrelation. It is expected that all the DEMs be similar to each other spatially with in the noise limits. However, they differ very much with one another. The 7 DEMs are compared with the DEM of SRTM for the estimation of errors. The spatial and temporal distribution of errors in the DEM is analyzed by considering several case studies. Spatial and temporal variability of precipitable water vapour is analysed. Precipitable water vapour (PWV) corrections to the DEMs are implemented and found to have no significant effect. The reasons are explained. Temporal decorrelation of phases and soil moisture variations seem to have influence on the accuracy of the derived DEM. It is suggested that installing a number of corner reflectors (CRs) and the use of Permanent Scatter approach may improve the accuracy of the results in desert test sites.

  15. An efficient variant of the Priority-Flood algorithm for filling depressions in raster digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guiyun; Sun, Zhongxuan; Fu, Suhua

    2016-05-01

    Depressions are common features in raster digital elevation models (DEMs) and they are usually filled for the automatic extraction of drainage networks. Among existing algorithms for filling depressions, the Priority-Flood algorithm substantially outperforms other algorithms in terms of both time complexity and memory requirement. The Priority-Flood algorithm uses a priority queue to process cells. This study proposes an efficient variant of the Priority-Flood algorithm, which considerably reduces the number of cells processed by the priority queue by using region-growing procedures to process the majority of cells not within depressions or flat regions. We present three implementations of the proposed variant: two-pass implementation, one-pass implementation and direct implementation. Experiments are conducted on thirty DEMs with a resolution of 3m. All three implementations run faster than existing variants of the algorithm for all tested DEMs. The one-pass implementation runs the fastest and the average speed-up over the fastest existing variant is 44.6%.

  16. A fast and robust bulk-loading algorithm for indexing very large digital elevation datasets: I. Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Félix R.; Barrena, Manuel

    2011-07-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) constitute a valuable source of data for a number of geoscience-related applications. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) collected and made available to the public the world's largest DEM (composed of billions of points) until that date. The SRTM DEM is stored on the NASA repository as a well-organized collection of flat files. The retrieval of this stored topographic information about a region of interest involves one selection of a proper list of files, their downloading, data filtering in the desired region, and their processing according to user needs. With the aim to provide an easier and faster access to this data by improving its further analysis and processing, we have indexed the SRTM DEM by means of a spatial indexing based on the kd-tree data structure, called the Q-tree. This paper is the first in a two-part series that describes the method followed to build an index on such huge amounts of data, minimizing the number of insert operations. We demonstrate that our method can build a very efficient space-partitioning index, with good performance in both point and range queries on the spatial data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only successful spatial indexing proposal in the literature that deals with such a huge volume of data.

  17. Using X-band Weather Radar Measurements to Monitor the Integrity of Digital Elevation Models for Synthetic Vision Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steve; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; Sayre, Jonathon

    2003-01-01

    Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) provide pilots with displays of stored geo-spatial data representing terrain, obstacles, and cultural features. As comprehensive validation is impractical, these databases typically have no quantifiable level of integrity. Further, updates to the databases may not be provided as changes occur. These issues limit the certification level and constrain the operational context of SVS for civil aviation. Previous work demonstrated the feasibility of using a realtime monitor to bound the integrity of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) by using radar altimeter measurements during flight. This paper describes an extension of this concept to include X-band Weather Radar (WxR) measurements. This enables the monitor to detect additional classes of DEM errors and to reduce the exposure time associated with integrity threats. Feature extraction techniques are used along with a statistical assessment of similarity measures between the sensed and stored features that are detected. Recent flight-testing in the area around the Juneau, Alaska Airport (JNU) has resulted in a comprehensive set of sensor data that is being used to assess the feasibility of the proposed monitor technology. Initial results of this assessment are presented.

  18. Evaluation of the effects of the seasonal variation of solar elevation angle and azimuth on the processes of digital filtering and thematic classification of relief units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Novo, E. M. L. M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the seasonal variation of illumination over digital processing of LANDSAT images are evaluated. Two sets of LANDSAT data referring to the orbit 150 and row 28 were selected with illumination parameters varying from 43 deg to 64 deg for azimuth and from 30 deg to 36 deg for solar elevation respectively. IMAGE-100 system permitted the digital processing of LANDSAT data. Original images were transformed by means of digital filtering so as to enhance their spatial features. The resulting images were used to obtain an unsupervised classification of relief units. Topographic variables (declivity, altitude, relief range and slope length) were used to identify the true relief units existing on the ground. The LANDSAT over pass data show that digital processing is highly affected by illumination geometry, and there is no correspondence between relief units as defined by spectral features and those resulting from topographic features.

  19. UAV-based photogrammetry combination of the elevational outcrop and digital surface models: an example of Sanyi active fault in western Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Cheng-En; Huang, Wen-Jeng; Chang, Ping-Yu; Lo, Wei

    2016-04-01

    An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a digital camera is an efficient tool for geologists to investigate structure patterns in the field. By setting ground control points (GCPs), UAV-based photogrammetry provides high-quality and quantitative results such as a digital surface model (DSM) and orthomosaic and elevational images. We combine the elevational outcrop 3D model and a digital surface model together to analyze the structural characteristics of Sanyi active fault in Houli-Fengyuan area, western Taiwan. Furthermore, we collect resistivity survey profiles and drilling core data in the Fengyuan District in order to build the subsurface fault geometry. The ground sample distance (GSD) of an elevational outcrop 3D model is 3.64 cm/pixel in this study. Our preliminary result shows that 5 fault branches are distributed 500 meters wide on the elevational outcrop and the width of Sanyi fault zone is likely much great than this value. Together with our field observations, we propose a structural evolution model to demonstrate how the 5 fault branches developed. The resistivity survey profiles show that Holocene gravel was disturbed by the Sanyi fault in Fengyuan area.

  20. Accuracy assessment of airborne photogrammetrically derived high-resolution digital elevation models in a high mountain environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Johann; Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Thee, Patrick; Ginzler, Christian

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) generated by airborne remote sensing are frequently used to analyze landform structures (monotemporal) and geomorphological processes (multitemporal) in remote areas or areas of extreme terrain. In order to assess and quantify such structures and processes it is necessary to know the absolute accuracy of the available DEMs. This study assesses the absolute vertical accuracy of DEMs generated by the High Resolution Stereo Camera-Airborne (HRSC-A), the Leica Airborne Digital Sensors 40/80 (ADS40 and ADS80) and the analogue camera system RC30. The study area is located in the Turtmann valley, Valais, Switzerland, a glacially and periglacially formed hanging valley stretching from 2400 m to 3300 m a.s.l. The photogrammetrically derived DEMs are evaluated against geodetic field measurements and an airborne laser scan (ALS). Traditional and robust global and local accuracy measurements are used to describe the vertical quality of the DEMs, which show a non Gaussian distribution of errors. The results show that all four sensor systems produce DEMs with similar accuracy despite their different setups and generations. The ADS40 and ADS80 (both with a ground sampling distance of 0.50 m) generate the most accurate DEMs in complex high mountain areas with a RMSE of 0.8 m and NMAD of 0.6 m They also show the highest accuracy relating to flying height (0.14‰). The pushbroom scanning system HRSC-A produces a RMSE of 1.03 m and a NMAD of 0.83 m (0.21‰ accuracy of the flying height and 10 times the ground sampling distance). The analogue camera system RC30 produces DEMs with a vertical accuracy of 1.30 m RMSE and 0.83 m NMAD (0.17‰ accuracy of the flying height and two times the ground sampling distance). It is also shown that the performance of the DEMs strongly depends on the inclination of the terrain. The RMSE of areas up to an inclination <40° is better than 1 m. In more inclined areas the error and outlier occurrence

  1. Sequential digital elevation models of active lava flows from ground-based stereo time-lapse imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a framework for deriving sequences of digital elevation models (DEMs) for the analysis of active lava flows using oblique stereo-pair time-lapse imagery. A photo-based technique was favoured over laser-based alternatives due to low equipment cost, high portability and capability for network expansion, with images of advancing flows captured by digital SLR cameras over durations of up to several hours. However, under typical field scale scenarios, relative camera orientations cannot be rigidly maintained (e.g. through the use of a stereo bar), preventing the use of standard stereo time-lapse processing software. Thus, we trial semi-automated DEM-sequence workflows capable of handling the small camera motions, variable image quality and restricted photogrammetric control that result from the practicalities of data collection at remote and hazardous sites. The image processing workflows implemented either link separate close-range photogrammetry and traditional stereo-matching software, or are integrated in a single software package based on structure-from-motion (SfM). We apply these techniques in contrasting case studies from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii and Mount Etna, Sicily, which differ in scale, duration and image texture. On Kilauea, the advance direction of thin fluid lava lobes was difficult to forecast, preventing good distribution of control. Consequently, volume changes calculated through the different workflows differed by ∼10% for DEMs (over ∼30 m2) that were captured once a minute for 37 min. On Mt. Etna, more predictable advance (∼3 m h-1 for ∼3 h) of a thicker, more viscous lava allowed robust control to be deployed and volumetric change results were generally within 5% (over ∼500 m2). Overall, the integrated SfM software was more straightforward to use and, under favourable conditions, produced results comparable to those from the close-range photogrammetry pipeline. However, under conditions with limited options for photogrammetric

  2. Improved estimation of flood parameters by combining space based SAR data with very high resolution digital elevation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwenzner, H.; Voigt, S.

    2009-05-01

    Severe flood events turned out to be the most devastating catastrophes for Europe's population, economy and environment during the past decades. The total loss caused by the August 2002 flood is estimated to be 10 billion Euros for Germany alone. Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters always depends on the scale and the geometric precision of the original data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived data products. The incorporation of auxiliary information such as elevation data can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the derived flood masks as well as higher level products. This paper presents methods to improve the matching of flood masks with very high resolution digital elevation models as derived from LiDAR measurements for example. In the following, a cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. This approach is tested in two study areas, using different input data sets. The first test area is part of the Elbe River (Germany) where flood masks derived from Radarsat-1 and IKONOS during the 2002 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 1 m spatial resolution. The other test data set is located on the River Severn (UK) and flood masks derived from the TerraSAR-X satellite and aerial photos acquired during the 2007 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 m pixel spacing. By means of these two examples the performance of the matching technique and the scaling effects are analysed and discussed. Furthermore, the systematic flood mapping capability of the different imaging systems are examined. It could be

  3. Improved estimation of flood parameters by combining space based SAR data with very high resolution digital elevation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwenzner, H.; Voigt, S.

    2008-10-01

    Severe flood events turned out to be the most devastating catastrophes for Europe's population, economy and environment during the past decades. The total loss caused by the August 2002 flood is estimated to be 10 billion Euros for Germany alone. Due to their capability to present a synoptic view of the spatial extent of floods, remote sensing technology, and especially synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems, have been successfully applied for flood mapping and monitoring applications. However, the quality and accuracy of the flood masks and derived flood parameters always depends on the scale and the geometric precision of the original data as well as on the classification accuracy of the derived data products. The incorporation of auxiliary information such as elevation data can help to improve the plausibility and reliability of the derived flood masks as well as higher level products. This paper presents methods to improve the matching of flood masks with very high resolution digital elevation models as derived from LiDAR measurements for example. In the following, a cross section approach is presented that allows the dynamic fitting of the position of flood mask profiles according to the underlying terrain information from the DEM. This approach is tested in two study areas, using different input data sets. The first test area is part of the Elbe River (Germany) where flood masks derived from Radarsat-1 and IKONOS during the 2002 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 1 m spatial resolution. The other test data set is located on the River Severn (UK) and flood masks derived from the TerraSAR-X satellite and aerial photos acquired during the 2007 flood are used in combination with a LiDAR DEM of 2 m pixel spacing. By means of these two examples the performance of the matching technique and the scaling effects are analysed and discussed. Furthermore, the systematic flood mapping capability of the different imaging systems are examined. It could be

  4. A Combined SRTM Digital Elevation Model for Zanjan State of Iran Based on the Corrective Surface Idea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiamehr, Ramin

    2016-04-01

    One arc-second high resolution version of the SRTM model recently published for the Iran by the US Geological Survey database. Digital Elevation Models (DEM) is widely used in different disciplines and applications by geoscientist. It is an essential data in geoid computation procedure, e.g., to determine the topographic, downward continuation (DWC) and atmospheric corrections. Also, it can be used in road location and design in civil engineering and hydrological analysis. However, a DEM is only a model of the elevation surface and it is subject to errors. The most important parts of errors could be comes from the bias in height datum. On the other hand, the accuracy of DEM is usually published in global sense and it is important to have estimation about the accuracy in the area of interest before using of it. One of the best methods to have a reasonable indication about the accuracy of DEM is obtained from the comparison of their height versus the precise national GPS/levelling data. It can be done by the determination of the Root-Mean-Square (RMS) of fitting between the DEM and leveling heights. The errors in the DEM can be approximated by different kinds of functions in order to fit the DEMs to a set of GPS/levelling data using the least squares adjustment. In the current study, several models ranging from a simple linear regression to seven parameter similarity transformation model are used in fitting procedure. However, the seven parameter model gives the best fitting with minimum standard division in all selected DEMs in the study area. Based on the 35 precise GPS/levelling data we obtain a RMS of 7 parameter fitting for SRTM DEM 5.5 m, The corrective surface model in generated based on the transformation parameters and included to the original SRTM model. The result of fitting in combined model is estimated again by independent GPS/leveling data. The result shows great improvement in absolute accuracy of the model with the standard deviation of 3.4 meter.

  5. Projection of Stabilized Aerial Imagery Onto Digital Elevation Maps for Geo-Rectified and Jitter-Free Viewing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansar, Adnan I.; Brennan, Shane; Clouse, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    As imagery is collected from an airborne platform, an individual viewing the images wants to know from where on the Earth the images were collected. To do this, some information about the camera needs to be known, such as its position and orientation relative to the Earth. This can be provided by common inertial navigation systems (INS). Once the location of the camera is known, it is useful to project an image onto some representation of the Earth. Due to the non-smooth terrain of the Earth (mountains, valleys, etc.), this projection is highly non-linear. Thus, to ensure accurate projection, one needs to project onto a digital elevation map (DEM). This allows one to view the images overlaid onto a representation of the Earth. A code has been developed that takes an image, a model of the camera used to acquire that image, the pose of the camera during acquisition (as provided by an INS), and a DEM, and outputs an image that has been geo-rectified. The world coordinate of the bounds of the image are provided for viewing purposes. The code finds a mapping from points on the ground (DEM) to pixels in the image. By performing this process for all points on the ground, one can "paint" the ground with the image, effectively performing a projection of the image onto the ground. In order to make this process efficient, a method was developed for finding a region of interest (ROI) on the ground to where the image will project. This code is useful in any scenario involving an aerial imaging platform that moves and rotates over time. Many other applications are possible in processing aerial and satellite imagery.

  6. Digital elevation models in 10 minute time steps - a status report on 4D monitoring of an active erosional scar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Hass, Erik; Jose, Steffen; Haas, Florian; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    In erosional research a variety of processes are well understood and have been mimicked under laboratory conditions. In complex natural systems such as Alpine environments a multitude of influencing factors tend to superimpose single processes in a mixed signal which impedes a reliable interpretation. These mixed signals can already be captured by geoscientific research approaches such as sediment collectors, erosion pins or remote sensing surveys. Nevertheless, they fail to distinguish between single processes and their individual impact on slope morphology. Throughout the last two years a highly active slope of unsorted glacial deposits in the northern Alps has been monitored by repeated terrestrial laser scans roughly every three months. Resulting high resolution digital elevation models of difference were produced to identify possible seasonal patterns. By reproducing the TLS results with a physically based erosion model (EROSION 3D) ran with in situ input data from rainfall simulations and a climate station a better understanding of individual mechanism could be achieved. However, the already elaborate combination of soil science and close range remote sensing could not answer all questions concerning the slopes behaviour, especially not for freeze and thaw cycles and the winter period. Therefore, an array of three fully automatic synchronised cameras was setup to generate continuous 3D surface models. Among the main challenges faced for the system were the energy supply and durability, perspectives of the cameras to avoid shadowing and to guarantee sufficient overlap, a certain robustness to withstand rough alpine weather conditions, the scaling of each 3D model by tracked ground control points and the automatic data handling. First results show individual processes sculpting the slope's morphology but further work is required to improve automatic point cloud creation and change monitoring.

  7. An approach of crater automatic recognition based on contour digital elevation model from Chang'E Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, W.; Li, C.; Zhang, Z.; Li, H.; Feng, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order to provide fundamental information for exploration and related scientific research on the Moon and other planets, we propose a new automatic method to recognize craters on the lunar surface based on contour data extracted from a digital elevation model (DEM). First, we mapped 16-bits DEM to 256 gray scales for data compression, then for the purposes of better visualization, the grayscale is converted into RGB image. After that, a median filter is applied twice to DEM for data optimization, which produced smooth, continuous outlines for subsequent construction of contour plane. Considering the fact that the morphology of crater on contour plane can be approximately expressed as an ellipse or circle, we extract the outer boundaries of contour plane with the same color(gray value) as targets for further identification though a 8- neighborhood counterclockwise searching method. Then, A library of training samples is constructed based on above targets calculated from some sample DEM data, from which real crater targets are labeled as positive samples manually, and non-crater objects are labeled as negative ones. Some morphological feathers are calculated for all these samples, which are major axis (L), circumference(C), area inside the boundary(S), and radius of the largest inscribed circle(R). We use R/L, R/S, C/L, C/S, R/C, S/L as the key factors for identifying craters, and apply Fisher discrimination method on the sample library to calculate the weight of each factor and determine the discrimination formula, which is then applied to DEM data for identifying lunar craters. The method has been tested and verified with DEM data from CE-1 and CE-2, showing strong recognition ability and robustness and is applicable for the recognition of craters with various diameters and significant morphological differences, making fast and accurate automatic crater recognition possible.

  8. Size Distribution for Potentially Unstable Rock Masses and In Situ Rock Blocks Using LIDAR-Generated Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrouli, O.; Corominas, J.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, two analytical procedures which are independent from the existence of empirical data are presented for the calculation of (1) the size distribution of potentially unstable rock masses that expresses the potential rockfall size distribution, including big volumes corresponding to potential rare events with low susceptibility of failure and (2) the in situ block distribution on the slope face. Two approaches are, respectively, used. The first one involves the detection of kinematically unstable surfaces on a digital elevation model (DEM) and on orthophotos and the calculation of the volumes resting on them. For the second one the in situ block volumes formed by the intersection of the existing discontinuity sets are calculated using a high-resolution DEM. The procedures are presented through an application example at the country of Andorra and in particular at the chute of Forat Negre. The results from the first procedure indicate that it is kinematically possible to have mobilized volumes of some thousands of cubic meters; however, these are considered rare events with low susceptibility of failure. The size distribution of potentially unstable rock masses for big volume events was well fitted by a power law with an exponent of -0.5. The in situ block distribution on the slope face from the second procedure, assuming three types of intersection between the joints of the existing discontinuity sets and two extreme cases of discontinuity persistence, was also found to follow a power law, but with an exponent of -1.3. The comparison with the observed in the field block volume distribution on the slope face indicates that in reality discontinuities have a very high persistence and that considering only their visible trace length overestimates volumes, which is conservative.

  9. Assessment of high resolution digital elevation model for deep humus-rich sediments delineation at a plot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penížek, Vít; Zádorová, Tereza

    2014-05-01

    Resolution and quality of digital elevation models is a key factor in erosion modeling. Spatial estimates of erosion and sedimentation rates are important for soil organic carbon stocks prediction or delineation of newly formed soil cover by degradation and sedimentation of soil material. Such analysis can be sensitive to DEM vertical accuracy and horizontal resolution. LIDAR data can provide very precise DEMs with very high resolution. In our study we used ground based LIDAR data with 10cm pixel. At such resolution, not only naturally formed terrain features are observed, but also anthropogenic features are depicted. Anthropogenic features are represented by more significant objects like hedges or ditches that can significantly influence the water and sediment movement in the landscape on one hand, on the other hand less significant anthropogenic impact can influence the terrain surface. Plot management forms a regular network consisting of parallel linear features given by plowing operations. At our research plot, such features depicted by DEM form specific flow direction (drainage) pattern over the area comparing to coarser resolution DEMs. We focused on comparison of differently preprocessed DEMs for deep humus-rich sediments depth prediction. We compared success rate of prediction models based on original DEM, DEMs with different resampling (resolution) and modeling of original DEM adding random noise given by size of plowing based terrain pattern. The study showed that original high resolution DEM significantly decreases the possibility of soil depth prediction. The actual very precise surface description is not very relevant for GIS modeling due to sensitivity of the models. DEMs depicting the wider constellations of the terrain were more successful in the prediction. The study was supported by grant nr. 13-07516P of the Czech science foundation and by grant nr. QJ1230319 of the Ministry of Agriculture.

  10. Monitoring fine-sediment volume in the Colorado River ecosystem, Arizona: construction and analysis of digital elevation models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaplinski, Matt; Hazel, Joseph E., Jr.; Grams, Paul E.; Davis, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) of eleven 2–5 kilometer reaches of the Colorado River ecosystem (CRE) in Grand Canyon were constructed from repeat bathymetric and topographic surveys collected between August 2000 and December 2004. The DEMs will be used by researchers to study the effects of Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations on the sediment resources of the CRE in Grand Canyon by quantifying morphological changes and sediment transfer within and among the study reaches. Airborne surveys collected light detection and ranging (lidar) and photogrammetric data, whereas ground topographic and bathymetric data were collected simultaneously on river trips. Surveys were conducted in August 2000, September 2000, May 2002, May 2004, November 2004, and December 2004. The aerial lidar and photogrammetric data were merged with the ground topographic and bathymetric data to create DEMs of the study areas with a grid resolution of 1 meter. For each survey period, the vertical component of uncertainty (specifically, reproducibility or precision) was estimated for each data type (lidar/photogrammetry, ground surveys, bathymetry) and for two different types of bed-surface texture (smooth and rough). The resulting DEMs from this study are a valuable contribution to ongoing efforts in assessing the effects of GCD operations on the CRE. The DEMs can be used to map the spatial characteristics of geomorphic change within the study reaches and to estimate sediment budgets for different time periods by calculating the difference in sediment volume between surveys. In addition, the DEMs provide essential boundary conditions for numerical models of sediment transport and deposition, as well as help define the spatial distribution of habitat for fisheries investigations.

  11. A multi-directional and multi-scale roughness filter to detect lineament segments on digital elevation models - analyzing spatial objects in R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Sebastian; Robl, Jörg; Wendt, Lorenz; Willingshofer, Ernst; Hilberg, Sylke

    2016-04-01

    Automated lineament analysis on remotely sensed data requires two general process steps: The identification of neighboring pixels showing high contrast and the conversion of these domains into lines. The target output is the lineaments' position, extent and orientation. We developed a lineament extraction tool programmed in R using digital elevation models as input data to generate morphological lineaments defined as follows: A morphological lineament represents a zone of high relief roughness, whose length significantly exceeds the width. As relief roughness any deviation from a flat plane, defined by a roughness threshold, is considered. In our novel approach a multi-directional and multi-scale roughness filter uses moving windows of different neighborhood sizes to identify threshold limited rough domains on digital elevation models. Surface roughness is calculated as the vertical elevation difference between the center cell and the different orientated straight lines connecting two edge cells of a neighborhood, divided by the horizontal distance of the edge cells. Thus multiple roughness values depending on the neighborhood sizes and orientations of the edge connecting lines are generated for each cell and their maximum and minimum values are extracted. Thereby negative signs of the roughness parameter represent concave relief structures as valleys, positive signs convex relief structures as ridges. A threshold defines domains of high relief roughness. These domains are thinned to a representative point pattern by a 3x3 neighborhood filter, highlighting maximum and minimum roughness peaks, and representing the center points of lineament segments. The orientation and extent of the lineament segments are calculated within the roughness domains, generating a straight line segment in the direction of least roughness differences. We tested our algorithm on digital elevation models of multiple sources and scales and compared the results visually with shaded relief map

  12. Use of Digital Elevation Models to understand map landforms and history of the magmatism Khibiny Massif (Kola Peninsula, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesalova, Elena; Asavin, Alex

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an improved geomorphological methodology that uses 3D model of relief, remotely-sensed data, geological, geophysical maps and tools of Geographical Information Systems. On the basis of maps of 1: 50,000 and 1: 200,000 the Digital Elevation model (DEM) of Khibiny massif was developed. We used software ARC / INFO v10.2 ESRI. A DEM was used for analyzing landform by extracting the slope gradient, curvature, valley pro?les, slope, aspect and so on. The results were gradually re?ned from the interpretation of satellite imagery and geological map Geomorphological analysis will allow us to determine spatial regularities in inner massive construction. We try to found areas where gas emissions (CH4/H2) enrich, according to morphometry, geology, tectonic and other environments. The main regional blocks were de?ned by different morphological evidences: impression zone, similar to subsidence caldera; uplift zone, domed area (located in the highest part of massif and zone of intersection of main faults) and others. It says that there are the few stages in the development of the Khibiny massif. There is no common concept of the consequence of intrudes magmatic phases now. And we hope that our geomorphical analysis take a new evidences about this problems. Locations of the blocks' borders (tectonic zones) were recognized by lineament analysis of valleys and tectonic faults presented in relief. Erosion system is represented by valleys of 4 ranks. It inherits the zone of tectonic disturbances 3 groups of faults were recognized: 1) Global lineament system cross whole peninsula - existing before Khibiny massif intrusion; 2) Faults associated with the formation of the intrusive phases sequence and magma differentiation and with later collision history during magma cooling; 3) Crack system related to neotectonic process. We believed that if different magmatic phases intrude in similar tectonic environment, the common spatial system of faults will be formed. Really we

  13. A critical source area phosphorus index with topographic transport factors using high resolution LiDAR digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Ian; Murphy, Paul; Fenton, Owen; Shine, Oliver; Mellander, Per-Erik; Dunlop, Paul; Jordan, Phil

    2015-04-01

    A new phosphorus index (PI) tool is presented which aims to improve the identification of critical source areas (CSAs) of phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural land to surface waters. In a novel approach, the PI incorporates topographic indices rather than watercourse proximity as proxies for runoff risk, to account for the dominant control of topography on runoff-generating areas and P transport pathways. Runoff propensity and hydrological connectivity are modelled using the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI) and Network Index (NI) respectively, utilising high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to capture the influence of micro-topographic features on runoff pathways. Additionally, the PI attempts to improve risk estimates of particulate P losses by incorporating an erosion factor that accounts for fine-scale topographic variability within fields. Erosion risk is modelled using the Unit Stream Power Erosion Deposition (USPED) model, which integrates DEM-derived upslope contributing area and Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) factors. The PI was developed using field, sub-field and sub-catchment scale datasets of P source, mobilisation and transport factors, for four intensive agricultural catchments in Ireland representing different agri-environmental conditions. Datasets included soil test P concentrations, degree of P saturation, soil attributes, land use, artificial subsurface drainage locations, and 2 m resolution LiDAR DEMs resampled from 0.25 m resolution data. All factor datasets were integrated within a Geographical Information System (GIS) and rasterised to 2 m resolution. For each factor, values were categorised and assigned relative risk scores which ranked P loss potential. Total risk scores were calculated for each grid cell using a component formulation, which summed the products of weighted factor risk scores for runoff and erosion pathways. Results showed that the new PI was able to predict

  14. Testing Pixel Translation Digital Elevation Models to Reconstruct Slip Histories: An Example from the Agua Blanca Fault, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, J.; Wetmore, P. H.; Malservisi, R.; Ferwerda, B. P.; Teran, O.

    2012-12-01

    We use recently collected slip vector and total offset data from the Agua Blanca fault (ABF) to constrain a pixel translation digital elevation model (DEM) to reconstruct the slip history of this fault. This model was constructed using a Perl script that reads a DEM file (Easting, Northing, Elevation) and a configuration file with coordinates that define the boundary of each fault segment. A pixel translation vector is defined as a magnitude of lateral offset in an azimuthal direction. The program translates pixels north of the fault and prints their pre-faulting position to a new DEM file that can be gridded and displayed. This analysis, where multiple DEMs are created with different translation vectors, allows us to identify areas of transtension or transpression while seeing the topographic expression in these areas. The benefit of this technique, in contrast to a simple block model, is that the DEM gives us a valuable graphic which can be used to pose new research questions. We have found that many topographic features correlate across the fault, i.e. valleys and ridges, which likely have implications for the age of the ABF, long term landscape evolution rates, and potentially provide conformation for total slip assessments The ABF of northern Baja California, Mexico is an active, dextral strike slip fault that transfers Pacific-North American plate boundary strain out of the Gulf of California and around the "Big Bend" of the San Andreas Fault. Total displacement on the ABF in the central and eastern parts of the fault is 10 +/- 2 km based on offset Early-Cretaceous features such as terrane boundaries and intrusive bodies (plutons and dike swarms). Where the fault bifurcates to the west, the northern strand (northern Agua Blanca fault or NABF) is constrained to 7 +/- 1 km. We have not yet identified piercing points on the southern strand, the Santo Tomas fault (STF), but displacement is inferred to be ~4 km assuming that the sum of slip on the NABF and STF is

  15. A 1-degree FOV 30-meter telescope concept revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.; McGrath, Andrew J.; Gillingham, Peter R.; Harmer, Charles F.

    2004-10-01

    The science case for wide fields on ELTs is well developed and justifies the implementation of 20 arc-minute and larger fields-of-view with seeing-limited performance on a 20 to 30-meter telescope. However, the practical implementation of a wide field can prove to be challenging with classical telescope design when low-thermal emissivity performance is also being optimized. Segmented mirrors assemblies need not be full aperture, axially symmetric structures. Space for secondary, tertiary, and quaternary mirror support structures that do not cross the optical path can be achieved with off-axis mirror assemblies. Barden, Harmer, Claver, and Dey described a 4-mirror, 1-degree FOV 30-meter telescope. We take that concept further with an off-axis approach. Three conic mirrors are required to produce excellent image quality in the 1-degree FOV (diffraction limited across the central few arc-minutes, better than 0.3" imaging performance at the edge of the field). A flat quaternary mirror is utilized both as a beam steering mirror to different instrument ports on the lower side of the telescope and as an adaptive mirror for wind-buffeting and possible ground layer AO correction. The final f/2.2 focal ratio allows the use of an echidna-style fiber positioner for very dense target field acquisition. Extreme AO and Ground Layer AO ports can both be implemented as well. Diffraction characteristics may possibly be improved given the lack of a spider mount for the secondary mirror but will be elliptical rather than circular.

  16. THE DEVELOPMENT OF A 1990 GLOBAL INVENTORY FOR SO(X) AND NO(X) ON A 1(DEGREE) X 1(DEGREE) LATITUDE-LONGITUDE GRID.

    SciTech Connect

    VAN HEYST,B.J.

    1999-10-01

    Sulfur and nitrogen oxides emitted to the atmosphere have been linked to the acidification of water bodies and soils and perturbations in the earth's radiation balance. In order to model the global transport and transformation of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x}, detailed spatial and temporal emission inventories are required. Benkovitz et al. (1996) published the development of an inventory of 1985 global emissions of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} from anthropogenic sources. The inventory was gridded to a 1{degree} x 1{degree} latitude-longitude grid and has served as input to several global modeling studies. There is now a need to provide modelers with an update of this inventory to a more recent year, with a split of the emissions into elevated and low level sources. This paper describes the development of a 1990 update of the SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} global inventories that also includes a breakdown of sources into 17 sector groups. The inventory development starts with a gridded global default EDGAR inventory (Olivier et al, 1996). In countries where more detailed national inventories are available, these are used to replace the emissions for those countries in the global default. The gridded emissions are distributed into two height levels (0-100m and >100m) based on the final plume heights that are estimated to be typical for the various sectors considered. The sources of data as well as some of the methodologies employed to compile and develop the 1990 global inventory for SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} are discussed. The results reported should be considered to be interim since the work is still in progress and additional data sets are expected to become available.

  17. New Enhancements of an ERS1-2 + ICESat Digital Elevation Model of West Antarctica Using MODIS Imagery, Shapelets, and Kriging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haran, T. M.; Scambos, T. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Csatho, B. M.

    2008-12-01

    An image enhancement approach is used to develop a new digital elevation map of West Antarctica, combining multiple MODIS images and both radar altimetry and ICESat laser altimetry Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data. The method combines the wide image coverage of MODIS, and its high radiometric sensitivity (which equates to high sunward slope sensitivity), with the high precision and accuracy of ICESat and combined ICESat and radar altimetry DEMs. ICESat (as of September 2008) has acquired a series of fourteen near-repeat observational campaigns over the Antarctic during the period September 2003 to March 2008, covering the continent to 86 deg S. ICESat data are acquired as a series of spot elevations, averaging a ~60m diameter surface region every ~172m. However, ICESat track paths have spacings wide enough (2 km at 85 deg; 20 - 50 km at 75 deg) that some surface ice dynamical features (e.g. flowlines, undulations, ice rises) are missed by the track data used to construct the ICESat DEM. Radar altimetry can provide some of the missing data north of 81.5 deg, but only to a maximum resolution of about 5 km. A set of cloud-cleared MODIS band 1 data from both the Aqua and Terra platforms acquired during the 2003-2004 austral summer, used in generating the Mosaic of Antarctica (MOA) surface morphology image map, were used for the image enhancement. Past analyses of the slope-brightness relationship for MODIS have shown ice surface slope precisions of +/- 0.00015. ICESat spot elevations have nominal precisions of ~5 cm under ideal conditions, although thin-cloud effects and mislocation errors can magnify these. Only cloud-free areas of MODIS scenes that also meet specific slope, grain-size, solar zenith, brightness, latitude, and elevation criteria are used for image enhancement. We calibrate brightness-to-slope relationships for several MODIS images of the central West Antarctic using a smoothed version of the combined DEM. Using the calibrations, we then create a

  18. Use of Digital Elevation Models to understand map landforms and history of the magmatism Khibiny Massif (Kola Peninsula, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesalova, Elena; Asavin, Alex

    2016-04-01

    This work presents an improved geomorphological methodology that uses 3D model of relief, remotely-sensed data, geological, geophysical maps and tools of Geographical Information Systems. On the basis of maps of 1: 50,000 and 1: 200,000 the Digital Elevation model (DEM) of Khibiny massif was developed. We used software ARC / INFO v10.2 ESRI. A DEM was used for analyzing landform by extracting the slope gradient, curvature, valley pro?les, slope, aspect and so on. The results were gradually re?ned from the interpretation of satellite imagery and geological map Geomorphological analysis will allow us to determine spatial regularities in inner massive construction. We try to found areas where gas emissions (CH4/H2) enrich, according to morphometry, geology, tectonic and other environments. The main regional blocks were de?ned by different morphological evidences: impression zone, similar to subsidence caldera; uplift zone, domed area (located in the highest part of massif and zone of intersection of main faults) and others. It says that there are the few stages in the development of the Khibiny massif. There is no common concept of the consequence of intrudes magmatic phases now. And we hope that our geomorphical analysis take a new evidences about this problems. Locations of the blocks' borders (tectonic zones) were recognized by lineament analysis of valleys and tectonic faults presented in relief. Erosion system is represented by valleys of 4 ranks. It inherits the zone of tectonic disturbances 3 groups of faults were recognized: 1) Global lineament system cross whole peninsula - existing before Khibiny massif intrusion; 2) Faults associated with the formation of the intrusive phases sequence and magma differentiation and with later collision history during magma cooling; 3) Crack system related to neotectonic process. We believed that if different magmatic phases intrude in similar tectonic environment, the common spatial system of faults will be formed. Really we

  19. Landscape unit based digital elevation model development for the freshwater wetlands within the Arthur C. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xie, Zhixiao; Liu, Zhongwei; Jones, John W.; Higer, Aaron L.; Telis, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrologic regime is a critical limiting factor in the delicate ecosystem of the greater Everglades freshwater wetlands in south Florida that has been severely altered by management activities in the past several decades. "Getting the water right" is regarded as the key to successful restoration of this unique wetland ecosystem. An essential component to represent and model its hydrologic regime, specifically water depth, is an accurate ground Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) supplies important hydrologic data, and its products (including a ground DEM) have been well received by scientists and resource managers involved in Everglades restoration. This study improves the EDEN DEMs of the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, also known as Water Conservation Area 1 (WCA1), by adopting a landscape unit (LU) based interpolation approach. The study first filtered the input elevation data based on newly available vegetation data, and then created a separate geostatistical model (universal kriging) for each LU. The resultant DEMs have encouraging cross-validation and validation results, especially since the validation is based on an independent elevation dataset (derived by subtracting water depth measurements from EDEN water surface elevations). The DEM product of this study will directly benefit hydrologic and ecological studies as well as restoration efforts. The study will also be valuable for a broad range of wetland studies.

  20. Automatic identification of fault surfaces through Object Based Image Analysis of a Digital Elevation Model in the submarine area of the North Aegean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyropoulou, Evangelia

    2015-04-01

    The current study was focused on the seafloor morphology of the North Aegean Basin in Greece, through Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) using a Digital Elevation Model. The goal was the automatic extraction of morphologic and morphotectonic features, resulting into fault surface extraction. An Object Based Image Analysis approach was developed based on the bathymetric data and the extracted features, based on morphological criteria, were compared with the corresponding landforms derived through tectonic analysis. A digital elevation model of 150 meters spatial resolution was used. At first, slope, profile curvature, and percentile were extracted from this bathymetry grid. The OBIA approach was developed within the eCognition environment. Four segmentation levels were created having as a target "level 4". At level 4, the final classes of geomorphological features were classified: discontinuities, fault-like features and fault surfaces. On previous levels, additional landforms were also classified, such as continental platform and continental slope. The results of the developed approach were evaluated by two methods. At first, classification stability measures were computed within eCognition. Then, qualitative and quantitative comparison of the results took place with a reference tectonic map which has been created manually based on the analysis of seismic profiles. The results of this comparison were satisfactory, a fact which determines the correctness of the developed OBIA approach.

  1. Mapping mine wastes and analyzing areas affected by selenium-rich water runoff in southeast Idaho using AVIRIS imagery and digital elevation data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mars, J.C.; Crowley, J.K.

    2003-01-01

    Remotely sensed hyperspectral and digital elevation data from southeastern Idaho are combined in a new method to assess mine waste contamination. Waste rock from phosphorite mining in the area contains selenium, cadmium, vanadium, and other metals. Toxic concentrations of selenium have been found in plants and soils near some mine waste dumps. Eighteen mine waste dumps and five vegetation cover types in the southeast Idaho phosphate district were mapped by using Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) imagery and field data. The interaction of surface water runoff with mine waste was assessed by registering the AVIRIS results to digital elevation data, enabling determinations of (1) mine dump morphologies, (2) catchment watershed areas above each mine dump, (3) flow directions from the dumps, (4) stream gradients, and (5) the extent of downstream wetlands available for selenium absorption. Watersheds with the most severe selenium contamination, such as the South Maybe Canyon watershed, are associated with mine dumps that have large catchment watershed areas, high stream gradients, a paucity of downstream wetlands, and dump forms that tend to obstruct stream flow. Watersheds associated with low concentrations of dissolved selenium, such as Angus Creek, have mine dumps with small catchment watershed areas, low stream gradients, abundant wetlands vegetation, and less obstructing dump morphologies. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A semi-automated tool for reducing the creation of false closed depressions from a filled LIDAR-derived digital elevation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waller, John S.; Doctor, Daniel H.; Terziotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Closed depressions on the land surface can be identified by ‘filling’ a digital elevation model (DEM) and subtracting the filled model from the original DEM. However, automated methods suffer from artificial ‘dams’ where surface streams cross under bridges and through culverts. Removal of these false depressions from an elevation model is difficult due to the lack of bridge and culvert inventories; thus, another method is needed to breach these artificial dams. Here, we present a semi-automated workflow and toolbox to remove falsely detected closed depressions created by artificial dams in a DEM. The approach finds the intersections between transportation routes (e.g., roads) and streams, and then lowers the elevation surface across the roads to stream level allowing flow to be routed under the road. Once the surface is corrected to match the approximate location of the National Hydrologic Dataset stream lines, the procedure is repeated with sequentially smaller flow accumulation thresholds in order to generate stream lines with less contributing area within the watershed. Through multiple iterations, artificial depressions that may arise due to ephemeral flow paths can also be removed. Preliminary results reveal that this new technique provides significant improvements for flow routing across a DEM and minimizes artifacts within the elevation surface. Slight changes in the stream flow lines generally improve the quality of flow routes; however some artificial dams may persist. Problematic areas include extensive road ditches, particularly along divided highways, and where surface flow crosses beneath road intersections. Limitations do exist, and the results partially depend on the quality of data being input. Of 166 manually identified culverts from a previous study by Doctor and Young in 2013, 125 are within 25 m of culverts identified by this tool. After three iterations, 1,735 culverts were identified and cataloged. The result is a reconditioned

  3. Long-term stability of peneplains and landscape evolution in southern Tibet inferred from field data, cosmogenic nuclides, and digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Ding, L.; Zhang, L.

    2010-05-01

    Peneplains constitute a widespread and well developed geomorphic element on the Tibetan Plateau, nevertheless little is known about their formation and the subsequent landscape evolution. In southern Tibet, north of Nam Co (~31° 20'N, 90° E), a particularly well-preserved peneplain occurs at an elevation of ~5350 m in Cretaceous granitoids. The main planation surface has been incised by small streams that formed additional small low-relief surfaces at lower elevations. Fluvial incision of the main peneplain has generated a local relief of up to ~700 m. The progressive incision has led to hillslope gradients that increase with decreasing elevation, i.e. from the main peneplain at ~5350 m down to the current base level at ~4650 m, as revealed by field observations and the analysis of digital elevation model. In order to quantify the landscape evolution of the peneplain region we determined local and catchment-wide erosion rates from the concentration of in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be. Local erosion rates on the main peneplain and the low-relief bedrock surfaces at lower elevation range from 6 to 12 m Ma-1 and indicate that the geomorphic surfaces are stable over long periods of time. Spatially integrated erosion rates of small river systems that are incising and eroding headwards into the main peneplain are only slightly higher and range from 11 to 18 m Ma-1. Even if river incision has proceeded at a rate that is 2-4 times higher than the catchment-wide erosion rates, i.e. at 30 to 60 m Ma-1, it would take about 10 to 20 Ma to generate the local relief of ~700 m observed today. This demonstrates that the major peneplain is a very stable geomorphic element with a minimum age of 10 to 20 Ma and that the landscape in the region has barely been modified by erosion in the last millions of years.

  4. Digital Elevations and Extents of Regional Hydrogeologic Units in the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifer System From Long Island, New York, to North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, Jason P.; David C. Andreasen; Mcfarland, E. Randolph; Watt, Martha K.

    2016-01-01

    Digital geospatial datasets of the extents and top elevations of the regional hydrogeologic units of the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system from Long Island, New York, to northeastern North Carolina were developed to provide an updated hydrogeologic framework to support analysis of groundwater resources. The 19 regional hydrogeologic units were delineated by elevation grids and extent polygons for 20 layers: the land and bathymetric surface at the top of the unconfined surficial aquifer, the upper surfaces of 9 confined aquifers and 9 confining units, and the bedrock surface that defines the base of all Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain sediments. The delineation of the regional hydrogeologic units relied on the interpretive work from source reports for New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina rather than from re-analysis of fundamental hydrogeologic data. This model of regional hydrogeologic unit geometries represents interpolation, extrapolation, and generalization of the earlier interpretive work. Regional units were constructed from available digital data layers from the source studies in order to extend units consistently across political boundaries and approximate units in offshore areas.Though many of the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain hydrogeologic units may extend eastward as far as the edge of the Atlantic Continental Shelf, the modeled boundaries of all regional hydrogeologic units in this study were clipped to an area approximately defined by the furthest offshore extent of fresh to brackish water in any part of the aquifer system, as indicated by chloride concentrations of 10,000 milligrams per liter. Elevations and extents of units that do not exist onshore in Long Island, New York, were not included north of New Jersey. Hydrogeologic units in North Carolina were included primarily to provide continuity across the Virginia-North Carolina State boundary, which was important for defining the southern edge of

  5. Regional glacier mass loss estimated by ICESat-GLAS data and SRTM digital elevation model in the West Kunlun Mountains, Tibetan Plateau, 2003-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongbo; Wang, Ninglian; Guo, Zhongming; Wu, Yuwei

    2014-01-01

    The Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) altimetry and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) data are used to estimate glacier mass loss changes in the West Kunlun Mountains, Tibetan Plateau (TP), 2003 to 2009. We integrated Landsat thematic mapper (TM)/enhanced TM images and GIS spatial analysis to map glacier surface elevation changes during 2003 to 2009. The ICESat-GLAS data can be used as baselines for surface elevation changes in altimetry as well as for TM imagery changes for depicting glacier area. Least-squares regression of an ICESat-derived thickness series shows the regional glacier mass decreased at an average rate of 1.41±0.23 km3/year water equivalent from 2003 to 2009, during the period of 2003 to 2009, the trend in thickness change became weaker. The ICESat-GLAS and SRTM DEM elevation differences between February 2003 and October 2009 show that the glacier surface elevations were decreasing below 5800 m but increased by 1.1±0.7 m above 6000 m a.s.l. region over that period. Thickness changes in the lower reaches of the glaciers indicate that the glacier ice ablation was mainly due to the summer temperature increases of 0.23°C and the summer precipitation decreases of 47.8 mm as measured at four stations, as well as the effects of sand and dust sources from the Tarim Basin. Meanwhile, in the upper parts of the glaciers (above 5800 m a.s.l.), ice surface elevation was increasing even though the Hetian station summer temperature at the 500 hPa level showed an obvious decrease of 0.78°C compared to 2003. In the upper part of the glacier-covered region, firn compaction and surface density should be taken into account. The glacier surges and bedrock movement may also lead to an underestimate of the volume loss due to the reduced mass conversion.

  6. Topogrid Derived 10 Meter Resolution Digital Elevation Model of the Shenandoah National Park and Surrounding Region, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Tanner, Seth D.

    2004-01-01

    Explanation The purpose of developing a new 10m resolution DEM of the Shenandoah National Park Region was to more accurately depict geologic structure, surfical geology, and landforms of the Shenandoah National Park Region in preparation for automated landform classification. Previously, only a 30m resolution DEM was available through the National Elevation Dataset (NED). During production of the Shenandoah10m DEM of the Park the Geography Discipline of the USGS completed a revised 10m DEM to be included into the NED. However, different methodologies were used to produce the two similar DEMs. The ANUDEM algorithm was used to develop the Shenadoah DEM data. This algorithm allows for the inclusion of contours, streams, rivers, lake and water body polygons as well as spot height data to control the elevation model. A statistical analysis using over 800 National Geodetic Survey (NGS) first and second order vertical control points reveals that the Shenandoah10m DEM, produced as a part of the Appalachian Blue Ridge Landscape project, has a vertical accuracy of ?4.87 meters. The metadata for the 10m NED data reports a vertical accuracy of ?7m. A table listing the NGS control points, the elevation comparison, and the RMSE for the Shenandoah10m DEM is provided. The process of automated terrain classification involves developing statistical signatures from the DEM for each type of surficial deposit and landform type. The signature will be a measure of several characteristics derived from the elevation data including slope, aspect, planform curvature, and profile curvature. The quality of the DEM is of critical importance when extracting terrain signatures. The highest possible horizontal and vertical accuracy is required. The more accurate Shenandoah 10m DEM can now be analyzed and integrated with the geologic observations to yield statistical correlations between the two in the development of landform and surface geology mapping projects.

  7. State of Florida 1:24,000- and 1:100,000-scale Quadrangle Index Map - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts 1:24,000- and 1:100,000-scale quadrangle footprints over a color shaded relief representation of the State of Florida. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED source data for this map consists of a mixture of 30-meter- and 10-meter-resolution DEMs. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Figure 1 shows a similar representation for the entire U.S. Gulf Coast, using coarsened 30-meter NED data. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. Quadrangle names, dated April, 2006, were obtained from the Federal Geographic Names Information System. The NED data were downloaded in 2004.

  8. Exploring the relationship between hydrologic parameters and nutrient loads using digital elevation model and GIS - a case study from Sugarcreek headwaters, Ohio, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Prasad, V Krishna; Ortiz, Ariel; Stinner, Ben; McCartney, David; Parker, Jason; Hudgins, Deana; Hoy, Casey; Moore, Richard

    2005-11-01

    Ohio is typical among the Midwestern and Eastern United States with high levels of water pollutants, the main sources being from agriculture. In this study, we used a digital elevation model in conjunction with hydrological indices to determine the role of landscape complexity affecting the spatial and temporal variation in pollutant levels, in one of the most impaired headwater streams in Ohio. More than eighty five percent of the study area is dominated by agriculture. Spatial distribution of slope (S), altitude and wetness index along with other watershed parameters such as flow direction, flow accumulation, stream networks, flow stream orders and erosion index were used within a Geographic Information Systems framework to quantify variation in nitrate and phosphate loads to headwater streams. Stream monitoring data for nutrient loads were used to correlate the observed spatial and temporal patterns with hydrological parameters using multiple linear regressions. Results from the wetness index calculated from a digital elevation model suggested a range of 0.10-16.39, with more than 35% having values less than 4.0. A Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) predicted soil loss in the range of 0.01-4.0 t/ha/yr. Nitrate nitrogen levels in the study area paralleled precipitation patterns over time, with higher nitrate levels corresponding to high precipitation. Atmospheric deposition through precipitation could explain approximately 35% of total nitrate levels observed in streams. Among the different topographic variables and hydrological indices, results from the step-wise multiple regression suggested the following best predictors, (1) elevation range and upstream flow length for nitrate, (2) flow direction and upstream flow length for ammonia-nitrogen and slope, and (3) elevation range for phosphate levels. Differences in the landscape models observed for nitrate, phosphate and ammonia-nitrogen in the surface waters were attributed partly to differences in the

  9. Slope adjustment of runoff curve number (CN) using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) for Kuantan River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Abolghasem

    2015-10-01

    The Natural Resources Conservation Service Curve Number (NRCS-CN) method is widely used for predicting direct runoff from rainfall. It employs the hydrologic soil groups and landuse information along with period soil moisture conditions to derive NRCS-CN. This method has been well documented and available in popular rainfall-runoff models such as HEC-HMS, SWAT, SWMM and many more. The Sharply-Williams and Hank methods was used to adjust CN values provided in standard table of TR-55. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) is used to derive slope map with spatial resolution of 30 m for Kuantan River Basin (KRB). The two investigated method stretches the conventional CN domain to the lower values. The study shows a successful application of remote sensing data and GIS tools in hydrological studies. The result of this work can be used for rainfall-runoff simulation and flood modeling in KRB.

  10. An automated, open-source pipeline for mass production of digital elevation models (DEMs) from very-high-resolution commercial stereo satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, David E.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Moratto, Zachary M.; Smith, Benjamin E.; Joughin, Ian R.; Porter, Claire; Morin, Paul

    2016-06-01

    We adapted the automated, open source NASA Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP) to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) and orthoimages from very-high-resolution (VHR) commercial imagery of the Earth. These modifications include support for rigorous and rational polynomial coefficient (RPC) sensor models, sensor geometry correction, bundle adjustment, point cloud co-registration, and significant improvements to the ASP code base. We outline a processing workflow for ∼0.5 m ground sample distance (GSD) DigitalGlobe WorldView-1 and WorldView-2 along-track stereo image data, with an overview of ASP capabilities, an evaluation of ASP correlator options, benchmark test results, and two case studies of DEM accuracy. Output DEM products are posted at ∼2 m with direct geolocation accuracy of <5.0 m CE90/LE90. An automated iterative closest-point (ICP) co-registration tool reduces absolute vertical and horizontal error to <0.5 m where appropriate ground-control data are available, with observed standard deviation of ∼0.1-0.5 m for overlapping, co-registered DEMs (n = 14, 17). While ASP can be used to process individual stereo pairs on a local workstation, the methods presented here were developed for large-scale batch processing in a high-performance computing environment. We are leveraging these resources to produce dense time series and regional mosaics for the Earth's polar regions.

  11. Comparison of transform coding methods with an optimal predictor for the data compression of digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Statistical encoding techniques enable the reduction of the number of bits required to encode a set of symbols, and are derived from their probabilities. Huffman encoding is an example of statistical encoding that has been used for error-free data compression. The degree of compression given by Huffman encoding in this application can be improved by the use of prediction methods. These replace the set of elevations by a set of corrections that have a more advantageous probability distribution. In particular, the method of Lagrange Multipliers for minimization of the mean square error has been applied to local geometrical predictors. Using this technique, an 8-point predictor achieved about a 7 percent improvement over an existing simple triangular predictor.

  12. High-resolution digital elevation model of lower Cowlitz and Toutle Rivers, adjacent to Mount St. Helens, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of October 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the Toutle River basin, which drains the northern and western flanks of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and lower Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, continues to monitor and mitigate excess sediment in North and South Fork Toutle River basins to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From October 22–27, 2007, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 273 square kilometers (105 square miles) of lower Cowlitz and Toutle River tributaries from the Columbia River at Kelso, Washington, to upper North Fork Toutle River (below the volcano's edifice), including lower South Fork Toutle River. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at

  13. High-resolution digital elevation model of Mount St. Helens crater and upper North Fork Toutle River basin, Washington, based on an airborne lidar survey of September 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosbrucker, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The lateral blast, debris avalanche, and lahars of the May 18th, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, dramatically altered the surrounding landscape. Lava domes were extruded during the subsequent eruptive periods of 1980–1986 and 2004–2008. More than three decades after the emplacement of the 1980 debris avalanche, high sediment production persists in the North Fork Toutle River basin, which drains the northern flank of the volcano. Because this sediment increases the risk of flooding to downstream communities on the Toutle and Cowlitz Rivers, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), under the direction of Congress to maintain an authorized level of flood protection, built a sediment retention structure on the North Fork Toutle River in 1989 to help reduce this risk and to prevent sediment from clogging the shipping channel of the Columbia River. From September 16–20, 2009, Watershed Sciences, Inc., under contract to USACE, collected high-precision airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) data that cover 214 square kilometers (83 square miles) of Mount St. Helens and the upper North Fork Toutle River basin from the sediment retention structure to the volcano's crater. These data provide a digital dataset of the ground surface, including beneath forest cover. Such remotely sensed data can be used to develop sediment budgets and models of sediment erosion, transport, and deposition. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used these lidar data to develop digital elevation models (DEMs) of the study area. DEMs are fundamental to monitoring natural hazards and studying volcanic landforms, fluvial and glacial geomorphology, and surface geology. Watershed Sciences, Inc., provided files in the LASer (LAS) format containing laser returns that had been filtered, classified, and georeferenced. The USGS produced a hydro-flattened DEM from ground-classified points at Castle, Coldwater, and Spirit Lakes. Final results averaged about five laser last

  14. Decadal region-wide and glacier-wide mass balances derived from multi-temporal ASTER satellite digital elevation models. Validation over the Mont-Blanc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthier, Etienne; Cabot, Vincent; Vincent, Christian; Six, Delphine

    2016-06-01

    Since 2000, a vast archive of stereo-images has been built by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) satellite. Several studies already extracted glacier mass balances from multi-temporal ASTER digital elevation models (DEMs) but they lacked accurate independent data for validation. Here, we apply a linear regression to a time series of 3D-coregistered ASTER DEMs to estimate the rate of surface elevation changes (dh/dtASTER) and geodetic mass balances of Mont-Blanc glaciers (155 km²) between 2000 and 2014. Validation using field and spaceborne geodetic measurements reveals large errors at the individual pixel level (> 1 m a-1) and an accuracy of 0.2-0.3 m a-1 for dh/dtASTER averaged over areas larger than 1 km². For all Mont-Blanc glaciers, the ASTER region-wide mass balance (-1.05±0.37 m water equivalent (w.e.) a-1) agrees remarkably with the one measured using Spot5 and Pléiades DEMs (-1.06±0.23 m w.e. a-1) over their common 2003-2012 period. This multi-temporal ASTER DEM strategy leads to smaller errors than the simple differencing of two ASTER DEMs. By extrapolating dh/dtASTER to mid-February 2000, we infer a mean penetration depth of about 9±3 m for the C-band Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) radar signal, with a strong altitudinal dependency (range 0-12 m). This methodology thus reveals the regional pattern of glacier surface elevation changes and improves our knowledge of the penetration of the radar signal into snow and ice.

  15. Assessing the quality of Digital Elevation Models obtained from mini-Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for overland flow modelling in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, J. P.; Moy de Vitry, M.; Scheidegger, A.; Rieckermann, J.

    2015-06-01

    Precise and detailed Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are essential to accurately predict overland flow in urban areas. Unfortunately, traditional sources of DEM remain a bottleneck for detailed and reliable overland flow models, because the resulting DEMs are too coarse to provide DEMs of sufficient detail to inform urban overland flows. Interestingly, technological developments of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) suggest that they have matured enough to be a competitive alternative to satellites or airplanes. However, this has not been tested so far. In this this study we therefore evaluated whether DEMs generated from UAV imagery are suitable for urban drainage overland flow modelling. Specifically, fourteen UAV flights were conducted to assess the influence of four different flight parameters on the quality of generated DEMs: (i) flight altitude, (ii) image overlapping, (iii) camera pitch and (iv) weather conditions. In addition, we compared the best quality UAV DEM to a conventional Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)-based DEM. To evaluate both the quality of the UAV DEMs and the comparison to LiDAR-based DEMs, we performed regression analysis on several qualitative and quantitative metrics, such as elevation accuracy, quality of object representation (e.g., buildings, walls and trees) in the DEM, which were specifically tailored to assess overland flow modelling performance, using the flight parameters as explanatory variables. Our results suggested that, first, as expected, flight altitude influenced the DEM quality most, where lower flights produce better DEMs; in a similar fashion, overcast weather conditions are preferable, but weather conditions and other factors influence DEM quality much less. Second, we found that for urban overland flow modelling, the UAV DEMs performed competitively in comparison to a traditional LiDAR-based DEM. An important advantage of using UAVs to generate DEMs in urban areas is their flexibility that enables more frequent

  16. Optimization of the resolution of remotely sensed digital elevation model to facilitate the simulation and spatial propagation of flood events in flat areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetsas, Nikolaos; Skoulikaris, Charalampos; Katsogiannos, Fotis; Zalidis, George; Alexandridis, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing products, such as Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), under specific computational interfaces of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has fostered and facilitated the acquisition of data on specific hydrologic features, such as slope, flow direction and flow accumulation, which are crucial inputs to hydrology or hydraulic models at the river basin scale. However, even though DEMs of different resolution varying from a few km up to 20m are freely available for the European continent, these remotely sensed elevation data are rather coarse in cases where large flat areas are dominant inside a watershed, resulting in an unsatisfactory representation of the terrain characteristics. This scientific work aims at implementing a combing interpolation technique for the amelioration of the analysis of a DEM in order to be used as the input ground model to a hydraulic model for the assessment of potential flood events propagation in plains. More specifically, the second version of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM2), which has an overall accuracy of around 20 meters, was interpolated with a vast number of aerial control points available from the Hellenic Mapping and Cadastral Organization (HMCO). The uncertainty that was inherent in both the available datasets (ASTER & HMCO) and the appearance of uncorrelated errors and artifacts was minimized by incorporating geostatistical filtering. The resolution of the produced DEM was approximately 10 meters and its validation was conducted with the use of an external dataset of 220 geodetic survey points. The derived DEM was then used as an input to the hydraulic model InfoWorks RS, whose operation is based on the relief characteristics contained in the ground model, for defining, in an automated way, the cross section parameters and simulating the flood spatial distribution. The plain of Serres, which is located in the downstream part of the Struma/Strymon transboundary river basin shared

  17. Principal facts for gravity stations in the Nevada portion of the Kingman 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracken, R. E.; Kane, M. F.

    The principal facts contained in the tables of this report document 862 gravity stations in the Nevada portion of the Kingman 1 degree x 2 degree quadrangle. Two data sets are documented: 193 stations by the USGS, and 669 from the Department of Defense gravity data file. The description of the USGS stations includes gravity meter used, base station locations and values, elevation sources and errors, data reduction methods, and Bouguer anomaly error analysis. Only principal facts are listed for the Department of Defense data. All stations have been terrain corrected.

  18. Elevating your elevator talk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  19. Improving Approaches for Determining Ice Volume Change on the Greenland Ice Sheet Margin using ASTER and SPOT Digital Elevation Models and Spectral Masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. N.; Rhodes, T.; Tulaczyk, S. M.; Finfrock, A.; Lajoie, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) is the largest ice sheet in the Northern Hemisphere and understanding trends in its mass balance has important implications for predicting global sea level rise. High relief topography along the margin of the GIS makes it difficult to use low-resolution remote sensing to resolve ice elevations. These marginal regions however, tend to be more dynamic than the interior of the ice sheet and may show signs of ice volume loss earlier than the interior. In this study we difference georeferenced ASTER digital elevation models (DEMs) from 2000-01 (30 meter resolution) with SPOT DEMs from 2008-09 (40 meter resolution) made available through the SPIRIT IPY program. ASTER DEMs from 2006-07 are used where SPOT data is not available. The change in these DEMs is divided by the time elapsed between scenes giving change in km3 per year. The method used for DEM production is not accurate over low contrast surfaces such as water, and snow. High relief bedrock can also have more error than areas of glacial ice due to slope. Masking snow, water, and rock from scenes minimizes total error. Most methods of spectral masking available in the literature rely on establishing thresholds for a scene which separate snow from ice from water. In order to apply these methods to multiple scenes taken at different latitudes, seasons, and sun altitudes, a new set of thresholds need to be developed for each scene which proves to be a very time intensive process. When covering large areas with a mosaic of scenes, these methods have not proven applicable. We have developed a method of nesting masks which allows for faster and less subjective trial-and-error threshold setting. This method can be applied to a range of scenes with little to no individual manipulation giving a repeatable result. The first mask eliminates most bedrock with a negative NDSI and fjord water and sea ice with an elevation of about 0. A principal components analysis (PCA) is done under this mask for

  20. Digital Elevation Models of the Pre-Eruption 2000 Crater and 2004-07 Dome-Building Eruption at Mount St. Helens, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Messerich, J.A.; Schilling, S.P.; Thompson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Presented in this report are 27 digital elevation model (DEM) datasets for the crater area of Mount St. Helens. These datasets include pre-eruption baseline data collected in 2000, incremental model subsets collected during the 2004-07 dome building eruption, and associated shaded-relief image datasets. Each dataset was collected photogrammetrically with digital softcopy methods employing a combination of manual collection and iterative compilation of x,y,z coordinate triplets utilizing autocorrelation techniques. DEM data points collected using autocorrelation methods were rigorously edited in stereo and manually corrected to ensure conformity with the ground surface. Data were first collected as a triangulated irregular network (TIN) then interpolated to a grid format. DEM data are based on aerotriangulated photogrammetric solutions for aerial photograph strips flown at a nominal scale of 1:12,000 using a combination of surveyed ground control and photograph-identified control points. The 2000 DEM is based on aerotriangulation of four strips totaling 31 photographs. Subsequent DEMs collected during the course of the eruption are based on aerotriangulation of single aerial photograph strips consisting of between three and seven 1:12,000-scale photographs (two to six stereo pairs). Most datasets were based on three or four stereo pairs. Photogrammetric errors associated with each dataset are presented along with ground control used in the photogrammetric aerotriangulation. The temporal increase in area of deformation in the crater as a result of dome growth, deformation, and translation of glacial ice resulted in continual adoption of new ground control points and abandonment of others during the course of the eruption. Additionally, seasonal snow cover precluded the consistent use of some ground control points.

  1. Update on CRUST1.0 - A 1-degree Global Model of Earth's Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, Gabi; Masters, Guy; Ma, Zhitu; Pasyanos, Mike

    2013-04-01

    Our new 1-by-1 degree global crustal model, CRUST1.0, was introduced last year and serves as starting model in a comprehensive effort to compile a global model of Earth's crust and lithosphere, LITHO1.0 (Pasyanos et al., 2012). The Moho depth in CRUST1.0 is based on 1-degree averages of a recently updated database of crustal thickness data from active source seismic studies as well as from receiver function studies. In areas where such constraints are still missing, for example in Antarctica, crustal thicknesses are estimated using gravity constraints. The compilation of the new crustal model initially followed the philosophy of the widely used crustal model CRUST2.0 (Bassin et al., 2000; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~gabi/crust2.html) to assign elastic properties in the crystalline crust according to basement age or tectonic setting (loosely following an updated map by Artemieva and Mooney (2001; http://www.lithosphere.info). For cells with no local seismic or gravity constraints, statistical averages of crustal properties, including crustal thickness, were extrapolated. However, in places with constraints the depth to basement and mantle are given explicitly and no longer assigned by crustal type. This allows for much smaller errors in both. In each 1-degree cell, boundary depth, compressional and shear velocity as well as density is given for 8 layers: water, ice, 3 sediment layers and upper, middle and lower crystalline crust. Topography, bathymetry and ice cover are taken from ETOPO1. The sediment cover is based on our sediment model (Laske and Masters, 1997; http://igppweb.ucsd.edu/~sediment.html), with some near-coastal updates. In an initial step toward LITHO1.0, the model is then validated against new global surface wave disperison maps and adjusted in areas of extreme misfit. This poster presents the next validation step: compare the new Moho depths with in-situ active source and receiver function results. We also present comparisons with CRUST2.0. CRUST1.0 is

  2. Semi-automated Technique to Extract Boundary of Valley/mountain Glaciers using Glacio-morphological Information from Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, M.; Panigrahy, S.; Kundu, S.

    2014-11-01

    A semi automated technique has been developed to extract the spatial extension of valleys and mountain glaciers. The method is based on morphological properties of glaciated area extracted from Digital Elevation Model (DEM). Identification of glacial boundary based on spectral information from optical remote sensing imageries produces errors due to misclassification of debris-covered ablation area with surrounding rocky terrain and perennially snow-covered slope with debris free glaciated area. Elevation information DEM of Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), CartoDEM and ASTER DEM have been used. A part of western Himalayas was selected as the study area that contains large glaciated basins, e.g., Bhagirathi, Baspa, Chandra basin. First order derivatives, slope aspect, and second order derivatives like, profile and plan curvatures are computed from the DEM. The derivatives are used to quantify and characterise the morphological aspects of the glaciated area and used in the decision rule models to generate the glacial boundaries. The ridge lines of the study areas are also generated from the plan curvature and used in the model to delineate the catchments areas of the glaciers. The slope based boundary is checked for consistency with the boundary from profile curvature and combined manually to generate the final glacier boundary. Area and length under the derived boundary of Gangotri glacier of Bhagirathi catchments are 90.25 sq km and 30.5 km. The result has been checked with high resolution optical data. This objective approach is important to delineate glaciated area, measure the length, width and area and generate glacial hypsometry, concentration factor of the glaciers. Accuracy of the result depends up on the quality of the DEM. DEM generated by SAR interferometric technique is found superior over DEM generated from other interpolation techniques.

  3. Evaluating the Effects of Reductions in LiDAR Data on the Visual and Statistical Characteristics of the Created Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asal, F. F.

    2016-06-01

    With continuous developments in LiDAR technologies high point cloud densities have been attainable but accompanied by challenges for processing big volumes of data. Reductions in high point cloud densities are expected to lower data acquisition and data processing costs; however this could affect the characteristics of the generated Digital Elevation Models (DEMs). This research aimed to evaluate the effects of reductions in airborne LiDAR point cloud data densities on the visual and statistical characteristics of the generated DEMs. DEMs have been created from a dataset which constitutes last returns of raw LiDAR data that was acquired at bare lands for Gilmer County, USA between March and April 2004, where qualitative and quantitative testing analyses have been performed. Visual analysis has shown that the DEM can withstand a considerable degree of quality with reduced densities down to 0.128 pts/m2 (47 % of the data remaining), however degradations in the DEM visual characteristics appeared in coarser tones and rougher textures have occurred with more reductions. Additionally, the statistical analysis has indicated that the standard deviations of the DEM elevations have decreased by only 22 % of the total decrease with data density reductions down to 0.101 pts/m2 (37 % of the data remaining) while greater rate of decreasing in the standard deviations has occurred with more reductions referring to greater rate of surface smoothing and elevation approximating. Furthermore, the accuracy analysis testing has given that the DEM accuracy has degraded by only 4.83 % of the total degradations with data density reductions down to 0.128 pts/m2, however great deteriorations in the DEM accuracy have occurred with more data reductions. Finally, it is recommended that LiDAR data can withstand point density reductions down to 0.128 pts/m2 (about 50 % of the data) without big deteriorations in the visual and

  4. NATIONAL ELEVATION DATASET

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) has been developed by merging the highest-resolution, best-quality elevation data available across the United States into a seamless raster format. NED is the result of the maturation of the USGS effort to provide 1:24,000-scale Digital ...

  5. NATIONAL ELEVATION DATASET HILLSHADE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) has been developed bymerging the highest-resolution, best-quality elevation data available across the United States into a seamless raster format. NED is the result of the maturation of the USGS effort to provide 1:24,000-scale Digital E...

  6. Landslide-susceptibility analysis using light detection and ranging-derived digital elevation models and logistic regression models: a case study in Mizunami City, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang-Jie; Sawada, Kazuhide; Moriguchi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    To mitigate the damage caused by landslide disasters, different mathematical models have been applied to predict landslide spatial distribution characteristics. Although some researchers have achieved excellent results around the world, few studies take the spatial resolution of the database into account. Four types of digital elevation model (DEM) ranging from 2 to 20 m derived from light detection and ranging technology to analyze landslide susceptibility in Mizunami City, Gifu Prefecture, Japan, are presented. Fifteen landslide-causative factors are considered using a logistic-regression approach to create models for landslide potential analysis. Pre-existing landslide bodies are used to evaluate the performance of the four models. The results revealed that the 20-m model had the highest classification accuracy (71.9%), whereas the 2-m model had the lowest value (68.7%). In the 2-m model, 89.4% of the landslide bodies fit in the medium to very high categories. For the 20-m model, only 83.3% of the landslide bodies were concentrated in the medium to very high classes. When the cell size decreases from 20 to 2 m, the area under the relative operative characteristic increases from 0.68 to 0.77. Therefore, higher-resolution DEMs would provide better results for landslide-susceptibility mapping.

  7. High-resolution digital elevation model from tri-stereo Pleiades-1 satellite imagery for lava flow volume estimates at Fogo Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, Marco; González, Pablo J.; Hooper, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Resolving changes in topography through time using accurate high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) is key to understanding active volcanic processes. For the first time in a volcanic environment, we utilize very high-resolution tri-stereo optical imagery acquired by the Pleiades-1 satellite constellation and generate a 1 m resolution DEM of Fogo Volcano, Cape Verde -- the most active volcano in the Eastern Atlantic region. Point cloud density is increased by a factor of 6.5 compared to conventional stereo imagery, and the number of 1 m2 pixels with no height measurements is reduced by 43%. We use the DEM to quantify topographic changes associated with the 2014-2015 eruption at Fogo. Height differences between the posteruptive Pleiades-1 DEM and the preeruptive topography from TanDEM-X give a lava flow volume of 45.83 ± 0.02 × 106 m3, emplaced over an area of 4.8 km2 at a mean rate of 6.8 m3 s-1.

  8. Adjustment of Measurements with Multiplicative Errors: Error Analysis, Estimates of the Variance of Unit Weight, and Effect on Volume Estimation from LiDAR-Type Digital Elevation Models

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Xu, Peiliang; Peng, Junhuan; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2014-01-01

    Modern observation technology has verified that measurement errors can be proportional to the true values of measurements such as GPS, VLBI baselines and LiDAR. Observational models of this type are called multiplicative error models. This paper is to extend the work of Xu and Shimada published in 2000 on multiplicative error models to analytical error analysis of quantities of practical interest and estimates of the variance of unit weight. We analytically derive the variance-covariance matrices of the three least squares (LS) adjustments, the adjusted measurements and the corrections of measurements in multiplicative error models. For quality evaluation, we construct five estimators for the variance of unit weight in association of the three LS adjustment methods. Although LiDAR measurements are contaminated with multiplicative random errors, LiDAR-based digital elevation models (DEM) have been constructed as if they were of additive random errors. We will simulate a model landslide, which is assumed to be surveyed with LiDAR, and investigate the effect of LiDAR-type multiplicative error measurements on DEM construction and its effect on the estimate of landslide mass volume from the constructed DEM. PMID:24434880

  9. Adjustment of measurements with multiplicative errors: error analysis, estimates of the variance of unit weight, and effect on volume estimation from LiDAR-type digital elevation models.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun; Xu, Peiliang; Peng, Junhuan; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2013-01-01

    Modern observation technology has verified that measurement errors can be proportional to the true values of measurements such as GPS, VLBI baselines and LiDAR. Observational models of this type are called multiplicative error models. This paper is to extend the work of Xu and Shimada published in 2000 on multiplicative error models to analytical error analysis of quantities of practical interest and estimates of the variance of unit weight. We analytically derive the variance-covariance matrices of the three least squares (LS) adjustments, the adjusted measurements and the corrections of measurements in multiplicative error models. For quality evaluation, we construct five estimators for the variance of unit weight in association of the three LS adjustment methods. Although LiDAR measurements are contaminated with multiplicative random errors, LiDAR-based digital elevation models (DEM) have been constructed as if they were of additive random errors. We will simulate a model landslide, which is assumed to be surveyed with LiDAR, and investigate the effect of LiDAR-type multiplicative error measurements on DEM construction and its effect on the estimate of landslide mass volume from the constructed DEM. PMID:24434880

  10. Validating NASA's Airborne Multikilohertz Microlaser Altimeter (Microaltimeter) by Direct Comparison of Data Taken Over Ocean City, Maryland Against an Existing Digital Elevation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Peter

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Airborne Multikilohertz Microlaser Altimeter (Microaltimeter) is a scanning, photon-counting laser altimeter, which uses a low energy (less than 10 microJuoles), high repetition rate (approximately 10 kHz) laser, transmitting at 532 nm. A 14 cm diameter telescope images the ground return onto a segmented anode photomultiplier, which provides up to 16 range returns for each fire. Multiple engineering flights were made during 2001 and 2002 over the Maryland and Virginia coastal area, all during daylight hours. Post-processing of the data to geolocate the laser footprint and determine the terrain height requires post- detection Poisson filtering techniques to extract the actual ground returns from the noise. Validation of the instrument's ability to produce accurate terrain heights will be accomplished by direct comparison of data taken over Ocean City, Maryland with a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the region produced at Ohio State University (OSU) from other laser altimeter and photographic sources. The techniques employed to produce terrain heights from the Microaltimeter ranges will be shown, along with some preliminary comparisons with the OSU DEM.

  11. Use of Digital Elevation Models to understand and map glacial landforms — The case of the Canigou Massif (Eastern Pyrenees, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankl, Amaury; Nyssen, Jan; Calvet, Marc; Heyse, Irenée

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents an improved geomorphological methodology that uses remotely-sensed data, a Geographical Information System and a brief field campaign to allow rapid, yet, precise mapping as well as interpretation and analysis of glacial earth surface morphology in high mountain areas. The study area consists of the Quaternary-glaciated part of the Coumelade valley (Canigou massif, eastern Pyrenees, France), which ranges between 1450 and 2731 m a.s.l. A topographical-map-derived Digital Elevation Model was used for analyzing glacial landforms by extracting the slope gradient, valley profiles and the slope aspect. The results were gradually refined from the interpretations of aerial photograph and the field investigation. Glacial landforms are present above 1500 m a.s.l. and include glacial and nivation cirques, cirque and latero-frontal moraines (7.7 × 10 6 m³) and micro-scale landforms such as chattermarks, crescent grooves and polished surfaces. The geomorphological investigation reveals that the Quaternary glaciation of the Coumelade valley remained limited, resulting in a low denudation rate of 0.011 mm yr - 1 over the last glacial cycle.

  12. Multi-component mapping of karst features with remote sensing, digital elevation data and GIS: a case study from Central Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siart, C.; Bubenzer, O.; Eitel, B.

    2009-04-01

    The application of remote sensing (RS) and GIS techniques based on high resolution satellite imagery in combination with digital elevation models (DEMs) can provide detailed information for geomorphologic purposes such as karst feature mapping. Moreover, area wide surveying is significantly improved and supported, as computer applications allow a very cost and time effective proceeding. The exemplary focus of the project at hand is on the Ida-Ori in Central Crete, a high mountain range predominantly consisting of Palaeozoic to Mesozoic limestones and dolomites. Subdivided into several vast high plateaus, its main geomorphologic characteristics are dry valleys of Miocene age and an intense karstification reaching from the base up to the highest peak at 2456 m a.s.l. Nearly all types of karst forms appear in immediate adjacency, while dolines, uvalas and poljes are the most frequent objects. Such depressions provide sediment traps for eroded soils or aeolian deposits and, thus, can be significantly filled with colluvial materials. Since the area wide karstification of Mount Ida has not been fully explored so far, the prime objective is to evaluate the potential and suitability of satellite data and DEMs (SRTM 90m, ASTER 15m) for the precise mapping of those structures. Furthermore, the dominant influencing variables of karst processes are investigated. To acquire spatially comprehensive information, Quickbird MS tiles (0.6 m resolution) were used for land surface classifications with RS-techniques. Subsequent to image correction and enhancement, a hybrid parallelepiped maximum likelihood classification approach was carried out. Postprocessing and conversion of raster data into vector format finally allowed spatial analyses in a GIS environment. Derivatives of DEMs (slope, aspect, contours, curvature, hydrologic drainage pattern) were generated in order to assess their suitability for karst mapping and to specify the remote sensing outcomes, particularly by conducting

  13. Satellite Remote Sensing of Landscape Freeze/Thaw State Dynamics for Complex Topography and Fire Disturbance Areas Using Multi-Sensor Radar and SRTM Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podest, E.; McDonald, K.; Kimball, J.; Randerson, J. T.

    2003-12-01

    The annual freeze/thaw cycle drives the length of the growing season in the boreal forest, and is a major factor determining annual productivity and associated exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere. Variations in freeze/thaw processes are spatially and temporally complex in boreal environments, particularly in areas of complex topography and in fire disturbance regimes. We investigate the spatial and temporal characteristics of seasonal freeze/thaw dynamics in complex boreal landscapes, as derived from radar backscatter measured with ERS (C-band, VV polarization, 200m resolution) and JERS-1 (L-band, HH polarization, 100m resolution) Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs), and with the SeaWinds scatterometer (Ku-band, 25km resolution). C- and L-band backscatter are applied to characterize freeze/thaw transitions for a chronosequence of recovering burn sites near Delta Junction, Alaska, and for a region of complex topography on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. We characterize differences in radar-derived freeze/thaw state, examining transitions over complex terrain and landscape disturbance regimes. In areas of complex terrain, we explore freeze/thaw dynamics related to elevation, slope aspect and varying landcover. In the burned regions, we explore the timing of seasonal freeze/thaw transition as related to the recovering landscape, relative to that of a nearby control site. We apply in situ biophysical measurements, including flux tower measurements to validate and interpret the remotely sensed parameters. A multi-scale analysis is performed relating high-resolution SAR backscatter and moderate resolution scatterometer measurements to assess trade-offs in spatial and temporal resolution in the remotely sensed fields. A temporal change discriminator is applied to classify time series radar imagery to classify the landscape freeze-thaw state. We apply a 30m-resolution digital elevation model (DEM) derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data to orthorectify the time

  14. Satellite-derived Digital Elevation Model (DEM) selection, preparation and correction for hydrodynamic modelling in large, low-gradient and data-sparse catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarihani, Abdollah A.; Callow, John N.; McVicar, Tim R.; Van Niel, Thomas G.; Larsen, Joshua R.

    2015-05-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that accurately replicate both landscape form and processes are critical to support modelling of environmental processes. Topographic accuracy, methods of preparation and grid size are all important for hydrodynamic models to efficiently replicate flow processes. In remote and data-scarce regions, high resolution DEMs are often not available and therefore it is necessary to evaluate lower resolution data such as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) for use within hydrodynamic models. This paper does this in three ways: (i) assessing point accuracy and geometric co-registration error of the original DEMs; (ii) quantifying the effects of DEM preparation methods (vegetation smoothed and hydrologically-corrected) on hydrodynamic modelling relative accuracy; and (iii) quantifying the effect of the hydrodynamic model grid size (30-2000 m) and the associated relative computational costs (run time) on relative accuracy in model outputs. We initially evaluated the accuracy of the original SRTM (∼30 m) seamless C-band DEM (SRTM DEM) and second generation products from the ASTER (ASTER GDEM) against registered survey marks and altimetry data points from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). SRTM DEM (RMSE = 3.25 m,) had higher accuracy than ASTER GDEM (RMSE = 7.43 m). Based on these results, the original version of SRTM DEM, the ASTER GDEM along with vegetation smoothed and hydrologically corrected versions were prepared and used to simulate three flood events along a 200 km stretch of the low-gradient Thompson River, in arid Australia (using five metrics: peak discharge, peak height, travel time, terminal water storage and flood extent). The hydrologically corrected DEMs performed best across these metrics in simulating floods compared with vegetation smoothed DEMs and original DEMs. The response of model performance to grid size was non

  15. Computing the LS factor for the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation through array-based slope processing of digital elevation data using a C++ executable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Remortel, R. D.; Maichle, R. W.; Hickey, R. J.

    2004-11-01

    Until the mid-1990s, a major limitation of using the Universal Soil Loss Equation and Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation erosion models at regional landscape scales was the difficulty in estimating LS factor (slope length and steepness) values suitable for use in geographic information systems applications. A series of ArcInfo™ Arc Macro Language scripts was subsequently created that enabled the production of either USLE- or RUSLE-based LS factor raster grids using a digital elevation model input data set. These scripts have functioned exceptionally well for both single- and multiple-watershed applications within targeted study areas. However, due to the nature and complexity of flowpath processing necessary to compute cumulative slope length, the scripts have not taken advantage of available computing resources to the extent possible. It was determined that the speed of the computer runs could be significantly increased without sacrificing accuracy in the final results by performing the majority of the elevation data processing in a two-dimensional array framework outside the ArcInfo environment. This paper describes the evolution of a major portion of the original RUSLE-based AML processing code to an array-based executable program using ANSI C++™ software. Examples of the relevant command-line arguments are provided and comparative results from several AML-vs.-executable time trials are also presented. In wide-ranging areas of the United States where it has been tested, the new RUSLE-based executable has produced LS-factor values that mimic those generated by the original AML as well as the RUSLE Handbook estimates. Anticipated uses of the executable program include water quality assessment, landscape ecology, land-use change detection studies, and decision support activities. This research has now given users the option of either running the executable file alone to process a single watershed reporting unit or running a supporting AML shell program that

  16. Developmental and hormonal regulation of protein H1 degrees in rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Gjerset, R; Gorka, C; Hasthorpe, S; Lawrence, J J; Eisen, H

    1982-01-01

    The tissue and cellular distribution and regulation of the chromatin protein H1 degrees has been examined in developing and adult mouse and in rat. The protein appears in specific cell types of solid tissues only when the cells have terminated their maturation. This was found for brain, retina, striated and cardiac muscle, and liver. In tissues that depend on hormones for their function and maintenance, the expression of H1 degrees is dependent on the continued presence of the specific maintenance hormone. In regenerating rat liver the amount of H1 degrees decreases to one-third after the onset of DNA synthesis. The possible role of H1 degrees is discussed in light of these results. Images PMID:6954544

  17. Investigation of knickpoint propagation in tributaries to the South Fork Eel River, northern California, using 10-m and LiDAR-derived digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. A.; Kelsey, H. M.

    2009-12-01

    Base-level lowering is expressed in the long-profile of the South Fork Eel River, northern California by a knickpoint/knickzone ~135 km upstream from its mouth. Numerous knickpoints and knickzones in tributaries of the South Fork Eel River indicate that knickpoint propagation may be the dominant process of Quaternary base-level lowering throughout the basin. We study two tributary basins downstream from the mainstem South Fork Eel River knickzone, Bear Pen and Standley Creeks, for evidence of base-level lowering via knickpoint propagation. Results from the 10-m digital elevation models (DEM) indicate that these two tributaries, and their sub-tributaries, deviate from a typical concave-up long profile, and display a convexity in profile shape toward the stream mouths. When scaled against drainage area, tributary basins within the study area are steeper in the lower reaches of the basins. Steepness indices (ksn) normalized to a reference concavity (θ) of 0.45, are ~40-60 toward the mouth of the tributary basins, whereas in the upper watersheds ksn values are typically 10-40. Knickzones are identified along several of the sub-tributaries using the 10 m DEM data base. In addition, many field-identified knickpoints are not detected on 10m DEMs. Under the auspices of the National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping high-resolution LiDAR data recently (Sept. 2009) have been collected for the study area. We anticipate additional knickpoints and more subtle knickzones will be identified with high-quality LiDAR data. If knickpoint propagation has occurred in these two tributaries, we expect not only a steepening in lower reaches of these watersheds, but an increase in valley wall slopes. LiDAR data will allow precise measurement of valley walls and channel morphometrics, and more subtle indications of knickpoint propagation may be detected.

  18. Precision agriculture in dry land: spatial variability of crop yield and roles of soil surveys, aerial photos, and digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachabe, Mahmood; Ahuja, Laj; Shaffer, Mary Lou; Ascough, J.; Flynn, Brian; Cipra, J.

    1998-12-01

    In dryland, yield of crop varies substantially in space, often changing by an order of magnitude within few meters. Precision agriculture aims at exploiting this variability by changing agriculture management practices in space according to site specific conditions. Thus instead of managing a field (typical area 50 to 100 hectares) as a single unit using average conditions, the field is partitioned into small pieces of land known as management units. The size of management units can be in the order of 100 to 1,000 m2 to capture the patterns of variation of yield in the field. Agricultural practices like seeding rate, type of crop, and tillage and fertilizers are applied at the scale of the management unit to suit local agronomic conditions in unit. If successfully practiced, precision agriculture has the potential of increasing income and minimizing environmental impacts by reducing over application of crop production inputs. In the 90s, the implementation of precision agriculture was facilitated tremendously due to the wide availability and use of three technologies: (1) the Global Positioning System (GPS), (2) the Geographic Information System (GIS), and (3) remote sensing. The introduction of the GPS allowed the farmer to determine his coordinate location as equipments are moved in the field. Thus, any piece of equipment can be easily programmed to vary agricultural practices according to coordinate location over the field. The GIS allowed the storage and manipulation of large sets of data and the production of yield maps. Yield maps can be correlated with soil attributes from soil survey, and/or topographical attributes from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). This helps predicting variation of potential yield over the landscape based on the spatial distribution of soil and topographical attributes. Soil attributes may include soil PH, Organic Matter, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity, whereas topographical attributes involve the estimations of elevation, slope

  19. Digital map of the elevation of the base of the High Plains Aquifer in the Republican River Basin upstream of Hardy, Nebraska, in parts of Nebraska, Kansas, and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Michaela R.; Cornwall, James F.; Landon, Matthew K.

    2002-01-01

    This digital spatial data set consists of the aquifer base elevation contours (50-foot contour interval) for part of the High Plains aquifer in the central United States. This subset of the High Plains aquifer covers the Republican River Basin in Nebraska, Kansas, and Colorado upstream from the streamflow station on the Republican River near Hardy, Nebraska, near the Kansas/Nebraska border. In Nebraska, the digitized contours extend to the South Platte, Platte, and Little Blue Rivers. In Colorado and Kansas, the digital contours extend to the edge of the High Plains aquifer. These boundaries were chosen to simplify boundary conditions for a computer simulation model being used for a hydrologic study of the Republican River Basin. The data are not intended for use at scales larger than 1:500,000.

  20. Automatic and Objective Detection of Shallow Landslides from Lidar-Derived High-Resolution Digital Elevation Models Using a Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeder, W. J.; McKean, J. A.; Tonina, D.

    2012-12-01

    An accurate and detailed inventory map of existing shallow landslides is a necessary component of shallow landslide risk assessment. Traditional methods for creating landslide inventory maps include visual interpretation of aerial photographs, visual analysis of topographic maps and field surveys. The visual methods tend to be subjective and can be greatly hampered by the presence of forests or other dense vegetation. Field surveying is time consuming and can be limited by access to steep or heavily vegetated terrain. Shallow slides are also often only reported as point locations with no recorded information about size or even two-dimensional footprint. The increasing availability of high resolution, LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs), showing bare earth topography even beneath forest canopies, has created new opportunities to improve and automate the shallow landslide mapping process. Here we introduce the Automated Shallow Landslide Detection (ASLD) method, which is an integrated set of Matlab® utilities that, uses a two-dimensional continuous Morlet wavelet transform in an automated and largely unsupervised manner, to analyze high resolution terrain data and map the locations and footprints of shallow landslides. The terrain data are filtered to remove the finest scale of roughness and then the Morlet wavelet transform is applied to the terrain model. The Morlet wavelet is directionally selective and effectively steered to align with the aspect at each node in the DEM. This reduces confusion with other, likely non-landslide generated, topographic features that are not aligned with the local slope direction. Convex-upward features are then eliminated, as the polarity of their wavelet transform will be reversed. Finally, simple user-defined rules for the general shape of shallow landslides are applied to further eliminate false positives. The capabilities of ASLD are demonstrated in two different drainages. Buckhorn Creek is tributary to the South Fork

  1. Releasing the digital elevation model for the whole Italian territory: a case study reporting two years of core-data dissemination for Earth Sciences communities and other stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone; Nannipieri, Luca

    2014-05-01

    EPOS (European Plate Observing System) is the European initiative for the implementation and integration of European Research Infrastructures in the field of Solid Earth Sciences. In particular, EPOS is aimed at creating a common environment for data exchange for both the scientific community and relevant stakeholders interested in Earth Sciences. In such a context, a service providing access to the complete topography of one of the countries participating in EPOS represents a step forward towards the realization of the EPOS mission. Here we report about two years of activity of a data dissemination service which released (for free) a digital elevation model (DEM) of the whole Italian territory at 10 m-resolution named TINTALY/01. The new TINITALY/01 DEM for the whole Italian territory was completed and presented by INGV in 2007. This DEM was the final result of a project funded by the Italian Ministry of the Environment. TINITALY/01 was completed in two phases: in a first phase, independent elevation models for single regions were derived, and in a second phase, all the regional models were merged into a single, seamless model covering the whole territory of Italy. In early 2012, a web portal was published (http://tinitaly.pi.ingv.it/) through which the above DEM is open for a full web-GIS navigation (3-D navigation in anaglyph mode or standard 2-D hillshade), and where internet navigators can ask for the download of the DEM dataset (in grid format, 10 m-resolution) through the compilation of an online form (http://tinitaly.pi.ingv.it/account_request_form.html). Submission of the form implies stating the destination of use for the data, and acceptance of the policy of use (i.e. no-profit use). After nearly two years from the opening of the portal, the DEM is still browsed by up to 10-20 users per day (about 3000 visits throughout 2013). As of 31 December 2013, about 220 users affiliated to nearly 150 different institutions or associations (i.e. universities

  2. Combining digital elevation data (SRTM/ASTER), high resolution satellite imagery (Quickbird) and GIS for geomorphological mapping: A multi-component case study on Mediterranean karst in Central Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siart, Christoph; Bubenzer, Olaf; Eitel, Bernhard

    2009-11-01

    Remote sensing data have become more and more popular for geomorphological investigations because their steadily increasing level of detail and accessibility opens up new potentials. In this context, this paper examines the application and quality of digital elevation models (SRTM and ASTER DEMs), high resolution satellite imagery (Quickbird) and GIS techniques for the detection and mapping of karst landforms (mainly enclosed depressions) at different scales in the Ida Mountains of Central Crete. Besides discussing methodological issues and evaluating suitability potentials, we conducted an exemplary case study based on spatial analysis of the regional karst morphology. Different input datasets and processing methods are applied (GIS-based analysis, land cover classification, raster calculations, etc.) in order to carry out an area-wide surveying and mapping of karst depressions. The findings are supported and validated by auxiliary field studies. Due to the level of detail and occasional data errors, an exclusive use of satellite imagery or digital elevation models for automatic karst landform detection performs insufficiently. Our results demonstrate that mapping karst features through remote sensing is significantly dependent on scale of interest, existing environmental conditions and data quality. A semi-automatic data integration approach on the basis of digital datasets generated by combined satellite image processing and DEM analysis yields the best results, especially when indirect karst-indicating variables like iron oxide-rich sediments are included as detection criteria. The multi-component application presented in this paper provides a time-saving and effective tool for meso- to macro-scale object detection and extensive study areas. However, the potential of fully automated karst feature mapping still needs to be explored in future work. Concerning the spatial dimension of karstification in Central Crete, the GIS-based results allow differentiating

  3. Mars elevation distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington-Kraus, Annie E.; Ablin, Karyn K.

    1991-01-01

    A Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of Mars was derived with both Mercator and Sinusoidal Equal-Area projections from the global topographic map of Mars (scale 1:15 million, contour interval 1 km). Elevations on the map are referred to Mars' topographic datum that is defined by the gravity field at a 6.1-millibar pressure surface with respect to the center of mass of Mars. The DTM has a resolution at the equator of 1/59.226 degrees (exactly 1 km) per pixel. By using the DTM, the volumetric distribution of Mars topography above and below the datum has previously been calculated. Three types of elevation distributions of Mars' topography were calculated from the same DTM: (1) the frequency distribution of elevations at the pixel resolution; (2) average elevations in increments of 6 degrees in both longitude and latitude; and (3) average elevations in 36 separate blocks, each covering 30 degrees of latitude and 60 degrees of longitude.

  4. Countrywide digital elevation models for the Islamic Republic of Mauritania—SRTM and ASTER (phase V, deliverable 65): Chapter F in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Gregory K.

    2015-01-01

    A digital elevation model (DEM) of the entire country of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania was produced using Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data as required for deliverable 65 of the contract. In addition, because of significant recent advancements of availability, seamlessness, and validity of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) global elevation data, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) extended its efforts to include a higher resolution countrywide ASTER DEM as value added to the required Deliverable 63, which was limited to five areas within the country. Both SRTM and ASTER countrywide DEMs have been provided in ERDAS Imagine (.img) format that is also directly compatible with ESRI ArcMap, ArcGIS Explorer, and other GIS applications.

  5. Computer Programs to Display and Modify Data in Geographic Coordinates and Methods to Transfer Positions to and from Maps, with Applications to Gravity Data Processing, Global Positioning Systems, and 30-Meter Digital Elevation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plouff, Donald

    1998-01-01

    Computer programs were written in the Fortran language to process and display gravity data with locations expressed in geographic coordinates. The programs and associated processes have been tested for gravity data in an area of about 125,000 square kilometers in northwest Nevada, southeast Oregon, and northeast California. This report discusses the geographic aspects of data processing. Utilization of the programs begins with application of a template (printed in PostScript format) to transfer locations obtained with Global Positioning Systems to and from field maps and includes a 5-digit geographic-based map naming convention for field maps. Computer programs, with source codes that can be copied, are used to display data values (printed in PostScript format) and data coverage, insert data into files, extract data from files, shift locations, test for redundancy, and organize data by map quadrangles. It is suggested that 30-meter Digital Elevation Models needed for gravity terrain corrections and other applications should be accessed in a file search by using the USGS 7.5-minute map name as a file name, for example, file '40117_B8.DEM' contains elevation data for the map with a southeast corner at lat 40? 07' 30' N. and lon 117? 52' 30' W.

  6. An approach to regional wetland digital elevation model development using a differential global positioning system and a custom-built helicopter-based surveying system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Desmond, G.B.; Henkle, C.; Glover, R.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate topographic data are critical to restoration science and planning for the Everglades region of South Florida, USA. They are needed to monitor and simulate water level, water depth and hydroperiod and are used in scientific research on hydrologic and biologic processes. Because large wetland environments and data acquisition challenge conventional ground-based and remotely sensed data collection methods, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) adapted a classical data collection instrument to global positioning system (GPS) and geographic information system (GIS) technologies. Data acquired with this instrument were processed using geostatistics to yield sub-water level elevation values with centimetre accuracy (??15 cm). The developed database framework, modelling philosophy and metadata protocol allow for continued, collaborative model revision and expansion, given additional elevation or other ancillary data. ?? 2012 Taylor & Francis.

  7. ELEVATING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Frederick, H.S.; Kinsella, M.A.

    1959-02-24

    An elevator is described, which is arranged for movement both in a horizontal and in a vertical direction so that the elevating mechanism may be employed for servicing equipment at separated points in a plant. In accordance with the present invention, the main elevator chassis is suspended from a monorail. The chassis, in turn supports a vertically moveable carriage, a sub- carriage vertically moveable on the carriage, and a turntable carried by the sub- carriage and moveable through an arc of 90 with the equipment attached thereto. In addition, the chassis supports all the means required to elevate or rotate the equipment.

  8. The location of Airy-0, the Mars prime meridian reference, from stereo photogrammetric processing of THEMIS IR imaging and digital elevation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, T. C.; Christensen, P.; Smith, D. E.; Neumann, G. A.; Kirk, R. L.; Caplinger, M. A.; Albee, A. A.; Seregina, N. V.; Neukum, G.; Archinal, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    The small crater Airy-0 was selected from Mariner 9 images to be the reference for the Mars prime meridian. Initial analyses in the year 2000 tied Viking Orbiter and Mars Orbiter Camera images of Airy-0 to the evolving Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter global digital terrain model to update the location of Airy-0. Based upon this tie and radiometric tracking of landers/rovers from Earth, new expressions for the Mars spin axis direction, spin rate, and prime meridian epoch value were produced to define the orientation of the Martian surface in inertial space over time. Since the Mars Global Surveyor mission and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter global digital terrain model were completed some time ago, a more exhaustive study has been performed to determine the accuracy of the Airy-0 location and orientation of Mars at the standard epoch. Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) IR image cubes of the Airy and Gale crater regions were tied to the global terrain grid using precision stereo photogrammetric image processing techniques. The Airy-0 location was determined to be about 0.001° east of its predicted location using the currently defined International Astronomical Union (IAU) prime meridian location. Information on this new location and how it was derived will be provided to the NASA Mars Exploration Program Geodesy and Cartography Working Group for their assessment. This NASA group will make a recommendation to the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements to update the expression for the Mars spin axis direction, spin rate, and prime meridian location.

  9. Satellite remote sensing of landscape freeze/thaw state dynamics for complex Topography and Fire Disturbance Areas Using multi-sensor radar and SRTM digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podest, Erika; McDonald, Kyle; Kimball, John; Randerson, James

    2003-01-01

    We characterize differences in radar-derived freeze/thaw state, examining transitions over complex terrain and landscape disturbance regimes. In areas of complex terrain, we explore freezekhaw dynamics related to elevation, slope aspect and varying landcover. In the burned regions, we explore the timing of seasonal freeze/thaw transition as related to the recovering landscape, relative to that of a nearby control site. We apply in situ biophysical measurements, including flux tower measurements to validate and interpret the remotely sensed parameters. A multi-scale analysis is performed relating high-resolution SAR backscatter and moderate resolution scatterometer measurements to assess trade-offs in spatial and temporal resolution in the remotely sensed fields.

  10. EarthEnv-DEM90: A nearly-global, void-free, multi-scale smoothed, 90m digital elevation model from fused ASTER and SRTM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Natalie; Regetz, James; Guralnick, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of DEM products are available to the public at no cost, though all are characterized by trade-offs in spatial coverage, data resolution, and quality. The absence of a high-resolution, high-quality, well-described and vetted, free, global consensus product was the impetus for the creation of a new DEM product described here, 'EarthEnv-DEM90'. This new DEM is a compilation dataset constructed via rigorous techniques by which ASTER GDEM2 and CGIAR-CSI v4.1 products were fused into a quality-enhanced, consistent grid of elevation estimates that spans ∼91% of the globe. EarthEnv-DEM90 was assembled using methods for seamlessly merging input datasets, thoroughly filling voids, and smoothing data irregularities (e.g. those caused by DEM noise) from the approximated surface. The result is a DEM product in which elevational artifacts are strongly mitigated from the input data fusion zone, substantial voids are filled in the northern-most regions of the globe, and the entire DEM exhibits reduced terrain noise. As important as the final product is a well defined methodology, along with new processing techniques and careful attention to final outputs, that extends the value and usability of the work beyond just this single product. Finally, we outline EarthEnv-DEM90 acquisition instructions and metadata availability, so that researchers can obtain this high-resolution, high-quality, nearly-global new DEM product for the study of wide-ranging global phenomena.

  11. Understanding of altered N-glycosylation-related gene expression in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells subjected to elevated ammonium concentration by digital mRNA counting.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Gyun Min

    2015-08-01

    To understand the effects of ammonium on N-glycosylation, recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells that produce the Fc-fusion protein were cultivated in serum-free suspension cultures with 10 mM ammonium addition. The addition of ammonium to the cultures reduced the relative proportion of acidic isoforms and sialic acid content of an Fc-fusion protein. Fifty two N-glycosylation-related gene expressions were assessed by the NanoString nCounter system, which provides a digital readout using custom-designed color-coded probes. Among these queried genes, thirteen genes (gale, nans, gpi, man2a1, b4galt5, b4galt7, st3gal2, st3gal5, glb1, hexa, hexb, neu1, and neu3) were up-regulated over 1.5 times in the culture with ammonium addition after 5 days of culture; however, none of the 54 genes were significantly different after 3 days of culture. In particular, the expression level of neu1 (sialidase-1) and neu3 (sialidase-3), which play a role in reduction of sialylation, increased over 2 times. Likewise, the protein expression levels of sialidase-1 and sialidase-3 determined by Western blot analysis were also increased significantly in the culture with ammonium addition. Transient transfection of neu-1 or neu3-targeted siRNAs significantly improved the sialic acid content of the Fc-fusion protein in the culture with ammonium addition, indicating that the decreased sialic acid content was in part due to the increased expression level of sialidase. Taken together, the results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the detrimental effect of ammonium on N-glycosylation, especially sialylation, in rCHO cells. PMID:25728222

  12. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  13. Evaluating the Impact of Sea Level Rise and Coastal Flooding on NASA Centers and Facilities by Implementing Terrestrial Laser Scanning Surveys to Improve Coastal Digital Elevation and Inundation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, L. J.; Nerem, R. S.; Williams, K.; Meertens, C.; Lestak, L.; Masters, D.

    2014-12-01

    Sea level is rising in response to climate change. Currently the global mean rate is a little over 3 mm/year, but it is expected to accelerate significantly over this century. This will have a profound impact on coastal populations and infrastructure, including NASA centers and facilities. A detailed study proposed by the University of Colorado's Center for Astrodynamics Research on the impact of sea level rise on several of NASA's most vulnerable facilities was recently funded by NASA. Individual surveys at several high-risk NASA centers were conducted and used as case studies for a broader investigation that needs to be done for coastal infrastructure around the country. The first two years of this study included implementing and conducting a terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and GPS survey at Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida, Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia, Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, and Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. We are currently using airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data and TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanning) data to construct detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) of the facilities that we have assessed. The TLS data acquired at each center provides a very dense point cloud that is being used to improve the detail and accuracy of the digital elevation models currently available. We are also using GPS data we acquired at each center to assess the rate of vertical land movement at the facilities and to tie the DEM to tide gauges and other reference points. With completed, detailed DEMs of the topography and facilities at each center, a series of simple inundation models will then be applied to each area. We will use satellite altimeter data from TOPEX, Jason-1, and Jason-2 to assess the sea level changes observed near these NASA facilities over the last 20 years along with sea level projections from global climate models (GCMs) and semi-empirical projections to make detailed maps

  14. Elevation Derivatives for National Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2005-01-01

    The Elevation Derivatives for National Applications (EDNA) project is a multi-agency effort to develop standard topographically derived layers for use in hydrologic and environmental modeling. The EDNA takes advantage of the seamless and filtered characteristics for the National Elevation Dataset (NED) to create a hydrologically conditioned Digital Elevation Model (DEM) useful for modeling applications. The goals of the project are to create a hydrologically conditioned DEM and systematically extract a set of standard derivatives that can be used to facilitate data integration with other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) framework data sets such as the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and the Watershed Boundaries Dataset (WBD).

  15. A Digital Solar Aspect Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.

    1961-01-01

    The solar aspect sensor described herein performs the analog-to-digital conversion of data optically. To accomplish this, it uses a binary "Gray code" light mask to produce a digital indication, in vehicle-fixed coordinates, of the elevation and azimuth angles of incident light from the sun. This digital solar aspect sensor system, in Explorer X, provided measurements of both elevation and azimuth angles to +/- 2 degrees at a distance of over 140,000 statute miles.

  16. The importance of the vertical accuracy of digital elevation models in gauging inundation by sea level rise along the Valdelagrana beach and marshes (Bay of Cádiz, SW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile-Jurado, Pablo; Ojeda-Zújar, José

    2013-04-01

    The identification of potential coastal inundation caused by future sea level rise requires not only time series records from tide gauges, but also high-quality digital elevation models (DEMs). This study assesses the importance of DEM vertical accuracy in predicting inundation by sea level rise along the Valdelagrana beach and marshes of the Bay of Cádiz (SW Spain). A present-day (2000) and a projected (2100) high tide have been spatialized over a traditional (aerial photogrammetry) regional DEM of Andalusia with a horizontal spatial resolution of 10 m and a vertical accuracy of 0.68 m RMSE (root mean square error), and a LIDAR-derived DEM of the Valdelagrana study site with the same spatial resolution but a vertical accuracy of 0.205 m RMSE. The simulations are based on a bathtub model, which accounts for the effect of vertical barriers. The results reveal that the presence of infrastructures such as roads and salterns is the key to delimit the extent of water penetration during high tides in an otherwise homogeneously flat area comprising the beach and marshes of Valdelagrana. Moreover, in comparison with the highly accurate LIDAR DEM, the inundation areas derived from the lower-resolution DEM are overestimated by 72 % and 26 % for the present-day and future scenarios respectively. These findings demonstrate that DEM vertical accuracy is a critical variable in meaningfully gauging the impacts of sea level rise.

  17. Flood delineation from synthetic aperture radar data with the help of a priori knowledge from historical acquisitions and digital elevation models in support of near-real-time flood mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaffer, Stefan; Hollaus, Markus; Wagner, Wolfgang; Matgen, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    The monitoring of flood events with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors has attracted a considerable amount of attention during the last decade, owing to the growing interest in using spaceborne data in near-real time flood management. Most existing methods for classifying flood extent from SAR data rely on pure image processing techniques. In this paper, we propose a method involving a priori knowledge about an area taken from a multitemporal time series and a digital elevation model. A time series consisting of ENVISAT ASAR acquisitions was geocoded and coregistered. Then, a harmonic model was fitted to each pixel time series. The standardised residuals of the model were classified as flooded when exceeding a certain threshold value. Additionally, the classified flood extent was limited to flood-prone areas which were derived from a freely available DEM using the height above nearest drainage (HAND) index. Comparison with two different reference datasets for two different flood events showed that the approach yielded realistic results but underestimated the inundation extent. Among the possible reasons for this are the rather coarse resolution of 150 m and the sparse data coverage for a substantial part of the time series. Nevertheless, the study shows the potential for production of rapid overviews in near-real time in support of early response to flood crises.

  18. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? ...

  19. Data on ground-water quality for the southern Nevada part of the Kingman 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Alan H.; Williams, Rhea P.

    1987-01-01

    Water quality data for groundwater were compiled for the Kingman 1 degree x 2 degree quadrangle which covers a portion of southern Nevada. Chemical characteristics of the water are shown on a map (at a scale of 1:250,000) and on trilinear diagrams for the major ions. The data for the area are also presented in a table. (USGS)

  20. Data on ground-water quality for the Lovelock 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle, western Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Alan H.; Williams, Rhea P.

    1987-01-01

    Water quality data for groundwater has been compiled for the Lovelock 1 degree x 2 degree quadrangle which covers a portion of western Nevada. Chemical characteristics of the water are shown on a map (at a scale of 1:250,000) and on trilinear diagrams for the major ions. The data for the area are also presented in a table. (USGS)

  1. Data on ground-water quality for the Reno 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle, western Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Alan H.; Williams, Rhea P.

    1987-01-01

    Water quality data for groundwater has been compiled for the Reno 1 degree x 2 degree quadrangle which covers a portion of western Nevada. Chemical characteristics of the water are shown on a map (at a scale of 1:250,000) and on trilinear diagrams for the major ions. The data for the area is also presented in a table. (USGS)

  2. Fault growth and propagation during incipient continental rifting: Insights from a combined aeromagnetic and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model investigation of the Okavango Rift Zone, northwest Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinabo, B. D.; Hogan, J. P.; Atekwana, E. A.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Modisi, M. P.

    2008-06-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEM) extracted from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) data and high-resolution aeromagnetic data are used to characterize the growth and propagation of faults associated with the early stages of continental extension in the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ), northwest Botswana. Significant differences in the height of fault scarps and the throws across the faults in the basement indicate extended fault histories accompanied by sediment accumulation within the rift graben. Faults in the center of the rift either lack topographic expressions or are interpreted to have become inactive, or have large throws and small scarp heights indicating waning activity. Faults on the outer margins of the rift exhibit either (1) large throws or significant scarp heights and are considered older and active or (2) throws and scarp heights that are in closer agreement and are considered young and active. Fault linkages between major fault systems through a process of "fault piracy" have combined to establish an immature border fault for the ORZ. Thus, in addition to growing in length (by along-axis linkage of segments), the rift is also growing in width (by transferring motion to younger faults along the outer margins while abandoning older faults in the middle). Finally, utilization of preexisting zones of weakness allowed the development of very long faults (>100 km) at a very early stage of continental rifting, explaining the apparent paradox between the fault length versus throw for this young rift. This study clearly demonstrates that the integration of the SRTM DEM and aeromagnetic data provides a 3-D view of the faults and fault systems, providing new insight into fault growth and propagation during the nascent stages of continental rifting.

  3. Map showing geologic terranes of the Hailey 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle and the western part of the Idaho Falls 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Worl, R.G.; Johnson, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper version of Map Showing Geologic Terranes of the Hailey 1x2 Quadrangle and the western part of the Idaho Falls 1x2 Quadrangle, south-central Idaho was compiled by Ron Worl and Kate Johnson in 1995. The plate was compiled on a 1:250,000 scale topographic base map. TechniGraphic System, Inc. of Fort Collins Colorado digitized this map under contract for N.Shock. G.Green edited and prepared the digital version for publication as a geographic information system database. The digital geologic map database can be queried in many ways to produce a variety of geologic maps.

  4. High-resolution digital elevation dataset for Crater Lake National Park and vicinity, Oregon, based on LiDAR survey of August-September 2010 and bathymetric survey of July 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.

    2012-01-01

    Crater Lake partially fills the caldera that formed approximately 7,700 years ago during the eruption of a 12,000-foot volcano known as Mount Mazama. The caldera-forming or climactic eruption of Mount Mazama devastated the surrounding landscape, left a thick deposit of pumice and ash in adjacent valleys, and spread a blanket of volcanic ash as far away as southern Canada. Because the Crater Lake region is potentially volcanically active, knowledge of past events is important to understanding hazards from future eruptions. Similarly, because the area is seismically active, documenting and evaluating geologic faults is critical to assessing hazards from earthquakes. As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey was awarded funding for high-precision airborne LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) data collection at several volcanoes in the Cascade Range through the Oregon LiDAR Consortium, administered by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). The Oregon LiDAR Consortium contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc., to conduct the data collection surveys. Collaborating agencies participating with the Oregon LiDAR Consortium for data collection in the Crater Lake region include Crater Lake National Park (National Park Service) and the Federal Highway Administration. In the immediate vicinity of Crater Lake National Park, 798 square kilometers of LiDAR data were collected, providing a digital elevation dataset of the ground surface beneath forest cover with an average resolution of 1.6 laser returns/m2 and both vertical and horizontal accuracies of ±5 cm. The LiDAR data were mosaicked in this report with bathymetry of the lake floor of Crater Lake, collected in 2000 using high-resolution multibeam sonar in a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey, Crater Lake National Park, and the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New Hampshire. The bathymetric survey

  5. Geologic map of outcrop areas of sedimentary units in the eastern part of the Hailey 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle and part of the southern part of the Challis 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangle, south-central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Link, P.K.; Mahoney, J.B.; Bruner, D.J.; Batatian, L.D.; Wilson, Eric; Williams, F.J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The paper version of the Geologic map of outcrop areas of sedimentary units in the eastern part of the Hailey 1x2 Quadrangle and part of the southern part of the Challis 1x2 Quadrangle, south-central Idaho was compiled by Paul Link and others in 1995. The plate was compiled on a 1:100,000 scale topographic base map. TechniGraphic System, Inc. of Fort Collins Colorado digitized this map under contract for N.Shock. G.Green edited and prepared the digital version for publication as a GIS database. The digital geologic map database can be queried in many ways to produce a variety of geologic maps.

  6. Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.; Urs, Shalini R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of digital libraries research, practice, and literature. Highlights include new technologies; redefining roles; historical background; trends; creating digital content, including conversion; metadata; organizing digital resources; services; access; information retrieval; searching; natural language processing; visualization;…

  7. Aeromagnetic maps of the Colorado River region including the Kingman, Needles, Salton Sea, and El Centro 1 degree by 2 degrees quadrangles, California, Arizona, and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mariano, John; Grauch, V.J.

    1988-01-01

    Aeromagnetic anomalies are produced by variations in the strength and direction of the magnetic field of rocks that include magnetic minerals, commonly magnetite. Patterns of anomalies on aeromagnetic maps can reveal structures - for example, faults which have juxtaposed magnetic rocks against non-magnetic rocks, or areas of alteration where magnetic minerals have been destroyed by hydrothermal activity. Tectonic features of regional extent may not become apparent until a number of aeromagnetic surveys have been compiled and plotted at the same scale. Commonly the compilation involves piecing together data from surveys that were flown at different times with widely disparate flight specifications and data reduction procedures. The data may be compiled into a composite map, where all the pieces are plotted onto one map without regard to the difference in flight elevation and datum, or they may be compiled into a merged map, where all survey data are analytically reduced to a common flight elevation and datum, and then digitally merged at the survey boundaries. The composite map retains the original resolution of all the survey data, but computer methods to enhance regional features crossing the survey boundaries may not be applied. On the other hand, computer methods can be applied to the merged data, but the accuracy of the data may be slightly diminished.

  8. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1985-01-01

    A 3 year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for nonproportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved understanding were through several critical nonproportional loading experiments. The direction of cracking observed on failed specimens was also recorded and used to guide the development of the theory. Cyclic deformation responses were permanently recorded digitally during each test. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C. In contrast to some other metals, loading path in nonproportional loading had little effect on fatigue lives. Strain rate had a small effect on fatigue lives at 649 C. Of the various correlating parameters the modified plastic work and octahedral shear stress were the most successful.

  9. Mars digital terrain model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington, Annie-Elpis

    1987-01-01

    The Mars Digital Terrain Model (DTM) is the result of a new project to: (1) digitize the series of 1:2,000,000-scale topographic maps of Mars, which are being derived photogrammetically under a separate project, and (2) reformat the digital contour information into rasters of elevation that can be readily registered with the Digital Image Model (DIM) of Mars. Derivation of DTM's involves interpolation of elevation values into 1/64-degree resolution and transformation of them to a sinusoidal equal-area projection. Digital data are produced in blocks corresponding with the coordinates of the original 1:2,000,000-scale maps, i.e., the dimensions of each block in the equatorial belt are 22.5 deg of longitude and 15 deg of latitude. This DTM is not only compatible with the DIM, but it can also be registered with other data such as geologic units or gravity. It will be the most comprehensive record of topographic information yet compiled for the Martian surface. Once the DTM's are established, any enhancement of Mars topographic information made with updated data, such as data from the planned Mars Observer Mission, will be by mathematical transformation of the DTM's, eliminating the need for recompilation.

  10. Digital Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakel, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research on digital preservation issues, including born-digital and digitally recreated documents. Discusses electronic records research; metadata and other standards; electronic mail; Web-based documents; moving images media; selection of materials for digitization, including primary sources; administrative issues; media stability…

  11. Digital cartography of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.

    1987-01-01

    A medium-resolution Digital Image Model (DIM) of Mars is being compiled. A DIM is a mosaic of radiometrically corrected, photometrically modelled spacecraft images displaying accurate reflectance properties at uniform resolution, and geometrically tied to the best available control. The Mars medium-resolution DIM contains approximately 4700 Viking Orbiter image frames that were used to compile the recently completed 1:2,000,000-scale controlled photomosaic series of Mars. This DIM provides a planimetric control base to which all other Mars maps will be registered. A similar control base of topographic elevations (Digital Terrain Model, or DTM) is also being compiled. These products are scheduled for completion in 1989.

  12. National Digital Orthophoto Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service; Farm Service Agency; National States Geographic Information Council; U.S. Forest Service; U.S. Geological Survey

    1996-01-01

    A critical component of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI) is Framework. Framework provides a base on which to collect, register, and integrate geospatial information accurately and consistently. The Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) proposed that Framework include geodetic control, orthoimagery, elevation, transportation, hydrography, governmental units, and cadastral data. The Mapping Science Committee of the National Research Council recommends that geodetic control, orthoimagery, and elevation data become the critical foundation of the NSDI. The National Digital Orthophoto Program (NDOP) is a working model on how Federal, State, and local government, as well as private industry, can participate to develop the orthoimagery Framework for the Nation.

  13. INTEGER ELEVATION MODEL GRIDS FOR US EPA REGION 9

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integer Digital Elevation Models in GRID format for the mainland US administrative boundary of the US EPA Region 9 developed from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED). The administrative boundary is represented by the state boundaries of Ca...

  14. Digital Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin; Canan Gungoren, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Era in which we live is known and referred as digital age.In this age technology is rapidly changed and developed. In light of these technological advances in 21st century, schools have the responsibility of training "digital citizen" as well as a good citizen. Digital citizens must have extensive skills, knowledge, Internet and …

  15. Bouguer gravity anomaly and isostatic residual gravity maps of the Tonopah 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plouff, Donald

    1992-01-01

    A residual isostatic gravity map (sheet 2) was prepared so that the regional effect of isostatic compensation present on the Bouguer gravity anomaly map (sheet 1) would be minimized. Isostatic corrections based on the Airy-Heiskanen system (Heiskanen and Vening Meinesz, 1958, p. 135-137) were estimated by using 3-minute topographic digitization and applying the method of Jachens and Roberts (1981). Parameters selected for the isostatic model were 25 km for the normal crustal thickness at sea level, 2.67 g/cm3 for the density of the crust, and 0.4 g/cm3 for the contrast in density between the crust and the upper mantle. These parameters were selected so that the isostatic residual gravity map would be consistent with isostatic residual gravity maps of the adjacent Walker Lake quadrangle (Plouff, 1987) and the state of Nevada (Saltus, 1988c).

  16. National requirements for improved elevation data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Gregory I.; Sugarbaker, Larry J.; Jason, Allyson L.; Maune, David F.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of surveys, structured interviews, and workshops conducted to identify key national requirements for improved elevation data for the United States and its territories, including coastlines. Organizations also identified and reported the expected economic benefits that would be realized if their requirements for improved elevation were met (appendixes 1–3). This report describes the data collection methodology and summarizes the findings. Participating organizations included 34 Federal agencies, 50 States and two territories, and a sampling of local governments, tribes, and nongovernmental orgnizations. The nongovernmental organizations included The Nature Conservancy and a sampling of private sector businesses. These data were collected in 2010-2011 as part of the National Enhanced Elevation Assessment (NEEA), a study to identify program alternatives for better meeting the Nation’s elevation data needs. NEEA tasks included the collection of national elevation requirements; analysis of the benefits and costs of meeting these requirements; assessment of emerging elevation technologies, lifecycle data management needs, and costs for managing and distributing a national-scale dataset and derived products; and candidate national elevation program alternatives that balance costs and benefits in meeting the Nation’s elevation requirements. The NEEA was sponsored by the National Digital Elevation Program (NDEP), a government coordination body with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as managing partner that includes the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), among the more than a dozen agencies and organizations. The term enhanced elevation data as used in this report refers broadly to three-dimensional measurements of land or

  17. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  18. An Automated System of Knickpoint Definition and Extraction from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM): Implications for Efficient Large-Scale Mapping and Statistical Analyses of Knickpoint Distributions in Fluvial Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neely, A. B.; Bookhagen, B.; Burbank, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Knickpoints, or convexities in a stream's longitudinal profile, often delineate boundaries in stream networks that separate reaches eroding at different rates resulting from sharp temporal or spatial changes in uplift rate, contributing drainage area, precipitation, or bedrock lithology. We explicitly defined the geometry of a knickpoint in a manner that can be identified using an algorithm which operates in accordance with the stream power incision model, using a chi-plot analysis approach. This method allows for comparison between the real stream profile extracted from a DEM, and a linear best-fit line profile in chi-elevation space, representing a steady state theoretical stream functioning in accordance to uniform temporal and spatial conditions listed above. Assessing where the stream of interest is "under-steepened" and "over-steepened" with respect to a theoretical linear profile reveals knickpoints as certain points of slope inflection, extractable by our algorithm. We tested our algorithm on a 1m resolution LiDAR DEM of Santa Cruz Island (SCI), a tectonically active island 25km south of Santa Barbara, CA with an estimated uplift rate between 0.5 and 1.2mm/yr calculated from uplifted paleoshorelines. We have identified 1025 knickpoints using our algorithm and compared the position of these knickpoints to a similarly-sized dataset of knickpoints manually selected from distance-elevation longitudinal stream profiles for the same region. Our algorithm reduced mapping time by 99.3% and agreed with knickpoint positions from the manually selected knickpoint map for 85% of the 1025 knickpoints. Discrepancies can arise from inconsistencies in manual knickpoint selection that are not present in an automated computation. Additionally, the algorithm measures useful characteristics for each knickpoint allowing for quick statistical analyses. Histograms of knickpoint elevation and chi coordinate have a 3 peaked distribution, possibly expressing 3 levels of uplifted

  19. Elevation Map of Kathmandu, Nepal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Shuttle Radar Topgraphy Mission (SRTM) images show the basin of Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal: On the left a detail (27 km x 20.5 km) of the X-SAR digital elevation model (shown below), on the right the corresponding radar amplitude image. The amplitude is a measure of the backscattering of the transmitted microwaves. In the amplitude image the 'Bagmati-River' is visible south of the city center and the international Airport in the eastern part. The runway appears as a dark stripe. The airport is infamous for its difficult landing/takeoff conditions due to the close vicinity of the surrounding high mountains. For more information and a image of the region around Kathmandu, visit the German Remote Sensing Data Center SRTM Treasure Vault. Image courtesy German Remote Sensing Data Center

  20. AntarcticCRUST-08: New crustal model of Antarctica region based on seismic data - next step for building global crustal model with resolution of 1 x 1 degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    Different tectonic units cover the Antarctic territory: platform, orogen and depression structures. This structural variability is reflected both in thickness and physical properties of the crust. Previous crustal model (CRUST 2.0. Bassin et al. 2000 [1]) have 2x2 degree resolution and don't meet present-day requirements. A lot of new seismic data and regional compilations became available during last several years. We used data of deep seismic reflection, refraction and receiver functions studies as well as existing regional models (e.g. for Maud Land region, Hoffmann et al., 2003 [2]) from published papers and integrate them in a new model at a uniform grid with resolution of 1x1 degree. A new digital 3D model for the crust of Western and Eastern Antarctica and surroundings have been built. The existing data were verified and crosschecked. We present a suite of crustal models within the main tectonic units: West Antarctica rift system (WARS), the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs), and East Antarctica (EA). As the first result, we demonstrate a new Moho map for the region. The new map demonstrates the large differences with previous models. It turns out that many regions are more heterogeneous than it was demonstrated by the previous compilations. The crustal model comprises 3 layers of crystalline crust. For each of the three basic layers the thickness and the P-wave seismic velocity (Vp) are displayed. The West Antarctic rift system is one of the largest zones of continental extension on the Earth. The seismic data show a thin extended continental crust. Crustal thickness of WARS is variable from 21 km in the Bentley subglacial trench, to 32 km in the southern flank of the Marie Byrd Land. Transantarctic Mountains: 4000 km long, peaks 4 km above Sea Level, 200-300 km wide. TAMs are characterized by the rather strong variations of the Moho depth (28-40 km). Further inland, beneath the TAM, the estimated Moho depths range from 30-33 km (30 km from the coast) to 36

  1. Digital metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2014-12-01

    Balancing complexity and simplicity has played an important role in the development of many fields in science and engineering. One of the well-known and powerful examples of such balance can be found in Boolean algebra and its impact on the birth of digital electronics and the digital information age. The simplicity of using only two numbers, ‘0’ and ‘1’, in a binary system for describing an arbitrary quantity made the fields of digital electronics and digital signal processing powerful and ubiquitous. Here, inspired by the binary concept, we propose to develop the notion of digital metamaterials. Specifically, we investigate how one can synthesize an electromagnetic metamaterial with a desired permittivity, using as building blocks only two elemental materials, which we call ‘metamaterial bits’, with two distinct permittivity functions. We demonstrate, analytically and numerically, how proper spatial mixtures of such metamaterial bits lead to elemental ‘metamaterial bytes’ with effective material parameters that are different from the parameters of the metamaterial bits. We then apply this methodology to several design examples of optical elements, such as digital convex lenses, flat graded-index digital lenses, digital constructs for epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) supercoupling and digital hyperlenses, thus highlighting the power and simplicity of the methodology.

  2. Digital metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2014-12-01

    Balancing complexity and simplicity has played an important role in the development of many fields in science and engineering. One of the well-known and powerful examples of such balance can be found in Boolean algebra and its impact on the birth of digital electronics and the digital information age. The simplicity of using only two numbers, '0' and '1', in a binary system for describing an arbitrary quantity made the fields of digital electronics and digital signal processing powerful and ubiquitous. Here, inspired by the binary concept, we propose to develop the notion of digital metamaterials. Specifically, we investigate how one can synthesize an electromagnetic metamaterial with a desired permittivity, using as building blocks only two elemental materials, which we call 'metamaterial bits', with two distinct permittivity functions. We demonstrate, analytically and numerically, how proper spatial mixtures of such metamaterial bits lead to elemental 'metamaterial bytes' with effective material parameters that are different from the parameters of the metamaterial bits. We then apply this methodology to several design examples of optical elements, such as digital convex lenses, flat graded-index digital lenses, digital constructs for epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) supercoupling and digital hyperlenses, thus highlighting the power and simplicity of the methodology. PMID:25218061

  3. 54. West elevation of portion of elevated Mainline structure (Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. West elevation of portion of elevated Mainline structure (Section F-5) over Washington Street - looking East - at the corner of Bray Street. - Boston Elevated Railway, Elevated Mainline, Washington Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  4. Validation Of DEM Data Dvied From World View 3 Stero Imagery For Low Elevation Majuro Atoll, Marchall Islands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The availability of surface elevation data for the Marshall Islands has been identified as a "massive" data gap for conducting vulnerability assessments and the subsequent development of climate change adaption strategies. Specifically, digital elevation model (DEM) data are nee...

  5. Digital Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzam, Amy M.

    2006-01-01

    This article details the content of a recently released report from the Children's Partnership titled "Measuring Digital Opportunity for America's Children: Where We Stand and Where We Go From Here". On the basis of 40 indicators, the report's Digital Opportunity Measuring Stick showed how U.S. children and young adults use information and…

  6. Digital TMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the current status of the Digital TMI project to visiting members of the FAA Command Center. Digital TMI is an effort to store national-level traffic management initiatives in a standards-compliant manner. Work is funded by the FAA.

  7. Digital Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blansett, Jim

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the Internet has become a digital commons of commerce and education. However, accessibility standards have often been overlooked online, and the digital equivalents to curb-cuts and other physical accommodations have only rarely been implemented to serve those with print disabilities. (A print disability can be a learning…

  8. Digital Roundup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    State policy is crucial to the spread of digital-learning opportunities at the elementary and secondary level. A review of recent legislative action reveals policies that are constantly in flux and differ quite markedly from one state to another. Some have hoped for model digital-learning legislation that could handle all the various issues…

  9. Why Digitize?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Abby

    This paper is a response to discussions of digitization at meetings of the National Humanities Alliance (NHA). NHA asked the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) to evaluate the experiences of cultural institutions with digitization projects to date and to summarize what has been learned about the advantages and disadvantages of…

  10. Use of the ER-2 and IFSAR for digital terrain matrix, difference digital terrain matrix, and vector difference digital terrain matrix collection

    SciTech Connect

    Malliot, H.A.

    1996-10-01

    A national digital terrain matrix (DTM) archive with sub-meter elevation precision and three meter or less post spacing will have numerous commercial government and research uses. The Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Digital Terrain Elevation Mapping System (DTEMS) will be used to collect a DTM archive with average relative one {sigma} elevation precision of 0.3 meter, average absolute one U elevation precision less than 0.6 meter, and one to three meter post spacing (posting). DTEMS data will satisfy National Map Accuracy Standards (NMAS) contour intervals of one to two meters. DTEMS will also archive orth-rectified digital polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery with one to three meter resolution. A difference digital terrain matrix (DDTM) is defined as a digital data file containing elevation changes in a DTM. A DDTM archive will be useful for detection and measurement of natural or man made changes in terrain elevation. Using DTEMS to make periodic repeat DTM collections and coherent elevation change detection (CECD) to sense small elevation changes, DTEMS will be capable of resolving elevation changes of a few centimeters. A vector difference digital terrain matrix (VDDTM) is defined as a digital data file containing the X, Y and Z displacements of the ground. Using CECD with a sub-pixel digital image correlation (SPDIC) technique on pairs of DTM`s and radar images collected by DTEMS, it will be possible to measure X and Y ground displacements with resolutions of ten centimeters at posts with spacing of ten meters and measure the elevation (Z) displacement with a resolution of a few centimeters. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Data on ground-water quality for the western Nevada part of the Death Valley 1 degree by 2 degree quadrangle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Alan H.; Williams, Rhea P.

    1987-01-01

    Water quality data for groundwater has been compiled for the Nevada part of the Death Valley 1 degree x 2 degree quadrangle which covers a portion of western Nevada. Chemical characteristics of the water are shown on a map (at a scale of 1:250,000) and on trilinear diagrams for the major ions. The data for the area are also presented in a table. (USGS)

  12. Digital clubbing

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Mahesh, D. M.; Madabhavi, Irappa

    2012-01-01

    Digital clubbing is an ancient and important clinical signs in medicine. Although clubbed fingers are mostly asymptomatic, it often predicts the presence of some dreaded underlying diseases. Its exact pathogenesis is not known, but platelet-derived growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are recently incriminated in its causation. The association of digital clubbing with various disease processes and its clinical implications are discussed in this review. PMID:23243350

  13. Digital Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Salathé, Marcel; Bengtsson, Linus; Bodnar, Todd J.; Brewer, Devon D.; Brownstein, John S.; Buckee, Caroline; Campbell, Ellsworth M.; Cattuto, Ciro; Khandelwal, Shashank; Mabry, Patricia L.; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Mobile, social, real-time: the ongoing revolution in the way people communicate has given rise to a new kind of epidemiology. Digital data sources, when harnessed appropriately, can provide local and timely information about disease and health dynamics in populations around the world. The rapid, unprecedented increase in the availability of relevant data from various digital sources creates considerable technical and computational challenges. PMID:22844241

  14. Digital photography

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, J S; Rodway, G W; Middleton, P M; McCarthy, S

    2006-01-01

    Objective The emergence of a new generation of “point‐and‐shoot” digital cameras offers doctors a compact, portable and user‐friendly solution to the recording of highly detailed digital photographs and video images. This work highlights the use of such technology, and provides information for those who wish to record, store and display their own medical images. Methods Over a 3‐month period, a digital camera was carried by a doctor in a busy, adult emergency department and used to record a range of clinical images that were subsequently transferred to a computer database. Results In total, 493 digital images were recorded, of which 428 were photographs and 65 were video clips. These were successfully used for teaching purposes, publications and patient records. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of informed consent, the selection of a suitable package of digital technology and the role of basic photographic technique in developing a successful digital database in a busy clinical environment. PMID:17068281

  15. Digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Mattoon, J S

    2006-01-01

    Digital radiography has been used in human medical imaging since the 1980s with recent and rapid acceptance into the veterinary profession. Using advanced image capture and computer technology, radiographic images are viewed on a computer monitor. This is advantageous because radiographic images can be adjusted using dedicated computer software to maximize diagnostic image quality. Digital images can be accessed at computer workstations throughout the hospital, instantly retrieved from computer archives, and transmitted via the internet for consultation or case referral. Digital radiographic data can also be incorporated into a hospital information system, making record keeping an entirely paperless process. Digital image acquisition is faster when compared to conventional screen-film radiography, improving workflow and patient throughput. Digital radiography greatly reduces the need for 'retake' radiographs because of wide latitude in exposure factors. Also eliminated are costs associated with radiographic film and x-ray film development. Computed radiography, charged coupled devices, and flat panel detectors are types of digital radiography systems currently available. PMID:16971994

  16. Digital Collections, Digital Libraries & the Digitization of Cultural Heritage Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital collections and digital libraries. Topics include broadband availability; digital rights protection; content, both non-profit and commercial; digitization of cultural content; sustainability; metadata harvesting protocol; infrastructure; authorship; linking multiple resources; data mining; digitization of reference works;…

  17. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. S. C.

    1985-12-01

    The application of digital processing techniques to spacecraft television pictures and radar images is discussed. The use of digital rectification to produce contour maps from spacecraft pictures is described; images with azimuth and elevation angles are converted into point-perspective frame pictures. The digital correction of the slant angle of radar images to ground scale is examined. The development of orthophoto and stereoscopic shaded relief maps from digital terrain and digital image data is analyzed. Digital image transformations and rectifications are utilized on Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars.

  18. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of digital processing techniques to spacecraft television pictures and radar images is discussed. The use of digital rectification to produce contour maps from spacecraft pictures is described; images with azimuth and elevation angles are converted into point-perspective frame pictures. The digital correction of the slant angle of radar images to ground scale is examined. The development of orthophoto and stereoscopic shaded relief maps from digital terrain and digital image data is analyzed. Digital image transformations and rectifications are utilized on Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars.

  19. Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Light: Isometric Casing with Lens, South Elevation, North Elevation, Top Plan, Base Plan; Fresnel Lens: Isometric, Elevation, Plan - Fort Washington, Fort Washington Light, Northeast side of Potomac River at Fort Washington Park, Fort Washington, Prince George's County, MD

  20. location map, floor plan, north elevation, north elevation with porch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    location map, floor plan, north elevation, north elevation with porch removed, south elevation, building section - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Help's Quarters, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  1. 21. VIEW SECOND FLOOR, ELEVATOR SHAFT, TOP ELEVATOR SUPPORT, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. VIEW SECOND FLOOR, ELEVATOR SHAFT, TOP ELEVATOR SUPPORT, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Bates Manufacturing Company, Storehouse, Northeast corner of Chestnut Street & Hines Alley, Lewiston, Androscoggin County, ME

  2. Space Elevator: Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perek, Lubos

    2008-04-01

    Many papers have been published on engineering and economic aspects of the Space Elevator. The Elevator, however, is a very special and unusual astronomical body. Its behavior in space is affected not only by the attraction of the Earth and by the "centrifugal force" but also by the attraction of the Sun and the Moon, by the detailed shape of the Earth, by the presence of space debris, etc. Not all of the minor effects have been adequately studied. The size of the Space Elevator and its lack of resistance against buckling or bending require a detailed study of its stability, both in its initial phase as a geostationary (GEO) satellite as well as in its operational phase as a "sling". Lunisolar perturbations and other minor forces may affect the stability in the initial phase and will cause oscillations in the operational phase. Station-keeping thrusters will have to be mounted at selected points along the cable in order to maintain stability. In addition, the thrusters will perform local maneuvers for avoiding collisions with passing space debris. The control system of thrusters has to be adaptive, reacting fast to actual situation and rectifying the attitude of the Elevator whenever necessary. A further advantage of the thrusters is a possibility to locate the Elevator at any longitude, possibly looking for a region with minimum traffic at GEO distance. Extensive numerical simulations will have to be performed in order to determine elements of the thrusters and their control system.

  3. A global inverse model for estimating surface CO2 fluxes at a 0.1x0.1 degree resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksyutov, Shamil; Oda, Tomohiro; Janardanan, Rajesh; Yaremchuk, Alexey; Kaiser, Johannes W.; Ito, Akihiko; Belikov, Dmitry; Zhuravlev, Ruslan; Ganshin, Alexander; Valsala, Vinu

    2015-04-01

    We propose an iterative inversion method for estimating surface CO2 fluxes at a high spatial resolution (0.1 degree) using atmospheric CO2 data collected by the global in-situ network and GOSAT. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was coupled to the Eulerian atmospheric tracer transport model (NIES-TM) and an adjoint of the coupled model was derived. The inverse model calculates weekly corrections to given prior fluxes at a spatial resolution of the surface flux footprints simulated by FLEXPART model (0.1 degrees). Prior fluxes are given at different spatial resolutions in low and high resolution mode implementations. The hourly terrestrial biosphere fluxes are simulated with VISIT model using CFSR reanalysis. Ocean fluxes are calculated using a 4D-Var assimilation system of the surface pCO2 observations. Fossil fuel (ODIAC) and biomass burning (GFASv1.1) emissions are given at original model resolutions (0.1 degree), while terrestrial biosphere and ocean fluxes are interpolated from a coarser resolution. Flux response functions (footprints) for observations are first simulated with FLEXPART. The precalculated flux response functions are then used in forward and adjoint runs of the coupled transport model. We apply Lanczos process to obtain the truncated singular value decomposition (SVD) of the scaled tracer transport operator A = R-1/2HB1/2, where H - tracer transport operator, R and B - error covariance matrices for observations and fluxes, respectively. The square root of covariance matrix B is constructed by directional splitting in latitude, longitude and time, with exponential decay scales of 500 km on land, 1000 km over oceans and 2 weeks in time. Once singular vectors of AAT are obtained, the prior and posterior flux uncertainties are evaluated. Numerical experiments of inverting surface CO2 fluxes showed that the high-resolution (Lagrangian) part of the flux responses dominates the solution so that spatial patterns from the coarser

  4. Elevated BP after AKI.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Hsu, Raymond K; Yang, Jingrong; Ordonez, Juan D; Zheng, Sijie; Go, Alan S

    2016-03-01

    The connection between AKI and BP elevation is unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate whether AKI in the hospital is independently associated with BP elevation during the first 2 years after discharge among previously normotensive adults. We studied adult members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large integrated health care delivery system, who were hospitalized between 2008 and 2011, had available preadmission serum creatinine and BP measures, and were not known to be hypertensive or have BP>140/90 mmHg. Among 43,611 eligible patients, 2451 experienced AKI defined using observed changes in serum creatinine concentration measured during hospitalization. Survivors of AKI were more likely than those without AKI to have elevated BP-defined as documented BP>140/90 mmHg measured during an ambulatory, nonemergency department visit-during follow-up (46.1% versus 41.2% at 730 days; P<0.001). This difference was evident within the first 180 days (30.6% versus 23.1%; P<0.001). In multivariable models, AKI was independently associated with a 22% (95% confidence interval, 12% to 33%) increase in the odds of developing elevated BP during follow-up, with higher adjusted odds with more severe AKI. Results were similar in sensitivity analyses when elevated BP was defined as having at least two BP readings of >140/90 mmHg or those with evidence of CKD were excluded. We conclude that AKI is an independent risk factor for subsequent development of elevated BP. Preventing AKI during a hospitalization may have clinical and public health benefits beyond the immediate hospitalization. PMID:26134154

  5. Digital caliper

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cable, Louella E.

    1967-01-01

    The large number of measurements needed to describe fully the characteristics of biological specimens and other objects has always been tedious and time consuming. The work can be done much more rapidly and with greater accuracy with a digital caliper recently developed by us. The digital caliper is a new electronic instrument built to measure objects precisely throughout the range of 0.1 mm to 1.0 m. Calipers of several different discrete sizes make it possible to select the most convenient unit for the particular range of length and degree of accuracy desired.

  6. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  7. 1. MAIN ELEVATIONS, VIEW SHOWING LEFT ELEVATION WITH TWENTIETH CENTURY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. MAIN ELEVATIONS, VIEW SHOWING LEFT ELEVATION WITH TWENTIETH CENTURY REMODELING, CENTRAL ELEVATION WITH EARLY AND MID-NINETEENTH CENTURY ALTERATIONS, AND RIGHT ELEVATION WITH TWENTIETH CENTURY ALTERATIONS TO GROUND FLOOR - 160-166 Main Street, 160-166 Main Street, Annapolis, Anne Arundel County, MD

  8. 60. FORWARD AIRPLANE ELEVATOR PIT WITH ELEVATOR IN RAISED POSITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. FORWARD AIRPLANE ELEVATOR PIT WITH ELEVATOR IN RAISED POSITION AFT LOOKING FORWARD ON CENTERLINE SHOWING ELEVATOR GUIDES, WIREWAYS, SHEAVES, HYDRAULIC OIL TANKS AND ELEVATOR LANDING PADS. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  9. Geometric rectification of radar imagery using digital elevation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naraghi, M.; Stromberg, W.; Daily, M.

    1983-01-01

    Geologic analysis of radar imagery requires accurate spatial rectification to allow rock type discrimination and meaningful exploitation of multisensor data files. A procedure is described which removes distortions produced by most sources including the heretofore elusive problem of terrain induced effects. Rectified imagery is presented which displays geologic features not apparent in the distorted data.

  10. [Acute blood pressure elevations].

    PubMed

    Chamontin, B; Amar, J; Chollet, F; Rouge, P; Bonetti-d'Esteve, L; Guittard, J; Salvador, M

    2000-11-01

    Blood pressure (BP) elevations may correspond to different clinical situations. Hypertensives emergencies are situations that require immediate reduction in BP because of acute or rapidly progressing target organ damage: accelerated malignant hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy, acute myocardial infarction, acute aortic dissection, acute left ventricular failure, and eclampsia. Hypertensive urgencies are those with marked elevated BP in which it is desirable to reduce BP progressively within few hours, such as severe hypertension, progressive target organ damage, perioperative hypertension. Cerebrovascular accidents have to be individualized. In most patients in the immediate post-stroke period, BP should not be lowered. Caution is advised in lowering BP in these patients because excessive falls may precipitate cerebral ischemia. In situations without symptoms or progressive target organ it is necessary to exclude proximate causes of elevated BP such as pain and elevated BP alone rarely requires antihypertensive treatment. Among parenteral antihypertensive (AH) drugs labetalol, nicardipine, urapidil, and nitroprussiate are generally used, and the choice of AH drug depends on the clinical situation. It is not required to normalize BP immediately but to reduce mean BP no more than 25%, then toward 160/100 mmHg as recommended by JNC VI, in order to avoid an impairment of renal, cerebral or coronary ischemia. Oral long-acting dihydropyridines are often subsequently administrated, except in myocardial ischemia. Therapeutic attitudes vary considerably according to the clinical situation: abstention, immediate decrease or progressive decrease in BP have to be decided. PMID:11190294

  11. Digital Tidbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumaran, Maha; Geary, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Technology has transformed libraries. There are digital libraries, electronic collections, online databases and catalogs, ebooks, downloadable books, and much more. With free technology such as social websites, newspaper collections, downloadable online calendars, clocks and sticky notes, online scheduling, online document sharing, and online…

  12. Digital Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubler, Alfred

    2009-03-01

    The energy density in conventional capacitors is limited by sparking. We present nano-capacitor arrays, where - like in laser diodes and quantum wells [1] - quantization prevents dielectric breakthrough. We show that the energy density and the power/weight ratio are very high, possibly larger than in hydrogen [2]. Digital batteries are a potential clean energy source for cars, laptops, and mobile devices. The technology is related to flash drives. However, because of the high energy density, safety is a concern. Digital batteries can be easily and safely charged and discharged. In the discharged state they pose no danger. Even if a charged digital battery were to explode, it would produce no radioactive waste, no long-term radiation, and probably could be designed to produce no noxious chemicals. We discuss methodologies to prevent shorts and other measures to make digital batteries safe. [1] H. Higuraskh, A. Toriumi, F. Yamaguchi, K. Kawamura, A. Hubler, Correlation Tunnel Device, U. S. Patent No. 5,679,961 (1997) [2] Alfred Hubler, http://server10.how-why.com/blog/

  13. Digital books.

    PubMed

    Wink, Diane M

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes digital books. PMID:22024672

  14. Digital Badges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Unlike so much of the current vocabulary in education and technology that seems to stir more confusion than clarity, most public service librarians may already have a general idea about digital badges. As visual representations of individual accomplishments, competencies or skills that are awarded by groups, institutions, or organizations, they…

  15. Coregistration of Elevation Data from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter and the SELENE Terrain Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, M. K.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-10-01

    Our goal is to produce the most complete, accurate, and precise global terrain model of the lunar surface by coregistering and merging the digital elevation models from LOLA and the SELENE terrain camera.

  16. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yau, J. F.; Malik, S. N.; Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.; Laflen, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the Elevated Temperature Crack Growth Project is to evaluate proposed nonlinear fracture mechanics methods for application to combustor liners of aircraft gas turbine engines. During the first year of this program, proposed path-independent (P-I) integrals were reviewed for such applications. Several P-I integrals were implemented into a finite-element postprocessor which was developed and verified as part of the work. Alloy 718 was selected as the analog material for use in the forthcoming experimental work. A buttonhead, single-edge notch specimen was designed and verified for use in elevated-temperature strain control testing with significant inelastic strains. A crack mouth opening displacement measurement device was developed for further use.

  17. Digital psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Tang, S; Helmeste, D

    2000-02-01

    The American managed care movement has been viewed as a big experiment and is being watched closely by the rest of the world. In the meanwhile, computer-based information technology (IT) is changing the practice of medicine, much more rapidly than managed care. A New World of digitized knowledge and information has been created. Although literature on IT in psychiatry is largely absent in peer-reviewed psychiatric journals, IT is finding its way into all aspects of medicine, particularly psychiatry. Telepsychiatry programs are becoming very popular. At the same time, medical information sites are flourishing and evolving into a new health-care industry. Patient-physician information asymmetry is decreasing as patients are gaining easy access to medical information hitherto only available to professionals. Thus, psychiatry is facing another paradigm shift, at a time when most attention has been focused on managed care. In this new digital world, knowledge and information are no longer the sole property of professionals. Value will migrate from traditional in-person office-based therapy to digital clinical products, from in-person library search and classroom didactic instruction to interactive on-line searches and distance learning. In this time of value migration, psychiatrists have to determine what their 'distinctive competence' is and where best to add value in the health-care delivery value chain. The authors assess the impact of IT on clinical psychiatry and review how clinical practice, education and research in psychiatry are expected to change in this emerging digital world. PMID:15558872

  18. first floor plan, east elevation, north elevation, building section, paneling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    first floor plan, east elevation, north elevation, building section, paneling details, crown molding and location map - Cedar Pass Lodge, Cabin 1-2, 20681 South Dakota Highway 240, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  19. first floor plan, building section, west elevation, south elevation, baseboard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    first floor plan, building section, west elevation, south elevation, baseboard profile, crown molding profile, window and door details - Cedar Pass Lodge, Cabin 22, 20681 South Dakota Highway 240, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  20. first floor plan, west elevation, north elevation, building section, door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    first floor plan, west elevation, north elevation, building section, door details, window details, paneling details, crown molding and location map - Cedar Pass Lodge, Cabin 14-16, 20681 South Dakota Highway 240, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  1. first floor plan, north elevation, east elevation, building section, door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    first floor plan, north elevation, east elevation, building section, door details, window details, crown molding and location map - Cedar Pass Lodge, Cabin 9, 20681 South Dakota Highway 240, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  2. 33. Coal Fuel Elevator (diagonal in foreground), Fuel Elevator (left), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Coal Fuel Elevator (diagonal in foreground), Fuel Elevator (left), Fuel Storage Bins (center), and Power Plant (right) Photographs taken by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  3. Refrigeration Plant, North Elevation, Second Floor Plan, East Elevation, Ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Refrigeration Plant, North Elevation, Second Floor Plan, East Elevation, Ground Floor Plan, Section A-A - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  4. 3. NORTH ELEVATION OF BOILER HOUSE; PARTIAL NORTH ELEVATION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. NORTH ELEVATION OF BOILER HOUSE; PARTIAL NORTH ELEVATION OF ENGINE HOUSE, LEFT REAR. - Providence Sewage Treatment System, Ernest Street Pumping Station, Boiler House, Ernest Street & Allens Avenue, Providence, Providence County, RI

  5. South elevation of post office, with elevated storage tank and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    South elevation of post office, with elevated storage tank and standpipe at left and water column at right. - Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, Thurmond Yards, East side New River, mouths of Arbuckle & Dunlop Circles, Thurmond, Fayette County, WV

  6. SOUTH ELEVATION OF POST OFFICE, WITH ELEVATED STORAGE TANK AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF POST OFFICE, WITH ELEVATED STORAGE TANK AND STANDPIPE AT LEFT AND WATER COLUMN AT RIGHT - Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, Thurmond Yards, East side New River, mouths of Arbuckle & Dunlop Circles, Thurmond, Fayette County, WV

  7. 43. ELEVATOR HEADHOUSE INTERIOR: Interior view towards southeast of elevator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. ELEVATOR HEAD-HOUSE INTERIOR: Interior view towards southeast of elevator head-house at the Washington and Mason Street powerhouse. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. north elevation, south elevation, building section, window details Chopawamsic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    north elevation, south elevation, building section, window details - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  9. location plan, floor plan, west elevation, east elevation Chopawamsic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    location plan, floor plan, west elevation, east elevation - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Main Arts and Crafts Lodge, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  10. 44. VIEW OF ELEVATOR MOTOR LOCATED ABOVE TOP OF ELEVATOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. VIEW OF ELEVATOR MOTOR LOCATED ABOVE TOP OF ELEVATOR NEAR WEST WALL OF MST STATION 111 ANTEROOM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. 3. Occident Terminal Elevator. Reinforced concrete. First total "electric" elevator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Occident Terminal Elevator. Reinforced concrete. First total "electric" elevator at Duluth. (Powered by electrical substation instead of steam generator). - Occident Terminal Elevator & Storage Annex, South side of second slip, north from outer end of Rice's Point, east of Garfield Avenue, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  12. Building C west elevation showing south elevation of Building B ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building C west elevation showing south elevation of Building B (on left) and north elevation of Building D (on right). The Germantown Dyeworks complex and smoke stack appear in the background. View looking east - Hinckley Knitting Mills, Building C, 21-35 East Wister Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. Digital Maps, Matrices and Computer Algebra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    The way in which computer algebra systems, such as Maple, have made the study of complex problems accessible to undergraduate mathematicians with modest computational skills is illustrated by some large matrix calculations, which arise from representing the Earth's surface by digital elevation models. Such problems are often considered to lie in…

  14. The 3D Elevation Program: summary of program direction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, Gregory I.

    2012-01-01

    The 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) initiative responds to a growing need for high-quality topographic data and a wide range of other three-dimensional representations of the Nation's natural and constructed features. The National Enhanced Elevation Assessment (NEEA), which was completed in 2011, clearly documented this need within government and industry sectors. The results of the NEEA indicated that enhanced elevation data have the potential to generate $13 billion in new benefits annually. The benefits apply to food risk management, agriculture, water supply, homeland security, renewable energy, aviation safety, and other areas. The 3DEP initiative was recommended by the National Digital Elevation Program and its 12 Federal member agencies and was endorsed by the National States Geographic Information Council (NSGIC) and the National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NGAC).

  15. Using the solar elevation angle and radiance conversion to normalize forest spectral signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Lu, Y.-C.

    1984-01-01

    A number of spectral signals associated with forest cover were selected in order to test the usefulness of adjustments to Landsat MSS digital count values. The signatures were taken from 26 independent regional land cover inventories in the northeastern US. A regression analysis was conducted which revealed a significant relationship between digital count values and variation in the solar elevation angles in MSS bands four, six, and seven for deciduous forests and in all MSS bands for conifers. When signatures were adjusted for solar elevation angles and MSS sensor calibration differences, the dependence on solar elevation angle was reduced. The adjustments also significantly reduced the variance with Level II forest categories among scenes.

  16. Scanning for Digitization Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentzel, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Librarians and archivists find themselves facing the prospect of digitization. Everyone is doing it, everyone needs it. Discussions rage nationally and internationally concerning what to digitize and the best means to present and retain digital objects. Digitization is the act of making something digital, expressing a physical object "in numerical…

  17. Elevated temperature biaxial fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.

    1984-01-01

    A three year experimental program for studying elevated temperature biaxial fatigue of a nickel based alloy Hastelloy-X has been completed. A new high temperature fatigue test facility with unique capabilities has been developed. Effort was directed toward understanding multiaxial fatigue and correlating the experimental data to the existing theories of fatigue failure. The difficult task of predicting fatigue lives for non-proportional loading was used as an ultimate test for various life prediction methods being considered. The primary means of reaching improved undertanding were through several critical non-proportional loading experiments. It was discovered that the cracking mode switched from primarily cracking on the maximum shear planes at room temperature to cracking on the maximum normal strain planes at 649 C.

  18. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  19. Digital demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, T. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A digital demodulator for converting pulse code modulated data from phase shift key (PSK) to non return to zero (NRZ) and to biphase data is described. The demodulator is composed of standard integrated logic circuits. The key to the demodulation function is a pair of cross coupled one shot multivibrators and which with a flip-flop produce the NRZ-L is all that is required, the circuitry is greatly simplified and the 2(v) times bit rate contraint can be removed from the carrier. A flip-flop, an OR gate, and AND gate and a binary counter generate the bit rate clock (BTCK) for the NRZ-L. The remainder of the circuitry is for converting the NRZ-L and BTCK into biphase data. The device was designed for use in the space shuttle bay environment measurements.

  20. Digital Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbl, Terry G.; Ponchak, Denise; Lamarche, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    The field of digital avionics experienced another year of important advances in civil aviation, military systems, and space applications. As a result of the events of 9/11/2001, NASA has pursued activities to apply its aerospace technologies toward improved aviation security. Both NASA Glenn Research Center and Langley Research Center have performed flight research demonstrations using advanced datalink concepts to transmit live pictures from inside a jetliner, and to downlink the contents of the plane's 'black box' recorder in real time. The U.S. Navy and General Electric demonstrated survivable engine control (SEC) algorithms during engine ground tests at the Weapons Survivability Laboratory at China Lake. The scientists at Boeing Satellite Systems advanced the field of stellar inertial technology with the development of a new method for positioning optical star trackers on satellites.

  1. Digital Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbl, Terry G.; Ponchak, Denise; Lamarche, Teresa

    2003-01-01

    Digital Avionics activities played an important role in the advancements made in civil aviation, military systems, and space applications. This document profiles advances made in each of these areas by the aerospace industry, NASA centers, and the U.S. military. Emerging communication technologies covered in this document include Internet connectivity onboard aircraft, wireless broadband communication for aircraft, and a mobile router for aircraft to communicate in multiple communication networks over the course of a flight. Military technologies covered in this document include avionics for unmanned combat air vehicles and microsatellites, and head-up displays. Other technologies covered in this document include an electronic flight bag for the Boeing 777, and surveillance systems for managing airport operations.

  2. Digital structural

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Tanaka, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    Magmatic and tectonic activity have both contributed significantly to the surface geology of Mars. Digital structural mapping techniques have now been used to classify and date centers of tectonic activity in the western equatorial region. For example, our results show a center of tectonic activity at Valles Marineris, which may be associated with uplift caused by intrusion. Such evidence may help explain, in part, the development of the large troughs and associated outflow channels and chaotic terrain. We also find a local centre of tectonic activity near the source region of Warrego Valles. Here, we suggest that the valley system may have resulted largely from intrusive-related hydrothermal activity. We hope that this work, together with the current Mars Global Surveyor mission, will lead to a better understanding of the geological processes that shaped the Martian surface.

  3. Digital communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, Peyton Z., Jr.

    The fundamental principles of digital communication and the design of practical digital communication systems are explored in an introductory textbook for senior and graduate students of electrical engineering. Chapters are devoted to sampling principles, baseband digital waveforms, baseband digital systems, bandpass binary digital systems, and M-ary digital systems. Deterministic signals, networks, and random-signal theory are reviewed in extensive appendices, and graphs, flow charts, diagrams, and problems are provided.

  4. Can We Teach Digital Natives Digital Literacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Wan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much debate about the concept of digital natives, in particular the differences between the digital natives' knowledge and adoption of digital technologies in informal versus formal educational contexts. This paper investigates the knowledge about educational technologies of a group of undergraduate students…

  5. Digital photorefraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F.; Jorge, Jorge M.

    1997-12-01

    The early evaluation of the visual status of human infants is of a critical importance. It is of utmost importance to the development of the child's visual system that she perceives clear, focused, retinal images. Furthermore if the refractive problems are not corrected in due time amblyopia may occur. Photorefraction is a non-invasive clinical tool rather convenient for application to this kind of population. A qualitative or semi-quantitative information about refractive errors, accommodation, strabismus, amblyogenic factors and some pathologies (cataracts) can the easily obtained. The photorefraction experimental setup we established using new technological breakthroughs on the fields of imaging devices, image processing and fiber optics, allows the implementation of both the isotropic and eccentric photorefraction approaches. Essentially both methods consist on delivering a light beam into the eyes. It is refracted by the ocular media, strikes the retina, focusing or not, reflects off and is collected by a camera. The system is formed by one CCD color camera and a light source. A beam splitter in front of the camera's objective allows coaxial illumination and observation. An optomechanical system also allows eccentric illumination. The light source is a flash type one and is synchronized with the camera's image acquisition. The camera's image is digitized displayed in real time. Image processing routines are applied for image's enhancement and feature extraction.

  6. Digital photorefraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Jorge, Jorge M.

    1998-01-01

    The early evaluation of the visual status of human infants is of a critical importance. It is of utmost importance to the development of the child's visual system that she perceives clear, focused, retinal images. Furthermore if the refractive problems are not corrected in due time amblyopia may occur. Photorefraction is a non-invasive clinical tool rather convenient for application to this kind of population. A qualitative or semi-quantitative information about refractive errors, accommodation, strabismus, amblyogenic factors and some pathologies (cataracts) can the easily obtained. The photorefraction experimental setup we established using new technological breakthroughs on the fields of imaging devices, image processing and fiber optics, allows the implementation of both the isotropic and eccentric photorefraction approaches. Essentially both methods consist on delivering a light beam into the eyes. It is refracted by the ocular media, strikes the retina, focusing or not, reflects off and is collected by a camera. The system is formed by one CCD color camera and a light source. A beam splitter in front of the camera's objective allows coaxial illumination and observation. An optomechanical system also allows eccentric illumination. The light source is a flash type one and is synchronized with the camera's image acquisition. The camera's image is digitized displayed in real time. Image processing routines are applied for image's enhancement and feature extraction.

  7. 34. Coal Fuel Elevator (diagonal in foreground), Fuel Elevator (left), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Coal Fuel Elevator (diagonal in foreground), Fuel Elevator (left), Fuel Storage Bins (center), and Power Plant (far center), and Retail Coal Storage Bins (right) Photograph taken by George Harven - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  8. 35. Coal Fuel Elevator (diagonal in center), Fuel Elevator (left), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Coal Fuel Elevator (diagonal in center), Fuel Elevator (left), Fuel Storage Bins (center), and Power Plant (far center), and Retail Coal Storage Bins (right) Photograph taken by George Harven - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  9. 38. Second Floor Plan, North Elevation, South Elevation and Details. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Second Floor Plan, North Elevation, South Elevation and Details. Addition to Bacteriology Laboratory at Letterman General Hospital, San Francisco, Cal. January 1916. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  10. 180 degree view of Building 7 elevations, illustrating rear elevation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    180 degree view of Building 7 elevations, illustrating rear elevation of two story unit type with one story step-down on street side. View facing east - Harbor Hills Housing Project, One & Two Story Townhouse Type, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 180 degree view of Building 7 elevations, illustrating front elevation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    180 degree view of Building 7 elevations, illustrating front elevation of two story unit type with one story step-down on street side. View facing west - Harbor Hills Housing Project, One & Two Story Townhouse Type, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  12. H. Sapiens Digital: From Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives to Digital Wisdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prensky, Marc

    2009-01-01

    As we move further into the 21st century, the digital native/digital immigrant paradigm created by Marc Prensky in 2001 is becoming less relevant. In this article, Prensky suggests that we should focus instead on the development of what he calls "digital wisdom." Arguing that digital technology can make us not just smarter but truly wiser, Prensky…

  13. Influence of elevation modelling on hydrodynamic simulations of a tidally-dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Ana Paula; Mazzolari, Andrea; Gonçalves, Alexandre B.; Araújo, Maria Amélia V. C.; Trigo-Teixeira, António

    2013-08-01

    Hydrodynamic simulation of estuaries requires a single digital elevation model (DEM) resulting from merging of both topographic and bathymetric data. These two datasets are usually produced using different technologies, co-ordinate systems and datums. Intertidal data in particular are often lacking due to the difficulty of data acquisition using conventional survey techniques. This paper presents a fast, accurate and low-cost methodology to fill this gap and highlights the effect of the digital elevation model characteristics, such as the interpolation method and spatial resolution, on modelled water levels and flooded areas. The Lima river estuary, located in North-western Portugal, is used as a case study. Validation tests for commonly available spatial interpolators showed ordinary kriging to be the most adequate interpolator. Digital elevation models with regular grids of 5 m and 50 m resolution were used, together with the original (not interpolated) elevation dataset, as input to a finite element hydrodynamic model for astronomic tide simulation. Results indicate that the larger differences between using different elevation models occur at low tide during spring tide, marginally impacting the flood modelling. The effect of a vertical offset of the chart datum with respect to a part of the digital elevation model was finally investigated, showing a limited influence in the determination of the water levels.

  14. Anthropogenic Elevation Change in the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prush, V. B.; Lohman, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past few decades, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has emerged as a valuable tool for studying crustal deformation signals. Its applications to studies of tectonic and non-tectonic sources are varied, including earthquakes and fault-related processes, volcanic deformation, vegetation structure, and anthropogenic signals. In addition to studies of crustal deformation, the sensitivity of interferometric phase to topography makes InSAR a superb tool for the generation of digital elevation models (DEMs). While much of the focus of InSAR research in recent years has been on deformation, changes in the elevation of the ground surface can be of great scientific or societal interest as well. Examples include elevation and volume change due to anthropogenic processes such as landfill and open-pit mining operations, and natural processes such as glacier thinning or terrain alteration resulting from effusive volcanic eruptions. Our study describes two elevation change signals observed in the Pacific Northwest that are of anthropogenic origin. Using the baseline-dependent nature of the topographic component of interferometric phase, we have determined a proxy for canopy height using coherent interferometric phase differences between adjacent logged and forested regions, as well as a means for determining estimates of the amount and time history of material displaced during mining operations at the Centralia Coal Mine in Centralia, Washington. Quantifying the amount of surface change due to anthropogenic activities is not only critical for tracking the altering landscape of the Pacific Northwest and reducing the observed error in interferograms attributable to elevation change. Deforestation is one of the most significant contributors to global carbon emissions, and quantifying changes in vegetation structure can assist in efforts to monitor and mitigate the effects of deforestation on climate change. Similarly, mining operations can have a lasting

  15. Interpolation and elevation errors: the impact of the DEM resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilleos, Georgios A.

    2015-06-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are developing and evolving at a fast pace, given the progress of computer science and technology. This development though, is not accompanied by an advancement of knowledge on the quality of the models and their indigenous inaccuracy. The user on most occasions is not aware of this quality thus in not aware of the correlating product uncertainty. Extensive research has been conducted - and still is - towards this direction. In the research presented in this paper there is an analysis of elevation errors behavior which are recorded in a DEM. The behavior of these elevation errors, is caused by altering the DEM resolution upon the application of the algorithm interpolation. Contour lines are used as entry data from a topographical map. Elevation errors are calculated in the positions of the initial entry data and wherever the elevation is known. The elevation errors that are recorded, are analyzed, in order to reach conclusions about their distribution and the way in which they occur.

  16. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  17. Space Station tethered elevator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Michael H.; Anderson, Loren A.; Hosterman, K.; Decresie, E.; Miranda, P.; Hamilton, R.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The tethered elevator is an unmanned, mobile structure which operates on a ten-kilometer tether spanning the distance between Space Station Freedom and a platform. Its capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The report discusses the potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design. Emphasis is placed on the elevator's structural configuration and three major subsystem designs. First, the design of elevator robotics used to aid in elevator operations and tethered experimentation is presented. Second, the design of drive mechanisms used to propel the vehicle is discussed. Third, the design of an onboard self-sufficient power generation and transmission system is addressed.

  18. 1. 'Front Elevation, End Elevation of Parapet, Section on Centerline ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 'Front Elevation, End Elevation of Parapet, Section on Centerline of Portal,' Southern Pacific Standard Single-Track Tunnel, 1909. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 23 (HAER No. CA-198), Tunnel 24 (HAER No. CA-200), Tunnel 25 (HAER No. CA-201), Tunnel 27 (HAER No. CA-203), Tunnel 28 (HAER No. CA-204), and Tunnel 29 (HAER No. CA-205). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  19. Validation of DEM Data Derived from World View 3 Stereo Imagery for Low Elevation Majuro Atoll, Marshall Islands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The availability of surface elevation data for the Marshall Islands has been identified as a “massive” data gap for conducting vulnerability assessments and the subsequent development of climate change adaption strategies. Specifically, digital elevation model (DEM) data are need...

  20. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  1. Digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Euclid

    2004-01-01

    Digital image processing is now commonplace in radiology, nuclear medicine and sonography. This article outlines underlying principles and concepts of digital image processing. After completing this article, readers should be able to: List the limitations of film-based imaging. Identify major components of a digital imaging system. Describe the history and application areas of digital image processing. Discuss image representation and the fundamentals of digital image processing. Outline digital image processing techniques and processing operations used in selected imaging modalities. Explain the basic concepts and visualization tools used in 3-D and virtual reality imaging. Recognize medical imaging informatics as a new area of specialization for radiologic technologists. PMID:15352557

  2. Digital floodplain mapping and an analysis of errors involved

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamblen, C.S.; Soong, D.T.; Cai, X.

    2007-01-01

    Mapping floodplain boundaries using geographical information system (GIS) and digital elevation models (DEMs) was completed in a recent study. However convenient this method may appear at first, the resulting maps potentially can have unaccounted errors. Mapping the floodplain using GIS is faster than mapping manually, and digital mapping is expected to be more common in the future. When mapping is done manually, the experience and judgment of the engineer or geographer completing the mapping and the contour resolution of the surface topography are critical in determining the flood-plain and floodway boundaries between cross sections. When mapping is done digitally, discrepancies can result from the use of the computing algorithm and digital topographic datasets. Understanding the possible sources of error and how the error accumulates through these processes is necessary for the validation of automated digital mapping. This study will evaluate the procedure of floodplain mapping using GIS and a 3 m by 3 m resolution DEM with a focus on the accumulated errors involved in the process. Within the GIS environment of this mapping method, the procedural steps of most interest, initially, include: (1) the accurate spatial representation of the stream centerline and cross sections, (2) properly using a triangulated irregular network (TIN) model for the flood elevations of the studied cross sections, the interpolated elevations between them and the extrapolated flood elevations beyond the cross sections, and (3) the comparison of the flood elevation TIN with the ground elevation DEM, from which the appropriate inundation boundaries are delineated. The study area involved is of relatively low topographic relief; thereby, making it representative of common suburban development and a prime setting for the need of accurately mapped floodplains. This paper emphasizes the impacts of integrating supplemental digital terrain data between cross sections on floodplain delineation

  3. Radiation dose reduction in the evaluation of scoliosis: an application of digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, D.C.; Cleveland, R.H.; Herman, T.E.; Zaleske, D.J.; Ehrlich, M.G.; Correia, J.A.

    1986-10-01

    This report documents the clinical testing of scanning beam digital radiography as an imaging method in patients with scoliosis. This type of digital imaging requires a skin exposure of only 2.4 mR (0.619 microC/kg) per image, compared with the lowest possible posteroanterior screen-film exposure of 10 mR (2.58 microC/kg) at the chest and 60 mR (15.48 microC/kg) at the lumbar spine. Digital radiographic and screen-film images were obtained on multiple test objects and 273 patients. Scoliosis measurements using screen-film radiographs and digital radiographs were comparable to within a mean difference of 1 degrees at many different degrees of severity. The low-dose digital images were found to be useful and accurate for the detection and measurement of scoliosis after the first screen-film radiographs have excluded tumors and structural abnormalities.

  4. Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biologic...

  5. Elevation and elevation change of Greenland and Antarctica derived from CryoSat-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, V.; Humbert, A.; Miller, H.

    2014-03-01

    The ESA satellite CryoSat-2 has been observing Earth's polar regions since April 2010. It carries a sophisticated radar altimeter and aims for the detection of changes in sea ice thickness as well as surface elevation changes of Earth's land and marine ice sheets. This study focuses on the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, considering the contemporary elevation of their surfaces. Based on 2 years of CryoSat-2 data acquisition, elevation change maps and mass balance estimates are presented. Additionally, new digital elevation models (DEMs) and the corresponding error maps are derived. Due to the high orbit of CryoSat-2 (88° N/S) and the narrow across-track spacing, more than 99% of Antarctica's surface area is covered. In contrast, previous radar altimeter measurements of ERS1/2 and ENVISAT were limited to latitudes between 81.5° N and 81.5° S and to surface slopes below 1°. The derived DEMs for Greenland and Antarctica have an accuracy which is similar to previous DEMs obtained by satellite-based laser and radar altimetry (Liu et al., 2001; Bamber et al., 2009, 2013; Fretwell et al., 2013; Howat et al., 2014). Comparisons with ICESat data show that 80% of the CryoSat-2 DEMs have an error of less than 3 m ± 30 m. For both ice sheets the surface elevation change rates between 2011 and 2012 are presented at a resolution of 1 km. Negative elevation changes are concentrated at the west and south-east coast of Greenland and in the Amundsen Sea embayment in West Antarctica (e.g. Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers). They agree well with the dynamic mass loss observed by ICESat between 2003 and 2008 (Pritchard et al., 2009). Thickening occurs along the main trunk of Kamb Ice Stream and in Dronning Maud Land. While the former is a consequence of an ice stream stagnated ∼150 years ago (Rose, 1979; Retzlaff and Bentley, 1993), the latter represents a known large-scale accumulation event (Lenaerts et al., 2013). This anomaly partly compensates for the observed

  6. Space Elevator Base Leg Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, C.; Swan, P. A.

    While the Space Elevator stretches for 104,000 kilometers, the region of most concern, from the survival perspective, is 2,500 kms and below. The threats inside this dangerous arena include debris, spacecraft, meteorites, lightening, winds, rogue waves, aircraft, and intentional human acts. Two major questions will be addressed that will influence the overall systems architecture of a Space Elevator. While the deployment phase of the development of the Space Elevator will only have a single ribbon from the surface of the Earth to well beyond the Geosynchronous altitude, a mature Space Elevator must never allow a complete sever of the system. Design approaches, materials selections, international policy development and assembly must ensure that the integrity of the Space Elevator be maintained. The trade space analysis will address the probability of an individual ribbon being severed, the length of time to repair, and the potential for a catastrophic Space Elevator cut. The architecture proposed for the base leg portion will address two questions: Shall there be multiple base legs to 2,500 kms altitude? And Should the anchor be based on land or at sea?

  7. Digital subtraction laryngography

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.W.; Enzmann, D.R.; Hopp, M.L.; Castellino, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    Digital subtraction laryngography was used to evaluate laryngeal function in 8 patients: 4 with normal larynxes and 4 with laryngeal disease. Subtracted digital images provided a dynamic display of the extent and symmetry of vocal cord excursions and pyriform sinus inflation, and the vocal cord resting position was also clearly depicted. The technical details of digital subtraction laryngography and its application are described.

  8. Bridging the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Alan; Milner, Helen; Killer, Terry; Dixon, Genny

    2008-01-01

    As the Government publishes its action plan for consultation on digital inclusion, the authors consider some of the challenges and opportunities for the delivery of digital inclusion. Clarke argues that digital inclusion requires more than access to technology or the skills to use it effectively, it demands information and media literacy. Milner…

  9. Digital Ink and Notetaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Tablet PCs and graphics tablets employ digital ink technology. In this paper the author introduces the reader to digital ink technology with the aim of promoting its use in various instructional or training settings, with the goal of improving instructor-learner dialogue and student learning. The potential of digital ink for improved instructional…

  10. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  11. Digital Literacy. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    21st Century students need a complex set of skills to be successful in a digital environment. Digital literacy, similar to traditional definitions of literacy, is a set of skills students use to locate, organize, understand, evaluate and create information. The difference is that it occurs in an environment where a growing set of digital tools…

  12. Digital Language Death

    PubMed Central

    Kornai, András

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide. PMID:24167559

  13. Mass Digitization of Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Mass digitization of the bound volumes that we generally call "books" has begun, and, thanks to the interest in Google and all that it does, it is getting widespread media attention. The Open Content Alliance (OCA), a library initiative formed after Google announced its library book digitization project, has brought library digitization projects…

  14. NEXUS: Digitizing Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Camille

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of digital technology in the context of higher education planning considers how these technologies change teaching; the digital divide; the costs of information technology; hard wiring the campus; material consequences of information technology; digitally enabled crimes and misdemeanors; and libraries and scholarly publishing. Concludes…

  15. Digital language death.

    PubMed

    Kornai, András

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide. PMID:24167559

  16. 2. 'Tunnel No 6 West End, Front Elevation, Sectional Elevation ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. 'Tunnel No 6 West End, Front Elevation, Sectional Elevation on Centerline of Portal,' Southern Pacific Standard Single-Track Tunnel, 1910. Tunnel 6, which today would be Tunnel 20, was daylighted and no longer exists. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 23 (HAER No. CA-198), Tunnel 24 (HAER No. CA-200), Tunnel 25 (HAER No. CA-201), Tunnel 27 (HAER No. CA-203), Tunnel 28 (HAER No. CA-204), and Tunnel 29 (HAER No. CA-205). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  17. Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Tanya W

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging technology has advanced significantly from the 1930s until the present. American women have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer. Mammography has been proven in multiple clinical trials to reduce breast cancer mortality. Although a mainstay of breast imaging and improved from film-screen mammography, digital mammography is not a perfect examination. Overlapping obscuring breast tissue limits mammographic interpretation. Breast digital tomosynthesis reduces and/or eliminates overlapping obscuring breast tissue. Although there are some disadvantages with digital breast tomosynthesis, this relatively lost-cost technology may be used effectively in the screening and diagnostic settings. PMID:27101241

  18. US GeoData: Digital cartographic and geographic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1985-01-01

    The increasing use of computers for storing and analyzing earth science information has sparked a growth in the demand for various types of cartographic data in digital form. The production of map data in computerized form is called digital cartography, and it involves the collection, storage, processing, analysis, and display of map data with the aid of computers. The U.S. Geological Survey, the Nation's largest earth science research agency, has expanded its national mapping program to incorporate operations associated with digital cartography, including the collection of planimetric, elevation, and geographic names information in digital form. This digital information is available for use in meeting the multipurpose needs and applications of the map user community.

  19. Tether Elevator Crawler Systems (TECS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Frank R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the needs of the experimenters on the space station is access to steady and controlled-variation microgravity environments. A method of providing these environments is to place the experiment on a tether attached to the space station. This provides a high degree of isolation from structural oscillations and vibrations. Crawlers can move these experiments along the tethers to preferred locations, much like an elevator. This report describes the motion control laws developed for these crawlers and the testing of laboratory models of these tether elevator crawlers.

  20. Digital rights management for digital cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirovski, Darko; Peinado, Marcus; Petitcolas, Fabien A. P.

    2001-12-01

    There is a wide consensus among the feature film production studios that the Internet era brings a new paradigm for film distribution to cinemas worldwide. The benefits of digital cinema to both producers and cinemas are numerous: significantly lower distribution and maintenance costs, immediate access to film libraries, higher presentation quality, and strong potential for developing new business models. Despite these advantages, the studios are still reluctant to jump into the digital age. The main showstopper for digital cinema is the danger of widespread piracy. Piracy already costs Hollywood an estimated two billion dollars annually and digital cinema without proper copyright enforcement could increase this number. In this paper, we present a copyright management system that aims at providing the set of necessary security tools: standard cryptographic primitives and copyright protection mechanisms that enable a reliable and secure feature film delivery system.

  1. Digital Collections, Digital Libraries and the Digitization of Cultural Heritage Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the development of digital collections and digital libraries. Topics include digitization of cultural heritage information; broadband issues; lack of compelling content; training issues; types of materials being digitized; sustainability; digital preservation; infrastructure; digital images; data mining; and future possibilities for…

  2. ST-segment elevation: Distinguishing ST elevation myocardial infarction from ST elevation secondary to nonischemic etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Alok; Birnbaum, Yochai

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of early perfusion in ST elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMI) are established; however, early perfusion of non-ST elevation myocardial infarctions has not been shown to be beneficial. In addition, ST elevation (STE) caused by conditions other than acute ischemia is common. Non-ischemic STE may be confused as STEMI, but can also mask STEMI on electrocardiogram (ECG). As a result, activating the primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) protocol often depends on determining which ST elevation patterns reflect transmural infarction due to acute coronary artery thrombosis. Coordination of interpreting the ECG in its clinical context and appropriately activating the pPCI protocol has proved a difficult task in borderline cases. But its importance cannot be ignored, as reflected in the 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association guidelines concerning the treatment of ST elevation myocardial infarction. Multiples strategies have been tested and studied, and are currently being further perfected. No matter the strategy, at the heart of delivering the best care lies rapid and accurate interpretation of the ECG. Here, we present the different patterns of non-ischemic STE and methods of distinguishing between them. In writing this paper, we hope for quicker and better stratification of patients with STE on ECG, which will lead to be better outcomes. PMID:25349651

  3. Converting Topographic Maps into Digital Form to Aid in Archeological Research in the Peten, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Serena R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of my project was to convert a topographical map into digital form so that the data can be manipulated and easily accessed in the field. With the data in this particular format, Dr. Sever and his colleagues can highlight the specific features of the landscape that they require for their research of the ancient Mayan civilization. Digital elevation models (DEMs) can also be created from the digitized contour features adding another dimension to their research.

  4. Elevation change (2000-2004) on the Malaspina Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauber, J.; Molnia, B.; Carabajal, C.; Luthcke, S.; Muskett, R.

    2005-01-01

    The glaciers of the southeastern Alaska coastal region are the largest temperate glacier meltwater source on Earth and may contribute one third of the total glacier meltwater entering the global ocean. Since melt onset and refreeeze timing in this region show a tendency toward earlier onset and longer ablation seasons, accelerated glacier wastage may be occurring. In this study we focus on one of the largest temperate glacier systems on Earth, the Malaspina Glacier. This glacier, with a length of approximately 110 km and an area of approximately square 5,000 km, has the largest piedmont lobe of any temperate glacier. The entire lobe, which lies at elevations below 600 m, is within the ablation zone. We report and interpret ice elevation change between a digital elevation model (DEM) derived from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM C band) observations in Feb. 2000 and ICESat Laser 1-3 observations between Feb. 2003 and Nov. 2004. We use these elevation change results, along with earlier studies, to address the spatial and temporal variability in wastage of the piedmont lobe. Between 2000 and 2004 ice elevation changes of 10-30 meters occurred across the central Malaspina piedmont lobe. From 1972/73 (USGS DEM) to 1999 (SRTM corrected for estimated winter snow accumulation) Malaspina's (Agassiz, Seward Lobe, and Marvine) mean ice thinning was estimated at -47 m with maximum thinning on parts of the lobes to -160 m. The Malaspina's accumulation area is only slightly larger than its ablation area (2,575 km2 vs. 2,433 km2); unfortunately few glaciological observations are available from this source region. Snow accumulation rates have been largely inferred from low-altitude precipitation and temperature data. Comparing sequential ICESat observations in the Malaspina source region, we estimated short-term elevation increases of up to 5 meters during the winter of 2003/04.

  5. Nasal Sculpting: Calculated and Predictable Tip Elevation With Cephalic Trim

    PubMed Central

    Redstone, Jeremiah S.; Nguyen, Jonathan; North, Durham Alan; Hazani, Ron; Drury, Brad; Yoder, Eric M.; Cooperman, Ross D.; Yoder, Virginia; Little, Jarrod A.; Florman, Larry D.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rhinoplasty techniques to affect nasal tip rotation are well described. Cephalic alar trim is a powerful method for achieving tip elevation. Previous studies and texts provide aesthetic guidelines for nasolabial angles. Often, surgeon experience determines the degree of lower lateral cartilage resection to achieve optimal results. This study analyzes the change in tip elevation with measured resections of the lower lateral cartilages. This can aid the surgeon in accurately predicting the effect of cephalic alar trim on tip elevation. Methods: Ten fresh cadaveric dissections were performed to determine the change in nasolabial angles after cephalic trim of the lower lateral cartilage. Closed rhinoplasty technique was performed using marginal and intercartilaginous incisions to expose the lower lateral cartilage. Caliper measurements of the lower lateral cartilage were recorded. Serial cephalic trim was performed in 25% increments. True lateral photographs were obtained before and after each serial excision. Nasolabial angle measurements were obtained using a digital goniometer for digital photo analysis. Results: Four female and 6 male cadavers were evaluated. The mean initial nasolabial angle was 106° ± 2°. The mean lower lateral cartilage width was 9.45 ± 1.38 mm. Serial 25% reductions in lower lateral cartilage height resulted in a mean total nasolabial angle change of 7.4°, 12.9°, and 19.6°, respectively. The mean incremental change in the nasolabial angle was 6.47° ± 1.25°. Conclusion: The nasolabial angle is an essential aesthetic feature. Cephalic trim is a key maneuver in affecting the nasolabial angle. A 25% lower lateral cartilage cephalic trim correlates with an average change in the nasolabial angle of 6.47°. Knowledge of the cephalic trim to nasolabial angle relationship aids in achieving desired tip elevation. PMID:26171091

  6. Digital work-flow

    PubMed Central

    MARSANGO, V.; BOLLERO, R.; D’OVIDIO, N.; MIRANDA, M.; BOLLERO, P.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. The project presents a clinical case in which the digital work-flow procedure was applied for a prosthetic rehabilitation in natural teeth and implants. Materials. Digital work-flow uses patient’s photo for the aesthetic’s planning, digital smile technology for the simulation of the final restoration and real time scanning to register the two arches. Than the scanning are sent to the laboratory that proceed with CAD-CAM production. Results. Digital work-flow offers the opportunities to easily speak with laboratory and patients, gives better clinical results and demonstrated to be a less invasiveness method for the patient. Conclusion. Intra-oral scanner, digital smile design, preview using digital wax-up, CAD-CAM production, are new predictable opportunities for prosthetic team. This work-flow, compared with traditional methods, is faster, more precise and predictable. PMID:25694797

  7. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice. PMID:12444400

  8. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken D.; Quinn, Edward L.; Mauck, Jerry L.; Bockhorst, Richard M.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  9. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  10. Digital In, Digital Out: Digital Editing with Firewire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Bob; Sauer, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Reviews linear and nonlinear digital video (DV) editing equipment and software, using the IEEE 1394 (FireWire) connector. Includes a chart listing specifications and rating eight DV editing systems, reviews two DV still-photo cameras, and previews beta DV products. (PEN)

  11. Debunking the "Digital Native": Beyond Digital Apartheid, towards Digital Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, C.; Czerniewicz, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper interrogates the currently pervasive discourse of the "net generation" finding the concept of the "digital native" especially problematic, both empirically and conceptually. We draw on a research project of South African higher education students' access to and use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to show that age is…

  12. Digital shaded-relief map of Venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrity, Christopher P.; Hackley, Paul C.; Urbani, Franco

    2004-01-01

    The Digital Shaded-Relief Map of Venezuela is a composite of more than 20 tiles of 90 meter (3 arc second) pixel resolution elevation data, captured during the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in February 2000. The SRTM, a joint project between the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), provides the most accurate and comprehensive international digital elevation dataset ever assembled. The 10-day flight mission aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle Endeavour obtained elevation data for about 80% of the world's landmass at 3-5 meter pixel resolution through the use of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology. SAR is desirable because it acquires data along continuous swaths, maintaining data consistency across large areas, independent of cloud cover. Swaths were captured at an altitude of 230 km, and are approximately 225 km wide with varying lengths. Rendering of the shaded-relief image required editing of the raw elevation data to remove numerous holes and anomalously high and low values inherent in the dataset. Customized ArcInfo Arc Macro Language (AML) scripts were written to interpolate areas of null values and generalize irregular elevation spikes and wells. Coastlines and major water bodies used as a clipping mask were extracted from 1:500,000-scale geologic maps of Venezuela (Bellizzia and others, 1976). The shaded-relief image was rendered with an illumination azimuth of 315? and an altitude of 65?. A vertical exaggeration of 2X was applied to the image to enhance land-surface features. Image post-processing techniques were accomplished using conventional desktop imaging software.

  13. Digital security technology simplified.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Bernard J

    2007-01-01

    Digital security technology is making great strides in replacing analog and other traditional security systems including CCTV card access, personal identification and alarm monitoring applications. Like any new technology, the author says, it is important to understand its benefits and limitations before purchasing and installing, to ensure its proper operation and effectiveness. This article is a primer for security directors on how digital technology works. It provides an understanding of the key components which make up the foundation for digital security systems, focusing on three key aspects of the digital security world: the security network, IP cameras and IP recorders. PMID:17907609

  14. Digital solar system geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Kozak, R. C.; Isbell, Nancy K.

    1991-01-01

    All available synoptic maps of the solid-surface bodies of the Solar System were digitized for presentation in the planned Atlas of the Solar System by Greeley and Batson. Since the last report (Batson et al., 1990), preliminary Uranian satellite maps were replaced with improved versions, Galilean satellite geology was simplified and digitized, structure was added to many maps, and the maps were converted to a standard format, with corresponding standing colors for the mapped units. Following these changes, the maps were re-reviewed by their authors and are now undergoing final editing before preparation for publication. In some cases (for Mercury, Venus, and Mars), more detailed maps were digitized and then simplified for the Atlas. Other detailed maps are planned to be digitized in the coming year for the Moon and the Galilean satellites. For most of the remaining bodies such as the Uranian satellites, the current digitized versions contain virtually all the detail that can be mapped given the available data; those versions will be unchanged for the Atlas. These digital geologic maps are archived at the digital scale of 1/16 degree/ pixel, in sinusoidal format. The availability of geology of the Solar System in a digital database will facilitate comparisons and integration with other data: digitized lunar geologic maps have already been used in a comparison with Galileo SSI observations of the Moon.

  15. Experiments in digital literacy.

    PubMed

    Eshet-Alkali, Yoram; Amichai-Hamburger, Yair

    2004-08-01

    Having digital literacy requires more than just the ability to use software or to operate a digital device; it includes a large variety of complex skills such as cognitive, motoric, sociological, and emotional that users need to have in order to use digital environments effectively. A conceptual model that was recently described by the authors suggests that digital literacy comprises five major digital skills: photo-visual skills ("reading" instructions from graphical displays), reproduction skills (utilizing digital reproduction to create new, meaningful materials from preexisting ones), branching skills (constructing knowledge from non-linear, hypertextual navigation), information skills (evaluating the quality and validity of information), and socio-emotional skills (understanding the "rules" that prevail in cyberspace and applying this understanding in online cyberspace communication). The present paper presents results from a performance-based pioneer study that investigated the application of the above digital literacy skills conceptual model among different groups of scholars. Results clearly indicate that the younger participants performed better than the older ones, with photo-visual and branching literacy tasks, whereas the older participants were found to be more literate in reproduction and information literacy tasks. Research results shed light on the cognitive skills that users utilize in performing with digital environments, and provide educators and software developers with helpful guidelines for designing better user-centered digital environments. PMID:15331029

  16. Digitization Best Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Fei; Holtkamp, Irma S.; Knudson, Frances L.

    2012-07-31

    This project involved performing tests and documenting results to determine best practices for digitizing older print documents. The digitization process is complicated, especially when original documents exhibit non-standard fonts and are faded. Tests focused on solutions to improve high quality scanning, increase OCR accuracy, and efficiently use embedded metadata. Results are summarized. From the test results on the right sides, we know that when we plan to digitize documents, we should balance Quantity and Quality based on our expectation, and then make final decision for the digitization process.

  17. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences. PMID:26030375

  18. Global multi-resolution terrain elevation data 2010 (GMTED2010)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Gesch, Dean B.

    2011-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a global topographic elevation model designated as GTOPO30 at a horizontal resolution of 30 arc-seconds for the entire Earth. Because no single source of topographic information covered the entire land surface, GTOPO30 was derived from eight raster and vector sources that included a substantial amount of U.S. Defense Mapping Agency data. The quality of the elevation data in GTOPO30 varies widely; there are no spatially-referenced metadata, and the major topographic features such as ridgelines and valleys are not well represented. Despite its coarse resolution and limited attributes, GTOPO30 has been widely used for a variety of hydrological, climatological, and geomorphological applications as well as military applications, where a regional, continental, or global scale topographic model is required. These applications have ranged from delineating drainage networks and watersheds to using digital elevation data for the extraction of topographic structure and three-dimensional (3D) visualization exercises (Jenson and Domingue, 1988; Verdin and Greenlee, 1996; Lehner and others, 2008). Many of the fundamental geophysical processes active at the Earth's surface are controlled or strongly influenced by topography, thus the critical need for high-quality terrain data (Gesch, 1994). U.S. Department of Defense requirements for mission planning, geographic registration of remotely sensed imagery, terrain visualization, and map production are similarly dependent on global topographic data. Since the time GTOPO30 was completed, the availability of higher-quality elevation data over large geographic areas has improved markedly. New data sources include global Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTEDRegistered) from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), Canadian elevation data, and data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). Given the widespread use of GTOPO30 and the equivalent 30-arc

  19. Elevator deflections on the icing process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of elevator deflection of the horizontal stabilizer for certain icing parameters is investigated. Elevator deflection can severely change the lower and upper leading-edge impingement limits, and ice can accrete on the elevator itself. Also, elevator deflection had practically no effect on the maximum local collection efficiency. It is shown that for severe icing conditions (large water droplets), elevator deflections that increase the projected height of the airfoil can significantly increase the total collection efficiency of the airfoil.

  20. Gravity referenced elevation encoder development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, R. E.

    1993-05-01

    Recent progress in the development of a gravity-sensor-based instrument for determining the elevation angle of DSN antennas is described. The benefits of such a system include the capability to locate the Gravity Referenced Elevation Encoder (GREE) directly on the primary reflector (thus bypassing structural flexure and deformation error sources), anticipated lower maintenance costs compared to the present gimbal encoders, direct replaceability, or supplementation of the present gimbal encoders and the utilization of off-the-shelf components to construct the GREE. This article includes a description of the nominal GREE design. Test results on a laboratory breadboard model are given. Rigid-body dynamics of the GREE are derived and the simulated performance in response to measured antenna vibrations is given.

  1. Gravity referenced elevation encoder development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of a gravity-sensor-based instrument for determining the elevation angle of DSN antennas is described. The benefits of such a system include the capability to locate the Gravity Referenced Elevation Encoder (GREE) directly on the primary reflector (thus bypassing structural flexure and deformation error sources), anticipated lower maintenance costs compared to the present gimbal encoders, direct replaceability, or supplementation of the present gimbal encoders and the utilization of off-the-shelf components to construct the GREE. This article includes a description of the nominal GREE design. Test results on a laboratory breadboard model are given. Rigid-body dynamics of the GREE are derived and the simulated performance in response to measured antenna vibrations is given.

  2. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  3. Science on a space elevator

    SciTech Connect

    Laubscher, B. E.; Jorgensen, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Space Elevator (SE) represents a major paradigm shift in space access. If the SE's promise of low cost access can be realized, everything becomes economically more feasible to accomplish in space. In this paper we describe in-situ science stations mounted on a science-dedicated space elevator tether. The concept presented here involves a carbon nanotube ribbon that is constructed by an existing space elevator and then science sensors are stationed along the ribbon at differing altitudes. The finished ribbon can be moved across the earth to the position at which its scientific measurements are to be taken. The ability to station scientific, in-situ instrumentation at different altitudes for round-the-clock observations is a unique capability of the SE. The environments that the science packages sense range from the troposphere out beyond the magnetopause of the magnetosphere on the solar side of the earth. Therefore, the very end of the SE can sense the solar wind. The measurements at various points along its length include temperature, pressure, density, sampling, chemical analyses, wind speed, turbulence, free oxygen, electromagnetic radiation, cosmic rays, energetic particles and plasmas in the earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind. There exist some altitudes that are difficult to access with aircraft or balloons or rockets and so remain relatively unexplored. The space elevator solves these problems and opens these regions up to in-situ measurements. Without the need for propulsion, the SE provides a more benign and pristine environment for atmospheric measurements than available with powered aircraft. Moreover, replacing and upgrading instrumentation is expected to be very cost effective with the SE. Moving and stationing the science SE affords the opportunity to sense multiple regions of the atmosphere. The SE's geosynchronous, orbital motion through the magnetosphere, albeit nominally with Earth's magnetic field, will trace a plane through that region

  4. Digital rights language support for evolving digital cinema requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orri, Xavier; Mas, Joan-Maria; Macq, Benoit M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Digital cinema can be defined as the digital electronic distribution and display of theatrical film content or live material to the theatre. However, this simple definition does not reflect the complex mesh of balanced business relationships between the different parties involved in the worldwide cinematic distribution. Its transition from an analogue to a digital business will happen progressively, starting with only content being digitally distributed and going until an all-digital business. From these facts derive strong requirements on digital rights management (DRM) systems for digital cinema and therefore on the digital rights language supporting it. This paper explores the requirements imposed by the cinematic distribution model and by its progressive transition to digital, and the impact these have on digital rights languages. We analyze the support provided by different digital rights languages, identifying weaknesses and exploring solutions in fulfilling the requirements of the digital cinema distribution model.

  5. Digital line graphs from 1:100,000-scale maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1989-01-01

    The National Cartographic Information Center (NCIC) distributes digital cartographic/geographic data files produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Mapping Program. Digital cartographic data files may be grouped into four basic types. The first of these, called a Digital Line Graph (DLG), is line map information in digital form. These data files include information on planimetric base categories, such as transportation, hydrography, and boundaries. The second form, called a Digital Elevation Model (OEM), consists of a sampled array of elevations for ground positions that are usually, but not always, at regularly spaced intervals. The third type is Land Use and Land Cover digital data, which provides information on nine major classes of land use such as urban, agricultural, or forest as well as associated map data such as political units and Federal land ownership. The fourth type, the Geographic Names Information System, provides primary information for known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name.

  6. Digital line graphs from 1:24,000-scale maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey National Mapping Division

    1990-01-01

    The Earth Science Information Centers (ESIC) distribute digital cartographic/geographic data files produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Mapping Program. Digital cartographic data flles are grouped into four basic types. The first of these, called a Digital Line . Graph (DLG), is line map information in digital form. These data files include information on planimetric base categories, such as transportation, hydrography, and boundaries. The second type, called a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), consists of a sampled array of elevations for a number of ground positions that are usually at regularly spaced intervals. The third type is Land Use and Land Cover digital data, which provides information on nine major classes of land use such as urban, agricultural, or forest as wen as associated map data such as political units and Federal land ownership. The fourth type, the Geographic Names Information System, provides primary information for all known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name.

  7. The Digital Absurd

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Steve

    2010-01-01

    I believe that the concept of the absurd, as described in philosophy and reflected in works of drama and literature, provides an unusual and helpful perspective from which to view the emerging field of digital media. In my opinion, absurd principles can help us understand the mixed feelings we may have when engaging with digital media: joy and…

  8. Navigate the Digital Rapids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Julie; Davis, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    How can teachers teach digital citizenship when the digital landscape is changing so rapidly? How can teachers teach proper online social interactions when the students are outside their classroom and thus outside their control? Will encouraging students to engage in global collaborative environments land teachers in hot water? These are the…

  9. Educating Digital Citizens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Digital citizenship is how educators, citizens, and parents can teach where the lines of cyber safety and ethics are in the interconnected online world their students will inhabit. Aside from keeping technology users safe, digital citizenship also prepares students to survive and thrive in an environment embedded with information, communication,…

  10. Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    MacArthur launched the digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, socialize, communicate, and play. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than $100 million for research, development of innovative new technologies, new learning environments for youth,…

  11. Digital automatic gain control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Performance analysis, used to evaluated fitness of several circuits to digital automatic gain control (AGC), indicates that digital integrator employing coherent amplitude detector (CAD) is best device suited for application. Circuit reduces gain error to half that of conventional analog AGC while making it possible to automatically modify response of receiver to match incoming signal conditions.

  12. Digital rotation measurement unit

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, S.N.

    1983-09-30

    A digital rotation indicator is disclosed for monitoring the position of a valve member having a movable actuator. The indicator utilizes mercury switches adapted to move in cooperation with the actuator. Each of the switches produces an output as it changes state when the actuator moves. A direction detection circuit is connected to the switches to produce a first digital signal indicative of the direction of rotation of the actuator. A count pulse generating circuit is also connected to the switches to produce a second digital pulse signal having count pulses corresponding to a change of state of any of the mercury switches. A reset pulse generating circuit is provided to generate a reset pulse each time a count pulse is generated. An up/down counter is connected to receive the first digital pulse signal and the second digital pulse signal and to count the pulses of the second digital pulse signal either up or down depending upon the instantaneous digital value of the first digital signal whereby a running count indicative of the movement of the actuator is maintained.

  13. Occupying the Digital Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This essay questions the digital humanities' dependence on interpretation and critique as strategies for reading and responding to texts. Instead, the essay proposes suggestion as a digital rhetorical practice, one that does not replace hermeneutics, but instead offers alternative ways to respond to texts. The essay uses the Occupy movement as an…

  14. The Digital Vaults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Suzanne; Potter, Lee Ann

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the Digital Vaults and offers suggestions in introducing this site to students. The Digital Vaults, inspired by the permanent Public Vaults exhibition launched by the National Archives in 2004, is not just another website, but it designed to be an online exhibit and teaching tool, by offering both exposure to historical…

  15. Digital Pinhole Camera

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  16. Digital Collections Inventory Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClung, Patricia A.

    This report is intended to inform and stimulate discussion on digital library programs as well as the potential usefulness, scope, and desired features of future inventories of online digital collections. It describes a joint project by the Commission on Preservation and Access and the Council on Library Resources to determine the extent to which…

  17. Cresting the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Kay; Steelman, Joyce

    2008-01-01

    Catawba Valley Community College has introduced digital storytelling (DS), an innovative instructional method that has produced extraordinary results. Digital storytelling uses affordable software to craft powerful multimedia presentations of student writing. Students create 3-to-4-minute movies with images, voiceovers, and music. This project…

  18. Digital Video Editing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Monica Adams, head librarian at Robinson Secondary in Fairfax country, Virginia, states that librarians should have the technical knowledge to support projects related to digital video editing. The process of digital video editing and the cables, storage issues and the computer system with software is described.

  19. Will Digital Texts Succeed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    With faculty changing instructional practices to take advantage of customizable, focused content (and digital delivery of that content), many people assume that digital distribution is the answer to bringing the costs of course content delivery in line. But the picture just isn't that simple. A wide continuum of options is available to faculty and…

  20. Shaping Digital Library Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rush G.

    2002-01-01

    Explores issues related to the selection and purchase of digital content in academic libraries, including commercially-produced databases, electronic journals, and books and other electronic resources that are purchased from vendors; and in-house digitization projects. Considers the degree to which standard collection management principles apply.…

  1. Optimization of digital designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An application specific integrated circuit is optimized by translating a first representation of its digital design to a second representation. The second representation includes multiple syntactic expressions that admit a representation of a higher-order function of base Boolean values. The syntactic expressions are manipulated to form a third representation of the digital design.

  2. Music Instruction Goes Digital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Faced with meager enrollment in band, orchestra, and choir programs, schools are using digital technology to excite students about creating music on today's terms. This article discusses how music educators reinvent their profession by acknowledging and incorporating the way students interact with music today--digitally. Bill Evans, a music…

  3. Digital Image Access & Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidorn, P. Bryan, Ed.; Sandore, Beth, Ed.

    Recent technological advances in computing and digital imaging technology have had immediate and permanent consequences for visual resource collections. Libraries are involved in organizing and managing large visual resource collections. The central challenges in working with digital image collections mirror those that libraries have sought to…

  4. Creating Digital Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoch, Melody; Langston-DeMott, Brooke; Adams-Budde, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Elementary students find themselves engaged and learning at a digital writing camp. The authors find that such elementary students usually have limited access to technology at home and school, and posit that teachers should do all they can to give them more access to and experience in digital composing. Students were motivated and learned to use…

  5. Writing and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Waes, Luuk, Ed.; Leijten, Marielle, Ed.; Neuwirth, Chris, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known scholars from a…

  6. Digital Signature Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  7. Digital Knowledge Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandian, M. Paul

    2008-01-01

    Technology has revolutionized the concept of libraries. Networking and computing technologies have now become sufficiently advanced to support the design and deployment of large digital libraries which are capable of supporting the conventional end-user functions. Digital libraries are a natural extension of the evolution in which libraries have…

  8. Taming the Digital Beast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrizio, Andy

    2006-01-01

    As more and more schools move to digital repositories, it seems inevitable that the knowledge accumulated across universities will go digital. How smoothly an institution makes that transition will depend on how well its project is planned from inception, and how well it structure its data. All of the administrators and educators the authors spoke…

  9. Scholars | Digital Representation | Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the current state of digital publishing means that writers can now do more and say more in more ways than ever before in human history. As modes, methods, media and mechanisms of expression mutate into newer and newer digital forms, writers find themselves at a moment when they can create, critique collaborate, and comment according…

  10. Changing State Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    Research has shown that state virtual or digital libraries are evolving into websites that are loaded with free resources, subscription databases, and instructional tools. In this article, the author explores these evolving libraries based on the following questions: (1) How user-friendly are the state digital libraries?; (2) How do state digital…

  11. Fundamentals of Digital Logic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noell, Monica L.

    This course is designed to prepare electronics personnel for further training in digital techniques, presenting need to know information that is basic to any maintenance course on digital equipment. It consists of seven study units: (1) binary arithmetic; (2) boolean algebra; (3) logic gates; (4) logic flip-flops; (5) nonlogic circuits; (6)…

  12. ISDN: The Digital Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piedmo, Greg

    1995-01-01

    Integrated services digital network (ISDN) is a dial-up digital transmission service supporting transmission of audio, video, and text data over standard copper telephone wires or fiber optic cables. Advantages of ISDN over analog transmission include the ability of one phone line to support up to three simultaneous, separate conversations (phone,…

  13. Digital communications study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boorstyn, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported dealing with problems of digital data transmission and computer communications networks. The results of four individual studies are presented which include: (1) signal processing with finite state machines, (2) signal parameter estimation from discrete-time observations, (3) digital filtering for radar signal processing applications, and (4) multiple server queues where all servers are not identical.

  14. Towards a Digital Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    A month ago, a French court ruled that internet access is a basic human right. Gordon Brown has said it is as crucial for people as electricity and water. Yet, 17 million Britons are still excluded from digital technology and an estimated 13 per cent of the population--some six million people--are both socially and digitally excluded. There are…

  15. Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Liebrock, Lorie M.; Duggan, David Patrick

    2009-10-01

    This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

  16. Digital biology and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Witters, Daan; Sun, Bing; Begolo, Stefano; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Robles, Whitney; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2014-09-01

    This account examines developments in "digital" biology and chemistry within the context of microfluidics, from a personal perspective. Using microfluidics as a frame of reference, we identify two areas of research within digital biology and chemistry that are of special interest: (i) the study of systems that switch between discrete states in response to changes in chemical concentration of signals, and (ii) the study of single biological entities such as molecules or cells. In particular, microfluidics accelerates analysis of switching systems (i.e., those that exhibit a sharp change in output over a narrow range of input) by enabling monitoring of multiple reactions in parallel over a range of concentrations of signals. Conversely, such switching systems can be used to create new kinds of microfluidic detection systems that provide "analog-to-digital" signal conversion and logic. Microfluidic compartmentalization technologies for studying and isolating single entities can be used to reconstruct and understand cellular processes, study interactions between single biological entities, and examine the intrinsic heterogeneity of populations of molecules, cells, or organisms. Furthermore, compartmentalization of single cells or molecules in "digital" microfluidic experiments can induce switching in a range of reaction systems to enable sensitive detection of cells or biomolecules, such as with digital ELISA or digital PCR. This "digitizing" offers advantages in terms of robustness, assay design, and simplicity because quantitative information can be obtained with qualitative measurements. While digital formats have been shown to improve the robustness of existing chemistries, we anticipate that in the future they will enable new chemistries to be used for quantitative measurements, and that digital biology and chemistry will continue to provide further opportunities for measuring biomolecules, understanding natural systems more deeply, and advancing molecular and

  17. From Digital Divide to Digital Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de los Santos, Gerardo E., Ed.; de los Santos, Alfredo G., Jr., Ed.; Milliron, Mark David, Ed.

    This publication is one of many efforts of the League for Innovation in the Community College to address the issue of societal technology access and learning needs. This work addresses the issue of the digital divide, which includes the often conflicting perspectives of information technology (IT) access and literacy needs held by government…

  18. The Digital Carrot, the Digital Stick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Gregory A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author asserts that technology is not the answer to digital piracy at colleges and universities. Citing the three most common explanations given for copyright infringement--that students cannot always get what they want, cannot always use what they can get, or think the price of what they can get is unfair--he asserts that the…

  19. Digital Booktalk: Digital Media for Reluctant Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Glenda; Kenny, Robert

    2008-01-01

    New learning and communications paradigms of today's learners are extending the definition of literacy and directly affecting how reading and writing skills are acquired (Leu, 2000). Mirroring an ever-expanding definition of literacy, new college and K-12 curricular programs that redefine digital media are popping up all over the country. Story is…

  20. Computing Logarithms Digit-by-Digit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we present an algorithm for computing logarithms of positive real numbers, that bears structural resemblance to the elementary school algorithm of long division. Using this algorithm, we can compute successive digits of a logarithm using a 4-operation pocket calculator. The algorithm makes no use of Taylor series or calculus, but…

  1. Glacier-specific elevation changes in western Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Frank; Le Bris, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    Deriving glacier-specific elevation changes from DEM differencing and digital glacier outlines is rather straight-forward if the required datasets are available. Calculating such changes over large regions and including glaciers selected for mass balance measurements in the field, provides a possibility to determine the representativeness of the changes observed at these glaciers for the entire region. The related comparison of DEM-derived values for these glaciers with the overall mean avoids the rather error-prone conversion of volume to mass changes (e.g. due to unknown densities) and gives unit-less correction factors for upscaling the field measurements to a larger region. However, several issues have to be carefully considered, such as proper co-registration of the two DEMs, date and accuracy of the datasets compared, as well as source data used for DEM creation and potential artefacts (e.g. voids). In this contribution we present an assessment of the representativeness of the two mass balance glaciers Gulkana and Wolverine for the overall changes of nearly 3200 glaciers in western Alaska over a ca. 50-year time period. We use an elevation change dataset from a study by Berthier et al. (2010) that was derived from the USGS DEM of the 1960s (NED) and a more recent DEM derived from SPOT5 data for the SPIRIT project. Additionally, the ASTER GDEM was used as a more recent DEM. Historic glacier outlines were taken from the USGS digital line graph (DLG) dataset, corrected with the digital raster graph (DRG) maps from USGS. Mean glacier specific elevation changes were derived based on drainage divides from a recently created inventory. Land-terminating, lake-calving and tidewater glaciers were marked in the attribute table to determine their changes separately. We also investigated the impact of handling potential DEM artifacts in three different ways and compared elevation changes with altitude. The mean elevation changes of Gulkana and Wolverine glaciers (about -0

  2. Intelligent elevator management system using image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, H. Sai; Karunamurthy, Vignesh; Kumar, R. Barath

    2015-03-01

    In the modern era, the increase in the number of shopping malls and industrial building has led to an exponential increase in the usage of elevator systems. Thus there is an increased need for an effective control system to manage the elevator system. This paper is aimed at introducing an effective method to control the movement of the elevators by considering various cases where in the location of the person is found and the elevators are controlled based on various conditions like Load, proximity etc... This method continuously monitors the weight limit of each elevator while also making use of image processing to determine the number of persons waiting for an elevator in respective floors. Canny edge detection technique is used to find out the number of persons waiting for an elevator. Hence the algorithm takes a lot of cases into account and locates the correct elevator to service the respective persons waiting in different floors.

  3. Lunar Pole Illumination and Communications Maps Computed from GSSR Elevation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Scott

    2009-01-01

    A Digital Elevation Model of the lunar south pole was produced using Goldstone Solar System RADAR (GSSR) data obtained in 2006.12 This model has 40-meter horizontal resolution and about 5-meter relative vertical accuracy. This Digital Elevation Model was used to compute average solar illumination and Earth visibility with 100 kilometers of the lunar south pole. The elevation data were converted into local terrain horizon masks, then converted into lunar-centric latitude and longitude coordinates. The horizon masks were compared to latitude, longitude regions bounding the maximum Sun and Earth motions relative to the moon. Estimates of Earth visibility were computed by integrating the area of the region bounding the Earth's motion that was below the horizon mask. Solar illumination and other metrics were computed similarly. Proposed lunar south pole base sites were examined in detail, with the best site showing yearly solar power availability of 92 percent and Direct-To-Earth (DTE) communication availability of about 50 percent. Similar analysis of the lunar south pole used an older GSSR Digital Elevation Model with 600-meter horizontal resolution. The paper also explores using a heliostat to reduce the photovoltaic power system mass and complexity.

  4. Approach to managing elevated creatinine.

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Richard

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a systematic approach to finding the underlying cause of an elevated creatinine level. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: This diagnostic approach is based on a synthesis of information from reference works on nephrology, articles found through a MEDLINE search, and the author's personal experience. MAIN MESSAGE: Elevated creatinine levels suggest the differential diagnosis of renal failure (RF). History and a complete physical examination are important, keeping in mind that RF is often asymptomatic in the early stages. After repeating the creatinine test to verify results, baseline tests should be ordered to identify the cause of the RF. Comparing results of serial tests is essential for determining whether RF is acute or chronic, stable or progressive. An ultrasound scan is particularly useful for eliminating an obstructive cause; the size of the kidney can indicate whether disease is acute or chronic. Complementary blood tests and imaging studies might be useful. CONCLUSION: Diagnosing and managing RF can appear complex, but a systematic approach will help you find the cause and treat the condition. PMID:15171676

  5. Effect of elevation resolution on evapotranspiration simulations using MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Kambhammettu, B V N P; Schmid, Wolfgang; King, James P; Creel, Bobby J

    2012-01-01

    Surface elevations represented in MODFLOW head-dependent packages are usually derived from digital elevation models (DEMs) that are available at much high resolution. Conventional grid refinement techniques to simulate the model at DEM resolution increases computational time, input file size, and in many cases are not feasible for regional applications. This research aims at utilizing the increasingly available high resolution DEMs for effective simulation of evapotranspiration (ET) in MODFLOW as an alternative to grid refinement techniques. The source code of the evapotranspiration package is modified by considering for a fixed MODFLOW grid resolution and for different DEM resolutions, the effect of variability in elevation data on ET estimates. Piezometric head at each DEM cell location is corrected by considering the gradient along row and column directions. Applicability of the research is tested for the lower Rio Grande (LRG) Basin in southern New Mexico. The DEM at 10 m resolution is aggregated to resampled DEM grid resolutions which are integer multiples of MODFLOW grid resolution. Cumulative outflows and ET rates are compared at different coarse resolution grids. Results of the analysis conclude that variability in depth-to-groundwater within the MODFLOW cell is a major contributing parameter to ET outflows in shallow groundwater regions. DEM aggregation methods for the LRG Basin have resulted in decreased volumetric outflow due to the formation of a smoothing error, which lowered the position of water table to a level below the extinction depth. PMID:21916891

  6. Digital sonar system

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.K.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1995-11-21

    A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal. 4 figs.

  7. Digital sonar system

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kenneth K.; Wilkes, R. Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal.

  8. Fast transient digitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, F.

    1981-07-08

    Method and apparatus are presented for sequentially scanning a plurality of target elements with an electron scanning beam modulated in accordance with variations in a high-frequency analog signal to provide discrete analog signal samples representative of successive portions of the analog signal; coupling the discrete analog signal samples from each of the target elements to a different one of a plurality of high speed storage devices; converting the discrete analog signal samples to equivalent digital signals; and storing the digital signals in a digital memory unit for subsequent measurement or display.

  9. The oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kussner, H G; Schwartz, I

    1941-01-01

    The two-dimensional problem of the oscillating wing with aerodynamically balanced elevator is treated in the manner that the wing is replaced by a plate with bends and stages and the airfoil section by a mean line consisting of one or more straights. The computed formulas and tables permit, on these premises, the prediction of the pressure distribution and of the aerodynamic reactions of oscillating elevators and tabs with any position of elevator hinge in respect to elevator leading edge.

  10. Co-registration and bias corrections of satellite elevation data sets for quantifying glacier thickness change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuth, C.; Kääb, A.

    2011-03-01

    There are an increasing number of digital elevation models (DEMs) available worldwide for deriving elevation differences over time, including vertical changes on glaciers. Most of these DEMs are heavily post-processed or merged, so that physical error modelling becomes difficult and statistical error modelling is required instead. We propose a three-step methodological framework for assessing and correcting DEMs to quantify glacier elevation changes: (i) remove DEM shifts, (ii) check for elevation-dependent biases, and (iii) check for higher-order, sensor-specific biases. A simple, analytic and robust method to co-register elevation data is presented in regions where stable terrain is either plentiful (case study New Zealand) or limited (case study Svalbard). The method is demonstrated using the three global elevation data sets available to date, SRTM, ICESat and the ASTER GDEM, and with automatically generated DEMs from satellite stereo instruments of ASTER and SPOT5-HRS. After 3-D co-registration, significant biases related to elevation were found in some of the stereoscopic DEMs. Biases related to the satellite acquisition geometry (along/cross track) were detected at two frequencies in the automatically generated ASTER DEMs. The higher frequency bias seems to be related to satellite jitter, most apparent in the back-looking pass of the satellite. The origins of the more significant lower frequency bias is uncertain. ICESat-derived elevations are found to be the most consistent globally available elevation data set available so far. Before performing regional-scale glacier elevation change studies or mosaicking DEMs from multiple individual tiles (e.g. ASTER GDEM), we recommend to co-register all elevation data to ICESat as a global vertical reference system.

  11. Digital Citizenship Means Character Education for the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The reality of students' cyber lives has thrust upon educators a new approach: creating character education programs tuned to digital youth that are both proactive and aggressive. Taking this approach will help integrate students' digital activities within the context of the communities in which they live, both local and digital. The digital age…

  12. Digital Citizenship Means Character Education for the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The reality of students' cyber lives has thrust upon educators a new approach: creating character education programs tuned to digital youth that are proactive and aggressive. This will help integrate students' digital activities within the context of the communities in which they live, both local and digital. The digital age beckons a new era of…

  13. Digital Library and Digital Reference Service: Integration and Mutual Complementarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jia

    2008-01-01

    Both the digital library and the digital reference service were invented and have been developed under the networked environment. Among their intersections, the fundamental thing is their symbiotic interest--serving the user in a more efficient way. The article starts by discussing the digital library and its service and the digital reference…

  14. Elevations and Distances in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in elevations and distances with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. The entire document consists of statistical charts depicting the nation's 50 largest cities, extreme and mean elevations, elevations of named summits over 14,000 feet…

  15. 46 CFR 183.540 - Elevators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... INSTALLATION Miscellaneous Systems and Requirements § 183.540 Elevators. Each elevator on a vessel must meet the requirements of ANSI A 17.1 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 175.600) or other standard... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Elevators. 183.540 Section 183.540 Shipping COAST...

  16. First Digit Law and Its Application to Digital Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yun Q.

    Digital data forensics, which gathers evidence of data composition, origin, and history, is crucial in our digital world. Although this new research field is still in its infancy stage, it has started to attract increasing attention from the multimedia-security research community. This lecture addresses the first digit law and its applications to digital forensics. First, the Benford and generalized Benford laws, referred to as first digit law, are introduced. Then, the application of first digit law to detection of JPEG compression history for a given BMP image and detection of double JPEG compressions are presented. Finally, applying first digit law to detection of double MPEG video compressions is discussed. It is expected that the first digit law may play an active role in other task of digital forensics. The lesson learned is that statistical models play an important role in digital forensics and for a specific forensic task different models may provide different performance.

  17. Implantable digital hearing aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissiah, A. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Hearing aid converts analog output of microphone into digital pulses in about 10 channels of audiofrequencies. Each pulse band could be directly connected to portion of auditory nerve most sensitive to that range.

  18. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  19. Forecasting digital microcircuit obsolescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balwally, Nandakumar M.

    1991-03-01

    This report documents a procedure for forecasting digital microcircuit obsolescence at the Defense Electronics Supply Center, Dayton, OH. Obsolescence is caused by rapid advancement in digital technology and decrease in commercial demand while military demand still continues. In logistics parlance, parts obsolescence is known as a diminishing manufacturing source (DMS) problem. Continued supply of an obsolete DMS item is assured via substitution, alternate sourcing or a one time buy equal to the lifetime requirements of the item. Emulation is a recent alternative which explores the possibility of replacing obsolete digital microcircuits with state of the art devices which can be manufactured and supplied on demand. The report recommends use of a statistical model which forecasts DMS items from a population of presently non-DMS items belonging to obsolete digital microcircuit technologies. The items forecast by the model should be evaluated for their emulation potential.

  20. Replantation of digits

    MedlinePlus

    Risks of this surgery include: Reactions to medications Problems breathing Bleeding Infection Death of the replanted tissue Reduced nerve function or movement in the replanted digit Stiffness of the ...