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Sample records for 1-phosphate sn-glycerol 3-phosphate

  1. [Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs) in plants].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong; Xiao, Dan-Wang; Shi, Chun-Lin; Hu, Xue-Fang; Wu, Ke-Bin; Guan, Chun-Yun; Xiong, Xing-Hua

    2013-12-01

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) catalyzes the acylation at sn-1 position of glycerol-3-phosphate to produce lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in an acyl-CoA or acyl-ACP-dependent manner, which is the initial and rate-determining step of TAG biosynthetic pathway. Some GPATs have sn-2 transfer activity. Part members of the GPAT gene family have been cloned from different plant species. Based on their subcellular localizations, GPATs can be classified into three types, plastid GPATs, mitochondria GPATs and endoplasmic reticulum GPATs. GPATs exhibit diverse biochemical properties and are involved in synthesis of several lipids such as TAG, suberin, and cutin which play important roles in the growth and development of plants. This review summarized the current understanding of the chromosomal locus and gene structure of GPAT genes and the subcellular localization, sn-2 regiospecificity, substrates specialty, and functions of GPATs in plants. PMID:24645344

  2. Structure and Evolution of the Archaeal Lipid Synthesis Enzyme sn-Glycerol-1-phosphate Dehydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Vincenzo; Schofield, Linley R.; Zhang, Yanli; Sang, Carrie; Dey, Debjit; Hannus, Ingegerd M.; Martin, William F.; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J.; Ronimus, Ron S.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most critical events in the origins of cellular life was the development of lipid membranes. Archaea use isoprenoid chains linked via ether bonds to sn-glycerol 1-phosphate (G1P), whereas bacteria and eukaryotes use fatty acids attached via ester bonds to enantiomeric sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. NAD(P)H-dependent G1P dehydrogenase (G1PDH) forms G1P and has been proposed to have played a crucial role in the speciation of the Archaea. We present here, to our knowledge, the first structures of archaeal G1PDH from the hyperthermophilic methanogen Methanocaldococcus jannaschii with bound substrate dihydroxyacetone phosphate, product G1P, NADPH, and Zn2+ cofactor. We also biochemically characterized the enzyme with respect to pH optimum, cation specificity, and kinetic parameters for dihydroxyacetone phosphate and NAD(P)H. The structures provide key evidence for the reaction mechanism in the stereospecific addition for the NAD(P)H-based pro-R hydrogen transfer and the coordination of the Zn2+ cofactor during catalysis. Structure-based phylogenetic analyses also provide insight into the origins of G1PDH. PMID:26175150

  3. Glycerolipid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Schlossman, D M; Bell, R M

    1978-01-01

    Yeast acyl-coenzyme A:dihydroxyacetone-phosphate O-acyltransferase (DHAP acyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.42) was investigated to (i) determine whether its activity and that of acyl-coenzyme A:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase (glycerol-P acyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.15) represent dual catalytic functions of a single membranous enzyme, (ii) estimate the relative contributions of the glycerol-P and DHAP pathways for yeast glycerolipid synthesis, and (iii) evaluate the suitability of yeast for future genetic investigations of the eucaryotic glycerol-P and DHAP acyltransferase activities. The membranous DHAP acyltransferase activity showed an apparent Km of 0.79 mM for DHAP, with a Vmax of 5.3 nmol/min per mg, whereas the glycerol-P acyltransferase activity showed an apparent Km of 0.05 mM for glycerol-P, with a Vmax of 3.4 nmol/min per mg. Glycerol-P was a competitive inhibitor (Ki, 0.07 mM) of the DHAP acyltransferase activity, and DHAP was a competitive inhibitor (Ki, 0.91 mM) of the glycerol-P acyltransferase activity. The two acyltransferase activities exhibited marked similarities in their pH dependence, acyl-coenzyme A chain length preference and substrate concentration dependencies, thermolability, and patterns of inactivation by N-ethylmaleimide, trypsin, and detergents. Thus, the data strongly suggest that yeast glycerol-P and DHAP acyltransferase activities represent dual catalytic functions of a single membrane-bound enzyme. Furthermore, since no acyl-DHAP oxidoreductase activity could be detected in yeast membranes, the DHAP pathway for glycerolipid synthesis may not operate in yeast. PMID:25265

  4. Improved purification of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its inhibition by ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, J.R.; Chen, S.M.; Osinchak, J.; Trumbore, M.

    1986-05-01

    An improved purification procedure yielded a homogeneous preparation of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) from commercially available baker's yeast. The enzyme had an apparent molecular weight of 42,000 by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This differs from the 31,000 reported earlier on the basis of its elution from a calibrated Sepharose 6B column. When denatured by guanidine (6M) and chromatographed on a Sephadex G-100 column with 6M guanidine in 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 6.5, containing 0.1M ..beta..-mercaptoethanol, GPD eluted with the approximately 42,000 mw proteins. S. cerevisiae GPD is an NAD-dependent oxidoreductase. With NADH as the variable substrate the GPD-catalyzed reduction of dihydroxacetone phosphate (DHAP) had a K/sub M/ of 0.018 mM and was competitively inhibited by ethanol. With DHAP as the variable substrate and NADH constant GPD catalyzed the reduction with a K/sub M/ of 0.37 mM and was noncompetitively inhibited by ethanol. The calculated K/sub i/ for the non-competitive inhibition was 3.4M. K/sub i/ for the competitive inhibition of NADH by ethanol varied with increasing concentrations of ethanol indicating a more complex mechanism than a truly competitive one.

  5. Cloning and characterization of murine 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases and their regulation by PPARalpha in murine heart.

    PubMed

    Lu, Biao; Jiang, Yan J; Zhou, Yaling; Xu, Fred Y; Hatch, Grant M; Choy, Patrick C

    2005-01-15

    AGPAT (1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase) exists in at least five isoforms in humans, termed as AGPAT1, AGPAT2, AGPAT3, AGPAT4 and AGPAT5. Although they catalyse the same biochemical reaction, their relative function, tissue expression and regulation are poorly understood. Linkage studies in humans have revealed that AGPAT2 contributes to glycerolipid synthesis and plays an important role in regulating lipid metabolism. We report the molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and enzyme characterization of mAGPATs (murine AGPATs) and regulation of cardiac mAGPATs by PPARalpha (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor alpha). mAGPATs demonstrated differential tissue expression profiles: mAGPAT1 and mAGPAT3 were ubiquitously expressed in most tissues, whereas mAGPAT2, mAGPAT4 and mAGPAT5 were expressed in a tissue-specific manner. mAGPAT2 expressed in in vitro transcription and translation reactions and in transfected COS-1 cells exhibited specificity for 1-acyl-sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. When amino acid sequences of five mAGPATs were compared, three highly conserved motifs were identified, including one novel motif/pattern KX2LX6GX12R. Cardiac mAGPAT activities were 25% lower (P<0.05) in PPARalpha null mice compared with wild-type. In addition, cardiac mAGPAT activities were 50% lower (P<0.05) in PPARalpha null mice fed clofibrate compared with clofibrate fed wild-type animals. This modulation of AGPAT activity was accompanied by significant enhancement/reduction of the mRNA levels of mAGPAT3/mAGPAT2 respectively. Finally, mRNA expression of cardiac mAGPAT3 appeared to be regulated by PPARalpha activation. We conclude that cardiac mAGPAT activity may be regulated by both the composition of mAGPAT isoforms and the levels of each isoform. PMID:15367102

  6. Topology of 1-Acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferases SLC1 and ALE1 and Related Membrane-bound O-Acyltransferases (MBOATs) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Pagac, Martin; de la Mora, Hector Vazquez; Duperrex, Cécile; Roubaty, Carole; Vionnet, Christine; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In yeast, phosphatidic acid, the biosynthetic precursor for all glycerophospholipids and triacylglycerols, is made de novo by the 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases Ale1p and Slc1p. Ale1p belongs to the membrane-bound O-acyltransferase (MBOAT) family, which contains many enzymes acylating lipids but also others that acylate secretory proteins residing in the lumen of the ER. A histidine present in a very short loop between two predicted transmembrane domains is the only residue that is conserved throughout the MBOAT gene family. The yeast MBOAT proteins of known function comprise Ale1p, the ergosterol acyltransferases Are1p and Are2p, and Gup1p, the last of which acylates lysophosphatidylinositol moieties of GPI anchors on ER lumenal GPI proteins. C-terminal topology reporters added to truncated versions of Gup1p yield a topology predicting a lumenal location of its uniquely conserved histidine 447 residue. The same approach shows that Ale1p and Are2p also have the uniquely conserved histidine residing in the ER lumen. Because these data raised the possibility that phosphatidic acid could be made in the lumen of the ER, we further investigated the topology of the second yeast 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, Slc1p. The location of C-terminal topology reporters, microsomal assays probing the protease sensitivity of inserted tags, and the accessibility of natural or artificially inserted cysteines to membrane-impermeant alkylating agents all indicate that the most conserved motif containing the presumed active site histidine of Slc1p is oriented toward the ER lumen, whereas other conserved motifs are cytosolic. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21849510

  7. Three Homologous Genes Encoding sn-Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase 4 Exhibit Different Expression Patterns and Functional Divergence in Brassica napus1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L.; El-Mezawy, Aliaa; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J.

    2011-01-01

    Brassica napus is an allotetraploid (AACC) formed from the fusion of two diploid progenitors, Brassica rapa (AA) and Brassica oleracea (CC). Polyploidy and genome-wide rearrangement during the evolution process have resulted in genes that are present as multiple homologs in the B. napus genome. In this study, three B. napus homologous genes encoding endoplasmic reticulum-bound sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) were identified and characterized. Although the three GPAT4 homologs share a high sequence similarity, they exhibit different expression patterns and altered epigenetic features. Heterologous expression in yeast further revealed that the three BnGPAT4 homologs encoded functional GPAT enzymes but with different levels of polypeptide accumulation. Complementation of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gpat4 gpat8 double mutant line with individual BnGPAT4 homologs suggested their physiological roles in cuticle formation. Analysis of gpat4 RNA interference lines of B. napus revealed that the BnGPAT4 deficiency resulted in reduced cutin content and altered stomatal structures in leaves. Our results revealed that the BnGPAT4 homologs have evolved into functionally divergent forms and play important roles in cutin synthesis and stomatal development. PMID:21173024

  8. Cloning of a coconut endosperm cDNA encoding a 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase that accepts medium-chain-length substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Knutzon, D S; Lardizabal, K D; Nelsen, J S; Bleibaum, J L; Davies, H M; Metz, J G

    1995-01-01

    Immature coconut (Cocos nucifera) endosperm contains a 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (LPAAT) activity that shows a preference for medium-chain-length fatty acyl-coenzyme A substrates (H.M. Davies, D.J. Hawkins, J.S. Nelsen [1995] Phytochemistry 39:989-996). Beginning with solubilized membrane preparations, we have used chromatographic separations to identify a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 29 kD, whose presence in various column fractions correlates with the acyltransferase activity detected in those same fractions. Amino acid sequence data obtained from several peptides generated from this protein were used to isolate a full-length clone from a coconut endosperm cDNA library. Clone pCGN5503 contains a 1325-bp cDNA insert with an open reading frame encoding a 308-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 34.8 kD. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of pCGN5503 to sequences in the data banks revealed significant homology to other putative LPAAT sequences. Expression of the coconut cDNA in Escherichia coli conferred upon those cells a novel LPAAT activity whose substrate activity profile matched that of the coconut enzyme. PMID:8552723

  9. Cloning, heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of plastidial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Payá-Milans, Miriam; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    The acyl-[acyl carrier protein]:sn-1-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT; E.C. 2.3.1.15) catalyzes the first step of glycerolipid assembly within the stroma of the chloroplast. In the present study, the sunflower (Helianthus annuus, L.) stromal GPAT was cloned, sequenced and characterized. We identified a single ORF of 1344base pairs that encoded a GPAT sharing strong sequence homology with the plastidial GPAT from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATS1, At1g32200). Gene expression studies showed that the highest transcript levels occurred in green tissues in which chloroplasts are abundant. The corresponding mature protein was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and biochemical characterization. In vitro assays using radiolabelled acyl-ACPs and glycerol-3-phosphate as substrates revealed a strong preference for oleic versus palmitic acid, and weak activity towards stearic acid. The positional fatty acid composition of relevant chloroplast phospholipids from sunflower leaves did not reflect the in vitro GPAT specificity, suggesting a more complex scenario with mixed substrates at different concentrations, competition with other acyl-ACP consuming enzymatic reactions, etc. In summary, this study has confirmed the affinity of this enzyme which would partly explain the resistance to cold temperatures observed in sunflower plants. PMID:25618244

  10. Antioxidant behavior of 1-feruloyl-sn-glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol in phospholipid liposomes 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1-Feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (DFG) are two natural plant compounds that may be useful in cosmeceutical, food, and skin care applications because of excellent antioxidant properties. FG and DFG enzymatically synthesized through esterification of glycerol and soybean oil...

  11. Technological approach of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycerols separation from Berryteuthis magister squid liver oil.

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, Ekaterina; Latyshev, Nikolay; Sultanov, Ruslan; Kasyanov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Biological active compounds, 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycerols (AG), were isolated from liver oil of the squid Berryteuthis magister. The main components of the initial lipids were 1-O-alkyl-2,3-diacyl-sn-glycerols (38.50 %) and triacylglycerols (24.26 %). The first step of separation was the alkaline hydrolysis of oil to form a lipid mixture consisting of AG, free fatty acids and cholesterol. AG were separated by double recrystallization from acetone at -20 °C and 1 °C. A simple procedure is proposed for obtaining AG with a purity of 99.22 %, the main component of which is chimyl alcohol (94.39 %). Purity and structure of the obtained products were confirmed by GC and GC-MS technique. Isolated AG may be used in nutrition and cosmetics. PMID:27570298

  12. Metabolism of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyananda, M.K.G.S.

    1985-01-01

    E. coli is able to incorporate L-glyceraldehyde and L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into phospholipids, L-(3-/sup 3/H)Glyceraldehyde was synthesized and the purity and the chemical identity of the product were checked by paper chromatography. L-(3-/sup 3/H)Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate was synthesized from L-(3-/sup 3/H)glyceraldehyde in a reaction catalyzed by glycerokinase. E. coli extract contains a new enzyme activity which catalyzes an NADPH dependent reduction of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into sn-glycerol 3-phosphate. A procedure, specifically suitable for assaying the reductase activity in the crude extract, was developed. A more convenient spectrophotometric assay method was employed for the purified enzyme. At moderate concentrations sulfhydryl group inhibitors had no effect on the enzyme activity of L-GAP reductase. At 100..mu..M concentration Zn/sup +2/ inhibited the enzyme activity by about 30% while Mn/sup +2/ elevated the activity by about the same margin. Mg/sup +2/, Ca/sup +2/ and Fe/sup +2/ were without effect at this concentration. L-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is known to be bactericidal at 1.25 ..mu..M concentration and the D-enantiomer is without effect. Furthermore, methylglyoxal is known to be bactericidal at or above 0.5 mM concentration. Strains of E. coli resistant to 1 mM methylglyoxal were isolated. The cell extract prepared from the mutant possessed increased capacity to transform methylglyoxal into D-lactate via a glutathione dependent reaction. These mutants were less sensitive to 2.5 mM DL-GAP suggesting that conversion of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into methylglyoxal may at least partly be responsible for the bactericidal activity of L-GAP.

  13. Metabolism of L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyananda, M.K.G.S.; Engel, R.; Tropp, B.E.

    1987-06-01

    When either /sup 3/H-labeled L-glyceraldehyde or /sup 3/H-labeled L-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAP) was added to cultures of Escherichia coli, the phosphoglycerides were labeled. More than 81% of the label appeared in the backbone of the phosphoglycerides. Chromatographic analyses of the labeled phosphoglycerides revealed that the label was normally distributed into phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin. These results suggest that L-glyceraldehyde is phosphorylated and the resultant L-GAP is converted into sn-glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) before being incorporated into the bacterial phosphoglycerides. Cell-free bacterial extracts catalyzed an NADPH-dependent reduction of L-GAP to sn-G3P. The partially purified enzyme was specific for L-GAP and recognized neither D-GAP nor dihydroxyacetone phosphate as a substrate. NADH could not replace NADPH as a coenzyme. The L-GAP:NADPH oxidoreductase had an apparent K/sub m/ of 28 and 35 ..mu..M for L-GAP and NADPH, respectively. The enzyme was insensitive to sulfhydryl reagents and had a pH optimum of approximately 6.6. The phosphonic acid analog of GAP, 3-hydroxy-4-oxobutyl-1-phosphonate, was a substrate for the reductase, with an apparent K/sub m/ of 280 ..mu..M.

  14. 1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol from the biocatalytic transesterification of ethyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid (ethyl ferulate) and soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1,3-Diferuloyl-sn-glycerol is a natural plant component found ubiquitously throughout the plant kingdom, possessing ultraviolet adsorbing and antioxidant properties. Diferuloyl glycerol was synthesized and isolated as a byproduct in up to 5% yield from the pilot plant scale packed-bed, biocatalytic...

  15. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Karen; Evans, Todd; Hla, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid mediator formed by the metabolism of sphingomyelin. In vertebrates, S1P is secreted into the extracellular environment and signals via G protein-coupled S1P receptors to regulate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion, and thereby influence cell migration, differentiation and survival. The expression and localization of S1P receptors is dynamically regulated and controls vascular development, vessel stability and immune cell trafficking. In addition, crucial events during embryogenesis, such as angiogenesis, cardiogenesis, limb development and neurogenesis, are regulated by S1P signalling. Here, and in the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of S1P signalling in development and in disease. PMID:24346695

  16. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-04-02

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes.

  17. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an essential monotopic membrane enzyme involved in respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Chinte, Unmesh; Du, Shoucheng

    2008-01-01

    Sn-glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GlpD) is an essential membrane enzyme, functioning at the central junction of respiration, glycolysis, and phospholipid biosynthesis. Its critical role is indicated by the multitiered regulatory mechanisms that stringently controls its expression and function. Once expressed, GlpD activity is regulated through lipid-enzyme interactions in Escherichia coli. Here, we report seven previously undescribed structures of the fully active E. coli GlpD, up to 1.75 Å resolution. In addition to elucidating the structure of the native enzyme, we have determined the structures of GlpD complexed with substrate analogues phosphoenolpyruvate, glyceric acid 2-phosphate, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, and product, dihydroxyacetone phosphate. These structural results reveal conformational states of the enzyme, delineating the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the glycerol-3-phosphate site. Two probable mechanisms for catalyzing the dehydrogenation of glycerol-3-phosphate are envisioned, based on the conformational states of the complexes. To further correlate catalytic dehydrogenation to respiration, we have additionally determined the structures of GlpD bound with ubiquinone analogues menadione and 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide, identifying a hydrophobic plateau that is likely the ubiquinone-binding site. These structures illuminate probable mechanisms of catalysis and suggest how GlpD shuttles electrons into the respiratory pathway. Glycerol metabolism has been implicated in insulin signaling and perturbations in glycerol uptake and catabolism are linked to obesity in humans. Homologs of GlpD are found in practically all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans, with >45% consensus protein sequences, signifying that these structural results on the prokaryotic enzyme may be readily applied to the eukaryotic GlpD enzymes. PMID:18296637

  18. Thermotropic phase properties of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O-(3-O-methyl- beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Trouard, T P; Mannock, D A; Lindblom, G; Rilfors, L; Akiyama, M; McElhaney, R N

    1994-01-01

    The hydration properties and the phase structure of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O(3-O-methyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG) in water have been studied via differential scanning calorimetry, 1H-NMR and 2H-NMR spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Results indicate that this lipid forms a crystalline (Lc) phase up to temperatures of 60-70 degrees C, where a transition through a metastable reversed hexagonal (Hll) phase to a reversed micellar solution (L2) phase occurs. Experiments were carried out at water concentrations in a range from 0 to 35 wt%, which indicate that all phases are poorly hydrated, taking up < 5 mol water/mol lipid. The absence of a lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase and the low levels of hydration measured in the discernible phases suggest that the methylation of the saccharide moiety alters the hydrogen bonding properties of the headgroup in such a way that the 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG headgroup cannot achieve the same level of hydration as the unmethylated form. Thus, in spite of the small increase in steric bulk resulting from methylation, there is an increase in the tendency of 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG to form nonlamellar structures. A similar phase behavior has previously been observed for the Acholeplasma laidlawii A membrane lipid 1,2-diacyl-3-O-(6-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol in water (Lindblom et al. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:16198-16207). The phase behavior of the two lipids suggests that hydrophobic substitution of a hydroxyl group in the sugar ring of the glucopyranosylglycerols has a very strong effect on their physicochemical properties, i.e., headgroup hydration and the formation of different lipid aggregate structures. PMID:7811919

  19. Structure of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 2.45 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, David Aparicio; Nandi, Munmun; Carpena, Xavi; Fita, Ignacio; Loewen, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    The interconversion of glycerol 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate by glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenases provides a link between carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and provides Saccharomyces cerevisiae with protection against osmotic and anoxic stress. The first structure of a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from S. cerevisiae, GPD1, is reported at 2.45 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains two monomers, each of which is organized with N- and C-terminal domains. The N-terminal domain contains a classic Rossmann fold with the (β-α-β-α-β)2 motif typical of many NAD+-dependent enzymes, while the C-terminal domain is mainly α-helical. Structural and phylogenetic comparisons reveal four main structure types among the five families of glycerol-3-phosphate and glycerol-1-phosphate dehydrogenases and reveal that the Clostridium acetobutylican protein with PDB code 3ce9 is a glycerol-1-­phosphate dehydrogenase. PMID:23143232

  20. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 is essential for the normal development of reproductive organs and the embryo in Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Guanqun; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L.; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) is involved in the biosynthesis of plant lipid poly-esters. The present study further characterizes the enzymatic activities of three endoplasmic reticulum-bound GPAT4 isoforms of Brassica napus and examines their roles in the development of reproductive organs and the embryo. All three BnGPAT4 isoforms exhibited sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activities with dicarboxylic acid-CoA as acyl donor. When non-substituted acyl-CoA was used as acyl donor, the rate of acylation was considerably lower and phosphatase activity was not manifested. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of all GPAT4 homologues in B. napus under the control of the napin promoter caused abnormal development of several reproductive organs and reduced seed set. Microscopic examination and reciprocal crosses revealed that both pollen grains and developing embryo sacs of the B. napus gpat4 lines were affected. The gpat4 mature embryos showed decreased cutin content and altered monomer composition. The defective embryo development further affected the oil body morphology, oil content, and fatty acid composition in gpat4 seeds. These results suggest that GPAT4 has a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and the seed of B. napus. PMID:24821955

  1. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 is essential for the normal development of reproductive organs and the embryo in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Guanqun; Truksa, Martin; Snyder, Crystal L; Shah, Saleh; Weselake, Randall J

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4 (GPAT4) is involved in the biosynthesis of plant lipid poly-esters. The present study further characterizes the enzymatic activities of three endoplasmic reticulum-bound GPAT4 isoforms of Brassica napus and examines their roles in the development of reproductive organs and the embryo. All three BnGPAT4 isoforms exhibited sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activities with dicarboxylic acid-CoA as acyl donor. When non-substituted acyl-CoA was used as acyl donor, the rate of acylation was considerably lower and phosphatase activity was not manifested. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated down-regulation of all GPAT4 homologues in B. napus under the control of the napin promoter caused abnormal development of several reproductive organs and reduced seed set. Microscopic examination and reciprocal crosses revealed that both pollen grains and developing embryo sacs of the B. napus gpat4 lines were affected. The gpat4 mature embryos showed decreased cutin content and altered monomer composition. The defective embryo development further affected the oil body morphology, oil content, and fatty acid composition in gpat4 seeds. These results suggest that GPAT4 has a critical role in the development of reproductive organs and the seed of B. napus. PMID:24821955

  2. Purification and characterization of thiol-reagent-sensitive glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from the membrane fraction of an oleaginous fungus.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, S; Kamisaka, Y

    2001-01-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT), responsible for the first committed, rate-limiting, step of glycerolipid synthesis, was purified to homogeneity from the membrane fraction of an oleaginous fungus, Mortierella ramanniana var. angulispora. The enzyme was solubilized from the membrane fraction by pretreatment with 0.05% Triton X-100 and treatment of the resulting pellet with 0.3% Triton X-100. The enzyme was subsequently purified by column chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, Yellow 86 agarose, a second heparin-Sepharose column, Superdex-200 and hydroxylapatite Bio-Gel. Enzyme activity was finally enriched 1308-fold over that of the starting membrane fraction. SDS/PAGE of the purified fraction revealed a single band with a molecular mass of 45 kDa. Native PAGE showed a major band that corresponded to GPAT activity. Enzyme activity was inhibited by thiol reagents, suggesting that it originated from microsomes rather than mitochondria. Purified GPAT depended on exogenous oleoyl-CoA and sn-glycerol-3-phosphate, with the highest activity at approx. 50 and 250 microM, respectively, and preferred oleoyl-CoA 5.4-fold over palmitoyl-CoA as an acyl donor. Anionic phospholipids, such as phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine, were absolutely required for activity of the purified enzyme, and their ability to activate GPAT was influenced by the purity of the GPAT preparation. Bivalent cations, such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibited purified GPAT activity, whereas 5 mM Mn(2+) elevated activity approx. 2-fold. These results provide new insights into the molecular characterization of microsomal GPAT, which has not been well characterized compared with mitochondrial and plastidic GPAT. PMID:11284717

  3. Mechanism of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate transfer from aldolase to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kvassman, J; Pettersson, G; Ryde-Pettersson, U

    1988-03-01

    The catalytic interaction of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate has been examined by transient-state kinetic methods. The results confirm previous reports that the apparent Km for oxidative phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate decreases at least 50-fold when the substrate is generated in a coupled reaction system through the action of aldolase on fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, but lend no support to the proposal that glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is directly transferred between the two enzymes without prior release to the reaction medium. A theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the kinetic behaviour of the coupled two-enzyme system is compatible in all respects tested with a free-diffusion mechanism for the transfer of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate from the producing enzyme to the consuming one. PMID:3350006

  4. Molecular analysis of a store-operated and 2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-sensitive non-selective cation channel. Heteromeric assembly of TRPC1-TRPC3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xibao; Bandyopadhyay, Bidhan C; Singh, Brij B; Groschner, Klaus; Ambudkar, Indu S

    2005-06-01

    We have reported that internal Ca2+ store depletion in HSY cells stimulates a nonselective cation current which is distinct from I(CRAC) in RBL cells and TRPC1-dependent I(SOC) in HSG cells (Liu, X., Groschner, K., and Ambudkar, I. S. (2004) J. Membr. Biol. 200, 93-104). Here we have analyzed the molecular composition of this channel. Both thapsigargin (Tg) and 2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG) stimulated similar non-selective cation currents and Ca2+ entry in HSY cells. The effects of Tg and OAG were not additive. HSY cells endogenously expressed TRPC1, TRPC3, and TRPC4 but not TRPC5 or TRPC6. Immunoprecipitation of TRPC1 pulled down TRPC3 but not TRPC4. Conversely, TRPC1 co-immunoprecipitated with TRPC3. Expression of antisense TRPC1 decreased (i) Tg- and OAG-stimulated currents and Ca2+ entry and (ii) the level of endogenous TRPC1 but not TRPC4. Antisense TRPC3 similarly reduced Ca2+ entry and endogenous TRPC3. Yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed an interaction between NTRPC1 and NTRPC3 (CTRPC1-CTRPC3, CTRPC3-CTRPC1, or CTRPC1-NTRPC3 did not interact), which was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays (GST-NTRPC3 pulled down TRPC1 and vice versa). Expression of NTRPC1 or NTRPC3 induced similar dominant suppression of Tg- and OAG-stimulated Ca2+ entry. NTRPC3 did not alter surface expression of TRPC1 or TRPC3 but disrupted TRPC1-TRPC3 association. In aggregate, our data demonstrate that TRPC1 and TRPC3 co-assemble, via N-terminal interactions, to form a heteromeric store-operated non-selective cation channel in HSY cells. Thus selective association between TRPCs generate distinct store-operated channels. Diversity of store-operated channels might be related to the physiology of the different cell types. PMID:15834157

  5. An ultraviolet spectrophotometric assay for the screening of sn-2-specific lipases using 1,3-O-dioleoyl-2-O-α-eleostearoyl-sn-glycerol as substrate

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Lilia D.; Rodriguez, Jorge A.; Leclaire, Julien; Buono, Gerard; Fotiadu, Frédéric; Carrière, Frédéric; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we propose a continuous assay for the screening of sn-2 lipases by using triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Aleurites fordii seed (tung oil) and a synthetic TAG containing the α-eleostearic acid at the sn-2 position and the oleic acid (OA) at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions [1,3-O-dioleoyl-2-O-α-eleostearoyl-sn-glycerol (sn-OEO)]. Each TAG was coated into a microplate well, and the lipase activity was measured by optical density increase at 272 nm due to transition of α-eleostearic acid from the adsorbed to the soluble state. The sn-1,3-regioselective lipases human pancreatic lipase (HPL), LIP2 lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLLIP2), and a known sn-2 lipase, Candida antarctica lipase A (CALA) were used to validate this method. TLC analysis of lipolysis products showed that the lipases tested were able to hydrolyze the sn-OEO and the tung oil TAGs, but only CALA hydrolyzed the sn-2 position. The ratio of initial velocities on sn-OEO and tung oil TAGs was used to estimate the sn-2 preference of lipases. CALA was the enzyme with the highest ratio (0.22 ± 0.015), whereas HPL and YLLIP2 showed much lower ratios (0.072 ± 0.026 and 0.038 ± 0.016, respectively). This continuous sn-2 lipase assay is compatible with a high sample throughput and thus can be applied to the screening of sn-2 lipases. PMID:22114038

  6. Berberine treatment attenuates the palmitate-mediated inhibition of glucose uptake and consumption through increased 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol synthesis and accumulation in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Chen, Li; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunction of lipid metabolism and accumulation of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (DAG) may be a key factor in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract that has shown promise as a hypoglycemic agent in the management of diabetes in animal and human studies. However, its mechanism of action is not well understood. To determine the effect of BBR on lipid synthesis and its relationship to insulin resistance in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, we measured neutral lipid and phospholipid synthesis and their relationship to glucose uptake. Compared with controls, BBR treatment stimulated 2-[1,2-(3)H(N)]deoxy-D-glucose uptake and consumption in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells. The mechanism was though an increase in protein kinase B (AKT) activity and GLUT-4 glucose transporter expression. DAG accumulated in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells and treatment with BBR reduced this DAG accumulation and increased accumulation of 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol (TAG) compared to controls. Treatment of palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells with BBR increased [1,3-(3)H]glycerol and [1-(14)C]glucose incorporation into TAG and reduced their incorporation into DAG compared to control. In addition, BBR treatment of these cells increased [1-(14)C]palmitic acid incorporation into TAG and decreased its incorporation into DAG compared to controls. BBR treatment did not alter phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. The mechanism for the BBR-mediated decreased precursor incorporation into DAG and increased incorporation into TAG in palmitate-incubated cells was an increase in DAG acyltransferase-2 activity and its expression and a decrease in TAG hydrolysis. Thus, BBR treatment attenuates palmitate-induced reduction in glucose uptake and consumption, in part, through reduction in cellular DAG levels and accumulation of TAG in H9c2 cells. PMID:26774040

  7. Iodination of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jean O.; Harris, J. Ieuan

    1970-01-01

    1. A high degree of homology in the positions of tyrosine residues in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from lobster and pig muscle, and from yeast, prompted an examination of the reactivity of tyrosine residues in the enzyme. 2. Iodination of the enzyme from lobster muscle with low concentrations of potassium tri-[125I]-iodide led to the identification of tyrosine residues of differing reactivity. Tyrosine-46 appeared to be the most reactive in the native enzyme. 3. When the monocarboxymethylated enzyme was briefly treated with small amounts of iodine, iodination could be confined almost entirely to tyrosine-46 in the lobster enzyme; tyrosine-39 or tyrosine-42, or both, were also beginning to react. 4. These three tyrosine residues were also those that reacted most readily in the carboxymethylated pig and yeast enzymes. 5. The difficulties in attaining specific reaction of the native enzyme are considered. 6. The differences between our results and those of other workers are discussed. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:5530750

  8. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme. PMID:25161314

  9. Specificities of the Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Thioesterase and Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase for Octadecenoyl-ACP Isomers (Identification of a Petroselinoyl-ACP Thioesterase in Umbelliferae).

    PubMed Central

    Dormann, P.; Frentzen, M.; Ohlrogge, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to address the question: How specific for double bond position and conformation are plant enzymes that act on oleoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)? Octadecenoyl-ACPs with cis double bonds at positions [delta]6, [delta]7, [delta]8, [delta]9, [delta]10, [delta]11, or [delta]12 and elaidyl (18:1[delta]9trans)-ACP were synthesized and used to characterize the substrate specificity of the acyl-ACP thioesterase and acyl-ACP:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. The two enzymes were found to be specific for the [delta]9 position of the double bond. The thioesterase was highly specific for the [delta]9 cis conformation, but the transferase was almost equally active with the cis and the trans isomer of 18:1[delta]9-ACP. In plants such as the Umbelliferae species coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) that accumulate petroselinic acid (18:1[delta]6cis) in their seed triacylglycerols, a high petroselinoyl-ACP thioesterase activity was found in addition to the oleoyl-ACP thioesterase. The two activities could be separated by anion-exchange chromatography, indicating that the petroselinoyl-ACP thioesterase is represented by a distinct polypeptide. PMID:12232130

  10. Inhibitors of sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism (sphingosine kinases and sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase).

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luis; Casas, Josefina; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are essential structural and signaling molecules of eukaryotic cells. Among them, sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P) is a recognized promoter of cell survival, also involved, inter alia, in inflammation and tumorigenesis processes. The knowledge and modulation of the enzymes implicated in the biosynthesis and degradation of S1P are capital to control the intracellular levels of this lipid and, ultimately, to determine the cell fate. Starting with a general overview of the main metabolic pathways involved in SL metabolism, this review is mainly focused on the description of the most relevant findings concerning the development of modulators of S1P, namely inhibitors of the enzymes regulating S1P synthesis (sphingosine kinases) and degradation (sphingosine 1 phosphate phosphatase and lyase). In addition, a brief overview of the most significant agonists and antagonists at the S1P receptors is also addressed. PMID:26200919

  11. Sphingosine-1-phosphate metabolism: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Pulkoski-Gross, Michael J; Donaldson, Jane C; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids represent an important class of bioactive signaling lipids which have key roles in numerous cellular processes. Over the last few decades, the levels of bioactive sphingolipids and/or their metabolizing enzymes have been realized to be important factors involved in disease development and progression, most notably in cancer. Targeting sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes in disease states has been the focus of many studies and has resulted in a number of pharmacological inhibitors, with some making it into the clinic as therapeutics. In order to better understand the regulation of sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes as well as to develop much more potent and specific inhibitors, the field of sphingolipids has recently taken a turn toward structural biology. The last decade has seen the structural determination of a number of sphingolipid enzymes and effector proteins. In these terms, one of the most complete arms of the sphingolipid pathway is the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) arm. The structures of proteins involved in the function and regulation of S1P are being used to investigate further the regulation of said proteins as well as in the design and development of inhibitors as potential therapeutics. PMID:25923252

  12. [Sphingosine-1-phosphate--molecular maestro].

    PubMed

    Salata, Daria; Budkowska, Marta; Dołegowska, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which is a bioactive lipid from the family of sphingolipids is synthesized i.e. by platelates and stored in erythrocytes. The effects of this compound on the cells are connected with the presence of specific receptors on their surface (S1P1-S1P5). S1P acts upon, i.e, hematopoetic and nervous cells, having influencing their migration, adhesion, differentation and survival. This molecule plays mediator role in inflammatory responses, angiogenesis and wound healing. In contrast to spingosine and ceramid, S1P counteracts apoptosis. Recent studies have shown that S1P is a factor, which participates in the process of release stem cells from bone marrow to peripherial blood. Cell and tissue damaged, stress, physical exercise and some drugs have influence on the numbers of stem cells. The research on S1P as the main chemotactic factor for stem cells may have substantial impact on the development of regenerative medicine. PMID:23373414

  13. Hypoxia, therapeutic resistance, and sphingosine 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Ader, Isabelle; Bouquerel, Pierre; Brizuela, Leyre; Gstalder, Cécile; Malavaud, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, defined as a poor oxygenation, has been long recognized as a hallmark of solid tumors and a negative prognostic factor for response to therapeutics and survival of patients. Cancer cells have evolved biochemical mechanisms that allow them to react and adapt to hypoxia. At the cellular level, this adaptation is under the control of two related transcription factors, HIF-1 and HIF-2 (hypoxia-inducible factor), that respond rapidly to decreased oxygen levels to activate the expression of a broad range of genes promoting neoangiogenesis, glycolysis, metastasis, increased tumor growth, and resistance to treatments. Recent studies have identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) signaling pathway-which elicits various cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell survival, or angiogenesis-as a new regulator of HIF-1 or HIF-2 activity. In this review, we will focus on how the inhibition/neutralization of the SphK1/S1P signaling could be exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:23290779

  14. Export and functions of sphingosine-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Roger H.; Takabe, Kazuaki; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    The sphingolipid metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), has emerged as a critical player in a number of fundamental biological processes and is important in cancer, angiogenesis, wound healing, cardiovascular function, atherosclerosis, immunity and asthma, among others. Activation of sphingosine kinases, enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of sphingosine to S1P, by a variety of agonists, including growth factors, cytokines, hormones, and antigen, increases intracellular S1P. Many of the biological effects of S1P are mediated by its binding to five specific G protein-coupled receptors located on the cell surface in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. Therefore, understanding the mechanism by which intracellularly generated S1P is released out of cells is both interesting and important. In this review, we will discuss how S1P is formed and released. We will focus particularly on the current knowledge of how the S1P gradient between tissues and blood is maintained, and the role of ABC transporters in S1P release. PMID:19268560

  15. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Endothelial Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Teresa

    2016-06-01

    Numerous preclinical studies indicate that sustained endothelial activation significantly contributes to tissue edema, perpetuates the inflammatory response, and exacerbates tissue injury ultimately resulting in organ failure. However, no specific therapies aimed at restoring endothelial function are available as yet. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is emerging as a potent modulator of endothelial function and endothelial responses to injury. Recent studies indicate that S1PR are attractive targets to treat not only disorders of the arterial endothelium but also microvascular dysfunction caused by ischemic or inflammatory injury. In this article, we will review the current knowledge of the role of S1P and its receptors in endothelial function in health and disease, and we will discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting S1PR not only for disorders of the arterial endothelium but also the microvasculature. The therapeutic targeting of S1PR in the endothelium could help to bridge the gap between biomedical research in vascular biology and clinical practice. PMID:27115142

  16. Implication of Ceramide, Ceramide 1-Phosphate and Sphingosine 1-Phosphate in Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gangoiti, Patricia; Granado, Maria H.; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M.; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    In the last two decades there has been considerable progress in our understanding of the role of sphingolipids in controlling signal transduction processes, particularly in the mechanisms leading to regulation of cell growth and death. Ceramide is a well-characterized sphingolipid metabolite and second messenger that can be produced by cancer cells in response to a variety of stimuli, including therapeutic drugs, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Although this is a promising aspect when thinking of treating cancer, it should be borne in mind that ceramide production may not always be a growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic signal. In fact, ceramide can be readily converted to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) by the concerted actions of ceramidases and sphingosine kinases, or to ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) by the action of ceramide kinase. In general, S1P and C1P have opposing effects to ceramide, acting as pro-survival or mitogenic signals in most cell types. This review will address our current understanding of the many roles of ceramide, S1P and C1P in the regulation of cell growth and survival with special emphasis to the emerging role of these molecules and their metabolizing enzymes in controlling tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:21566746

  17. Synthesis of phosphonate and phostone analogues of ribose-1-phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Nasomjai, Pitak; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of phosphonate analogues of ribose-1-phosphate and 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose-1-phosphate is described. Preparations of both the α- and β-phosphonate anomers are reported for the ribose and 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose series and a synthesis of the corresponding cyclic phostones of each α-ribose is also reported. These compounds have been prepared as tools to probe the details of fluorometabolism in S. cattleya. PMID:19777136

  18. Distinct generation, pharmacology, and distribution of sphingosine 1-phosphate and dihydro-sphingosine 1-phosphate in human neural progenitor cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-vivo and in-vitro studies suggest a crucial role for Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and its receptors in the development of the nervous system. Dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate (dhS1P), a reduced form of S1P, is an active ligand at S1P receptors, but the pharmacology and physiology of dhS1P has not...

  19. Model of early self-replication based on covalent complementarity for a copolymer of glycerate-3-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1989-03-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate acts as the substrate in a model of early self-replication of a phosphodiester copolymer of glycerate-3-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate. This model of self-replication is based on covalent complementarity in which information transfer is mediated by a single covalent bond, in contrast to multiple weak interactions that establish complementarity in nucleic acid replication. This replication model is connected to contemporary biochemistry through its use of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, a central metabolite of glycolysis and photosynthesis.

  20. Model of early self-replication based on covalent complementarity for a copolymer of glycerate-3-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1989-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate acts as the substrate in a model of early self-replication of a phosphodiester copolymer of glycerate-3-phosphate and glycerol-3-phosphate. This model of self-replication is based on covalent complementarity in which information transfer is mediated by a single covalent bond, in contrast to multiple weak interactions that establish complementarity in nucleic acid replication. This replication model is connected to contemporary biochemistry through its use of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, a central metabolite of glycolysis and photosynthesis.

  1. Probing myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase with multisubstrate adducts

    PubMed Central

    Deranieh, Rania M.; Greenberg, Miriam L.; Le Calvez, Pierre-B.; Mooney, Maura C.; Migaud, Marie E.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of carbohydrate-nucleotide hybrids, designed to be multisubstrate adducts mimicking myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase first oxidative transition state, is reported. Their ability to inhibit the synthase has been assessed and results have been rationalised computationally to estimate their likely binding mode. PMID:23132282

  2. [Cooperative properties of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Nagradova, N K

    1977-03-01

    The structure of the active center of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the arrangement of subunits in the tetrameric molecule is delineated. The mechanism of cooperative effects in the oligomer is considered, and the involvement of various regions of the active center and of different-subunit contact area in the realization of the cooperative phenomena is discussed. A special attention is paid to the effect of NAD+ bound to one of the subunits of the tetramer on the structure of an adjacent subunit and to the problem of the participation of the coenzyme in the creation of anion-binding sites of the enzyme. The conditions of reversible dissociation of the tetrameric apoenzyme molecule into dimers are depicted, and the role of NAD+ in the organization of the quaternary structure of the dehydrogenase is discussed. The problem of catalytic activity of the dimeric form of the enzyme is argued. PMID:193581

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate regulate phagolysosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeschke, Andreas; Zehethofer, Nicole; Lindner, Buko; Krupp, Jessica; Schwudke, Dominik; Haneburger, Ina; Jovic, Marko; Backer, Jonathan M.; Balla, Tamas; Hilbi, Hubert; Haas, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Professional phagocytic cells ingest microbial intruders by engulfing them into phagosomes, which subsequently mature into microbicidal phagolysosomes. Phagosome maturation requires sequential fusion of the phagosome with early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes. Although various phosphoinositides (PIPs) have been detected on phagosomes, it remained unclear which PIPs actually govern phagosome maturation. Here, we analyzed the involvement of PIPs in fusion of phagosomes with various endocytic compartments and identified phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P], phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P], and the lipid kinases that generate these PIPs, as mediators of phagosome–lysosome fusion. Phagosome–early endosome fusion required PI(3)P, yet did not depend on PI(4)P. Thus, PI(3)P regulates phagosome maturation at early and late stages, whereas PI(4)P is selectively required late in the pathway. PMID:25825728

  4. Synthesis of fluorinated agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Aliouane, Lucie; Chao, Sovy; Brizuela, Leyre; Pfund, Emmanuel; Cuvillier, Olivier; Jean, Ludovic; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Lequeux, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The bioactive metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a product of sphingosine kinases (SphKs), mediates diverse biological processes such as cell differentiation, proliferation, survival and angiogenesis. A fluorinated analogue of S1P receptor agonist has been synthesized by utilizing a ring opening reaction of oxacycles by a lithiated difluoromethylphosphonate anion as the key reaction. In vitro activity of this S1P analogue is also reported. PMID:25047939

  5. Properties of microtubule bundles induced by Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, Marijke; Engelborghs, Yves

    1991-05-01

    The binding of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; E.C. 1.2.1.12) to microtubules causes the microtubules to assemble into large bundles. This bundling can be considered as a further step in the assembly of supramolecular structures. The rate of bundle formation, after addition of GAPDH to preformed microtubules, is not dependent on the GAPDH concentration and reflects bundling kinetics. Bundle disassembly can be studied by the addition of 1 mM adenosine 5'-(β, -imidotri-phosphate) (AMPPNP) to bundled microtubules, and is extremely fast. Bundling reduces the rate of association of tubulin dimers to microtubules, as well as the dissocation from the microtubles. Both rates are reduced to the same extent. This is in agreement with the fact that the critical concentration of tubulin is practically not influenced by the binding of the enzyme. Adding microtubule associated proteins (at I=0.1 M) does not appreciably influence the affinity for GAPDH, but reduces bundle formation possibly for sterical reasons.

  6. The reaction of ozone with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K.L.; Mudd, J.B.

    1984-02-15

    Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) by ozone can be correlated with oxidation of the active-site -SH residue. Oxidation of peripheral -SH groups, and tryptophan, methionine, and histidine residues occurs concomitantly, but loss of activity depends solely on active-site oxidation. Inactivation is only slightly reversible by dithiothreitol. Kinetic studies show that inhibition of GPDH by ozone mimics noncompetitive inhibition and is characterized as irreversible enzyme inactivation. Analysis of products resulting from ozone oxidation of glutathione suggests that cysteic acid is the product of protein-SH oxidation. Despite oxidation of the active-site -SH, no significant decrease in the Racker band absorbance occurs. This is explained by the appearance of a new chromophore in this region of the absorbance spectrum. Increased absorbance at 322 nm following ozone treatment indicates that tryptophan is converted quantitatively to N-formylkynurenine. When the active-site -SH is reversibly blocked by tetrathionate, enzyme activity is completely recoverable following reaction of the derivatized enzyme with a 1.3X excess of ozone over enzyme monomer. Activity is fully recovered despite the oxidation of peripheral -SH, tryptophan, and histidine residues. Circular dichroism spectra of ozone-treated enzyme show that reaction of GPDH with up to a threefold excess of ozone over enzyme monomer results in no significant disruption of protein secondary structure. Spectra in the near-uv show distinct changes that reflect tryptophan oxidation.

  7. [Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors: from biology to physiopathology].

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) mediates critical physiological responses by its binding to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subtypes, known as S1P receptors. Five distinct mammalian S1P receptors, designated S1P1-5 have been identified, each with a different cellular pattern of expression which influences the responses to S1P. In this review, we briefly outline our understanding of the modes of action and the roles of S1P receptors in the regulation of physiological and pathological functions in the cardiovascular, immune and central nervous system. PMID:23171898

  8. THE HEME BINDING PROPERTIES OF GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Collins, Daniel; Brassard, Julie; Chakravarti, Ritu; Vempati, Rajesh; Dorlet, Pierre; Santolini, Jérôme; Dawson, John H.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme that also functions in transcriptional regulation, oxidative stress, vesicular trafficking, and apoptosis. Because GAPDH is required for cellular heme insertion into inducible nitric oxide synthase (Chakravarti et al, PNAS 2010, 107(42):18004-9), we extensively characterized the heme binding properties of GAPDH. Substoichiometric amounts of ferric heme bound to GAPDH (1 heme per GAPDH tetramer) to form a low-spin complex with UV-visible maxima at 362, 418 and 537 nm, and when reduced to ferrous gave maxima at 424, 527 and 559 nm. Ferric heme association and dissociation rate constants at 10 °C were kon =17,800 M−1s−1 and koff1 = 7.0 × 10−3 s−1; koff2 = 3.3 × 10−4 s−1 respectively, giving approximate affinities of 19–390 nM. Ferrous heme bound more poorly to GAPDH and dissociated with a koff = 4.2 × 10−3 s−1. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), resonance Raman (rR) and EPR spectroscopic data on the ferric, ferrous, and ferrous-CO complexes of GAPDH showed that the heme is bis-ligated with His as the proximal ligand. The distal ligand in ferric complex was not displaced by CN− or N3− but in ferrous complex was displaceable by CO at a rate of 1.75 s−1 (for [CO]>0.2 mM). Studies with heme analogs revealed selectivity toward the coordinating metal and porphyrin ring structure. GAPDH-heme was isolated from bacteria induced to express rabbit GAPDH in the presence of δ-amino levulinic acid. Our finding of heme binding to GAPDH expands the protein’s potential roles. The strength, selectivity, reversibility, and redox sensitivity of heme binding to GAPDH is consistent with it performing heme sensing or heme chaperone-like functions in cells. PMID:22957700

  9. Interactions among p22, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and microtubules.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Josefa; Pearce, Sandy Timm; Zhao, Hu; Barroso, Margarida

    2004-12-01

    Previously, we have shown that p22, an EF-hand Ca2+-binding protein, interacts indirectly with microtubules in an N-myristoylation-dependent and Ca2+-independent manner. In the present study, we report that N-myristoylated p22 interacts with several microtubule-associated proteins within the 30-100 kDa range using overlay blots of microtubule pellets containing cytosolic proteins. One of those p22-binding partners, a 35-40 kDa microtubule-binding protein, has been identified by MS as GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). Several lines of evidence suggest a functional relationship between GAPDH and p22. First, endogenous p22 interacts with GAPDH by immunoprecipitation. Secondly, p22 and GAPDH align along microtubule tracks in analogous punctate structures in BHK cells. Thirdly, GAPDH facilitates the p22-dependent interactions between microtubules and microsomal membranes, by increasing the ability of p22 to bind microtubules but not membranes. We have also shown a direct interaction between N-myristoylated p22 and GAPDH in vitro with a K(D) of approximately 0.5 microM. The removal of either the N-myristoyl group or the last six C-terminal amino acids abolishes the binding of p22 to GAPDH and reduces the ability of p22 to associate with microtubules. In summary, we report that GAPDH is involved in the ability of p22 to facilitate microtubule-membrane interactions by affecting the p22-microtubule, but not the p22-membrane, association. PMID:15312048

  10. Glycerol-3-Phosphate-Induced Catabolite Repression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eppler, Tanja; Postma, Pieter; Schütz, Alexandra; Völker, Uwe; Boos, Winfried

    2002-01-01

    The formation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) in cells growing on TB causes catabolite repression, as shown by the reduction in malT expression. For this repression to occur, the general proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system (PTS), in particular EIIAGlc, as well as the adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP-catabolite activator protein system, have to be present. We followed the level of EIIAGlc phosphorylation after the addition of glycerol or G3P. In contrast to glucose, which causes a dramatic shift to the dephosphorylated form, glycerol or G3P only slightly increased the amount of dephosphorylated EIIAGlc. Isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside-induced overexpression of EIIAGlc did not prevent repression by G3P, excluding the possibility that G3P-mediated catabolite repression is due to the formation of unphosphorylated EIIAGlc. A mutant carrying a C-terminally truncated adenylate cyclase was no longer subject to G3P-mediated repression. We conclude that the stimulation of adenylate cyclase by phosphorylated EIIAGlc is controlled by G3P and other phosphorylated sugars such as d-glucose-6-phosphate and is the basis for catabolite repression by non-PTS compounds. Further metabolism of these compounds is not necessary for repression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to obtain an overview of proteins that are subject to catabolite repression by glycerol. Some of the prominently repressed proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Among these were periplasmic binding proteins (glutamine and oligopeptide binding protein, for example), enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, aldehyde dehydrogenase, Dps (a stress-induced DNA binding protein), and d-tagatose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase. PMID:12003946

  11. Membrane topology of murine glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 2.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Tadahiko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Miyamoto, Aiko; Kawanishi, Yukiko; Yoshida, Masaki; Shono, Masayuki; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Akira; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Nakaya, Yutaka

    2012-02-17

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) is a rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian triacylglycerol biosynthesis. GPAT is a target for the treatment of metabolic disorders associated with high lipid accumulation. Although the molecular basis for GPAT1 activation has been investigated extensively, the activation of other isoforms, such as GPAT2, is less well understood. Here the membrane topology of the GPAT2 protein was examined using an epitope-tag-based method. Exogenously expressed GPAT2 protein was present in the membrane fraction of transformed HEK293 cells even in the presence of Na(2)CO(3) (100 mM), indicating that GPAT2 is a membrane-bound protein. Trypsin treatment of the membrane fraction degraded the N-terminal (FLAG) and C-terminal (myc-epitope) protein tags of the GPAT2 protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the GPAT2 protein sequence indicated four hydrophobic sequences as potential membrane-spanning regions (TM1-TM4). Immunoblotting of the myc-epitope tag, which was inserted between each TM region of the GPAT2 protein, showed that the amino acid sequence between TM3 and TM4 was protected from trypsin digestion. These results suggest that the GPAT2 protein has two transmembrane segments and that the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of this protein face the cytoplasm. These results also suggest that the enzymatically active motifs I-III of the GPAT2 protein face the cytosol, while motif IV is within the membrane. It is expected that the use of this topological model of GPAT2 will be essential in efforts to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of GPAT2 activity in mammalian cells. PMID:22285183

  12. Distinct generation, pharmacology, and distribution of sphingosine 1-phosphate and dihydro-sphingosine 1-phosphate in human neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Callihan, Phillip; Zitomer, Nicholas C.; Stoeling, Michael V.; Kennedy, Perry C.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Riley, Ronald T.; Hooks, Shelley B.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro studies suggest a crucial role for Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and its receptors in the development of the nervous system. Dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate (dhS1P), a reduced form of S1P, is an agonist at S1P receptors, but the pharmacology and physiology of dhS1P has not been widely studied. The mycotoxin fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a potent inhibitor of ceramide synthases and causes selective accumulation of dihydrosphingosine and dhS1P. Recent studies suggest that maternal exposure to FB1 correlates with the development of neural tube defects (NTDs) in which the neural epithelial progenitor cell layers of the developing brain fail to fuse. We hypothesize that the altered balance of S1P and dhS1P in neural epithelial cells contributes to the developmental effects of FB1. The goal of this work was first to define the effect of FB1 exposure on levels of sphingosine and dh-sphingosine and their receptor active 1-phosphate metabolites in human embryonic stem cell-derived neural epithelial progenitor (hES-NEP) cells; and second, to define the relative activity of dhS1P and S1P in hES-NEP cells. We found that dhS1P is a more potent stimulator of inhibition of cAMP and Smad phosphorylation than is S1P in neural progenitors, and this difference in apparent potency may be due, in part, to more persistent presence of extracellular dhS1P applied to human neural progenitors rather than a higher activity at S1P receptors. This study establishes hES-NEP cells as a useful human in vitro model system to study the mechanism of FB1 toxicity and the molecular pharmacology of sphingolipid signaling. PMID:22016110

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates rat primary chondrocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, Ha Young; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik . E-mail: yoesik@donga.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    Rat primary chondrocytes express the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor, S1P{sub 2}, S1P{sub 3}, S1P{sub 4}, but not S1P{sub 1}. When chondrocytes were stimulated with S1P or phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P, an S1P{sub 1}- and S1P{sub 4}-selective agonist), phospholipase C-mediated cytosolic calcium increase was dramatically induced. S1P and PhS1P also stimulated two kinds of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase in chondrocytes. In terms of the two phospholipids-mediated functional modulation of chondrocytes, S1P and PhS1P stimulated cellular proliferation. The two phospholipids-induced chondrocyte proliferations were almost completely blocked by PD98059 but not by SB203580, suggesting that ERK but not p38 kinase is essentially required for the proliferation. Pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited the two phospholipids-induced cellular proliferation and ERK activation, indicating the crucial role of G{sub i} protein. This study demonstrates the physiological role of two important phospholipids (S1P and PhS1P) on the modulation of rat primary chondrocyte proliferation, and the crucial role played by ERK in the process.

  14. A Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 selective allosteric agonist

    PubMed Central

    Satsu, Hideo; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Guerrero, Miguel; Saldana, Adrian; Eberhart, Christina; Hodder, Peter; Cayanan, Charmagne; Schürer, Stephan; Bhhatarai, Barun; Roberts, Ed; Rosen, Hugh; Brown, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular probe tool compounds for the Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) are important for investigating the multiple biological processes in which the S1PR2 receptor has been implicated. Amongst these are NF-κB-mediated tumor cell survival and fibroblast chemotaxis to fibronectin. Here we report our efforts to identify selective chemical probes for S1PR2 and their characterization. We employed high throughput screening to identify two compounds which activate the S1PR2 receptor. SAR optimization led to compounds with high nanomolar potency. These compounds, XAX-162 and CYM-5520, are highly selective and do not activate other S1P receptors. Binding of CYM-5520 is not competitive with the antagonist JTE-013. Mutation of receptor residues responsible for binding to the zwitterionic headgroup of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) abolishes S1P activation of the receptor, but not activation by CYM-5520. Competitive binding experiments with radiolabeled S1P demonstrate that CYM-5520 is an allosteric agonist and does not displace the native ligand. Computational modeling suggests that CYM-5520 binds lower in the orthosteric binding pocket, and that co-binding with S1P is energetically well tolerated. In summary, we have identified an allosteric S1PR2 selective agonist compound. PMID:23849205

  15. Facile enzymatic synthesis of sugar 1-phosphates as substrates for phosphorylases using anomeric kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Nishimoto, Mamoru; Kitaoka, Motomitsu

    2015-01-12

    Three sugar 1-phosphates that are donor substrates for phosphorylases were produced at the gram scale from phosphoenolpyruvic acid and the corresponding sugars by the combined action of pyruvate kinase and the corresponding anomeric kinases in good yields. These sugar 1-phosphates were purified through two electrodialysis steps. α-D-Galactose 1-phosphate was finally isolated as crystals of dipotassium salts. α-D-Mannose 1-phosphate and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-glucose 1-phosphate were isolated as crystals of bis(cyclohexylammonium) salts. PMID:25464074

  16. Hypoxia-inducible factors and sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Ader, Isabelle

    2011-11-01

    Hypoxia, defined as reduced tissue oxygen concentration, is a characteristic of solid tumors and is an indicator of unfavorable diagnosis in patients. At the cellular level, the adaptation to hypoxia is under the control of two related transcription factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor), which activate expression of genes promoting angiogenesis, metastasis, increased tumor growth and resistance to treatments. A role for HIF-1α and HIF-2α is also emerging in hematologic malignancies such as lymphoma and l eukemia. Recent studies have identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) signaling pathway - which elicits various cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell survival or angiogenesis - as a new regulator of HIF-1α or HIF-2α activity. This review will consider how targeting the SphK1/S1P signaling could represent an attractive strategy for therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:21707486

  17. A map of sphingosine 1-phosphate distribution in the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Perez, Willy D.; Fang, Victoria; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Cammer, Michael; Schwab, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of signaling lipids, many questions remain about their function because we have few tools to chart lipid gradients in vivo. Here we describe a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) reporter mouse, and use this mouse to define S1P distribution in the spleen. Surprisingly, the presence of blood does not predict the concentration of signaling-available S1P. Large areas of the red pulp are S1P-low, while S1P can be sensed by cells inside the white pulp near the marginal sinus. Lipid phosphate phosphatase 3 maintains low S1P concentrations in the spleen, and enables efficient marginal zone B cell shuttling. The exquisitely tight regulation of S1P availability may explain how a single lipid can simultaneously orchestrate many immune cell movements. PMID:26502404

  18. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling impacts lymphocyte migration, inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Tiper, Irina V; East, James E; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B; Webb, Tonya J

    2016-08-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingosine containing lipid intermediate obtained from ceramide. S1P is known to be an important signaling molecule and plays multiple roles in the context of immunity. This lysophospholipid binds and activates G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) known as S1P receptors 1-5 (S1P1-5). Once activated, these GPCRs mediate signaling that can lead to alterations in cell proliferation, survival or migration, and can also have other effects such as promoting angiogenesis. In this review, we will present evidence demonstrating a role for S1P in lymphocyte migration, inflammation and infection, as well as in cancer. The therapeutic potential of targeting S1P receptors, kinases and lyase will also be discussed. PMID:27354294

  19. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1315 Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. (a)...

  1. Divergent role of sphingosine 1-phosphate on insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Fayyaz, Susann; Japtok, Lukasz; Kleuser, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a complex metabolic disorder in which insulin-sensitive tissues fail to respond to the physiological action of insulin. There is a strong correlation of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes both reaching epidemic proportions. Dysfunctional lipid metabolism is a hallmark of insulin resistance and a risk factor for several cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. Numerous studies in humans and rodents have shown that insulin resistance is associated with elevations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in the plasma. Moreover, bioactive lipid intermediates such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and ceramides appear to accumulate in response to NEFA, which may interact with insulin signaling. However, recent work has also indicated that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a breakdown product of ceramide, modulate insulin signaling in different cell types. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge about S1P and insulin signaling in insulin sensitive cells. A specific focus is put on the action of S1P on hepatocytes, pancreatic β-cells and skeletal muscle cells. In particular, modulation of S1P-signaling can be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24977487

  2. Phosphatidic acid inhibits ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    PubMed

    Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Presa, Natalia; Simón, Jorge; Trueba, Miguel; Gangoiti, Patricia; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2014-12-15

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) was recently demonstrated to potently induce cell migration. This action could only be observed when C1P was applied exogenously to cells in culture, and was inhibited by pertussis toxin. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are poorly understood. In this work, we found that phosphatidic acid (PA), which is structurally related to C1P, displaced radiolabeled C1P from its membrane-binding site and inhibited C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. This effect was independent of the saturated fatty acid chain length or the presence of a double bond in each of the fatty acyl chains of PA. Treatment of RAW264.7 macrophages with exogenous phospholipase D (PLD), an enzyme that produces PA from membrane phospholipids, also inhibited C1P-stimulated cell migration. Likewise, PA or exogenous PLD inhibited C1P-stimulated extracellularly regulated kinases (ERK) 1 and 2 phosphorylation, leading to inhibition of cell migration. However, PA did not inhibit C1P-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. It is concluded that PA is a physiological regulator of C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. These actions of PA may have important implications in the control of pathophysiological functions that are regulated by C1P, including inflammation and various cellular processes associated with cell migration such as organogenesis or tumor metastasis. PMID:25450673

  3. Implication of sphingosin-1-phosphate in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ningjun; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite generated by phosphorylation of sphingosine catalyzed by sphingosine kinase. S1P acts mainly through its high affinity G-protein-coupled receptors and participates in the regulation of multiple systems, including cardiovascular system. It has been shown that S1P signaling is involved in the regulation of cardiac chronotropy and inotropy and contributes to cardioprotection as well as cardiac remodeling; S1P signaling regulates vascular function, such as vascular tone and endothelial barrier, and possesses an anti-atherosclerotic effect; S1P signaling is also implicated in the regulation of blood pressure. Therefore, manipulation of S1P signaling may offer novel therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular diseases. As several S1P receptor modulators and sphingosine kinase inhibitors have been approved or under clinical trials for the treatment of other diseases, it may expedite the test and implementation of these S1P-based drugs in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27100508

  4. Truth and consequences of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Ana; Saba, Julie D.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine phosphate lyase (SPL) is an intracellular enzyme responsible for the irreversible catabolism of the lipid signaling molecule sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). SPL catalyzes the cleavage of S1P resulting in the formation of hexadecenal and ethanolamine phosphate. S1P functions as a ligand for a family of ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors that mediate autocrine and paracrine signals controlling cell migration, proliferation and programmed cell death pathways. S1P has also been implicated in developmental and pathological angiogenesis, cancer, inflammation, allergy, diabetes, lymphocyte trafficking and morphogenesis of the heart, kidney and brain as well as their response to ischemic injury. As the final enzyme in the sphingolipid degradative pathway, SPL commands the only exit point for sphingolipid intermediates and their flow into phospholipid metabolism. So, in addition to regulating S1P levels, SPL is the gatekeeper of a critical node of lipid metabolic flow. The recent crystallization of a prokaryotic SPL has provided insight into the function and potential regulation and drug targeting of this enzyme. Considering the many physiological and pathological functions of S1P signaling, it seems likely that targeting SPL to modulate S1P signaling could be useful in a variety of clinical contexts. In this review we discuss the recent highlights related to SPL-mediated biology, the structure of the SPL protein, the function of its products, new insights regarding the usefulness of SPL targeting in treating human diseases and the consequences of permanent SPL disruption in mice. PMID:21946005

  5. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Modulators in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Subei, Adnan M.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulators possess a unique mechanism of action as disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). Subtype 1 S1P receptors are expressed on the surfaces of lymphocytes and are important in regulating egression from lymph nodes. The S1P receptor modulators indirectly antagonize the receptor’s function and sequester lymphocytes in lymph nodes. Fingolimod was the first S1P agent approved in the United States in 2010 for relapsing MS after two phase 3 trials (FREEDOMS and TRANSFORMS) demonstrated potent efficacy, and good safety and tolerability. Post-marketing experience as well as a third phase 3 trial (FREEDOMS II) also showed favorable results. More selective S1P receptor agents: ponesimod (ACT128800), siponimod (BAF312), ozanimod (RPC1063), ceralifimod (ONO-4641), GSK2018682, and MT-1303 are still in relatively early stages of development, but phase 1 and 2 trials showed promising efficacy and safety. However, these observations have yet to be reproduced in phase 3 clinical trials. PMID:26239599

  6. Regulation of Vascular Permeability by Sphingosine 1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lichun; Dudek, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    A significant and sustained increase in vascular permeability is a hallmark of acute inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury (ALI) and sepsis and is an essential component of tumor metastasis, angiogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), an endogenous bioactive lipid produced in many cell types, regulates endothelial barrier function by activation of its G-protein coupled receptor SIP1. S1P enhances vascular barrier function through a series of profound events initiated by SIP1 ligation with subsequent downstream activation of the Rho family of small GTPases, cytoskeletal reorganization, adherens junction and tight junction assembly, and focal adhesion formation. Furthermore, recent studies have identified transactivation of SIP1 signaling by other barrier enhancing agents as a common mechanism for promoting endothelial barrier function. This review summarizes the state of our current knowledge about the mechanisms through which the S1P/SIP1 axis reduces vascular permeability, which remains an area of active investigation that will hopefully produce novel therapeutic agents in the near future. PMID:18973762

  7. Export of sphingosine-1-phosphate and cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Takabe, Kazuaki; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid mediator that promotes cell survival, proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and immune response; all are critical processes of cancer progression. Although some important roles of intracellular S1P have recently been uncovered, the majority of its biological effects are known to be mediated via activation of five specific G protein-coupled receptors [S1P receptor (S1PR)1–S1PR5] located on the cell surface. Secretion of S1P produced inside cells by sphingosine kinases can then signal through these receptors in autocrine, paracrine, and/or endocrine manners, coined “inside-out” signaling of S1P. Numerous studies suggest that secreted S1P plays important roles in cancer progression; thus, understanding the mechanism by which S1P is exported out of cells, particularly cancer cells, is both interesting and important. Here we will review the current understanding of the transport of S1P out of cancer cells and its potential roles in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24474820

  8. Sphingosine-1-phosphate synthesis and functions in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Price, Megan M; Oskeritzian, Carole A; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids are not only major lipid components of all eukaryotic cell membranes, but they also comprise an important family of bioactive signaling molecules that regulate a diverse array of biological responses. The sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is a key regulator of immune responses. Cellular levels of S1P are determined by the balance between its synthesis, involving two sphingosine kinases (SphK1 and SphK2), and its degradation, involving S1P lyase and S1P phosphatases. S1P mainly signals through its cell-surface receptors and may also have intracellular functions. S1P has important functions in mast cells – the major effectors of allergic responses. Antigen triggering of IgE receptors on mast cells activates both SphKs resulting in the production of S1P that is released and regulates and amplifies mast cell functions, including degranulation as well as cytokine and chemokine release. PMID:19802381

  9. Sphingosine Kinase and Sphingosine 1-Phosphate in Cardioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Karliner, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of sphingosine kinase/sphingosine 1-phosphate– mediated signaling has emerged as a critical cardioprotective pathway in response to acute ischemia/reperfusion injury. Application of exogenous sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in cultured cardiac myocytes subjected to hypoxia or treatment of isolated hearts either before ischemia or at the onset of reperfusion (pharmacologic preconditioning or postconditioning) exerts prosurvival effects. Synthetic congeners of S1P mimic these responses. Gene-targeted mice null for the sphingosine kinase 1 isoform whose hearts are subjected to ischemia/reperfusion injury exhibit increased infarct size and respond poorly either to ischemic preconditioning or to ischemic postconditioning. Measurements of cardiac sphingosine kinase activity and S1P parallel these observations. High-density lipoprotein is a major carrier of S1P, and studies of hearts in which selected S1P receptors have been deleted implicate the S1P cargo of high-density lipoprotein in cardioprotection. These observations have considerable relevance for future therapeutic approaches to acute and chronic myocardial injury. PMID:19247197

  10. Extracellular and Intracellular Actions of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Strub, Graham M.; Maceyka, Michael; Hait, Nitai C.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid mediator with crucial roles in a wide variety of cellular functions across a broad range of organisms. Though a simple molecule in structure, S1P functions are complex. The formation of S1P is catalyzed by one of two sphingosine kinases that have differential cellular distributions as well as both overlapping and opposing functions and which are activated by many different stimuli. S1P can act on a family of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PRs) that are also differentially expressed in different cell types, which influences the cellular responses to S1P. In addition to acting on receptors located on the plasma membrane, S1P can also function inside the cell, independently of S1PRs. It also appears that both the intracellular location and the isotype of sphingosine kinase involved are major determinants of inside-out signaling of S1P in response to many extracellular stimuli. This chapter is focused on the current literature on extracellular and intracellular actions of S1P PMID:20919652

  11. Sphingosine-1-phosphate in cell growth and cell death.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, S; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L C; Kohama, T; Menzeleev, R; Olah, Z; Olivera, A; Pirianov, G; Thomas, D M; Tu, Z; Van Brocklyn, J R; Wang, F

    1998-06-19

    Recent evidence suggests that branching pathways of sphingolipid metabolism may mediate either apoptotic or mitogenic responses depending on the cell type and the nature of the stimulus. While ceramide has been shown to be an important regulatory component of apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha and Fas ligand, sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP), a further metabolite of ceramide, has been implicated as a second messenger in cellular proliferation and survival induced by platelet-derived growth factor, nerve growth factor, and serum. SPP protects cells from apoptosis resulting from elevations of ceramide. Inflammatory cytokines stimulate sphingomyelinase, but not ceramidase, leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also stimulate ceramidase and sphingosine kinase leading to increased SPP levels. We propose that the dynamic balance between levels of sphingolipid metabolites, ceramide, and SPP, and consequent regulation of different family members of mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK versus ERK), is an important factor that determines whether a cell survives or dies. PMID:9668339

  12. Antiapoptotic Agent Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Protects Vitrified Murine Ovarian Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yung-Chieh; Tzeng, Chii-Ruey; Wang, Chia-Woei; Hsu, Ming-I; Tan, Shun-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Significant follicle loss from frozen ovarian grafts is unavoidable. The authors evaluated the protective effects of the antiapoptotic agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on vitrified ovarian grafts. Three-week-old sexually immature female FVB mice were divided into 4 groups, fresh, control without S1P, 0.5 mmol/L S1P, and 2 mmol/L S1P. The ovaries were pretreated with S1P for 1 hour and then cryopreserved by modified vitrification. The frozen–thawed ovaries were autotransplanted under the back muscles of mice for 10 days. Expression of apoptosis-related genes encoding caspase 3 and c-Myc was analyzed in the vitrified ovaries and 10 days after transplantation using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. To quantify the ovarian reserve, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and follicles were measured in the 10-day vitrified ovarian grafts. Caspase 3 and c-Myc messenger RNA did not differ significantly in the 4 groups after vitrification but was significantly upregulated in the control group after transplantation. The AMH levels and primordial follicle pool were significantly higher in the S1P-treated groups than in the control group but lower than that in the fresh group. The S1P protects vitrified ovarian grafts from ischemic reperfusion injury rather than from vitrification-associated process. PMID:23793475

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate transporters as targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Takabe, Kazuaki; Terracina, Krista P; Soma, Daiki; Hirose, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takashi; Matsuda, Yasunobu; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic lipid mediator that regulates cell survival, migration, the recruitment of immune cells, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis, all of which are involved in cancer progression. S1P is generated inside cancer cells by sphingosine kinases then exported outside of the cell into the tumor microenvironment where it binds to any of five G protein coupled receptors and proceeds to regulate a variety of functions. We have recently reported on the mechanisms underlying the "inside-out" signaling of S1P, its export through the plasma membrane, and its interaction with cell surface receptors. Membrane lipids, including S1P, do not spontaneously exchange through lipid bilayers since the polar head groups do not readily go through the hydrophobic interior of the plasma membrane. Instead, specific transporter proteins exist on the membrane to exchange these lipids. This review summarizes what is known regarding S1P transport through the cell membrane via ATP-binding cassette transporters and the spinster 2 transporter and discusses the roles for these transporters in cancer and in the tumor microenvironment. Based on our research and the emerging understanding of the role of S1P signaling in cancer and in the tumor microenvironment, S1P transporters and S1P signaling hold promise as new therapeutic targets for cancer drug development. PMID:25133174

  14. Implication of sphingosin-1-phosphate in cardiovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ningjun; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite generated by phosphorylation of sphingosine catalyzed by sphingosine kinase. S1P acts mainly through its high affinity G-protein-coupled receptors and participates in the regulation of multiple systems, including cardiovascular system. It has been shown that S1P signaling is involved in the regulation of cardiac chronotropy and inotropy and contributes to cardioprotection as well as cardiac remodeling; S1P signaling regulates vascular function, such as vascular tone and endothelial barrier, and possesses an anti-atherosclerotic effect; S1P signaling is also implicated in the regulation of blood pressure. Therefore, manipulation of S1P signaling may offer novel therapeutic approaches to cardiovascular diseases. As several S1P receptor modulators and sphingosine kinase inhibitors have been approved or under clinical trials for the treatment of other diseases, it may expedite the test and implementation of these S1P-based drugs in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27100508

  15. Sphingosine 1-phosphate in blood: function, metabolism, and fate.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Andreas V; Reimann, Christina-Maria; Hemdan, Nasr Y A; Gräler, Markus H

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lipid metabolite and a ligand of five G protein-coupled cell surface receptors S1PR1 to S1PR5. These receptors are expressed on various cells and cell types of the immune, cardiovascular, respiratory, hepatic, reproductive, and neurologic systems, and S1P has an impact on many different pathophysiological conditions including autoimmune, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, deafness, osteogenesis, and reproduction. While these diverse signalling properties of S1P have been extensively reviewed, the particular role of S1P in blood is still a matter of debate. Blood contains the highest S1P concentration of all body compartments, and several questions are still not sufficiently answered: Where does it come from and how is it metabolized? Why is the concentration of S1P in blood so high? Are minor changes of the high blood S1P concentrations physiologically relevant? Do blood cells and vascular endothelial cells that are constantly exposed to high blood S1P levels still respond to S1P via S1P receptors? Recent data reveal new insights into the functional role and the metabolic fate of blood-borne S1P. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge regarding the source, secretion, transportation, function, metabolism, and fate of S1P in blood. PMID:24977489

  16. Resveratrol Stimulates Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling of Cathelicidin Production

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyungho; Elias, Peter M.; Hupe, Melanie; Borkowski, Andrew W.; Gallo, Richard L.; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M.; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    We recently discovered a regulatory mechanism that stimulates production of the multifunctional antimicrobial peptide, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP). In response to subtoxic levels of ER stress, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) production activates an NFκB→C/EBPα dependent pathway that enhances CAMP production in cultured human keratinocytes. Since the multifunctional stilbenoid compound, resveratrol (RESV), increases ceramide (Cer) levels, a precursor of S1P, we hypothesized and assessed whether RESV could exploit the same pathway to regulate CAMP production. Accordingly, RESV significantly increased Cer and S1P levels in cultured keratinocytes, paralleled by increased CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Furthermore, topical RESV also increased murine CAMP mRNA/protein expression in mouse skin. Conversely, blockade of Cer→sphingosine→S1P metabolic conversion, with specific inhibitors of ceramidase or sphingosine kinase, attenuated the expected RESV-mediated increase in CAMP expression. The RESV-induced increase in CAMP expression required both NF-κB and C/EBPα transactivation. Moreover, conditioned media from keratinocyte treated with RESV significantly suppressed Staphylococcus aureus growth. Finally, topical RESV, if not coapplied with a specific inhibitor of sphingosine kinase, blocked Staphylococcus aureus invasion into murine skin. These results demonstrate that the dietary stilbenoid, RESV, stimulates S1P signaling of CAMP production through an NF-κB→C/EBPα-dependent mechanism, leading to enhanced antimicrobial defense against exogenous microbial pathogens. PMID:23856934

  17. Resveratrol stimulates sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling of cathelicidin production.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyungho; Elias, Peter M; Hupe, Melanie; Borkowski, Andrew W; Gallo, Richard L; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Lee, Yong-Moon; Holleran, Walter M; Uchida, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-01

    We recently discovered a regulatory mechanism that stimulates the production of the multifunctional antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP). In response to subtoxic levels of ER stress, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) production activates an NFκBC/EBPα-dependent pathway that enhances CAMP production in cultured human keratinocytes. As the multifunctional stilbenoid compound resveratrol (RESV) increases ceramide (Cer) levels, a precursor of S1P, we hypothesized and assessed whether RESV could exploit the same pathway to regulate CAMP production. Accordingly, RESV significantly increased Cer and S1P levels in cultured keratinocytes, paralleled by increased CAMP mRNA/protein expression. Furthermore, topical RESV also increased murine CAMP mRNA/protein expression in mouse skin. Conversely, blockade of Cer-->sphingosine-->S1P metabolic conversion, with specific inhibitors of ceramidase or sphingosine kinase, attenuated the expected RESV-mediated increase in CAMP expression. The RESV-induced increase in CAMP expression required both NF-κB and C/EBPα transactivation. Moreover, conditioned media from keratinocytes treated with RESV significantly suppressed Staphylococcus aureus growth. Finally, topical RESV, if not coapplied with a specific inhibitor of sphingosine kinase, blocked S. aureus invasion into murine skin. These results demonstrate that the dietary stilbenoid RESV stimulates S1P signaling of CAMP production through an NF-κB-->C/EBPα-dependent mechanism, leading to enhanced antimicrobial defense against exogenous microbial pathogens. PMID:23856934

  18. Ceramide 1-phosphate stimulates glucose uptake in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic and antiapoptotic, and that it is implicated in the regulation of macrophage migration. These activities require high energy levels to be available in cells. Macrophages obtain most of their energy from glucose. In this work, we demonstrate that C1P enhances glucose uptake in RAW264.7 macrophages. The major glucose transporter involved in this action was found to be GLUT 3, as determined by measuring its translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. C1P-stimulated glucose uptake was blocked by selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or Akt, also known as protein kinase B (PKB), and by specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding for these kinases. C1P-stimulated glucose uptake was also inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX) and by the siRNA that inhibited GLUT 3 expression. C1P increased the affinity of the glucose transporter for its substrate, and enhanced glucose metabolism to produce ATP. The latter action was also inhibited by PI3K- and Akt-selective inhibitors, PTX, or by specific siRNAs to inhibit GLUT 3 expression. PMID:23333242

  19. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components of cell membranes, and many of them regulate vital cell functions. In particular, ceramide plays crucial roles in cell signaling processes. Two major actions of ceramides are the promotion of cell cycle arrest and the induction of apoptosis. Phosphorylation of ceramide produces ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which has opposite effects to ceramide. C1P is mitogenic and has prosurvival properties. In addition, C1P is an important mediator of inflammatory responses, an action that takes place through stimulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2, and the subsequent release of arachidonic acid and prostaglandin formation. All of the former actions are thought to be mediated by intracellularly generated C1P. However, the recent observation that C1P stimulates macrophage chemotaxis implicates specific plasma membrane receptors that are coupled to Gi proteins. Hence, it can be concluded that C1P has dual actions in cells, as it can act as an intracellular second messenger to promote cell survival, or as an extracellular receptor agonist to stimulate cell migration. PMID:20137073

  20. Endogenous galactose formation in galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schadewaldt, Peter; Kamalanathan, Loganathan; Hammen, Hans-Werner; Kotzka, Jorg; Wendel, Udo

    2014-12-01

    Patients with classical galactosaemia (galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) deficiency) manifest clinical complications despite strict dietary galactose restriction. Therefore the significance of endogenous galactose production has been assessed. Previous in vivo studies primarily focused on patients homozygous for the most common genetic variant Q188R but little is known about other genetic variants. In the present study the endogenous galactose release in a group of non-Q188R homozygous galactosaemic patients (n = 17; 4-34 years) exhibiting comparably low residual GALT activity in red blood cells was investigated. Primed continuous infusion studies with D-[1-(13)C]galactose as substrate were conducted under post-absorptive conditions and in good metabolic control. The results demonstrate that all patients exhibiting residual GALT activity of <1.5% of control showed a comparable pathological pattern of increased endogenous galactose release irrespective of the underlying genetic variations. Possible implications of the findings towards a more differentiated dietary regimen in galactosaemia are discussed. PMID:25268296

  1. Cytoplasmic sphingosine-1-phosphate pathway modulates neuronal autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Moruno Manchon, Jose Felix; Uzor, Ndidi-Ese; Dabaghian, Yuri; Furr-Stimming, Erin E.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Tsvetkov, Andrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important homeostatic mechanism that eliminates long-lived proteins, protein aggregates and damaged organelles. Its dysregulation is involved in many neurodegenerative disorders. Autophagy is therefore a promising target for blunting neurodegeneration. We searched for novel autophagic pathways in primary neurons and identified the cytosolic sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway as a regulator of neuronal autophagy. S1P, a bioactive lipid generated by sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) in the cytoplasm, is implicated in cell survival. We found that SK1 enhances flux through autophagy and that S1P-metabolizing enzymes decrease this flux. When autophagy is stimulated, SK1 relocalizes to endosomes/autophagosomes in neurons. Expression of a dominant-negative form of SK1 inhibits autophagosome synthesis. In a neuron model of Huntington’s disease, pharmacologically inhibiting S1P-lyase protected neurons from mutant huntingtin-induced neurotoxicity. These results identify the S1P pathway as a novel regulator of neuronal autophagy and provide a new target for developing therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26477494

  2. Influence of calcium on ceramide-1-phosphate monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Brezesinski, Gerald; Hill, Alexandra; Gericke, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) plays an important role in several biological processes, being identified as a key regulator of many protein functions. For instance, it acts as a mediator of inflammatory responses. The mediation of the inflammation process happens due to the interaction of C1P with the C2 domain of cPLA2α, an effector protein that needs the presence of submicromolar concentrations of calcium ions. The aim of this study was to determine the phase behaviour and structural properties of C1P in the presence and absence of millimolar quantities of calcium in a well-defined pH environment. For that purpose, we used monomolecular films of C1P at the soft air/liquid interface with calcium ions in the subphase. The pH was varied to change the protonation degree of the C1P head group. We used surface pressure versus molecular area isotherms coupled with other monolayer techniques as Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). The isotherms indicate that C1P monolayers are in a condensed state in the presence of calcium ions, regardless of the pH. At higher pH without calcium ions, the monolayer is in a liquid-expanded state due to repulsion between the negatively charged phosphate groups of the C1P molecules. When divalent calcium ions are added, they are able to bridge the highly charged phosphate groups, enhancing the regular arrangement of the head groups. Similar solidification of the monolayer structure can be seen in the presence of a 150 times larger concentration of monovalent sodium ions. Therefore, calcium ions have clearly a strong affinity for the phosphomonoester of C1P. PMID:26977381

  3. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase enzyme assay using a BODIPY-labeled substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Li Zaiguo; Bittman, Robert; Saba, Julie D.

    2009-03-06

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is responsible for the irreversible catabolism of sphingosine 1-phosphate, which signals through five membrane receptors to mediate cell stress responses, angiogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. The standard assay for SPL activity utilizes a radioactive dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate substrate and is expensive and cumbersome. In this study, we describe an SPL assay that employs an {omega}-labeled BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate substrate, allowing fluorescent product detection by HPLC and incorporating advantages of the BODIPY fluorophore. The major aldehyde product is confirmed by reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The SPL-catalyzed reaction is linear over a 30 min time period and yields a K{sub m} of 35 {mu}M for BODIPY-sphingosine 1-phosphate.

  4. Sphingosine-1-phosphate, FTY720, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors in the pathobiology of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Viswanathan; Dudek, Steven M; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Huang, Long Shuang; Abassi, Taimur; Mathew, Biji; Zhao, Yutong; Wang, Lichun; Bittman, Robert; Weichselbaum, Ralph; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Garcia, Joe G N

    2013-07-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) attributable to sepsis or mechanical ventilation and subacute lung injury because of ionizing radiation (RILI) share profound increases in vascular permeability as a key element and a common pathway driving increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, despite advances in the understanding of lung pathophysiology, specific therapies do not yet exist for the treatment of ALI or RILI, or for the alleviation of unremitting pulmonary leakage, which serves as a defining feature of the illness. A critical need exists for new mechanistic insights that can lead to novel strategies, biomarkers, and therapies to reduce lung injury. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a naturally occurring bioactive sphingolipid that acts extracellularly via its G protein-coupled S1P1-5 as well as intracellularly on various targets. S1P-mediated cellular responses are regulated by the synthesis of S1P, catalyzed by sphingosine kinases 1 and 2, and by the degradation of S1P mediated by lipid phosphate phosphatases, S1P phosphatases, and S1P lyase. We and others have demonstrated that S1P is a potent angiogenic factor that enhances lung endothelial cell integrity and an inhibitor of vascular permeability and alveolar flooding in preclinical animal models of ALI. In addition to S1P, S1P analogues such as 2-amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol (FTY720), FTY720 phosphate, and FTY720 phosphonates offer therapeutic potential in murine models of lung injury. This translational review summarizes the roles of S1P, S1P analogues, S1P-metabolizing enzymes, and S1P receptors in the pathophysiology of lung injury, with particular emphasis on the development of potential novel biomarkers and S1P-based therapies for ALI and RILI. PMID:23449739

  5. Esterification of glycerol 3-phosphate in lactating guinea-pig mammary gland

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, N. J.

    1967-01-01

    1. The presence of palmitoyl-CoA–l-glycerol 3-phosphate palmitoyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.15) has been demonstrated in a particulate fraction of mammary tissue from lactating guinea pigs. 2. Cell-free preparations also catalysed the activation of palmitate and oleate, and the conversion of enzymically formed phosphatidic acid into glycerides, in accord with the Kennedy pathway of glyceride formation. 3. The properties of the system that esterifies l-glycerol 3-phosphate were studied with respect to substrates and cofactors, and the reaction product was shown to be phosphatidic acid (1,2-diacyl glycerol 3-phosphate). 4. The extent to which newly formed phosphatidic acid was converted into glyceride in a cell-free system was dependent on the nature of the acyl donor, the concentration of subcellular particles, the time of incubation and the concentration of Mg2+. PMID:6070127

  6. Control of glycolysis by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in Streptococcus cremoris and Streptococcus lactis.

    PubMed Central

    Poolman, B; Bosman, B; Kiers, J; Konings, W N

    1987-01-01

    The decreased response of the energy metabolism of lactose-starved Streptococcus cremoris upon readdition of lactose is caused by a decrease of the glycolytic activity (B. Poolman, E. J. Smid, and W. N. Konings, J. Bacteriol. 169:1460-1468, 1987). The decrease in glycolysis is accompanied by a decrease in the activities of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoglycerate mutase. The steady-state levels of pathway intermediates upon refeeding with lactose after various periods of starvation indicate that the decreased glycolysis is primarily due to diminished glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Furthermore, quantification of the control strength exerted by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase on the overall activity of the glycolytic pathway shows that this enzyme can be significantly rate limiting in nongrowing cells. PMID:2824452

  7. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  8. EXPRESSION OF THE SPERMATOGENIC CELL-SPECIFIC GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (GAPDS) IN RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spermatogenic cell-specific variant of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) has been cloned from a rat testis cDNA library and its pattern of expression determined. A 1417 nucleotide cDNA has been found to encode an enzyme with substantial homology to mouse GAPDS...

  9. Chemical and enzymatic methodologies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates.

    PubMed

    Gauss, Dominik; Schoenenberger, Bernhard; Wohlgemuth, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates are important intermediates of many central metabolic pathways in a large number of living organisms. d-Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (d-GAP) is a key intermediate during glycolysis and can as well be found in a variety of other metabolic pathways. The opposite enantiomer, l-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (l-GAP), has been found in a few exciting new pathways. Here, improved syntheses of enantiomerically pure glyceraldehyde 3-phosphates are reported. While d-GAP was synthesized by periodate cleavage of d-fructose 6-phosphate, l-GAP was obtained by enzymatic phosphorylation of l-glyceraldehyde. (1)H- and (31)P NMR spectroscopy was applied in order to examine pH-dependent behavior of GAP over time and to identify potential degradation products. It was found that GAP is stable in acidic aqueous solution below pH 4. At pH 7, methylglyoxal is formed, whereas under alkaline conditions, the formation of lactic acid could be observed. PMID:24680504

  10. 1 L-myo-Inositol 1-Phosphate Synthase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. D.; Sussex, I. M.

    1995-01-01

    A recombinant phage containing an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA sequence encoding a protein with 1L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase (EC 5.5.1.4) activity has been isolated and used for transcriptional and translational studies. The identification of the recombinant phage relied on the observations that (a) the clone complements a mutation in the structural gene for 1L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, (b) the in vitro synthesized polypeptide enzymatically converts glucose 6-phosphate into inositol 1-phosphate, (c) in vitro transcription and translation of this cDNA sequence produces a polypeptide that is recognized by anti-yeast myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase antiserum, and (d) inositol regulates the expression of the corresponding gene in Arabidopsis. PMID:12228386

  11. Expression, essentiality, and a microtiter plate assay for mycobacterial GlmU, the bifunctional glucosamine-1-phosphate acetyltransferase and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenli; Jones, Victoria C.; Scherman, Michael S.; Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Crick, Dean; Bhamidi, Suresh; Xin, Yi; McNeil, Michael R.; Ma, Yufang

    2008-01-01

    UDP-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) is an essential precursor of peptidoglycan and the rhamnose-GlcNAc linker region of mycobacterial cell wall. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv genome, Rv1018c shows strong homology to the GlmU protein involved in the formation of UDP-GlcNAc from other bacteria. GlmU is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes two sequential steps in UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis. Glucosamine-1-phosphate acetyl transferase catalyzes the formation of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate, and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase catalyzes the formation of UDP-GlcNAc. Since inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis often results in cell lysis, M. tuberculosis GlmU is a potential anti-tuberculosis drug target. In this study we cloned M. tuberculosis Rv1018c (glmU gene) and expressed soluble GlmU protein in E. coli BL21(DE3). Enzymatic assays showed that M. tuberculosis GlmU protein exhibits both glucosamine-1-phosphate acetyltransferase and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase activities. We also investigated the effect on Mycobacterium smegmatis when the activity of GlmU is fully removed or reduced via a genetic approach. The results showed that activity of GlmU is required for growth of M. smegmatis as the bacteria did not grow in the absence of active GlmU enzyme. As the amount of functional GlmU enzyme was gradually reduced in a temperature shift experiment, the M. smegmatis cells became non-viable and their morphology changed from a normal rod shape to stubby-rounded morphology and in some cases they lysed. Finally a microtiter plate based assay for GlmU activity with an OD340 read out was developed. These studies therefore support the further development of M. tuberculosis GlmU enzyme as a target for new anti-tuberculosis drugs. PMID:18573680

  12. Purification and characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Gani, Zahid; Boradia, Vishant Mahendra; Raghu Ram, Janaki; Suryavanshi, Prashant Mohan; Patil, Pravinkumar; Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Ranvir; Raje, Manoj; Raje, Chaaya Iyengar

    2016-11-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH, NAD + oxidoreductase (phosphorylating) 1.2.1.12] catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate coupled with the reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. In addition to its role in glycolysis, this enzyme has numerous alternate functions, in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, additional functions have been reported from multiple species including Pisum sativum. A recent study has identified that GAPDH may play an important role in seed ageing and programmed cell death. Despite this the existing purification protocols are almost 40 years old, and only partial characterization of the enzyme has been reported. In the current study, we report a modified method for purification of enzymatically active pea seed GAPDH along with the characterization of the enzyme. Using 2D gel electrophoresis our study also demonstrates that pea seeds contain four isoforms of NAD(+) dependent GAPDH. PMID:27389468

  13. Crystal structure of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the ESKAPE pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kristin A; Breen, Jennifer; Russo, Thomas A; Schultz, L Wayne; Umland, Timothy C

    2016-03-01

    The enzyme 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase catalyzes the sixth step of the seven-step shikimate pathway. Chorismate, the product of the pathway, is a precursor for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids, siderophores and metabolites such as folate, ubiquinone and vitamin K. The shikimate pathway is present in bacteria, fungi, algae, plants and apicomplexan parasites, but is absent in humans. The EPSP synthase enzyme produces 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate and phosphate from phosphoenolpyruvate and shikimate 3-phosphate via a transferase reaction, and is the target of the herbicide glyphosate. The Acinetobacter baumannii gene encoding EPSP synthase, aroA, has previously been demonstrated to be essential during host infection for the growth and survival of this clinically important drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogen. Prephenate dehydrogenase is also encoded by the bifunctional A. baumannii aroA gene, but its activity is dependent upon EPSP synthase since it operates downstream of the shikimate pathway. As part of an effort to evaluate new antimicrobial targets, recombinant A. baumannii EPSP (AbEPSP) synthase, comprising residues Ala301-Gln756 of the aroA gene product, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The crystal structure, determined to 2.37 Å resolution, is described in the context of a potential antimicrobial target and in comparison to EPSP synthases that are resistant or sensitive to the herbicide glyphosate. PMID:26919521

  14. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-catalyzed chain oxidation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by perhydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, P.C.

    1980-02-10

    The chain oxidation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH by perhydroxyl radicals and propagated by molecular oxygen was studied by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system, /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-ray, and pulse radiolysis. The chain length, amount of NADH oxidized per HO/sub 2/ generated, increases with increasing acidity of the medium and reaches a value of 73 at pH 5.0. The rate constant for the oxidation of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH complex by HO/sub 2/ was estimated to be 2 x 10/sup 7/ m/sup -1/s/sup -1/ at ambient temperatures (23-24/sup 0/C). Rate studies as a function of pH indicate that O/sub 2//sup -/ is unreactive toward the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase NADH complex. Other dehydrogenases (malate dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and isocitric dehydrogenase) studied showed no catalytic activity in the oxidation of NADH by HO/sub 2//O/sub 2//sup -/.

  15. Sphingomyelinase D Activity in Model Membranes: Structural Effects of in situ Generation of Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Roberto P.; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes. PMID:22558302

  16. Suppression of ceramide-mediated programmed cell death by sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, O; Pirianov, G; Kleuser, B; Vanek, P G; Coso, O A; Gutkind, S; Spiegel, S

    1996-06-27

    Ceramide is an important regulatory participant of programmed cell death (apoptosis) induced by tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and Fas ligand, members of the TNF superfamily. Conversely, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate, which are metabolites of ceramide, induce mitogenesis and have been implicated as second messengers in cellular proliferation induced by platelet-derived growth factor and serum. Here we report that sphingosine-1-phosphate prevents the appearance of the key features of apoptosis, namely intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation and morphological changes, which result from increased concentrations of ceramide. Furthermore, inhibition of ceramide-mediated apoptosis by activation of protein kinase C results from stimulation of sphingosine kinase and the concomitant increase in intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate. Finally sphingosine-1-phosphate not only stimulates the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, it counteracts the ceramide-induced activation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK). Thus, the balance between the intracellular levels of ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate and their regulatory effects on different family members of mitogen-activated protein kinases determines the fate of the cell. PMID:8657285

  17. Regulation by sphingosine 1-phosphate of Bax and Bad activities during apoptosis in a MEK-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Betito, Susan; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2006-02-24

    Herein we report that the prosurvival sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate regulates the activities of both Bad and Bax during apoptosis of Jurkat cells. First, sphingosine 1-phosphate treatment results in Bad inactivation via the ERK/Rsk-1 pathway. Second, sphingosine 1-phosphate blocks the translocation of Bax to the mitochondria induced by Fas ligation. MEK inhibition by PD98059 or U0126 not only abrogates sphingosine 1-phosphate-induced Bad phosphorylation, but also its cytoprotective effect. Furthermore, inhibition of both mitochondrial cytochrome c efflux and Bax translocation to the mitochondria by sphingosine 1-phosphate could be overcome by PD98059 or U0126. Hence, the MEK/ERK pathway seems to be crucial for the survival effects initiated by sphingosine 1-phosphate. PMID:16414356

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD FOR QUANTITATING SPHINGOID BASE 1-PHOSPHATES IN BLOOD SPOTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red blood cells (RBC) accumulate, store and release sphingoid base 1-phosphates,important ligands for the extracellular receptors S1P1-5. The ability of RBC to accumulate these bioactive lipids is because, with the exception of sphingosine kinase, the enzymes responsible for metabolizing sphingosine...

  19. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES...

  20. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  1. 21 CFR 862.1315 - Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase test system. 862.1315 Section 862.1315 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... hereditary disease galactosemia (disorder of galactose metabolism) in infants. (b) Classification. Class II....

  2. Biochemical methods for quantifying sphingolipids: ceramide, sphingosine, sphingosine kinase-1 activity, and sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Leyre; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Sphingolipids (ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate) are bioactive lipids with important biological functions in proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Herein, we describe easy and rapid biochemical methods with the use of radiolabeled molecules ((3)H, (32)P) for their mass determination. Quantitation of sphingosine kinase-1 activity, the most studied isoform, is also included. PMID:22528435

  3. Selectivity of 3-bromo-isoxazoline inhibitors between human and Plasmodium falciparum glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Stefano; Margiotta, Marilena; Pinto, Andrea; Cullia, Gregorio; Conti, Paola; De Micheli, Carlo; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2016-06-15

    Compounds based on the 3-Br-isoxazoline scaffold fully inhibit glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Plasmodium falciparum by selectively alkylating all four catalytic cysteines of the tetramer. Here, we show that, under the same experimental conditions that led to a fast and complete inhibition of the protozoan enzyme, the human ortholog was only 25% inhibited, with the alkylation of a single catalytic cysteine within the tetramer. The partial alkylation seems to produce a slow conformational rearrangement that severely limits the accessibility of the remaining active sites to bulky 3-Br-isoxazoline derivatives, but not to the substrate or smaller alkylating agents. PMID:27137361

  4. Expression, purification and kinetic characterization of His-tagged glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Cheleski, Juliana; Freitas, Renato F; Wiggers, Helton José; Rocha, Josmar R; de Araújo, Ana Paula Ulian; Montanari, Carlos A

    2011-04-01

    Trypanosomes are flagellated protozoa responsible for serious parasitic diseases that have been classified by the World Health Organization as tropical sicknesses of major importance. One important drug target receiving considerable attention is the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (T. cruzi Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TcGAPDH); EC 1.2.1.12). TcGAPDH is a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway of T. cruzi and catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG) coupled to the reduction of oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, (NAD(+)) to NADH, the reduced form. Herein, we describe the cloning of the T. cruzi gene for TcGAPDH into the pET-28a(+) vector, its expression as a tagged protein in Escherichia coli, purification and kinetic characterization. The His(6)-tagged TcGAPDH was purified by affinity chromatography. Enzyme activity assays for the recombinant His(6)-TcGAPDH were carried out spectrophotometrically to determine the kinetic parameters. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)(app)) determined for D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and NAD(+) were 352±21 and 272±25 μM, respectively, which were consistent with the values for the untagged enzyme reported in the literature. We have demonstrated by the use of Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) that this vector modification resulted in activity preserved for a higher period. We also report here the use of response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the region of optimal conditions for enzyme activity. A quadratic model was developed by RSM to describe the enzyme activity in terms of pH and temperature as independent variables. According to the RMS contour plots and variance analysis, the maximum enzyme activity was at 29.1°C and pH 8.6. Above 37°C, the enzyme activity starts to fall, which may be related to previous

  5. Mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli. Chemical properties and binding of substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Chase, T

    1986-01-01

    Mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase was purified to homogeneity, and some chemical and physical properties were examined. The isoelectric point is 4.19. Amino acid analysis and polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in presence of SDS indicate a subunit Mr of about 22,000, whereas gel filtration and electrophoresis of the native enzyme indicate an Mr of 45,000. Thus the enzyme is a dimer. Amino acid analysis showed cysteine, tyrosine, histidine and tryptophan to be present in low quantities, one, three, four and four residues per subunit respectively. The zinc content is not significant to activity. The enzyme is inactivated (greater than 99%) by reaction of 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoate) with the single thiol group; the inactivation rate depends hyperbolically on reagent concentration, indicating non-covalent binding of the reagent before covalent modification. The pH-dependence indicated a pKa greater than 10.5 for the thiol group. Coenzymes (NAD+ and NADH) at saturating concentrations protect completely against reaction with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoate), and substrates (mannitol 1-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate) protect strongly but not completely. These results suggest that the thiol group is near the catalytic site, and indicate that substrates as well as coenzymes bind to free enzyme. Dissociation constants were determined from these protective effects: 0.6 +/- 0.1 microM for NADH, 0.2 +/- 0.03 mM for NAD+, 9 +/- 3 microM for mannitol 1-phosphate, 0.06 +/- 0.03 mM for fructose 6-phosphate. The binding order for reaction thus may be random for mannitol 1-phosphate oxidation, though ordered for fructose 6-phosphate reduction. Coenzyme and substrate binding in the E X NADH-mannitol 1-phosphate complex is weaker than in the binary complexes, though in the E X NADH+-fructose 6-phosphate complex binding is stronger. PMID:3545182

  6. Expanding the molecular diversity and phenotypic spectrum of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Shteyer, Eyal; Niceta, Marcello; Rizzo, Cristiano; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Chillemi, Giovanni; Bruselles, Alessandro; Semeraro, Michela; Barel, Ortal; Eyal, Eran; Kol, Nitzan; Haberman, Yael; Lahad, Avishai; Diomedi-Camassei, Francesca; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Rechavi, Gideon; Tartaglia, Marco; Anikster, Yair

    2016-09-01

    Transient infantile hypertriglyceridemia (HTGT1; OMIM #614480) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, which manifests in early infancy with transient hypertriglyceridemia, hepatomegaly, elevated liver enzymes, persistent fatty liver and hepatic fibrosis. This rare clinical entity is caused by inactivating mutations in the GPD1 gene, which encodes the cytosolic isoform of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Here we report on four patients from three unrelated families of diverse ethnic origins, who presented with hepatomegaly, liver steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, with or without fasting ketotic hypoglycemia. Whole exome sequencing revealed the affected individuals to harbor deleterious biallelic mutations in the GPD1 gene, including the previously undescribed c.806G > A (p.Arg269Gln) and c.640T > C (p.Cys214Arg) mutations. The clinical features in three of our patients showed several differences compared to the original reports. One subject presented with recurrent episodes of fasting hypoglycemia along with hepatomegaly, hypetriglyceridemia, and elevated liver enzymes; the second showed a severe liver disease, with intrahepatic cholestasis associated with kidney involvement; finally, the third presented persistent hypertriglyceridemia at the age of 30 years. These findings expand the current knowledge of this rare disorder, both with regard to the phenotype and molecular basis. The enlarged phenotypic spectrum of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency can mimic other inborn errors of metabolism with liver involvement and should alert clinicians to recognize this entity by considering GPD1 mutations in appropriate clinical settings. PMID:27368975

  7. Carbon-13 and deuterium isotope effects on the reaction catalyzed by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Canellas, P.F.; Cleland, W.W. )

    1991-09-10

    Carbon-13 and deuterium isotope effects have been measured on the reaction catalyzed by rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in an effort to locate the rate-limiting steps. With D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as substrate, hydride transfer is a major, but not the only, slow step prior to release of the first product, and the intrinsic primary deuterium and {sup 13}C isotope effects on this step are 5-5.5 and 1.034-1.040, and the sum of the commitments to catalysis is {approximately} 3. The {sup 13}C isotope effects on thiohemiacetal formation and thioester phosphorolysis are 1.005 or less. With D-glyceraldehyde as substrate, the isotope effects are similar, but the sum of commitments is {approximately} 1.5, so that hydride transfer is more, but still not solely, rate limiting for this slow substrate. The observed {sup 13}C and deuterium equilibrium isotope effects on the overall reaction from the hydrated aldehyde are 0.995 and 1.145, while the {sup 13}C equilibrium isotope effect for conversion of a thiohemiacetal to a thioester is 0.994, and that for conversion of a thioester to an acyl phosphate is 0.997. Somewhat uncertain values for the {sup 13}C equilibrium isotope effects on aldehyde dehydration and formation of a thiohemiacetal are 1.003 and 1.004.

  8. Cloning and characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene in Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xueying; Sui, Zhenghong; Zhang, Xuecheng

    2006-04-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in various cellular processes. A cytosolic GAPDH encoding gene ( gpd) of Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was cloned and characterized. Deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme of G. lemaneiformis had high homology with those of seven red algae. The 5'-untranslated regions of the GAPDHs encoding genes of these red algae varied greatly. GAPDHs of these red algae shared the highly conserved glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site ASCTTNCL. However, such active site of Cyanidium caldarium was different from those of the other six algae at the last two residues (CL to LF), thus the spatial structure of its GAPDH active center may be different from those of the other six. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GAPDH of G. lemaneiformis might have undergone an evolution similar to those of Porphyra yezoensis, Chondrus crispus, and Gracilaria verrucosa. C. caldarium had a closer evolutionary relationship with Cyanidioschyzon merolae than with Cyanidium sp. Virtual Northern blot analysis revealed that gpd of G. lemaneiformis expressed constitutively, which suggested that it might be house-keeping and could be adapted as an inner control in gene expression analysis of G. lemaneiformis.

  9. [Use of immobilization in the study of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Immobilized monomers].

    PubMed

    Muronets, V I; Ashmarina, L I; Asriiants, R A; Nagradova, N K

    1982-06-01

    Active immobilized monomers of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase were prepared by means of dissociation of the tetrameric enzyme molecule covalently bound to Sepharose via a single subunit. The conditions were elaborated to achieve the inactivation and solubilization of the non-covalently bound subunits leaving the monomer coupled to the matrix intact. This procedure differs from the previously developed method of matrix-bound oligomeric enzymes dissociation in a detail which was found to be essentially important. The widely used method includes complete denaturation of all subunits during treatment with urea followed by reactivation of the immobilized one, whereas only the non-covalently bound subunits suffer denaturation under the conditions developed in the present work. The immobilized monomers of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase exhibit Vmax and Km (for NAD and substrate) values similar to those found for the immobilized tetramer. Reassociation of the immobilized monomers with soluble enzyme subunits obtained in the presence of urea produces matrix-bound tetrameric species. Immobilized trimers ae formed upon incubation of matrix-bound monomers in a diluted apoenzyme solution. The immobilized monomeric, trimeric and tetrameric enzyme species were used to study the role of subunit interactions in cooperative phenomena exhibited by the dehydrogenase. PMID:7115810

  10. Kinetic and Mechanistic Characterization of the Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson-Stofko, Brett; Hadi, Timin; Blanchard, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic protein responsible for the conversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P), inorganic phosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate (1,3-BPG) and the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Here we report the characterization of GAPDH from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). This enzyme exhibits a kinetic mechanism in which first NAD+, then G3P bind to the active site resulting in the formation of a covalently bound thiohemiacetal intermediate. After oxidation of the thiohemiacetal and subsequent nucleotide exchange (NADH off, NAD+ on), the binding of inorganic phosphate and phosphorolysis yields the product 1,3-BPG. Mutagenesis and iodoacetamide (IAM) inactivation studies reveal the conserved C158 to be responsible for nucleophilic catalysis and that the conserved H185 to act as a catalytic base. Primary, solvent and multiple kinetic isotope effects revealed that the first half-reaction is rate limiting and utilizes a step-wise mechanism for thiohemiacetal oxidation via a transient alkoxide to promote hydride transfer and thioester formation. PMID:24161676

  11. Oral streptococcal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mediates interaction with Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbriae.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Hideki; Nonaka, Aya; Kataoka, Kosuke; Tanaka, Muneo; Shizukuishi, Satoshi

    2004-11-01

    Interaction of Porphyromonas gingivalis with plaque-forming bacteria is necessary for its colonization in periodontal pockets. Participation of Streptococcus oralis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and P. gingivalis fimbriae in this interaction has been reported. In this investigation, the contribution of various oral streptococcal GAPDHs to interaction with P. gingivalis fimbriae was examined. Streptococcal cell surface GAPDH activity was measured by incubation of a constant number of streptococci with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and analysis for the conversion of NAD+ to NADH based on the absorbance at 340 nm. Coaggregation activity was measured by a turbidimetric assay. Cell surface GAPDH activity was correlated with coaggregation activity (r = 0.854, P < 0.01) with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. S. oralis ATCC 9811 and ATCC 10557, Streptococcus gordonii G9B, Streptococcus sanguinis ATCC 10556, and Streptococcus parasanguinis ATCC 15909 exhibited high cell surface GAPDH activity and coaggregation activity; consequently, their cell surface GAPDHs were extracted with mutanolysin and purified on a Cibacron Blue Sepharose column. Subsequently, their DNA sequences were elucidated. Purified GAPDHs bound P. gingivalis recombinant fimbrillin by Western blot assay, furthermore, their DNA sequences displayed a high degree of homology with one another. Moreover, S. oralis recombinant GAPDH inhibited coaggregation between P. gingivalis and the aforementioned five streptococcal strains in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that GAPDHs of various plaque-forming streptococci may be involved in their attachment to P. gingivalis fimbriae and that they may contribute to P. gingivalis colonization. PMID:15488735

  12. Human 1-Acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-Acyltransferase Isoforms 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anil K.; Sukumaran, Suja; Cortés, Víctor A.; Tunison, Katie; Mizrachi, Dario; Sankella, Shireesha; Gerard, Robert D.; Horton, Jay D.; Garg, Abhimanyu

    2011-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase (AGPAT) 2 in humans and mice result in loss of both the white and brown adipose tissues from birth. AGPAT2 generates precursors for the synthesis of glycerophospholipids and triacylglycerols. Loss of adipose tissue, or lipodystrophy, results in hyperinsulinemia, diabetes mellitus, and severe hepatic steatosis. Here, we analyzed biochemical properties of human AGPAT2 and its close homolog, AGPAT1, and we studied their role in liver by transducing their expression via recombinant adenoviruses in Agpat2−/− mice. The in vitro substrate specificities of AGPAT1 and AGPAT2 are quite similar for lysophosphatidic acid and acyl-CoA. Protein homology modeling of both the AGPATs with glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 1 (GPAT1) revealed that they have similar tertiary protein structure, which is consistent with their similar substrate specificities. When co-expressed, both isoforms co-localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. Despite such similarities, restoring AGPAT activity in liver by overexpression of either AGPAT1 or AGPAT2 in Agpat2−/− mice failed to ameliorate the hepatic steatosis. From these studies, we suggest that the role of AGPAT1 or AGPAT2 in liver lipogenesis is minimal and that accumulation of liver fat is primarily a consequence of insulin resistance and loss of adipose tissue in Agpat2−/− mice. PMID:21873652

  13. Escherichia coli N-Acetylglucosamine-1-Phosphate-Uridyltransferase/Glucosamine-1-Phosphate-Acetyltransferase (GlmU) Inhibitory Activity of Terreic Acid Isolated from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi; Lambu, Mallikharjuna Rao; Jamwal, Urmila; Rani, Chitra; Chib, Reena; Wazir, Priya; Mukherjee, Debaraj; Chaubey, Asha; Khan, Inshad Ali

    2016-04-01

    Secondary metabolite of Aspergillus terreus, terreic acid, is a reported potent antibacterial that was identified more than 60 years ago, but its cellular target(s) are still unknown. Here we screen its activity against the acetyltransferase domain of a bifunctional enzyme, Escherichia coli N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate-uridyltransferase/glucosamine-1-phosphate-acetyltransferase (GlmU). An absorbance-based assay was used to screen terreic acid against the acetyltransferase activity of E. coli GlmU. Terreic acid was found to inhibit the acetyltransferase domain of E. coli GlmU with an IC50 of 44.24 ± 1.85 µM. Mode of inhibition studies revealed that terreic acid was competitive with AcCoA and uncompetitive with GlcN-1-P. It also exhibited concentration-dependent killing of E. coli ATCC 25922 up to 4× minimum inhibitory concentration and inhibited the growth of biofilms generated by E. coli. Characterization of resistant mutants established mutation in the acetyltransferase domain of GlmU. Terreic acid was also found to be metabolically stable in the in vitro incubations with rat liver microsome in the presence of a NADPH regenerating system. The studies reported here suggest that terreic acid is a potent antimicrobial agent and support that E. coli GlmU acetyltransferase is a molecular target of terreic acid, resulting in its antibacterial activity. PMID:26762501

  14. An Expedient Synthesis of Fluorescent Labeled Ceramide-1-phosphate Analogues1

    PubMed Central

    Boldyrev, I. A.; Brown, R. E.; Molotkovsky, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    A synthesis for fluorescent analogs of ceramide-1-phosphate bearing 9-anthrylvinyl or 4,4-difluoro-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-8-yl (Me4-BODIPY) fluorophore at co-position of fatty acid residue was carried out. The key stage of the synthesis is hydrolysis of corresponding sphingomyelins catalyzed by phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus; the enzymatic yield has been raised to 50–70% by appliance of organic solvent in the incubation medium.

  15. Pattern Recognition Techniques Applied to the Study of Leishmanial Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Norka B. H.; Oliveira, Rafael F.; Weber, Karen C.; Honorio, Kathia M.; Guido, Rafael V. C.; Andricopulo, Adriano D.; de Sousa, Alexsandro G.; da Silva, Albérico B. F.

    2014-01-01

    Chemometric pattern recognition techniques were employed in order to obtain Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) models relating the structures of a series of adenosine compounds to the affinity for glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Leishmania mexicana (LmGAPDH). A training set of 49 compounds was used to build the models and the best ones were obtained with one geometrical and four electronic descriptors. Classification models were externally validated by predictions for a test set of 14 compounds not used in the model building process. Results of good quality were obtained, as verified by the correct classifications achieved. Moreover, the results are in good agreement with previous SAR studies on these molecules, to such an extent that we can suggest that these findings may help in further investigations on ligands of LmGAPDH capable of improving treatment of leishmaniasis. PMID:24566143

  16. Atomic-level characterization of transport cycle thermodynamics in the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Enkavi, Giray; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-09-01

    Membrane transporters actively translocate their substrate by undergoing large-scale structural transitions between inward- (IF) and outward-facing (OF) states (`alternating-access' mechanism). Despite extensive structural studies, atomic-level mechanistic details of such structural transitions, and as importantly, their coupling to chemical events supplying the energy, remain amongst the most elusive aspects of the function of these proteins. Here we present a quantitative, atomic-level description of the functional thermodynamic cycle for the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter GlpT by using a novel approach in reconstructing the free energy landscape governing the IF<-->OF transition along a cyclic transition pathway involving both apo and substrate-bound states. Our results provide a fully atomic description of the complete transport process, offering a structural model for the alternating-access mechanism and substantiating the close coupling between global structural transitions and local chemical events.

  17. Daily variations in the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms expression in Triatoma infestans flight muscles.

    PubMed

    Stroppa, María M; Carriazo, Carlota S; Gerez de Burgos, Nelia M; Garcia, Beatríz A

    2014-08-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease, is a blood-sucking insect. Flight dispersal of adults is the most important mechanism for reinfestation of houses after insecticide spraying. Flight muscles have two glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) isoforms: GPDH-1 is involved in flight metabolism and GPDH-2 provides lipid precursors. In this study, we explored the profile of GPDH expression in females and males adult flight muscles under light/dark cycle, constant light, and constant dark conditions. Under constant dark conditions, GPDH-1 flight muscles of T. infestans showed a rhythmic pattern of transcription synchronous with a rhythmic profile of activity suggesting regulation by the endogenous circadian clock. Otherwise, the GPDH-2 expression analysis showed no regulation by the endogenous clock, but showed that an external factor, such as the dark/light period, was necessary for synchronization of GPDH-2 transcription and activity. PMID:24914000

  18. Mechanistic similarities in docking of the FYVE and PX domains to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate containing membranes

    PubMed Central

    Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2007-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P], a phospholipid produced by PI 3-kinases in early endosomes and multivesicular bodies, often serves as a marker of endosomal membranes. PtdIns(3)P recruits and activates effector proteins containing the FYVE or PX domain and therefore regulates a variety of biological processes including endo- and exocytosis, membrane trafficking, protein sorting, signal transduction and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Structures and PtdIns(3)P binding modes of several FYVE and PX domains have recently been characterized, unveiling the molecular basis underlying multiple cellular functions of these proteins. Here, structural and functional aspects and current mechanisms of the multivalent membrane anchoring by the FYVE and PX domains are reviewed and compared. PMID:17707914

  19. Atomic-level characterization of transport cycle thermodynamics in the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Enkavi, Giray; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2015-01-01

    Membrane transporters actively translocate their substrate by undergoing large-scale structural transitions between inward- (IF) and outward-facing (OF) states (‘alternating-access' mechanism). Despite extensive structural studies, atomic-level mechanistic details of such structural transitions, and as importantly, their coupling to chemical events supplying the energy, remain amongst the most elusive aspects of the function of these proteins. Here we present a quantitative, atomic-level description of the functional thermodynamic cycle for the glycerol-3-phosphate:phosphate antiporter GlpT by using a novel approach in reconstructing the free energy landscape governing the IF↔OF transition along a cyclic transition pathway involving both apo and substrate-bound states. Our results provide a fully atomic description of the complete transport process, offering a structural model for the alternating-access mechanism and substantiating the close coupling between global structural transitions and local chemical events. PMID:26417850

  20. Molecular cloning and characterization of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Penicillium expansum PE-12.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Qi, Z; Yu, Q S; Tang, K X

    2013-01-01

    Penicillium expansum produces large amounts of lipase, which is widely used in laundry detergent and leather industry. We isolated the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (PeGPD) from P. expansum PE-12 through reverse transcriptase PCR and 5'-3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). The gene is 1266 bp long, including an ORF of 1014 bp, encoding a polypeptide chain of 337 amino acids. A phylogenetic tree based on GPD proteins showed that P. expansum is close to Aspergillus species, but comparatively distant from P. marneffei. Southern blot results revealed a single copy of PeGPD, and expression analysis gave evidence of high expression levels. PeGPD genes have potential for genetic engineering of P. expansum for industrial lipase production. PMID:23420404

  1. Daily Variations in the Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isoforms Expression in Triatoma infestans Flight Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Stroppa, María M.; Carriazo, Carlota S.; Gerez de Burgos, Nelia M.; Garcia, Beatríz A.

    2014-01-01

    Triatoma infestans, the main vector of Chagas disease, is a blood-sucking insect. Flight dispersal of adults is the most important mechanism for reinfestation of houses after insecticide spraying. Flight muscles have two glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) isoforms: GPDH-1 is involved in flight metabolism and GPDH-2 provides lipid precursors. In this study, we explored the profile of GPDH expression in females and males adult flight muscles under light/dark cycle, constant light, and constant dark conditions. Under constant dark conditions, GPDH-1 flight muscles of T. infestans showed a rhythmic pattern of transcription synchronous with a rhythmic profile of activity suggesting regulation by the endogenous circadian clock. Otherwise, the GPDH-2 expression analysis showed no regulation by the endogenous clock, but showed that an external factor, such as the dark/light period, was necessary for synchronization of GPDH-2 transcription and activity. PMID:24914000

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Tanaka, Nobukazu; Esaka, Muneharu

    2012-01-01

    L-Galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPPase) is an enzyme involved in ascorbate biosynthesis in higher plants. We isolated a cDNA encoding GPPase from tobacco, and named it NtGPPase. The putative amino acid sequence of NtGPPase contained inositol monophosphatase motifs and metal binding sites. Recombinant NtGPPase hydrolyzed not only L-galactose-1-phosphate, but also myo-inositol-1-phosphate. The optimum pH for the GPPase activity of NtGPPase was 7.5. Its enzyme activity required Mg2+, and was inhibited by Li+ and Ca2+. Its fluorescence, fused with green fluorescence protein in onion cells and protoplasts of tobacco BY-2 cells, was observed in both the cytosol and nucleus. The expression of NtGPPase mRNA and protein was clearly correlated with L-ascorbic acid (AsA) contents of BY-2 cells during culture. The AsA contents of NtGPPase over expression lines were higher than those of empty lines at 13 d after subculture. This suggests that NtGPPase contributes slightly to AsA biosynthesis. PMID:22790939

  3. Characterization of a Novel Intestinal Glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferase Pathway and Its Role in Lipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Irani; Clark, Ronald W; Vera, Nicholas B; Kou, Kou; Erion, Derek M; Coskran, Timothy; Bobrowski, Walter F; Okerberg, Carlin; Goodwin, Bryan

    2016-02-01

    Dietary triglycerides (TG) are absorbed by the enterocytes of the small intestine after luminal hydrolysis into monacylglycerol and fatty acids. Before secretion on chylomicrons, these lipids are reesterified into TG, primarily through the monoacylglycerol pathway. However, targeted deletion of the primary murine monoacylglycerol acyltransferase does not quantitatively affect lipid absorption, suggesting the existence of alternative pathways. Therefore, we investigated the role of the glycerol 3-phosphate pathway in dietary lipid absorption. The expression of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT3) was examined throughout the small intestine. To evaluate the role for GPAT3 in lipid absorption, mice harboring a disrupted GPAT3 gene (Gpat3(-/-)) were subjected to an oral lipid challenge and fed a Western-type diet to characterize the role in lipid and cholesterol homeostasis. Additional mechanistic studies were performed in primary enterocytes. GPAT3 was abundantly expressed in the apical surface of enterocytes in the small intestine. After an oral lipid bolus, Gpat3(-/-) mice exhibited attenuated plasma TG excursion and accumulated lipid in the enterocytes. Electron microscopy studies revealed a lack of lipids in the lamina propria and intercellular space in Gpat3(-/-) mice. Gpat3(-/-) enterocytes displayed a compensatory increase in the synthesis of phospholipid and cholesteryl ester. When fed a Western-type diet, hepatic TG and cholesteryl ester accumulation was significantly higher in Gpat3(-/-) mice compared with the wild-type mice accompanied by elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase, a marker of liver injury. Dysregulation of bile acid metabolism was also evident in Gpat3-null mice. These studies identify GPAT3 as a novel enzyme involved in intestinal lipid metabolism. PMID:26644473

  4. A novel 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Rahnella aquatilis with significantly reduced glyphosate sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ri-He; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Han, Hong-Juan; Chen, Chen; Jin, Xiao-Fen; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2012-01-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS; EC 2.5.1.19) is a key enzyme in the shikimate pathway for the production of aromatic amino acids and chorismate-derived secondary metabolites in plants, fungi, and microorganisms. It is also the target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Natural glyphosate resistance is generally thought to occur within microorganisms in a strong selective pressure condition. Rahnella aquatilis strain GR20, an antagonist against pathogenic agrobacterial strains of grape crown gall, was isolated from the rhizosphere of grape in glyphosate-contaminated vineyards. A novel gene encoding EPSPS was identified from the isolated bacterium by complementation of an Escherichia coli auxotrophic aroA mutant. The EPSPS, named AroA(R. aquatilis), was expressed and purified from E. coli, and key kinetic values were determined. The full-length enzyme exhibited higher tolerance to glyphosate than the E. coli EPSPS (AroA(E. coli)), while retaining high affinity for the substrate phosphoenolpyruvate. Transgenic plants of AroA(R. aquatilis) were also observed to be more resistant to glyphosate at a concentration of 5 mM than that of AroA(E. coli). To probe the sites contributing to increased tolerance to glyphosate, mutant R. aquatilis EPSPS enzymes were produced with the c-strand of subdomain 3 and the f-strand of subdomain 5 (Thr38Lys, Arg40Val, Arg222Gln, Ser224Val, Ile225Val, and Gln226Lys) substituted by the corresponding region of the E. coli EPSPS. The mutant enzyme exhibited greater sensitivity to glyphosate than the wild type R. aquatilis EPSPS with little change of affinity for its first substrate, shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). The effect of the residues on subdomain 5 on glyphosate resistance was more obvious. PMID:22870190

  5. Characterization of Streptococcus pneumoniae 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthase and its activation by univalent cations.

    PubMed

    Du, W; Wallis, N G; Mazzulla, M J; Chalker, A F; Zhang, L; Liu, W S; Kallender, H; Payne, D J

    2000-01-01

    The aroA gene (Escherichia coli nomenclature) encoding 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae has been identified, cloned and overexpressed in E. coli, and the enzyme purified to homogeneity. It was shown to catalyze a reversible conversion of shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to EPSP and inorganic phosphate. Activation by univalent cations was observed in the forward reaction, with NH+4, Rb+ and K+ exerting the greatest effects. Km(PEP) was lowered by increasing [NH+4] and [K+], whereas Km(S3P) rose with increasing [K+], but fell with increasing [NH+4]. Increasing [NH+4] and [K+] resulted in an overall increase in kcat. Glyphosate (GLP) was found to be a competitive inhibitor with PEP, but the potency of inhibition was profoundly affected by [NH+4] and [K+]. For example, increasing [NH+4] and [K+] reduced Ki(GLP versus PEP) up to 600-fold. In the reverse reaction, the enzyme catalysis was less sensitive to univalent cations. Our analysis included univalent cation concentrations comparable with those found in bacterial cells. Therefore, the observed effects of these metal ions are more likely to reflect the physiological behavior of EPSP synthase and also add to our understanding of how to inhibit this enzyme in the host organism. As there is a much evidence to suggest that EPSP synthase is essential for bacterial survival, its discovery in the serious gram-positive pathogen S. pneumoniae and its inhibition by GLP indicate its potential as a broad-spectrum antibacterial target. PMID:10601870

  6. Reduced sphingosine kinase-1 and enhanced sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase expression demonstrate deregulated sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The accumulation of beta amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is related to mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration. Among its pleiotropic cellular effects, Aβ accumulation has been associated with a deregulation of sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) derived from sphingosine is emerging as a critical lipid mediator regulating various biological activities including cell proliferation, survival, migration, inflammation, or angiogenesis. S1P tissue level is low and kept under control through equilibrium between its synthesis mostly governed by sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) and its degradation by sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL). We have previously reported that Aβ peptides were able to decrease the activity of SphK1 in cell culture models, an effect that could be blocked by the prosurvival IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling. Results Herein, we report for the first time the expression of both SphK1 and SPL by immunohistochemistry in frontal and entorhinal cortices from 56 human AD brains. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a decreased expression of SphK1 and an increased expression of SPL both correlated to amyloid deposits in the entorhinal cortex. Otherwise, analysis of brain tissue extracts showed a decrease of SphK1 expression in AD brains whereas SPL expression was increased. The content of IGF-1R, an activator of SphK1, was found decreased in AD brains as well as S1P1, the major receptor for S1P. Conclusions Collectively, these results highlight the importance of S1P in AD suggesting the existence of a global deregulation of S1P signaling in this disease from its synthesis by SphK1 and degradation by SPL to its signaling by the S1P1 receptor. PMID:24468113

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the glycerol-3-phosphate 1-acyltransferase from squash (Cucurbita moschata).

    PubMed

    Turnbull, A P; Rafferty, J B; Sedelnikova, S E; Slabas, A R; Schierer, T P; Kroon, J T; Nishida, I; Murata, N; Simon, J W; Rice, D W

    2001-03-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate 1-acyltransferase (E.C. 2.3.1.15; G3PAT) catalyses the incorporation of an acyl group from either acyl-acyl carrier proteins (acylACPs) or acylCoAs into the sn-1 position of glycerol 3-phosphate to yield 1-acylglycerol 3-phosphate. Crystals of squash G3PAT have been obtained by the hanging-drop method of vapour diffusion using PEG 4000 as the precipitant. These crystals are most likely to belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with approximate unit-cell parameters a = 61.1, b = 65.1, c = 103.3 A, alpha = beta = gamma = 90 degrees and a monomer in the asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data to 1.9 A resolution have been collected in-house using a MAR 345 imaging-plate system. PMID:11223529

  8. Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter suggests a potential 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2008-10-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane alpha-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family--the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY)--have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational "switching" mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible "switch" mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.(23) We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a "tilt" of 9 degrees -10 degrees rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the "tilted" structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the

  9. Dengue Virus NS1 Protein Modulates Cellular Energy Metabolism by Increasing Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Allonso, Diego; Andrade, Iamara S.; Conde, Jonas N.; Coelho, Diego R.; Rocha, Daniele C. P.; da Silva, Manuela L.; Ventura, Gustavo T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue is one of the main public health concerns worldwide. Recent estimates indicate that over 390 million people are infected annually with the dengue virus (DENV), resulting in thousands of deaths. Among the DENV nonstructural proteins, the NS1 protein is the only one whose function during replication is still unknown. NS1 is a 46- to 55-kDa glycoprotein commonly found as both a membrane-associated homodimer and a soluble hexameric barrel-shaped lipoprotein. Despite its role in the pathogenic process, NS1 is essential for proper RNA accumulation and virus production. In the present study, we identified that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) interacts with intracellular NS1. Molecular docking revealed that this interaction occurs through the hydrophobic protrusion of NS1 and the hydrophobic residues located at the opposite side of the catalytic site. Moreover, addition of purified recombinant NS1 enhanced the glycolytic activity of GAPDH in vitro. Interestingly, we observed that DENV infection promoted the relocalization of GAPDH to the perinuclear region, where NS1 is commonly found. Both DENV infection and expression of NS1 itself resulted in increased GAPDH activity. Our findings indicate that the NS1 protein acts to increase glycolytic flux and, consequently, energy production, which is consistent with the recent finding that DENV induces and requires glycolysis for proper replication. This is the first report to propose that NS1 is an important modulator of cellular energy metabolism. The data presented here provide new insights that may be useful for further drug design and the development of alternative antiviral therapies against DENV. IMPORTANCE Dengue represents a serious public health problem worldwide and is caused by infection with dengue virus (DENV). Estimates indicate that half of the global population is at risk of infection, with almost 400 million cases occurring per year. The NS1 glycoprotein is found in both the

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase Deficient Cells as a Tool to Study Protein Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gerl, Mathias J.; Bittl, Verena; Kirchner, Susanne; Sachsenheimer, Timo; Brunner, Hanna L.; Lüchtenborg, Christian; Özbalci, Cagakan; Wiedemann, Hannah; Wegehingel, Sabine; Nickel, Walter; Haberkant, Per; Schultz, Carsten; Krüger, Marcus; Brügger, Britta

    2016-01-01

    Cell membranes contain hundreds to thousands of individual lipid species that are of structural importance but also specifically interact with proteins. Due to their highly controlled synthesis and role in signaling events sphingolipids are an intensely studied class of lipids. In order to investigate their metabolism and to study proteins interacting with sphingolipids, metabolic labeling based on photoactivatable sphingoid bases is the most straightforward approach. In order to monitor protein-lipid-crosslink products, sphingosine derivatives containing a reporter moiety, such as a radiolabel or a clickable group, are used. In normal cells, degradation of sphingoid bases via action of the checkpoint enzyme sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase occurs at position C2-C3 of the sphingoid base and channels the resulting hexadecenal into the glycerolipid biosynthesis pathway. In case the functionalized sphingosine looses the reporter moiety during its degradation, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling is maintained. In case degradation of a sphingosine derivative does not remove either the photoactivatable or reporter group from the resulting hexadecenal, specificity towards sphingolipid labeling can be achieved by blocking sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase activity and thus preventing sphingosine derivatives to be channeled into the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. Here we report an approach using clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated nuclease Cas9 to create a sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1) HeLa knockout cell line to disrupt the sphingolipid-to-glycerolipid metabolic pathway. We found that the lipid and protein compositions as well as sphingolipid metabolism of SGPL1 knock-out HeLa cells only show little adaptations, which validates these cells as model systems to study transient protein-sphingolipid interactions. PMID:27100999

  11. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate are negative regulators of TNF-α production induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Józefowski, Szczepan; Czerkies, Maciej; Łukasik, Anna; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    LPS is a constituent of cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria that, acting through the CD14/TLR4 receptor complex, causes strong proinflammatory activation of macrophages. In murine peritoneal macrophages and J774 cells, LPS at 1-2 ng/ml induced maximal TNF-α and MIP-2 release, and higher LPS concentrations were less effective, which suggested a negative control of LPS action. While studying the mechanism of this negative regulation, we found that in J774 cells, LPS activated both acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase and moderately elevated ceramide, ceramide 1-phosphate, and sphingosine levels. Lowering of the acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase activities using inhibitors or gene silencing upregulated TNF-α and MIP-2 production in J774 cells and macrophages. Accordingly, treatment of those cells with exogenous C8-ceramide diminished TNF-α and MIP-2 production after LPS stimulation. Exposure of J774 cells to bacterial sphingomyelinase or interference with ceramide hydrolysis using inhibitors of ceramidases also lowered the LPS-induced TNF-α production. The latter result indicates that ceramide rather than sphingosine suppresses TNF-α and MIP-2 production. Of these two cytokines, only TNF-α was negatively regulated by ceramide 1-phosphate as was indicated by upregulated TNF-α production after silencing of ceramide kinase gene expression. None of the above treatments diminished NO or RANTES production induced by LPS. Together the data indicate that ceramide negatively regulates production of TNF-α and MIP-2 in response to LPS with the former being sensitive to ceramide 1-phosphate as well. We hypothesize that the ceramide-mediated anti-inflammatory pathway may play a role in preventing endotoxic shock and in limiting inflammation. PMID:21041721

  12. The utilization of fructose by Escherichia coli. Properties of a mutant defective in fructose 1-phosphate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ferenci, T; Kornberg, H L

    1973-02-01

    1. The isolation and properties of a mutant of Escherichia coli devoid of fructose 1-phosphate kinase activity are described. 2. This mutant grew in media containing any one of a variety of substances, including hexoses, hexose 6-phosphates, sugar acids and glucogenic substrates, at rates not significantly different from those at which the parent organism grew on these substrates. However, only the parent grew on fructose or fructose 1-phosphate. 3. Fructose and fructose 1-phosphate inhibit the growth of the mutant, but not of its parent, on other carbon sources. 4. Even though not previously exposed to fructose, the mutant took up [(14)C]fructose rapidly but to only a small extent: [(14)C]fructose 1-phosphate was identified as the predominant labelled product. In contrast, the equally rapid but more extensive uptake of [(14)C]fructose by the parent organism required prior growth in the presence of fructose. PMID:4579702

  13. Targeting the sphingosine-1-phosphate axis in cancer, inflammation and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Gregory T.; Maceyka, Michael; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is involved in multiple cellular signalling systems and has a pivotal role in the control of immune cell trafficking. As such, S1P has been implicated in disorders such as cancer and inflammatory diseases. This Review discusses the ways in which S1P might be therapeutically targeted — for example, via the development of chemical inhibitors that target the generation, transport and degradation of S1P and via the development of specific S1P receptor agonists. We also highlight recent conflicting results observed in preclinical studies targeting S1P and discuss ongoing clinical trials in this field. PMID:23954895

  14. Chemical modulators of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors as barrier-oriented therapeutic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Marsolais, David; Rosen, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Biological barriers regulate the passage of cells, pathogens, fluids, nutrients, ions and signalling molecules between anatomical compartments during homeostasis and disease. Yet strategies that allow for reversible therapeutic modulation of these barriers are still in their infancy. The enhancement or protection of natural barriers is desirable in conditions such as acute respiratory distress syndrome or ischaemia–reperfusion injuries, whereas a temporary disruption could facilitate the penetration of drugs across such barriers. This Review discusses the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors in the regulation and protection of biological barriers, and the potential of therapeutic strategies that target this receptor family. PMID:19300460

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors: Biology and therapeutic potential in kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Jo, S-K; Bajwa, A; Awad, AS; Lynch, KR; Okusa, MD

    2008-01-01

    The major sphingolipid metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), has important biological functions. S1P is the ligand for a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors with distinct signaling pathways that regulate angiogenesis, vascular maturation, immunity, chemotaxis, and other important biological pathways. Recently, clinical trials have targeted S1P receptors (S1PRs) for autoimmune diseases and transplantation and have generated considerable interest in developing additional, more selective compounds. This review summarizes current knowledge on the biology of S1P and S1PRs that forms the basis for future drug development and the treatment of kidney disease. PMID:18322542

  16. Glycerol-3-Phosphate Levels Are Associated with Basal Resistance to the Hemibiotrophic Fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important component of carbohydrate and lipid metabolic processes. In this article, we provide evidence that G3P levels in plants are associated with defense to a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. Inoculation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thal...

  17. GLYCERALDEHYDE 3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE-S, A SPERM-SPECIFIC GLYCOLYTIC ENZYME, IS REQUIRED FOR SPERM MOTILITY AND MALE FERTILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    While glycolysis is highly conserved, it is remarkable that several novel isozymes in this central metabolic pathway are found in mammalian sperm. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-S (GAPDS) is the product of a mouse gene expressed only during spermatogenesis and, like it...

  18. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.523... requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance when used as...

  19. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.523... requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance when used as...

  20. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.523... requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance when used as...

  1. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.523... requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance when used as...

  2. 40 CFR 174.523 - CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase in all plants; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROCEDURES AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.523... requirement of a tolerance. Residues of the CP4 Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (CP4 EPSPS) synthase enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance when used as...

  3. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The internalization of oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors’ cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants ...

  4. ROS generation and multiple forms of mammalian mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Mráček, Tomáš; Holzerová, Eliška; Drahota, Zdeněk; Kovářová, Nikola; Vrbacký, Marek; Ješina, Pavel; Houštěk, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in a range of pathologies. Mitochondrial flavin dehydrogenases glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPDH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) represent important ROS source, but the mechanism of electron leak is still poorly understood. To investigate the ROS production by the isolated dehydrogenases, we used brown adipose tissue mitochondria solubilized by digitonin as a model. Enzyme activity measurements and hydrogen peroxide production studies by Amplex Red fluorescence, and luminol luminescence in combination with oxygraphy revealed flavin as the most likely source of electron leak in SDH under in vivo conditions, while we propose coenzyme Q as the site of ROS production in the case of mGPDH. Distinct mechanism of ROS production by the two dehydrogenases is also apparent from induction of ROS generation by ferricyanide which is unique for mGPDH. Furthermore, using native electrophoretic systems, we demonstrated that mGPDH associates into homooligomers as well as high molecular weight supercomplexes, which represent native forms of mGPDH in the membrane. By this approach, we also directly demonstrated that isolated mGPDH itself as well as its supramolecular assemblies are all capable of ROS production. PMID:23999537

  5. Oxidatively Modified Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Alzheimer Disease: Many Pathways to Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Hardas, Sarita S.; Bader Lange, Miranda L.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the oxidoreductase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has become a subject of interest as more and more studies reveal a surfeit of diverse GAPDH functions, extending beyond traditional aerobic metabolism of glucose. As a result of multiple isoforms and cellular locales, GAPDH is able to come in contact with a variety of small molecules, proteins, membranes, etc. that play important roles in normal and pathologic cell function. Specifically, GAPDH has been shown to interact with neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the β-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP). Studies from our laboratory have shown significant inhibition of GAPDH dehydrogenase activity in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain due to oxidative modification. Although, oxidative stress and damage is a common phenomenon in AD brain, it would seem that inhibition of glycolytic enzyme activity is merely one avenue in which AD pathology affects neuronal cell development and survival, as oxidative modification can also impart a toxic gain-of-function to many proteins, including GAPDH. In this review, we examine the many functions of GAPDH with respect to AD brain; in particular, GAPDH’s apparent role(s) in AD-related apoptotic cell death is emphasized. PMID:20164570

  6. Isolation of a functional, insulin regulatable glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander-Bridges, M.; Ramaika, C.; Lomanto, M.; Florence, B.; Ercolani, L.

    1987-05-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a glycolytic enzyme which is regulated by insulin in 3T3 adipocytes and liver. They have isolated a 10 Kb BAM fragment which contains the entire GAPDH coding sequence and 1 Kb of the 5' flanking region. This clone has been mapped and sequenced to show the presence of a TATAA box; ATG, TAA, ATAA sites; and introns. When transiently expressed in L cells, the gene encodes a full length mRNA and functional protein. Thus, they have isolated a functional gene and not a pseudogene. When the gene is expressed in insulin-sensitive cells, the human GAPDH mRNA level was increased 3-fold in H35 hepatoma cells similar to the fold effect seen for endogenous rat mRNA in the same experiment. A 600 bp fragment of the GAPDH gene 5' flanking sequence was subcloned into a vector containing the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene and cotransfected with the neomycin-resistant gene in H35 hepatoma cells to select stable lines. RNA isolated from control- and insulin-treated transfected cells show an appropriately sized S1 nuclease-protected fragment indicating that both the control species and insulin-stimulated species are primed off the GAPDH protomer. These studies indicate that insulin regulates GAPDH gene expression through an interaction with specific DNA sequences in rat hepatoma cells.

  7. On the interaction between glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and airborne particles: Evidence for electrophilic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinyashiki, Masaru; Rodriguez, Chester E.; Di Stefano, Emma W.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Kumagai, Yoshito; Froines, John R.; Cho, Arthur K.

    Many of the adverse health effects of airborne particulate matter (PM) have been attributed to the chemical properties of some of the large number of chemical species present in PM. Some PM component chemicals are capable of generating reactive oxygen species and eliciting a state of oxidative stress. In addition, however, PM can contain chemical species that elicit their effects through covalent bond formation with nucleophilic functions in the cell. In this manuscript, we report the presence of constituents with electrophilic properties in ambient and diesel exhaust particles, demonstrated by their ability to inhibit the thiol enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). GAPDH is irreversibly inactivated by electrophiles under anaerobic conditions by covalent bond formation. This inactivation can be blocked by the prior addition of a high concentration of dithiothreitol (DTT) as an alternate nucleophile. Addition of DTT after the reaction between the electrophile and GAPDH, however, does not reverse the inactivation. This property has been utilized to develop a procedure that provides a quantitative measure of electrophiles present in samples of ambient particles collected in the Los Angeles Basin and in diesel exhaust particles. The toxicity of electrophiles is the result of irreversible changes in biological molecules; recovery is dependent on resynthesis. If the resynthesis is slow, the irreversible effects can be cumulative and manifest themselves after chronic exposure to low levels of electrophiles.

  8. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from Zymomonas mobilis: cloning, sequencing, and identification of promoter region

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, T.; Sewell, G.W.; Ingram, L.O.

    1987-12-01

    The gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was isolated from a library of Zymomonas mobilis DNA fragments by complementing a deficient strain of Escherichia coli. It contained tandem promoters which were recognized by E. coli but appeared to function less efficiently than the enteric lac promoter in E. coli. The open reading frame for this gene encoded 337 amino acids with an aggregate molecular weight of 36,099 (including the N-terminal methionine). The primary amino acid sequence for this gene had considerable functional homology and amino acid identity with other eukaryotic and bacterial genes. Based on this comparison, the gap gene from Z. mobilis appeared to be most closely related to that of the thermophilic bacteria and to the chloroplast isozymes. Comparison of this gene with other glycolytic enzymes from Z. mobilis revealed a conserved pattern of codon bias and several common features of gene structure. A tentative transcriptional consensus sequence is proposed for Z. mobilis based on comparison of the five known promoters for three glycolytic enzymes.

  9. Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase-Telomere Association Correlates with Redox Status in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  10. Lactobacillus reuteri glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase functions in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hai-Feng; Gao, Kan; Wang, Cong; Liu, Li; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2015-05-01

    This study was aimed to identify key surface proteins mediating the adhesion of lactobacilli to intestinal epithelial cells. By using Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin in the western blotting, a protein band of an approximately 37 kDa was detected on the surface layer of Lactobacillus reuteri strains ZJ616, ZJ617, ZJ621, and ZJ623 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Mass spectrometry analysis using the adhesion-related protein from L. reuteri ZJ617 showed that it was 100% homologous to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of L. reuteri JCM 1112 (GenBank: YP_001841377). The ability of L. reuteri ZJ617 to adhere to epithelial cells decreased significantly by treatment with LiCl or by blocking with an anti-GAPDH antibody, in comparison with the untreated strain (p < 0.05). Immunoelectron microscopic and immunofluorescence analyses confirmed that GAPDH is located on the surface layer of L. reuteri ZJ617. The results indicated that the GAPDH protein of L. reuteri ZJ617 acts as an adhesion component that plays an important role in binding to the intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:25867279

  11. Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate is light-regulated and essential for survival in retinal rods

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Agosto, Melina A.; Anastassov, Ivan A.; Tse, Dennis Y.; Wu, Samuel M.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides play important roles in numerous intracellular membrane pathways. Little is known about the regulation or function of these lipids in rod photoreceptor cells, which have highly active membrane dynamics. Using new assays with femtomole sensitivity, we determined that whereas levels of phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate were below detection limits, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) levels in rod inner/outer segments increased more than 30-fold after light exposure. This increase was blocked in a rod-specific knockout of the PI-3 kinase Vps34, resulting in failure of endosomal and autophagy-related membranes to fuse with lysosomes, and accumulation of abnormal membrane structures. At early ages, rods displayed normal morphology, rhodopsin trafficking, and light responses, but underwent progressive neurodegeneration with eventual loss of both rods and cones by twelve weeks. The degeneration is considerably faster than in rod knockouts of autophagy genes, indicating defects in endosome recycling or other PI(3)P-dependent membrane trafficking pathways are also essential for rod survival. PMID:27245220

  12. Glycolytic flux controls d-serine synthesis through glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Sasabe, Jumpei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Kuwasako, Kanako; Muto, Yutaka; Hamase, Kenji; Matsuoka, Masaaki; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2015-01-01

    d-Serine is an essential coagonist with glutamate for stimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. Although astrocytic metabolic processes are known to regulate synaptic glutamate levels, mechanisms that control d-serine levels are not well defined. Here we show that d-serine production in astrocytes is modulated by the interaction between the d-serine synthetic enzyme serine racemase (SRR) and a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In primary cultured astrocytes, glycolysis activity was negatively correlated with d-serine level. We show that SRR interacts directly with GAPDH, and that activation of glycolysis augments this interaction. Biochemical assays using mutant forms of GAPDH with either reduced activity or reduced affinity to SRR revealed that GAPDH suppresses SRR activity by direct binding to GAPDH and through NADH, a product of GAPDH. NADH allosterically inhibits the activity of SRR by promoting the disassociation of ATP from SRR. Thus, astrocytic production of d-serine is modulated by glycolytic activity via interactions between GAPDH and SRR. We found that SRR is expressed in astrocytes in the subiculum of the human hippocampus, where neurons are known to be particularly vulnerable to loss of energy. Collectively, our findings suggest that astrocytic energy metabolism controls d-serine production, thereby influencing glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus. PMID:25870284

  13. Reciprocal Phosphorylation of Yeast Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases in Adaptation to Distinct Types of Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Jae; Jeschke, Grace R.; Roelants, Françoise M.; Thorner, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved mechanisms for ensuring growth and survival in the face of stress caused by a fluctuating environment. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two homologous glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenases, Gpd1 and Gpd2, that are required to endure various stresses, including hyperosmotic shock and hypoxia. These enzymes are only partially redundant, and their unique functions were attributed previously to differential transcriptional regulation and localization. We find that Gpd1 and Gpd2 are negatively regulated through phosphorylation by distinct kinases under reciprocal conditions. Gpd2 is phosphorylated by the AMP-activated protein kinase Snf1 to curtail glycerol production when nutrients are limiting. Gpd1, in contrast, is a target of TORC2-dependent kinases Ypk1 and Ypk2. Inactivation of Ypk1 by hyperosmotic shock results in dephosphorylation and activation of Gpd1, accelerating recovery through increased glycerol production. Gpd1 dephosphorylation acts synergistically with its transcriptional upregulation, enabling long-term growth at high osmolarity. Phosphorylation of Gpd1 and Gpd2 by distinct kinases thereby enables rapid adaptation to specific stress conditions. Introduction of phosphorylation motifs targeted by distinct kinases provides a general mechanism for functional specialization of duplicated genes during evolution. PMID:22988299

  14. Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate is light-regulated and essential for survival in retinal rods.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Agosto, Melina A; Anastassov, Ivan A; Tse, Dennis Y; Wu, Samuel M; Wensel, Theodore G

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides play important roles in numerous intracellular membrane pathways. Little is known about the regulation or function of these lipids in rod photoreceptor cells, which have highly active membrane dynamics. Using new assays with femtomole sensitivity, we determined that whereas levels of phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate were below detection limits, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) levels in rod inner/outer segments increased more than 30-fold after light exposure. This increase was blocked in a rod-specific knockout of the PI-3 kinase Vps34, resulting in failure of endosomal and autophagy-related membranes to fuse with lysosomes, and accumulation of abnormal membrane structures. At early ages, rods displayed normal morphology, rhodopsin trafficking, and light responses, but underwent progressive neurodegeneration with eventual loss of both rods and cones by twelve weeks. The degeneration is considerably faster than in rod knockouts of autophagy genes, indicating defects in endosome recycling or other PI(3)P-dependent membrane trafficking pathways are also essential for rod survival. PMID:27245220

  15. Mitochondrial FAD-linked Glycerol-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase: A Target for Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurmit

    2014-01-01

    Imbalances in cellular redox state are frequently observed in cancer cells, and contribute significantly to cancer progression and apoptotic resistance. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one reactive oxygen species (ROS) that is produced in excess within cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate-dependent (GPD2) ROS production in PC-3 cells and demonstrated the importance of excessive H2O2 production on their survival. By exploiting the abnormal H2O2 production of PC-3 cells, we initiated a high-throughput screening of the Canadian Compound Collection, composed of 29,586 small molecules, targeting the glycerophosphate-dependent H2O2 formation in PC-3 cells. Eighteen compounds were identified to have significant inhibitory activity. These compounds have not been previously characterized as inhibitors of the enzyme. Six of these compounds were further analyzed in PC-3 cells and dose response studies displayed an inhibitory and anti-oxidative potency that ranged from 1 µM to 30 µM. The results presented here demonstrate that inhibitors of mitochondrial GPD2 activity elicit anti-proliferative effects on cancer cells. PMID:24521925

  16. Chemical Synthesis and Molecular Recognition of Phosphatase-Resistant Analogues of Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Lee, Stephanie A.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.; Sbrissa, Diego; Shisheva, Assia; Prestwich, Glenn D.

    2008-01-01

    The remodeling of phosphatidylinositol polyphosphates in cellular membranes by phosphatases and kinases orchestrates the signaling by these lipids in space and time. In order to provide chemical tools to study of the changes in cell physiology mediated by these lipids, three new metabolically-stabilized (ms) analogues of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P were synthesized. We describe herein the total asymmetric synthesis of 3-methylphosphonate, 3-monofluoromethylphosphonate and 3-phosphorothioate analogues of PtdIns(3)P. From differentially protected D-myo-inositol key intermediates, a versatile phosphoramidite reagent was employed in the synthesis of PtdIns(3)P analogues with diacylglyceryl moieties containing dioleoyl, dipalmitoyl and dibutyryl chains. In addition, we introduce a new phosphorlyation reagent, monofluoromethylphosphonyl chloride, which has general applications for the preparation of “pKa-matched” monofluorophosphonates. These ms-PtdIns(3)P analogues exhibited reduced binding activities with 15N-labelled FYVE and PX domains, as significant 1H and 15N chemical shift changes in the FYVE domain were induced by titrating ms-PtdIns(3)Ps into membrane-mimetic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. In addition, the PtdIns(3)P analogues with dioleyl and dipalmitoyl chains were substrates for the 5-kinase enzyme PIKfyve; the corresponding phosphorylated ms-PI(3,5)P2 products were detected by radio-TLC analysis. PMID:16417379

  17. U(VI) Sequestration in Hydroxyapatite Produced by Microbial Glycerol 3-Phosphate Metabolism▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for removal of U(VI) from solution via precipitation of U(VI)-bearing calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) minerals coupled to microbial hydrolysis of glycerol phosphate compounds. We evaluated this process in circumneutral-pH groundwater from Area 2 of the U.S. Department of Energy Field Research Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Area 2 groundwater contains high concentrations of dissolved calcium (ca. 4 mM), and thus, release of phosphate during glycerol phosphate metabolism has the potential to create conditions favorable for U(VI) sequestration in Ca-P minerals. Microbial enumeration and isolation studies verified the presence of aerobic and nitrate-reducing glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P)-metabolizing microorganisms in Area 2 sediments. Coprecipitation of U(VI) with Ca-P minerals coupled to microbial G3P hydrolysis was demonstrated in artificial groundwater under aerobic and nitrate-reducing conditions. Transmission electron microscopy analysis and mineral-washing experiments demonstrated that U(VI) was incorporated into the structure of the insoluble Ca-P mineral hydroxyapatite [Ca5(PO4)3OH]. Our results support the idea that U(VI) can be effectively removed from solution in contaminated aquifers through stimulation of microbial organophosphate metabolism. PMID:19633115

  18. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-telomere association correlates with redox status in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Pariona-Llanos, Ricardo; Pavani, Raphael Souza; Reis, Marcelo; Noël, Vincent; Silber, Ariel Mariano; Armelin, Hugo Aguirre; Cano, Maria Isabel Nogueira; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a classical metabolic enzyme involved in energy production and plays a role in additional nuclear functions, including transcriptional control, recognition of misincorporated nucleotides in DNA and maintenance of telomere structure. Here, we show that the recombinant protein T. cruzi GAPDH (rTcGAPDH) binds single-stranded telomeric DNA. We demonstrate that the binding of GAPDH to telomeric DNA correlates with the balance between oxidized and reduced forms of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides (NAD+/NADH). We observed that GAPDH-telomere association and NAD+/NADH balance changed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle. For example, in replicative epimastigote forms of T. cruzi, which show similar intracellular concentrations of NAD+ and NADH, GAPDH binds to telomeric DNA in vivo and this binding activity is inhibited by exogenous NAD+. In contrast, in the T. cruzi non-proliferative trypomastigote forms, which show higher NAD+ concentration, GAPDH was absent from telomeres. In addition, NAD+ abolishes physical interaction between recombinant GAPDH and synthetic telomere oligonucleotide in a cell free system, mimicking exogenous NAD+ that reduces GAPDH-telomere interaction in vivo. We propose that the balance in the NAD+/NADH ratio during T. cruzi life cycle homeostatically regulates GAPDH telomere association, suggesting that in trypanosomes redox status locally modulates GAPDH association with telomeric DNA. PMID:25775131

  19. Cloning, characterization and application of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuenian; Lu, Xuefeng; Li, Jian-Jun

    2014-03-01

    It is important to develop native and highly efficient promoters for effective genetic engineering of filamentous fungi. Although Aspergillus terreus is an important industrial fungus for the production of itaconic acid and lovastatin, the available genetic toolbox for this microorganism is still rather limited. We have cloned the 5' upstream region of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpd; 2,150 bp from the start codon) from A. terreus CICC 40205 and subsequently confirmed its promoter function using sgfp (synthetic green fluorescent protein) as the reporter. The sequence of the promoter PgpdAt was further analysed by systematic deletion to obtain an effective and compact functional promoter. Two truncated versions of PgpdAt (1,081 and 630 bp) were also able to drive sgfp expression in A. terreus. The activities of these three PgpdAt promoters of varying different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, western blot and transcription. The shortest one (630 bp) was successfully applied as a driver of vgb expression in the genetic engineering of A. terreus. The function of expressed haemoglobin was demonstrated by the CO (carbon monoxide)-difference spectrum and enhanced oxygen uptake rate, glucose consumption and itaconic acid titer. Our study was successful in developing and validating an efficient and compact native promoter for genetic engineering of A. terreus. PMID:24306453

  20. Assisted folding of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by trigger factor.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, G. C.; Li, Z. Y.; Zhou, J. M.; Fischer, G.

    2000-01-01

    The Escherichia coli trigger factor is a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that catalyzes proline-limited protein folding extremely well. Here, refolding of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in the presence of trigger factor was investigated. The regain of activity of GAPDH was markedly increased by trigger factor after either long- or short-term denaturation, and detectable aggregation of GAPDH intermediates was prevented. In both cases, time courses of refolding of GAPDH were decelerated by trigger factor. The reactivation yield of GAPDH showed a slow down-turn when molar ratios of trigger factor to GAPDH were above 5, due to tight binding between trigger factor and GAPDH intermediates. Such inactive bound GAPDH could be partially rescued from trigger factor by addition of reduced alphaLA as competitor, by further diluting the refolding mixture, or by disrupting hydrophobic interactions in the complexes. A model for trigger factor assisted refolding of GAPDH is proposed. We also suggest that assisted refolding of GAPDH is due mainly to the chaperone function of trigger factor. PMID:10892818

  1. Modulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity by surface functionalized quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabanti; Ray, Manju; Das, Mahua Rani; Chakrabarti, Adrita; Khan, Ali Hossain; Sarma, D D; Acharya, Somobrata

    2014-03-21

    Enzymatic regulation is a fast and reliable diagnosis tool via identification and design of inhibitors for modulation of enzyme function. Previous reports on quantum dots (QDs)-enzyme interactions reveal a protein-surface recognition ability leading to promising applications in protein stabilization, protein delivery, bio-sensing and detection. However, the direct use of QDs to control enzyme inhibition has never been revealed to date. Here we show that a series of biocompatible surface-functionalized metal-chalcogenide QDs can be used as potent inhibitors for malignant cells through the modulation of enzyme activity, while normal cells remain unaffected. The in vitro activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), an enzyme involved critically in the glycolysis of cancer cells, is inactivated selectively in a controlled way by the QDs at a significantly low concentration (nM). Cumulative kinetic studies delineate that the QDs undergo both reversible and irreversible inhibition mechanisms owing to the site-specific interactions, enabling control over the inhibition kinetics. These complementary loss-of-function probes may offer a novel route for rapid clinical diagnosis of malignant cells and biomedical applications. PMID:24496476

  2. Structural and functional properties of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from a mammalian hibernator.

    PubMed

    de la Roche, Marc; Tessier, Shannon N; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-02-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH; E.C.1.1.1.8) was purified from liver and skeletal muscle of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludivicianus), a hibernating species. Native and subunit molecular masses of the dimeric enzyme were 77 and 40 kD, respectively, and both tissues contained a single isozyme with a pI of 6.4. Kinetic parameters of purified G3PDH from prairie dog liver and muscle were characterized at 22 and 5 °C and compared with rabbit muscle G3PDH. Substrate affinities for hibernator muscle G3PDH were stable (NAD) or increased significantly (K(m) G3P and DHAP decreased) at low temperature whereas K(m) NAD and DHAP of rabbit G3PDH increased. Prairie dog G3PDH showed greater conservation of K(m) G3P over a wide temperature range as well as greater thermal stability and resistance to chemical denaturation by guanidine hydrochloride than the rabbit enzyme. In addition, using the protein sequence of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) and bioinformatics tools, the deduced protein structure of G3PDH was compared between heterothermic and homeothermic mammals. Structural and functional characteristics of G3PDH from the hibernating species would support enzyme function over a wide range of core body temperatures over cycles of torpor and arousal. PMID:22180227

  3. Isolation and some properties of glycated D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from rabbit muscle.

    PubMed Central

    He, R Q; Yang, M D; Zheng, X; Zhou, J X

    1995-01-01

    Glycated D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDH) from rabbit muscle and human erythrocytes have been investigated. The specific activity of the non-glycated GAPDH from rabbit muscle is approx. 180 units. (One unit is defined as the specific activity required to convert 1 microM of substrate/min per mg of enzyme.) The activity of the glycated enzyme, consisting of two sugars per tetramer, is lower than that of the non-glycated GAPDH. Non-enzymic transamination of the N-termini of glycated GAPDH (gGAPDH) indicates that they are not blocked by glycation. The rate of modification of thiols (Cys-149) with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) was greater for the glycated than the non-glycated enzymes. The rate of modification of amino groups of Lys residues of gGAPDH with o-phthalaldehyde was greater for the non-glycated enzyme. In 0.18 M guanidine-HC1 solution, the emission intensity at 410 nm of a fluorescent NAD+ derivative introduced into the active site decreased to 80%, whereas that of gGAPDH decreased to 50%. This suggests that the glycated sites are near the active site; glycation of the enzyme leads to a change of the microenvironment of Cys-149, alters the conformation of the active site and decreases the activity. Images Figure 1 PMID:7619048

  4. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles

    PubMed Central

    Frej, Anna D.; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I.; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A.; Otto, Grant P.; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H.; Claus, Sandrine P.; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len

    2016-01-01

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1− mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  5. The Inositol-3-Phosphate Synthase Biosynthetic Enzyme Has Distinct Catalytic and Metabolic Roles.

    PubMed

    Frej, Anna D; Clark, Jonathan; Le Roy, Caroline I; Lilla, Sergio; Thomason, Peter A; Otto, Grant P; Churchill, Grant; Insall, Robert H; Claus, Sandrine P; Hawkins, Phillip; Stephens, Len; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-05-15

    Inositol levels, maintained by the biosynthetic enzyme inositol-3-phosphate synthase (Ino1), are altered in a range of disorders, including bipolar disorder and Alzheimer's disease. To date, most inositol studies have focused on the molecular and cellular effects of inositol depletion without considering Ino1 levels. Here we employ a simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum, to demonstrate distinct effects of loss of Ino1 and inositol depletion. We show that loss of Ino1 results in an inositol auxotrophy that can be rescued only partially by exogenous inositol. Removal of inositol supplementation from the ino1(-) mutant resulted in a rapid 56% reduction in inositol levels, triggering the induction of autophagy, reduced cytokinesis, and substrate adhesion. Inositol depletion also caused a dramatic generalized decrease in phosphoinositide levels that was rescued by inositol supplementation. However, loss of Ino1 triggered broad metabolic changes consistent with the induction of a catabolic state that was not rescued by inositol supplementation. These data suggest a metabolic role for Ino1 that is independent of inositol biosynthesis. To characterize this role, an Ino1 binding partner containing SEL1L1 domains (Q54IX5) and having homology to mammalian macromolecular complex adaptor proteins was identified. Our findings therefore identify a new role for Ino1, independent of inositol biosynthesis, with broad effects on cell metabolism. PMID:26951199

  6. Negative regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate levels in early-to-late endosome conversion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai; Jian, Youli; Sun, Xiaojuan; Yang, Chengkui; Gao, Zhiyang; Zhang, Zhili; Liu, Xuezhao; Li, Yang; Xu, Jing; Jing, Yudong; Mitani, Shohei; He, Sudan

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) plays a central role in endosome fusion, recycling, sorting, and early-to-late endosome conversion, but the mechanisms that determine how the correct endosomal PtdIns3P level is achieved remain largely elusive. Here we identify two new factors, SORF-1 and SORF-2, as essential PtdIns3P regulators in Caenorhabditis elegans. Loss of sorf-1 or sorf-2 leads to greatly elevated endosomal PtdIns3P, which drives excessive fusion of early endosomes. sorf-1 and sorf-2 function coordinately with Rab switching genes to inhibit synthesis of PtdIns3P, allowing its turnover for endosome conversion. SORF-1 and SORF-2 act in a complex with BEC-1/Beclin1, and their loss causes elevated activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) complex. In mammalian cells, inactivation of WDR91 and WDR81, the homologs of SORF-1 and SORF-2, induces Beclin1-dependent enlargement of PtdIns3P-enriched endosomes and defective degradation of epidermal growth factor receptor. WDR91 and WDR81 interact with Beclin1 and inhibit PI3K complex activity. These findings reveal a conserved mechanism that controls appropriate PtdIns3P levels in early-to-late endosome conversion. PMID:26783301

  7. Endocytosis of Ligand-Activated Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Mediated by the Clathrin-Pathway.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Patrick M; Kang, Yuan-Lin; Kirchhausen, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is one of five G protein-coupled receptors activated by the lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Stimulation of S1PR1 by binding S1P or the synthetic agonist FTY720P results in rapid desensitization, associated in part with depletion of receptor from the cell surface. We report here combining spinning disc confocal fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to show that rapid internalization of activated S1PR1 relies on a functional clathrin-mediated endocytic pathway. Uptake of activated S1PR1 was strongly inhibited in cells disrupted in their clathrin-mediated endocytosis by depleting clathrin or AP-2 or by treating cells with dynasore-OH. The uptake of activated S1P1R was strongly inhibited in cells lacking both β-arrestin 1 and β-arrestin 2, indicating that activated S1PR1 follows the canonical route of endocytosis for G-protein coupled receptor's (GPCR)'s. PMID:26481905

  8. Migration of germline progenitor cells is directed by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling in a basal chordate.

    PubMed

    Kassmer, Susannah H; Rodriguez, Delany; Langenbacher, Adam D; Bui, Connor; De Tomaso, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    The colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri continuously regenerates entire bodies in an asexual budding process. The germ line of the newly developing bodies is derived from migrating germ cell precursors, but the signals governing this homing process are unknown. Here we show that germ cell precursors can be prospectively isolated based on expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase and integrin alpha-6, and that these cells express germ cell markers such as vasa, pumilio and piwi, as well as sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor. In vitro, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) stimulates migration of germ cells, which depends on integrin alpha-6 activity. In vivo, S1P signalling is essential for homing of germ cells to newly developing bodies. S1P is generated by sphingosine kinase in the developing germ cell niche and degraded by lipid phosphate phosphatase in somatic tissues. These results demonstrate a previously unknown role of the S1P signalling pathway in germ cell migration in the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri. PMID:26456232

  9. The roles of bile acids and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in the hepatobiliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagahashi, Masayuki; Yuza, Kizuki; Hirose, Yuki; Nakajima, Masato; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Hait, Nitai C; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-09-01

    Based on research carried out over the last decade, it has become increasingly evident that bile acids act not only as detergents, but also as important signaling molecules that exert various biological effects via activation of specific nuclear receptors and cell signaling pathways. Bile acids also regulate the expression of numerous genes encoding enzymes and proteins involved in the synthesis and metabolism of bile acids, glucose, fatty acids, and lipoproteins, as well as energy metabolism. Receptors activated by bile acids include, farnesoid X receptor α, pregnane X receptor, vitamin D receptor, and G protein-coupled receptors, TGR5, muscarinic receptor 2, and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)2. The ligand of S1PR2, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates various physiological and pathophysiological cellular processes. We have recently reported that conjugated bile acids, via S1PR2, activate and upregulate nuclear sphingosine kinase 2, increase nuclear S1P, and induce genes encoding enzymes and transporters involved in lipid and sterol metabolism in the liver. Here, we discuss the role of bile acids and S1P signaling in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism and in hepatobiliary diseases. PMID:27459945

  10. Migration of germline progenitor cells is directed by sphingosine-1-phosphate signalling in a basal chordate

    PubMed Central

    Kassmer, Susannah H.; Rodriguez, Delany; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Bui, Connor; De Tomaso, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    The colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri continuously regenerates entire bodies in an asexual budding process. The germ line of the newly developing bodies is derived from migrating germ cell precursors, but the signals governing this homing process are unknown. Here we show that germ cell precursors can be prospectively isolated based on expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase and integrin alpha-6, and that these cells express germ cell markers such as vasa, pumilio and piwi, as well as sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor. In vitro, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) stimulates migration of germ cells, which depends on integrin alpha-6 activity. In vivo, S1P signalling is essential for homing of germ cells to newly developing bodies. S1P is generated by sphingosine kinase in the developing germ cell niche and degraded by lipid phosphate phosphatase in somatic tissues. These results demonstrate a previously unknown role of the S1P signalling pathway in germ cell migration in the ascidian Botryllus schlosseri. PMID:26456232

  11. Prolonging Survival of Corneal Transplantation by Selective Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Min; Liu, Yong; Xiao, Yang; Han, Gencheng; Jia, Liang; Wang, Liqiang; Lei, Tian; Huang, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most used therapy for eye disorders. Although the cornea is somewhat an immune privileged organ, immune rejection is still the major problem that reduces the success rate. Therefore, effective chemical drugs that regulate immunoreactions are needed to improve the outcome of corneal transplantations. Here, a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) selective agonist was systematically evaluated in mouse allogeneic corneal transplantation and compared with the commonly used immunosuppressive agents. Compared with CsA and the non-selective sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist FTY720, the S1P1 selective agonist can prolong the survival corneal transplantation for more than 30 days with a low immune response. More importantly, the optimal dose of the S1P1 selective agonist was much less than non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720, which would reduce the dose-dependent toxicity in drug application. Then we analyzed the mechanisms of the selected S1P1 selective agonist on the immunosuppression. The results shown that the S1P1 selective agonist could regulate the distribution of the immune cells with less CD4+ T cells and enhanced Treg cells in the allograft, moreover the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines TGF-β1 and IL-10 unregulated which can reduce the immunoreactions. These findings suggest that S1P1 selective agonist may be a more appropriate immunosuppressive compound to effectively prolong mouse allogeneic corneal grafts survival. PMID:25216235

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 influences cell cycle progression in muscle satellite cells

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Mathieu; Figeac, Nicolas; White, Robert B.; Knopp, Paul; Zammit, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle retains a resident stem cell population called satellite cells, which are mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, but can be activated to produce myoblast progeny for muscle homeostasis, hypertrophy and repair. We have previously shown that satellite cell activation is partially controlled by the bioactive phospholipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and that S1P biosynthesis is required for muscle regeneration. Here we investigate the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 3 (S1PR3) in regulating murine satellite cell function. S1PR3 levels were high in quiescent myogenic cells before falling during entry into cell cycle. Retrovirally-mediated constitutive expression of S1PR3 led to suppressed cell cycle progression in satellite cells, but did not overtly affect the myogenic program. Conversely, satellite cells isolated from S1PR3-null mice exhibited enhanced proliferation ex-vivo. In vivo, acute cardiotoxin-induced muscle regeneration was enhanced in S1PR3-null mice, with bigger muscle fibres compared to control mice. Importantly, genetically deleting S1PR3 in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy produced a less severe muscle dystrophic phenotype, than when signalling though S1PR3 was operational. In conclusion, signalling though S1PR3 suppresses cell cycle progression to regulate function in muscle satellite cells. PMID:23911934

  13. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Sphingosine Kinase Substrates as Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Foss, Frank W.; Mathews, Thomas P.; Kharel, Yugesh; Kennedy, Perry C.; Snyder, Ashley H.; Davis, Michael D.; Lynch, Kevin R.; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2009-01-01

    In the search for bioactive sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor ligands, a series of 2-amino-2-heterocyclic-propanols were synthesized. These molecules were discovered to be substrates of human-sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (SPHK1 and SPHK2). When phosphorylated, the resultant phosphates showed varied activities at the five sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors (S1P1–5). Agonism at S1P1 was displayed in vivo by induction of lymphopenia. A stereochemical preference of the quaternary carbon was crucial for phosphorylation by the kinases and alters binding affinities at the S1P receptors. Oxazole and oxadiazole compounds are superior kinase substrates to FTY720, the prototypical prodrug immunomodulator, fingolimod (FTY720). The oxazole-derived structure was the most active for human SPHK2. Imidazole analogues were less active substrates for SPHKs, but more potent and selective agonists of the S1P1 receptor; additionally, the imidazole class of compounds rendered mice lymphopenic. PMID:19632123

  14. [Biological assay for galactose-1 phosphate measurement application in subjects with galactosemia].

    PubMed

    Braham, Imene; Charfeddine, Bassem; Ben Othmene, Leila; Neffati, Souhir; Mtar, Aida; Ben Abdallah, Jihene; Ali Smach, Med; Dridi, Hedi; Limem, Khalifa

    2012-01-01

    Congenital galactosemia is a hereditary, autosomal recessive and metabolic disease. It is linked to an enzyme deficiency, more commonly known by the deficiency of galactose-1- phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), which is responsible for an accumulation of galactose-1- phosphate in the blood. Clinical symptoms appear early in infancy from the second week of life. They generally manifested by some disorders within liver, kidney, eye, gastrointestinal, neurological and also with cataracts. Currently, the clinical diagnosis remains difficult hence the importance of further investigations based on effective biological assessments to highlight the disease. The diagnosis of galactosemia is made by the laboratory test. The latter includes the determination of Gal-1-P which is done by a fluorometric method spot test. This study was conducted in order to assess the repeatability, reproducibility, accuracy, and effectiveness of the techniques used. We have found the CV for a repeatability (CV = 5 %), reproducibility (CV = 4 %) which confirms the accuracy of the method proceeded in this study. This method allows us to have a degree of inaccuracy less than 1%. According to the study of the effectiveness of "spot test", we found that our technique is specific (Sp = 93 %) and sensitive (Se = 83 %). PMID:22294140

  15. Glutathione conjugates recognize the Rossmann fold of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Puder, M; Soberman, R J

    1997-04-18

    Leukotriene (LT) C4 and other glutathione conjugates are synthesized intracellularly and then move to the plasma membrane for export. The intracellular proteins that bind these molecules and the significance of these interactions are poorly understood. To identify the binding sites of membrane-associated proteins that recognize these molecules, we utilized photoaffinity probes to label the inner leaflet of erythrocytes. The predominant molecule labeled with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)glutathione-[125I]4-azidosalicylic acid (PNBG-[125I]ASA) or LTC4-[125I]4-azidosalicylic acid (LTC4-[125I]ASA) was 38 kDa. The protein was labeled with PNBG-[125I]ASA, electroblotted to polyvinylidene difluoride membranes, digested in situ with lysyl endopeptidase, and two radiolabeled peptides isolated by reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography. These contained an identity of 7/11 with amino acids 119-129, and 11/11 with amino acids 67-77 of human liver glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), respectively. Photoaffinity labeling with PNBG-[125I]ASA was blocked completely by 100 microM ATP and greater than 50% with 100 microM NAD+. LTC4-[125I]ASA binding to the NAD+ site was confirmed by V8 protease digestion of purified GAPDH labeled with LTC4-[125I]ASA or PNBG-[125I]ASA, with both labels localized to the 6.8-kDa N-terminal fragment. Photoaffinity labeling of HL-60 cells with LTC4-125I-ASA identified GAPDH as the predominant cytoplasmic binding protein in these cells. These data indicate that GAPDH is a membrane-associated and cytoplasmic protein which binds glutathione conjugates including LTC4. PMID:9099752

  16. Disruption of NAD+ binding site in glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase affects its intranuclear interactions

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Mishra, Anurag; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim; Gothe, Scott A; Krynetskiy, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To characterize phosphorylation of human glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and mobility of GAPDH in cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic agents. METHODS: We used proteomics analysis to detect and characterize phosphorylation sites within human GAPDH. Site-specific mutagenesis and alanine scanning was then performed to evaluate functional significance of phosphorylation sites in the GAPDH polypeptide chain. Enzymatic properties of mutated GAPDH variants were assessed using kinetic studies. Intranuclear dynamics parameters (diffusion coefficient and the immobile fraction) were estimated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and confocal microscopy. Molecular modeling experiments were performed to estimate the effects of mutations on NAD+ cofactor binding. RESULTS: Using MALDI-TOF analysis, we identified novel phosphorylation sites within the NAD+ binding center of GAPDH at Y94, S98, and T99. Using polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-T99-containing peptide within GAPDH, we demonstrated accumulation of phospho-T99-GAPDH in the nuclear fractions of A549, HCT116, and SW48 cancer cells after cytotoxic stress. We performed site-mutagenesis, and estimated enzymatic properties, intranuclear distribution, and intranuclear mobility of GAPDH mutated variants. Site-mutagenesis at positions S98 and T99 in the NAD+ binding center reduced enzymatic activity of GAPDH due to decreased affinity to NAD+ (Km = 741 ± 257 μmol/L in T99I vs 57 ± 11.1 µmol/L in wild type GAPDH. Molecular modeling experiments revealed the effect of mutations on NAD+ binding with GAPDH. FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching) analysis showed that mutations in NAD+ binding center of GAPDH abrogated its intranuclear interactions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest an important functional role of phosphorylated amino acids in the NAD+ binding center in GAPDH interactions with its intranuclear partners. PMID:26629320

  17. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Aggregates Accelerate Amyloid-β Amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Masanori; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Kubo, Takeya; Semi, Yuko; Kume, Satoshi; Higashida, Shusaku; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Harada, Naoki; Kita, Akinori; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Inui, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2015-10-23

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by loss of neurons and formation of pathological extracellular deposits induced by amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Numerous studies have established Aβ amyloidogenesis as a hallmark of AD pathogenesis, particularly with respect to mitochondrial dysfunction. We have previously shown that glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) forms amyloid-like aggregates upon exposure to oxidative stress and that these aggregates contribute to neuronal cell death. Here, we report that GAPDH aggregates accelerate Aβ amyloidogenesis and subsequent neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Co-incubation of Aβ40 with small amounts of GAPDH aggregates significantly enhanced Aβ40 amyloidogenesis, as assessed by in vitro thioflavin-T assays. Similarly, structural analyses using Congo red staining, circular dichroism, and atomic force microscopy revealed that GAPDH aggregates induced Aβ40 amyloidogenesis. In PC12 cells, GAPDH aggregates augmented Aβ40-induced cell death, concomitant with disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, mice injected intracerebroventricularly with Aβ40 co-incubated with GAPDH aggregates exhibited Aβ40-induced pyramidal cell death and gliosis in the hippocampal CA3 region. These observations were accompanied by nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytosolic release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Finally, in the 3×Tg-AD mouse model of AD, GAPDH/Aβ co-aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction were consistently detected in an age-dependent manner, and Aβ aggregate formation was attenuated by GAPDH siRNA treatment. Thus, this study suggests that GAPDH aggregates accelerate Aβ amyloidogenesis, subsequently leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal cell death in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:26359500

  18. Glycerol-3-phosphate metabolism plays a role in stress response in the red alga Pyropia haitanensis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao-Juan; Yang, Rui; Luo, Qi-Jun; Chen, Juan-Juan; Chen, Hai-Min; Yan, Xiao-Jun

    2015-04-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) has been suggested as a novel regulator of plant defense signaling, however, its role in algal resistance remains largely unknown. The glycerol kinase (also designated as NHO1) and NAD-dependent G3P dehydrogenase (GPDH) are two key enzymes involved in the G3P biosynthesis. In our study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of NHO1 (NHO1Ph ) and GPDH (GPDHP h ) from the red alga Pyropia haitanensis (denoted as NHO1Ph and GPDHP h ) and examined their expression level under flagellin peptide 22 (flg22) stimulation or heat stress. We also measured the level of G3P and floridoside (a downstream product of G3P in P. haitanensis) under flg22 stimulation or heat stress. Both NHO1Ph and GPDHP h shared high sequence identity and structural conservation with their orthologs from different species, especially from red algae. Phylogenetic analysis showed that NHO1s and GPDHs from red algae were closely related to those from animals. Under flg22 stimulation or heat stress, the expression levels of NHO1Ph and GPDHP h were up-regulated, G3P levels increased, and the contents of floridoside decreased. But the floridoside level increased in the recovery period after heat stress. Taken together, we found that G3P metabolism was associated with the flg22-induced defense response and heat stress response in P. haitanensis, indicating the general conservation of defense response in angiosperms and algae. Furthermore, floridoside might also participate in the stress resistance of P. haitanensis. PMID:26986527

  19. Cellular recovery of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and thiol status after exposure to hydroperoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.E.; Reed, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of the thiol-dependent enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), in vertebrate cells, was modulated by a change in the intracellular thiol:disulfide redox status. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were incubated with 1-120 mM H2O2, 1-120 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide, 1-6 mM ethacrynic acid, or 0.1-10 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 5 min. Loss of reduced protein thiols, as measured by binding of the thiol reagent iodoacetic acid to GPD, and loss of GPD enzymatic activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of the cells, following oxidative treatment, in saline for 30 min or with 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed both changes in GPD. The enzymatic recovery of GPD activity was observed either without addition of thiols to the medium or by incubation of a sonicated cell mixture with 2 mM cysteine, cystine, cysteamine, or glutathione (GSH); GSSG had no effect. Treatment of cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to decrease cellular GSH by varying amounts caused a dose-related increase in sensitivity of GPD activity to inactivation by H2O2 and decreased cellular ability for subsequent recovery. GPD responded in a similar fashion with oxidative treatment of another lung carcinoma cell line (A427) as well as normal lung tissue from human and rat. These findings indicate that the cellular thiol redox status can be important in determining GPD enzymatic activity.

  20. Vaccine efficacy of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Edwardsiella ictaluri against E. tarda in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Trung Cao, Thanh; Tsai, Ming-An; Yang, Chung-Da; Wang, Pei-Chyi; Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Gabriel Chen, Hsu-Chung; Chen, Shih-Chu

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), derived from the outer-membrane protein (OMP) fraction, has been used as a potential candidate for vaccine development. The gene-encoding 37 kDa GAPDH outer membrane protein (OMP) from Edwardsiella ictaluri was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Western blotting, and nucleotide and amino acid sequencing were used to analyze the expressed antigenic protein and gene encoding this protein. Comparative DNA and protein sequence analysis of GAPDH from E. ictaluri GAPDHs from several Gram-negative bacterial species within the Enterobacteriaceae family revealed that the GAPDHs within this group are highly conserved and share a sequence similarity of 75-100% with E. ictaluri GDPDH. Rabbit antiserum raised against the E. ictaluri recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH) protein recognized purified GADPH, indicating that it has a strong immunogenicity. Tilapia fish were intraperitoneally immunized with formalin-killed E. ictaluri whole cells, and rGAPDH (30 μg fish(-1)) from E. ictaluri, both of which were emulsified in ISA 763A adjuvant. At 3 months after immunization, fish were challenged with the E. tarda strain to assess vaccine efficacy; the relative percent survival (RPS) values were found to exceed 71.4%. The specific mean antibody titer log2 level of groups vaccinated with rGAPDH at 3 months was significantly higher than that of non-vaccinated fish (control group). Therefore, this recombinant protein can be considered a multi-purpose candidate vaccine against several pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25742975

  1. Identification of some ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes by PCR amplification of their gpd (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) genes.

    PubMed

    Kreuzinger, N; Podeu, R; Gruber, F; Göbl, F; Kubicek, C P

    1996-09-01

    Degenerated oligonucleotide primers designed to flank an approximately 1.2-kb fragment of the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) from ascomycetes and basidiomycetes were used to amplify the corresponding gpd fragments from several species of the ectomycorrhizal fungal taxa Boletus, Amanita, and Lactarius. Those from B. edulis, A. muscaria, and L. deterrimus were cloned and sequenced. The respective nucleotide sequences of these gene fragments showed a moderate degree of similarity (72 to 76%) in the protein-encoding regions and only a low degree of similarity in the introns (56 to 66%). Introns, where present, occurred at conserved positions, but the respective positions and numbers of introns in a given taxon varied. The amplified fragment from a given taxon could be distinguished from that of others by both restriction nuclease cleavage analysis and Southern hybridization. A procedure for labeling DNA probes with fluorescein-12-dUTP by PCR was developed. These probes were used in a nonradioactive hybridization assay, with which the gene could be detected in 2 ng of chromosomal DNA of L. deterrimus on slot blots. Taxon-specific amplification was achieved by the design of specific oligonucleotide primers. The application of the gpd gene for the identification of mycorrhizal fungi under field conditions was demonstrated, with Picea abies (spruce) mycorrhizal roots harvested from a northern alpine forest area as well as from a plant-breeding nursery. The interference by inhibitory substances, which sometimes occurred in the DNA extracted from the root-fungus mixture, could be overcome by using very diluted concentrations of template DNA for a first round of PCR amplification followed by a second round with nested oligonucleotide primers. We conclude that gpd can be used to detect ectomycorrhizal fungi during symbiotic interaction. PMID:8795234

  2. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (GAPDH) INACTIVATION BY α,β-UNSATURATED CARBONYL DERIVATIVES

    PubMed Central

    Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Fang, Bin; Koomen, John M.; Gavin, Terrence; Zhang, Lihai; Barber, David S.; LoPachin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    α,β-Unsaturated carbonyls are an important class of chemicals involved in environmental toxicity and disease processes. Whereas adduction of cysteine residues on proteins is a well-documented reaction of these chemicals, such a generic effect cannot explain the molecular mechanism of cytotoxicity. Instead, more detailed information is needed regarding the possible specificity and kinetics of cysteine targeting and the quantitative relationship between adduct burden and protein dysfunction. To address these datagaps, purified human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was incubated with acrylamide (ACR), acrolein or methylvinyl ketone (MVK). Results show that these α,β-unsaturated carbonyl toxicants inhibited GAPDH activity in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The rank order of enzyme inhibition (KI); i.e., ACR << MVK < acrolein, was related to the calculated electrophilic reactivity of each compound and to the corresponding kinetics of cysteine adduct formation. Tandem mass spectrometry revealed that adduct formation was selective at lower concentrations; i.e., ACR preferentially formed adducts with Cys152 (residues 146-162). At higher concentrations, ACR also formed adducts with Cys156 and Cys247 (residues 235-248). Adduct formation at Cys152 was correlated to enzyme inhibition, which is consistent with the regulatory role of this residue in enzyme function and its location within the GAPDH active site. Further analyses indicated that Cys152 was present in a pKa-lowering microenvironment (pKa = 6.03) and, at physiological pH, the corresponding sulfhydryl group exists in the highly reactive nucleophilic thiolate-state. These data suggest a general cytotoxic mechanism where electrophilic α,β-unsaturated carbonyls selectively form adducts with reactive nucleophilic cysteine residues specifically associated with the active sites of proteins. These specialized cysteine residues are toxicologically relevant molecular targets, since chemical

  3. Cloning and characterization of two novel chloroplastic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenases from Dunaliella viridis.

    PubMed

    He, Yunxia; Meng, Xiangzong; Fan, Qianlan; Sun, Xiaoliang; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2009-09-01

    Dunaliella, a unicellular green alga, has the unusual ability to survive dramatic osmotic stress by accumulating high concentrations of intracellular glycerol as a compatible solute. The chloroplastic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) has been considered to be the key enzyme that produces glycerol for osmoregulation in Dunaliella. In this study, we cloned the two most prominent GPDH cDNAs (DvGPDH1 and DvGPDH2) from Dunaliella viridis, which encode two polypeptides of 695 and 701 amino acids, respectively. Unlike higher plant GPDHs, both proteins contained extra phosphoserine phosphatase (SerB) domains at their N-termini in addition to C-terminal GPDH domains. Such bi-domain GPDHs represent a novel type of GPDH and are found exclusively in the chlorophyte lineage. Transient expression of EGFP fusion proteins in tobacco leaf cells demonstrated that both DvGPDH1 and DvGPDH2 are localized in the chloroplast. Overexpression of DvGPDH1 or DvGPDH2 could complement a yeast GPDH mutant (gpd1Delta), but not a yeast SerB mutant (ser2Delta). In vitro assays with purified DvGPDH1 and DvGPDH2 also showed apparent GPDH activity for both, but no SerB activity was detected. Surprisingly, unlike chloroplastic GPDHs from plants, DvGPDH1 and DvGPDH2 could utilize both NADH and NADPH as coenzymes and exhibited significantly higher GPDH activities when NADH was used as the coenzyme. Q-PCR analysis revealed that both genes exhibited transient transcriptional induction of gene expression upon hypersalinity shock, followed by a negative feedback of gene expression. These results shed light on the regulation of glycerol synthesis during salt stress in Dunaliella. PMID:19551475

  4. Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Interacts with Proapoptotic Kinase Mst1 to Promote Cardiomyocyte Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    You, Bei; Huang, Shengdong; Qin, Qing; Yi, Bing; Yuan, Yang; Xu, Zhiyun; Sun, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1) is a critical component of the Hippo signaling pathway, which regulates a variety of biological processes ranging from cell contact inhibition, organ size control, apoptosis and tumor suppression in mammals. Mst1 plays essential roles in the heart disease since its activation causes cardiomyocyte apoptosis and dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the mechanism underlying Mst1 activation in the heart remains unknown. In a yeast two-hybrid screen of a human heart cDNA library with Mst1 as bait, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was identified as an Mst1-interacting protein. The interaction of GAPDH with Mst1 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation in both co-transfected HEK293 cells and mouse heart homogenates, in which GAPDH interacted with the kinase domain of Mst1, whereas the C-terminal catalytic domain of GAPDH mediated its interaction with Mst1. Moreover, interaction of Mst1 with GAPDH caused a robust phosphorylation of GAPDH and markedly increased the Mst1 activity in cells. Chelerythrine, a potent inducer of apoptosis, substantially increased the nuclear translocation and interaction of GAPDH and Mst1 in cardiomyocytes. Overexpression of GAPDH significantly augmented the Mst1 mediated apoptosis, whereas knockdown of GAPDH markedly attenuated the Mst1 activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in response to either chelerythrine or hypoxia/reoxygenation. These findings reveal a novel function of GAPDH in Mst1 activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis and suggest that disruption of GAPDH interaction with Mst1 may prevent apoptosis related heart diseases such as heart failure and ischemic heart disease. PMID:23527007

  5. Diacylglycerol pyrophosphate binds and inhibits the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in barley aleurone.

    PubMed

    Astorquiza, Paula Luján; Usorach, Javier; Racagni, Graciela; Villasuso, Ana Laura

    2016-04-01

    The aleurona cell is a model that allows the study of the antagonistic effect of gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Previous results of our laboratory demonstrated the involvement of phospholipids during the response to ABA and GA. ABA modulates the levels of diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol pyrophosphate (DAG, PA, DGPP) through the activities of phosphatidate phosphatases, phospholipase D, diacylglycerol kinase and phosphatidate kinase (PAP, PLD, DGK and PAK). PA and DGPP are key phospholipids in the response to ABA, since both are capable of modifying the hydrolitic activity of the aleurona. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanism of action of these phospholipids during the ABA signal. DGPP is an anionic phospholipid with a pyrophosphate group attached to diacylglycerol. The ionization of the pyrophosphate group may be important to allow electrostatic interactions between DGPP and proteins. To understand how DGPP mediates cell functions in barley aleurone, we used a DGPP affinity membrane assay to isolate DGPP-binding proteins from Hordeum vulgare, followed by mass spectrometric sequencing. A cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12) was identified for being bound to DGPP. To validate our method, the relatively abundant GAPDH was characterized with respect to its lipid-binding properties, by fat western blot. GAPDH antibody interacts with proteins that only bind to DGPP and PA. We also observed that ABA treatment increased GAPDH abundance and enzyme activity. The presence of phospholipids during GAPDH reaction modulated the GAPDH activity in ABA treated aleurone. These data suggest that DGPP binds to GAPDH and this DGPP and GAPDH interaction provides new evidences in the study of DGPP-mediated ABA responses in barley aleurone. PMID:26866974

  6. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Aggregate Formation Participates in Oxidative Stress-induced Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Amano, Wataru; Kubo, Takeya; Fukuhara, Ayano; Ihara, Hideshi; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Tajima, Hisao; Inui, Takashi; Sawa, Akira; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2009-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH)2 is a classic glycolytic enzyme that also mediates cell death by its nuclear translocation under oxidative stress. Meanwhile, we previously presented that oxidative stress induced disulfide-bonded GAPDH aggregation in vitro. Here, we propose that GAPDH aggregate formation might participate in oxidative stress-induced cell death both in vitro and in vivo. We show that human GAPDH amyloid-like aggregate formation depends on the active site cysteine-152 (Cys-152) in vitro. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, treatment with dopamine decreases the cell viability concentration-dependently (IC50 = 202 μm). Low concentrations of dopamine (50–100 μm) mainly cause nuclear translocation of GAPDH, whereas the levels of GAPDH aggregates correlate with high concentrations of dopamine (200–300 μm)-induced cell death. Doxycycline-inducible overexpression of wild-type GAPDH in SH-SY5Y, but not the Cys-152-substituted mutant (C152A-GAPDH), accelerates cell death accompanying both endogenous and exogenous GAPDH aggregate formation in response to high concentrations of dopamine. Deprenyl, a blocker of GAPDH nuclear translocation, fails to inhibit the aggregation both in vitro and in cells but reduced cell death in SH-SY5Y treated with only a low concentration of dopamine (100 μm). These results suggest that GAPDH participates in oxidative stress-induced cell death via an alternative mechanism in which aggregation but not nuclear translocation of GAPDH plays a role. Moreover, we observe endogenous GAPDH aggregate formation in nigra-striatum dopaminergic neurons after methamphetamine treatment in mice. In transgenic mice overexpressing wild-type GAPDH, increased dopaminergic neuron loss and GAPDH aggregate formation are observed. These data suggest a critical role of GAPDH aggregates in oxidative stress-induced brain damage. PMID:19837666

  7. Glyphosate inhibition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate synthease from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, J.L.; Gaines, C.G.; Jensen, R.A.

    1984-07-01

    Treatment of isogenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana silvestris Speg, et Comes with glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) led to elevated levels of intracellular shikimate (364-fold increase by 1.0 millimolar glyphosate). In the presence of glyphosate, it is likely that most molecules of shikimate originate from the action of 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate (DAHP) synthase-Mn since this isozyme, in contrast to the DAHP synthase-Co isozyme, is insensitive to inhibition by glyphosate. 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate 3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase (EC 2.5.1.19) from N. silvestris was sensitive to micromolar concentrations of glyphosate and possessed a single inhibitor binding site. Rigorous kinetic studies of EPSP synthase required resolution from the multiple phosphatase activities present in crude extracts, a result achieved by ion-exchange column chromatography. Although EPSP synthase exhibited a broad pH profile (50% of maximal activity between pH 6.2 and 8.5), sensitivity to glyphosate increased dramatically with increasing pH within this range. In accordance with these data and the pK/sub a/ values of glyphosate, it is likely that the ionic form of glyphosate inhibiting EPSP synthase is COO/sup -/CH/sub 2/NH/sub 2//sup +/CH/sub 2/PO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and that a completely ionized phosphono group is essential for inhibition. At pH 7.0, inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphoenolpyruvate (K/sub i/ = 1.25 micromolar) and uncompetitive with respect to shikimate-3-P (K/sub i/ = 18.3 micromolar). All data were consistent with a mechanism of inhibition in which glyphosate competes with PEP for binding to an (enzyme:shikimate-3-P) complex and ultimately forms the dead-end complex of (enzyme:shikimate-3-P:glyphosate). 36 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  8. Ceramide 1-phosphate, a novel phospholipid in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. Synthesis via ceramide from sphingomyelin

    SciTech Connect

    Dressler, K.A.; Kolesnick, R.N. )

    1990-09-05

    Prior studies demonstrated that conversion of sphingomyelin to ceramide via sphingomyelinase action resulted in the generation of free sphingoid bases and inactivation of protein kinase C in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. The present studies define the novel phospholipid ceramide 1-phosphate in these cells and present evidence for formation of this compound by preferential utilization of ceramide derived from spingomyelin. A ceramide 1-phosphate standard, prepared enzymatically via diacylglycerol kinase, was utilized for localization. In cells labeled to equilibrium with 32Pi to label the head group of the molecule, the basal ceramide 1-phosphate level was 30 +/- 2 pmol/10(6) cells. Generation of ceramide via the use of exogenous sphingomyelinase resulted in time- and concentration-dependent formation of ceramide 1-phosphate. As little as 3.8 x 10(-5) units/ml was effective and a 3-fold increase was observed with a maximal concentration of 3.8 x 10(-2) units/ml; ED50 approximately 2 x 10(-4) units/ml. This effect was observed by 5 min and maximal at 30 min. Similarly, in cells labeled with (3H)serine to probe the sphingoid base backbone, the basal level of ceramide 1-phosphate was 39 +/- 5 pmol/10(6) and increased 2.5-fold with sphingomyelinase; ED 50 approximately 5 x 10(-5) units/ml. To determine the source of the phosphate moiety, studies were performed with cells short term labeled with 32Pi and resuspended in medium without radiolabel. Under these conditions, sphingomyelin was virtually unlabeled. Nevertheless, sphingomyelin (3.8 x 10(-2) units/ml) induced a 12-fold increase in radiolabel incorporation, suggesting ceramide 1-phosphate formation occurred via ceramide phosphorylation. This event appeared specific for ceramide derived from sphingomyelin since ceramide from glycosphingolipids was not converted to ceramide 1-phosphate.

  9. ESR-ENDOR studies of x-irradiated glucose-1-phosphate dipotassium salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locher, Sarah E.; Box, Harold C.

    1980-01-01

    Single crystals of the dipotassium salt of gluocose-1-phosphate were grown out of water or deuterium oxide and x-irradiated at 4.2 °K. The products of irradiation were identified by means of ESR and ENDOR spectroscopy. In crystals grown out of water, three different alkoxy radicals were observed as oxidation products. In partially deuterated crystals only one of the aforementioned alkoxy radicals was produced. A hydroxyalkyl radical, RHĊOH was also produced by loss of hydrogen from the C6' position. Electrons trapped at intermolecular sites were identified. The distances between the electron and the protons of the polar hydroxy groups forming the trap were deduced from ENDOR measurements and found to be relatively large, namely 1.732 and 1.738 Å.

  10. Controlled release of sphingosine-1-phosphate agonist with gelatin hydrogels for macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masahiro; Saito, Takashi; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to design a drug delivery system (DDS) for the in vivo promotion of macrophage recruitment. As the drug, a water-insoluble agonist of sphingosine-1-phosphate type 1 receptor (SEW2871) was selected. SEW2871 (SEW) was water-solubilized by micelle formation with gelatin grafted by L-lactic acid oligomer. SEW micelles were mixed with gelatin, followed by dehydrothermal crosslinking of gelatin to obtain gelatin hydrogels incorporating SEW micelles. SEW was released from the hydrogels incorporating SEW micelles in vitro and in vivo. The water-solubilized SEW showed in vitro macrophage migration activity. When implanted into the back subcutis or the skin wound defect of mice, the hydrogel incorporating SEW micelles promoted macrophage migration toward the tissue around the implanted site to a significantly great extent compared with SEW-free hydrogel and that mixed with SEW micelles. The hydrogel is a promising DDS to enhance macrophage recruitment in vivo. PMID:25038462

  11. Expanding the Nucleotide and Sugar 1-Phosphate Promiscuity of Nucleotidyltransferase RmlA via Directed Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, Rocco; Chang, Aram; Peltier-Pain, Pauline; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Thorson, Jon S.

    2012-03-15

    Directed evolution is a valuable technique to improve enzyme activity in the absence of a priori structural knowledge, which can be typically enhanced via structure-guided strategies. In this study, a combination of both whole-gene error-prone polymerase chain reaction and site-saturation mutagenesis enabled the rapid identification of mutations that improved RmlA activity toward non-native substrates. These mutations have been shown to improve activities over 10-fold for several targeted substrates, including non-native pyrimidine- and purine-based NTPs as well as non-native d- and l-sugars (both a- and b-isomers). This study highlights the first broadly applicable high throughput sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidyltransferase screen and the first proof of concept for the directed evolution of this enzyme class toward the identification of uniquely permissive RmlA variants.

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate as a potential target for the treatment of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Waeber, Christian; Walther, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in the heart, with particular emphasis on how it could be modulated therapeutically in the context of myocardial infarction (MI). After a brief general description of sphingolipid metabolism and signaling, this review will examine the relationship between S1P and the beneficial effects of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and finally focus on the known actions of S1P on different mechanisms relevant to MI pathophysiology (cardiomyocyte protection, fibrosis, remodeling, arrhythmia, control of vascular tone and potential repair mechanisms). The potential of particular enzyme isoforms or receptor subtypes for the development of therapeutic agents for MI will also be explored.  PMID:24632793

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase in development and disease: Sphingolipid metabolism takes flight

    PubMed Central

    Fyrst, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SPL) is a highly conserved enzyme that catalyses the final step of sphingolipid degradation, namely the irreversible cleavage of the carbon chain at position 2-3 of a long chain base phosphate (LCBP), thereby yielding a long-chain aldehyde and phosphoethanolamine. LCBPs are potent signaling molecules involved in cell proliferation, survival, migration, cell-cell interactions and cell stress responses. Therefore, tight regulation of LCBP signaling is required for proper cell function, and perturbations of this system can lead to alterations in biological processes including development, reproduction and physiology. SPL is a key enzyme in regulating the intracellular and circulating levels of LCBPs and is, therefore, gaining attention as a putative target for pharmacological intervention. This review provides an overview of our current understanding of SPL structure and function, mechanisms involved in SPL regulation and the role of SPL in development and disease. PMID:18558101

  14. STAT3 and sphingosine-1-phosphate in inflammation-associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Andrew V; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Lin, Elaine Y

    2014-01-01

    Accumulated evidences have demonstrated that signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a critical link between inflammation and cancer. Multiple studies have indicated that persistent activation of STAT3 in epithelial/tumor cells in inflammation-associated colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor signaling. In inflammatory response whereby interleukin (IL)-6 production is abundant, STAT3-mediated pathways were found to promote the activation of sphingosine kinases (SphK1 and SphK2) leading to the production of S1P. Reciprocally, S1P encourages the activation of STAT3 through a positive autocrine-loop signaling. The crosstalk between IL-6, STAT3 and sphingolipid regulated pathways may play an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression in inflamed intestines. Therapeutics targeting both STAT3 and sphingolipid are therefore likely to contribute novel and more effective therapeutic strategies against inflammation-associated CRC. PMID:25132744

  15. Atheroprotective role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P).

    PubMed

    Potì, Francesco; Simoni, Manuela; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch

    2014-08-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies documented an inverse relationship between plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and the extent of atherosclerotic disease. However, clinical interventions targeting HDL cholesterol failed to show clinical benefits with respect to cardiovascular risk reduction, suggesting that HDL components distinct from cholesterol may account for anti-atherogenic effects attributed to this lipoprotein. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-a lysosphingolipid exerting its biological activity via binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors and regulating a wide array of biological responses in a variety of different organs and tissues including the cardiovascular system-has been identified as an integral constituent of HDL particles. In the present review, we discuss current evidence from epidemiological studies, experimental approaches in vitro, and animal models of atherosclerosis, suggesting that S1P contributes to atheroprotective effects exerted by HDL particles. PMID:24891400

  16. The outs and the ins of sphingosine-1-phosphate in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Sarah; Milstien, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    The potent lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is produced inside cells by two closely related kinases, sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) and SPHK2, and has emerged as a crucial regulator of immunity. Many of the actions of S1P in innate and adaptive immunity are mediated by its binding to five G protein-coupled receptors, designated S1PR1–5, but recent findings have also identified important roles for S1P as a second messenger during inflammation. In this Review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the roles of S1P receptors and describe the newly identified intracellular targets of S1P that are crucial for immune responses. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of new drugs that target S1P signalling and functions. PMID:21546914

  17. A map of the distribution of sphingosine 1-phosphate in the spleen.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Perez, Willy D; Fang, Victoria; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Cammer, Michael; Schwab, Susan R

    2015-12-01

    Despite the importance of signaling lipids, many questions remain about their function because few tools are available for charting lipid gradients in vivo. Here we generated a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) reporter mouse and used this mouse to define the distribution of S1P in the spleen. Unexpectedly, the presence of blood did not serve as a predictor of the concentration of signaling-available S1P. Large areas of the red pulp had low concentrations of S1P, while S1P was sensed by cells inside the white pulp near the marginal sinus. The lipid phosphate phosphatase LPP3 maintained low S1P concentrations in the spleen and enabled efficient shuttling of marginal zone B cells. The exquisitely tight regulation of S1P availability might explain how a single lipid can simultaneously orchestrate the movements of many cells of the immune system. PMID:26502404

  18. The stereochemical configuration of lysobisphosphatidic acid from rat liver, rabbit lung and pig lung.

    PubMed

    Joutti, A; Brotherus, J; Renkonen, O; Laine, R; Fischer, W

    1976-11-19

    Lysobisphosphatidic acid known also as bis(monoacyl-glycerol)phosphate, was isolated from liver of rats treated with Triton WR1339, and from rabbit and pig lung. Alkaline hydrolysates of all these samples of lysobisphosphatidic acid were essentially similar and contained phosphorus, total glycerol, free glycerol, total glycerophosphates, beta-glycerophosphate, total alpha-glycerophosphates, sn-glycero-1-phosphate and sn-glycero-3-phosphate in a molar ratio of 1.0 : 2.0 : 1.0 : 1.0 :0.6 : 0.4 : 0.38 : 0.04. This proves that the backbone of the principal lysobisphosphatidic acid from all three sources has the structure of 1-sn-glycerophospho-1-sn-glycerol. PMID:990300

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase from the model brown alga Ectocarpus sp.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Patricia; Groisillier, Agnès; Raimbault, Alice; Guibert, Anaïs; Boyen, Catherine; Tonon, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    The sugar alcohol mannitol is important in the food, pharmaceutical, medical and chemical industries. It is one of the most commonly occurring polyols in nature, with the exception of Archaea and animals. It has a range of physiological roles, including as carbon storage, compatible solute, and osmolyte. Mannitol is present in large amounts in brown algae, where its synthesis involved two steps: a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase (M1PDH) catalyzes a reversible reaction between fructose-6-phosphate (F6P) and mannitol-1-phosphate (M1P) (EC 1.1.1.17), and a mannitol-1-phosphatase hydrolyzes M1P to mannitol (EC 3.1.3.22). Analysis of the model brown alga Ectocarpus sp. genome provided three candidate genes for M1PDH activities. We report here the sequence analysis of Ectocarpus M1PDHs (EsM1PDHs), and the biochemical characterization of the recombinant catalytic domain of EsM1PDH1 (EsM1PDH1cat). Ectocarpus M1PDHs are representatives of a new type of modular M1PDHs among the polyol-specific long-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (PSLDRs). The N-terminal domain of EsM1PDH1 was not necessary for enzymatic activity. Determination of kinetic parameters indicated that EsM1PDH1cat displayed higher catalytic efficiency for F6P reduction compared to M1P oxidation. Both activities were influenced by NaCl concentration and inhibited by the thioreactive compound pHMB. These observations were completed by measurement of endogenous M1PDH activity and of EsM1PDH gene expression during one diurnal cycle. No significant changes in enzyme activity were monitored between day and night, although transcription of two out of three genes was altered, suggesting different levels of regulation for this key metabolic pathway in brown algal physiology. PMID:26232554

  20. Advance in the Study of the Mechanisms Regulated by Sphingosine-1-Phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fei; Kong, Xiangqian; Luo, Cheng

    2010-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid messenger in the cells that regulate gene expression and NF-KB signal pathway through unknown mechanisms. Recently, Cheng Luo, associate professor of DDDC in Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, whose project was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, joined in a research team led by Professor Sarah Spiegel of Virginia Commonwealth University. The team continuously made significant breakthroughs in understanding the regulation mechanism of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate. In September 2009, in a paper published on SCIENCE magazine (Science 2009, 325: 1254-7), they firstly demonstrated that S1P is a physiologically important regulator of histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs are direct intracellular targets of S1P. Furthermore, they identified the mechanism that S1P regulates gene expression through regulating the activity of HDACs. In June 24th, 2010, in another paper to be published on NATURE magazine (Nature 2010, June 24th, advance online publication) which reports the regulation of NF-KB signaling pathway by S1P. They demonstrate that S1P is the missing cofactor for TRAF2 (tumour-necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2) and indicate a new paradigm for the regulation of lysine-63-linked poly-ubiquitination. The study also highlight the key role of SphK1 and its product S1P in TNF-α signalling and the canonical NF-KB activation pathway, and then play crucial role in inflammatory, antiapoptotic and immune processes. The identification of new mechanisms by which S1P regulates gene expression and TNF and NF-KB signaling pathway will light up the road to develop novel inhibitors that might be useful for treatment of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  1. Purification and characterisation of acyl-CoA: glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) tissues.

    PubMed

    Manaf, A M; Harwood, J L

    2000-01-01

    Glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, EC 2.3.15) catalyses the first step of the Kennedy pathway for acyl lipid formation. This enzyme was studied using high-speed particulate fractions from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) tissue cultures and mesocarp acetone powders. The fractions were incubated with [(14)C]glycerol 3-phosphate and incorporation of radioactivity into Kennedy pathway intermediates studied. Optimal conditions were broadly similar between the two preparations but those from fruit mesocarp clearly contained more active enzymes for the subsequent stages of the Kennedy pathway - as exemplified by the appreciable accumulation of radioactivity in triacylglycerol. Experiments with different acyl-CoA substrates showed that the GPAT in both high-speed particulate preparations had a significant preference for palmitate. Glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase was solubilised from both preparations with optimal solubilisation being achieved at 0.5% (w/v) CHAPS concentrations. Solubilised GPATs were purified further using DE52 ion-exchange chromatography and Sephadex G-100 molecular exclusion chromatography. Purifications of up to about 70-fold were achieved. The purified GPATs showed a strong preference for palmitoyl-CoA compared to other acyl-CoA donors, in keeping with the importance of palmitate in palm oil. PMID:10664139

  2. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase TbGAT is Dispensable for Viability and the Synthesis of Glycerolipids in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nipul; Pirani, Karim A; Zhu, Tongtong; Cheung-See-Kit, Melanie; Lee, Sungsu; Chen, Daniel G; Zufferey, Rachel

    2016-09-01

    Glycerolipids are the main constituents of biological membranes in Trypanosoma brucei, which causes sleeping sickness in humans. Importantly, they occur as a structural component of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol lipid anchor of the abundant cell surface glycoproteins procyclin in procyclic forms and variant surface glycoprotein in bloodstream form, that play crucial roles for the development of the parasite in the insect vector and the mammalian host, respectively. The present work reports the characterization of the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase TbGAT that initiates the biosynthesis of ester glycerolipids. TbGAT restored glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity when expressed in a Leishmania major deletion strain lacking this activity and exhibited preference for medium length, unsaturated fatty acyl-CoAs. TbGAT localized to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane with its N-terminal domain facing the cytosol. Despite that a TbGAT null mutant in T. brucei procyclic forms lacked glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity, it remained viable and exhibited similar growth rate as the wild type. TbGAT was dispensable for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and GPI-anchored protein procyclin. However, the null mutant exhibited a slight decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis that was compensated with a modest increase in production of ether phosphatidylcholine. Our data suggest that an alternative initial acyltransferase takes over TbGAT's function in its absence. PMID:26909872

  3. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is inactivated by S-sulfuration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Artur P; Wei, Wanlei; Gauld, James W; Auld, Janeen; Özcan, Filiz; Aslan, Mutay; Mutus, Bulent

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced enzymatically by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), as well as other enzymes in mammalian tissues. These discoveries have led to the crowning of H2S as yet another toxic gas that serves as a gasotransmitter like NO and CO. H2S is thought to exert its biological effects through its reaction with cysteine thiols in proteins, yielding sulfurated thiol (-SSH) derivatives. One of the first proteins shown to be modified by H2S was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) [1] where the S-sulfuration of the active site cysteine (Cys 152) resulted in ~7-fold increase in the activity of the enzyme. In the present study we have attempted to reproduce this result with no success. GAPDH in its reduced, or hydrogen peroxide, or glutathione disulfide, or nitrosonium oxidized forms was reacted with sulfide or polysulfides. Sulfide had no effect on reduced GAPDH activity, while polysulfides inhibited GAPDH to ~42% of control. S-sulfuration of GAPDH occurred at Cys 247 after sulfide treatment, Cys 156 and Cys 247 after polysulfide treatment. No evidence of S-sulfuration at active site Cys 152 was discovered. Both sulfide and polysulfide was able to restore the activity of glutathione disulfide oxidized GAPDH, but not to control untreated levels. Treatment of glutathione disulfide oxidized GAPDH with polysulfide also produced S-sulfuration of Cys 156. Treatment of a C156S mutant of GAPDH with sulfide and polysulfide resulted in S-sulfuration of Cys 152, which also caused a decrease and not an increase in enzymatic activity. Computational chemistry shows S-sulfuration of Cys 156 may affect the position of catalytic Cys 152, raising its pKa by 0.5, which may affect the nucleophilicity of Cys 152. The current study raises significant questions about the reported ability of H2S to activate GAPDH by the sulfuration of its active site thiol, and indicates that polysulfide is a stronger protein S-sulfurating agent

  4. Sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Weber, Jana; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-01

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent, which is acutely toxic to a variety of organ systems including skin, eyes, respiratory system and bone marrow. The underlying molecular pathomechanism was mainly attributed to the alkylating properties of SM. However, recent studies have revealed that cellular responses to SM exposure are of more complex nature and include increased protein expression and protein modifications that can be used as biomarkers. In order to confirm already known biomarkers, to detect potential new ones and to further elucidate the pathomechanism of SM, we conducted large-scale proteomic experiments based on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) exposed to SM. Surprisingly, our analysis identified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as one of the up-regulated proteins after exposure of HaCaT cells to SM. In this paper we demonstrate the sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH in HaCaT cells by 2D gel-electrophoresis (2D GE), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western Blot (WB) and a combination thereof. 2D GE in combination with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis identified GAPDH as an up-regulated protein after SM exposure. Immunocytochemistry revealed a distinct nuclear translocation of GAPDH after exposure to 300μM SM. This finding was confirmed by fractionated WB analysis. 2D GE and subsequent immunoblot staining of GAPDH demonstrated two different spot locations of GAPH (pI 7.0 and pI 8.5) that are related to cytosolic or nuclear GAPDH respectively. After exposure to 300μM SM a significant increase of nuclear GAPDH at pI 8.5 occurred. Nuclear GAPDH has been associated with apoptosis, detection of structural DNA alterations, DNA repair and regulation of genomic integrity and telomere structure. The results of our study add new aspects to the pathophysiology of sulfur mustard toxicity, yet further studies will be necessary to reveal the specific function of nuclear GAPDH in the pathomechanism of sulfur mustard

  5. Biosynthesis of archaeal membrane ether lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Samta; Caforio, Antonella; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2014-01-01

    A vital function of the cell membrane in all living organism is to maintain the membrane permeability barrier and fluidity. The composition of the phospholipid bilayer is distinct in archaea when compared to bacteria and eukarya. In archaea, isoprenoid hydrocarbon side chains are linked via an ether bond to the sn-glycerol-1-phosphate backbone. In bacteria and eukarya on the other hand, fatty acid side chains are linked via an ester bond to the sn-glycerol-3-phosphate backbone. The polar head groups are globally shared in the three domains of life. The unique membrane lipids of archaea have been implicated not only in the survival and adaptation of the organisms to extreme environments but also to form the basis of the membrane composition of the last universal common ancestor (LUCA). In nature, a diverse range of archaeal lipids is found, the most common are the diether (or archaeol) and the tetraether (or caldarchaeol) lipids that form a monolayer. Variations in chain length, cyclization and other modifications lead to diversification of these lipids. The biosynthesis of these lipids is not yet well understood however progress in the last decade has led to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of archaeol. This review describes the current knowledge of the biosynthetic pathway of archaeal ether lipids; insights on the stability and robustness of archaeal lipid membranes; and evolutionary aspects of the lipid divide and the LUCA. It examines recent advances made in the field of pathway reconstruction in bacteria. PMID:25505460

  6. Essential Role of Class II Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-C2α in Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor-1-mediated Signaling and Migration in Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Kuntal; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Asanuma, Ken; Okamoto, Yasuo; Takuwa, Noriko; Sasaki, Takehiko; Takuwa, Yoh

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) 3-kinase (PI3K) family regulates diverse cellular processes, including cell proliferation, migration, and vesicular trafficking, through catalyzing 3′-phosphorylation of phosphoinositides. In contrast to class I PI3Ks, including p110α and p110β, functional roles of class II PI3Ks, comprising PI3K-C2α, PI3K-C2β, and PI3K-C2γ, are little understood. The lysophospholipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) plays the important roles in regulating vascular functions, including vascular formation and barrier integrity, via the G-protein-coupled receptors S1P1–3. We studied the roles of PI3K-C2α in S1P-induced endothelial cell (EC) migration and tube formation. S1P stimulated cell migration and activation of Akt, ERK, and Rac1, the latter of which acts as a signaling molecule essential for cell migration and tube formation, via S1P1 in ECs. Knockdown of either PI3K-C2α or class I p110β markedly inhibited S1P-induced migration, lamellipodium formation, and tube formation, whereas that of p110α or Vps34 did not. Only p110β was necessary for S1P-iduced Akt activation, but both PI3K-C2α and p110β were required for Rac1 activation. FRET imaging showed that S1P induced Rac1 activation in both the plasma membrane and PtdIns 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P)-enriched endosomes. Knockdown of PI3K-C2α but not p110β markedly reduced PtdIns(3)P-enriched endosomes and suppressed endosomal Rac1 activation. Also, knockdown of PI3K-C2α but not p110β suppressed S1P-induced S1P1 internalization into PtdIns(3)P-enriched endosomes. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of endocytosis suppressed S1P-induced S1P1 internalization, Rac1 activation, migration, and tube formation. These observations indicate that PI3K-C2α plays the crucial role in S1P1 internalization into the intracellular vesicular compartment, Rac1 activation on endosomes, and thereby migration through regulating vesicular trafficking in ECs. PMID:23192342

  7. Tumor-suppressive sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 counteracting tumor-promoting sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 and sphingosine kinase 1 — Jekyll Hidden behind Hyde

    PubMed Central

    Takuwa, Noriko; Du, Wa; Kaneko, Erika; Okamoto, Yasuo; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Takuwa, Yoh

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a plasma lipid mediator with multiple roles in mammalian development, physiology and pathophysiology. It is constitutively produced mostly by erythrocytes by the action of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), resulting in high (∼0.5 micromolar) steady-state plasma S1P content and steep S1P concentration gradient imposed between plasma/lymph/tissue interstitial fluid. S1P is also locally produced by activated platelets and tumor cells, in the latter case SphK1 is a downstream target of activated Ras mutant and hypoxia, and is frequently upregulated especially in advanced stages of tumors. Most if not all of the S1P actions in vertebrates are mediated through evolutionarily conserved G protein-coupled S1P receptor family. Ubiquitously expressed mammalian subtypes S1PR1, S1PR2 and S1PR3 mediate pleiotropic actions of S1P in diverse cell types, through coupling to distinctive repertoire of heterotrimeric G proteins. S1PR1 and S1PR3 mediate directed cell migration toward S1P through coupling to Gi and activating Rac, a Rho family small G protein essential for cell migration. Indeed, S1PR1 expressed in lymphocytes directs their egress from lymph nodes into lymph and recirculation, serving as the target for downregulation by the immunosuppressant FTY720 (fingolimod). S1PR1 in endothelial cells plays an essential role in vascular maturation in embryonic stage, and mediates angiogenic and vascular protective roles of S1P which include eNOS activation and maintenance of barrier integrity. It is likely that S1PR1 and SphK1 expressed in host endothelial cells and tumor cells act in concert in a paracrine loop to contribute to tumor angiogenesis, tumor invasion and progression. In sharp contrast, S1PR2 mediates S1P inhibition of Rac at the site downstream of G12/13-mediated Rho activation, thus identified as the first G protein-coupled receptor that negatively regulates Rac and cell migration. S1PR2 could also mediate inhibition of Akt and cell

  8. Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase Enzyme Activity by Liquid Chromatography–Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of galactosemia usually involves the measurement of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) activity. Traditional radioactive and fluorescent GALT assays are nonspecific, laborious, and/or lack sufficient analytical sensitivity. We developed a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)–based assay for GALT enzyme activity measurement. Method Our assay used stable isotope-labeled α-galactose-1-phosphate ([13C6]-Gal-1-P) as an enzyme substrate. Sample cleanup and separation were achieved by reversed-phase ion-pair chromatography, and the enzymatic product, isotope-labeled uridine diphosphate galactose ([13C6]-UDPGal), was detected by MS/MS at mass transition (571 > 323) and quantified by use of [13C6]-Glu-1-P (265 > 79) as an internal standard. Results The method yielded a mean (SD) GALT enzyme activity of 23.8 (3.8) µmol · (gHgb)−1 · h−1 in erythrocyte extracts from 71 controls. The limit of quantification was 0.04 µmol · (g Hgb)−1 · h−1 (0.2% of normal control value). Intraassay imprecision was determined at 4 different levels (100%, 25%, 5%, and 0.2% of the normal control values), and the CVs were calculated to be 2.1%, 2.5%, 4.6%, and 9.7%, respectively (n = 3). Interassay imprecision CVs were 4.5%, 6.7%, 8.2%, and 13.2% (n = 5), respectively. The assay recoveries at the 4 levels were higher than 90%. The apparent Km of the 2 substrates, Gal-1-P and UDPGlc, were determined to be 0.38 mmol/L and 0.071 mmol/L, respectively. The assay in erythrocytes of 33 patients with classical galactosemia revealed no detectable activity. Conclusions This LC-MS/MS–based assay for GALT enzyme activity will be useful for the diagnosis and study of biochemically heterogeneous patients with galactosemia, especially those with uncommon genotypes and detectable but low residual activities. PMID:20348403

  9. Effects of chemotherapy agents on Sphingosine-1-Phosphate receptors expression in MCF-7 mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, P; Sukocheva, O A; Wang, T; Mayne, G C; Watson, D I; Hussey, D J

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent bioactive sphingolipid involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and cancer progression. Increased expression of S1P receptors has been detected in advanced breast tumours with poor prognosis suggesting that S1P receptors might control tumour response to chemotherapy. However, it remains unclear how the levels of S1P receptor expression are influenced by chemotherapy agents. Western immunoblotting, PCR analysis and fluorescent microscopy techniques were used in this study to analyze expression patterns of S1P receptors 2 and 3 (S1P2/S1P3) in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells treated by Tamoxifen (TAM) and/or Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). We found that TAM/MPA induce downregulation of S1P3 receptors, but stimulate expression of S1P2. According to cell viability and caspase activity analyses, as expected, TAM activated apoptosis. We also detected TAM/MPA-induced autophagy marked by formation of macroautophagosomes and increased level of Beclin 1. Combined application of TAM and MPA resulted in synergistic apoptosis- and autophagy-stimulating effects. Assessed by fluorescent microscopy with autophagosome marker LAMP-2, changes in S1P receptor expression coincided with activation of autophagy, suggestively, directing breast cancer cells towards death. Further studies are warranted to explore the utility of manipulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptor expression as a novel treatment approach. PMID:27261597

  10. Emerging role of sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nema, Rajeev; Vishwakarma, Supriya; Agarwal, Rahul; Panday, Rajendra Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most frequent cancer type, with an annual incidence of approximately half a million people worldwide. It has a high recurrence rate and an extremely low survival rate. This is due to limited availability of effective therapies to reduce the rate of recurrence, resulting in high morbidity and mortality of patients with advanced stages of the disease. HNSCC often develops resistance to chemotherapy and targeted drug therapy. Thus, to overcome the problem of drug resistance, there is a need to explore novel drug targets. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in inflammation, tumor progression, and angiogenesis. S1P is synthesized intracellularly by two sphingosine kinases (SphKs). It can be exported to the extracellular space, where it can activate a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Alternatively, S1P can act as an intracellular second messenger. SphK1 regulates tumor progression, invasion, metastasis, and chemoresistance in HNSCC. SphK1 expression is highly elevated in advanced stage HNSCC tumors and correlates with poor survival. In this article, we review current knowledge regarding the role of S1P receptors and enzymes of S1P metabolism in HNSCC carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we summarize the current perspectives on therapeutic approaches for targeting S1P pathway for treating HNSCC. PMID:27330306

  11. Spinster 2, a sphingosine-1-phosphate transporter, plays a critical role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Donoviel, Michael S; Hait, Nitai C; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Maceyka, Michael; Takabe, Kazuaki; Milstien, Sheldon; Oravecz, Tamas; Spiegel, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic bioactive sphingolipid metabolite that regulates numerous processes important for immune responses. S1P is made within cells and must be transported out of cells to exert its effects through activation of 5 specific cell surface GPCRs in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Spinster 2 (Spns2) transports S1P out of cells, and its deletion in mice reduces circulating levels of S1P, alters immune cell trafficking, and induces lymphopenia. Here we examined the effects of Spns2 deletion on adaptive immune responses and in autoimmune disease models. Airway inflammation and hypersensitivity as well as delayed-type contact hypersensitivity were attenuated in Spns2(-/-) mice. Similarly, Spns2 deletion reduced dextran sodium sulfate- and oxazolone-induced colitis. Intriguingly, Spns2(-/-) mice were protected from the development of experimental autoimmune encephalopathy, a model of the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis. Deletion of Spns2 also strongly alleviated disease development in collagen-induced arthritis. These results point to a broad role for Spns2-mediated S1P transport in the initiation and development of adaptive immune related disorders. PMID:26324848

  12. Emerging biology of sphingosine-1-phosphate: its role in pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Proia, Richard L.; Hla, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Membrane sphingolipids are metabolized to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates many processes in vertebrate development, physiology, and pathology. Once exported out of cells by cell-specific transporters, chaperone-bound S1P is spatially compartmentalized in the circulatory system. Extracellular S1P interacts with five GPCRs that are widely expressed and transduce intracellular signals to regulate cellular behavior, such as migration, adhesion, survival, and proliferation. While many organ systems are affected, S1P signaling is essential for vascular development, neurogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. Recently, a pharmacological S1P receptor antagonist has won approval to control autoimmune neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis. The availability of pharmacological tools as well as mouse genetic models has revealed several physiological actions of S1P and begun to shed light on its pathological roles. The unique mode of signaling of this lysophospholipid mediator is providing novel opportunities for therapeutic intervention, with possibilities to target not only GPCRs but also transporters, metabolic enzymes, and chaperones. PMID:25831442

  13. Platelet-derived sphingosine-1-phosphate and inflammation: from basic mechanisms to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Vito, Clara Di; Hadi, Loubna Abdel; Navone, Stefania Elena; Marfia, Giovanni; Campanella, Rolando; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Riboni, Laura

    2016-07-01

    Beyond key functions in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are recognized as key players of inflammation, an underlying feature of a variety of diseases. In this regard, platelets act as a circulating source of several pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules, which are secreted from their intracellular stores upon activation. Among them, mounting evidence highlights a crucial role of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a multifunctional sphingoid mediator. S1P-induced pleiotropic effects include those crucial in inflammatory processes, such as the maintenance of the endothelial barrier integrity, and leukocyte activation and recruitment at the injured site. This review outlines the peculiar features and molecular mechanisms that allow platelets for acting as a unique factory that produces and stores S1P in large quantities. A particular emphasis is placed on the autocrine and paracrine roles of S1P derived from the "inflamed" platelets, highlighting the role of its cross-talk with endothelial and blood cells involved in inflammation, and the mechanisms of its contribution to the development and progression of inflammatory diseases. Finally, potential clinical implications of platelet-derived S1P as diagnostic tool of inflammatory severity, and as therapeutic target in inflammation are discussed. PMID:26950429

  14. Rational nanoconjugation improves biocatalytic performance of enzymes: aldol addition catalyzed by immobilized rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Ardao, Inés; Comenge, Joan; Benaiges, M Dolors; Álvaro, Gregorio; Puntes, Víctor F

    2012-04-17

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are attractive materials for the immobilization of enzymes due to several advantages such as high enzyme loading, absence of internal diffusion limitations, and Brownian motion in solution, compared to the conventional immobilization onto porous macroscopic supports. The affinity of AuNPs to different groups present at the protein surface enables direct enzyme binding to the nanoparticle without the need of any coupling agent. Enzyme activity and stability appear to be improved when the biocatalyst is immobilized onto AuNPs. Rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase (RhuA) was selected as model enzyme for the immobilization onto AuNPs. The enzyme loading was characterized by four different techniques: surface plasmon resonance (SPR) shift and intensity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AuNPs-RhuA complexes were further applied as biocatalyst of the aldol addition reaction between dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and (S)-Cbz-alaninal during two reaction cycles. In these conditions, an improved reaction yield and selectivity, together with a fourfold activity enhancement were observed, as compared to soluble RhuA. PMID:22428999

  15. Extracellular Matrix Rigidity-dependent Sphingosine-1-phosphate Secretion Regulates Metastatic Cancer Cell Invasion and Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Panseon; Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Jung, Jangho; Oh, Somi; Kim, Jaehyun; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment is critical for cancer progression via changes in cellular behavior including alteration of secreted molecules. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence exerted by the cancer microenvironment on secretion of molecules during cancer progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that secretion of spingsine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its regulator, SphK1 expression is dependent of the substrate rigidity, which is critical for the balance between cancer cell invasion and adhesion. Conditioned media (CM) of MDA-MB-231, an aggressive breast cancer cell obtained from soft substrate (~0.5 kPa) induced chemo-attractive invasion, while CM obtained from stiff substrate (~2.5 kPa) increased cell adhesion instead. We found that the expression of SphK1 is upregulated in the stiff substrate, resulting in an increase in S1P levels in the CM. We also found that upregulation of SphK1 expression in the stiff substrate is dominant in metastatic cancer cells but not in primary cancer cells. These results suggest that alterations in the mechanical environment of the ECM surrounding the tumor cells actively regulate cellular properties such as secretion, which in turn, may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:26877098

  16. Calcitonin controls bone formation by inhibiting the release of sphingosine 1-phosphate from osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Johannes; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Huebner, Antje K.; Jeschke, Anke; Heckt, Timo; Lueth, Anja; Krause, Matthias; Koehne, Till; Albers, Joachim; Schulze, Jochen; Schilling, Sarah; Haberland, Michael; Denninger, Hannah; Neven, Mona; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Streichert, Thomas; Breer, Stefan; Barvencik, Florian; Levkau, Bodo; Rathkolb, Birgit; Wolf, Eckhard; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Neff, Frauke; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Klutmann, Susanne; Tsourdi, Elena; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Kleuser, Burkhard; Chun, Jerold; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The hormone calcitonin (CT) is primarily known for its pharmacologic action as an inhibitor of bone resorption, yet CT-deficient mice display increased bone formation. These findings raised the question about the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism of CT action. Here we show that either ubiquitous or osteoclast-specific inactivation of the murine CT receptor (CTR) causes increased bone formation. CT negatively regulates the osteoclast expression of Spns2 gene, which encodes a transporter for the signaling lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). CTR-deficient mice show increased S1P levels, and their skeletal phenotype is normalized by deletion of the S1P receptor S1P3. Finally, pharmacologic treatment with the non-selective S1P receptor agonist FTY720 causes increased bone formation in wildtype, but not in S1P3-deficient mice. This study redefines the role of CT in skeletal biology, confirms that S1P acts as an osteoanabolic molecule in vivo, and provides evidence for a pharmacologically exploitable crosstalk between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. PMID:25333900

  17. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 2 Regulates the Migration, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Price, S Tucker; Beckham, Thomas H; Cheng, Joseph C; Lu, Ping; Liu, Xiang; Norris, James S

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a multipotent cell population acquired most prominently from bone marrow with the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and others. MSCs demonstrate the capacity to home to sites of injury and contribute to tissue repair. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a biologically active sphingolipid impacting proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation, and angiogenesis with changes in S1P concentration providing significant implications for various disease conditions including cancer, diabetes, and cardiac disease. These functions are primarily mediated by interactions with 5 G-protein coupled S1P receptors (S1PR1-5). In this paper, we demonstrate that inhibition of S1PR2 results in increased MSC clonogenicity, migration, and proliferation; features dependent on Erk phosphorylation. Furthermore, decreased S1PR2 expression decreases the differentiation of MSCs into adipocytes and mature osteoblasts that may be the result of increased expression of MSC pluripotency factors including Nanog, Sox-9, and Oct-4. Inhibition of S1PR1 and S1PR3 in contrast does not impact MSC migration or Erk activation although increased proliferation is observed. In the study, we describe the essential role of S1PR2 in MSC differentiation pathways through modification of pluripotency factors. We propose a MAPK dependent mechanism through S1PR2 inhibition that promotes equally multipotent MSC proliferation.

  18. Emerging biology of sphingosine-1-phosphate: its role in pathogenesis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Proia, Richard L; Hla, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sphingolipids are metabolized to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid mediator that regulates many processes in vertebrate development, physiology, and pathology. Once exported out of cells by cell-specific transporters, chaperone-bound S1P is spatially compartmentalized in the circulatory system. Extracellular S1P interacts with five GPCRs that are widely expressed and transduce intracellular signals to regulate cellular behavior, such as migration, adhesion, survival, and proliferation. While many organ systems are affected, S1P signaling is essential for vascular development, neurogenesis, and lymphocyte trafficking. Recently, a pharmacological S1P receptor antagonist has won approval to control autoimmune neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis. The availability of pharmacological tools as well as mouse genetic models has revealed several physiological actions of S1P and begun to shed light on its pathological roles. The unique mode of signaling of this lysophospholipid mediator is providing novel opportunities for therapeutic intervention, with possibilities to target not only GPCRs but also transporters, metabolic enzymes, and chaperones. PMID:25831442

  19. Hemovascular Progenitors in the Kidney Require Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 1 for Vascular Development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan; Li, Minghong; Göthert, Joachim R; Gomez, R Ariel; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S

    2016-07-01

    The close relationship between endothelial and hematopoietic precursors during early development of the vascular system suggested the possibility of a common yet elusive precursor for both cell types. Whether similar or related progenitors for endothelial and hematopoietic cells are present during organogenesis is unclear. Using inducible transgenic mice that specifically label endothelial and hematopoietic precursors, we performed fate-tracing studies combined with colony-forming assays and crosstransplantation studies. We identified a progenitor, marked by the expression of helix-loop-helix transcription factor stem cell leukemia (SCL/Tal1). During organogenesis of the kidney, SCL/Tal1(+) progenitors gave rise to endothelium and blood precursors with multipotential colony-forming capacity. Furthermore, appropriate morphogenesis of the kidney vasculature, including glomerular capillary development, arterial mural cell coating, and lymphatic vessel development, required sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling via the G protein-coupled S1P receptor 1 in these progenitors. Overall, these results show that SCL/Tal1(+) progenitors with hemogenic capacity originate and differentiate within the early embryonic kidney by hemovasculogenesis (the concomitant formation of blood and vessels) and underscore the importance of the S1P pathway in vascular development. PMID:26534925

  20. A novel role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 in mouse thrombopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Orban, Martin; Lorenz, Michael; Barocke, Verena; Braun, Daniel; Urtz, Nicole; Schulz, Christian; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Tirniceriu, Anca; Gaertner, Florian; Proia, Richard L.; Graf, Thomas; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Montanez, Eloi; Prinz, Marco; Müller, Alexandra; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Billich, Andreas; Sixt, Michael; Fässler, Reinhard; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Junt, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Millions of platelets are produced each hour by bone marrow (BM) megakaryocytes (MKs). MKs extend transendothelial proplatelet (PP) extensions into BM sinusoids and shed new platelets into the blood. The mechanisms that control platelet generation remain incompletely understood. Using conditional mutants and intravital multiphoton microscopy, we show here that the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) serves as a critical directional cue guiding the elongation of megakaryocytic PP extensions from the interstitium into BM sinusoids and triggering the subsequent shedding of PPs into the blood. Correspondingly, mice lacking the S1P receptor S1pr1 develop severe thrombocytopenia caused by both formation of aberrant extravascular PPs and defective intravascular PP shedding. In contrast, activation of S1pr1 signaling leads to the prompt release of new platelets into the circulating blood. Collectively, our findings uncover a novel function of the S1P–S1pr1 axis as master regulator of efficient thrombopoiesis and might raise new therapeutic options for patients with thrombocytopenia. PMID:23148237

  1. The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonist FTY720 is neuroprotective after cuprizone-induced CNS demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Slowik, A; Schmidt, T; Beyer, C; Amor, S; Clarner, T; Kipp, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Modulation of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor is an approved treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis because of its anti-inflammatory effect of retaining lymphocytes within the lymph nodes. Here, we evaluated the potential of an agonist at this receptor, FTY720 (fingolimod), to activate the promyelinating pathways within the brain to encourage remyelination and neuroprotection. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In this study, we used the cuprizone model in male C57BL/6 mice and tested the promyelinating and neuroprotective effects of FTY720 after acute and chronic toxin-induced experimental demyelination. We used histological, immunohistochemical and gene expression methods. KEY RESULTS The midline of the corpus callosum was severely demyelinated after acute and chronic cuprizone-induced demyelination. Robust endogenous remyelination was evident after acute, but impaired after chronic, demyelination. FTY720 treatment modestly accelerated myelin recovery after acute but not chronic cuprizone exposure. Markers of gliosis (astrocyte and microglia activation) were not affected by FTY720 treatment. Remarkably, the accumulation of amyloid precursor protein-positive spheroids in axons was less distinct in FTY720-treated animals, indicating that this compound alleviated ongoing axonal damage. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We show that even during endogenous remyelination, axonal degeneration continued at a low level, accumulating over time. This continuous neurodegenerative process was ameliorated by FTY720 treatment. FTY720 preserved CNS integrity by direct interaction with brain resident cells, the actions of which are still to be defined. PMID:25220526

  2. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Schistosoma mansoni in complex with ribose-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    D’Muniz Pereira, Humberto; Oliva, Glaucius; Garratt, Richard Charles

    2011-01-01

    Schistosomes are blood flukes which cause schistosomiasis, a disease affecting approximately 200 million people worldwide. Along with several other important human parasites including trypanosomes and Plasmodium, schistosomes lack the de novo pathway for purine synthesis and depend exclusively on the salvage pathway for their purine requirements, making the latter an attractive target for drug development. Part of the pathway involves the conversion of inosine (or guanosine) into hypoxanthine (or guanine) together with ribose-1-phosphate (R1P) or vice versa. This inter-conversion is undertaken by the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) which has been used as the basis for the development of novel anti-malarials, conceptually validating this approach. It has been suggested that, during the reverse reaction, R1P binding to the enzyme would occur only as a consequence of conformational changes induced by hypoxanthine, thus making a binary PNP–R1P complex unlikely. Contradictory to this statement, a crystal structure of just such a binary complex involving the Schistosoma mansoni enzyme has been successfully obtained. The ligand shows an intricate hydrogen-bonding network in the phosphate and ribose binding sites and adds a further chapter to our knowledge which could be of value in the future development of selective inhibitors. PMID:21169694

  3. Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate in cell growth, differentiation, and death.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, S; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L; Kohama, T; Menzeleev, R; Olivera, A; Thomas, D; Tu, Z; Van Brocklyn, J; Wang, F

    1998-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that branching pathways of sphingolipid metabolism may mediate either apoptotic or mitogenic responses depending on the cell type and the nature of the stimulus. While ceramide has been shown to be an important regulatory component of apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha and the Fas ligand, sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP), a further metabolite of ceramide, has been implicated as a second messenger in cellular proliferation and survival induced by platelet-derived growth factor, neuronal growth factor, and serum. SPP protects cells from apoptosis resulting from elevations of ceramide. Inflammatory cytokines stimulate sphingomyelinase, but not ceramidase, leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also stimulate ceramidase and sphingosine kinase leading to increased SPP levels. We propose that the dynamic balance between levels of sphingolipid metabolites, ceramide, and SPP and consequent regulation of different members of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK versus ERK) family is an important factor that determines whether a cell survives or dies. PMID:9526097

  4. “Inside-Out” Signaling of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate: Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    TAKABE, KAZUAKI; PAUGH, STEVEN W.; MILSTIEN, SHELDON; SPIEGEL, SARAH

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite involved in many critical cellular processes including proliferation, survival, and migration, as well as angiogenesis and allergic responses. S1P levels inside cells are tightly regulated by the balance between its synthesis by sphingosine kinases and degradation. S1P is interconvertible with ceramide, which is a critical mediator of apoptosis. It has been postulated that the ratio between S1P and ceramide determines cell fate. Activation of sphingosine kinase by a variety of agonists increases intracellular S1P, which in turn can function intracellularly as a second messenger or be secreted out of the cell and act extracellularly by binding to and signaling through S1P receptors in autocrine and/or paracrine manners. Recent studies suggest that this “inside-out” signaling by S1P may play a role in many human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. In this review we summarize metabolism of S1P, mechanisms of sphingosine kinase activation, and S1P receptors and their downstream signaling pathways and examine relationships to multiple disease processes. In particular, we describe recent preclinical and clinical trials of therapies targeting S1P signaling, including 2-amino-2-propane-1,3-diol hydrochloride (FTY720, fingolimod), S1P receptor agonists, sphingosine kinase inhibitors, and anti-S1P monoclonal antibody. PMID:18552276

  5. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Protects Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Apoptosis Through the Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Greenspon, Jose; Li, Ruiyun; Xiao, Lan; Rao, Jaladanki N.; Marasa, Bernard S.; Strauch, Eric D.; Wang, Jian-Ying; Turner, Douglas J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The regulation of apoptosis of intestinal mucosal cells is important in maintenance of normal intestinal physiology. Summary Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been shown to play a critical role in cellular protection to otherwise lethal stimuli in several nonintestinal tissues. Methods The current study determines whether S1P protected normal intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from apoptosis and whether Akt activation was the central pathway for this effect. Results S1P demonstrated significantly reduced levels of apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)/cycloheximide (CHX). S1P induced increased levels of phosphorylated Akt and increased Akt activity, but did not affect total amounts of Akt. This activation of Akt was associated with decreased levels of both caspase-3 protein levels and of caspase-3 activity. Inactivation of Akt by treatment with the PI3K chemical inhibitor LY294002 or by overexpression of the dominant negative mutant of Akt (DNMAkt) prevented the protective effect of S1P on apoptosis. Additionally, silencing of the S1P-1 receptor by specific siRNA demonstrated a lesser decrease in apoptosis to S1P exposure. Conclusion These results indicate that S1P protects intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis via an Akt-dependent pathway. PMID:18654850

  6. Hepatocyte exosomes mediate liver repair and regeneration via sphingosine-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Hiroyuki; Freeman, Christopher M.; Schuster, Rebecca M.; Japtok, Lukasz; Kleuser, Burkhard; Edwards, Michael J.; Gulbins, Erich; Lentsch, Alex B.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Exosomes are small membrane vesicles involved in intercellular communication. Hepatocytes are known to release exosomes, but little is known about their biological function. We sought to determine if exosomes derived from hepatocytes contribute to liver repair and regeneration after injury. Methods Exosomes derived from primary murine hepatocytes were isolated and characterized biochemically and biophysically. Using cultures of primary hepatocytes, we tested whether hepatocyte exosomes induced proliferation of hepatocytes in vitro. Using models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and partial hepatectomy, we evaluated whether hepatocyte exosomes promote hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration in vivo. Results Hepatocyte exosomes, but not exosomes from other liver cell types, induce dose-dependent hepatocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, hepatocyte exosomes directly fuse with target hepatocytes and transfer neutral ceramidase and sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2) causing increased synthesis of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) within target hepatocytes. Ablation of exosomal SK prevents the proliferative effect of exosomes. After ischemia/reperfusion injury, the number of circulating exosomes with proliferative effects increases. Conclusions Our data shows that hepatocyte-derived exosomes deliver the synthetic machinery to form S1P in target hepatocytes resulting in cell proliferation and liver regeneration after ischemia/reperfusion injury or partial hepatectomy. These findings represent a potentially novel new contributing mechanism of liver regeneration and have important implications for new therapeutic approaches to acute and chronic liver disease. PMID:26254847

  7. Sphingosine-1-phosphate inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2014-10-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a pluripotent lipid mediator that transmits signals through G-protein-coupled receptors to control diverse biological processes. The novel biological activity of S1P in the adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes was identified in the present study. S1P significantly decreased lipid accumulation in maturing preadipocytes in a dose‑dependent manner. In order to understand the anti‑adipogenic effects of S1P, preadipocytes were treated with S1P, and the change in the expression of several adipogenic transcription factors and enzymes was investigated using quantitative RT-PCR. S1P downregulated the transcriptional levels of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and adiponectin, which are markers of adipogenic differentiation. The effects of S1P on the levels of mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) signals in preadipocytes were also investigated. The activation of JNK and p38 were downregulated by S1P treatment in human preadipocytes. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that S1P alters fat mass by directly affecting adipogenesis. This is mediated by the downregulation of adipogenic transcription factors and by inactivation of the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways. Thus, selective targeting of the S1P receptors and sphingosine kinases may have clinical applications for the treatment of obesity. PMID:25050633

  8. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 Antagonists: Therapeutic Potential and Potential Risks

    PubMed Central

    Blankenbach, Kira V.; Schwalm, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling system with its specific G-protein-coupled S1P receptors, the enzymes of S1P metabolism and the S1P transporters, offers a multitude of promising targets for drug development. Until today, drug development in this area has nearly exclusively focused on (functional) antagonists at the S1P1 receptor, which cause a unique phenotype of immunomodulation. Accordingly, the first-in class S1P1 receptor modulator, fingolimod, has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and novel S1P1 receptor (functional) antagonists are being developed for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, lupus erythematodes, or polymyositis. Besides the S1P1 receptor, also S1P2 and S1P3 are widely expressed and regulate many diverse functions throughout the body. The S1P2 receptor, in particular, often exerts cellular functions which are opposed to the functions of the S1P1 receptor. As a consequence, antagonists at the S1P2 receptor have the potential to be useful in a contrasting context and different areas of indication compared to S1P1 antagonists. The present review will focus on the therapeutic potential of S1P2 receptor antagonists and discuss their opportunities as well as their potential risks. Open questions and areas which require further investigations will be emphasized in particular. PMID:27445808

  9. Regulation of autotaxin expression and secretion by lysophosphatidate and sphingosine 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Benesch, Matthew G K; Zhao, Yuan Y; Curtis, Jonathan M; McMullen, Todd P W; Brindley, David N

    2015-06-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme, which produces extracellular lysophosphatidate (LPA) from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). LPA activates six G protein-coupled receptors and this is essential for vasculogenesis during embryonic development. ATX is also involved in wound healing and inflammation, and in tumor growth, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. It is, therefore, important to understand how ATX is regulated. It was proposed that ATX activity is inhibited by its product LPA, or a related lipid called sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). We now show that this apparent inhibition is ineffective at the high concentrations of LPC that occur in vivo. Instead, feedback regulation by LPA and S1P is mediated by inhibition of ATX expression resulting from phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase activation. Inhibiting ATX activity in mice with ONO-8430506 severely decreased plasma LPA concentrations and increased ATX mRNA in adipose tissue, which is a major site of ATX production. Consequently, the amount of inhibitor-bound ATX protein in the plasma increased. We, therefore, demonstrate the concept that accumulation of LPA in the circulation decreases ATX production. However, this feedback regulation can be overcome by the inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α or interleukin 1β. This enables high LPA and ATX levels to coexist in inflammatory conditions. The results are discussed in terms of ATX regulation in wound healing and cancer. PMID:25896349

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling in Immune Cells and Inflammation: Roles and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Masayo; Aoki, Hiroaki; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Hait, Nitai C.; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite involved in many critical cell processes. It is produced by the phosphorylation of sphingosine by sphingosine kinases (SphKs) and exported out of cells via transporters such as spinster homolog 2 (Spns2). S1P regulates diverse physiological processes by binding to specific G protein-binding receptors, S1P receptors (S1PRs) 1–5, through a process coined as “inside-out signaling.” The S1P concentration gradient between various tissues promotes S1PR1-dependent migration of T cells from secondary lymphoid organs into the lymphatic and blood circulation. S1P suppresses T cell egress from and promotes retention in inflamed peripheral tissues. S1PR1 in T and B cells as well as Spns2 in endothelial cells contributes to lymphocyte trafficking. FTY720 (Fingolimod) is a functional antagonist of S1PRs that induces systemic lymphopenia by suppression of lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs. In this review, we summarize previous findings and new discoveries about the importance of S1P and S1PR signaling in the recruitment of immune cells and lymphocyte retention in inflamed tissues. We also discuss the role of S1P-S1PR1 axis in inflammatory diseases and wound healing. PMID:26966342

  11. Sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling pathway as a potential therapeutic target of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xi-Qian; Li, Yan-Li; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Xiao, Yi; Li, Zhi-Dong; Liu, Li-Qiong; Zhou, Yu-Shan; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Li-Hui; Zhuang, Min; Chen, Yan-Ping; Ouyang, Sheng-Rong; Wu, Xu-Wei; Yang, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by extensive vascular remodelling, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and eventual death due to right heart failure. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension involves vascular endothelial dysfunction and disordered vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration, but the exact processes remain unknown. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysophospholipid involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes. S1P has been shown to regulate VSMC proliferation and migration and vascular tension via a family of five S1P G-protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-SIP5). S1P has been shown to have both a vasoconstrictive and vasodilating effect. The S1P receptors S1P1 and S1P3 promote, while S1P2 inhibits VSMC proliferation and migration in vitro in response to S1P. Moreover, it has been reported recently that sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P2 inhibitors might be useful therapeutic agents in the treatment of empirical pulmonary hypertension. The sphingosine kinase 1/S1P signalling pathways may play a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Modulation of this pathway may offer novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26550106

  12. Sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate signalling pathway as a potential therapeutic target of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xi-Qian; Li, Yan-Li; Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Xiao, Yi; Li, Zhi-Dong; Liu, Li-Qiong; Zhou, Yu-Shan; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Li-Hui; Zhuang, Min; Chen, Yan-Ping; Ouyang, Sheng-Rong; Wu, Xu-Wei; Yang, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by extensive vascular remodelling, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and eventual death due to right heart failure. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension involves vascular endothelial dysfunction and disordered vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration, but the exact processes remain unknown. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysophospholipid involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes. S1P has been shown to regulate VSMC proliferation and migration and vascular tension via a family of five S1P G-protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-SIP5). S1P has been shown to have both a vasoconstrictive and vasodilating effect. The S1P receptors S1P1 and S1P3 promote, while S1P2 inhibits VSMC proliferation and migration in vitro in response to S1P. Moreover, it has been reported recently that sphingosine kinase 1 and S1P2 inhibitors might be useful therapeutic agents in the treatment of empirical pulmonary hypertension. The sphingosine kinase 1/S1P signalling pathways may play a role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Modulation of this pathway may offer novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26550106

  13. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and Its Receptors: A Mutual Link between Blood Coagulation and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan-Thakur, Shailaja; Böhm, Andreas; Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Schrör, Karsten; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a versatile lipid signaling molecule and key regulator in vascular inflammation. S1P is secreted by platelets, monocytes, and vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. It binds specifically to a family of G-protein-coupled receptors, S1P receptors 1 to 5, resulting in downstream signaling and numerous cellular effects. S1P modulates cell proliferation and migration, and mediates proinflammatory responses and apoptosis. In the vascular barrier, S1P regulates permeability and endothelial reactions and recruitment of monocytes and may modulate atherosclerosis. Only recently has S1P emerged as a critical mediator which directly links the coagulation factor system to vascular inflammation. The multifunctional proteases thrombin and FXa regulate local S1P availability and interact with S1P signaling at multiple levels in various vascular cell types. Differential expression patterns and intracellular signaling pathways of each receptor enable S1P to exert its widespread functions. Although a vast amount of information is available about the functions of S1P and its receptors in the regulation of physiological and pathophysiological conditions, S1P-mediated mechanisms in the vasculature remain to be elucidated. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the role of S1P and its receptors in vascular wall and blood cells, which link the coagulation system to inflammatory responses in the vasculature. PMID:26604433

  14. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Regulates Myogenic Responsiveness in Human Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Daniel L.; Burnstein, Marcus J.; Errett, Lee; Bonneau, Daniel; Latter, David; Rotstein, Ori D.; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Lidington, Darcy; Voigtlaender-Bolz, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) as prominent regulators of myogenic responsiveness in rodent resistance arteries. However, since rodent models frequently exhibit limitations with respect to human applicability, translation is necessary to validate the relevance of this signaling network for clinical application. We therefore investigated the significance of these regulatory elements in human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries. Mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries were isolated from patient tissue specimens collected during colonic or cardiac bypass surgery. Pressure myography assessments confirmed endothelial integrity, as well as stable phenylephrine and myogenic responses. Both human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries (i) express critical S1P signaling elements, (ii) constrict in response to S1P and (iii) lose myogenic responsiveness following S1P receptor antagonism (JTE013). However, while human mesenteric arteries express CFTR, human skeletal muscle resistance arteries do not express detectable levels of CFTR protein. Consequently, modulating CFTR activity enhances myogenic responsiveness only in human mesenteric resistance arteries. We conclude that human mesenteric and skeletal muscle resistance arteries are a reliable and consistent model for translational studies. We demonstrate that the core elements of an S1P-dependent signaling network translate to human mesenteric resistance arteries. Clear species and vascular bed variations are evident, reinforcing the critical need for further translational study. PMID:26367262

  15. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonist SEW2871 prolongs heterotopic heart allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qian; Yuan, Baohong; Liu, Tao; Lan, Fang; Luo, Xiaochun; Lu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Ping; Dai, Liangcheng; Jin, Xiaobao; Yin, Hui

    2015-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a biologically active metabolite of plasma-membrane sphingolipids that is essential for immune cell trafficking. Recent studies have revealed immunomodulatory functions of S1P and its receptors (S1PR1-S1PR5) in many inflammatory conditions, such as asthma and autoimmunity. Here, we explore the efficacy of SEW2871, a selective S1PR1 agonist, in the prevention of acute allograft rejection in a murine cardiac transplantation model. Treatment of recipient mice with SEW2871 significantly prolongs cardiac allograft survival as compared to those recipients treated with control vehicle. The enhanced graft survival is associated with reduced circulating lymphocytes and allograft inflammatory cell infiltration. The cytokine analysis showed decreased allograft expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-2 in the SEW2871-treated mice. Moreover, administration of SEW2871 increases the percentage of CD4(+) T regulatory cells and FoxP3 expression in spleen of allograft recipients. Therefore, SEW2871 plays a critical role in regulation of lymphocyte trafficking and development, which directly contributes to prolongation of the allograft survival. PMID:25776899

  16. Bile acids and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 in hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Eric; Li, Yunzhou; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping

    2015-03-01

    The liver is the central organ involved in lipid metabolism. Dyslipidemia and its related disorders, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), obesity and other metabolic diseases, are of increasing public health concern due to their increasing prevalence in the population. Besides their well-characterized functions in cholesterol homoeostasis and nutrient absorption, bile acids are also important metabolic regulators and function as signaling hormones by activating specific nuclear receptors, G-protein coupled receptors, and multiple signaling pathways. Recent studies identified a new signaling pathway by which conjugated bile acids (CBA) activate the extracellular regulated protein kinases (ERK1/2) and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway via sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2). CBA-induced activation of S1PR2 is a key regulator of sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2) and hepatic gene expression. This review focuses on recent findings related to the role of bile acids/S1PR2-mediated signaling pathways in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism. PMID:26579441

  17. Expression of 1L-Myoinositol-1-Phosphate Synthase in Organelles1

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Kimberly Helms; Pope, Patricia Marie; Johnson, Margaret Dean

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the expression of 1l-myoinositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS; EC 5.5.1.4) in developing organs of Phaseolus vulgaris to define genetic controls that spatially regulate inositol phosphate biosynthesis. MIPS, the pivotal biosynthetic enzyme in inositol metabolism, is the only enzyme known to catalyze the conversion of glucose 6-phosphate to inositol phosphate. It is found in unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes and has been isolated as a soluble enzyme from both. Thus, it is widely accepted that inositol phosphate biosynthesis is largely restricted to the cytosol. Here, we report findings that suggest the enzyme is also expressed in membrane-bound organelles. Microscopic and biochemical analyses detected MIPS expression in plasma membranes, plastids, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticula, nuclei, and cell walls of bean. To address mechanisms by which the enzyme could be targeted to or through membranes, MIPS genes were analyzed for sorting signals within primary structures and upstream open reading frames that we discovered through our sequence analyses. Comprehensive computer analyses revealed putative transit peptides that are predicted to target the enzyme to different cellular compartments. Reverse transcriptase PCR experiments suggest that these putative targeting peptides are expressed in bean roots and leaves. PMID:12913178

  18. Potential signaling pathway involved in sphingosine-1-phosphate-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, YE; YAO, XING-HONG; YAN, ZHI-PING; LIU, JING-XIA; LIU, XIAO-HENG

    2016-01-01

    The developmental process of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs when epithelial cells acquire invasive mesenchymal cell characteristics, and the activation of this process has been indicated to be involved in tumor progression. EMT could be induced by growth factors, cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a biologically-active lipid that plays an important role in cancer metastasis. S1P also contributes to the activation of EMT. However, the mechanism underlying S1P-induced EMT is unclear. Increased evidence has demonstrated that the cell surface glycocalyx is closed associated with S1P and plays an important role in tumor progression, suggesting that S1P-induced EMT could be Snail-MMP signaling-dependent. Thus, we hypothesize that an S1P-glycocalyx-Snail-MMP signaling axis mediates S1P-induced EMT. This is an essential step towards improved understanding of the underlying mechanism involved in S1P-regulted EMT, and the development of novel diagnostic and anticancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:27347154

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signaling Augments Resistance Artery Myogenic Tone in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sauvé, Meghan; Hui, Sonya K; Dinh, Danny D; Foltz, Warren D; Momen, Abdul; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Offermanns, Stefan; Husain, Mansoor; Kroetsch, Jeffrey T; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes strongly associates with microvascular complications that ultimately promote multiorgan failure. Altered myogenic responsiveness compromises tissue perfusion, aggravates hypertension, and sets the stage for later permanent structural changes to the microcirculation. We demonstrate that skeletal muscle resistance arteries isolated from patients with diabetes have augmented myogenic tone, despite reasonable blood glucose control. To understand the mechanisms, we titrated a standard diabetes mouse model (high-fat diet plus streptozotocin [HFD/STZ]) to induce a mild increase in blood glucose levels. HFD/STZ treatment induced a progressive myogenic tone augmentation in mesenteric and olfactory cerebral arteries; neither HFD nor STZ alone had an effect on blood glucose or resistance artery myogenic tone. Using gene deletion models that eliminate tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or sphingosine kinase 1, we demonstrate that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF drives the elevation of myogenic tone via enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling. Therapeutically antagonizing TNF (etanercept) or S1P (JTE013) signaling corrects this defect. Our investigation concludes that vascular smooth muscle cell TNF augments resistance artery myogenic vasoconstriction in a diabetes model that induces a small elevation of blood glucose. Our data demonstrate that microvascular reactivity is an early disease marker and advocate establishing therapies that strategically target the microcirculation. PMID:27207546

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Maintains Normal Vascular Permeability by Preserving Endothelial Surface Glycocalyx in Intact Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Fan, Jie; Tarbell, John, M.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) was found to protect the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) by inhibiting matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity-dependent shedding of ESG in cultured endothelial cell studies. We aimed to further test that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels. Methods We quantified the ESG in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery and measured the vascular permeability to albumin in the presence and absence of 1 μM S1P. We also measured permeability to albumin in the presence of MMP inhibitors and compared the measured permeability with those predicted by a transport model for the inter-endothelial cleft. Results We found that in the absence of S1P, the fluorescence intensity of the FITC-anti-heparan sulfate labeled ESG was ~10% of that in the presence of S1P, while the measured permeability to albumin was ~6.5 fold that in the presence of S1P. Similar results were observed with MMP inhibition. The predictions by the mathematical model further confirmed that S1P maintains microvascular permeability by preserving ESG. Conclusions Our results show that S1P contributes to the maintenance of normal vascular permeability by protecting the ESG in intact microvessels, consistent with parallel observation in cultured endothelial monolayers. PMID:27015105

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Phosphatase 2 Regulates Pancreatic Islet β-Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yoshimitsu; Allende, Maria L; Mizukami, Hiroki; Cook, Emily K; Gavrilova, Oksana; Tuymetova, Galina; Clarke, Benjamin A; Chen, Weiping; Olivera, Ana; Proia, Richard L

    2016-06-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid metabolite that regulates basic cell functions through metabolic and signaling pathways. Intracellular metabolism of S1P is controlled, in part, by two homologous S1P phosphatases (SPPases), 1 and 2, which are encoded by the Sgpp1 and Sgpp2 genes, respectively. SPPase activity is needed for efficient recycling of sphingosine into the sphingolipid synthesis pathway. SPPase 1 is important for skin homeostasis, but little is known about the functional role of SPPase 2. To identify the functions of SPPase 2 in vivo, we studied mice with the Sgpp2 gene deleted. In contrast to Sgpp1(-/-) mice, Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal skin and were viable into adulthood. Unexpectedly, WT mice expressed Sgpp2 mRNA at high levels in pancreatic islets when compared with other tissues. Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal pancreatic islet size; however, they exhibited defective adaptive β-cell proliferation that was demonstrated after treatment with either a high-fat diet or the β-cell-specific toxin, streptozotocin. Importantly, β-cells from untreated Sgpp2(-/-) mice showed significantly increased expression of proteins characteristic of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response compared with β-cells from WT mice, indicating a basal islet defect. Our results show that Sgpp2 deletion causes β-cell endoplasmic reticulum stress, which is a known cause of β-cell dysfunction, and reveal a juncture in the sphingolipid recycling pathway that could impact the development of diabetes. PMID:27059959

  2. Sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes erythrocyte glycolysis and oxygen release for adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Song, Anren; Wu, Hongyu; Liu, Hong; Adebiyi, Morayo; Huang, Aji; Wen, Yuan E; Bogdanov, Mikhail V; Vila, Alejandro; O'Brien, John; Kellems, Rodney E; Dowhan, William; Subudhi, Andrew W; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G; Lovering, Andrew T; Safo, Martin; Hansen, Kirk C; Roach, Robert C; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive signalling lipid highly enriched in mature erythrocytes, with unknown functions pertaining to erythrocyte physiology. Here by employing nonbiased high-throughput metabolomic profiling, we show that erythrocyte S1P levels rapidly increase in 21 healthy lowland volunteers at 5,260 m altitude on day 1 and continue increasing to 16 days with concurrently elevated erythrocyte sphingonisne kinase 1 (Sphk1) activity and haemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O2) release capacity. Mouse genetic studies show that elevated erythrocyte Sphk1-induced S1P protects against tissue hypoxia by inducing O2 release. Mechanistically, we show that intracellular S1P promotes deoxygenated Hb anchoring to the membrane, enhances the release of membrane-bound glycolytic enzymes to the cytosol, induces glycolysis and thus the production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), an erythrocyte-specific glycolytic intermediate, which facilitates O2 release. Altogether, we reveal S1P as an intracellular hypoxia-responsive biolipid promoting erythrocyte glycolysis, O2 delivery and thus new therapeutic opportunities to counteract tissue hypoxia. PMID:27417539

  3. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor regulation of N-cadherin mediates vascular stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Ji-Hye; Skoura, Athanasia; Chae, Sung-Suk; Cowan, Ann E.; Han, David K.; Proia, Richard L.; Hla, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    Vascular stabilization, a process by which nascent vessels are invested with mural cells, is important in angiogenesis. Here we describe the molecular basis of vascular stabilization regulated by sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a platelet-derived lipid mediator. S1P1 receptor-dependent cell-surface trafficking and activation of the cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin is essential for interactions between endothelial and mural cells. Endothelial cell S1P1/Gi/Rac pathway induces microtubule polymerization, resulting in trafficking of N-cadherin to polarized plasma membrane domains. S1P treatment modulated the phosphorylation of N-cadherin as well as p120-catenin and induced the formation of cadherin/catenin/actin complexes containing novel regulatory and trafficking factors. The net result of endothelial cell S1P1 receptor activation is the proper trafficking and strengthening of N-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion with mural cells. Perturbation of N-cadherin expression with small interfering RNA profoundly attenuated vascular stabilization in vitro and in vivo. S1P-induced trafficking and activation of N-cadherin provides a novel mechanism for the stabilization of nascent blood vessels by mural cells and may be exploited to control angiogenesis and vascular diseases. PMID:15371328

  4. Calcitonin controls bone formation by inhibiting the release of sphingosine 1-phosphate from osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Keller, Johannes; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Huebner, Antje K; Jeschke, Anke; Heckt, Timo; Lueth, Anja; Krause, Matthias; Koehne, Till; Albers, Joachim; Schulze, Jochen; Schilling, Sarah; Haberland, Michael; Denninger, Hannah; Neven, Mona; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Streichert, Thomas; Breer, Stefan; Barvencik, Florian; Levkau, Bodo; Rathkolb, Birgit; Wolf, Eckhard; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Neff, Frauke; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabĕ; Klutmann, Susanne; Tsourdi, Elena; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Kleuser, Burkhard; Chun, Jerold; Schinke, Thorsten; Amling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The hormone calcitonin (CT) is primarily known for its pharmacologic action as an inhibitor of bone resorption, yet CT-deficient mice display increased bone formation. These findings raised the question about the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism of CT action. Here we show that either ubiquitous or osteoclast-specific inactivation of the murine CT receptor (CTR) causes increased bone formation. CT negatively regulates the osteoclast expression of Spns2 gene, which encodes a transporter for the signalling lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). CTR-deficient mice show increased S1P levels, and their skeletal phenotype is normalized by deletion of the S1P receptor S1P3. Finally, pharmacologic treatment with the nonselective S1P receptor agonist FTY720 causes increased bone formation in wild-type, but not in S1P3-deficient mice. This study redefines the role of CT in skeletal biology, confirms that S1P acts as an osteoanabolic molecule in vivo and provides evidence for a pharmacologically exploitable crosstalk between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. PMID:25333900

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes erythrocyte glycolysis and oxygen release for adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kaiqi; Zhang, Yujin; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Nemkov, Travis; Song, Anren; Wu, Hongyu; Liu, Hong; Adebiyi, Morayo; Huang, Aji; Wen, Yuan E.; Bogdanov, Mikhail V.; Vila, Alejandro; O'Brien, John; Kellems, Rodney E.; Dowhan, William; Subudhi, Andrew W.; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G.; Lovering, Andrew T.; Safo, Martin; Hansen, Kirk C.; Roach, Robert C.; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive signalling lipid highly enriched in mature erythrocytes, with unknown functions pertaining to erythrocyte physiology. Here by employing nonbiased high-throughput metabolomic profiling, we show that erythrocyte S1P levels rapidly increase in 21 healthy lowland volunteers at 5,260 m altitude on day 1 and continue increasing to 16 days with concurrently elevated erythrocyte sphingonisne kinase 1 (Sphk1) activity and haemoglobin (Hb) oxygen (O2) release capacity. Mouse genetic studies show that elevated erythrocyte Sphk1-induced S1P protects against tissue hypoxia by inducing O2 release. Mechanistically, we show that intracellular S1P promotes deoxygenated Hb anchoring to the membrane, enhances the release of membrane-bound glycolytic enzymes to the cytosol, induces glycolysis and thus the production of 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), an erythrocyte-specific glycolytic intermediate, which facilitates O2 release. Altogether, we reveal S1P as an intracellular hypoxia-responsive biolipid promoting erythrocyte glycolysis, O2 delivery and thus new therapeutic opportunities to counteract tissue hypoxia. PMID:27417539

  6. Extracellular Matrix Rigidity-dependent Sphingosine-1-phosphate Secretion Regulates Metastatic Cancer Cell Invasion and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ko, Panseon; Kim, Daehwan; You, Eunae; Jung, Jangho; Oh, Somi; Kim, Jaehyun; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment is critical for cancer progression via changes in cellular behavior including alteration of secreted molecules. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the influence exerted by the cancer microenvironment on secretion of molecules during cancer progression remain largely unknown. In this study, we report that secretion of spingsine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its regulator, SphK1 expression is dependent of the substrate rigidity, which is critical for the balance between cancer cell invasion and adhesion. Conditioned media (CM) of MDA-MB-231, an aggressive breast cancer cell obtained from soft substrate (~0.5 kPa) induced chemo-attractive invasion, while CM obtained from stiff substrate (~2.5 kPa) increased cell adhesion instead. We found that the expression of SphK1 is upregulated in the stiff substrate, resulting in an increase in S1P levels in the CM. We also found that upregulation of SphK1 expression in the stiff substrate is dominant in metastatic cancer cells but not in primary cancer cells. These results suggest that alterations in the mechanical environment of the ECM surrounding the tumor cells actively regulate cellular properties such as secretion, which in turn, may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:26877098

  7. The lipoprotein receptor LRP1 modulates sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling and is essential for vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Chikako; Haffner, Philipp; Goerke, Sebastian M.; Zurhove, Kai; Adelmann, Giselind; Frotscher, Michael; Herz, Joachim; Bock, Hans H.; May, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is indispensable for embryonic development. Comparing different genetically engineered mouse models, we found that expression of Lrp1 is essential in the embryo proper. Loss of LRP1 leads to lethal vascular defects with lack of proper investment with mural cells of both large and small vessels. We further demonstrate that LRP1 modulates Gi-dependent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling and integrates S1P and PDGF-BB signaling pathways, which are both crucial for mural cell recruitment, via its intracellular domain. Loss of LRP1 leads to a lack of S1P-dependent inhibition of RAC1 and loss of constraint of PDGF-BB-induced cell migration. Our studies thus identify LRP1 as a novel player in angiogenesis and in the recruitment and maintenance of mural cells. Moreover, they reveal an unexpected link between lipoprotein receptor and sphingolipid signaling that, in addition to angiogenesis during embryonic development, is of potential importance for other targets of these pathways, such as tumor angiogenesis and inflammatory processes. PMID:25377550

  8. Substrate-dependent utilization of the glycerol 3-phosphate or malate/aspartate redox shuttles by Ehrlich ascites cells.

    PubMed Central

    Grivell, A R; Korpelainen, E I; Williams, C J; Berry, M N

    1995-01-01

    The rate of transfer of reducing equivalents from cytoplasm to mitochondria has been examined in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells incubated in the presence of lactate. The flux of reducing equivalents was determined from the rate of metabolism of reduced intermediates that are oxidized within the cytosol. The magnitude of the flux of reducing equivalents was dependent on both the concentration of added lactate and the presence of carbohydrate. The rate of flux was twice as great in the presence of glucose and four times as high when glucose and lactate were added together as when lactate was the only added substrate. Fructose was less effective than glucose in stimulating reducing equivalent flux. In the presence of glucose or fructose, there was a substantial accumulation of hexose phosphates, dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glycerol 3-phosphate. Rotenone, an inhibitor of NADH dehydrogenase, and amino-oxyacetate, which inhibits the malate/aspartate shuttle, were powerful suppressors of reducing equivalent flux from lactate as sole substrate, but were much less potent in the presence of carbohydrate. Antimycin substantially inhibited reducing equivalent flux from all combinations of added substrates, consistent with its ability to block oxidation of reducing equivalents transferred by both the malate/aspartate and glycerol 3-phosphate shuttles. The glycerol 3-phosphate shuttle represents around 80% of the maximum total observed activity but is active only while glycolytic intermediates are present to provide the necessary substrates of the shuttle. This Ehrlich ascites cell line has an essentially similar total reducing equivalent shuttle capacity to that of isolated hepatocytes. PMID:7654209

  9. Implication of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in ceramide 1-phosphate-stimulated macrophage migration.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez, Marta; Rivera, Io-Guané; Presa, Natalia; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Cell migration is a complex biological function involved in both physiologic and pathologic processes. Although this is a subject of intense investigation, the mechanisms by which cell migration is regulated are not completely understood. In this study we show that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which is involved in inflammatory responses, causes upregulation of metalloproteinases (MMP) -2 and -9 in J774A.1 macrophages. This effect was shown to be dependent on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellularly regulated kinases 1-2 (ERK1-2) as demonstrated by treating the cells with specific siRNA to knockdown the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K, or ERK1-2. Inhibition of MMP-2 or MMP-9 pharmacologically or with specific siRNA to silence the genes encoding these MMPs abrogated C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. Also, C1P induced actin polymerization and potently increased phosphorylation of the focal adhesion protein paxillin, which are essential factors in the regulation of cell migration. As expected, blockade of paxillin activation with specific siRNA significantly reduced actin polymerization. In addition, inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasin D completely blocked C1P-induced MMP-2 and -9 expression as well as C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. It was also observed that pertussis toxin (Ptx) inhibited Akt, ERK1-2, and paxillin phosphorylation, and completely blocked cell migration. The latter findings support the notion that C1P-stimulated macrophage migration is a receptor mediated effect, and point to MMP-2 and -9 as possible therapeutic targets to control inflammation. PMID:27164414

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase downregulation promotes colon carcinogenesis through STAT3-activated microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Degagné, Emilie; Pandurangan, Ashok; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Eltanawy, Abeer; Zhang, Meng; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Bittman, Robert; Ahmedi, Yasmin; Saba, Julie D.

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a link between inflammation and cancer; however, mediators of the transition between inflammation and carcinogenesis remain incompletely understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (SPL) irreversibly degrades the bioactive sphingolipid S1P and is highly expressed in enterocytes but downregulated in colon cancer. Here, we investigated the role of SPL in colitis-associated cancer (CAC). We generated mice with intestinal epithelium-specific Sgpl1 deletion and chemically induced colitis and tumor formation in these animals. Compared with control animals, mice lacking intestinal SPL exhibited greater disease activity, colon shortening, cytokine levels, S1P accumulation, tumors, STAT3 activation, STAT3-activated microRNAs (miRNAs), and suppression of miR-targeted anti-oncogene products. This phenotype was attenuated by STAT3 inhibition. In fibroblasts, silencing SPL promoted tumorigenic transformation through a pathway involving extracellular transport of S1P through S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2), S1P receptor activation, JAK2/STAT3-dependent miR-181b-1 induction, and silencing of miR-181b-1 target cylindromatosis (CYLD). Colon biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease revealed enhanced S1P and STAT3 signaling. In mice with chemical-induced CAC, oral administration of plant-type sphingolipids called sphingadienes increased colonic SPL levels and reduced S1P levels, STAT3 signaling, cytokine levels, and tumorigenesis, indicating that SPL prevents transformation and carcinogenesis. Together, our results suggest that dietary sphingolipids can augment or prevent colon cancer, depending upon whether they are metabolized to S1P or promote S1P metabolism through the actions of SPL. PMID:25347472

  11. Impairment of Angiogenic Sphingosine Kinase-1/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptors Pathway in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Dobierzewska, Aneta; Palominos, Macarena; Sanchez, Marianela; Dyhr, Michael; Helgert, Katja; Venegas-Araneda, Pia; Tong, Stephen; Illanes, Sebastian E.

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), is a serious pregnancy disorder characterized in the early gestation by shallow trophoblast invasion, impaired placental neo-angiogenesis, placental hypoxia and ischemia, which leads to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Here we hypothesized that angiogenic sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors pathway is impaired in PE. We found that SPHK1 mRNA and protein expression are down-regulated in term placentae and term chorionic villous explants from patients with PE or severe PE (PES), compared with controls. Moreover, mRNA expression of angiogenic S1PR1 and S1PR3 receptors were decreased in placental samples of PE and PES patients, whereas anti-angiogenic S1PR2 was up-regulated in chorionic villous tissue of PES subjects, pointing to its potential atherogenic and inflammatory properties. Furthermore, in in vitro (JAR cells) and ex vivo (chorionic villous explants) models of placental hypoxia, SPHK1 mRNA and protein were strongly up-regulated under low oxygen tension (1% 02). In contrast, there was no change in SPHK1 expression under the conditions of placental physiological hypoxia (8% 02). In both models, nuclear protein levels of HIF1A were increased at 1% 02 during the time course, but there was no up-regulation at 8% 02, suggesting that SPHK1 and HIF1A might be the part of the same canonical pathway during hypoxia and that both contribute to placental neovascularization during early gestation. Taken together, this study suggest the SPHK1 pathway may play a role in the human early placentation process and may be involved in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:27284992

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor inhibition prevents denervation-induced dendritic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Willems, Laurent M; Zahn, Nadine; Ferreirós, Nerea; Scholich, Klaus; Maggio, Nicola; Deller, Thomas; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of several major neurological diseases is neuronal cell death. In addition to this primary pathology, secondary injury is seen in connected brain regions in which neurons not directly affected by the disease are denervated. These transneuronal effects on the network contribute considerably to the clinical symptoms. Since denervated neurons are viable, they are attractive targets for intervention. Therefore, we studied the role of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-receptor signaling, the target of Fingolimod (FTY720), in denervation-induced dendritic atrophy. The entorhinal denervation in vitro model was used to assess dendritic changes of denervated mouse dentate granule cells. Live-cell microscopy of GFP-expressing granule cells in organotypic entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures was employed to follow individual dendritic segments for up to 6 weeks after deafferentation. A set of slice cultures was treated with FTY720 or the S1P-receptor (S1PR) antagonist VPC23019. Lesion-induced changes in S1P (mass spectrometry) and S1PR-mRNA levels (laser microdissection and qPCR) were determined. Denervation caused profound changes in dendritic stability. Dendritic elongation and retraction events were markedly increased, resulting in a net reduction of total dendritic length (TDL) during the first 2 weeks after denervation, followed by a gradual recovery in TDL. These changes were accompanied by an increase in S1P and S1PR1- and S1PR3-mRNA levels, and were not observed in slice cultures treated with FTY720 or VPC23019. We conclude that inhibition of S1PR signaling prevents dendritic destabilization and denervation-induced dendrite loss. These results suggest a novel neuroprotective effect for pharmaceuticals targeting neural S1PR pathways. PMID:27036416

  13. Induction of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 by sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei-Hong; Harel, Miriam; Hla, Timothy; Ferrer, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood. Preliminary data derived from a human angiogenesis array in NB showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induced the secretion of several angiogenesis-related proteins including the important inflammatory factor chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2). In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of S1P-induced CCL2 expression in NB. Methods Quantitative real-time PCR and CCL2 ELISA were conducted to detect the mRNA expression and protein secretion of CCL2 in NB cells. Gain and loss of function studies were performed by using specific S1PR antagonists, adenoviral transduction and siRNA transfection. Macrophage F4/80 receptor in NB xenografts was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry staining. Results S1P induced CCL2 mRNA expression and protein secretion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in NB cells. Blockade of S1P2 signaling using the selective S1P2 antagonist JTE-013 inhibited S1P-induced CCL2 expression. Overexpression of S1P2 by adenoviral transduction increased CCL2 secretion while knockdown of S1P2 by siRNA transfection decreased S1P-induced CCL2 secretion in NB cells. Macrophage infiltration, as detected by F4/80 staining, was significantly decreased in JTE-013-treated NB xenografts. Conclusions Taken together, our data for the first time demonstrate that S1P induced the macrophage-recruiting factor CCL2 expression in NB cells via S1P2, providing new insights into the complicated functions of S1P2 in cancer. PMID:25092091

  14. Conjugated bile acids promote cholangiocarcinoma cell invasive growth through activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Runping; Zhao, Renping; Zhou, Xiqiao; Liang, Xiuyin; Campbell, Deanna JW; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Luyong; Shi, Ruihua; Wang, Guangji; Pandak, William M; Sirica, Alphonse E; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an often fatal primary malignancy of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary tract that is commonly associated with chronic cholestasis and significantly elevated levels of primary and conjugated bile acids (CBAs), which are correlated with bile duct obstruction (BDO). BDO has also recently been shown to promote CCA progression. However, whereas there is increasing evidence linking chronic cholestasis and abnormal bile acid profiles to CCA development and progression, the specific mechanisms by which bile acids may be acting to promote cholangiocarcinogenesis and invasive biliary tumor growth have not been fully established. Recent studies have shown that CBAs, but not free bile acids, stimulate CCA cell growth, and that an imbalance in the ratio of free to CBAs may play an important role in the tumorigenesis of CCA. Also, CBAs are able to activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2- and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/protein kinase B (AKT)-signaling pathways through sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) in rodent hepatocytes. In the current study, we demonstrate S1PR2 to be highly expressed in rat and human CCA cells, as well as in human CCA tissues. We further show that CBAs activate the ERK1/2- and AKT-signaling pathways and significantly stimulate CCA cell growth and invasion in vitro. Taurocholate (TCA)-mediated CCA cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were significantly inhibited by JTE-013, a chemical antagonist of S1PR2, or by lentiviral short hairpin RNA silencing of S1PR2. In a novel organotypic rat CCA coculture model, TCA was further found to significantly increase the growth of CCA cell spheroidal/“duct-like” structures, which was blocked by treatment with JTE-013. Conclusion: Our collective data support the hypothesis that CBAs promote CCA cell-invasive growth through S1PR2. PMID:24700501

  15. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Novel Regulator of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Activity

    PubMed Central

    Semenkov, Illya; Molinski, Steven; Pasyk, Stan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Bui, Hai H.; Bear, Christine E.; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) attenuates sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in resistance arteries and has emerged as a prominent regulator of myogenic vasoconstriction. This investigation demonstrates that S1P inhibits CFTR activity via adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK), establishing a potential feedback link. In Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK) cells expressing wild-type human CFTR, S1P (1μmol/L) attenuates forskolin-stimulated, CFTR-dependent iodide efflux. S1P’s inhibitory effect is rapid (within 30 seconds), transient and correlates with CFTR serine residue 737 (S737) phosphorylation. Both S1P receptor antagonism (4μmol/L VPC 23019) and AMPK inhibition (80μmol/L Compound C or AMPK siRNA) attenuate S1P-stimluated (i) AMPK phosphorylation, (ii) CFTR S737 phosphorylation and (iii) CFTR activity inhibition. In BHK cells expressing the ΔF508 CFTR mutant (CFTRΔF508), the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis, both S1P receptor antagonism and AMPK inhibition enhance CFTR activity, without instigating discernable correction. In summary, we demonstrate that S1P/AMPK signaling transiently attenuates CFTR activity. Since our previous work positions CFTR as a negative S1P signaling regulator, this signaling link may positively reinforce S1P signals. This discovery has clinical ramifications for the treatment of disease states associated with enhanced S1P signaling and/or deficient CFTR activity (e.g. cystic fibrosis, heart failure). S1P receptor/AMPK inhibition could synergistically enhance the efficacy of therapeutic strategies aiming to correct aberrant CFTR trafficking. PMID:26079370

  16. The role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling pathway in osteocyte mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-Ning; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Chao; Han, Elizabeth S; Yu, Xue; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; You, Lidan

    2015-10-01

    Osteocytes are proposed to be the mechanosensory cells that translate mechanical loading into biochemical signals during the process of bone adaptation. The lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been reported to play a role in the mechanotransduction process of blood vessels and also in the dynamic control of bone mineral homeostasis. Nevertheless, the potential role of S1P in bone mechanotransduction has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that a S1P cascade is involved in the activation of osteocytes in response to loading-induced oscillatory fluid flow (OFF) in bone. MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells express the necessary components of a functional S1P cascade. To examine the involvement of S1P signaling in osteocyte mechanotransduction, we applied OFF (1 Pa, 1 Hz) to osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells under conditions where the S1P signaling pathway was modulated. We found that decreased endogenous S1P levels significantly suppressed the OFF-induced intracellular calcium response. Addition of extracellular S1P to MLO-Y4 cells enhanced the synthesis and release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) under static cells and amplified OFF-induced PGE2 release. The stimulatory effect of OFF on the gene expression levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) was S1P dependent. Furthermore, the S1P2 receptor subtype was shown to be involved in OFF-induced PGE2 synthesis and release, as well as down-regulation of RANKL/OPG gene expression ratio. In summary, our data suggest that S1P cascade is involved in OFF-induced mechanotransduction in MLO-Y4 cells and that extracellular S1P exerts its effect partly through S1P2 receptors. PMID:25988659

  17. Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor 3-Deficient Dendritic Cells Modulate Splenic Responses to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Amandeep; Huang, Liping; Kurmaeva, Elvira; Gigliotti, Joseph C; Ye, Hong; Miller, Jacqueline; Rosin, Diane L; Lobo, Peter I; Okusa, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    The plasticity of dendritic cells (DCs) permits phenotypic modulationex vivoby gene expression or pharmacologic agents, and these modified DCs can exert therapeutic immunosuppressive effectsin vivothrough direct interactions with T cells, either inducing T regulatory cells (TREGs) or causing anergy. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid and the natural ligand for five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1, S1P2, S1P3, S1P4, and S1P5), and S1PR agonists reduce kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice.S1pr3(-/-)mice are protected from kidney IRI, because DCs do not mature. We tested the therapeutic advantage ofS1pr3(-/-)bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC) transfers in kidney IRI. IRI produced a rise in plasma creatinine (PCr) levels in mice receiving no cells (NCs) and mice pretreated with wild-type (WT) BMDCs. However,S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-pretreated mice were protected from kidney IRI.S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-pretreated mice had significantly higher numbers of splenic TREGs compared with NC and WT BMDC-pretreated mice.S1pr3(-/-)BMDCs did not attenuate IRI in splenectomized,Rag-1(-/-), or CD11c(+)DC-depleted mice. Additionally,S1pr3(-/-)BMDC-dependent protection required CD169(+)marginal zone macrophages and the macrophage-derived chemokine CCL22 to increase splenic CD4(+)Foxp3(+)TREGs. Pretreatment withS1pr3(-/-)BMDCs also induced TREG-dependent protection against IRI in an allogeneic mouse model. In summary, adoptively transferredS1pr3(-/-)BMDCs prevent kidney IRI through interactions within the spleen and expansion of splenic CD4(+)Foxp3(+)TREGs. We conclude that genetically induced deficiency ofS1pr3in allogenic BMDCs could serve as a therapeutic approach to prevent IRI-induced AKI. PMID:26286732

  18. Sphingomyelinase D/Ceramide 1-Phosphate in Cell Survival and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Presa, Natalia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Simón, Jorge; Trueba, Miguel; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are major constituents of biological membranes of eukaryotic cells. Many studies have shown that sphingomyelin (SM) is a major phospholipid in cell bilayers and is mainly localized to the plasma membrane of cells, where it serves both as a building block for cell architecture and as a precursor of bioactive sphingolipids. In particular, upregulation of (C-type) sphingomyelinases will produce ceramide, which regulates many physiological functions including apoptosis, senescence, or cell differentiation. Interestingly, the venom of some arthropodes including spiders of the genus Loxosceles, or the toxins of some bacteria such as Corynebacterium tuberculosis, or Vibrio damsela possess high levels of D-type sphingomyelinase (SMase D). This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of SM to yield ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), which promotes cell growth and survival and is a potent pro-inflammatory agent in different cell types. In particular, C1P stimulates cytosolic phospholipase A2 leading to arachidonic acid release and the subsequent formation of eicosanoids, actions that are all associated to the promotion of inflammation. In addition, C1P potently stimulates macrophage migration, which has also been associated to inflammatory responses. Interestingly, this action required the interaction of C1P with a specific plasma membrane receptor, whereas accumulation of intracellular C1P failed to stimulate chemotaxis. The C1P receptor is coupled to Gi proteins and activates of the PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK1-2 pathways upon ligation with C1P. The proposed review will address novel aspects on the control of inflammatory responses by C1P and will highlight the molecular mechanisms whereby C1P exerts these actions. PMID:25938271

  19. Ceramide 1-phosphate regulates cell migration and invasion of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Io-Guané; Ordoñez, Marta; Presa, Natalia; Gangoiti, Patricia; Gomez-Larrauri, Ana; Trueba, Miguel; Fox, Todd; Kester, Mark; Gomez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2016-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive and devastating disease characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Despite years of intense investigation, the prognosis of this type of cancer is poor and there is no efficacious treatment to overcome the disease. Using human PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 cells, we demonstrate that the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) increases pancreatic cancer cell migration and invasion. Treatment of these cells with selective inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), Akt1, or mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTOR1), or with specific siRNAs to silence the genes encoding these kinases, resulted in potent inhibition of C1P-induced cell migration and invasion. Likewise, the extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1-2), and the small GTPase RhoA, which regulates cytoskeleton reorganization, were also found to be implicated in C1P-stimulated ROCK1-dependent cancer cell migration and invasion. In addition, pre-treatment of the cancer cells with pertussis toxin abrogated C1P-induced cell migration, suggesting the intervention of a Gi protein-coupled receptor in this process. Pancreatic cancer cells engineered to overexpress ceramide kinase (CerK), the enzyme responsible for C1P biosynthesis in mammalian cells, showed enhanced spontaneous cell migration that was potently blocked by treatment with the selective CerK inhibitor NVP-231, or by treatment with specific CerK siRNA. Moreover, overexpression of CerK with concomitant elevations in C1P enhanced migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Collectively, these data demonstrate that C1P is a key regulator of pancreatic cancer cell motility, and suggest that targeting CerK expression/activity and C1P may be relevant factors for controlling pancreatic cancer cell dissemination. PMID:26707801

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase downregulation promotes colon carcinogenesis through STAT3-activated microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Degagné, Emilie; Pandurangan, Ashok; Bandhuvula, Padmavathi; Kumar, Ashok; Eltanawy, Abeer; Zhang, Meng; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Nefedov, Mikhail; de Jong, Pieter J; Fong, Loren G; Young, Stephen G; Bittman, Robert; Ahmedi, Yasmin; Saba, Julie D

    2014-12-01

    Growing evidence supports a link between inflammation and cancer; however, mediators of the transition between inflammation and carcinogenesis remain incompletely understood. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) lyase (SPL) irreversibly degrades the bioactive sphingolipid S1P and is highly expressed in enterocytes but downregulated in colon cancer. Here, we investigated the role of SPL in colitis-associated cancer (CAC). We generated mice with intestinal epithelium-specific Sgpl1 deletion and chemically induced colitis and tumor formation in these animals. Compared with control animals, mice lacking intestinal SPL exhibited greater disease activity, colon shortening, cytokine levels, S1P accumulation, tumors, STAT3 activation, STAT3-activated microRNAs (miRNAs), and suppression of miR-targeted anti-oncogene products. This phenotype was attenuated by STAT3 inhibition. In fibroblasts, silencing SPL promoted tumorigenic transformation through a pathway involving extracellular transport of S1P through S1P transporter spinster homolog 2 (SPNS2), S1P receptor activation, JAK2/STAT3-dependent miR-181b-1 induction, and silencing of miR-181b-1 target cylindromatosis (CYLD). Colon biopsies from patients with inflammatory bowel disease revealed enhanced S1P and STAT3 signaling. In mice with chemical-induced CAC, oral administration of plant-type sphingolipids called sphingadienes increased colonic SPL levels and reduced S1P levels, STAT3 signaling, cytokine levels, and tumorigenesis, indicating that SPL prevents transformation and carcinogenesis. Together, our results suggest that dietary sphingolipids can augment or prevent colon cancer, depending upon whether they are metabolized to S1P or promote S1P metabolism through the actions of SPL. PMID:25347472

  1. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Is a Novel Regulator of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Activity.

    PubMed

    Malik, Firhan A; Meissner, Anja; Semenkov, Illya; Molinski, Steven; Pasyk, Stan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Bui, Hai H; Bear, Christine E; Lidington, Darcy; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) attenuates sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling in resistance arteries and has emerged as a prominent regulator of myogenic vasoconstriction. This investigation demonstrates that S1P inhibits CFTR activity via adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK), establishing a potential feedback link. In Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK) cells expressing wild-type human CFTR, S1P (1μmol/L) attenuates forskolin-stimulated, CFTR-dependent iodide efflux. S1P's inhibitory effect is rapid (within 30 seconds), transient and correlates with CFTR serine residue 737 (S737) phosphorylation. Both S1P receptor antagonism (4μmol/L VPC 23019) and AMPK inhibition (80μmol/L Compound C or AMPK siRNA) attenuate S1P-stimluated (i) AMPK phosphorylation, (ii) CFTR S737 phosphorylation and (iii) CFTR activity inhibition. In BHK cells expressing the ΔF508 CFTR mutant (CFTRΔF508), the most common mutation causing cystic fibrosis, both S1P receptor antagonism and AMPK inhibition enhance CFTR activity, without instigating discernable correction. In summary, we demonstrate that S1P/AMPK signaling transiently attenuates CFTR activity. Since our previous work positions CFTR as a negative S1P signaling regulator, this signaling link may positively reinforce S1P signals. This discovery has clinical ramifications for the treatment of disease states associated with enhanced S1P signaling and/or deficient CFTR activity (e.g. cystic fibrosis, heart failure). S1P receptor/AMPK inhibition could synergistically enhance the efficacy of therapeutic strategies aiming to correct aberrant CFTR trafficking. PMID:26079370

  2. Production and characterization of monoclonal anti-sphingosine-1-phosphate antibodies1

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Nicole; Jones, S. Tarran; Williams, David G.; Cunningham, H. Brad; Moreno, Kelli; Visentin, Barbara; Gentile, Angela; Vekich, John; Shestowsky, William; Hiraiwa, Masao; Matteo, Rosalia; Cavalli, Amy; Grotjahn, Douglas; Grant, Maria; Hansen, Geneviève; Campbell, Mary-Ann; Sabbadini, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a pleiotropic bioactive lipid involved in multiple physiological processes. Importantly, dysregulated S1P levels are associated with several pathologies, including cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases and cancer. This report describes the successful production and characterization of a murine monoclonal antibody, LT1002, directed against S1P, using novel immunization and screening methods applied to bioactive lipids. We also report the successful generation of LT1009, the humanized variant of LT1002, for potential clinical use. Both LT1002 and LT1009 have high affinity and specificity for S1P and do not cross-react with structurally related lipids. Using an in vitro bioassay, LT1002 and LT1009 were effective in blocking S1P-mediated release of the pro-angiogenic and prometastatic cytokine, interleukin-8, from human ovarian carcinoma cells, showing that both antibodies can out-compete S1P receptors in binding to S1P. In vivo anti-angiogenic activity of all antibody variants was demonstrated using the murine choroidal neovascularization model. Importantly, intravenous administration of the antibodies showed a marked effect on lymphocyte trafficking. The resulting lead candidate, LT1009, has been formulated for Phase 1 clinical trials in cancer and age-related macular degeneration. The anti-S1P antibody shows promise as a novel, first-in-class therapeutic acting as a “molecular sponge” to selectively deplete S1P from blood and other compartments where pathological S1P levels have been implicated in disease progression or in disorders where immune modulation may be beneficial. PMID:19509417

  3. Ceramidases: regulators of cellular responses mediated by ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Cungui; Obeid, Lina M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Ceramidases catalyze hydrolysis of ceramides to generate sphingosine (SPH), which is phosphorylated to form sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Ceramide, SPH, and S1P are bioactive lipids that mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration, likely by controlling hydrolysis of ceramides and generation of SPH and S1P. Presently, 5 human ceramidases encoded by 5 distinct genes have been cloned: acid ceramidase (AC), neutral ceramidase (NC), alkaline ceramidase 1 (ACER1), alkaline ceramidase 2 (ACER2), and alkaline ceramidase 3 (ACER3). Each human ceramidase has a mouse counterpart. AC, NC, and ACER1–3 have maximal activities in acidic, neutral, and alkaline environments, respectively. ACER1–3 have similar protein sequences but no homology to AC and NC. AC and NC also have distinct protein sequences. The human AC (hAC) was implicated in Farber disease, and hAC may be important for cell survival. The mouse AC (mAC) is needed for early embryo survival. NC is protective against inflammatory cytokines, and the mouse NC (mNC) is required for the catabolism of ceramides in the digestive tract. ACER1 is critical in mediating cell differentiation by controlling the generation of SPH and S1P and that ACER2’s role in cell proliferation and survival depends on its expression or the cell type in which it is found. Here, we discuss the role of each ceramidase in regulating cellular responses mediated by ceramides, SPH, and S1P. PMID:18619555

  4. P17.15AUTOCRINE SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE FUELS GROWTH AND STEMNESS IN GLIOBLASTOMA STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Di Vito, C.; Navone, S.; Abdel Hadi, L.; Giussani, P.; Viani, P.; Rampini, P.M.; Caroli, M.; Marfia, G.; Campanella, R.; Riboni, L.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is an onco-promoter lipid that, after interaction with specific membrane receptors, acts as a key regulator of growth, invasion, and therapy-resistance of different tumors, including human glioblastomas (GBMs). These are the most common and lethal primary brain cancer in adults, exhibiting a dismal prognosis, despite diverse therapeutic approaches. Accumulating reports suggest that human GBMs contain glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs), a small subpopulation of cells determinant in tumor growth, and malignant progression. Little is known about the role of S1P in GSCs. Using GSCs derived from human GBM specimens with different proliferative index and stemness marker expression, we investigated the possible role of S1P in the proliferative and stemness properties of GSCs. Metabolic studies demonstrated that GSCs can rapidly export newly synthesized S1P, this process being enhanced in fast proliferating cells. Released S1P levels reached nM concentrations in response to increased extracellular sphingosine. Moreover, EGF and bFGF, recognized autocrine factors in GSC, potentiated the constitutive capacity of GSCs to secrete S1P, suggesting that cooperation between S1P and these growth factors is of relevance in GSC maintenance and proliferation. Of relevance, we then found that S1P is able to act as a proliferative and pro-stemness autocrine factor for GSCs, promoting both cell cycle progression and stemness phenotypic profile, in a receptor-dependent fashion. Overall, our results suggest that the GSC population is critically modulated by microenvironmental S1P, that acts as an autocrine signal to maintain a pro-stemness microenvironment and favoring GSC survival, proliferation and maintenance of stem properties. These findings could open novel opportunities for the development of effective treatments for GBMs.

  5. Sphingosine 1-phosphate axis: a new leader actor in skeletal muscle biology

    PubMed Central

    Donati, Chiara; Cencetti, Francesca; Bruni, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid involved in the regulation of biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival. Here we review the role of S1P in the biology and homeostasis of skeletal muscle. S1P derives from the catabolism of sphingomyelin and is produced by sphingosine phosphorylation catalyzed by sphingosine kinase (SK). S1P can act either intracellularly or extracellularly through specific ligation to its five G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) named S1P receptors (S1PR). Many experimental findings obtained in the last 20 years demonstrate that S1P and its metabolism play a multifaceted role in the regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration. Indeed, this lipid is known to activate muscle-resident satellite cells, regulating their proliferation and differentiation, as well as mesenchymal progenitors such as mesoangioblasts that originate outside skeletal muscle, both involved in tissue repair following an injury or disease. The molecular mechanism of action of S1P in skeletal muscle cell precursors is highly complex, especially because S1P axis is under the control of a number of growth factors and cytokines, canonical regulators of skeletal muscle biology. Moreover, this lipid is crucially involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle contractile properties, responsiveness to insulin, fatigue resistance and tropism. Overall, on the basis of these findings S1P signaling appears to be an appealing pharmacological target for improving skeletal muscle repair. Nevertheless, further understanding is required on the regulation of S1P downstream signaling pathways and the expression of S1PR. This article will resume our current knowledge on S1P signaling in skeletal muscle, hopefully stimulating further investigation in the field, aimed at individuating novel molecular targets for ameliorating skeletal muscle regeneration and reducing fibrosis of the tissue after a trauma or due to skeletal muscle diseases. PMID

  6. Elevation of serum sphingosine-1-phosphate attenuates impaired cardiac function in experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Coldewey, Sina M.; Benetti, Elisa; Collino, Massimo; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Sponholz, Christoph; Bauer, Michael; Huwiler, Andrea; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are reduced in septic patients and are inversely associated with disease severity. We show that serum S1P is reduced in human sepsis and in murine models of sepsis. We then investigated whether pharmacological or genetic approaches that alter serum S1P may attenuate cardiac dysfunction and whether S1P signaling might serve as a novel theragnostic tool in sepsis. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan (LPS/PepG). LPS/PepG resulted in an impaired systolic contractility and reduced serum S1P. Administration of the immunomodulator FTY720 increased serum S1P, improved impaired systolic contractility and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-pathway in the heart. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were abolished following administration of a S1P receptor 2 (S1P2) antagonist or a PI3K inhibitor. Sphingosine kinase-2 deficient mice had higher endogenous S1P levels and the LPS/PepG-induced impaired systolic contractility was attenuated in comparison with wild-type mice. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were confirmed in polymicrobial sepsis. We show here for the first time that the impaired left ventricular systolic contractility in experimental sepsis is attenuated by FTY720. Mechanistically, our results indicate that activation of S1P2 by increased serum S1P and the subsequent activation of the PI3K-Akt survival pathway significantly contributes to the observed cardioprotective effect of FTY720. PMID:27277195

  7. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 agonism attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Stone, Matthew L; Sharma, Ashish K; Zhao, Yunge; Charles, Eric J; Huerter, Mary E; Johnston, William F; Kron, Irving L; Lynch, Kevin R; Laubach, Victor E

    2015-06-15

    Outcomes for lung transplantation are the worst of any solid organ, and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) limits both short- and long-term outcomes. Presently no therapeutic agents are available to prevent IRI. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) modulates immune function through binding to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1PR1-5). Although S1P has been shown to attenuate lung IRI, the S1P receptors responsible for protection have not been defined. The present study tests the hypothesis that protection from lung IRI is primarily mediated through S1PR1 activation. Mice were treated with either vehicle, FTY720 (a nonselective S1P receptor agonist), or VPC01091 (a selective S1PR1 agonist and S1PR3 antagonist) before left lung IR. Function, vascular permeability, cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration, and myeloperoxidase levels were measured in lungs. After IR, both FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly improved lung function (reduced pulmonary artery pressure and increased pulmonary compliance) vs. vehicle control. In addition, FTY720 and VPC01091 significantly reduced vascular permeability, expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-17, IL-12/IL-23 p40, CC chemokine ligand-2, and TNF-α), myeloperoxidase levels, and neutrophil infiltration compared with control. No significant differences were observed between VPC01091 and FTY720 treatment groups. VPC01091 did not significantly affect elevated invariant natural killer T cell infiltration after IR, and administration of an S1PR1 antagonist reversed VPC01091-mediated protection after IR. In conclusion, VPC01091 and FTY720 provide comparable protection from lung injury and dysfunction after IR. These findings suggest that S1P-mediated protection from IRI is mediated by S1PR1 activation, independent of S1PR3, and that selective S1PR1 agonists may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to prevent lung IRI. PMID:25910934

  8. Galactose-1-phosphate Uridyltransferase Dried Blood Spot Quality Control Materials for Newborn Screening Tests

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Barbara W.; Flores, Sharon R.; Hou, Yu; Allen, Todd W.; De Jesus, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to prepare dried-blood-spot (DBS) quality control (QC) materials for galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), to evaluate their stability during storage and use, and to evaluate their performance in five DBS GALT test methods. Design and Methods We prepared and characterized GALT-normal and GALT-deficient DBS materials and compared GALT activities in DBSs after predetermined storage intervals at controlled temperatures and humidities. External evaluators documented the suitability of the DBS QC materials for use in five GALT test methods. Results GALT activity losses from DBSs stored in low (<30%) humidity for 14 days at 45°C, 35 days at 37°C, 91 days at room temperature, 182 days at 4°C, and 367 days at −20°C were 54%, 53%, 52% 23%, and 7% respectively. In paired DBSs stored in high humidity (>50%) for identical intervals, losses were: 45°C—68%; 37°C—79%; room temperature—72%, and 4°C—63%. GALT activities in DBSs stored at 4°C were stable throughout 19 excursions to room temperature. Twenty-five of 26 external evaluators, using five different GALT test methods, classified the GALT-deficient DBSs as “outside normal limits”. All evaluators classified the GALT-normal DBSs as “within normal limits”. Conclusions Most of the GALT activity loss from DBSs stored at elevated or room temperature was attributable to the effects of storage temperature. Most of the loss from DBSs stored at 4°C was attributable to the effects of elevated humidity. Loss from DBSs stored at −20°C was insignificant. The DBS materials were suitable for monitoring performance of all five GALT test methods. PMID:25528144

  9. Therapeutic Impact of Sphingosine 1-phosphate Receptor Signaling in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kristina; Soufi, Henry; Bandyopadhyay, Mausumi; Dasgupta, Subhajit

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a female predominant autoimmune demyelinating disease of central nervous system. The proper etiology is not clear. The existing therapies with interferon beta (Betaseron, Rebif), glatiramer acetate (copolymer 1, copaxone) are found to be promising for MS patients. The alpha-4 integrin antagonist monoclonal antibody Natalizumab has been found to decrease brain inflammation in relapsing-remitting MS via inhibition of alpha-4 beta- 1 integrinmediated mode of action of antigen -primed T cells to enter into central nervous system through blood brain barrier. The advancement of drug development introduced prospects of CD52 monoclonal antibody Alemtuzumab and CD20 monoclonal antibody Rituximab in MS therapy. The benefit versus risk ratios of these therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are currently under clinical trial. The ongoing researches demonstrated the importance of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor statins, NF-κBp65 inhibitor NBD peptide, and antagonist of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), animal model for MS. Recently, the clinical trials indicated the therapeutic prospect of G-protein coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor (S1PR) in MS patients. Recent studies showed remyelination through selective activation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In the context, role of S1PR-mediated signals following interaction with natural ligand S1P and agonist Fingolimod (FTY720) gain profound therapeutic importance in prevention of demyelination in MS brain. The S1PR agonist Fingolimod (FTY 720) has recently been approved by Food and Drug Administration for MS therapy. In the review, we provided an insight on S1PR mode of action in the aspect of treatment of autoimmune disorder, re-myelination and regeneration of axons in damaged central nervous system in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26156414

  10. The Role of Sphingosine-1-phosphate Transporter Spns2 in Immune System Function

    PubMed Central

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Clare, Simon; Hale, Christine; Chen, Jing; Raisen, Claire; Mottram, Lynda; Lucas, Mark; Estabel, Jeanne; Ryder, Edward; Adissu, Hibret; Adams, Niels C.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; White, Jacqueline K.; Steel, Karen P.; Dougan, Gordon; Hancock, Robert E.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is lipid messenger involved in the regulation of embryonic development, immune system functions, and many other physiological processes. However the mechanisms of S1P transport across cellular membranes remain poorly understood with several ATP-binding cassette family members and the spinster 2 (Spns2) member of the major facilitator superfamily known to mediate S1P transport in cell culture. Spns2 was also shown to control S1P activities in zebrafish in vivo and to play a critical role in zebrafish cardiovascular development. However the in vivo roles of Spns2 in mammals and its involvement in the different S1P-dependent physiological processes have not been investigated. Here we characterized Spns2-null mouse line carrying the Spns2tm1a(KOMP)Wtsi allele (Spns2tm1a). The Spns2tm1a/tm1a animals were viable, indicating a divergence in Spns2 function from its zebrafish orthologue. However the immunological phenotype of the Spns2tm1a/tm1a mice closely mimicked the phenotypes of partial S1P deficiency and impaired S1P-dependent lymphocyte trafficking, with a depletion of lymphocytes in circulation, an increase in mature single-positive T cells in the thymus, and a selective reduction in mature B cells in the spleen and bone marrow. Spns2 activity in the non-hematopoietic cells was critical for normal lymphocyte development and localization. Overall Spns2tm1a/tm1a resulted in impaired humoral immune responses to immunization. This work thus demonstrated a physiological role for Spns2 in mammalian immune system functions but not in cardiovascular development. Other components of the S1P signaling network are investigated as drug targets for immunosuppressive therapy, but the selective action of Spns2 may present an advantage in this regard. PMID:22664872

  11. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  12. Impairment of Angiogenic Sphingosine Kinase-1/Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptors Pathway in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Dobierzewska, Aneta; Palominos, Macarena; Sanchez, Marianela; Dyhr, Michael; Helgert, Katja; Venegas-Araneda, Pia; Tong, Stephen; Illanes, Sebastian E

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE), is a serious pregnancy disorder characterized in the early gestation by shallow trophoblast invasion, impaired placental neo-angiogenesis, placental hypoxia and ischemia, which leads to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Here we hypothesized that angiogenic sphingosine kinase-1 (SPHK1)/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors pathway is impaired in PE. We found that SPHK1 mRNA and protein expression are down-regulated in term placentae and term chorionic villous explants from patients with PE or severe PE (PES), compared with controls. Moreover, mRNA expression of angiogenic S1PR1 and S1PR3 receptors were decreased in placental samples of PE and PES patients, whereas anti-angiogenic S1PR2 was up-regulated in chorionic villous tissue of PES subjects, pointing to its potential atherogenic and inflammatory properties. Furthermore, in in vitro (JAR cells) and ex vivo (chorionic villous explants) models of placental hypoxia, SPHK1 mRNA and protein were strongly up-regulated under low oxygen tension (1% 02). In contrast, there was no change in SPHK1 expression under the conditions of placental physiological hypoxia (8% 02). In both models, nuclear protein levels of HIF1A were increased at 1% 02 during the time course, but there was no up-regulation at 8% 02, suggesting that SPHK1 and HIF1A might be the part of the same canonical pathway during hypoxia and that both contribute to placental neovascularization during early gestation. Taken together, this study suggest the SPHK1 pathway may play a role in the human early placentation process and may be involved in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:27284992

  13. Elevation of serum sphingosine-1-phosphate attenuates impaired cardiac function in experimental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Coldewey, Sina M; Benetti, Elisa; Collino, Massimo; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Sponholz, Christoph; Bauer, Michael; Huwiler, Andrea; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Serum levels of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are reduced in septic patients and are inversely associated with disease severity. We show that serum S1P is reduced in human sepsis and in murine models of sepsis. We then investigated whether pharmacological or genetic approaches that alter serum S1P may attenuate cardiac dysfunction and whether S1P signaling might serve as a novel theragnostic tool in sepsis. Mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan (LPS/PepG). LPS/PepG resulted in an impaired systolic contractility and reduced serum S1P. Administration of the immunomodulator FTY720 increased serum S1P, improved impaired systolic contractility and activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-pathway in the heart. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were abolished following administration of a S1P receptor 2 (S1P2) antagonist or a PI3K inhibitor. Sphingosine kinase-2 deficient mice had higher endogenous S1P levels and the LPS/PepG-induced impaired systolic contractility was attenuated in comparison with wild-type mice. Cardioprotective effects of FTY720 were confirmed in polymicrobial sepsis. We show here for the first time that the impaired left ventricular systolic contractility in experimental sepsis is attenuated by FTY720. Mechanistically, our results indicate that activation of S1P2 by increased serum S1P and the subsequent activation of the PI3K-Akt survival pathway significantly contributes to the observed cardioprotective effect of FTY720. PMID:27277195

  14. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor 2 Regulates Proinflammatory Cytokine Production and Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) couples with the Gi, Gq, and G12/13 group of proteins, which modulate an array of cellular signaling pathways and affect immune responses to multiple stimuli. In this study, we demonstrated that knockdown of S1PR2 by a specific S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector significantly inhibited IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α protein levels induced by oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans) in murine bone marrow-derived monocytes and macrophages (BMMs) compared with controls. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 by the S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector suppressed p-PI3K, p-ERK, p-JNK, p-p38, and p-NF-κBp65 protein expressions induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Furthermore, bone marrow cells treated with the S1PR2 shRNA lentiviral vector inhibited osteoclastogenesis induced by RANKL compared with controls. The S1PR2 shRNA suppressed the mRNA levels of six osteoclastogenic factors including nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K (Ctsk), acid phosphatase 5 (Acp5), osteoclast-associated receptor (Oscar), dendritic cells specific transmembrane protein (Dcstamp), and osteoclast stimulatory transmembrane protein (Ocstamp) in bone marrow cells. We conclude that S1PR2 plays an essential role in modulating proinflammatory cytokine production and osteoclastogenesis. Blocking S1PR2 signaling might be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat inflammatory bone loss diseases. PMID:27224249

  15. Membrane Organization and Ionization Behavior of the Minor but Crucial Lipid Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kooijman, Edgar E.; Sot, Jesús; Montes, L.-Ruth; Alonso, Alicia; Gericke, Arne; de Kruijff, Ben; Kumar, Satyendra; Goñi, Felix M.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (Cer-1-P), one of the simplest of all sphingophospholipids, occurs in minor amounts in biological membranes. Yet recent evidence suggests important roles of this lipid as a novel second messenger with crucial tasks in cell survival and inflammatory responses. We present a detailed description of the physical chemistry of this hitherto little explored membrane lipid. At full hydration Cer-1-P forms a highly organized subgel (crystalline) bilayer phase (Lc) at low temperature, which transforms into a regular gel phase (Lβ) at ∼45°C, with the gel to fluid phase transition (Lβ–Lα) occurring at ∼65°C. When incorporated at 5 mol % in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer, the pKa2 of Cer-1-P, 7.39 ± 0.03, lies within the physiological pH range. Inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the phosphatidylcholine bilayer, at equimolar ratio, dramatically reduces the pKa2 to 6.64 ± 0.03. We explain these results in light of the novel electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch model described recently for phosphatidic acid. In mixtures with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, small concentrations of Cer-1-P cause a large reduction of the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature, suggesting that Cer-1-P induces, like phosphatidic acid, negative membrane curvature in these types of lipid mixtures. These properties place Cer-1-P in a class more akin to certain glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid) than to any other sphingolipid. In particular, the similarities and differences between ceramide and Cer-1-P may be relevant in explaining some of their physiological roles. PMID:18296489

  16. Membrane organization and ionization behavior of the minor but crucial lipid ceramide-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Kooijman, Edgar E; Sot, Jesús; Montes, L-Ruth; Alonso, Alicia; Gericke, Arne; de Kruijff, Ben; Kumar, Satyendra; Goñi, Felix M

    2008-06-01

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (Cer-1-P), one of the simplest of all sphingophospholipids, occurs in minor amounts in biological membranes. Yet recent evidence suggests important roles of this lipid as a novel second messenger with crucial tasks in cell survival and inflammatory responses. We present a detailed description of the physical chemistry of this hitherto little explored membrane lipid. At full hydration Cer-1-P forms a highly organized subgel (crystalline) bilayer phase (L(c)) at low temperature, which transforms into a regular gel phase (L(beta)) at approximately 45 degrees C, with the gel to fluid phase transition (L(beta)-L(alpha)) occurring at approximately 65 degrees C. When incorporated at 5 mol % in a phosphatidylcholine bilayer, the pK(a2) of Cer-1-P, 7.39 +/- 0.03, lies within the physiological pH range. Inclusion of phosphatidylethanolamine in the phosphatidylcholine bilayer, at equimolar ratio, dramatically reduces the pK(a2) to 6.64 +/- 0.03. We explain these results in light of the novel electrostatic/hydrogen bond switch model described recently for phosphatidic acid. In mixtures with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine, small concentrations of Cer-1-P cause a large reduction of the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal phase transition temperature, suggesting that Cer-1-P induces, like phosphatidic acid, negative membrane curvature in these types of lipid mixtures. These properties place Cer-1-P in a class more akin to certain glycerophospholipids (phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid) than to any other sphingolipid. In particular, the similarities and differences between ceramide and Cer-1-P may be relevant in explaining some of their physiological roles. PMID:18296489

  17. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  18. Glucose-1-Phosphate Transport into Protoplasts and Chloroplasts from Leaves of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Joerg; Malinova, Irina; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Steup, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Almost all glucosyl transfer reactions rely on glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) that either immediately acts as glucosyl donor or as substrate for the synthesis of the more widely used Glc dinucleotides, ADPglucose or UDPglucose. In this communication, we have analyzed two Glc-1-P-related processes: the carbon flux from externally supplied Glc-1-P to starch by either mesophyll protoplasts or intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). When intact protoplasts or chloroplasts are incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P, starch is rapidly labeled. Incorporation into starch is unaffected by the addition of unlabeled Glc-6-P or Glc, indicating a selective flux from Glc-1-P to starch. However, illuminated protoplasts incorporate less 14C into starch when unlabeled bicarbonate is supplied in addition to the 14C-labeled Glc-1-P. Mesophyll protoplasts incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P incorporate 14C into the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose. Protoplasts prepared from leaves of mutants of Arabidopsis that lack either the plastidial phosphorylase or the phosphoglucomutase isozyme incorporate 14C derived from external Glc-1-P into starch, but incorporation into starch is insignificant when protoplasts from a mutant possessing a highly reduced ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity are studied. Thus, the path of assimilatory starch biosynthesis initiated by extraplastidial Glc-1-P leads to the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose, and at this intermediate it is fused with the Calvin cycle-driven route. Mutants lacking the plastidial phosphoglucomutase contain a small yet significant amount of transitory starch. PMID:21115809

  19. Antagonism of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors by FTY720 inhibits angiogenesis and tumor vascularization.

    PubMed

    LaMontagne, Kenneth; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda; Schnell, Christian; O'Reilly, Terence; Wyder, Lorenza; Sanchez, Teresa; Probst, Beatrice; Butler, Jeannene; Wood, Alexander; Liau, Gene; Billy, Eric; Theuer, Andreas; Hla, Timothy; Wood, Jeanette

    2006-01-01

    FTY720, a potent immunomodulator, becomes phosphorylated in vivo (FTY-P) and interacts with sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors. Recent studies showed that FTY-P affects vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular permeability, an important aspect of angiogenesis. We show here that FTY720 has antiangiogenic activity, potently abrogating VEGF- and S1P-induced angiogenesis in vivo in growth factor implant and corneal models. FTY720 administration tended to inhibit primary and significantly inhibited metastatic tumor growth in a mouse model of melanoma growth. In combination with a VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584, FTY720 showed some additional benefit. FTY720 markedly inhibited tumor-associated angiogenesis, and this was accompanied by decreased tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. In transfected HEK293 cells, FTY-P internalized S1P1 receptors, inhibited their recycling to the cell surface, and desensitized S1P receptor function. Both FTY720 and FTY-P apparently failed to impede VEGF-produced increases in mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC), and unlike its activity in causing S1PR internalization, FTY-P did not result in a decrease of surface VEGFR2 levels in HUVEC cells. Pretreatment with FTY720 or FTY-P prevented S1P-induced Ca2+ mobilization and migration in vascular endothelial cells. These data show that functional antagonism of vascular S1P receptors by FTY720 potently inhibits angiogenesis; therefore, this may provide a novel therapeutic approach for pathologic conditions with dysregulated angiogenesis. PMID:16397235

  20. Subfertility and growth restriction in a new galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) - deficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Manshu; Siddiqi, Anwer; Witt, Benjamin; Yuzyuk, Tatiana; Johnson, Britt; Fraser, Nisa; Chen, Wyman; Rascon, Rafael; Yin, Xue; Goli, Harish; Bodamer, Olaf A; Lai, Kent

    2014-10-01

    The first GalT gene knockout (KO) mouse model for Classic Galactosemia (OMIM 230400) accumulated some galactose and its metabolites upon galactose challenge, but was seemingly fertile and symptom free. Here we constructed a new GalT gene-trapped mouse model by injecting GalT gene-trapped mouse embryonic stem cells into blastocysts, which were later implanted into pseudo-pregnant females. High percentage GalT gene-trapped chimera obtained were used to generate heterozygous and subsequently, homozygous GalT gene-trapped mice. Biochemical assays confirmed total absence of galactose-1 phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity in the homozygotes. Although the homozygous GalT gene-trapped females could conceive and give birth when fed with normal chow, they had smaller litter size (P=0.02) and longer time-to-pregnancy (P=0.013) than their wild-type littermates. Follicle-stimulating hormone levels of the mutant female mice were not significantly different from the age-matched, wild-type females, but histological examination of the ovaries revealed fewer follicles in the homozygous mutants (P=0.007). Administration of a high-galactose (40% w/w) diet to lactating homozygous GalT gene-trapped females led to lethality in over 70% of the homozygous GalT gene-trapped pups before weaning. Cerebral edema, abnormal changes in the Purkinje and the outer granular cell layers of the cerebellum, as well as lower blood GSH/GSSG ratio were identified in the galactose-intoxicated pups. Finally, reduced growth was observed in GalT gene-trapped pups fed with normal chow and all pups fed with high-galactose (20% w/w) diet. This new mouse model presents several of the complications of Classic Galactosemia and will be useful to investigate pathogenesis and new therapies. PMID:24549051

  1. Sphingosine 1-phosphate signaling pathway in inner ear biology. New therapeutic strategies for hearing loss?

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Guevara, Ricardo; Cencetti, Francesca; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent conditions around the world, in particular among people over 60 years old. Thus, an increase of this affection is predicted as result of the aging process in our population. In this context, it is important to further explore the function of molecular targets involved in the biology of inner ear sensory cells to better individuate new candidates for therapeutic application. One of the main causes of deafness resides into the premature death of hair cells and auditory neurons. In this regard, neurotrophins and growth factors such as insulin like growth factor are known to be beneficial by favoring the survival of these cells. An elevated number of published data in the last 20 years have individuated sphingolipids not only as structural components of biological membranes but also as critical regulators of key biological processes, including cell survival. Ceramide, formed by catabolism of sphingomyelin (SM) and other complex sphingolipids, is a strong inducer of apoptotic pathway, whereas sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), generated by cleavage of ceramide to sphingosine and phosphorylation catalyzed by two distinct sphingosine kinase (SK) enzymes, stimulates cell survival. Interestingly S1P, by acting as intracellular mediator or as ligand of a family of five distinct S1P receptors (S1P1–S1P5), is a very powerful bioactive sphingolipid, capable of triggering also other diverse cellular responses such as cell migration, proliferation and differentiation, and is critically involved in the development and homeostasis of several organs and tissues. Although new interesting data have become available, the information on S1P pathway and other sphingolipids in the biology of the inner ear is limited. Nonetheless, there are several lines of evidence implicating these signaling molecules during neurogenesis in other cell populations. In this review, we discuss the role of S1P during inner ear development, also as guidance for future

  2. Origins, distribution and expression of the Duarte-2 (D2) allele of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Amanda E.; Sanders, Rebecca D.; Garza, Kerry R.; McGaha, Lee Anne; Bean, Lora J. H.; Coffee, Bradford W.; Thomas, James W.; Cutler, David J.; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Fridovich-Keil, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    Duarte galactosemia is a mild to asymptomatic condition that results from partial impairment of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Patients with Duarte galactosemia demonstrate reduced GALT activity and carry one profoundly impaired GALT allele (G) along with a second, partially impaired GALT allele (Duarte-2, D2). Molecular studies reveal at least five sequence changes on D2 alleles: a p.N314D missense substitution, three intronic base changes and a 4 bp deletion in the 5′ proximal sequence. The four non-coding sequence changes are unique to D2. The p.N314D substitution, however, is not; it is found together with a silent polymorphism, p.L218(TTA), on functionally normal Duarte-1 alleles (D1, also called Los Angeles or LA alleles). The HapMap database reveals that p.N314D is a common human variant, and cross-species comparisons implicate D314 as the ancestral allele. The p.N314D substitution is also functionally neutral in mammalian cell and yeast expression studies. In contrast, the 4 bp 5′ deletion characteristic of D2 alleles appears to be functionally impaired in reporter gene transfection studies. Here we present allele-specific qRT–PCR evidence that D2 alleles express less mRNA in vivo than their wild-type counterparts; the difference is small but statistically significant. Furthermore, we characterize the prevalence of the 4 bp deletion in GG, NN and DG populations; the deletion appears exclusive to D2 alleles. Combined, these data strongly implicate the 4 bp 5′ deletion as a causal mutation in Duarte galactosemia and suggest that direct tests for this deletion, as proposed here, could enhance or supplant current tests, which define D2 alleles on the basis of the presence and absence of linked coding sequence polymorphisms. PMID:19224951

  3. An Unusual Cation-Binding Site and Distinct Domain-Domain Interactions Distinguish Class II Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate Synthases.

    PubMed

    Light, Samuel H; Krishna, Sankar N; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-03-01

    Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) catalyzes a critical step in the biosynthesis of a number of aromatic metabolites. An essential prokaryotic enzyme and the molecular target of the herbicide glyphosate, EPSPSs are the subject of both pharmaceutical and commercial interest. Two EPSPS classes that exhibit low sequence homology, differing substrate/glyphosate affinities, and distinct cation activation properties have previously been described. Here, we report structural studies of the monovalent cation-binding class II Coxiella burnetii EPSPS (cbEPSPS). Three cbEPSPS crystal structures reveal that the enzyme undergoes substantial conformational changes that alter the electrostatic potential of the active site. A complex with shikimate-3-phosphate, inorganic phosphate (Pi), and K(+) reveals that ligand induced domain closure produces an unusual cation-binding site bordered on three sides by the N-terminal domain, C-terminal domain, and the product Pi. A crystal structure of the class I Vibrio cholerae EPSPS (vcEPSPS) clarifies the basis of differential class I and class II cation responsiveness, showing that in class I EPSPSs a lysine side chain occupies the would-be cation-binding site. Finally, we identify distinct patterns of sequence conservation at the domain-domain interface and propose that the two EPSPS classes have evolved to differently optimize domain opening-closing dynamics. PMID:26813771

  4. A human nuclear uracil DNA glycosylase is the 37-kDa subunit of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Siegler, K.; Mauro, D.J.; Seal, G.; Wurzer, J.; DeRiel, J.K.; Sirover, M.A. )

    1991-10-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized a plasmid (pChug 20.1) that contains the cDNA of a nuclear uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) gene isolated from normal human placenta. This cDNA directed the synthesis of a fusion protein that exhibited UDG activity. The enzymatic activity was specific for a uracil-containing polynucleotide substrate and was inhibited by a glycosylase antibody or a {beta}-galactosidase antibody. Sequence analysis demonstrated an open reading frame that encoded a protein of 335 amino acids of calculated M{sub r} 36,050 and pI 8.7, corresponding to the M{sub r} 37,000 and pI 8.1 of purified human placental UDG. Surprisingly, a search of the GenBank data base revealed that the cDNA of UDG was completely homologous with the 378-kDa subunit of human glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Human erythrocyte glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was obtained commercially in its tetrameric form. A 37-kDa subunit was isolated form it and shown to possess UDG activity equivalent to that seen for the purified human placental UDG. The multiple functions of this 37-kDa protein as here and previously reported indicate that it possesses a series of activities, depending on its oligomeric state. Accordingly, mutation(s) in the gene of this multifunctional protein may conceivably result in the diverse cellular phenotypes of Bloom syndrome.

  5. Metabolic engineering of enhanced glycerol-3-phosphate synthesis to increase lipid production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Xiong, Xiaochao; Sa, Na; Roje, Sanja; Chen, Shulin

    2016-07-01

    With the growing attention to global warming and energy sustainability, biosynthesis of lipids by photosynthetic microorganisms has attracted more interest for the production of renewable transportation fuels. Recently, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has been widely used for biofuel production through metabolic engineering because of its efficient photosynthesis and well-developed genetic tools. In lipid biosynthesis, glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is a key node for both CO2 fixation and lipid metabolism in cyanobacteria. However, few studies have explored the use of G3P synthesis to improve photosynthetic lipid production. In this study, metabolic engineering combined with flux balance analysis (FBA) was conducted to reveal the effect of G3P synthesis on lipid production. Heterologous genes that encoded glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) were engineered into Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 to enhance G3P supply and lipid production. The resultant recombinant Synechocystis produced higher levels of lipids without a significant reduction in cell growth. Compared with the wild-type strain, lipid content and productivity of the engineered cyanobacteria increased by up to 36 and 31 %, respectively, under autotrophic conditions. Lipid production under mixotrophic conditions of the engineered cyanobacteria was also investigated. This work demonstrated that enhanced G3P synthesis was an important factor in photosynthetic lipid production and that introducing heterologous GPD and DGAT genes was an effective strategy to increase lipid production in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. PMID:27154348

  6. Synergistic interaction of glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ArsJ, a novel organoarsenical efflux permease, confers arsenate resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Garbinski, Luis D; Rosen, Barry P

    2016-06-01

    Microbial biotransformations are major contributors to the arsenic biogeocycle. In parallel with transformations of inorganic arsenic, organoarsenicals pathways have recently been recognized as important components of global cycling of arsenic. The well-characterized pathway of resistance to arsenate is reduction coupled to arsenite efflux. Here, we describe a new pathway of arsenate resistance involving biosynthesis and extrusion of an unusual pentavalent organoarsenical. A number of arsenic resistance (ars) operons have two genes of unknown function that are linked in these operons. One, gapdh, encodes the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The other, arsJ, encodes a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein. The two genes were cloned from the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. When expressed together, but not alone, in Escherichia coli, gapdh and arsJ specifically conferred resistance to arsenate and decreased accumulation of As(V). Everted membrane vesicles from cells expressing arsJ accumulated As(V) in the presence of purified GAPDH, D-glceraldehylde 3-phosphate (G3P) and NAD(+) . GAPDH forms the unstable organoarsenical 1-arseno-3-phosphoglycerate (1As3PGA). We propose that ArsJ is an efflux permease that extrudes 1As3PGA from cells, where it rapidly dissociates into As(V) and 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA), creating a novel pathway of arsenate resistance. PMID:26991003

  7. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Guanosine Tetraphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Merlie, John P.; Pizer, Lewis I.

    1973-01-01

    Phospholipid synthesis has been reported to be subject to stringent control in Escherichia coli. We present evidence that demonstrates a strict correlation between guanosine tetraphosphate accumulation and inhibition of phospholipid synthesis. In vivo experiments designed to examine the pattern of phospholipid labeling with 32P-inorganic phosphate and 32P-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate suggest that regulation must occur at the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase step. Assay of phospholipid synthesis by cell-free extracts and semipurified preparations revealed that guanosine tetraphosphate inhibits at least two enzymes specific for the biosynthetic pathway, sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase as well as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatidyl transferase. These findings provide a biochemical basis for the stringent control of lipid synthesis as well as regulation of steady-state levels of phospholipid in growing cells. Images PMID:4583220

  8. Synthesis and Physicochemical Characterization of D-Tagatose-1-phosphate: The Substrate of the Tagatose-1-Phosphate Kinase TagK in the PTS-mediated D-Tagatose Catabolic Pathway of Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Delmarcelle, Michaël; Simon, Patricia; Counson, Melody; Galleni, Moreno; Freedberg, Darón I.; Thompson, John; Joris, Bernard; Battistel, Marcos D.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first enzymatic synthesis of D-tagatose-1-phosphate (Tag-1P) by the multi-component PEP-dependent:tag-PTS present in tagatose-grown cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Physicochemical characterization by 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy reveals that, in solution, this derivative is primarily in the pyranose form. Tag-1P was used to characterize the putative tagatose-1-phosphate kinase (TagK) of the Bacillus licheniformis PTS-mediated D-Tagatose catabolic Pathway (Bli-TagP). For this purpose, a soluble protein fusion was obtained with the 6 His-tagged trigger factor (TFHis6) of Escherichia coli. The active fusion enzyme was named TagK-TFHis6. Tag-1P and D-fructose-1-phosphate (Fru-1P) are substrates for the TagK-TFHis6 enzyme, whereas the isomeric derivatives D-tagatose-6-phosphate (Tag-6P) and D-fructose-6-phosphate (Fru-6P) are inhibitors. Studies of catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) reveal that the enzyme specificity is markedly in favor of Tag-1P as substrate. Importantly, we show in vivo that the transfer of the phosphate moiety from PEP to the B. licheniformis tagatose-specific enzyme II (EIITag) in E.coli is inefficient. The capability of the PTS general cytoplasmic components of B. subtilis, HPr and EI, to restore the phosphate transfer is demonstrated. PMID:26159072

  9. Structure of Insoluble Rat Sperm Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) via Heterotetramer Formation with Escherichia coli GAPDH Reveals Target for Contraceptive Design*

    PubMed Central

    Frayne, Jan; Taylor, Abby; Cameron, Gus; Hadfield, Andrea T.

    2009-01-01

    Sperm glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase has been shown to be a successful target for a non-hormonal contraceptive approach, but the agents tested to date have had unacceptable side effects. Obtaining the structure of the sperm-specific isoform to allow rational inhibitor design has therefore been a goal for a number of years but has proved intractable because of the insoluble nature of both native and recombinant protein. We have obtained soluble recombinant sperm glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a heterotetramer with the Escherichia coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in a ratio of 1:3 and have solved the structure of the heterotetramer which we believe represents a novel strategy for structure determination of an insoluble protein. A structure was also obtained where glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate binds in the Ps pocket in the active site of the sperm enzyme subunit in the presence of NAD. Modeling and comparison of the structures of human somatic and sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase revealed few differences at the active site and hence rebut the long presumed structural specificity of 3-chlorolactaldehyde for the sperm isoform. The contraceptive activity of α-chlorohydrin and its apparent specificity for the sperm isoform in vivo are likely to be due to differences in metabolism to 3-chlorolactaldehyde in spermatozoa and somatic cells. However, further detailed analysis of the sperm glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structure revealed sites in the enzyme that do show significant difference compared with published somatic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structures that could be exploited by structure-based drug design to identify leads for novel male contraceptives. PMID:19542219

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yosuke Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  11. Characterization of a Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Antagonist ProdrugS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Perry C.; Zhu, Ran; Huang, Tao; Tomsig, Jose L.; Mathews, Thomas P.; David, Marion; Peyruchaud, Olivier; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a phospholipid that binds to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1–S1P5) to initiate an array of signaling cascades that affect cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and migration. On a larger physiological scale, the effects of S1P on immune cell trafficking, vascular barrier integrity, angiogenesis, and heart rate have also been observed. An impetus for the characterization of S1P-initiated signaling effects came with the discovery that FTY720 [fingolimod; 2-amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol] modulates the immune system by acting as an agonist at S1P1. In the course of structure-activity relationship studies to better understand the functional chemical space around FTY720, we discovered conformationally constrained FTY720 analogs that behave as S1P receptor type-selective antagonists. Here, we present a pharmacological profile of a lead S1P1/3 antagonist prodrug, 1-(hydroxymethyl)-3-(3-octylphenyl)cyclobutane (VPC03090). VPC03090 is phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase 2 to form the competitive antagonist species 3-(3-octylphenyl)-1-(phosphonooxymethyl)cyclobutane (VPC03090-P) as observed in guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding assays, with effects on downstream S1P receptor signaling confirmed by Western blot and calcium mobilization assays. Oral dosing of VPC03090 results in an approximate 1:1 phosphorylated/alcohol species ratio with a half-life of 30 h in mice. Because aberrant S1P signaling has been implicated in carcinogenesis, we applied VPC03090 in an immunocompetent mouse mammary cancer model to assess its antineoplastic potential. Treatment with VPC03090 significantly inhibited the growth of 4T1 primary tumors in mice. This result calls to attention the value of S1P receptor antagonists as not only research tools but also potential therapeutic agents. PMID:21632869

  12. Conjugated bile acids activate the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 in primary rodent hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Studer, Elaine; Zhou, Xiqiao; Zhao, Renping; Wang, Yun; Takabe, Kazuaki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Pandak, William M; Dent, Paul; Spiegel, Sarah; Shi, Ruihua; Xu, Weiren; Liu, Xuyuan; Bohdan, Pat; Zhang, Luyong; Zhou, Huiping; Hylemon, Phillip B

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids have been shown to be important regulatory molecules for cells in the liver and gastrointestinal tract. They can activate various cell signaling pathways including extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) membrane-type bile acid receptor (TGR5/M-BAR). Activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways by conjugated bile acids has been reported to be sensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX) and dominant-negative Gα(i) in primary rodent hepatocytes. However, the GPCRs responsible for activation of these pathways have not been identified. Screening GPCRs in the lipid-activated phylogenetic family (expressed in HEK293 cells) identified sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P(2) ) as being activated by taurocholate (TCA). TCA, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA), tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA), and S1P-induced activation of ERK1/2 and AKT were significantly inhibited by JTE-013, a S1P(2) antagonist, in primary rat hepatocytes. JTE-013 significantly inhibited hepatic ERK1/2 and AKT activation as well as short heterodimeric partner (SHP) mRNA induction by TCA in the chronic bile fistula rat. Knockdown of the expression of S1P(2) by a recombinant lentivirus encoding S1P(2) shRNA markedly inhibited the activation of ERK1/2 and AKT by TCA and S1P in rat primary hepatocytes. Primary hepatocytes prepared from S1P(2) knock out (S1P(2) (-/-) ) mice were significantly blunted in the activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways by TCA. Structural modeling of the S1P receptors indicated that only S1P(2) can accommodate TCA binding. In summary, all these data support the hypothesis that conjugated bile acids activate the ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways primarily through S1P(2) in primary rodent hepatocytes. PMID:21932398

  13. Functional variants of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 gene associate with asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoguang; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Wade, Michael S.; Flores, Carlos; Pino-Yanes, Maria; Moitra, Jaideep; Ober, Carole; Kittles, Rick; Husain, Aliya N.; Ford, Jean G.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic mechanisms underlying asthma remain unclear. Increased permeability of the microvasculature is a feature of asthma and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, S1PR1, is an essential participant regulating lung vascular integrity and responses to lung inflammation. Objective We explored the contribution of polymorphisms in the S1PR1 gene (S1PR1) to asthma susceptibility. Methods A combination of gene re-sequencing for SNP discovery, case-control association, functional evaluation of associated SNPs, and protein immunochemistry studies was utilized. Results Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated significantly decreased S1PR1 protein expression in pulmonary vessels in asthmatic lungs compared to non-asthmatic individuals (p<0.05). Direct DNA sequencing of 27 multiethnic samples identified 39 S1PR1 variants (18 novel SNPs). Association studies were performed based on genotyping results from cosmopolitan tagging SNPs in three case-control cohorts from Chicago and New York totaling 1061 subjects (502 cases and 559 controls). Promoter SNP rs2038366 (−1557G/T) was found to be associated with asthma (p=0.03) in European Americans. In African Americans, an association was found for both asthma and severe asthma for intronic SNP rs3753194 (c.−164+170A/G) (p=0.006 and p=0.040, respectively) and for promoter SNP rs59317557 (−532C/G) with severe asthma (p=0.028). Consistent with predicted in silico functionality, alleles of promoter SNPs rs2038366 (−1557G/T) and rs59317557 (−532C/G) influenced the activity of a luciferase S1PR1 reporter vector in transfected endothelial cells exposed to growth factors (EGF, PDGF, VEGF) known to be increased in asthmatic airways. Conclusion These data provide strong support for a role for S1PR1 gene variants in asthma susceptibility and severity. Clinical Implications Our results indicate S1PR1 is a novel asthma candidate gene and an attractive target for future therapeutic strategies. Capsule summary This study

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor activation enhances BMP-2-induced osteoblast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Chieri; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sano, Hajime

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the role of S1P signaling for osteoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both S1P and FTY enhanced BMP-2-stimulated osteoblast differentiation by C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P signaling enhanced BMP-2-stimulated Smad and ERK phosphorylation by C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEK/ERK signaling is a pathway underlying S1P signaling for osteoblast differentiation. -- Abstract: We previously demonstrated that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor-mediated signaling induced proliferation and prostaglandin productions by synovial cells from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. In the present study we investigated the role of S1P receptor-mediated signaling for osteoblast differentiation. We investigated osteoblast differentiation using C2C12 myoblasts, a cell line derived from murine satellite cells. Osteoblast differentiation was induced by the treatment of bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-2 in the presence or absence of either S1P or FTY720 (FTY), a high-affinity agonist of S1P receptors. Osteoblast differentiation was determined by osteoblast-specific transcription factor, Runx2 mRNA expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin production by the cells. Smad1/5/8 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was examined by Western blotting. Osteocalcin production by C2C12 cells were determined by ELISA. Runx2 expression and ALP activity by BMP-2-stimulated C2C12 cells were enhanced by addition of either S1P or FTY. Both S1P and FTY enhanced BMP-2-induced ERK1/2 and Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. The effect of FTY was stronger than that of S1P. S1P receptor-mediated signaling on osteoblast differentiation was inhibited by addition of mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitor, indicating that the S1P receptor-mediated MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway enhanced BMP-2-Smad signaling. These results indicate that S1P

  15. Sphingosine kinase expression increases intracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate and promotes cell growth and survival.

    PubMed

    Olivera, A; Kohama, T; Edsall, L; Nava, V; Cuvillier, O; Poulton, S; Spiegel, S

    1999-11-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP) is a bioactive lipid that has recently been identified as the ligand for the EDG family of G protein-coupled cell surface receptors. However, the mitogenic and survival effects of exogenous SPP may not correlate with binding to cell-surface receptors (Van Brocklyn, J.R., M.J. Lee, R. Menzeleev, A. Olivera, L. Edsall, O. Cuvillier, D.M. Thomas, P.J.P. Coopman, S. Thangada, T. Hla, and S. Spiegel. 1998. J. Cell Biol. 142:229-240). The recent cloning of sphingosine kinase, a unique lipid kinase responsible for the formation of SPP, has provided a new tool to investigate the role of intracellular SPP. Expression of sphingosine kinase markedly increased SPP levels in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and HEK293 cells, but no detectable secretion of SPP into the medium was observed. The increased sphingosine kinase activity in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts was sufficient to promote growth in low- serum media, expedite the G(1)/S transition, and increase DNA synthesis and the proportion of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle with a concomitant increase in cell numbers. Transient or stable overexpression of sphingosine kinase in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts or HEK293 cells protected against apoptosis induced by serum deprivation or ceramide elevation. N,N-Dimethylsphingosine, a competitive inhibitor of sphingosine kinase, blocked the effects of sphingosine kinase overexpression on cell proliferation and suppression of apoptosis. In contrast, pertussis toxin did not abrogate these biological responses. In Jurkat T cells, overexpression of sphingosine kinase also suppressed serum deprivation- and ceramide-induced apoptosis and, to a lesser extent, Fas-induced apoptosis, which correlated with inhibition of DEVDase activity, as well as inhibition of the executionary caspase-3. Taken together with ample evidence showing that growth and survival factors activate sphingosine kinase, our results indicate that SPP functions as a second messenger important for growth and survival of

  16. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate as an Amphipathic Metabolite: Its Properties in Aqueous and Membrane Environments

    PubMed Central

    García-Pacios, Marcos; Collado, M. Isabel; Busto, Jon V.; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Arrondo, José-Luis R.; Goñi, Félix M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is currently considered to be an important signaling molecule in cell metabolism. We studied a number of relevant biophysical properties of S1P, using mainly Langmuir balance, differential scanning calorimetry, 31P-NMR, and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. We found that, at variance with other, structurally related sphingolipids that are very hydrophobic, S1P may occur in either an aqueous dispersion or a bilayer environment. S1P behaves in aqueous media as a soluble amphiphile, with a critical micelle concentration of ≈12 μM. Micelles give rise to larger aggregates (in the micrometer size range) at and above a 1 mM concentration. The aggregates display a thermotropic transition at ∼60°C, presumably due to the formation of smaller structures at the higher temperatures. S1P can also be studied in mixtures with phospholipids. Studies with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DEPE) or deuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) show that S1P modifies the gel-fluid transition of the glycerophospholipids, shifting it to lower temperatures and decreasing the transition enthalpy. Low (<10 mol %) concentrations of S1P also have a clear effect on the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal transition of DEPE, i.e., they increase the transition temperature and stabilize the lamellar versus the inverted hexagonal phase. IR spectroscopy of natural S1P mixed with deuterated DPPC allows the independent observation of transitions in each molecule, and demonstrates the existence of molecular interactions between S1P and the phospholipid at the polar headgroup level that lead to increased hydration of the carbonyl group. The combination of calorimetric, IR, and NMR data allowed the construction of a temperature-composition diagram (“partial phase diagram”) to facilitate a comparative study of the properties of S1P and other related lipids (ceramide and sphingosine) in membranes. In conclusion, two important differences between S1P and ceramide

  17. Electrophysiological and functional effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate in mouse ventricular fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Benamer, Najate; Bois, Patrick

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} In cardiac fibroblasts, SUR2/Kir6.1 channel is activated by S1P via the S1P3R. {yields} S1P increases cell proliferation through SUR2/Kir6.1 activation. {yields} S1P decreases collagen and IL-6 secretion through SUR2/Kir6.1 activation. {yields} S1P stimulates fibroblast migration independently from SUR2/Kir6.1 channel. -- Abstract: The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) on cardiac ventricular fibroblasts. Impacts of S1P on fibroblast excitability, cell migration, proliferation and secretion were characterized. The patch-clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration was used to study the S1P-induced current from mouse ventricular fibroblasts. The expression level of the S1P receptor during cell culture duration was evaluated by western-blot. Fibroblast proliferation and migration were quantified using the methylene blue assay and the Boyden chamber technique, respectively. Finally, fibroblast secretion properties were estimated by quantification of the IL-6 and collagen levels using ELISA and SIRCOL collagen assays, respectively. We found that S1P activated SUR2/Kir6.1 channel and that this effect was sensitive to specific inhibition of the S1P receptor of type 3 (S1P3R). In contrast, S1P1R receptor inhibition had no effect. Moreover, the S1P-induced current increased with cell culture duration whereas S1P3R expression level remained constant. The activation of SUR2/Kir6.1 channel by S1P via S1P3R stimulated cell proliferation and decreased IL-6 and collagen secretions. S1P also stimulated fibroblast migration via S1P3R but independently from SUR2/Kir6.1 channel activation. This study demonstrates that S1P, via S1P3R, affects cardiac ventricular fibroblasts function independently or through activation of SUR2/Kir6.1 channel. The latter effect occurs after fibroblasts differentiate into myofibroblasts, opening a new potential therapeutic strategy to modulate fibrosis after cardiac

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate as an amphipathic metabolite: its properties in aqueous and membrane environments.

    PubMed

    García-Pacios, Marcos; Collado, M Isabel; Busto, Jon V; Sot, Jesús; Alonso, Alicia; Arrondo, José-Luis R; Goñi, Félix M

    2009-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is currently considered to be an important signaling molecule in cell metabolism. We studied a number of relevant biophysical properties of S1P, using mainly Langmuir balance, differential scanning calorimetry, (31)P-NMR, and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. We found that, at variance with other, structurally related sphingolipids that are very hydrophobic, S1P may occur in either an aqueous dispersion or a bilayer environment. S1P behaves in aqueous media as a soluble amphiphile, with a critical micelle concentration of approximately 12 muM. Micelles give rise to larger aggregates (in the micrometer size range) at and above a 1 mM concentration. The aggregates display a thermotropic transition at approximately 60 degrees C, presumably due to the formation of smaller structures at the higher temperatures. S1P can also be studied in mixtures with phospholipids. Studies with dielaidoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DEPE) or deuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) show that S1P modifies the gel-fluid transition of the glycerophospholipids, shifting it to lower temperatures and decreasing the transition enthalpy. Low (<10 mol %) concentrations of S1P also have a clear effect on the lamellar-to-inverted hexagonal transition of DEPE, i.e., they increase the transition temperature and stabilize the lamellar versus the inverted hexagonal phase. IR spectroscopy of natural S1P mixed with deuterated DPPC allows the independent observation of transitions in each molecule, and demonstrates the existence of molecular interactions between S1P and the phospholipid at the polar headgroup level that lead to increased hydration of the carbonyl group. The combination of calorimetric, IR, and NMR data allowed the construction of a temperature-composition diagram ("partial phase diagram") to facilitate a comparative study of the properties of S1P and other related lipids (ceramide and sphingosine) in membranes. In conclusion, two important differences

  19. MECHANISMS OF SPHINGOSINE-1-PHOSPHATE INDUCED AKT DEPENDENT SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL MIGRATION

    PubMed Central

    Roztocil, Elisa; Nicholl, Suzanne M.; Davies, Mark G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S-1-P) is a bioactive sphingolipid released from activated platelets, which stimulates migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in vitro. S-1-P will activate akt, which can regulate multiple cellular functions including cell migration. Akt activation is downstream of phosphatidyl-inositol 3′ kinase (PI3-K) and Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1). Objective To examine the regulation of akt signaling during smooth muscle cell migration in response to S-1-P. Methods Murine arterial SMCs were cultured in vitro. Linear wound and Boyden microchemotaxis assays of migration were performed in the presence of S-1-P with and without an akt inhibitor (aktI). Assays were performed for PI3-K, PDK1, akt and GSK3β activation in the presence of various inhibitors and after transfection with the Gβγ inhibitor. βARKCT. Results S-1-P induced time dependent PI3-K, PDK1 and akt activation. The migratory responses in both assays to S-1-P were blocked by akt inhibitor (aktI). Activation of akt and dephosphorylation of its downstream kinase, GSK3 β, were inhibited by aktI. Inhibition of PI3-K with LY294002 significantly reduced both PI3-K and akt activation. Inhibition of G βγ inhibited akt activation through a reduction in both PI3-K and PDK1 activation. While inhibition of the ras with manumycin A had no effect, inhibition of rho with C3 limited both PI3K and akt activation. PDK1 responses were unchanged by inhibition of GTPases. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation with N-acetylcysteine and of EGFR with AG1478 inhibited PDK1 activation in response to S-1-P. Conclusion S-1-P mediated migration is akt dependent. S-1-P mediated akt phosphorylation is controlled by G βγ dependent, PI3-K activation, which requires the GTPase rho and Gβγ. PDK1 activation requires Gβγ reactive oxygen species generation and EGFR activation. PMID:19081473

  20. Characterization of the highly active fragment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter for recombinant protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Zhu, Jihong; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    Developing efficient native promoters is important for improving recombinant protein expression by fungal genetic engineering. The promoter region of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Pleurotus ostreatus (Pogpd) was isolated and optimized by upstream truncation. The activities of these promoters with different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. A truncated Pogpd-P2 fragment (795 bp) drove enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene expression in P. ostreatus much more efficiently than full-length Pogpd-P1. Further truncating Pogpd-P2 to 603, 403 and 231 bp reduced the eGFP expression significantly. However, the 403-bp fragment between -356 bp and the start codon was the minimal but sufficient promoter element for eGFP expression. Compact native promoters for genetic engineering of P. ostreatus were successfully developed and validated in this study. This will broaden the preexisting repertoire of fungal promoters for biotechnology application. PMID:25743073

  1. Cytoplastic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases Interact with ATG3 to Negatively Regulate Autophagy and Immunity in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Han, Shaojie; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiyin; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Bai, Fan; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2015-04-01

    Autophagy as a conserved catabolic pathway can respond to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plays an important role in degrading oxidized proteins in plants under various stress conditions. However, how ROS regulates autophagy in response to oxidative stresses is largely unknown. Here, we show that autophagy-related protein 3 (ATG3) interacts with the cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPCs) to regulate autophagy in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that oxidative stress inhibits the interaction of ATG3 with GAPCs. Silencing of GAPCs significantly activates ATG3-dependent autophagy, while overexpression of GAPCs suppresses autophagy in N. benthamiana plants. Moreover, silencing of GAPCs enhances N gene-mediated cell death and plant resistance against both incompatible pathogens Tobacco mosaic virus and Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000, as well as compatible pathogen P. syringae pv tabaci. These results indicate that GAPCs have multiple functions in the regulation of autophagy, hypersensitive response, and plant innate immunity. PMID:25829441

  2. Cytoplastic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases Interact with ATG3 to Negatively Regulate Autophagy and Immunity in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shaojie; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Xiyin; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Bai, Fan; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy as a conserved catabolic pathway can respond to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plays an important role in degrading oxidized proteins in plants under various stress conditions. However, how ROS regulates autophagy in response to oxidative stresses is largely unknown. Here, we show that autophagy-related protein 3 (ATG3) interacts with the cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPCs) to regulate autophagy in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that oxidative stress inhibits the interaction of ATG3 with GAPCs. Silencing of GAPCs significantly activates ATG3-dependent autophagy, while overexpression of GAPCs suppresses autophagy in N. benthamiana plants. Moreover, silencing of GAPCs enhances N gene-mediated cell death and plant resistance against both incompatible pathogens Tobacco mosaic virus and Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000, as well as compatible pathogen P. syringae pv tabaci. These results indicate that GAPCs have multiple functions in the regulation of autophagy, hypersensitive response, and plant innate immunity. PMID:25829441

  3. Homocysteine induces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase acetylation and apoptosis in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a.

    PubMed

    Fang, M; Jin, A; Zhao, Y; Liu, X

    2016-02-01

    High plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) promote the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which Hcy mediates neurotoxicity has not been elucidated. We observed that upon incubation with Hcy, the viability of a neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a declined in a dose-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced within 48 h. The median effective concentration (EC50) of Hcy was approximately 5 mM. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) nuclear translocation and acylation has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. We found that nuclear translocation and acetylation of GAPDH increased in the presence of 5 mM Hcy and that higher levels of acetyltransferase p300/CBP were detected in Neuro2a cells. These findings implicate the involvement of GAPDH in the mechanism whereby Hcy induces apoptosis in neurons. This study highlights a potentially important pathway in neurodegenerative disorders, and a novel target pathway for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:26785692

  4. Endosymbiotic origin and codon bias of the nuclear gene for chloroplast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from maize.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, H; Martinez, P; Quigley, F; Martin, W; Cerff, R

    1987-01-01

    The nuclei of plant cells harbor genes for two types of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDH) displaying a sequence divergence corresponding to the prokaryote/eukaryote separation. This strongly supports the endosymbiotic theory of chloroplast evolution and in particular the gene transfer hypothesis suggesting that the gene for the chloroplast enzyme, initially located in the genome of the endosymbiotic chloroplast progenitor, was transferred during the course of evolution into the nuclear genome of the endosymbiotic host. Codon usage in the gene for chloroplast GAPDH of maize is radically different from that employed by present-day chloroplasts and from that of the cytosolic (glycolytic) enzyme from the same cell. This reveals the presence of subcellular selective pressures which appear to be involved in the optimization of gene expression in the economically important graminaceous monocots. PMID:3131533

  5. Homocysteine induces glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase acetylation and apoptosis in the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a

    PubMed Central

    Fang, M.; Jin, A.; Zhao, Y.; Liu, X.

    2016-01-01

    High plasma levels of homocysteine (Hcy) promote the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which Hcy mediates neurotoxicity has not been elucidated. We observed that upon incubation with Hcy, the viability of a neuroblastoma cell line Neuro2a declined in a dose-dependent manner, and apoptosis was induced within 48 h. The median effective concentration (EC50) of Hcy was approximately 5 mM. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) nuclear translocation and acylation has been implicated in the regulation of apoptosis. We found that nuclear translocation and acetylation of GAPDH increased in the presence of 5 mM Hcy and that higher levels of acetyltransferase p300/CBP were detected in Neuro2a cells. These findings implicate the involvement of GAPDH in the mechanism whereby Hcy induces apoptosis in neurons. This study highlights a potentially important pathway in neurodegenerative disorders, and a novel target pathway for neuroprotective therapy. PMID:26785692

  6. Steady-state kinetic evaluation of the reverse reaction for Escherichia coli 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Gruys, K J; Marzabadi, M R; Pansegrau, P D; Sikorski, J A

    1993-08-01

    Recently it has been found that the kinetic mechanism for Escherichia coli 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) in the forward direction is random with synergistic binding of substrates and inhibitors (K. J. Gruys, M. C. Walker, and J. A. Sikorski, 1992, Biochemistry 31, 5534). This work, however, did not address the reverse reaction with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) and phosphate (Pi) as substrates where a similar question of random versus ordered addition of substrates remained. Previous transient-state kinetic results led to a proposal for an equilibrium-ordered mechanism, where binding of EPSP occurs first followed by Pi (K. S. Anderson, and K. A. Johnson, 1990, Chem. Rev. 90, 1131). Steady-state kinetic results of the reverse reaction presented here suggest that, like the forward reaction, addition of substrates occurs randomly. Initial velocity studies with EPSP and Pi show a normal intersecting pattern in the reciprocal plots, consistent with a random or steady-state-ordered mechanism, but not with equilibrium-ordered addition of substrates. Inhibition of the EPSPS reverse reaction by 5-amino-S3P or the S3P-glyphosate hybrid molecule gave the expected competitive patterns versus EPSP, but mixed noncompetitive patterns versus Pi. These results also disfavor an equilibrium-ordered model, but again are consistent with a random or steady-state-ordered mechanism. A more quantitative mechanistic analysis of the inhibition data to determine the true rather than apparent Ki values provides evidence for a random over a steady-state-ordered addition of substrates. These results in combination with previous findings lead to the conclusion that the mechanism is random addition of EPSP and Pi since it is the only possible model for substrate addition that is consistent with the cumulative data from all kinetic (transient- as well as steady-state) and direct binding studies. PMID:8346911

  7. In silico cloning and characterization of the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) gene family in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Valencia, Virginia A; Macario-González, Laura A; Casais-Molina, Melissa L; Beltran-Aguilar, Anayeli G; Peraza-Echeverría, Santy

    2012-05-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) catalyzes the conversion of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and NADH to glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and NAD(+). G3P is important as a precursor for glycerol and glycerolipid synthesis in microalgae. A GPDH enzyme has been previously purified from the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, however, no genes coding for GPDH have been characterized before. In this study, we report the in silico characterization of three putative GPDH genes from C. reinhardtii: CrGPDH1, CrGPDH2, and CrGPDH3. These sequences showed a significant similarity to characterized GPDH genes from the microalgae Dunaliella salina and Dunaliella viridis. The prediction of the three-dimensional structure of the proteins showed the characteristic fold topology of GPDH enzymes. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analysis showed that the three CrGPDHs share the same clade with characterized GPDHs from Dunaliella suggesting a common evolutionary origin and a similar catalytic function. In addition, the K(a)/K(s) ratios of these sequences suggested that they are under purifying selection. Moreover, the expression analysis showed a constitutive expression of CrGPDH1, while CrGPDH2 and CrGPDH3 were induced in response to osmotic stress, suggesting a possible role for these two sequences in the synthesis of glycerol as a compatible solute in osmoregulation, and perhaps also in lipid synthesis in C. reinhardtii. This study has provided a foundation for further biochemical and genetic studies of the GPDH family in this model microalga, and also opportunities to assess the potential of these genes to enhance the synthesis of TAGs for biodiesel production. PMID:22358185

  8. Synergy between Sphingosine 1-Phosphate and Lipopolysaccharide Signaling Promotes an Inflammatory, Angiogenic and Osteogenic Response in Human Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onecha, Esther; Maeso, Patricia; Crespo, Mariano Sánchez; Román, José Alberto San; García-Rodríguez, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Given that the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate is involved in cardiovascular pathophysiology, and since lipid accumulation and inflammation are hallmarks of calcific aortic stenosis, the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate on the pro-inflammatory/pro-osteogenic pathways in human interstitial cells from aortic and pulmonary valves was investigated. Real-time PCR showed sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor expression in aortic valve interstitial cells. Exposure of cells to sphingosine 1-phosphate induced pro-inflammatory responses characterized by interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and cyclooxygenase-2 up-regulations, as observed by ELISA and Western blot. Strikingly, cell treatment with sphingosine 1-phosphate plus lipopolysaccharide resulted in the synergistic induction of cyclooxygenase-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, as well as the secretion of prostaglandin E2, the soluble form of the intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor-A. Remarkably, the synergistic effect was significantly higher in aortic valve interstitial cells from stenotic than control valves, and was drastically lower in cells from pulmonary valves, which rarely undergo stenosis. siRNA and pharmacological analysis revealed the involvement of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 1/3 and Toll-like receptor-4, and downstream signaling through p38/MAPK, protein kinase C, and NF-κB. As regards pro-osteogenic pathways, sphingosine 1-phosphate induced calcium deposition and the expression of the calcification markers bone morphogenetic protein-2 and alkaline phosphatase, and enhanced the effect of lipopolysaccharide, an effect that was partially blocked by inhibition of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 3/2 signaling. In conclusion, the interplay between sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and Toll-like receptor 4 signaling leads to a cooperative up-regulation of inflammatory, angiogenic, and osteogenic pathways in aortic valve interstitial cells

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Paul R.; Evans, Daniel; Greenwood, Jacqueline A.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A has been cloned, expressed and purified. Apoprotein crystals have been grown which diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}; holo crystals were grown in the presence of NADP, diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 2}. The classical glycolytic pathway contains an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, with NADP-dependent forms reserved for photosynthetic organisms and archaea. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori is reported; crystals of the protein were grown both in the presence and the absence of NADP.

  10. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-1 Selective Agonist Enhances Collateral Growth and Protects against Subsequent Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Li, Fuying; Yui, Daishi; Miki, Kazunori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Collateral growth after acute occlusion of an intracranial artery is triggered by increasing shear stress in preexisting collateral pathways. Recently, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1PR1) on endothelial cells was reported to be essential in sensing fluid shear stress. Here, we evaluated the expression of S1PR1 in the hypoperfused mouse brain and investigated the effect of a selective S1PR1 agonist on leptomeningeal collateral growth and subsequent ischemic damage after focal ischemia. Methods In C57Bl/6 mice (n = 133) subjected to unilateral common carotid occlusion (CCAO) and sham surgery. The first series examined the time course of collateral growth, cell proliferation, and S1PR1 expression in the leptomeningeal arteries after CCAO. The second series examined the relationship between pharmacological regulation of S1PR1 and collateral growth of leptomeningeal anastomoses. Animals were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: LtCCAO and daily intraperitoneal (ip) injection for 7 days of an S1PR1 selective agonist (SEW2871, 5 mg/kg/day); sham surgery and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 after surgery; LtCCAO and daily ip injection for 7 days of SEW2871 and an S1PR1 inverse agonist (VPC23019, 0.5 mg/kg); LtCCAO and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days after surgery; and sham surgery and daily ip injection of DMSO for 7 days. Leptomeningeal anastomoses were visualized 14 days after LtCCAO by latex perfusion method, and a set of animals underwent subsequent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) 7days after the treatment termination. Neurological functions 1hour, 1, 4, and 7days and infarction volume 7days after pMCAO were evaluated. Results In parallel with the increase in S1PR1 mRNA levels, S1PR1 expression colocalized with endothelial cell markers in the leptomeningeal arteries, increased markedly on the side of the CCAO, and peaked 7 days after CCAO. Mitotic cell numbers in the leptomeningeal arteries

  11. One-pot synthesis of L-Fructose using coupled multienzyme systems based on rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Dirk; Machajewski, Timothy; Hsu, Che-Chang; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2003-08-22

    Two methods have been developed for the highly efficient enzymatic synthesis of L-fructose: one is based on rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase and acid phosphatase using racemic glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone phosphate as substrates; the other is to generate enantiomerically pure L-glyceraldehyde in situ from glycerol for the aldol reaction, using galactose oxidase catalyzed oxidation of glycerol in the presence of catalase. Using this four-enzyme system, enantiomerically pure L-fructose was obtained. Using the more expensive dihydroxyacetone phosphate, the yield was 55% after purification. PMID:12919060

  12. Neuroprotective role of sphingosine-1-phosphate in L-BMAA treated neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; de Munck García, Estefanía; Arahuetes Portero, Rosa María; Vicente, Francisca; Ortiz-López, Francisco Javier; Cantizani, Juan; Gómez Miguel, Begoña

    2015-04-23

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid which regulates proliferation, cell migration, survival and differentiation by specific receptors activation. We studied its effects on L-BMAA treated neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y), an amino acid that can trigger neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC). We found that S1P protects from necrosis and prevents the GSK3 increasing as long as the PI3K/AKT pathway is active. Moreover, GSK3 inhibition protects against neuronal death caused by L-BMAA. PMID:25769802

  13. Exploring amino acids derivatives as potent, selective, and direct agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor subtype-1.

    PubMed

    Evindar, Ghotas; Deng, Hongfeng; Bernier, Sylvie G; Doyle, Elisabeth; Lorusso, Jeanine; Morgan, Barry A; Westlin, William F

    2013-01-15

    In the quest to discover a potent and selective class of direct agonists to the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, we explored the carboxylate functional group as a replacement to previously reported lead phosphates. This has led to the discovery of potent and selective direct agonists with moderate to substantial in vivo lymphopenia. The previously reported selectivity enhancing moiety (SEM) and selectivity enhancing orientation (SEO) in the phenylamide and phenylimidazole scaffolds were crucial to obtaining selectivity for S1P receptor subtype 1 over 3. PMID:23245510

  14. The role of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 in the progression of fatty liver after acute ethanol administration in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tomoki; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Ethanol administration increased GPD1 mRNA expression. • Ethanol administration increased glucose incorporation into TG glycerol moieties. • No increase in hepatic TG levels was observed in ethanol-injected GPD1 null mice. • We propose that GPD1 is required for ethanol-induced TG accumulation in the liver. - Abstract: Acute ethanol consumption leads to the accumulation of triglycerides (TGs) in hepatocytes. The increase in lipogenesis and reduction of fatty acid oxidation are implicated as the mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation. Although glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P), formed by glycerol kinase (GYK) or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), is also required for TG synthesis, the roles of GYK and GPD1 have been the subject of some debate. In this study, we examine (1) the expression of genes involved in Gro3P production in the liver of C57BL/6J mice in the context of hepatic TG accumulation after acute ethanol intake, and (2) the role of GPD1 in the progression of ethanol-induced fatty liver using GPD1 null mice. As a result, in C57BL/6J mice, ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation began within 2 h and was 1.7-fold greater than that observed in the control group after 6 h. The up-regulation of GPD1 began 2 h after administering ethanol, and significantly increased 6 h later with the concomitant escalation in the glycolytic gene expression. The incorporation of {sup 14}C-labelled glucose into TG glycerol moieties increased during the same period. On the other hand, in GPD1 null mice carrying normal GYK activity, no significant increase in hepatic TG level was observed after acute ethanol intake. In conclusion, GPD1 and glycolytic gene expression is up-regulated by ethanol, and GPD1-mediated incorporation of glucose into TG glycerol moieties together with increased lipogenesis, is suggested to play an important role in ethanol-induced hepatic TG accumulation.

  15. Morphological and metabolic changes in transgenic wheat with altered glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase or acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase activities.

    PubMed

    Edlin, D A; Kille, P; Wilkinson, M D; Jones, H D; Harwood, J L

    2000-12-01

    We have transformed varieties of wheat with a Pisum sativum glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase gene, and also with an Arabidopsis thaliana acyl-ACP thioesterase gene. Morphological (growth, organelle development) and metabolic changes (fatty acid labelling of chloroplast and non-chloroplast lipids) have been observed in transgenics with altered gene expression for either enzyme. PMID:11171169

  16. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2009-06-08

    The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate) and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate) proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD) state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2{angstrom} resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in the substrate-free conformation

  17. SIRT1 interacts with and protects glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from nuclear translocation: Implications for cell survival after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Woo, Seon Rang; Shen, Yan-Nan; Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Joon; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 serves to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, preventing GAPDH nuclear translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When SIRT1 is depleted, GAPDH translocation occurs even in the absence of stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, SIRT1 interacts with GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 prevents irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 presence rather than activity is essential for inhibiting GAPDH translocation. -- Abstract: Upon apoptotic stimulation, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytosolic enzyme normally active in glycolysis, translocates into the nucleus and activates an apoptotic cascade therein. In the present work, we show that SIRT1 prevents nuclear translocation of GAPDH via interaction with GAPDH. SIRT1 depletion triggered nuclear translocation of cytosolic GAPDH even in the absence of apoptotic stress. Such translocation was not, however, observed when SIRT1 enzymatic activity was inhibited, indicating that SIRT1 protein per se, rather than the deacetylase activity of the protein, is required to inhibit GAPDH translocation. Upon irradiation, SIRT1 prevented irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH, accompanied by interaction of SIRT1 and GAPDH. Thus, SIRT1 functions to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, protecting the enzyme from nuclear translocation via interaction with these two proteins. This serves as a mechanism whereby SIRT1 regulates cell survival upon induction of apoptotic stress by means that include irradiation.

  18. Identification of a mammalian glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase: Role in metabolism and signaling in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mugabo, Yves; Zhao, Shangang; Seifried, Annegrit; Gezzar, Sari; Al-Mass, Anfal; Zhang, Dongwei; Lamontagne, Julien; Attane, Camille; Poursharifi, Pegah; Iglesias, José; Joly, Erik; Peyot, Marie-Line; Gohla, Antje; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-26

    Obesity, and the associated disturbed glycerolipid/fatty acid (GL/FA) cycle, contribute to insulin resistance, islet β-cell failure, and type 2 diabetes. Flux through the GL/FA cycle is regulated by the availability of glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P) and fatty acyl-CoA. We describe here a mammalian Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP), which was not known to exist in mammalian cells, that can directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol. We identified that mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase, with an uncertain function, acts in fact as a G3PP. We found that G3PP, by controlling Gro3P levels, regulates glycolysis and glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, glycerolipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation in pancreatic islet β-cells and hepatocytes, and that glucose stimulated insulin secretion and the response to metabolic stress, e.g., glucolipotoxicity, in β-cells. In vivo overexpression of G3PP in rat liver lowers body weight gain and hepatic glucose production from glycerol and elevates plasma HDL levels. G3PP is expressed at various levels in different tissues, and its expression varies according to the nutritional state in some tissues. As Gro3P lies at the crossroads of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism, control of its availability by G3PP adds a key level of metabolic regulation in mammalian cells, and G3PP offers a potential target for type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:26755581

  19. Enhanced resistance in Theobroma cacao against oomycete and fungal pathogens by secretion of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, Emily E; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Shi, Zi; Bailey, Bryan; Xiao, Shunyuan; Maximova, Siela N; Tyler, Brett M; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2016-03-01

    The internalization of some oomycete and fungal pathogen effectors into host plant cells has been reported to be blocked by proteins that bind to the effectors' cell entry receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). This finding suggested a novel strategy for disease control by engineering plants to secrete PI3P-binding proteins. In this study, we tested this strategy using the chocolate tree Theobroma cacao. Transient expression and secretion of four different PI3P-binding proteins in detached leaves of T. cacao greatly reduced infection by two oomycete pathogens, Phytophthora tropicalis and Phytophthora palmivora, which cause black pod disease. Lesion size and pathogen growth were reduced by up to 85%. Resistance was not conferred by proteins lacking a secretory leader, by proteins with mutations in their PI3P-binding site, or by a secreted PI4P-binding protein. Stably transformed, transgenic T. cacao plants expressing two different PI3P-binding proteins showed substantially enhanced resistance to both P. tropicalis and P. palmivora, as well as to the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum theobromicola. These results demonstrate that secretion of PI3P-binding proteins is an effective way to increase disease resistance in T. cacao, and potentially in other plants, against a broad spectrum of pathogens. PMID:26214158

  20. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    PubMed

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  1. In silico peptide prediction for antibody generation to recognize 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) in genetically modified organisms.

    PubMed

    Marani, Mariela M; Costa, Joana; Mafra, Isabel; Oliveira, Maria Beatriz P P; Camperi, Silvia A; Leite, José Roberto de Souza Almeida

    2015-03-01

    For the prospective immunorecognition of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (CP4-EPSPS) as a biomarker protein expressed by transgenic soybean, an extensive in silico evaluation of the referred protein was performed. The main objective of this study was the selection of a set of peptides that could function as potential immunogens for the production of novel antibodies against CP4-EPSPS protein. For this purpose, the protein was in silico cleaved with trypsin/chymotrypsin and the resultant peptides were extensively analyzed for further selection of the best candidates for antibody production. The analysis enabled the successful proposal of four peptides with potential immunogenicity for their future use as screening biomarkers of genetically modified organisms. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to select and define potential linear epitopes for the immunization of animals and, subsequently, to generate adequate antibodies for CP4-EPSPS recognition. The present work will be followed by the synthesis of the candidate peptides to be incubated in animals for antibody generation and potential applicability for the development of an immunosensor for CP4-EPSPS detection. PMID:25620523

  2. Secreted multifunctional Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase sequesters lactoferrin and iron into cells via a non-canonical pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Anoop S.; Rawat, Pooja; Malhotra, Himanshu; Sheokand, Navdeep; Kumar, Manoj; Patidar, Anil; Chaudhary, Surbhi; Jakhar, Priyanka; Raje, Chaaya I.; Raje, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin is a crucial nutritionally important pleiotropic molecule and iron an essential trace metal for all life. The current paradigm is that living organisms have evolved specific membrane anchored receptors along with iron carrier molecules for regulated absorption, transport, storage and mobilization of these vital nutrients. We present evidence for the existence of non-canonical pathway whereby cells actively forage these vital resources from beyond their physical boundaries, by secreting the multifunctional housekeeping enzyme Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) into the extracellular milieu. This effect’s an autocrine/paracrine acquisition of target ligand into the cell. Internalization by this route is extensively favoured even by cells that express surface receptors for lactoferrin and involves urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We also demonstrate the operation of this phenomenon during inflammation, as an arm of the innate immune response where lactoferrin denies iron to invading microorganisms by chelating it and then itself being sequestered into surrounding host cells by GAPDH. PMID:26672975

  3. Over-expression of PsGPD, a mushroom glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, enhances salt tolerance in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung-Il; Lim, Hye-Min; Siddiqui, Zamin Shaheed; Park, Sung-Han; Kim, A-Ram; Kwon, Taek-Ryoun; Lee, Seong-Kon; Park, Soo-Chul; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Lee, Gang-Seob

    2014-08-01

    Transgenic potatoes expressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), isolated from the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, had increased tolerance to salt stress (Jeong et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 278:192-196, 2000). To examine the physiological mechanisms enhancing salt tolerance in GPD-transgenic rice plants, the salt tolerance of five GPD transgenic rice lines (T1-T5) derived from Dongjin rice cultivar were evaluated in a fixed 150 mM saline environment in comparison to two known wild-type rice cultivars, Dongjin (salt sensitive) and Pokali (salt tolerant). Transgenic lines, T2, T3, and T5, had a substantial increase in biomass and relative water content compared to Dongjin. Stomatal conductance and osmotic potential were higher in the GPD transgenic lines and were similar to those in Pokali. The results are discussed based on the comparative physiological response of GPD transgenic lines with those of the salt-sensitive and salt-tolerant rice cultivars. PMID:24737077

  4. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human liver glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Warizaya, Masaichi; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Kato, Akemi; Nakajima, Hidenori; Fujii, Takashi

    2004-03-01

    Human liver glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was purified and crystallized using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. However, the crystals were extremely fragile towards osmotic shock. A 1% change in PEG 3350 content causes destruction of the crystals. After many trials for freezing the crystals, X-ray diffraction data from a native crystal were collected at 2.8 A resolution using as a cryoprotectant a mixture consisting of paraffin oil and Paratone-N in a 3:1 ratio and a cryoloop covered with Formver film. Crystals belong to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 63.23, b = 97.84, c = 84.23 A, beta = 104.1 degrees. Molecular replacement with a starting model consisting of a homology model based on the low-resolution structure of human skeletal muscle GAPDH, which has 90% identical residues with the liver protein, led to a solution. Most of the current model was assigned properly in the electron-density map, but the map corresponding to some important regions containing the phosphate-binding loop was ambiguous. It is planned to crystallize human liver GAPDH in the presence of phosphate ions and/or some kind of inhibitor in order to fix the flexible region. PMID:14993695

  5. The influence of oxygen on radiation-induced structural and functional changes in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Bubinski, Michal; Krokosz, Anita; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2012-07-01

    Proteins are major targets for oxidative damage due to their abundance in cells and high reactivity with free radicals. In the present study we examined the influence of oxygen on radiation-induced inactivation and structural changes of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We chose these two enzymes because they occur at high concentrations and participate in the most important processes in organisms; furthermore, they show considerable similarity in their structure. Protein solutions were irradiated with X-rays in doses ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 kGy, in air and N2O. The much higher radiation inactivation of GAPDH as compared to LDH is correlated with substantially greater structural changes in this protein, mainly involving the loss of free thiol groups (-SH). Of lesser importance in the differentiation of the radiosensitivity of the studied enzymes are tryptophan residues. Molecular oxygen, present during irradiation, increased to a significantly greater extent the inactivation and structural changes of GAPDH than that of LDH. The results suggest that the greater effect of oxygen on GAPDH is due to the higher efficiency of the superoxide radical, the higher amount of hydroperoxides generated, and the higher degree of unfolding of this protein.

  6. Insulin regulation of protein biosynthesis in differentiated 3T3 adipocytes. Regulation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, M.; Curtis, G.; Avruch, J.; Goodman, H.M.

    1985-10-05

    The effect of insulin on protein biosynthesis was examined in differentiated 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A adipocytes. Insulin altered the relative rate of synthesis of specific proteins independent of its ability to hasten conversion of the fibroblast (preadipocyte) phenotype to the adipocyte phenotype. Although more than one pattern of response to insulin was observed, the authors focused on the induction of a Mr 33,000 protein which was identified as the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Exposure of 3T3 adipocytes to insulin throughout differentiation specifically increased GAPDH activity and protein content by 2- to 3-fold as compared to 3T3 adipocytes differentiated in the absence of insulin. These changes in enzyme activity and content could be accounted for by a 4-fold increase in the relative rate of synthesis of GAPDH and a 9-fold increase in hybridizable mRNA levels. Within 2 h of insulin addition to 3T3 adipocytes differentiated in the absence of hormone, hybridizable GAPDH mRNA levels increased 3-fold, and within 24 h GAPDH mRNA levels increased 8-fold, and (TVS) methionine incorporation into GAPDH protein increased 5-fold. These studies demonstrate that insulin, as the sole hormonal perturbant, can increase the synthesis of certain 3T3 adipocyte proteins by altering the cellular content of a specific mRNA.

  7. A Novel 5-Enolpyruvylshikimate-3-Phosphate Synthase Shows High Glyphosate Tolerance in Escherichia coli and Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengxue; Yang, Xuewen; Chen, Rongrong; Zhang, Yuwen; Lu, Wei; Liu, Yan; Wang, Jianhua; Lin, Min; Wang, Guoying

    2012-01-01

    A key enzyme in the shikimate pathway, 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is the primary target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. Identification of new aroA genes coding for EPSPS with a high level of glyphosate tolerance is essential for the development of glyphosate-tolerant crops. In the present study, the glyphosate tolerance of five bacterial aroA genes was evaluated in the E. coli aroA-defective strain ER2799 and in transgenic tobacco plants. All five aroA genes could complement the aroA-defective strain ER2799, and AM79 aroA showed the highest glyphosate tolerance. Although glyphosate treatment inhibited the growth of both WT and transgenic tobacco plants, transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA tolerated higher concentration of glyphosate and had a higher fresh weight and survival rate than plants expressing other aroA genes. When treated with high concentration of glyphosate, lower shikimate content was detected in the leaves of transgenic plants expressing AM79 aroA than transgenic plants expressing other aroA genes. These results suggest that AM79 aroA could be a good candidate for the development of transgenic glyphosate-tolerant crops. PMID:22715408

  8. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding

    PubMed Central

    Boddey, Justin A.; O'Neill, Matthew T.; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G.; Hodder, Anthony N.; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J.; Cowman, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  9. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase antisense oligodeoxynucleotides protect against cytosine arabinonucleoside-induced apoptosis in cultured cerebellar neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ishitani, R; Chuang, D M

    1996-01-01

    Cytosine arabinonucleoside (AraC) is a pyrimidine antimetabolite that kills proliferating cells by inhibiting DNA synthesis and, importantly, is also an inducer of apoptosis. We recently reported that age-induced apoptotic cell death of cultured cerebellar neurons is directly associated with an over-expression of a particulate 38-kDa protein, identified by us as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; EC 1.2.1.12). We now show that the AraC-induced neuronal death of immature cerebellar granule cells in culture is effectively delayed by actinomycin-D, cycloheximide, or aurintricarboxylic acid (a DNase inhibitor). Furthermore, two GAPDH antisense, but not their corresponding sense, oligodeoxyribonucleotides markedly arrested AraC-induced apoptosis. This protection was more effective than that induced by the above-mentioned classical inhibitors of apoptosis. Prior to AraC-induced neuronal death, GAPDH mRNA levels increased by approximately 2.5-fold, and this mRNA accumulation was blocked by actinomycin-D and the GAPDH antisense (but not sense) oligonucleotide. Like actinomycin-D, a GAPDH antisense oligonucleotide also suppressed the AraC-induced over-expression of the 38-kDa particulate protein (i.e., GAPDH), while the corresponding sense oligonucleotide was totally ineffective. Thus, the present results show that GAPDH over-expression is involved in AraC-induced apoptosis of cultured cerebellar granule cells. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790435

  10. Autophagy and endosomal trafficking inhibition by Vibrio cholerae MARTX toxin phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-specific phospholipase A1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Shivani; Kim, Hyunjin; Chan, Robin B.; Agarwal, Shivangi; Williamson, Rebecca; Cho, Wonhwa; Paolo, Gilbert D.; Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, responsible for acute gastroenteritis secretes a large multifunctional-autoprocessing repeat-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin linked to evasion of host immune system, facilitating colonization of small intestine. Unlike other effector domains of the multifunctional toxin that target cytoskeleton, the function of alpha-beta hydrolase (ABH) remained elusive. This study demonstrates that ABH is an esterase/lipase with catalytic Ser–His–Asp triad. ABH binds with high affinity to phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and cleaves the fatty acid in PtdIns3P at the sn1 position in vitro making it the first PtdIns3P-specific phospholipase A1 (PLA1). Expression of ABH in vivo reduces intracellular PtdIns3P levels and its PtdIns3P-specific PLA1 activity blocks endosomal and autophagic pathways. In accordance with recent studies acknowledging the potential of extracellular pathogens to evade or exploit autophagy to prevent their clearance and facilitate survival, this is the first report highlighting the role of ABH in inhibiting autophagy and endosomal trafficking induced by extracellular V. cholerae. PMID:26498860

  11. Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Contributes to Triacylglycerol Biosynthesis, Lipid Droplet Formation, and Host Invasion in Metarhizium robertsii

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiang; Shang, Yanfang; Huang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes involved in the triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis have been well studied in the model organisms of yeasts and animals. Among these, the isoforms of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) redundantly catalyze the first and rate-limiting step in glycerolipid synthesis. Here, we report the functions of mrGAT, a GPAT ortholog, in an insect-pathogenic fungus, Metarhizium robertsii. Unlike in yeasts and animals, a single copy of the mrGAT gene is present in the fungal genome and the gene deletion mutant is viable. Compared to the wild type and the gene-rescued mutant, the ΔmrGAT mutant demonstrated reduced abilities to produce conidia and synthesize TAG, glycerol, and total lipids. More importantly, we found that mrGAT is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and directly linked to the formation of lipid droplets (LDs) in fungal cells. Insect bioassay results showed that mrGAT is required for full fungal virulence by aiding fungal penetration of host cuticles. Data from this study not only advance our understanding of GPAT functions in fungi but also suggest that filamentous fungi such as M. robertsii can serve as a good model to elucidate the role of the glycerol phosphate pathway in fungal physiology, particularly to determine the mechanistic connection of GPAT to LD formation. PMID:24077712

  12. Sequence analysis and structural characterization of a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from the phytopathogenic fungus Eremothecium ashbyi.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Chandra, T S

    2011-02-01

    Eremothecium ashbyi is a phytopathogenic fungus infesting cotton, soybeans and several other plants. This highly flavinogenic fungus has been phylogenetically characterized, but the genetic aspects of its central metabolic and riboflavin biosynthetic pathways are unknown. An ORF of 996 bp was obtained from E. ashbyi by using degenerate primers for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) through reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and 5'-3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). This nucleotide sequence had a high similarity of 88% with GPD sequence of Ashbya gossypii. The putative GPD peptide of 331-aa had a high similarity of 85% with the GPD sequence from other ascomycetes. The ORF had an unusually strong codon bias with 5 amino acids showing strict preference of a single codon. The theoretical molecular weight for the putative peptide was 35.58 kDa with an estimated pI of 5.7. A neighbor-joining tree showed that the putative peptide from E. ashbyi displayed the highest similarity to GPD of A. gossypii. The gene sequence is available at the GenBank, accession number EU717696. Homology modeling done with Kluyveromyces marxianus GPD (PDB: 2I5P) as template indicated high structural similarity. PMID:20820924

  13. Altered chloroplast structure and function in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-07-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in plastid glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity have altered chloroplast membrane lipid composition. This caused an increase in the number of regions of appressed membrane per chloroplast and a decrease in the average number of thylakoid membranes in the appressed regions. The net effect was a significant decrease in the ratio of appressed to nonappressed membranes. A comparison of 77 K fluorescence emission spectra of thylakoid membranes from the mutant and wild type indicated that the ultrastructural changes were associated with an altered distribution of excitation energy transfer from antenna chlorophyll to photosystem II and photosystem I in the mutant. The changes in leaf lipid composition did not significantly affect growth or development of the mutant under standard conditions. However, at temperatures above 28{degree}C the mutant grew slightly more rapidly than the wild type, and measurements of temperature-induced fluorescence yield enhancement suggested an increased thermal stability of the photosynthetic apparatus of the mutant. These effects are consistent with other evidence suggesting that membrane lipid composition is an important determinant of chloroplast structure but has relatively minor direct effects on the function of the membrane proteins associated with photosynthetic electron transport.

  14. Structural basis for the NAD binding cooperativity and catalytic characteristics of sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Kuravsky, M L; Barinova, K V; Asryants, R A; Schmalhausen, E V; Muronetz, V I

    2015-08-01

    Catalytic properties of enzymes used in biotechnology can be improved by eliminating those regulatory mechanisms that are not absolutely required for their functioning. We exploited mammalian glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a model protein and examined the structural basis of the NAD(+) cooperative binding exhibited by its homologous isoenzymes: the somatic enzyme (GAPD) and the recombinant sperm-specific enzyme (dN-GAPDS). Moreover, we obtained a mutant dN-GAPDS, which misses the cooperativity, but exhibits a twofold increase in the specific activity instead (92 and 45 μmol NADH/min per mg protein for the mutant and the wild type proteins, respectively). Such an effect was caused by the disruption of the interdomain salt bridge D311-H124, which is located close to the active site of the enzyme. The thermal stability of the mutant protein also increased compared to the wild type form (heat absorption peak values were 70.4 and 68.6 °C, respectively). We expect our findings to be of importance for the purposes of biotechnological applications. PMID:25936797

  15. The plasmin-binding protein Plr of group A streptococci is identified as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Winram, S B; Lottenberg, R

    1996-08-01

    Group A streptococci bind the serine protease plasmin with high affinity. Previously, a 41 kDa protein was identified as a candidate plasmin receptor protein (Plr) from group A streptococcal strain 64/14. The plr gene encoding Plr was cloned and the deduced amino acid sequence of Plr had significant similarity to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs). In this study we have isolated cytoplasmic GAPDH of streptococcal strain 64/14. This enzyme was examined, on both structural and functional levels, for its relatedness to the Plr of strain 64/14 purified from mutanolysin extract and to recombinant Plr. We report here that no differences were detected between streptococcal Plr and cytoplasmic GAPDH on the basis of antibody reactivity, plasmin-binding activity, GAPDH activity, N-terminal amino acid sequence, peptide map analysis by V8 protease digestion and amino acid composition analysis. Furthermore, the plr gene appears to be present as a single copy in group A streptococci. PMID:8760943

  16. A Dimer Interface Mutation in Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Regulates Its Binding to AU-rich RNA*

    PubMed Central

    White, Michael R.; Khan, Mohd M.; Deredge, Daniel; Ross, Christina R.; Quintyn, Royston; Zucconi, Beth E.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Garcin, Elsa D.

    2015-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an enzyme best known for its role in glycolysis. However, extra-glycolytic functions of GAPDH have been described, including regulation of protein expression via RNA binding. GAPDH binds to numerous adenine-uridine rich elements (AREs) from various mRNA 3′-untranslated regions in vitro and in vivo despite its lack of a canonical RNA binding motif. How GAPDH binds to these AREs is still unknown. Here we discovered that GAPDH binds with high affinity to the core ARE from tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA via a two-step binding mechanism. We demonstrate that a mutation at the GAPDH dimer interface impairs formation of the second RNA-GAPDH complex and leads to changes in the RNA structure. We investigated the effect of this interfacial mutation on GAPDH oligomerization by crystallography, small-angle x-ray scattering, nano-electrospray ionization native mass spectrometry, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. We show that the mutation does not significantly affect GAPDH tetramerization as previously proposed. Instead, the mutation promotes short-range and long-range dynamic changes in regions located at the dimer and tetramer interface and in the NAD+ binding site. These dynamic changes are localized along the P axis of the GAPDH tetramer, suggesting that this region is important for RNA binding. Based on our results, we propose a model for sequential GAPDH binding to RNA via residues located at the dimer and tetramer interfaces. PMID:25451934

  17. Phosphatidylcholine is essential for efficient functioning of the mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase Gut2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rijken, Pieter J; De Kruijff, Ben; De Kroon, Anton I P M

    2007-01-01

    Gut2, the mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, was previously shown to become preferentially labelled with photoactivatable phosphatidylcholine (PC), pointing to a functional relation between these molecules. In the present study we analyzed whether Gut2 functioning depends on the PC content of yeast cells, using PC biosynthetic mutants in which the PC content was lowered. PC depletion was found to reduce growth on glycerol and to increase glycerol excretion, both indicating that PC is needed for optimal Gut2 functioning in vivo. Using several in vitro approaches the nature of the dependence of Gut2 functioning on cellular PC contents was investigated. The results of these experiments suggest that it is unlikely that the effects observed in vivo are due to changes in cellular Gut2 content, in specific activity of Gut2 in isolated mitochondria, or in the membrane association of Gut2, upon lowering the PC level. The in vivo effects are more likely an indirect result of PC depletion-induced changes in the cellular context in which Gut2 functions, that are not manifested in the in vitro systems used. PMID:17520483

  18. Identification of a mammalian glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase: Role in metabolism and signaling in pancreatic β-cells and hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mugabo, Yves; Zhao, Shangang; Seifried, Annegrit; Gezzar, Sari; Al-Mass, Anfal; Zhang, Dongwei; Lamontagne, Julien; Attane, Camille; Poursharifi, Pegah; Iglesias, José; Joly, Erik; Peyot, Marie-Line; Gohla, Antje; Madiraju, S. R. Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, and the associated disturbed glycerolipid/fatty acid (GL/FA) cycle, contribute to insulin resistance, islet β-cell failure, and type 2 diabetes. Flux through the GL/FA cycle is regulated by the availability of glycerol-3-phosphate (Gro3P) and fatty acyl-CoA. We describe here a mammalian Gro3P phosphatase (G3PP), which was not known to exist in mammalian cells, that can directly hydrolyze Gro3P to glycerol. We identified that mammalian phosphoglycolate phosphatase, with an uncertain function, acts in fact as a G3PP. We found that G3PP, by controlling Gro3P levels, regulates glycolysis and glucose oxidation, cellular redox and ATP production, gluconeogenesis, glycerolipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation in pancreatic islet β-cells and hepatocytes, and that glucose stimulated insulin secretion and the response to metabolic stress, e.g., glucolipotoxicity, in β-cells. In vivo overexpression of G3PP in rat liver lowers body weight gain and hepatic glucose production from glycerol and elevates plasma HDL levels. G3PP is expressed at various levels in different tissues, and its expression varies according to the nutritional state in some tissues. As Gro3P lies at the crossroads of glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism, control of its availability by G3PP adds a key level of metabolic regulation in mammalian cells, and G3PP offers a potential target for type 2 diabetes and cardiometabolic disorders. PMID:26755581

  19. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Boddey, Justin A; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G; Hodder, Anthony N; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J; Cowman, Alan F

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  20. Allosteric regulation of the partitioning of glucose-1-phosphate between glycogen and trehalose biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Asención Diez, Matías D.; Demonte, Ana M.; Syson, Karl; Arias, Diego G.; Gorelik, Andrii; Guerrero, Sergio A.; Bornemann, Stephen; Iglesias, Alberto A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a pathogenic prokaryote adapted to survive in hostile environments. In this organism and other Gram-positive actinobacteria, the metabolic pathways of glycogen and trehalose are interconnected. Results In this work we show the production, purification and characterization of recombinant enzymes involved in the partitioning of glucose-1-phosphate between glycogen and trehalose in M. tuberculosis H37Rv, namely: ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, glycogen synthase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and trehalose-6-phosphate synthase. The substrate specificity, kinetic parameters and allosteric regulation of each enzyme were determined. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was highly specific for ADP-glucose while trehalose-6-phosphate synthase used not only ADP-glucose but also UDP-glucose, albeit to a lesser extent. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was allosterically activated primarily by phosphoenolpyruvate and glucose-6-phosphate, while the activity of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase was increased up to 2-fold by fructose-6-phosphate. None of the other two enzymes tested exhibited allosteric regulation. Conclusions Results give information about how the glucose-1-phosphate/ADP-glucose node is controlled after kinetic and regulatory properties of key enzymes for mycobacteria metabolism. General significance This work increases our understanding of oligo and polysaccharides metabolism in M. tuberculosis and reinforces the importance of the interconnection between glycogen and trehalose biosynthesis in this human pathogen. PMID:25277548

  1. L-myo-lnositol 1-Phosphate Synthase from Plant Sources (Characteristics of the Chloroplastic and Cytosolic Enzymes).

    PubMed Central

    RayChaudhuri, A.; Hait, N. C.; Dasgupta, S.; Bhaduri, T. J.; Deb, R.; Majumder, A. L.

    1997-01-01

    L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthase (EC 5.5.1.4) from cyanobacterial (Spirulina platensis), algal (Euglena gracilis), and higher plant (Oryza sativa, Vigna radiata) sources was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity, biochemically characterized, and compared. Both chloroplastic and cytosolic forms of the enzyme were detected in E. gracilis, O. sativa, and V. radiata, whereas only the cytosolic form was detected in streptomycin-bleached or chloroplastic mutants of E. gracilis and in S. platensis. Both the chloroplastic and cytosolic forms from different sources could be purified following the same three-step chromatographic protocol. L-myo-inositol 1-phosphate synthases purified from these different sources do not differ significantly with respect to biochemical and kinetic parameters except for the molecular mass of the chloroplastic and cytosolic native holoenzymes, which appear to be homotetrameric and homotrimeric associations of their constituent subunits, respectively. Monovalent and divalent cations, sugar alcohols, and sugar phosphates are inhibitory to the enzyme activity. N-ethylmaleimide inhibition of synthase activity could be protected by the combined presence of the substrate glucose-6-phosphate and cofactor NAD+. Antibody raised against the cytosolic enzyme from E. gracilis immunoprecipitates and cross-reacts with both chloroplastic and cytosolic forms from the other sources studied. PMID:12223840

  2. Serum sphingolipidomic analyses reveal an upregulation of C16- ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Schoell, Niklas; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bon, Dimitra; Herrmann, Eva; Farnik, Harald; Köberle, Verena; Piiper, Albrecht; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kronenberger, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that major alterations of serum sphingolipid metabolites in chronic liver disease associate significantly with the stage of liver fibrosis in corresponding patients. In the current study we assessed via mass spectrometry serum concentrations of sphingolipid metabolites in a series of 122 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to an age- and sex-matched series of 127 patients with cirrhosis. We observed a highly significant upregulation of long and very long chain ceramides (C16-C24) in the serum of patients with HCC as compared to patients with cirrhosis (P < 0.001). Accordingly, dihydro-ceramides, synthetic precursors of ceramides and notably sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphinganine-1-phosphate (SA1P) were upregulated in patients with HCC (P < 0.001). Especially the diagnostic accuracy of C16-ceramide and S1P, assessed by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, showed a higher area under the curve (AUC) value as compared to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) (0.999 and 0.985 versus 0.823, P < 0.001 respectively). In conclusion, serum levels of sphingolipid metabolites show a significant upregulation in patients with HCC as compared to patients with cirrhosis. Particularly C16-ceramide and S1P may serve as novel diagnostic markers for the identification of HCC in patients with liver diseases. Our data justify further investigations on the role of sphingolipids in HCC. PMID:26933996

  3. Serum sphingolipidomic analyses reveal an upregulation of C16-ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Schoell, Niklas; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bon, Dimitra; Herrmann, Eva; Farnik, Harald; Köberle, Verena; Piiper, Albrecht; Zeuzem, Stefan; Kronenberger, Bernd; Waidmann, Oliver; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-04-01

    We have recently shown that major alterations of serum sphingolipid metabolites in chronic liver disease associate significantly with the stage of liver fibrosis in corresponding patients. In the current study we assessed via mass spectrometry serum concentrations of sphingolipid metabolites in a series of 122 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to an age- and sex-matched series of 127 patients with cirrhosis. We observed a highly significant upregulation of long and very long chain ceramides (C16-C24) in the serum of patients with HCC as compared to patients with cirrhosis (P < 0.001). Accordingly, dihydro-ceramides, synthetic precursors of ceramides and notably sphingosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and sphinganine-1-phosphate (SA1P) were upregulated in patients with HCC (P < 0.001). Especially the diagnostic accuracy of C16-ceramide and S1P, assessed by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, showed a higher area under the curve (AUC) value as compared to alpha fetoprotein (AFP) (0.999 and 0.985 versus 0.823, P < 0.001 respectively). In conclusion, serum levels of sphingolipid metabolites show a significant upregulation in patients with HCC as compared to patients with cirrhosis. Particularly C16-ceramide and S1P may serve as novel diagnostic markers for the identification of HCC in patients with liver diseases. Our data justify further investigations on the role of sphingolipids in HCC. PMID:26933996

  4. A limitation of the continuous spectrophotometric assay for the measurement of myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinyi; Hernick, Marcy

    2011-10-15

    Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) catalyzes the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to myo-inositol-1-phosphate. The reaction catalyzed by MIPS is the first step in the biosynthesis of inositol and inositol-containing molecules that serve important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Consequently, MIPS is a target for the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of infectious diseases and bipolar disorder. We recently reported a continuous spectrophotometric method for measuring MIPS activity using a coupled assay that allows the rapid characterization of MIPS in a multiwell plate format. Here we validate the continuous assay as a high-throughput alternative for measuring MIPS activity and report on one limitation of this assay-the inability to examine the effect of divalent metal ions (at high concentrations) on MIPS activity. In addition, we demonstrate that the activity of MIPS from Arabidopsis thaliana is moderately enhanced by the addition Mg(2+) and is not enhanced by other divalent metal ions (Zn(2+) and Mn(2+)), consistent with what has been observed for other eukaryotic MIPS enzymes. Our findings suggest that the continuous assay is better suited for characterizing eukaryotic MIPS enzymes that require monovalent cations as cofactors than for characterizing bacterial or archeal MIPS enzymes that require divalent metal ions as cofactors. PMID:21729692

  5. Investigation of the complex between rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and aldolase using fluorescence laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orstan, Aydin; Gafni, Ari

    1990-05-01

    The interaction of rabbit muscle aldolase with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) has been investigated at 25°C in Tris buffer, pH 7. 5. The addition of 5 to1 0 fold excess of aldolase to 0.1-1 micron GPDH labeled with FITC (GPDHFITC) causes a large increase in both the fluorescence and polarization of FITC over a period of several hours, reflecting the formation ofa complex between the enzymes. When GPDH-FITC is incubated with either 1 mM NAD or ADP, the fluorescence of FITC increases while the polarization decreases, indicating that these nucleotides may increase the degree of dissociation of tetrameric GPDH. The rate of approach to equilibrium during the formation of the complex between the two enzymes increases in the presence of either NAD or ADP but decreases with increasing concentrations ofGPDH. Therefore, the interaction of the enzymes may involve the dissociation of tetrameric GPDH into smaller units. Aldolase causes no changes in the fluorescence properties of probes that are attacted to the active site cysteine residues of GPDH, such as fluorescein acrylamide, indicating that when the active site of GPDH is blocked the formation of the complex between the two enzymes is prevented. When GPDH-FITC is incubated with either excess NAD or aldolase, the average fluorescence lifetime of FITC slowly increases and approaches that of free FITC. Since fluorescein is quenched by tryptophan, it is likely that the increases observed both in the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of GPDH-FITC during its interaction with aldolase arise from the removal of tryptophan residues from the vicinity of the FITC groups as a result of changes either in the conformation or in the degree of dissociation of tetrameric GPDH.

  6. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase GPAT6 from Tomato Plays a Central Role in Fruit Cutin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Tai, Fabienne Wong Jun; Martin, Laetitia B B; Fich, Eric A; Joubès, Jérôme; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The thick cuticle covering and embedding the epidermal cells of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit acts not only as a protective barrier against pathogens and water loss but also influences quality traits such as brightness and postharvest shelf-life. In a recent study, we screened a mutant collection of the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom and isolated several glossy fruit mutants in which the abundance of cutin, the polyester component of the cuticle, was strongly reduced. We employed a newly developed mapping-by-sequencing strategy to identify the causal mutation underlying the cutin deficiency in a mutant thereafter named gpat6-a (for glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase6). To this end, a backcross population (BC1F2) segregating for the glossy trait was phenotyped. Individuals displaying either a wild-type or a glossy fruit trait were then pooled into bulked populations and submitted to whole-genome sequencing prior to mutation frequency analysis. This revealed that the causal point mutation in the gpat6-a mutant introduces a charged amino acid adjacent to the active site of a GPAT6 enzyme. We further showed that this mutation completely abolished the GPAT activity of the recombinant protein. The gpat6-a mutant showed perturbed pollen formation but, unlike a gpat6 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), was not male sterile. The most striking phenotype was observed in the mutant fruit, where cuticle thickness, composition, and properties were altered. RNA sequencing analysis highlighted the main processes and pathways that were affected by the mutation at the transcriptional level, which included those associated with lipid, secondary metabolite, and cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:27208295

  7. Crystal Structure of CTP: Glycerol-3-Phosphate Cytidylyl Tranferase from Staphylococcus Aurues: Examination of Structural Basis for Kinetic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Fong,D.; Yim, V.; D'elia, M.; Brown, E.; Berghuis, A.

    2006-01-01

    Integrity of the cell wall is essential for bacterial survival, and as a consequence components involved in its biosynthesis can potentially be exploited as targets for antibiotics. One such potential target is CTP:glycerol-3-phosphate cytidylyltransferase. This enzyme (TarD{sub Sa} in Staphylococcus aureus and TagD{sub Bs} in Bacillus subtilis) catalyzes the formation of CDP-glycerol, which is used for the assembly of linkages between peptidoglycan and teichoic acid polymer in Gram-positive bacteria. Intriguingly, despite the high sequence identity between TarD{sub Sa} and TagD{sub Bs} (69% identity), kinetic studies show that these two enzymes differ markedly in their kinetic mechanism and activity. To examine the basis for the disparate enzymological properties, we have determined the crystal structure of TarD{sub Sa} in the apo state to 3 Angstroms resolution, and performed equilibrium sedimentation analysis. Comparison of the structure with that of CTP- and CDP-glycerol-bound TagD{sub Bs} crystal structures reveals that the overall structure of TarD{sub Sa} is essentially the same as that of TagD{sub Bs}, except in the C-terminus, where it forms a helix in TagD{sub Bs} but is disordered in the apo TarDSa structure. In addition, TarD{sub Sa} can exist both as a tetramer and as a dimer, unlike TagD{sub Bs}, which is a dimer. These observations shed light on the structural basis for the differing kinetic characteristics between TarD{sub Sa} and TagD{sub Bs}.

  8. Glycerol-3-phosphate Acyltransferase Isoform-4 (GPAT4) Limits Oxidation of Exogenous Fatty Acids in Brown Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Daniel E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Klett, Eric L; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2015-06-12

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4 (GPAT4) null pups grew poorly during the suckling period and, as adults, were protected from high fat diet-induced obesity. To determine why Gpat4(-/-) mice failed to gain weight during these two periods of high fat feeding, we examined energy metabolism. Compared with controls, the metabolic rate of Gpat4(-/-) mice fed a 45% fat diet was 12% higher. Core body temperature was 1 ºC higher after high fat feeding. Food intake, fat absorption, and activity were similar in both genotypes. Impaired weight gain in Gpat4(-/-) mice did not result from increased heat loss, because both cold tolerance and response to a β3-adrenergic agonist were similar in both genotypes. Because GPAT4 comprises 65% of the total GPAT activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT), we characterized BAT function. A 45% fat diet increased the Gpat4(-/-) BAT expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR) target genes, Cpt1α, Pgc1α, and Ucp1, and BAT mitochondria oxidized oleate and pyruvate at higher rates than controls, suggesting that fatty acid signaling and flux through the TCA cycle were enhanced. To assess the role of GPAT4 directly, neonatal BAT preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes. Compared with controls, Gpat4(-/-) brown adipocytes incorporated 33% less fatty acid into triacylglycerol and 46% more into the pathway of β-oxidation. The increased oxidation rate was due solely to an increase in the oxidation of exogenous fatty acids. These data suggest that in the absence of cold exposure, GPAT4 limits excessive fatty acid oxidation and the detrimental induction of a hypermetabolic state. PMID:25918168

  9. A land-plant-specific glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase family in Arabidopsis: substrate specificity, sn-2 preference, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Simpson, Jeffrey P; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Pollard, Mike; Ohlrogge, John B

    2012-10-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has eight glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) genes that are members of a plant-specific family with three distinct clades. Several of these GPATs are required for the synthesis of cutin or suberin. Unlike GPATs with sn-1 regiospecificity involved in membrane or storage lipid synthesis, GPAT4 and -6 are unique bifunctional enzymes with both sn-2 acyltransferase and phosphatase activity resulting in 2-monoacylglycerol products. We present enzymology, pathway organization, and evolutionary analysis of this GPAT family. Within the cutin-associated clade, GPAT8 is demonstrated as a bifunctional sn-2 acyltransferase/phosphatase. GPAT4, -6, and -8 strongly prefer C16:0 and C18:1 ω-oxidized acyl-coenzyme As (CoAs) over unmodified or longer acyl chain substrates. In contrast, suberin-associated GPAT5 can accommodate a broad chain length range of ω-oxidized and unsubstituted acyl-CoAs. These substrate specificities (1) strongly support polyester biosynthetic pathways in which acyl transfer to glycerol occurs after oxidation of the acyl group, (2) implicate GPAT specificities as one major determinant of cutin and suberin composition, and (3) argue against a role of sn-2-GPATs (Enzyme Commission 2.3.1.198) in membrane/storage lipid synthesis. Evidence is presented that GPAT7 is induced by wounding, produces suberin-like monomers when overexpressed, and likely functions in suberin biosynthesis. Within the third clade, we demonstrate that GPAT1 possesses sn-2 acyltransferase but not phosphatase activity and can utilize dicarboxylic acyl-CoA substrates. Thus, sn-2 acyltransferase activity extends to all subbranches of the Arabidopsis GPAT family. Phylogenetic analyses of this family indicate that GPAT4/6/8 arose early in land-plant evolution (bryophytes), whereas the phosphatase-minus GPAT1 to -3 and GPAT5/7 clades diverged later with the appearance of tracheophytes. PMID:22864585

  10. A distinct type of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase with sn-2 preference and phosphatase activity producing 2-monoacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Pollard, Mike; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Beisson, Fred; Feig, Michael; Ohlrogge, John

    2010-06-29

    The first step in assembly of membrane and storage glycerolipids is acylation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P). All previously characterized membrane-bound, eukaryotic G3P acyltransferases (GPATs) acylate the sn-1 position to produce lysophosphatidic acid (1-acyl-LPA). Cutin is a glycerolipid with omega-oxidized fatty acids and glycerol as integral components. It occurs as an extracellular polyester on the aerial surface of all plants, provides a barrier to pathogens and resistance to stress, and maintains organ identity. We have determined that Arabidopsis acyltransferases GPAT4 and GPAT6 required for cutin biosynthesis esterify acyl groups predominantly to the sn-2 position of G3P. In addition, these acyltransferases possess a phosphatase domain that results in sn-2 monoacylglycerol (2-MAG) rather than LPA as the major product. Such bifunctional activity has not been previously described in any organism. The possible roles of 2-MAGs as intermediates in cutin synthesis are discussed. GPAT5, which is essential for the accumulation of suberin aliphatics, also exhibits a strong preference for sn-2 acylation. However, phosphatase activity is absent and 2-acyl-LPA is the major product. Clearly, plant GPATs can catalyze more reactions than the sn-1 acylation by which they are currently categorized. Close homologs of GPAT4-6 are present in all land plants, but not in animals, fungi or microorganisms (including algae). Thus, these distinctive acyltransferases may have been important for evolution of extracellular glycerolipid polymers and adaptation of plants to a terrestrial environment. These results provide insight into the biosynthetic assembly of cutin and suberin, the two most abundant glycerolipid polymers in nature. PMID:20551224

  11. Sex and depot differences in ex vivo adipose tissue fatty acid storage and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Bathke, Maria; Chen, Liang; Oberschneider, Elisabeth; Harteneck, Debra

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue fatty acid storage varies according to sex, adipose tissue depot, and degree of fat gain. However, the mechanism(s) for these variations is not completely understood. We examined whether differences in adipose tissue glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) might play a role in these variations. We optimized an enzyme activity assay for total GPAT and GPAT1 activity in human adipose tissue and measured GPAT activity. Omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue was collected from obese and nonobese adults for measures of GPAT and GPAT1 activities, ex vivo palmitate storage, acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS) and diacylglycerol-acyltransferase (DGAT) activities, and CD36 protein. Total GPAT and GPAT1 activities decreased as a function of adipocyte size in both omental (r = −0.71, P = 0.003) and subcutaneous (r = −0.58, P = 0.04) fat. The relative contribution of GPAT1 to total GPAT activity increased as a function of adipocyte size, accounting for up to 60% of GPAT activity in those with the largest adipocytes. We found strong, positive correlations between ACS, GPAT, and DGAT activities for both sexes and depots (r values 0.58–0.91) and between these storage factors and palmitate storage rates into TAG (r values 0.55–0.90). We conclude that: 1) total GPAT activity decreases as a function of adipocyte size; 2) GPAT1 can account for over half of adipose GPAT activity in hypertrophic obesity; and 3) ACS, GPAT, and DGAT are coordinately regulated. PMID:25738782

  12. Pharmacological glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase inhibition decreases food intake and adiposity and increases insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Francis P.; Tu, Yajun; Han, Wan Fang; Medghalchi, Susan M.; El Meskini, Rajaa; Landree, Leslie E.; Peterson, Jonathan M.; Daniels, Khadija; Wong, Kody; Wydysh, Edward A.; Townsend, Craig A.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2011-01-01

    Storage of excess calories as triglycerides is central to obesity and its associated disorders. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs) catalyze the initial step in acylglyceride syntheses, including triglyceride synthesis. We utilized a novel small-molecule GPAT inhibitor, FSG67, to investigate metabolic consequences of systemic pharmacological GPAT inhibition in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. FSG67 administered intraperitoneally decreased body weight and energy intake, without producing conditioned taste aversion. Daily FSG67 (5 mg/kg, 15.3 μmol/kg) produced gradual 12% weight loss in DIO mice beyond that due to transient 9- to 10-day hypophagia (6% weight loss in pair-fed controls). Continued FSG67 maintained the weight loss despite return to baseline energy intake. Weight was lost specifically from fat mass. Indirect calorimetry showed partial protection by FSG67 against decreased rates of oxygen consumption seen with hypophagia. Despite low respiratory exchange ratio due to a high-fat diet, FSG67-treated mice showed further decreased respiratory exchange ratio, beyond pair-fed controls, indicating enhanced fat oxidation. Chronic FSG67 increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in DIO mice. Chronic FSG67 decreased gene expression for lipogenic enzymes in white adipose tissue and liver and decreased lipid accumulation in white adipose, brown adipose, and liver tissues without signs of damage. RT-PCR showed decreased gene expression for orexigenic hypothalamic neuropeptides AgRP or NPY after acute and chronic systemic FSG67. FSG67 given intracerebroventricularly (100 and 320 nmol icv) produced 24-h weight loss and feeding suppression, indicating contributions from direct central nervous system sites of action. Together, these data point to GPAT as a new potential therapeutic target for the management of obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:21490364

  13. The Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase GPAT6 from Tomato Plays a Central Role in Fruit Cutin Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Johann; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Tai, Fabienne Wong Jun; Fich, Eric A.; Joubès, Jérôme; Rothan, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The thick cuticle covering and embedding the epidermal cells of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit acts not only as a protective barrier against pathogens and water loss but also influences quality traits such as brightness and postharvest shelf-life. In a recent study, we screened a mutant collection of the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom and isolated several glossy fruit mutants in which the abundance of cutin, the polyester component of the cuticle, was strongly reduced. We employed a newly developed mapping-by-sequencing strategy to identify the causal mutation underlying the cutin deficiency in a mutant thereafter named gpat6-a (for glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase6). To this end, a backcross population (BC1F2) segregating for the glossy trait was phenotyped. Individuals displaying either a wild-type or a glossy fruit trait were then pooled into bulked populations and submitted to whole-genome sequencing prior to mutation frequency analysis. This revealed that the causal point mutation in the gpat6-a mutant introduces a charged amino acid adjacent to the active site of a GPAT6 enzyme. We further showed that this mutation completely abolished the GPAT activity of the recombinant protein. The gpat6-a mutant showed perturbed pollen formation but, unlike a gpat6 mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), was not male sterile. The most striking phenotype was observed in the mutant fruit, where cuticle thickness, composition, and properties were altered. RNA sequencing analysis highlighted the main processes and pathways that were affected by the mutation at the transcriptional level, which included those associated with lipid, secondary metabolite, and cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:27208295

  14. Translocation of the precursor of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase into chloroplasts of higher plants in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Della-Cioppa, Guy; Bauer, S. Christopher; Klein, Barbara K.; Shah, Dilip M.; Fraley, Robert T.; Kishore, Ganesh M.

    1986-01-01

    5-enolPyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSP synthase; 3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyl-transferase; EC 2.5.1.19) is a chloroplast-localized enzyme of the shikimate pathway in plants. This enzyme is the target for the nonselective herbicide glyphosate (N-phosphonomethylglycine). We have previously isolated a full-length cDNA clone of EPSP synthase from Petunia hybrida. DNA sequence analysis suggested that the enzyme is synthesized as a cytosolic precursor (pre-EPSP synthase) with an amino-terminal transit peptide. Based on the known amino terminus of the mature enzyme, and the 5′ open reading frame of the cDNA, the transit peptide of pre-EPSP synthase would be maximally 72 amino acids long. To confirm this prediction and to assay directly for translocation of pre-EPSP synthase into chloroplasts in vitro, we cloned the full-length cDNA into an SP6 transcription system to produce large amounts of mRNA for in vitro translation. The translation products, when analyzed by NaDodSO4/PAGE autoradiography, indicate a relative molecular mass for pre-EPSP synthase of ≈55 kDa. Uptake studies with intact chloroplasts, in vitro, indicate that pre-EPSP synthase was rapidly taken up into chloroplasts and proteolytically cleaved to the mature ≈48-kDa enzyme. The transit peptide was shown to be essential for import of the precursor enzyme into the chloroplast. To our knowledge, post-translational import into chloroplasts of a precursor enzyme involved in amino acid biosynthesis has not been reported previously. Furthermore, enzymatic analysis of translation products indicates that pre-EPSP synthase is catalytically active and has a similar sensitivity to the herbicide glyphosate as the mature enzyme. To our knowledge, pre-EPSP synthase represents the only example of a catalytically competent chloroplast-precursor enzyme. Images PMID:16593759

  15. When the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate pathway meets hypoxia signaling: new targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ader, Isabelle; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2009-05-01

    The reduction in the normal level of tissue oxygen tension or hypoxia is a characteristic of solid tumors that triggers the activation of signaling pathways promoting neovascularization, metastasis, increased tumor growth, and resistance to treatments. The activation of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) has been identified as the master mechanism of adaptation to hypoxia. In a recent study, we identified the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) pathway, which elicits various cellular processes including cell proliferation, cell survival, or angiogenesis, as a new modulator of HIF-1alpha activity under hypoxic conditions. Here, we consider how the SphK1/S1P signaling pathway could represent a very important target for therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:19383898

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of fluorinated fingolimod (FTY720) analogues for sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor molecular imaging by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rizwan S; Schilson, Stefanie S; Wagner, Stefan; Hermann, Sven; Keul, Petra; Levkau, Bodo; Schäfers, Michael; Haufe, Günter

    2015-04-23

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid that evokes a variety of biological responses via stimulation of a set of cognate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs): S1P1-S1P5. S1P and its receptors (S1PRs) play important roles in the immune, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems and have also been implicated in carcinogenesis. Recently, the S1P analogue Fingolimod (FTY720) has been approved for the treatment of patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. This work presents the synthesis of various fluorinated structural analogues of FTY720, their in vitro and in vivo biological testing, and their development and application as [(18)F]radiotracers for the study of S1PR biodistribution and imaging in mice using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). PMID:25826109

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GalU) from Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Toccafondi, Mirco; Cianci, Michele; Benini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase from Erwinia amylovora CFPB1430 was expressed as a His-tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli. After tag removal, the purified protein was crystallized from 100 mM Tris pH 8.5, 2 M ammonium sulfate, 5% ethylene glycol. Diffraction data sets were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.46 Å using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P62, with unit-cell parameters a = 80.67, b = 80.67, c = 169.18. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the structure of the E. coli enzyme as a search model. PMID:25195902

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 2 promotes disruption of mucosal integrity, and contributes to ulcerative colitis in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Ching; Liang, Jie; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Avni, Dorit; Yamada, Akimitsu; Maceyka, Michael; Wolen, Aaron R; Kordula, Tomasz; Milstien, Sheldon; Takabe, Kazuaki; Oravecz, Tamas; Spiegel, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the kinase that produces it have been implicated in inflammatory bowel diseases in mice and humans; however, little is known about the role of the 2 S1P-specific phosphohydrolase isoforms, SGPP1 and SGPP2, which catalyze dephosphorylation of S1P to sphingosine. To elucidate their functions, we generated specific knockout mice. Deletion of Sgpp2, which is mainly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, significantly reduced dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis severity, whereas deletion of ubiquitously expressed Sgpp1 slightly worsened colitis. Moreover, Sgpp1 deletion enhanced expression of multifunctional proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β, activation of the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and immune cell infiltration into the colon. Conversely, Sgpp2-null mice failed to mount a DSS-induced systemic inflammatory response. Of interest, Sgpp2 deficiency suppressed DSS-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis and improved mucosal barrier integrity. Furthermore, down-regulation of Sgpp2 attenuated LPS-induced paracellular permeability in cultured cells and enhanced expression of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin. Finally, in patients with ulcerative colitis, SGPP2 expression was elevated in colitis tissues relative to that in uninvolved tissues. These results indicate that induction of SGPP2 expression contributes to the pathogenesis of colitis by promoting disruption of the mucosal barrier function. SGPP2 may represent a novel therapeutic target in inflammatory bowel disease.-Huang, W.-C., Liang, J., Nagahashi, M., Avni, D., Yamada, A., Maceyka, M., Wolen, A. R., Kordula, T., Milstien, S., Takabe, K., Oravecz, T., Spiegel, S. Sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 2 promotes disruption of mucosal integrity, and contributes to ulcerative colitis in mice and humans. PMID:27130484

  19. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  20. Ultra Fast and Sensitive Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Based Assay for Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase and Galactokinase Deficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S.; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T.

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([13C6]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [13C6]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4 ± 4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8 ± 0.47 (mean ± SD) µmol·(g Hgb) −1·hr−1. Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analzyed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  1. Ultra fast and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry based assay for galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase and galactokinase deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijun; Ptolemy, Adam S; Harmonay, Lauren; Kellogg, Mark; Berry, Gerard T

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of transferase and galactokinase deficiency galactosemia usually involves the measurement of erythrocyte galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) and galactokinase (GALK) enzyme activity, respectively. The current gold standard assays for these enzymes are radioactive assays, which are laborious and/or incapable of measuring low enzyme activities. To further our knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships, we had developed an assay for GALT activity alone using LC-MS/MS. In this study we generated a robust and sensitive LC-MS/MS based GALT and GALK assay using a novel normal phase chromatographic condition. We improved upon our earlier assay by drastically reducing the instrument run time and eliminating the use of an ion pairing reagent. Stable isotope labeled substrates were utilized in the GALT and GALK assays. The enzymatic products ([(13)C(6)]-uridine diphosphate galactose in GALT assay and [(13)C(6)]-galactose-1-phosphate in GALK assay) were quantified in a 3 min LC-MS/MS run. The assays were sensitive enough to allow for the quantification of enzyme activities as low as 0.2% and 0.3% of normal control values in the GALT and GALK assays, respectively. Thirty-three samples from non-galactosemic patients were assayed to have erythrocyte GALT activity of 23.4±4.2 and GALK activity of 1.8±0.47 (mean±SD) μmol⋅(g Hgb)(-1) h(-1). Erythrocyte GALT activities in a cohort of 16 patients with classic or severe galactosemia were measured: 4 patients had GALT activity less than 1% of normal control values and the remaining 12 had no detectable GALT activity. No GALK activity was detected in a GALK deficient sample we analyzed. Lastly, we tested the feasibility of adapting this LC-MS/MS based GALT/GALK assay as a newborn screening (NBS) test. PMID:20863731

  2. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Paul R.; Mohammad, Shabaz; Melrose, Helen J.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase B from H. pylori has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized in the presence of NAD. Crystals of GAPDHB diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 166.1, c = 253.1 Å. Helicobacter pylori is a dangerous human pathogen that resides in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about its metabolism and with the onset of antibiotic resistance new treatments are required. In this study, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from H. pylori are reported.

  3. New EPSP synthase inhibitors: synthesis and evaluation of an aromatic tetrahedral intermediate mimic containing a 3-malonate ether as a 3-phosphate surrogate.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; Cleary, D G; Ream, J E; Snyder, K R; Sikorski, J A

    1995-12-01

    A new analog of the EPSP synthase enzyme reaction intermediate 1, containing a 3-malonate ether moiety in place of the usual 3-phosphate group, was synthesized from 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. This simple, synthetically accessible aromatic compound (5) is an effective competitive inhibitor versus S3P with an apparent Ki of 1.3 +/- 0.22 microM. This result demonstrates that a simple benzene ring can be a suitable achiral substitute for the more complex shikimate ring in the design of EPSP synthase inhibitors. Furthermore, the greater potency of 5 versus the phenol 6, glycolate 7 and the gallic acid analog 8 demonstrates the requirement for multiple anionic charges at the dihydroxybenzoate 5-position in order to attain effective inhibition of this enzyme. However, this 3-malonate ether substituted compound was at least 10-fold less effective as a bisubstrate inhibitor than the corresponding 3-phosphate. This suggests that tetrahedral intermediate mimics possessing a 3-malonate ether moiety are less effective than their corresponding 3-phosphates in accessing the optimal enzyme conformation stabilizing 1. PMID:8770393

  4. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene over expression correlates with poor prognosis in non small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycolysis in presence of oxygen with high glucose consumption is known to be the metabolism of choice in many tumors. In lung cancer this phenomenon is routinely exploited in diagnostic PET imaging of fluorodeoxyglucose uptake, but not much is known about the prognostic capabilities of glycolysis level assessment in resected lung tumor samples. Methods In this retrospective study, we used real time polymerase chain reaction(RQ-PCR) to assess the expression level of the gene for Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH), key enzyme for glucose breakdown, in tumor samples from 82 consecutive early stages resected non small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) patients. We then compared our results in six large publicly available NSCLC microarray datasets collecting data from over 1250 total patients. Results In our study GAPDH gene over expression was found to be an adverse prognostic factor in early stages NSCLC (n = 82 HR = 1.30 p = 0.050). This result was confirmed in 5 of 6 public datasets analyzed: Shedden et al. 2008: n = 442 HR = 1.54 p < 0.0001; Lee et al. 2008: n = 138 HR = 1.31 p = 0.043; Tomida et al. 2009: n = 117 HR = 1.59 p = 0.004; Roepman et al. 2009: n = 172 (TPI1 gene) HR = 1.51 p = 0.009; Okayama et al. 2012: n = 226 HR = 3.19 p < 0.0001; Botling et al. 2013: n = 196 HR = 1.00 p = 0.97). Furthermore, in the large and clinically well annotated Shedden et al. microarray dataset, GAPDH hazard ratio did not change whether calculated for the whole dataset or for the subgroup of adjuvant naive patients only (n = 330 HR = 1.49 p < 0.0001). Conclusion GAPDH gene over expression in resected tumor samples is an adverse prognostic factor in NSCLC. Our results confirm the prognostic value of glucose metabolism assessment in NSCLC. PMID:23988223

  5. Nitric oxide-dependent NAD linkage to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase: possible involvement of a cysteine thiyl radical intermediate.

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, M; Pietraforte, D; Di Stasi, A M; Mallozzi, C

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) undergoes NAD(H) linkage to an active site thiol when it comes into contact with .NO-related oxidants. We found that a free-radical generator 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH), which does not release either .NO or .NO-related species, was indeed able to induce the NAD(H) linkage to GAPDH. We performed spin-trapping studies with purified apo-GAPDH to identify a putative thiol intermediate produced by AAPH as well as by .NO-related oxidants. As .NO sources we used .NO gas and two .NO-donors, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine and 3-morpholinosydno-nimine hydrochloride (SIN-1). Because SIN-1 produces .NO and a superoxide radical simultaneously, we also tested the effects of peroxynitrite. All the .NO-related oxidants were able to induce the linkage of NAD(H) to GAPDH and the formation of a protein free-radical identified as a thiyl radical (inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide). .NO gas and the .NO-donors required molecular oxygen to induce the formation of the GAPDH thiyl radical, suggesting the possible involvement of higher nitrogen oxides. Thiyl radical formation was decreased by the reconstitution of GAPDH with NAD+. Apo-GAPDH was a strong scavenger of AAPH radicals, but its scavenging ability was decreased when its cysteine residues were alkylated or when it was reconstituted with NAD+. In addition, after treatment with AAPH, a thiyl radical of GAPDH was trapped at high enzyme concentrations. We suggest that the NAD(H) linkage to GAPDH is mediated by a thiyl radical intermediate not specific to .NO or .NO-related oxidants. The cysteine residue located at the active site of GAPDH (Cys-149) is oxidized by free radicals to a thiyl radical, which reacts with the neighbouring coenzyme to form Cys-NAD(H) linkages. Studies with the NAD+ molecule radio-labelled in the nicotinamide or adenine portion revealed that both portions of the NAD+ molecule are linked to GAPDH

  6. Antibodies to inactive conformations of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inactivate the apo- and holoforms of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Arutiunova, E I; Pleten, A P; Nagradova, N K; Muronetz, V I

    2006-06-01

    Polyclonal antibodies produced after the immunization of a rabbit with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Bacillus stearothermophilus were used to isolate two types of antibodies interacting with different non-native forms of the antigen. Type I antibodies were purified using Sepharose-bound apo-GAPDH that was treated with glutaraldehyde to stabilize the enzyme in the tetrameric form. Type II antibodies were isolated using immobilized denatured monomers of the enzyme. It was shown that the type I antibodies bound to the native holo- and apoforms of the enzyme with the ratio of one antibody molecule per GAPDH tetramer. While interacting with the native holoenzyme, the type I antibodies induce a time-dependent decrease in its activity by 80-90%. In the case of the apoenzyme, the decrease in the activity constitutes only 25%, this indicating that only one subunit of the tetramer is inactivated. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that the formation of the complex between both forms of the enzyme and the type I antibodies resulted in a shift of the maximum of the thermal capacity curves (T(m) value) to lower temperatures. The extremely stable holoenzyme was affected to the greatest extent, the shift of the T(m) value constituting approximately 20 degrees C. We assume that the formation of the complex between the holo- or apo-GAPDH and the type I antibody results in time-dependent conformational changes in the enzyme molecule. Thus, the antibodies induce the structural rearrangements yielding the conformation that is identical to the structure of the antigen used for the selection of the antibodies (i.e., inactive). The interaction of the antibodies with the apo-GAPDH results in the inactivation of the subunit directly bound to the antibody. Virtually complete inactivation of the holoenzyme by the antibodies is likely due to the transmission of the conformational changes through the intersubunit contacts. The type II antibodies, which

  7. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and galectin from Dirofilaria immitis participate in heartworm disease endarteritis via plasminogen/plasmin system.

    PubMed

    González-Miguel, Javier; Larrazabal, Carmen; Loa-Mesón, Diana; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Simón, Fernando; Morchón, Rodrigo

    2016-06-15

    The interaction between parasitic protozoa and helminths, both in the blood and in tissues and the fibrinolytic system of their hosts is usually considered as a survival parasite mechanism since this system is the physiological route responsible for degrading fibrin clots. The broad-range proteolytic activity of plasmin, the final enzyme of the route, implies that its recruitment by these parasites is an important mechanism that mediates their invasion and establishment in the hosts. However, recent studies have proposed a dual role for plasmin by linking its over-production with pathological mechanisms at vascular level. Most of these studies have been conducted in Dirofilaria immitis, a blood-borne parasite that survives in the pulmonary arteries of its host for years while it produces a chronic inflammatory disease, whose main pathogenic mechanism is the appearance of proliferative endarteritis. Recently, the participation of two proteins from D. immitis, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (DiGAPDH) and galectin (DiGAL), in the activation of the fibrinolytic system of its host has been demonstrated, which has been a priori associated with parasite survival mechanisms. The aim of the present paper was to study the role of plasmin generated by these proteins in the emergence of proliferative endarteritis. An in vitro model of canine endothelial and smooth muscle cells, as well as the two parasitic recombinant proteins were employed. The results show that DiGAPDH and DiGAL stimulate the proliferation and migration of both cell types, as well as the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) via plasminogen (PLG)/plasmin system, being all of these mechanisms related to the appearance of proliferative endarteritis. Due to the high degree of evolutionary conservation of these antigens, these data support the hypothesis of the survival/pathology ambivalence in the interactions between parasites and the fibrinolytic system of their hosts and represent an

  8. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 mediates endothelial cells dysfunction by PI3K-Akt pathway under high glucose condition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihua; Liu, Bin; Liu, Shaojun; Zhang, Jingzhi; Lin, Shuangfeng

    2016-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is believed the early stage of development of diabetic cardiovascular complications. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates various biological activities by binding to sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors (S1PRs) including S1PR1-S1PR5. In the present study, the role of S1P receptors in S1P-induced human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) dysfunction under high glucose condition was investigated and the underlying mechanism was explored. S1PR1-S1PR5 mRNA levels were detected by quantitative Real-time PCR. NO level and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN)-endothelial cells adhesion were measured by nitrate reductase and myeloperoxidase colorimetric method, respectively. Protein levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt were measured by Western blot analysis. S1PR2 were found the predominant S1P receptor expressed in HCAECs exposed to high glucose. NO level and eNOS activity were remarkably decreased, while PMN adhesion, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 protein levels were increased significantly by S1P treatment in HCAECs exposed to high glucose and normal glucose. Blockage of S1PR2 with specific antagonist JTE-013 and small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in enhanced NO level and eNOS activity as well as decreased PMN adhesion, reduced protein levels of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 induced by S1P. Furthermore, Phosphor-PI3K and phosphor-Akt level were markedly increased by S1PR2 blockade in S1P-treated cells exposed to high glucose, which were suppressed by PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. In conclusion, S1P/S1PR2 mediated endothelial dysfunction partly by inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling pathway under high glucose condition. S1PR2 blockage could ameliorate endothelial dysfunction which might provide a potential therapeutic strategy for diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26921757

  9. A strategy for enrichment of the bioactive sphingoid base-1-phosphates produced by Hypericum perforatum L. in a balloon type airlift reactor.

    PubMed

    Jin, You-Xun; Cui, Xi-Hua; Paek, Kee-Yoeup; Yim, Yong-Hyeon

    2012-11-01

    An efficient enrichment method using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) was developed for selective extraction of bioactive sphingoid base-1-phosphates (SB1Ps) from adventitious roots of Hypericum perforatum cultured in bioreactor. The phosphate-selective IMAC enrichment coupled with LC-MS/MS enabled sensitive analysis of low-abundance SB1Ps present in the root biomass, which would not be feasible otherwise due to severe interferences from complex biological matrices. The time-dependent growth rate and production of SB1Ps from adventitious roots were investigated. The level of phytosphingosine-1-phosphate, which was found to be the major SB1Ps, reached a maximum amount of 635.6pmolpergram of dry weight after 3weeks of culture and decreased between 3 and 5weeks of culture subsequently. On the other hand, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphinganine-1-phosphate were present at levels of 18.91 and 73.15pmolpergram of dry weight, respectively, after a week of culture and their level decreased thereafter. PMID:22940331

  10. Identification and characterization of a thermostable bifunctional enzyme with phosphomannose isomerase and sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidylyltransferase activities from a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Jun-ichi; Zhang, Zilian; Morita, Rihito; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka

    2015-11-01

    Mannosylglycerate is known as a compatible solute, and plays important roles for salinity adaptation and high temperature stability of microorganisms. In the gene cluster for the mannosylglycerate biosynthetic pathway predicted from the genomic data of Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3, the PH0925 protein was found as a putative bifunctional enzyme with phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) and mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase (Man-1-P GTase) activities, which can synthesize GDP-mannose when accompanied by a phosphomannomutase/phosphoglucomutase (PMM/PGM) enzyme (PH0923). The recombinant PH0925 protein, expressed in E. coli, exhibited both expected PMI and Man-1-P GTase activities, as well as absolute thermostability; 95 °C was the optimum reaction temperature. According to the guanylyltransferase activity (GTase) of the PH0925 protein, it was found that the protein can catalyze glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) and glucosamine-1-phosphate (GlcN-1-P) in addition to Man-1-P. The analyses of C-terminus-truncated forms of the PH0925 protein indicated that sugar-1-phosphate nucleotidylyltransferase (Sugar-1-P NTase) activity was located in the region from the N-terminus to the 345th residue, and that the C-terminal 114 residue region of the PH0925 protein inhibited the Man-1-P GTase activity. Conversely, the PMI activity was abolished by deletion of the C-terminal 14 residues. This is the first report of a thermostable enzyme with both PMI and multiple Sugar-1-P NTase activities. PMID:26290359

  11. Reinforced Epithelial Barrier Integrity via Matriptase Induction with Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Did Not Result in Disturbances in Physiological Redox Status.

    PubMed

    Pászti-Gere, E; Jerzsele, Á; Balla, P; Ujhelyi, G; Székács, A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The relationship among matriptase function, cellular redox status, and maintenance of intestinal barrier integrity has not been established yet. The aim of this study is to reveal if the crosstalk between matriptase activators and intestinal epithelial monolayers can lead to perturbations in physiological redox regulation in vitro. Methods. The effects of suramin and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) were tested on viability of intestinal porcine epithelial IPEC-J2 cells using MTS assay. Measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) were performed to determine changes in barrier integrity of cell monolayers. Amplex Red assay was used to monitor extracellular hydrogen peroxide production. Occludin distribution pattern was detected prior to and after matriptase activation using immunofluorescent staining technique. Results. TER reduction was observed in suramin-treated IPEC-J2 cell monolayers, which could be attributed to cell cytotoxic properties of 48 hr 50 μM suramin administration. In contrast, S1P treatment increased TER significantly and elevated occludin accumulation in tight junctions. It was also found that extracellular hydrogen peroxide levels were maintained in IPEC-J2 cells exposed to matriptase activators. Discussion. S1P administration not accompanied by redox imbalance might be one of the key strategies in the improvement of barrier function and consequently in the therapy of intestinal inflammations. PMID:26823955

  12. Sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase inhibition by 2-acetyl-4-(tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) under conditions of vitamin B6 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ohtoyo, Mamoru; Tamura, Masakazu; Machinaga, Nobuo; Muro, Fumihito; Hashimoto, Ryuji

    2015-02-01

    Caramel food colorant 2-acetyl-4-(tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) causes lymphopenia in animals through sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) inhibition. However, this mechanism of action is partly still controversial because THI did not inhibit SPL in vitro either in cell-free or in cell-based systems. It is thought that the in vitro experimental conditions which have been used so far were not suitable for the evaluation of SPL inhibition, especially in case of cell-based experiments. We speculated that the key factor might be the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), an active form of vitamin B6 (VB6), because media used in cell-based assays usually contain an excess amount of VB6 which leads to the activation of SPL. By the use of VB6-deficient culture medium, we could regulate apo- (without PLP) and holo- (with PLP) SPL enzyme in cultured cells, resulting in the successful detection of SPL inhibition by THI. Although the observed inhibitory effect was not as strong as that of 4-deoxypyridoxine (a VB6 analog SPL inhibitor), these findings may be useful for further understanding the mechanism of action of THI. PMID:25381637

  13. Critical role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 in the disruption of cerebrovascular integrity in experimental stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gab Seok; Yang, Li; Zhang, Guoqi; Zhao, Honggang; Selim, Magdy; McCullough, Louise D.; Kluk, Michael J.; Sanchez, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    The use and effectiveness of current stroke reperfusion therapies are limited by the complications of reperfusion injury, which include increased cerebrovascular permeability and haemorrhagic transformation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is emerging as a potent modulator of vascular integrity via its receptors (S1PR). By using genetic approaches and a S1PR2 antagonist (JTE013), here we show that S1PR2 plays a critical role in the induction of cerebrovascular permeability, development of intracerebral haemorrhage and neurovascular injury in experimental stroke. In addition, inhibition of S1PR2 results in decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity in vivo and lower gelatinase activity in cerebral microvessels. S1PR2 immunopositivity is detected only in the ischemic microvessels of wild-type mice and in the cerebrovascular endothelium of human brain autopsy samples. In vitro, S1PR2 potently regulates the responses of the brain endothelium to ischaemic and inflammatory injury. Therapeutic targeting of this novel pathway could have important translational relevance to stroke patients. PMID:26243335

  14. Altered expression of sphingosine kinase 1 and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 in mouse hippocampus after kainic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Jeong, Eun Ae; Kim, Joon Soo; Cho, Yong Woon; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Choi, Wan Sung; Roh, Gu Seob

    2010-03-12

    Kainic acid (KA) induces hippocampal cell death and astrocyte proliferation. There are reports that sphingosine kinase (SPHK)1 and sphingosine-1- phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P{sub 1}) signaling axis controls astrocyte proliferation. Here we examined the temporal changes of SPHK1/S1P{sub 1} in mouse hippocampus during KA-induced hippocampal cell death. Mice were killed at 2, 6, 24, or 48 h after KA (30 mg/kg) injection. There was an increase in Fluoro-Jade B-positive cells in the hippocampus of KA-treated mice with temporal changes of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. The lowest level of SPHK1 protein expression was found 2 h after KA treatment. Six hours after KA treatment, the expression of SPHK1 and S1P{sub 1} proteins steadily increased in the hippocampus. In immunohistochemical analysis, SPHK1 and S1P{sub 1} are more immunoreactive in astrocytes within the hippocampus of KA-treated mice than in hippocampus of control mice. These results indicate that SPHK1/S1P{sub 1} signaling axis may play an important role in astrocytes proliferation during KA-induced excitotoxicity.

  15. Defective sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) phosphorylation exacerbates TH17-mediated autoimmune neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Garris, Christopher S; Wu, Linfeng; Acharya, Swati; Arac, Ahmet; Blaho, Victoria A; Huang, Yingxiang; Moon, Byoung San; Axtell, Robert C; Ho, Peggy P; Steinberg, Gary K; Lewis, David B; Sobel, Raymond A; Han, David K; Steinman, Lawrence; Snyder, Michael P; Hla, Timothy; Han, May H

    2013-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling regulates lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs into systemic circulation. The sphingosine phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) agonist FTY-720 (Gilenya) arrests immune trafficking and prevents multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. However, alternative mechanisms of S1P-S1P1 signaling have been reported. Phosphoproteomic analysis of MS brain lesions revealed S1P1 phosphorylation on S351, a residue crucial for receptor internalization. Mutant mice harboring an S1pr1 gene encoding phosphorylation-deficient receptors (S1P1(S5A)) developed severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) due to autoimmunity mediated by interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper T cells (TH17 cells) in the peripheral immune and nervous system. S1P1 directly activated the Jak-STAT3 signal-transduction pathway via IL-6. Impaired S1P1 phosphorylation enhances TH17 polarization and exacerbates autoimmune neuroinflammation. These mechanisms may be pathogenic in MS. PMID:24076635

  16. Mechanistic characterization of the tetraacyldisaccharide-1-phosphate 4'-kinase LpxK involved in lipid A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Emptage, Ryan P; Pemble, Charles W; York, John D; Raetz, Christian R H; Zhou, Pei

    2013-04-01

    The sixth step in the lipid A biosynthetic pathway involves phosphorylation of the tetraacyldisaccharide-1-phosphate (DSMP) intermediate by the cytosol-facing inner membrane kinase LpxK, a member of the P-loop-containing nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) hydrolase superfamily. We report the kinetic characterization of LpxK from Aquifex aeolicus and the crystal structures of LpxK in complex with ATP in a precatalytic binding state, the ATP analogue AMP-PCP in the closed catalytically competent conformation, and a chloride anion revealing an inhibitory conformation of the nucleotide-binding P-loop. We demonstrate that LpxK activity in vitro requires the presence of a detergent micelle and formation of a ternary LpxK-ATP/Mg(2+)-DSMP complex. Using steady-state kinetics, we have identified crucial active site residues, leading to the proposal that the interaction of D99 with H261 acts to increase the pKa of the imidazole moiety, which in turn serves as the catalytic base to deprotonate the 4'-hydroxyl of the DSMP substrate. The fact that an analogous mechanism has not yet been observed for other P-loop kinases highlights LpxK as a distinct member of the P-loop kinase family, a notion that is also reflected through its localization at the membrane, lipid substrate, and overall structure. PMID:23464738

  17. Priming with ceramide-1 phosphate promotes the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells on pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisun; Kim, YongHwan; Heo, Jinbeom; Kim, Kang-Hyun; Lee, Seungun; Lee, Sei Won; Kim, Kyunggon; Kim, In-Gyu; Shin, Dong-Myung

    2016-04-22

    Some molecules enriched in damaged organs can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating the mobilization of stem cells. These so-called "priming" factors include bioactive lipids, complement components, and cationic peptides. However, their therapeutic significance remains to be determined. Here, we show that priming of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) with ceramide-1 phosphate (C1P), a bioactive lipid, enhances their therapeutic efficacy in pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Human bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs treated with 100 or 200 μM C1P showed improved migration activity in Transwell assays compared with non-primed MSCs and concomitantly activated MAPK(p42/44) and AKT signaling cascades. Although C1P priming had little effect on cell surface marker phenotypes and the multipotency of MSCs, it potentiated their proliferative, colony-forming unit-fibroblast, and anti-inflammatory activities. In a monocrotaline-induced PAH animal model, a single administration of human MSCs primed with C1P significantly attenuated the PAH-related increase in right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and thickness of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells around the vessel wall. Thus, this study shows that C1P priming increases the effects of MSC therapy by enhancing the migratory, self-renewal, and anti-inflammatory activity of MSCs and that MSC therapy optimized with priming protocols might be a promising option for the treatment of PAH patients. PMID:26993164

  18. Sphingosine-1-phosphate and other lipid mediators generated by mast cells as critical players in allergy and mast cell function.

    PubMed

    Kulinski, Joseph M; Muñoz-Cano, Rosa; Olivera, Ana

    2016-05-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), platelet activating factor (PAF) and eicosanoids are bioactive lipid mediators abundantly produced by antigen-stimulated mast cells that exert their function mostly through specific cell surface receptors. Although it has long been recognized that some of these bioactive lipids are potent regulators of allergic diseases, their exact contributions to disease pathology have been obscured by the complexity of their mode of action and the regulation of their metabolism. Indeed, the effects of such lipids are usually mediated by multiple receptor subtypes that may differ in their signaling mechanisms and functions. In addition, their actions may be elicited by cell surface receptor-independent mechanisms. Furthermore, these lipids may be converted into metabolites that exhibit different functionalities, adding another layer of complexity to their overall biological responses. In some instances, a second wave of lipid mediator synthesis by both mast cell and non-mast cell sources may occur late during inflammation, bringing about additional roles in the altered environment. New evidence also suggests that bioactive lipids in the local environment can fine-tune mast cell maturation and phenotype, and thus their responsiveness. A better understanding of the subtleties of the spatiotemporal regulation of these lipid mediators, their receptors and functions may aid in the pursuit of pharmacological applications for allergy treatments. PMID:25941085

  19. The Enhancement of Bone Allograft Incorporation by the Local Delivery of the Sphingosine 1-phosphate Receptor Targeted Drug FTY720

    PubMed Central

    Aronin, Caren E Petrie; Shin, Soo J; Naden, Kimberly B; Rios, Peter D; Sefcik, Lauren S; Zawodny, Sarah R; Bagayoko, Namory D; Cui, Quanjun; Khan, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    Poor vascularization coupled with mechanical instability is the leading cause of post-operative complications and poor functional prognosis of massive bone allografts. To address this limitation, we designed a novel continuous polymer coating system to provide sustained localized delivery of pharmacological agent, FTY720, a selective agonist for sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors, within massive tibial defects. In vitro drug release studies validated 64% loading efficiency with complete release of compound following 14 days. Mechanical evaluation following six weeks of healing suggested significant enhancement of mechanical stability in FTY720 treatment groups compared with unloaded controls. Furthermore, superior osseous integration across the host-graft interface, significant enhancement in smooth muscle cell investment, and reduction in leukocyte recruitment was evident in FTY720 treated groups compared with untreated groups. Using this approach, we can capitalize on the existing mechanical and biomaterial properties of devitalized bone, add a controllable delivery system while maintaining overall porous structure, and deliver a small molecule compound to constitutively target vascular remodeling, osseous remodeling, and minimize fibrous encapsulation within the allograft-host bone interface. Such results support continued evaluation of drug-eluting allografts as a viable strategy to improve functional outcome and long-term success of massive cortical allograft implants. PMID:20621764

  20. Identification of the orphan GPCR, P2Y(10) receptor as the sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid receptor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masanori; Shiraishi, Akira; Tabata, Kenichi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2008-07-11

    Phylogenetic analysis of transmembrane regions of GPCRs using PHYLIP indicated that the orphan receptor P2Y(10) receptor was classified into the cluster consisting nucleotide and lipid receptors. Based on the results, we studied the abilities of nucleotides and lipids to activate the P2Y(10) receptors. As a result, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) evoked intracellular Ca(2+) increases in the CHO cells stably expressing the P2Y(10) fused with a G(16alpha) protein. These Ca(2+) responses were inhibited by S1P receptor and LPA receptor antagonists. The introduction of siRNA designed for P2Y(10) receptor into the P2Y(10)-CHO cells effectively blocked both S1P- and LPA-induced Ca(2+) increases. RT-PCR analysis showed that the mouse P2Y(10) was expressed in reproductive organs, brain, lung and skeletal muscle, suggesting the receptor plays physiological roles throughout the whole body. In conclusion, the P2Y(10) receptor is the first receptor identified as a dual lysophospholipid receptor. PMID:18466763

  1. Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces human endothelial VEGF and MMP-2 production via transcription factor ZNF580: Novel insights into angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Wei, Shu-Ping; Xu, Rui-Cheng; Xu, Peng-Xiao; Zhang, Wen-Cheng

    2010-05-07

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced migration and proliferation of endothelial cells are critical for angiogenesis. C2H2-zinc finger (ZNF) proteins usually play an essential role in altering gene expression and regulating the angiogenesis. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a novel human C2H2-zinc finger gene ZNF580 (Gene ID: 51157) is involved in the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells stimulated by S1P. Our study shows that EAhy926 endothelial cells express S1P1, S1P3 and S1P5 receptors. Furthermore, S1P upregulates both ZNF580 mRNA and protein levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. SB203580, the specific inhibitor of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway, blocks the S1P-induced upregulation of ZNF580. Moreover, overexpression/downexpression of ZNF580 in EAhy926 cells leads to the enhancement/decrease of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression as well as the migration and proliferation of EAhy926 endothelial cells. These results elucidate the important role that ZNF580 plays in the process of migration and proliferation of endothelial cells, which provides a foundation for a novel approach to regulate angiogenesis.

  2. Induction of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in human endothelial cells by lysophosphatidic acid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and platelets.

    PubMed

    Muehlich, Susanne; Schneider, Nadine; Hinkmann, Fabian; Garlichs, Christoph D; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete

    2004-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is characterized by multiple interactions between endothelial cells and components of the blood. This study focussed on the induction of the pro-atherogenic connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in endothelial cells by bioactive lipids and platelets. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) led to a time- and concentration-dependent increase in CTGF mRNA and protein expression in the human endothelial cell line EAHY 926 and in primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). As both cell types expressed various receptors for LPA and S1P, signaling pathways were further characterized by pharmacological means: induction of CTGF was pertussis toxin-insensitive and inhibition of activation of p42/44 MAP kinases only partially reduced CTGF expression. On the contrary, interference with the RhoA signaling pathway by simvastatin, an inhibitor of geranylgeranyltransferases, or the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27632 prevented induction of CTGF. Co-incubation of endothelial cells with freshly isolated human platelets significantly increased the expression of CTGF mRNA in endothelial cells, which was also sensitive to simvastatin. Up-regulation of CTGF in endothelial cells, induced by LPA, S1P, or platelets, may contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Interference of simvastatin with the synthesis of this pro-atherogenic factor further supports the anti-atherogenic role of statins. PMID:15262182

  3. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Play a Phylogenetically Conserved Role in Endocrine Pancreas Morphogenesis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Serafimidis, Ioannis; Heximer, Scott; Beis, Dimitris; Gavalas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During development pancreatic endocrine cells migrate in a coordinated fashion. This migration is necessary to form fully functional islets, but the mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therapeutic strategies to restore β-cell mass and islet functionality by reprogramming endogenous exocrine cells would be strengthened from simultaneous treatments that enhance endocrine cell clustering. We found that endocrine progenitors respond to and regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in order to cluster in islets. Rgs4, a dedicated regulator of GPCR signaling, was specifically expressed in early epithelial endocrine progenitors of both zebrafish and mouse, and its expression in the mouse endocrine progenitors was strictly dependent upon Ngn3, the key specification gene of the endocrine lineage. Rgs4 loss of function resulted in defects in islet cell aggregation. By genetically inactivating Gαi-mediated GPCR signaling in endocrine progenitors, we established its role in islet cell aggregation in both mouse and zebrafish. Finally, we identified sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as a ligand mediating islet cell aggregation in both species acting through distinct but closely related receptors. PMID:21911471

  4. Expression and validation of D-erythrulose 1-phosphate dehydrogenase from Brucella abortus: a diagnostic reagent for bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Eoh, Hyungjin; Jeon, Bo-Young; Kim, Zhiyeol; Kim, Seung-Cheol; Cho, Sang-Nae

    2010-07-01

    Brucella abortus is a bacterium of brucellosis causing abortion in cattle. The diagnosis of bovine brucellosis mainly relies on serologic tests using smooth lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) from B. abortus. However, the usefulness of this method is limited by false-positive reactions due to cross-reaction with other Gram-negative bacteria. In the present study, the eryC gene encoding B. abortus d-erythrulose 1-phosphate dehydrogenase, which is involved in the erythritol metabolism in virulent B. abortus strain but is absent from a B. abortus vaccine strain (S19), was cloned. Recombinant EryC was expressed and purified for the evaluation as a diagnostic reagent for bovine brucellosis. Other B. abortus proteins, Omp16, PP26, and CP39 were also purified and their seroreactivities were compared. Recombinant EryC, Omp16, PP26, and PP39 were all reactive to B. abortus-positive serum. The specificity of recombinant Omp16, PP26, CP39, and EryC, were shown to be approximately 98%, whereas that of B. abortus whole cell lysates was shown to be 95%. The sensitivity of Omp16, PP26, CP39, and EryC were 10%, 51%, 64%, and 43%, respectively, whereas that of B. abortus whole cell lysates was 53%. These results suggested that B. abortus EryC would be a potential reagent for diagnosis for bovine brucellosis as a single protein antigen. PMID:20622221

  5. The Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cell Secretome Inhibits Inflammatory Responses of Microglia: Evidence for an Involvement of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Signalling.

    PubMed

    Marfia, Giovanni; Navone, Stefania Elena; Hadi, Loubna Abdel; Paroni, Moira; Berno, Valeria; Beretta, Matteo; Gualtierotti, Roberta; Ingegnoli, Francesca; Levi, Vincenzo; Miozzo, Monica; Geginat, Jens; Fassina, Lorenzo; Rampini, Paolo; Tremolada, Carlo; Riboni, Laura; Campanella, Rolando

    2016-07-15

    Central nervous system (CNS) inflammation is primarily driven by microglial cells which secrete proinflammatory cytokines and undergo proliferation upon activation, as it occurs in neurodegenerative diseases. Uncontrolled or prolonged CNS inflammation is potentially harmful and can result in cellular damage. Recently, many studies have focused on human adipose tissue as an attractive source of cytokines with immunosuppressive properties that potentially modulate inflammation. Our study aimed to evaluate if different methods of human tissue collection could affect adipose mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC)-derived cytokine secretion and investigate the effects of ADSC secretome in modulating microglia activation and the possible implication of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in these effects. Our results demonstrate that the conditioned medium (CM) of ADSCs isolated by two different processing methods (lipoaspirate and Lipogems) significantly inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced effects on microglia activation, including microglial expression of CD68, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and migration. Pulse studies with radiolabeled sphingosine demonstrated that LPS treatment of resting microglia induced a significant increase of both cellular and extracellular S1P. Moreover, and of relevance, FTY720, a functional antagonist of S1P receptor, inhibited the multiple LPS-induced proinflammatory effects on microglia, and S1P suppressed the anti-inflammatory effect of ADSC-CM. This suggests that LPS-mediated microglial activation is countered by ADSC-CM through the modulation of sphingosine kinase/S1P signalling. PMID:27217090

  6. Arginine Functionally Improves Clinically Relevant Human Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridylyltransferase (GALT) Variants Expressed in a Prokaryotic Model.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Ana I; Trabuco, Matilde; Silva, Maria João; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Leandro, Paula; Rivera, Isabel; Vicente, João B

    2015-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a rare genetic disease of the galactose metabolism, resulting from deficient activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). The current standard of care is lifelong dietary restriction of galactose, which however fails to prevent the development of long-term complications. Structural-functional studies demonstrated that the most prevalent GALT mutations give rise to proteins with increased propensity to aggregate in solution. Arginine is a known stabilizer of aggregation-prone proteins, having already shown a beneficial effect in other inherited metabolic disorders.Herein we developed a prokaryotic model of galactose sensitivity that allows evaluating in a cellular context the mutations' impact on GALT function, as well as the potential effect of arginine in functionally rescuing clinically relevant variants.This study revealed that some hGALT variants, previously described to exhibit no detectable activity in vitro, actually present residual activity when determined in vivo. Furthermore, it revealed that arginine presents a mutation-specific beneficial effect, particularly on the prevalent p.Q188R and p.K285N variants, which led us to hypothesize that it might constitute a promising therapeutic agent in classic galactosemia. PMID:25814382

  7. Bacterial versus human sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) in the design of potential S1PL inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sanllehí, Pol; Abad, José-Luis; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Delgado, Antonio

    2016-09-15

    A series of potential active-site sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (S1PL) inhibitors have been designed from scaffolds 1 and 2, arising from virtual screening using the X-ray structures of the bacterial (StS1PL) and the human (hS1PL) enzymes. Both enzymes are very similar at the active site, as confirmed by the similar experimental kinetic constants shown by the fluorogenic substrate RBM13 in both cases. However, the docking scoring functions used probably overestimated the weight of electrostatic interactions between the ligands and key active-site residues in the protein environment, which may account for the modest activity found for the designed inhibitors. In addition, the possibility that the inhibitors do not reach the enzyme active site should not be overlooked. Finally, since both enzymes show remarkable structural differences at the access channel and in the proximity to the active site cavity, caution should be taken when designing inhibitors acting around that area, as evidenced by the much lower activity found in StS1PL for the potent hS1PL inhibitor D. PMID:27475537

  8. Characterization and site-directed mutagenesis of a novel class II 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase from the deep-sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Yi, Licong; Lin, Yongjun; Zhang, Lili; Shao, Zongze; Liu, Ziduo

    2014-09-01

    The 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) is a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway in microorganisms and plants, which catalyzes the formation of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) from shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). In this study, a novel AroA-encoding gene was identified from the deep sea bacterium Alcanivorax sp. L27 through screening the genomic library and termed as AroAA.sp. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that AroAA.sp (1317 bp and 438 amino acids) is a class II AroA. This enzyme exhibited considerable activity between pH 5.5 and pH 8.0 and notable activity at low temperatures. The KM for PEP and IC50 [glyphosate] values (the concentration of glyphosate that inhibited enzyme activity by 50%) of AroAA.sp were 78 μM and 1.5 mM, respectively. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the G100A mutant had a 30-fold increase in the IC50 [glyphosate] value; while the L105P mutant showed only 20% catalytic activity compared to wild-type AroAA.sp. The specific activity of the wild-type AroAA.sp, the G100A mutant and the L105P mutant were 7.78 U/mg, 7.26 U/mg and 1.76 U/mg, respectively. This is the first report showing that the G100A mutant of AroA displays considerably improved glyphosate resistance and demonstrates that Leu105 is essential for the enzyme's activity. PMID:25039062

  9. Structure of Trypanosoma cruzi glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase complexed with chalepin, a natural product inhibitor, at 1.95 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Pavão, F; Castilho, M S; Pupo, M T; Dias, R L A; Correa, A G; Fernandes, J B; da Silva, M F G F; Mafezoli, J; Vieira, P C; Oliva, G

    2002-06-01

    The structure of the glycosomal glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) from Trypanosoma cruzi complexed with chalepin, a natural product from Pilocarpus spicatus, has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.95 A resolution. The structure is in the apo form without cofactors in the subunits of the tetrameric gGAPDH in the asymmetric unit. Unequivocal density corresponding to the inhibitor was clearly identified in one monomer. The final refined model of the complex shows extensive conformational changes when compared with the native structure. The mode of binding of chalepin to gGAPDH and its implications for inhibitor design are discussed. PMID:12044862

  10. Lipocalin 2 from macrophages stimulated by tumor cell-derived sphingosine 1-phosphate promotes lymphangiogenesis and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Michaela; Ören, Bilge; Mora, Javier; Mertens, Christina; Dziumbla, Sarah; Popp, Rüdiger; Weigert, Andreas; Grossmann, Nina; Fleming, Ingrid; Brüne, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell-derived factors skew macrophages toward a tumor-supporting phenotype associated with the secretion of protumorigenic mediators. Apoptosing tumor cells release sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which stimulates the production of lipocalin 2 (LCN2) in tumor-associated macrophages and is associated with tumor metastasis. We explored the mechanism by which S1P induces LCN2 in macrophages and investigated how this contributed to tumor growth and metastasis. Knockdown of S1P receptor 1 (S1PR1) in primary human macrophages and experiments with bone marrow-derived macrophages from S1PR1-deficient mice showed that S1P signaled through S1PR1 to induce LCN2 expression. The LCN2 promoter contains a consensus sequence for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and deletion of the STAT3 recognition sequence reduced expression of an LCN2-controlled reporter gene. Conditioned medium from coculture experiments indicated that the release of LCN2 from macrophages induced tube formation and proliferation in cultures of primary human lymphatic endothelial cells in a manner dependent on the kinase PI3K and subsequent induction of the growth factor VEGFC, which functioned as an autocrine signal stimulating the receptor VEGFR3. Knockout of Lcn2 attenuated tumor-associated lymphangiogenesis and breast tumor metastasis both in the breast cancer model MMTV-PyMT mice and in mice bearing orthotopic wild-type tumors. Our findings indicate that macrophages respond to dying tumor cells by producing signals that promote lymphangiogenesis, which enables metastasis. PMID:27353364

  11. Sorbitol production from lactose by engineered Lactobacillus casei deficient in sorbitol transport system and mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    De Boeck, Reinout; Sarmiento-Rubiano, Luz Adriana; Nadal, Inmaculada; Monedero, Vicente; Pérez-Martínez, Gaspar; Yebra, María J

    2010-02-01

    Sorbitol is a sugar alcohol largely used in the food industry as a low-calorie sweetener. We have previously described a sorbitol-producing Lactobacillus casei (strain BL232) in which the gutF gene, encoding a sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, was expressed from the lactose operon. Here, a complete deletion of the ldh1 gene, encoding the main L-lactate dehydrogenase, was performed in strain BL232. In a resting cell system with glucose, the new strain, named BL251, accumulated sorbitol in the medium that was rapidly metabolized after glucose exhaustion. Reutilization of produced sorbitol was prevented by deleting the gutB gene of the phosphoenolpyruvate: sorbitol phosphotransferase system (PTS(Gut)) in BL251. These results showed that the PTS(Gut) did not mediate sorbitol excretion from the cells, but it was responsible for uptake and reutilization of the synthesized sorbitol. A further improvement in sorbitol production was achieved by inactivation of the mtlD gene, encoding a mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase. The new strain BL300 (lac::gutF Deltaldh1 DeltagutB mtlD) showed an increase in sorbitol production whereas no mannitol synthesis was detected, avoiding thus a polyol mixture. This strain was able to convert lactose, the main sugar from milk, into sorbitol, either using a resting cell system or in growing cells under pH control. A conversion rate of 9.4% of lactose into sorbitol was obtained using an optimized fed-batch system and whey permeate, a waste product of the dairy industry, as substrate. PMID:19784641

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate in inflammatory bowel disease and colitis-associated colon cancer: the fat’s in the fire

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jung H.; Saba, Julie D.

    2015-01-01

    Colitis-associated colon cancer (CAC) is a pathological condition defined by the development of colon cancer in patients afflicted by Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), two idiopathic diseases of the gut which together comprise the disease group called inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). When IBD involves the colon, affected patients face an increased risk of developing colon cancer compared to the general population. The phenomenon of CAC represents one of the most convincing forms of evidence linking the processes of inflammation, oxidative stress and carcinogenesis. A greater understanding of the molecular events driving CAC could reveal new strategies to treat IBD and reduce the incidence of CAC. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid produced through degradation of endogenous and dietary mammalian sphingolipids containing the long chain base sphingosine. S1P signals through a family of five G protein-coupled receptors. In addition, it activates nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), two transcriptional regulators that serve as master switches in inflammation and carcinogenesis. Through these and other mechanisms, a causal role for S1P in inflammatory conditions including colitis and CAC has been implicated. In contrast to S1P, dietary sphingolipids called sphingadienes derived from plant food sources cannot be converted to S1P and exhibit anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive activities, reducing colitis and CAC in mouse models. In this review, we summarize recent findings implicating S1P signaling and metabolism in the pathogenesis of IBD and CAC. The potential role of oxidative stress in modulating S1P is also discussed. Further, we propose the hypothesis that dietary sphingolipids may promote or prevent CAC depending on their ability to be converted to S1P. PMID:27011900

  13. Sphingosine 1-phosphate and its carrier apolipoprotein M in human sepsis and in Escherichia coli sepsis in baboons.

    PubMed

    Frej, Cecilia; Linder, Adam; Happonen, Kaisa E; Taylor, Fletcher B; Lupu, Florea; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2016-06-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of vascular integrity and immune cell migration, carried in plasma by high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated apolipoprotein M (apoM) and by albumin. In sepsis, the protein and lipid composition of HDL changes dramatically. The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in S1P and its carrier protein apoM during sepsis. For this purpose, plasma samples from both human sepsis patients and from an experimental Escherichia coli sepsis model in baboons were used. In the human sepsis cohort, previously studied for apoM, plasma demonstrated disease-severity correlated decreased S1P levels, the profile mimicking that of plasma apoM. In the baboons, a similar disease-severity dependent decrease in plasma levels of S1P and apoM was observed. In the lethal E. coli baboon sepsis, S1P decreased already within 6-8 hrs, whereas the apoM decrease was seen later at 12-24 hrs. Gel filtration chromatography of plasma from severe human or baboon sepsis on Superose 6 demonstrated an almost complete loss of S1P and apoM in the HDL fractions. S1P plasma concentrations correlated with the platelet count but not with erythrocytes or white blood cells. The liver mRNA levels of apoM and apoA1 decreased strongly upon sepsis induction and after 12 hr both were almost completely lost. In conclusion, during septic challenge, the plasma levels of S1P drop to very low levels. Moreover, the liver synthesis of apoM decreases severely and the plasma levels of apoM are reduced. Possibly, the decrease in S1P contributes to the decreased endothelial barrier function observed in sepsis. PMID:26990127

  14. Fructose 1-phosphate is the one and only physiological effector of the Cra (FruR) regulator of Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Chavarría, Max; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Krell, Tino; Santiago, César; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Fructose-1-phosphate (F1P) is the preferred effector of the catabolite repressor/activator (Cra) protein of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida but its ability to bind other metabolic intermediates in vivo is unclear. The Cra protein of this microorganism (CraPP) was submitted to mobility shift assays with target DNA sequences (the PfruB promoter) and candidate effectors fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), glucose 6-phosphate (G6P), and fructose-6-phosphate (F6P). 1 mM F1P was sufficient to release most of the Cra protein from its operators but more than 10 mM of FBP or G6P was required to free the same complex. However, isothermal titration microcalorimetry failed to expose any specific interaction between CraPP and FBP or G6P. To solve this paradox, transcriptional activity of a PfruB-lacZ fusion was measured in wild-type and ΔfruB cells growing on substrates that change the intracellular concentrations of F1P and FBP. The data indicated that PfruB activity was stimulated by fructose but not by glucose or succinate. This suggested that CraPP represses expression in vivo of the cognate fruBKA operon in a fashion dependent just on F1P, ruling out any other physiological effector. Molecular docking and dynamic simulations of the Cra-agonist interaction indicated that both metabolites can bind the repressor, but the breach in the relative affinity of CraPP for F1P vs FBP is three orders of magnitude larger than the equivalent distance in the Escherichia coli protein. This assigns the Cra protein of P. putida the sole role of transducing the presence of fructose in the medium into a variety of direct and indirect physiological responses. PMID:24918052

  15. Effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate on L-type calcium current and Ca(2+) transient in rat ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel Eroume-A; Bae, James S H; Capel, Rebecca; Richards, Mark; Ke, Yunbo; Pharithi, Rebabonye B; Maher, Vincent; Kruzliak, Peter; Lei, Ming

    2016-08-01

    Modulation of Ca(2+) homoeostasis in cardiac myocytes plays a major role in beat-to-beat regulation of heart function. Previous studies suggest that sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a biologically active sphingomyelin metabolite, regulates Ca(2+) handling in cardiac myocytes, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that S1P-induced functional alteration of intracellular Ca(2+) handling includes the L-type calcium channel current (ICa,L) via a signalling pathway involving P21-activated kinase 1 (Pak1). Our results show that, in rat ventricular myocytes, S1P (100 nM) does not affect the basal activity of ICa,L but is able to partially reverse the effect of the β-adrenergic agonist Isoproterenol (ISO, 100 nM) on ICa,L. S1P (25 nM) also significantly prevents ISO (5 nM)-induced Ca(2+) waves and diastolic Ca(2+) release in these cells. Our further molecular characterisation demonstrates that Pak1 activity is increased in myocytes treated with S1P (25 nM) compared with those myocytes without treatment of S1P. By immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that Pak1 and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) are associated in ventricular tissue indicating their functional interaction. Thus the results indicate that S1P attenuates β-adrenergic stress-induced alteration of intracellular Ca(2+) release and L-type Ca(2+) channel current at least in part via Pak1-PP2A-mediated signalling. PMID:27372350

  16. Fingolimod: direct CNS effects of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulation and implications in multiple sclerosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Aran; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Chun, Jerold

    2013-01-01

    Fingolimod is the first oral disease-modifying therapy approved for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Following phosphorylation in vivo, the active agent, fingolimod phosphate (fingolimod-P), acts as a sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor modulator, binding with high affinity to four of the five known S1P receptors (S1P1, S1P3, S1P4 and S1P5). The mechanism of action of fingolimod in MS has primarily been considered as immunomodulatory, whereby fingolimod-P modulates S1P1 on lymphocytes, selectively retaining autoreactive lymphocytes in lymph nodes to reduce damaging infiltration into the central nervous system (CNS). However, emerging evidence indicates that fingolimod has direct effects in the CNS in MS. For example, in the MS animal model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), fingolimod is highly efficacious in both a prophylactic and therapeutic setting, yet becomes ineffective in animals selectively deficient for S1P1 on astrocytes, despite maintained normal immunologic receptor expression and functions, and S1P-mediated immune activities. Here, we review S1P signalling effects relevant to MS in neural cell types expressing S1P receptors, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, neurons, microglia and dendritic cells. The direct effects of fingolimod on these CNS cells observed in preclinical studies are discussed in view of the functional consequences of reducing neurodegenerative processes and promoting myelin preservation and repair. The therapeutic implications of S1P modulation in the CNS are considered in terms of the clinical outcomes of MS, such as reducing MS-related brain atrophy, and other CNS disorders. Additionally, we briefly outline other existing and investigational MS therapies that may also have effects in the CNS. PMID:23518370

  17. The Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase (LegS2) Contributes to the Restriction of Legionella pneumophila in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Kanneganti, Apurva; C. Guttridge D, Denis; Amer, Amal O.

    2016-01-01

    L. pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease, a human illness characterized by severe pneumonia. In contrast to those derived from humans, macrophages derived from most mouse strains restrict L. pneumophila replication. The restriction of L. pneumophila replication has been shown to require bacterial flagellin, a component of the type IV secretion system as well as the cytosolic NOD-like receptor (NLR) Nlrc4/ Ipaf. These events lead to caspase-1 activation which, in turn, activates caspase-7. Following caspase-7 activation, the phagosome-containing L. pneumophila fuses with the lysosome, resulting in the restriction of L. pneumophila growth. The LegS2 effector is injected by the type IV secretion system and functions as a sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase. It is homologous to the eukaryotic sphingosine lyase (SPL), an enzyme required in the terminal steps of sphingolipid metabolism. Herein, we show that mice Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMDMs) and human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (hMDMs) are more permissive to L. pneumophila legS2 mutants than wild-type (WT) strains. This permissiveness to L. pneumophila legS2 is neither attributed to abolished caspase-1, caspase-7 or caspase-3 activation, nor due to the impairment of phagosome-lysosome fusion. Instead, an infection with the legS2 mutant resulted in the reduction of some inflammatory cytokines and their corresponding mRNA; this effect is mediated by the inhibition of the nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Moreover, BMDMs infected with L. pneumophila legS2 mutant showed elongated mitochondria that resembles mitochondrial fusion. Therefore, the absence of LegS2 effector is associated with reduced NF-κB activation and atypical morphology of mitochondria. PMID:26741365

  18. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Enhances Satellite Cell Activation in Dystrophic Muscles through a S1PR2/STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Morgan E.; Oskouian, Babak; Kumar, Ashok; Fyrst, Henrik; Zhang, Meng; Proia, Richard L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Saba, Julie D.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) activates a widely expressed family of G protein-coupled receptors, serves as a muscle trophic factor and activates muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that muscle injury induces dynamic changes in S1P signaling and metabolism in vivo. These changes include early and profound induction of the gene encoding the S1P biosynthetic enzyme SphK1, followed by induction of the catabolic enzyme sphingosine phosphate lyase (SPL) 3 days later. These changes correlate with a transient increase in circulating S1P levels after muscle injury. We show a specific requirement for SphK1 to support efficient muscle regeneration and SC proliferation and differentiation. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), were found to be S1P-deficient and exhibited muscle SPL upregulation, suggesting that S1P catabolism is enhanced in dystrophic muscle. Pharmacological SPL inhibition increased muscle S1P levels, improved mdx muscle regeneration and enhanced SC proliferation via S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2)-dependent inhibition of Rac1, thereby activating Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), a central player in inflammatory signaling. STAT3 activation resulted in p21 and p27 downregulation in a S1PR2-dependent fashion in myoblasts. Our findings suggest that S1P promotes SC progression through the cell cycle by repression of cell cycle inhibitors via S1PR2/STAT3-dependent signaling and that SPL inhibition may provide a therapeutic strategy for MD. PMID:22606352

  19. The Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Lyase (LegS2) Contributes to the Restriction of Legionella pneumophila in Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Abu Khweek, Arwa; Kanneganti, Apurva; Guttridge D, Denis C; Amer, Amal O

    2016-01-01

    L. pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a human illness characterized by severe pneumonia. In contrast to those derived from humans, macrophages derived from most mouse strains restrict L. pneumophila replication. The restriction of L. pneumophila replication has been shown to require bacterial flagellin, a component of the type IV secretion system as well as the cytosolic NOD-like receptor (NLR) Nlrc4/ Ipaf. These events lead to caspase-1 activation which, in turn, activates caspase-7. Following caspase-7 activation, the phagosome-containing L. pneumophila fuses with the lysosome, resulting in the restriction of L. pneumophila growth. The LegS2 effector is injected by the type IV secretion system and functions as a sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase. It is homologous to the eukaryotic sphingosine lyase (SPL), an enzyme required in the terminal steps of sphingolipid metabolism. Herein, we show that mice Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMDMs) and human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages (hMDMs) are more permissive to L. pneumophila legS2 mutants than wild-type (WT) strains. This permissiveness to L. pneumophila legS2 is neither attributed to abolished caspase-1, caspase-7 or caspase-3 activation, nor due to the impairment of phagosome-lysosome fusion. Instead, an infection with the legS2 mutant resulted in the reduction of some inflammatory cytokines and their corresponding mRNA; this effect is mediated by the inhibition of the nuclear transcription factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Moreover, BMDMs infected with L. pneumophila legS2 mutant showed elongated mitochondria that resembles mitochondrial fusion. Therefore, the absence of LegS2 effector is associated with reduced NF-κB activation and atypical morphology of mitochondria. PMID:26741365

  20. Analysis of Molecular Species Profiles of Ceramide-1-phosphate and Sphingomyelin Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Ryouhei; Tabata, Yumika; Iga, Erina; Nakao, Michiyasu; Sano, Shigeki; Kogure, Kentaro; Tokumura, Akira; Tanaka, Tamotsu

    2016-02-01

    Ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P) is a potential signaling molecule that modulates various cellular functions in animals. It has been known that C1P with different N-acyl lengths induce biological responses differently. However, molecular species profiles of the C1P in animal tissues have not been extensively examined yet. Here, we developed a method for determination of the molecular species of a C1P using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry with Phos-tag, a phosphate capture molecule. The amounts of total C1P in skin, brain, liver, kidney and small intestine of mice were determined to be 344, 151, 198, 96 and 90 pmol/g wet weight, respectively. We found a C1P species having an α-hydroxypalmitoyl residue (h-C1P, 44 pmol/g wet weight) in mouse skin. The h-C1P was detected only in the skin, and not other tissues of mice. The same analysis was applied to sphingomyelin after conversion of sphingomyelin to C1P by Streptomyces chromofuscus phospholipase D. We found that molecular species profiles of sphingomyelin in skin, kidney and small intestine of mice were similar to those of C1P in corresponding tissues. In contrast, molecular species profiles of sphingomyelin in liver and brain were quite different from those of C1P in these tissues, indicating selective synthesis or degradation of C1P in these tissues. The method described here will be useful for detection of changes in molecular species profiles of C1P and sphingomyelin. PMID:26694604

  1. Engineering in vivo gradients of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor ligands for localized microvascular remodeling and inflammatory cell positioning.

    PubMed

    Ogle, Molly E; Sefcik, Lauren S; Awojoodu, Anthony O; Chiappa, Nathan F; Lynch, Kevin; Peirce-Cottler, Shayn; Botchwey, Edward A

    2014-11-01

    Biomaterial-mediated controlled release of soluble signaling molecules is a tissue engineering approach to spatially control processes of inflammation, microvascular remodeling and host cell recruitment, and to generate biochemical gradients in vivo. Lipid mediators, such as sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), are recognized for their essential roles in spatial guidance, signaling and highly regulated endogenous gradients. S1P and pharmacological analogs such as FTY720 are therapeutically attractive targets for their critical roles in the trafficking of cells between blood and tissue spaces, both physiologically and pathophysiologically. However, the interaction of locally delivered sphingolipids with the complex metabolic networks controlling the flux of lipid species in inflamed tissue has yet to be elucidated. In this study, complementary in vitro and in vivo approaches are investigated to identify relationships between polymer composition, drug release kinetics, S1P metabolic activity, signaling gradients and spatial positioning of circulating cells around poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) biomaterials. Results demonstrate that biomaterial-based gradients of S1P are short-lived in the tissue due to degradation by S1P lyase, an enzyme that irreversibly degrades intracellular S1P. On the other hand, in vivo gradients of the more stable compound, FTY720, enhance microvascular remodeling by selectively recruiting an anti-inflammatory subset of monocytes (S1P3(high)) to the biomaterial. Results highlight the need to better understand the endogenous balance of lipid import/export machinery and lipid kinase/phosphatase activity in order to design biomaterial products that spatially control the innate immune environment to maximize regenerative potential. PMID:25128750

  2. Sphingosine 1-phosphate analogue recognition and selectivity at S1P4 within the endothelial differentiation gene family of receptors

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Pham, TrucChi T.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Kohno, Takayuki; Osborne, Daniel A.; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L.

    2005-01-01

    Synergistic computational and experimental studies provided previously unforeseen details concerning the structural basis of S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate) recognition by the S1P4 G-protein-coupled receptor. Similarly to reports on the S1P1 receptor, cationic and anionic residues in the third transmembrane domain (R3.28 and E3.29 at positions 124 and 125) form ion pairs with the phosphate and ammonium of S1P, and alanine mutations at these positions abolished specific S1P binding, S1P-induced receptor activation and cell migration. Unlike findings on the S1P1 receptor, no cationic residue in the seventh transmembrane domain interacts with the phosphate. Additionally, two previously undiscovered interactions with the S1P polar headgroup have been identified. Trp186 at position 4.64 in the fourth transmembrane domain interacts by a cation-π interaction with the ammonium group of S1P. Lys204 at position 5.38 forms an ion pair with the S1P. The S1P4 and S1P1 receptors show differences in binding-pocket shape and electrostatic distributions that correlate with the published structure–activity relationships. In particular, the binding pocket of mS1P4 (mouse S1P4) has recognition sites for the anionic phosphate and cationic ammonium groups that are equidistant from the end of the non-polar tail. In contrast, the binding pocket of hS1P1 (human S1P4) places the ammonium recognition site 2 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) closer to the end of the non-polar tail than the phosphate recognition site. PMID:15733055

  3. Activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-1 by SEW2871 improves cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease model rats

    PubMed Central

    Asle-Rousta, Masoumeh; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Ahmadiani, Abolhassan; Rahnema, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) is involved in a variety of cellular processes via activation of S1P receptors (S1PRs; S1PR1 to S1PR5) that are highly expressed in the brain. It has been shown that the level of S1P is reduced in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. However, there is no study designed to evaluate the expression of S1PRs in AD brains. The objectives of the present work are (1) to examine the expression of S1PR1-3 in the hippocampus of beta amyloid (Aβ) 1-42 injected rats and (2) to clarify the effects of chronic S1PR1 activation on S1PR1-3 levels, spatial memory deficit and hippocampal damage in AD rats. SEW2871, the S1PR1 selective agonist, repeatedly was injected intraperitoneally during a period of two weeks. Upon Western Blot data bilateral intrahippocampal injection of Aβ1-42 decreased the expression of S1PR1 while increased S1PR2 level and did not affect that of S1PR3. We found that chronic administration of SEW2871 inhibited the reduction of S1PR1 expression and ameliorated spatial memory impairment in the Morris water maze task in rats. In addition, SEW2871 attenuated the Aβ1-42-induced hippocampal neuronal loss according to Nissl staining findings. Data in the current study highlights the importance of S1PR1 signaling pathway deregulation in AD development and suggests that activation of S1PR1 may represent a potential approach for developing new therapeutics to manage memory deficit and apoptosis associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:26417237

  4. Lysophosphatidic Acid and Sphingosine-1-Phosphate: A Concise Review of Biological Function and Applications for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Binder, Bernard Y K; Williams, Priscilla A; Silva, Eduardo A; Leach, J Kent

    2015-12-01

    The presentation and controlled release of bioactive signals to direct cellular growth and differentiation represents a widely used strategy in tissue engineering. Historically, work in this field has primarily focused on the delivery of large cytokines and growth factors, which can be costly to manufacture and difficult to deliver in a sustained manner. There has been a marked increase over the past decade in the pursuit of lipid mediators due to their wide range of effects over multiple cell types, low cost, and ease of scale-up. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) are two bioactive lysophospholipids (LPLs) that have gained attention for use as pharmacological agents in tissue engineering applications. While these lipids can have similar effects on cellular response, they possess distinct chemical backbones, mechanisms of synthesis and degradation, and signaling pathways using a discrete set of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). LPA and S1P predominantly act extracellularly on their GPCRs and can directly regulate cell survival, differentiation, cytokine secretion, proliferation, and migration--each of the important functions that must be considered in regenerative medicine. In addition to these potent physiological functions, these LPLs play pivotal roles in a number of pathophysiological processes. To capitalize on the promise of these molecules in tissue engineering, these lipids have been incorporated into biomaterials for in vivo delivery. Here, we survey the effects of LPA and S1P on both cellular- and tissue-level phenotypes, with an eye toward regulating stem/progenitor cell growth and differentiation. In particular, we examine work that has translational applications for cell-based tissue engineering strategies in promoting cell survival, bone and cartilage engineering, and therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:26035484

  5. Sphingosine-1-phosphate enhances satellite cell activation in dystrophic muscles through a S1PR2/STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kenneth C; Leong, Weng-In; Carlson, Morgan E; Oskouian, Babak; Kumar, Ashok; Fyrst, Henrik; Zhang, Meng; Proia, Richard L; Hoffman, Eric P; Saba, Julie D

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) activates a widely expressed family of G protein-coupled receptors, serves as a muscle trophic factor and activates muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that muscle injury induces dynamic changes in S1P signaling and metabolism in vivo. These changes include early and profound induction of the gene encoding the S1P biosynthetic enzyme SphK1, followed by induction of the catabolic enzyme sphingosine phosphate lyase (SPL) 3 days later. These changes correlate with a transient increase in circulating S1P levels after muscle injury. We show a specific requirement for SphK1 to support efficient muscle regeneration and SC proliferation and differentiation. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), were found to be S1P-deficient and exhibited muscle SPL upregulation, suggesting that S1P catabolism is enhanced in dystrophic muscle. Pharmacological SPL inhibition increased muscle S1P levels, improved mdx muscle regeneration and enhanced SC proliferation via S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2)-dependent inhibition of Rac1, thereby activating Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), a central player in inflammatory signaling. STAT3 activation resulted in p21 and p27 downregulation in a S1PR2-dependent fashion in myoblasts. Our findings suggest that S1P promotes SC progression through the cell cycle by repression of cell cycle inhibitors via S1PR2/STAT3-dependent signaling and that SPL inhibition may provide a therapeutic strategy for MD. PMID:22606352

  6. Activation of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor-1 by FTY720 is neuroprotective after ischemic stroke in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Sozen, Takumi; Rolland, William; Zhang, John H

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose FTY720 is a known sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonist. In the present study we investigated the neuroprotective effect of postischemic administration of FTY720 in rats with 2 hours transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Methods One hundred eleven male rats were randomly assigned to sham-operated and MCAO treated with vehicle, 0.25mg/kg and 1mg/kg of FTY720, another selective S1P receptor-1 (S1P1) agonist SEW2871 (5mg/kg), or 0.25mg/kg of FTY720+ a S1P antagonist VPC23019 (0.5mg/kg). Drugs were injected intraperitoneally immediately after reperfusion. Neurological score and infarct volume were assessed at 24 and 72 hours after MCAO. Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5′-triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) were conducted at 24 hours after MCAO. Results FTY720 significantly reduced infarct volume and improved neurological score at 24 and 72 hours after MCAO compared with the vehicle group. SEW2871 showed similar neuroprotective effects to FTY720, while VPC 20319 abolished the neuroprotective effects of FTY720. FTY720 significantly retained Akt and extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation and Bcl-2 expression, and decreased cleaved caspase-3 expression and TUNEL-positive neurons at 24 hours after MCAO. VPC23019 blocked the antiapoptotic effects of FTY720. Conclusions These data suggest that activation of S1P1 by FTY720 reduces neuronal death after transient MCAO. PMID:19940275

  7. Melatonin inhibits the sphingosine kinase 1/sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling pathway in rabbits with fulminant hepatitis of viral origin.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Irene; San-Miguel, Beatriz; Sánchez, Diana I; González-Fernández, Bárbara; Álvarez, Marcelino; González-Gallego, Javier; Tuñón, María J

    2016-09-01

    The sphingosine kinase (SphK)1/sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) pathway is involved in multiple biological processes, including liver diseases. This study investigate whether modulation of the SphK1/S1P system associates to the beneficial effects of melatonin in an animal model of acute liver failure (ALF) induced by the rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV). Rabbits were experimentally infected with 2 × 10(4) hemagglutination units of a RHDV isolate and received 20 mg/kg of melatonin at 0, 12, and 24 hr postinfection. Liver mRNA levels, protein concentration, and immunohistochemical labeling for SphK1 increased in RHDV-infected rabbits. S1P production and protein expression of the S1PR1 receptor were significantly elevated following RHDV infection. These effects were significantly reduced by melatonin. Rabbits also exhibited increased expression of toll-like receptor (TLR)4, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p50 and p65 subunits, and phosphorylated inhibitor of kappa B (IκB)α. Melatonin administration significantly inhibited those changes and induced a decreased immunoreactivity for RHDV viral VP60 antigen in the liver. Results obtained indicate that the SphK1/S1P system activates in parallel to viral replication and the inflammatory process induced by the virus. Inhibition of the lipid signaling pathway by the indole reveals novel molecular pathways that may account for the protective effect of melatonin in this animal model of ALF, and supports the potential of melatonin as an antiviral agent. PMID:27101794

  8. Phenotypic Regulation of the Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Miles Apart by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved DRY motif at the end of the third helix of rhodopsin-like, class-A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a major regulator of receptor stability, signaling activity, and β-arrestin-mediated internalization. Substitution of the DRY arginine with histidine in the human vasopressin receptor results in a loss-of-function phenotype associated with diabetes insipidus. The analogous R150H substitution of the DRY motif in zebrafish sphingosine-1 phosphate receptor 2 (S1p2) produces a mutation, miles apart m93 (milm93), that not only disrupts signaling but also impairs heart field migration. We hypothesized that constitutive S1p2 desensitization is the underlying cause of this strong zebrafish developmental defect. We observed in cell assays that the wild-type S1p2 receptor is at the cell surface whereas in distinct contrast the S1p2 R150H receptor is found in intracellular vesicles, blocking G protein but not arrestin signaling activity. Surface S1p2 R150H expression could be restored by inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). Moreover, we observed that β-arrestin 2 and GRK2 colocalize with S1p2 in developing zebrafish embryos and depletion of GRK2 in the S1p2 R150H miles apart zebrafish partially rescued cardia bifida. The ability of reduced GRK2 activity to reverse a developmental phenotype associated with constitutive desensitization supports efforts to genetically or pharmacologically target this kinase in diseases involving biased GPCR signaling. PMID:25555130

  9. Elevated nuclear sphingoid base-1-phosphates and decreased histone deacetylase activity after fumonisin B1 treatment in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Nicole M; Riley, Ronald T; Showker, Jency L; Voss, Kenneth A; Sachs, Andrew J; Maddox, Joyce R; Gelineau-van Waes, Janee B

    2016-05-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a mycotoxin produced by a common fungal contaminant of corn. Administration of FB1 to pregnant LM/Bc mice induces exencephaly in embryos, and ingestion of FB1-contaminated food during early pregnancy is associated with increased risk for neural tube defects (NTDs) in humans. FB1 inhibits ceramide synthase enzymes in sphingolipid biosynthesis, causing sphinganine (Sa) and bioactive sphinganine-1-phosphate (Sa1P) accumulation in blood, cells, and tissues. Sphingosine kinases (Sphk) phosphorylate Sa to form Sa1P. Upon activation, Sphk1 associates primarily with the plasma membrane, while Sphk2 is found predominantly in the nucleus. In cells over-expressing Sphk2, accumulation of Sa1P in the nuclear compartment inhibits histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity, causing increased acetylation of histone lysine residues. In this study, FB1 treatment in LM/Bc mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in significant accumulation of Sa1P in nuclear extracts relative to cytoplasmic extracts. Elevated nuclear Sa1P corresponded to decreased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and increased histone acetylation at H2BK12, H3K9, H3K18, and H3K23. Treatment of LM/Bc MEFs with a selective Sphk1 inhibitor, PF-543, or with ABC294640, a selective Sphk2 inhibitor, significantly reduced nuclear Sa1P accumulation after FB1, although Sa1P levels remained significantly increased relative to basal levels. Concurrent treatment with both PF-543 and ABC294640 prevented nuclear accumulation of Sa1P in response to FB1. Other HDAC inhibitors are known to cause NTDs, so these results suggest that FB1-induced disruption of sphingolipid metabolism leading to nuclear Sa1P accumulation, HDAC inhibition, and histone hyperacetylation is a potential mechanism for FB1-induced NTDs. PMID:26905748

  10. GlmU (N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase) bound to three magnesium ions and ATP at the active site

    PubMed Central

    Vithani, Neha; Bais, Vaibhav; Prakash, Balaji

    2014-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU), a bifunctional enzyme exclusive to prokaryotes, belongs to the family of sugar nucleotidyltransferases (SNTs). The enzyme binds GlcNAc-1-P and UTP, and catalyzes a uridyltransfer reaction to synthesize UDP-GlcNAc, an important precursor for cell-wall biosynthesis. As many SNTs are known to utilize a broad range of substrates, substrate specificity in GlmU was probed using biochemical and structural studies. The enzymatic assays reported here demonstrate that GlmU is specific for its natural substrates UTP and GlcNAc-1-P. The crystal structure of GlmU bound to ATP and GlcNAc-1-P provides molecular details for the inability of the enzyme to utilize ATP for the nucleotidyltransfer reaction. ATP binding results in an inactive pre-catalytic enzyme–substrate complex, where it adopts an unusual conformation such that the reaction cannot be catalyzed; here, ATP is shown to be bound together with three Mg2+ ions. Overall, this structure represents the binding of an inhibitory molecule at the active site and can potentially be used to develop new inhibitors of the enzyme. Further, similar to DNA/RNA polymerases, GlmU was recently recognized to utilize two metal ions, MgA 2+ and MgB 2+, to catalyze the uridyltransfer reaction. Interestingly, displacement of MgB 2+ from its usual catalytically competent position, as noted in the crystal structure of RNA polymerase in an inactive state, was considered to be a key factor inhibiting the reaction. Surprisingly, in the current structure of GlmU MgB 2+ is similarly displaced; this raises the possibility that an analogous inhibitory mechanism may be operative in GlmU. PMID:24915076

  11. Sphingolipids and cancer: ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate in the regulation of cell death and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Suriyan; Meyers-Needham, Marisa; Senkal, Can E; Saddoughi, Sahar A; Sentelle, David; Selvam, Shanmugam Panneer; Salas, Arelis; Ogretmen, Besim

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids have emerged as bioeffector molecules, controlling various aspects of cell growth and proliferation in cancer, which is becoming the deadliest disease in the world. These lipid molecules have also been implicated in the mechanism of action of cancer chemotherapeutics. Ceramide, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, generally mediates antiproliferative responses, such as cell growth inhibition, apoptosis induction, senescence modulation, endoplasmic reticulum stress responses and/or autophagy. Interestingly, recent studies suggest de novo-generated ceramides may have distinct and opposing roles in the promotion/suppression of tumors, and that these activities are based on their fatty acid chain lengths, subcellular localization and/or direct downstream targets. For example, in head and neck cancer cells, ceramide synthase 6/C16-ceramide addiction was revealed, and this was associated with increased tumor growth, whereas downregulation of its synthesis resulted in ER stress-induced apoptosis. By contrast, ceramide synthase 1-generated C18-ceramide has been shown to suppress tumor growth in various cancer models, both in situ and in vivo. In addition, ceramide metabolism to generate sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) by sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 mediates, with or without the involvement of G-protein-coupled S1P receptor signaling, prosurvival, angiogenesis, metastasis and/or resistance to drug-induced apoptosis. Importantly, recent findings regarding the mechanisms by which sphingolipid metabolism and signaling regulate tumor growth and progression, such as identifying direct intracellular protein targets of sphingolipids, have been key for the development of new chemotherapeutic strategies. Thus, in this article, we will present conclusions of recent studies that describe opposing roles of de novo-generated ceramides by ceramide synthases and/or S1P in the regulation of cancer pathogenesis, as well as the development of sphingolipid-based cancer

  12. Metabolomic analysis reveals hepatic metabolite perturbations in citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double-knockout mice, a model of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Inoue, Kanako; Ono, Hiromi; Tushima, Anmi; Katsura, Natsumi; Yokogawa, Mana; Yoshidumi, Yukari; Kuhara, Tomiko; Ohse, Morimasa; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2011-12-01

    The citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) double-knockout mouse displays phenotypic attributes of both neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis and adult-onset type II citrullinemia, making it a suitable model of human citrin deficiency. In the present study, we investigated metabolic disturbances in the livers of wild-type, citrin (Ctrn) knockout, mGPD knockout, and Ctrn/mGPD double-knockout mice following oral sucrose versus saline administration using metabolomic approaches. By using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry, we found three general groupings of metabolite changes in the livers of the double-knockout mice following sucrose administration that were subsequently confirmed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry or enzymatic methods: a marked increase of hepatic glycerol 3-phosphate, a generalized decrease of hepatic tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, and alterations of hepatic amino acid levels related to the urea cycle or lysine catabolism including marked increases in citrulline and lysine. Furthermore, concurrent oral administration of sodium pyruvate with sucrose ameliorated the hyperammonemia induced by sucrose, as had been shown previously, as well as almost completely normalizing the hepatic metabolite perturbations found. Overall, we have identified additional metabolic disturbances in double-KO mice following oral sucrose administration, and provided further evidence for the therapeutic use of sodium pyruvate in our mouse model of citrin deficiency. PMID:21908222

  13. Over-expression of Arabidopsis thaliana SFD1/GLY1, the gene encoding plastid localized glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, increases plastidic lipid content in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijayata; Singh, Praveen Kumar; Siddiqui, Adnan; Singh, Subaran; Banday, Zeeshan Zahoor; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Lipids are the major constituents of all membranous structures in plants. Plants possess two pathways for lipid biosynthesis: the prokaryotic pathway (i.e., plastidic pathway) and the eukaryotic pathway (i.e., endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) pathway). Whereas some plants synthesize galactolipids from diacylglycerol assembled in the plastid, others, including rice, derive their galactolipids from diacylglycerols assembled by the eukaryotic pathway. Arabidopsis thaliana glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pDH), coded by SUPPRESSOR OF FATTY ACID DESATURASE 1 (SFD1; alias GLY1) gene, catalyzes the formation of glycerol 3-phosphate (G3p), the backbone of many membrane lipids. Here SFD1 was introduced to rice as a transgene. Arabidopsis SFD1 localizes in rice plastids and its over-expression increases plastidic membrane lipid content in transgenic rice plants without any major impact on ER lipids. The results suggest that over-expression of plastidic G3pDH enhances biosynthesis of plastid-localized lipids in rice. Lipid composition in the transgenic plants is consistent with increased phosphatidylglycerol synthesis in the plastid and increased galactolipid synthesis from diacylglycerol produced via the ER pathway. The transgenic plants show a higher photosynthetic assimilation rate, suggesting a possible application of this finding in crop improvement. PMID:26747130

  14. Identification of arylazido-. beta. -alanyl NAD/sup +/ modified site in the rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydeogenase by microsequencing and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Lee, T.D.; Legesse, K.; Shively, J.E.

    1985-05-01

    Arylazido-BETA-alanyl NAD/sup +/, A3'-0-((3-(N-(4-azido-2-nitrophenyl) amino) propionyl)) NAD/sup +/, is a photoaffinity analog of NAD/sup +/. The NAD/sup +/ analog has been previously demonstrated to modify glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in a very specific manner and probably at the active site of the enzyme. The labeling experiment utilizing (/sup 3/H)-arylazido-..beta..-alanyl NAD/sup +/ revealed that the analog is associated exclusively with a tryptic peptide which has the sequence as Ile-Val-Ser-Asn-Ala-Ser-Cys-Thr-Thr-Asn. In comparison to the amino acid sequence of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydeogenase from other species this peptide is in a highly conserved region and is part of the active site of enzyme. The cysteine residue at position seven was predominantly labeled and suggested to be the site modified by arylazido-..beta..-alanyl NAD/sup +/. This cysteins residue corresponds to the Cys-149 in the pig muscle enzyme and which has been shown to be an essential residue for the enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that arylazido-..beta..-alanyl NAD/sup +/ is a useful photoaffinity probe to characterize the active site of NAD(H) dependent enzymes.

  15. Safety evaluation of the double mutant 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (2mEPSPS) from maize that confers tolerance to glyphosate herbicide in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Rouquié, David; Freyssinet, Martine; Currier, Thomas; Martone, Aris; Zhou, Junguo; Bates, Elizabeth E M; Ferullo, Jean-Marc; Hendrickx, Koen; Rouan, Dominique

    2009-07-01

    Glyphosate tolerance can be conferred by decreasing the herbicide's ability to inhibit the enzyme 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase, which is essential for the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids in all plants, fungi, and bacteria. Glyphosate tolerance is based upon the expression of the double mutant 5-enol pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (2mEPSPS) protein. The 2mEPSPS protein, with a lower binding affinity for glyphosate, is highly resistant to the inhibition by glyphosate and thus allows sufficient enzyme activity for the plants to grow in the presence of herbicides that contain glyphosate. Based on both a review of published literature and experimental studies, the potential safety concerns related to the transgenic 2mEPSPS protein were assessed. The safety evaluation supports that the expressed protein is innocuous. The 2mEPSPS enzyme does not possess any of the properties associated with known toxins or allergens, including a lack of amino acid sequence similarity to known toxins and allergens, a rapid degradation in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, and no adverse effects in mice after intravenous or oral administration (at 10 or 2000 mg/kg body weight, respectively). In conclusion, there is a reasonable certainty of no harm resulting from the inclusion of the 2mEPSPS protein in human food or in animal feed. PMID:19303906

  16. Molecular Clone and Expression of a NAD+-Dependent Glycerol-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isozyme Gene from the Halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ma; He, Li-Hong; Yu, Tu-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Glycerol is an important osmotically compatible solute in Dunaliella. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) is a key enzyme in the pathway of glycerol synthesis, which converts dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glycerol-3-phosphate. Generally, the glycerol-DHAP cycle pathway, which is driven by G3PDH, is considered as the rate-limiting enzyme to regulate the glycerol level under osmotic shocks. Considering the peculiarity in osmoregulation, the cDNA of a NAD+-dependent G3PDH was isolated from D. salina using RACE and RT-PCR approaches in this study. Results indicated that the length of the cDNA sequence of G3PDH was 2,100 bp encoding a 699 amino acid deduced polypeptide whose computational molecular weight was 76.6 kDa. Conserved domain analysis revealed that the G3PDH protein has two independent functional domains, SerB and G3PDH domains. It was predicted that the G3PDH was a nonsecretory protein and may be located in the chloroplast of D. salina. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the D. salina G3PDH had a closer relationship with the G3PDHs from the Dunaliella genus than with those from other species. In addition, the cDNA was subsequently subcloned in the pET-32a(+) vector and was transformed into E. coli strain BL21 (DE3), a expression protein with 100 kDa was identified, which was consistent with the theoretical value. PMID:23626797

  17. Plastidial Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Leads to Altered Root Development and Affects the Sugar and Amino Acid Balance in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Cascales-Miñana, Borja; Mulet, Jose Miguel; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Pozueta-Romero, Javier; Kuhn, Josef M.; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2009-01-01

    Glycolysis is a central metabolic pathway that, in plants, occurs in both the cytosol and the plastids. The glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the conversion of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate with concomitant reduction of NAD+ to NADH. Both cytosolic (GAPCs) and plastidial (GAPCps) GAPDH activities have been described. However, the in vivo functions of the plastidial isoforms remain unresolved. In this work, we have identified two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) chloroplast/plastid-localized GAPDH isoforms (GAPCp1 and GAPCp2). gapcp double mutants display a drastic phenotype of arrested root development, dwarfism, and sterility. In spite of their low gene expression level as compared with other GAPDHs, GAPCp down-regulation leads to altered gene expression and to drastic changes in the sugar and amino acid balance of the plant. We demonstrate that GAPCps are important for the synthesis of serine in roots. Serine supplementation to the growth medium rescues root developmental arrest and restores normal levels of carbohydrates and sugar biosynthetic activities in gapcp double mutants. We provide evidence that the phosphorylated pathway of Ser biosynthesis plays an important role in supplying serine to roots. Overall, these studies provide insights into the in vivo functions of the GAPCps in plants. Our results emphasize the importance of the plastidial glycolytic pathway, and specifically of GAPCps, in plant primary metabolism. PMID:19675149

  18. Arabidopsis plants deficient in plastidial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase show alterations in abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction: interaction between ABA and primary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Bermúdez, María Angeles; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) controls plant development and regulates plant responses to environmental stresses. A role for ABA in sugar regulation of plant development has also been well documented although the molecular mechanisms connecting the hormone with sugar signal transduction pathways are not well understood. In this work it is shown that Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in plastidial glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapcp1gapcp2) are ABA insensitive in growth, stomatal closure, and germination assays. The ABA levels of gapcp1gapcp2 were normal, suggesting that the ABA signal transduction pathway is impaired in the mutants. ABA modified gapcp1gapcp2 gene expression, but the mutant response to the hormone differed from that observed in wild-type plants. The gene expression of the transcription factor ABI4, involved in both sugar and ABA signalling, was altered in gapcp1gapcp2, suggesting that their ABA insensitivity is mediated, at least partially, through this transcriptional regulator. Serine supplementation was able partly to restore the ABA sensitivity of gapcp1gapcp2, indicating that amino acid homeostasis and/or serine metabolism may also be important determinants in the connections of ABA with primary metabolism. Overall, these studies provide new insights into the links between plant primary metabolism and ABA signalling, and demonstrate the importance of plastidial glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in these interactions. PMID:21068209

  19. The specific role of plastidial glycolysis in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells under scrutiny through the study of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Anoman, Armand Djoro; Flores-Tornero, María; Rosa-Telléz, Sara; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2016-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of metabolic processes is an important feature in plants where the same pathways could be simultaneously active in different compartments. Plant glycolysis occurs in the cytosol and plastids of green and non-green cells in which the requirements of energy and precursors may be completely different. Because of this, the relevance of plastidial glycolysis could be very different depending on the cell type. In the associated study, we investigated the function of plastidial glycolysis in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells by specifically driving the expression of plastidial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double mutant background (gapcp1gapcp2). We showed that GAPCp is not functionally significant in photosynthetic cells, while it plays a crucial function in heterotrophic cells. We also showed that (i) GAPCp activity expression in root tips is necessary for primary root growth, (ii) its expression in heterotrophic cells of aerial parts and roots is necessary for plant growth and development, and (iii) GAPCp is an important metabolic connector of carbon and nitrogen metabolism through the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis (PPSB). We discuss here the role that this pathway could play in the control of plant growth and development. PMID:26953506

  20. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus woesei: characterization of the enzyme, cloning and sequencing of the gene, and expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Zwickl, P; Fabry, S; Bogedain, C; Haas, A; Hensel, R

    1990-01-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrococcus woesei (optimal growth temperature, 100 to 103 degrees C) was purified to homogeneity. This enzyme was strictly phosphate dependent, utilized either NAD+ or NADP+, and was insensitive to pentalenolactone like the enzyme from the methanogenic archaebacterium Methanothermus fervidus. The enzyme exhibited a considerable thermostability, with a 44-min half-life at 100 degrees C. The amino acid sequence of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from P. woesei was deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the coding gene. Compared with the enzyme homologs from mesophilic archaebacteria (Methanobacterium bryantii, Methanobacterium formicicum) and an extremely thermophilic archaebacterium (Methanothermus fervidus), the primary structure of the P. woesei enzyme exhibited a strikingly high proportion of aromatic amino acid residues and a low proportion of sulfur-containing residues. The coding gene of P. woesei was expressed at a high level in Escherichia coli, thus providing an ideal basis for detailed structural and functional studies of that enzyme. Images PMID:2165475

  1. Overexpression of ACC gene from oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi enhanced the lipid accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with increased levels of glycerol 3-phosphate substrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiancai; Xu, Ronghua; Wang, Ruling; Haque, Mohammad Enamul; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) is the rate-limiting step in fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, a gene coding for ACC was isolated and characterized from an oleaginous yeast, Lipomyces starkeyi. Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of L. starkeyi acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (LsACC1) showed that the expression levels were upregulated with the fast accumulation of lipids. The LsACC1 was co-overexpressed with the glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GPD1), which regulates lipids biosynthesis by supplying another substrates glycerol 3-phosphate for storage lipid assembly, in the non-oleaginous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Further, the S. cerevisiae acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ScACC1) was transferred with GPD1 and its function was analyzed in comparison with LsACC1. The results showed that overexpressed LsACC1 and GPD1 resulted in a 63% increase in S. cerevisiae. This study gives new data in understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of fatty acids and lipid biosynthesis in yeasts. PMID:26865376

  2. Potent and Selective Agonists of Sphingosine 1-Phosphate 1 (S1P1): Discovery and SAR of a Novel Isoxazole Based Series.

    PubMed

    Watterson, Scott H; Guo, Junqing; Spergel, Steve H; Langevine, Charles M; Moquin, Robert V; Shen, Ding Ren; Yarde, Melissa; Cvijic, Mary Ellen; Banas, Dana; Liu, Richard; Suchard, Suzanne J; Gillooly, Kathleen; Taylor, Tracy; Rex-Rabe, Sandra; Shuster, David J; McIntyre, Kim W; Cornelius, Georgia; D'Arienzo, Celia; Marino, Anthony; Balimane, Praveen; Warrack, Bethanne; Salter-Cid, Luisa; McKinnon, Murray; Barrish, Joel C; Carter, Percy H; Pitts, William J; Xie, Jenny; Dyckman, Alaric J

    2016-03-24

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is the endogenous ligand for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors (S1P1-5) and evokes a variety of cellular responses through their stimulation. The interaction of S1P with the S1P receptors plays a fundamental physiological role in a number of processes including vascular development and stabilization, lymphocyte migration, and proliferation. Agonism of S1P1, in particular, has been shown to play a significant role in lymphocyte trafficking from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs, resulting in immunosuppression. This article will detail the discovery and SAR of a potent and selective series of isoxazole based full agonists of S1P1. Isoxazole 6d demonstrated impressive efficacy when administered orally in a rat model of arthritis and in a mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26924461

  3. Sphingosine 1-phosphate elicits RhoA-dependent proliferation and MRTF-A mediated gene induction in CPCs.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, Alessandra; Chesini, Gino P; Taylor, Amy E; Sussman, Mark A; Brown, Joan Heller; Purcell, Nicole H

    2016-08-01

    Although c-kit(+) cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) are currently used in clinical trials there remain considerable gaps in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying their proliferation and differentiation. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) play an important role in regulating these processes in mammalian cell types thus we assessed GPCR mRNA expression in c-kit(+) cells isolated from adult mouse hearts. Our data provide the first comprehensive overview of the distribution of this fundamental class of cardiac receptors in CPCs and reveal notable distinctions from that of adult cardiomyocytes. We focused on GPCRs that couple to RhoA activation in particular those for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The S1P2 and S1P3 receptors are the most abundant S1P receptor subtypes in mouse and human CPCs while cardiomyocytes express predominantly S1P1 receptors. Treatment of CPCs with S1P, as with thrombin and serum, increased proliferation through a pathway requiring RhoA signaling, as evidenced by significant attenuation when Rho was inhibited by treatment with C3 toxin. Further analysis demonstrated that both S1P- and serum-induced proliferation are regulated through the S1P2 and S1P3 receptor subtypes which couple to Gα12/13 to elicit RhoA activation. The transcriptional co-activator MRTF-A was activated by S1P as assessed by its nuclear accumulation and induction of a RhoA/MRTF-A luciferase reporter. In addition S1P treatment increased expression of cardiac lineage markers Mef2C and GATA4 and the smooth muscle marker GATA6 through activation of MRTF-A. In conclusion, we delineate an S1P-regulated signaling pathway in CPCs that introduces the possibility of targeting S1P2/3 receptors, Gα12/13 or RhoA to influence the proliferation and commitment of c-kit(+) CPCs and improve the response of the myocardium following injury. PMID:27094722

  4. The Granuloma Response Controlling Cryptococcosis in Mice Depends on the Sphingosine Kinase 1–Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Farnoud, Amir M.; Bryan, Arielle M.; Kechichian, Talar; Luberto, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungal pathogen that causes pulmonary infections, which may progress into life-threatening meningitis. In commonly used mouse models of C. neoformans infections, fungal cells are not contained in the lungs, resulting in dissemination to the brain. We have previously reported the generation of an engineered C. neoformans strain (C. neoformans Δgcs1) which can be contained in lung granulomas in the mouse model and have shown that granuloma formation is dependent upon the enzyme sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) and its product, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). In this study, we have used four mouse models, CBA/J and C57BL6/J (both immunocompetent), Tgε26 (an isogenic strain of strain CBA/J lacking T and NK cells), and SK−/− (an isogenic strain of strain C57BL6/J lacking SK1), to investigate how the granulomatous response and SK1-S1P pathway are interrelated during C. neoformans infections. S1P and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were significantly elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of all mice infected with C. neoformans Δgcs1 but not in mice infected with the C. neoformans wild type. SK1−/− mice did not show elevated levels of S1P or MCP-1. Primary neutrophils isolated from SK1−/− mice showed impaired antifungal activity that could be restored by the addition of extracellular S1P. In addition, high levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha were found in the mice infected with C. neoformans Δgcs1 in comparison to the levels found in mice infected with the C. neoformans wild type, and their levels were also dependent on the SK1-S1P pathway. Taken together, these results suggest that the SK1-S1P pathway promotes host defense against C. neoformans infections by regulating cytokine levels, promoting extracellular killing by phagocytes, and generating a granulomatous response. PMID:25895971

  5. Recombinant sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides: characterization, kinetic studies of transglucosylation, and application of immobilised enzyme for production of alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Goedl, Christiane; Schwarz, Alexandra; Minani, Alphonse; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2007-03-30

    Sucrose phosphorylase catalyzes the reversible conversion of sucrose (alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-1,2-beta-D-fructofuranoside) and phosphate into D-fructose and alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate. We report on the molecular cloning and expression of the structural gene encoding sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides (LmSPase) in Escherichia coli DH10B. The recombinant enzyme, containing an 11 amino acid-long N-terminal metal affinity fusion peptide, was overproduced 60-fold in comparison with the natural enzyme. It was purified to apparent homogeneity using copper-loaded Chelating Sepharose and obtained in 20% yield with a specific activity of 190 Umg(-1). LmSPase was covalently attached onto Eupergit C with a binding efficiency of 50% and used for the continuous production of alpha-D-glucose 1-phosphate from sucrose and phosphate (600 mM each) in a packed-bed immobilised enzyme reactor (30 degrees C, pH 7.0). The reactor was operated at a stable conversion of 91% (550 mM product) and productivity of approximately 11 gl(-1)h(-1) for up to 600 h. A kinetic study of transglucosylation by soluble LmSPase was performed using alpha-d-glucose 1-phosphate as the donor substrate and various alcohols as acceptors. D- and L-arabitol were found to be good glucosyl acceptors. PMID:17215056

  6. Dual actions of sphingosine-1-phosphate: extracellular through the Gi-coupled receptor Edg-1 and intracellular to regulate proliferation and survival.

    PubMed

    Van Brocklyn, J R; Lee, M J; Menzeleev, R; Olivera, A; Edsall, L; Cuvillier, O; Thomas, D M; Coopman, P J; Thangada, S; Liu, C H; Hla, T; Spiegel, S

    1998-07-13

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP), a bioactive lipid, acts both intracellularly and extracellularly to cause pleiotropic biological responses. Recently, we identified SPP as a ligand for the G protein-coupled receptor Edg-1 (Lee, M.-J., J.R. Van Brocklyn, S. Thangada, C.H. Liu, A.R. Hand, R. Menzeleev, S. Spiegel, and T. Hla. 1998. Science. 279:1552-1555). Edg-1 binds SPP with remarkable specificity as only sphinganine-1-phosphate displaced radiolabeled SPP, while other sphingolipids did not. Binding of SPP to Edg-1 resulted in inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. In contrast, two well-characterized biological responses of SPP, mitogenesis and prevention of apoptosis, were clearly unrelated to binding to Edg-1 and correlated with intracellular uptake. SPP also stimulated signal transduction pathways, including calcium mobilization, activation of phospholipase D, and tyrosine phosphorylation of p125(FAK), independently of edg-1 expression. Moreover, DNA synthesis in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts was significantly and specifically increased by microinjection of SPP. Finally, SPP suppresses apoptosis of HL-60 and pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, which do not have specific SPP binding or expression of Edg-1 mRNA. Conversely, sphinganine-1-phosphate, which binds to and signals via Edg-1, does not have any significant cytoprotective effect. Thus, SPP is a prototype for a novel class of lipid mediators that act both extracellularly as ligands for cell surface receptors and intracellularly as second messengers. PMID:9660876

  7. The 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone could be explored to develop new inhibitors against the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leishmania species.

    PubMed

    Passalacqua, Thais G; Torres, Fábio A E; Nogueira, Camila T; de Almeida, Leticia; Del Cistia, Mayara L; dos Santos, Mariana B; Regasini, Luis O; Graminha, Márcia A S; Marchetto, Reinaldo; Zottis, Aderson

    2015-09-01

    The enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) from Leishmania species is considered as an attractive target to design new antileishmanial drugs and a previous in silico study reported on the importance of chalcones to achieve its inhibition. Here, we report the identification of a synthetic chalcone in our in vitro assays with promastigote cells from Leishmania amazonensis, its biological activity in animal models, and docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the molecular interactions and structural patterns that are crucial to achieve the inhibition complex between this compound and G3PDH. A molecular fragment of this natural product derivative can provide new inhibitors with increased potency and selectivity. PMID:26169126

  8. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltranferase-2 behaves as a cancer testis gene and promotes growth and tumorigenicity of the breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line.

    PubMed

    Pellon-Maison, Magali; Montanaro, Mauro A; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Garcia-Fabiani, Maria B; Soler-Gerino, Mercedes C; Cattaneo, Elizabeth R; Quiroga, Ivana Y; Abba, Martin C; Coleman, Rosalind A; Gonzalez-Baro, Maria R

    2014-01-01

    The de novo synthesis of glycerolipids in mammalian cells begins with the acylation of glycerol-3-phosphate, catalyzed by glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT). GPAT2 is a mitochondrial isoform primarily expressed in testis under physiological conditions. Because it is aberrantly expressed in multiple myeloma, it has been proposed as a novel cancer testis gene. Using a bioinformatics approach, we found that GPAT2 is highly expressed in melanoma, lung, prostate and breast cancer, and we validated GPAT2 expression at the protein level in breast cancer by immunohistochemistry. In this case GPAT2 expression correlated with a higher histological grade. 5-Aza-2' deoxycytidine treatment of human cells lines induced GPAT2 expression suggesting epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In order to evaluate the contribution of GPAT2 to the tumor phenotype, we silenced its expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. GPAT2 knockdown diminished cell proliferation, anchorage independent growth, migration and tumorigenicity, and increased staurosporine-induced apoptosis. In contrast, GPAT2 over-expression increased cell proliferation rate and resistance to staurosporine-induced apoptosis. To understand the functional role of GPAT2, we performed a co-expression analysis in mouse and human testis and found a significant association with semantic terms involved in cell cycle, DNA integrity maintenance, piRNA biogenesis and epigenetic regulation. Overall, these results indicate the GPAT2 would be directly associated with the control of cell proliferation. In conclusion, we confirm GPAT2 as a cancer testis gene and that its expression contributes to the tumor phenotype of MDA-MB-231 cells. PMID:24967918

  9. Inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by a reactive metabolite of acetaminophen and mass spectral characterization of an arylated active site peptide.

    PubMed

    Dietze, E C; Schäfer, A; Omichinski, J G; Nelson, S D

    1997-10-01

    Acetaminophen (4'-hydroxyacetanilide, APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug that can cause hepatic necrosis under some circumstances via cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation to a reactive metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). Although the mechanism of hepatocellular injury caused by APAP is not fully understood, it is known that NAPQI forms covalent adducts with several hepatocellular proteins. Reported here is the identification of one of these proteins as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH, D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD+ oxidoreductase (phosphorylating), EC 1.2.1.12]. Two hours after the administration of hepatotoxic doses of [14C]APAP to mice, at a time prior to overt cell damage, hepatocellular GAPDH activity was significantly decreased concurrent with the formation of a 14C-labeled GAPDH adduct. A nonhepatotoxic regioisomer of APAP, 3'-hydroxyacetanilide (AMAP), was found to decrease GAPDH activity to a lesser extent than APAP, and radiolabel from [14C]AMAP bound to a lesser extent to GAPDH at a time when its overall binding to hepatocellular proteins was almost equivalent to that of APAP. In order to determine the nature of the covalent adduct between GAPDH and APAP, its major reactive and toxic metabolite, NAPQI, was incubated with purified porcine muscle GAPDH. Microsequencing analysis and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) with collision-induced dissociation (CID) were used to characterize one of the adducts as APAP bound to the cysteinyl sulfhydryl group of Cys-149 in the active site peptide of GAPDH. PMID:9348431

  10. The Class II Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate Kinase PIK3C2A Promotes Shigella flexneri Dissemination through Formation of Vacuole-Like Protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Dragoi, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as Shigella flexneri and Listeria monocytogenes achieve dissemination in the intestinal epithelium by displaying actin-based motility in the cytosol of infected cells. As they reach the cell periphery, motile bacteria form plasma membrane protrusions that resolve into vacuoles in adjacent cells, through a poorly understood mechanism. Here, we report on the role of the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase PIK3C2A in S. flexneri dissemination. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that PIK3C2A was required for the resolution of protrusions into vacuoles through the formation of an intermediate membrane-bound compartment that we refer to as a vacuole-like protrusion (VLP). Genetic rescue of PIK3C2A depletion with RNA interference (RNAi)-resistant cDNA constructs demonstrated that VLP formation required the activity of PIK3C2A in primary infected cells. PIK3C2A expression was required for production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PtdIns(3)P] at the plasma membrane surrounding protrusions. PtdIns(3)P production was not observed in the protrusions formed by L. monocytogenes, whose dissemination did not rely on PIK3C2A. PIK3C2A-mediated PtdIns(3)P production in S. flexneri protrusions was regulated by host cell tyrosine kinase signaling and relied on the integrity of the S. flexneri type 3 secretion system (T3SS). We suggest a model of S. flexneri dissemination in which the formation of VLPs is mediated by the PIK3C2A-dependent production of the signaling lipid PtdIns(3)P in the protrusion membrane, which relies on the T3SS-dependent activation of tyrosine kinase signaling in protrusions. PMID:25667265

  11. Site-Directed Mutagenesis from Arg195 to His of a Microalgal Putatively Chloroplastidial Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase Causes an Increase in Phospholipid Levels in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Long-Ling; Li, Hui; Yan, Xiao-Jun; Xu, Ji-Lin; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the contribution of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) to the first acylation of glycerol-3-phosphate (G-3-P), the present study focused on a functional analysis of the GPAT gene from Lobosphaera incisa (designated as LiGPAT). A full-length cDNA of LiGPAT consisting of a 1,305-bp ORF, a 1,652-bp 5′-UTR, and a 354-bp 3′-UTR, was cloned. The ORF encoded a 434-amino acid peptide, of which 63 residues at the N-terminus defined a chloroplast transit peptide. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny analysis of GPAT homologs provided the convincible bioinformatics evidence that LiGPAT was localized to chloroplasts. Considering the conservation of His among the G-3-P binding sites from chloroplastidial GPATs and the substitution of His by Arg at position 195 in the LiGPAT mature protein (designated mLiGPAT), we established the heterologous expression of either mLiGPAT or its mutant (Arg195His) (sdmLiGPAT) in the GPAT-deficient yeast mutant gat1Δ. Lipid profile analyses of these transgenic yeasts not only validated the acylation function of LiGPAT but also indicated that the site-directed mutagenesis from Arg195 to His led to an increase in the phospholipid level in yeast. Semi-quantitative analysis of mLiGPAT and sdmLiGPAT, together with the structural superimposition of their G-3-P binding sites, indicated that the increased enzymatic activity was caused by the enlarged accessible surface of the phosphate group binding pocket when Arg195 was mutated to His. Thus, the potential of genetic manipulation of GPAT to increase the glycerolipid level in L. incisa and other microalgae would be of great interest. PMID:27014309

  12. Structural Insight into How Streptomyces coelicolor Maltosyl Transferase GlgE Binds α-Maltose 1-Phosphate and Forms a Maltosyl-enzyme Intermediate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    GlgE (EC 2.4.99.16) is an α-maltose 1-phosphate:(1→4)-α-d-glucan 4-α-d-maltosyltransferase of the CAZy glycoside hydrolase 13_3 family. It is the defining enzyme of a bacterial α-glucan biosynthetic pathway and is a genetically validated anti-tuberculosis target. It catalyzes the α-retaining transfer of maltosyl units from α-maltose 1-phosphate to maltooligosaccharides and is predicted to use a double-displacement mechanism. Evidence of this mechanism was obtained using a combination of site-directed mutagenesis of Streptomyces coelicolor GlgE isoform I, substrate analogues, protein crystallography, and mass spectrometry. The X-ray structures of α-maltose 1-phosphate bound to a D394A mutein and a β-2-deoxy-2-fluoromaltosyl-enzyme intermediate with a E423A mutein were determined. There are few examples of CAZy glycoside hydrolase family 13 members that have had their glycosyl-enzyme intermediate structures determined, and none before now have been obtained with a 2-deoxy-2-fluoro substrate analogue. The covalent modification of Asp394 was confirmed using mass spectrometry. A similar modification of wild-type GlgE proteins from S. coelicolor and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was also observed. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the M. tuberculosis enzyme revealed a homodimeric assembly similar to that of the S. coelicolor enzyme but with slightly differently oriented monomers. The deeper understanding of the structure–function relationships of S. coelicolor GlgE will aid the development of inhibitors of the M. tuberculosis enzyme. PMID:24689960

  13. Structures and genetics of biosynthesis of glycerol 1-phosphate-containing O-polysaccharides of Escherichia coli O28ab, O37, and O100.

    PubMed

    Shashkov, Alexander S; Yang, Baopeng; Senchenkova, Sofya N; Perepelov, Andrei V; Liu, Bin; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-05-13

    O-polysaccharides of E. coli O28ab, O37, and O100 were found to contain glycerol 1-phosphate and the following structures of their oligosaccharide repeats were established by sugar analysis, Smith degradation (for O28ab), 1D and 2D (1)H, (13)C, and (13)P NMR spectroscopy: Functions of putative glycosyltransferases genes in the O-antigen gene clusters of the strains studied were tentatively assigned based on similarities to genes of other E. coli O-serogroups available from GenBank and taking into account the O-polysaccharide structures established. PMID:27058293

  14. Apicoplast-Localized Lysophosphatidic Acid Precursor Assembly Is Required for Bulk Phospholipid Synthesis in Toxoplasma gondii and Relies on an Algal/Plant-Like Glycerol 3-Phosphate Acyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Damien L.; Dubois, David; van Dooren, Giel G.; Shears, Melanie J.; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Maréchal, Eric; McConville, Malcolm J.; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Botté, Cyrille Y.

    2016-01-01

    Most apicomplexan parasites possess a non-photosynthetic plastid (the apicoplast), which harbors enzymes for a number of metabolic pathways, including a prokaryotic type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway. In Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, the FASII pathway is essential for parasite growth and infectivity. However, little is known about the fate of fatty acids synthesized by FASII. In this study, we have investigated the function of a plant-like glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (TgATS1) that localizes to the T. gondii apicoplast. Knock-down of TgATS1 resulted in significantly reduced incorporation of FASII-synthesized fatty acids into phosphatidic acid and downstream phospholipids and a severe defect in intracellular parasite replication and survival. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that lipid precursors are made in, and exported from, the apicoplast for de novo biosynthesis of bulk phospholipids. This study reveals that the apicoplast-located FASII and ATS1, which are primarily used to generate plastid galactolipids in plants and algae, instead generate bulk phospholipids for membrane biogenesis in T. gondii. PMID:27490259

  15. Plastidial Glycolytic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Is an Important Determinant in the Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism of Heterotrophic Cells in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Anoman, Armand D; Muñoz-Bertomeu, Jesús; Rosa-Téllez, Sara; Flores-Tornero, María; Serrano, Ramón; Bueso, Eduardo; Fernie, Alisdair R; Segura, Juan; Ros, Roc

    2015-11-01

    This study functionally characterizes the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plastidial glycolytic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells. We expressed the enzyme in gapcp double mutants (gapcp1gapcp2) under the control of photosynthetic (Rubisco small subunit RBCS2B [RBCS]) or heterotrophic (phosphate transporter PHT1.2 [PHT]) cell-specific promoters. Expression of GAPCp1 under the control of RBCS in gapcp1gapcp2 had no significant effect on the metabolite profile or growth in the aerial part (AP). GAPCp1 expression under the control of the PHT promoter clearly affected Arabidopsis development by increasing the number of lateral roots and having a major effect on AP growth and metabolite profile. Our results indicate that GAPCp1 is not functionally important in photosynthetic cells but plays a fundamental role in roots and in heterotrophic cells of the AP. Specifically, GAPCp activity may be required in root meristems and the root cap for normal primary root growth. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses indicate that the lack of GAPCp activity affects nitrogen and carbon metabolism as well as mineral nutrition and that glycerate and glutamine are the main metabolites responding to GAPCp activity. Thus, GAPCp could be an important metabolic connector of glycolysis with other pathways, such as the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis, the ammonium assimilation pathway, or the metabolism of γ-aminobutyrate, which in turn affect plant development. PMID:26134167

  16. A de novo NADPH generation pathway for improving lysine production of Corynebacterium glutamicum by rational design of the coenzyme specificity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Engineering the cofactor availability is a common strategy of metabolic engineering to improve the production of many industrially important compounds. In this work, a de novo NADPH generation pathway is proposed by altering the coenzyme specificity of a native NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) to NADP, which consequently has the potential to produce additional NADPH in the glycolytic pathway. Specifically, the coenzyme specificity of GAPDH of Corynebacterium glutamicum is systematically manipulated by rational protein design and the effect of the manipulation for cellular metabolism and lysine production is evaluated. By a combinatorial modification of four key residues within the coenzyme binding sites, different GAPDH mutants with varied coenzyme specificity were constructed. While increasing the catalytic efficiency of GAPDH towards NADP enhanced lysine production in all of the tested mutants, the most significant improvement of lysine production (~60%) was achieved with the mutant showing similar preference towards both NAD and NADP. Metabolic flux analysis with (13)C isotope studies confirmed that there was no significant change of flux towards the pentose phosphate pathway and the increased lysine yield was mainly attributed to the NADPH generated by the mutated GAPDH. The present study highlights the importance of protein engineering as a key strategy in de novo pathway design and overproduction of desired products. PMID:24953302

  17. A novel 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase transgene for glyphosate resistance stimulates growth and fecundity in weedy rice (Oryza sativa) without herbicide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ting; Si, Hong Jiang; Cai, Xing Xing; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Understanding evolutionary interactions among crops and weeds can facilitate effective weed management. For example, gene flow from crops to their wild or weedy relatives can lead to rapid evolution in recipient populations. In rice (Oryza sativa), transgenic herbicide resistance is expected to spread to conspecific weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) via hybridization. Here, we studied fitness effects of transgenic over-expression of a native 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene developed to confer glyphosate resistance in rice. Controlling for genetic background, we examined physiological traits and field performance of crop–weed hybrid lineages that segregated for the presence or absence of this novel epsps transgene. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic F2 crop–weed hybrids produced 48–125% more seeds per plant than nontransgenic controls in monoculture- and mixed-planting designs without glyphosate application. Transgenic plants also had greater EPSPS protein levels, tryptophan concentrations, photosynthetic rates, and per cent seed germination compared with nontransgenic controls. Our findings suggest that over-expression of a native rice epsps gene can lead to fitness advantages, even without exposure to glyphosate. We hypothesize that over-expressed epsps may be useful to breeders and, if deployed, could result in fitness benefits in weedy relatives following transgene introgression. PMID:23905647

  18. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus agalactiae NEM316.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Revathi; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2014-07-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an essential enzyme involved in glycolysis. Despite lacking the secretory signal sequence, this cytosolic enzyme has been found localized at the surface of several bacteria and fungi. As a surface protein, GAPDH exhibits various adhesive functions, thereby facilitating colonization and invasion of host tissues. Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as group B streptococcus (GBS), binds onto the host using its surface adhesins and causes sepsis and pneumonia in neonates. GAPDH is one of the surface adhesins of GBS binding to human plasminogen and is a virulent factor associated with host colonization. Although the surface-associated GAPDH has been shown to bind to a variety of host extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in various bacteria, the molecular mechanism underlying their interaction is not fully understood. To investigate this, structural studies on GAPDH of S. agalactiae were initiated. The gapC gene of S. agalactiae NEM316 encoding GAPDH protein was cloned into pET-28a vector, overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The GAPDH crystals obtained in two different crystallization conditions diffracted to 2.8 and 2.6 Å resolution, belonging to two different space groups P2₁ and P2₁2₁2₁, respectively. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and structure refinement is now in progress. PMID:25005093

  19. Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases Interact with Phospholipase Dδ to Transduce Hydrogen Peroxide Signals in the Arabidopsis Response to Stress[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liang; Devaiah, Shivakumar P.; Narasimhan, Rama; Pan, Xiangqing; Zhang, Yanyan; Zhang, Wenhua; Wang, Xuemin

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in plants under various stress conditions and serve as important mediators in plant responses to stresses. Here, we show that the cytosolic glycolytic enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPCs) interact with the plasma membrane–associated phospholipase D (PLDδ) to transduce the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) signal in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic ablation of PLDδ impeded stomatal response to abscisic acid (ABA) and H2O2, placing PLDδ downstream of H2O2 in mediating ABA-induced stomatal closure. To determine the molecular link between H2O2 and PLDδ, GAPC1 and GAPC2 were identified to bind to PLDδ, and the interaction was demonstrated by coprecipitation using proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and yeast, surface plasmon resonance, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. H2O2 promoted the GAPC–PLDδ interaction and PLDδ activity. Knockout of GAPCs decreased ABA- and H2O2-induced activation of PLD and stomatal sensitivity to ABA. The loss of GAPCs or PLDδ rendered plants less responsive to water deficits than the wild type. The results indicate that the H2O2-promoted interaction of GAPC and PLDδ may provide a direct connection between membrane lipid–based signaling, energy metabolism and growth control in the plant response to ROS and water stress. PMID:22589465

  20. A H2 very high frequency capacitively coupled plasma inactivates glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GapDH) more efficiently than UV photons and heat combined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelmann, Katharina; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Buerger, Ines; Bandow, Julia Elisabeth; Awakowicz, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Plasma sterilization is a promising alternative to commonly used sterilization techniques, because the conventional methods suffer from certain limitations, e.g. incompatibility with heat-sensitive materials, or use of toxic agents. However, plasma-based sterilization mechanisms are not fully understood yet. A low-pressure very high frequency capacitively coupled plasma is used to investigate the impact of a hydrogen discharge on the protein glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapDH). GapDH is an enzyme of glycolysis. As a part of the central metabolism, it occurs in nearly all organisms from bacteria to humans. The plasma is investigated with absolutely calibrated optical emission spectroscopy in order to identify and to quantify plasma components that can contribute to enzyme inactivation. The contribution of UV photons and heat to GapDH inactivation is investigated separately, and neither seems to be a major factor. In order to investigate the mechanisms of GapDH inactivation by the hydrogen discharge, samples are investigated for etching, induction of amino acid backbone breaks, and chemical modifications. While neither etching nor strand breaks are observed, chemical modifications occur at different amino acid residues of GapDH. Deamidations of asparagines as well as methionine and cysteine oxidations are detected after VHF-CCP treatment. In particular, oxidation of the cysteine in the active centre is known to lead to GapDH inactivation.

  1. Cloning and heterologous overexpression of three gap genes encoding different glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases from the plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000.

    PubMed

    Elkhalfi, Bouchra; Araya-Garay, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Castro, Jorge; Rey-Méndez, Manuel; Soukri, Abdelaziz; Serrano Delgado, Aurelio

    2013-06-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is the causal agent of bacterial speck, a common disease of tomato. The mode of infection of this pathogen is not well understood, but according to molecular biological, genomic and proteomic data it produces a number of proteins that may promote infection and draw nutrients from the plant. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a major enzyme of carbon metabolism that was reported to be a surface antigen and virulence factor in other pathogenic microorganisms, but its possible role in the infection process of P. syringae has so far not been studied. Whole-genome sequence analyses revealed the occurrence in this phytopathogenic bacterium of three paralogous gap genes encoding distinct GAPDHs, namely two class I enzymes having different molecular mass subunits and one class III bifunctional D-erythrose-4-phosphate dehydrogenase/GAPDH enzyme. By using genome bioinformatics data, as well as alignments of both DNA and deduced protein sequences, the three gap genes of P. syringae were one-step cloned with a His-Tag in pET21a vector using a PCR-based strategy, and its expression optimized in Escherichia coli BL21 to achieve high yield of the heterologous proteins. In accordance with their distinct molecular phylogenies, these bacterial gap genes encode functional GAPDHs of diverse molecular masses and nicotinamide-coenzyme specificities, suggesting specific metabolic and/or cellular roles. PMID:23507306

  2. Divergent properties and phylogeny of cyanobacterial 5-enol-pyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate synthases: evidence for horizontal gene transfer in the Nostocales.

    PubMed

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Bertazzini, Michele; Barillaro, Donatella; Rippka, Rosmarie

    2015-01-01

    As it represents the target of the successful herbicide glyphosate, great attention has been paid to the shikimate pathway enzyme 5-enol-pyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase. However, inconsistent results have been reported concerning the sensitivity of the enzyme from cyanobacteria, and consequent inhibitory effects on cyanobacterial growth. The properties of EPSP synthase were investigated in a set of 42 strains representative of the large morphological diversity of these prokaryotes. Publicly available protein sequences were analyzed, and related to enzymatic features. In most cases, the native protein showed an unusual homodimeric composition and a general sensitivity to micromolar doses of glyphosate. By contrast, eight out of 15 Nostocales strains were found to possess a monomeric EPSP synthase, whose activity was inhibited only at concentrations exceeding 1 mM. Sequence analysis showed that these two forms are only distantly related, the latter clustering separately in a clade composed of diverse bacterial phyla. The results are consistent with the occurrence of a horizontal gene transfer event involving an evolutionarily distant organism. Moreover, data suggest that the existence of class I (glyphosate-sensitive) and class II (glyphosate-tolerant) EPSP synthases representing two distinct phylogenetic clades is an oversimplification because of the limited number of analyzed samples. PMID:25229999

  3. Evolutionary engineering of a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-negative, acetate-reducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain enables anaerobic growth at high glucose concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Guadalupe-Medina, Víctor; Metz, Benjamin; Oud, Bart; van Der Graaf, Charlotte M; Mans, Robert; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is required for redox-cofactor balancing in anaerobic cultures, causes yield reduction in industrial bioethanol production. Recently, glycerol formation in anaerobic S. cerevisiae cultures was eliminated by expressing Escherichia coli (acetylating) acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by mhpF) and simultaneously deleting the GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, thus coupling NADH reoxidation to reduction of acetate to ethanol. Gpd– strains are, however, sensitive to high sugar concentrations, which complicates industrial implementation of this metabolic engineering concept. In this study, laboratory evolution was used to improve osmotolerance of a Gpd– mhpF-expressing S. cerevisiae strain. Serial batch cultivation at increasing osmotic pressure enabled isolation of an evolved strain that grew anaerobically at 1 M glucose, at a specific growth rate of 0.12 h−1. The evolved strain produced glycerol at low concentrations (0.64 ± 0.33 g l−1). However, these glycerol concentrations were below 10% of those observed with a Gpd+ reference strain. Consequently, the ethanol yield on sugar increased from 79% of the theoretical maximum in the reference strain to 92% for the evolved strains. Genetic analysis indicated that osmotolerance under aerobic conditions required a single dominant chromosomal mutation, and one further mutation in the plasmid-borne mhpF gene for anaerobic growth. PMID:24004455

  4. Apicoplast-Localized Lysophosphatidic Acid Precursor Assembly Is Required for Bulk Phospholipid Synthesis in Toxoplasma gondii and Relies on an Algal/Plant-Like Glycerol 3-Phosphate Acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Amiar, Souad; MacRae, James I; Callahan, Damien L; Dubois, David; van Dooren, Giel G; Shears, Melanie J; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Maréchal, Eric; McConville, Malcolm J; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Yamaryo-Botté, Yoshiki; Botté, Cyrille Y

    2016-08-01

    Most apicomplexan parasites possess a non-photosynthetic plastid (the apicoplast), which harbors enzymes for a number of metabolic pathways, including a prokaryotic type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway. In Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, the FASII pathway is essential for parasite growth and infectivity. However, little is known about the fate of fatty acids synthesized by FASII. In this study, we have investigated the function of a plant-like glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (TgATS1) that localizes to the T. gondii apicoplast. Knock-down of TgATS1 resulted in significantly reduced incorporation of FASII-synthesized fatty acids into phosphatidic acid and downstream phospholipids and a severe defect in intracellular parasite replication and survival. Lipidomic analysis demonstrated that lipid precursors are made in, and exported from, the apicoplast for de novo biosynthesis of bulk phospholipids. This study reveals that the apicoplast-located FASII and ATS1, which are primarily used to generate plastid galactolipids in plants and algae, instead generate bulk phospholipids for membrane biogenesis in T. gondii. PMID:27490259

  5. ATP-driven transhydrogenation and ionization of water in a reconstituted glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (phosphorylating and non-phosphorylating) model system.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Mateos, M I; Losada, M

    1993-12-30

    In an unbuffered medium, an intense acidification occurs during the oxidation of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) to 3-phospho-D-glycerate (PGA) catalyzed by NADP(+)-specific non-phosphorylating G3P dehydrogenase, an enzyme that photosynthetic eukaryotic cells contain exclusively in their cytosol. The true enzymatic character of this proton release is the consequence of the following redox/acid-base reaction: G3P + NADP+ + H2O-->PGA + NADPH + 2H+. When the well-established ATP-dependent reduction of PGA to G3P, catalyzed by PGA kinase and NAD(+)-specific phosphorylating G3P dehydrogenase, was coupled through the intermediate G3P to the above reverse oxidation reaction, a transient alkalinization of the medium followed by its acidification accompanied transhydrogenation from NADH to NADP+. The significance of the observed endergonic transhydrogenation and ionization of water at the expense of the chemical energy of ATP in this reconstituted enzyme system as well as its relevance for the export of reducing power (H-) across the chloroplast membrane and the maintenance of the pH gradient that exists between the stroma and the cytosol are discussed. PMID:8280152

  6. The N-terminal segment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Haemonchus contortus interacts with complements C1q and C3.

    PubMed

    Vedamurthy, G V; Sahoo, S; Devi, I K; Murugavel, S; Joshi, P

    2015-11-01

    Haemonchus contortus, an economically important blood-sucking parasite of sheep and goats, survives the harsh host gut environment by secreting a number of proteins referred as excretory/secretory (ES) products. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a glycolytic enzyme, is one of the components of H. contortus ES products. The parasite enzyme binds to complement C3 and inhibits its activity. In this study, the C3-binding activity of the parasite GAPDH was mapped to the N-terminal part of the enzyme by generating defined recombinant fragments of the protein. The N-terminal fragment also trapped complement C1q but not C5 and inhibited complement-mediated lysis of sensitized sheep erythrocytes. Competitive binding assay indicates different binding regions for C1q and C3 proteins. GAPDH stimulated proliferation of goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro and reacted with the sera from H. contortus-infected animals. However, the fragments of GAPDH did not stimulate cell proliferation nor reacted with the infected animal sera. Furthermore, denatured GAPDH failed to react with the infected animal sera in dot blot suggesting conformation-dependent epitope. These results demonstrate an elegant strategy of the parasite to completely shut down complement activation and identify GAPDH as a promising target for future therapeutic intervention. PMID:26332726

  7. Possible role of NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in growth promotion of Arabidopsis seedlings by low levels of selenium.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Toru; Fukui, Yuki

    2015-01-01

    We explored functional significance of selenium (Se) in Arabidopsis physiology. Se at very low concentrations in cultivation exerted a considerable positive effect on Arabidopsis growth with no indication of oxidative stress, whereas Se at higher concentrations significantly suppressed the growth and brought serious oxidative damage. Respiration, ATP levels, and the activity of NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NAD-GAPDH) were enhanced in Arabidopsis grown in the medium containing 1.0 μM Se. Addition of an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis to the medium abolished both of the Se-dependent growth promotion and NAD-GAPDH up-regulation. Assay of NAD-GAPDH purified from seedlings subjected to Se interventions raised the possibility of a direct connection between the activity of this enzyme and Arabidopsis growth. These results reveal that trace amounts of Se accelerate Arabidopsis growth, and suggest that this pro-growth effect of Se arises enhancing mitochondrial performance in a GSH-dependent manner, in which NAD-GAPDH may serve as a key regulator. PMID:25988618

  8. Defective Hyphal Induction of a Candida albicans Phosphatidylinositol 3-Phosphate 5-Kinase Null Mutant on Solid Media Does Not Lead to Decreased Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Augsten, Martin; Hübner, Claudia; Nguyen, Monika; Künkel, Waldemar; Härtl, Albert; Eck, Raimund

    2002-01-01

    A phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate [PI(3)P] 5-kinase gene (CaFAB1) of the most important human pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans, was cloned and sequenced. An open reading frame was detected which encodes a 2,369-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 268 kDa and a relative isoelectric point of 6.76. This protein exhibits 38% overall amino acid sequence identity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fab1p. We localized the CaFAB1 gene on chromosome R. To determine the influence of the PI(3)P 5-kinase CaFab1p on processes involved in C. albicans morphogenesis and pathogenicity, we sequentially disrupted both copies of the gene. Homozygous deletion of C. albicans CaFAB1 resulted in a mutant strain which exhibited defects in morphogenesis. A Cafab1 null mutant had enlarged vacuoles, an acidification defect, and increased generation times and was unable to form hyphae on different solid media. The sensitivities to hyperosmotic and high-temperature stresses, adherence, and virulence compared to those of wild-type strain SC5314 were not affected. PMID:12117957

  9. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus agalactiae NEM316

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Revathi; Ponnuraj, Karthe

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an essential enzyme involved in glycolysis. Despite lacking the secretory signal sequence, this cytosolic enzyme has been found localized at the surface of several bacteria and fungi. As a surface protein, GAPDH exhibits various adhesive functions, thereby facilitating colonization and invasion of host tissues. Streptococcus agalactiae, also known as group B streptococcus (GBS), binds onto the host using its surface adhesins and causes sepsis and pneumonia in neonates. GAPDH is one of the surface adhesins of GBS binding to human plasminogen and is a virulent factor associated with host colonization. Although the surface-associated GAPDH has been shown to bind to a variety of host extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules in various bacteria, the molecular mechanism underlying their interaction is not fully understood. To investigate this, structural studies on GAPDH of S. agalactiae were initiated. The gapC gene of S. agalactiae NEM316 encoding GAPDH protein was cloned into pET-28a vector, overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells and purified to homogeneity. The purified protein was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The GAPDH crystals obtained in two different crystallization conditions diffracted to 2.8 and 2.6 Å resolution, belonging to two different space groups P21 and P212121, respectively. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and structure refinement is now in progress. PMID:25005093

  10. Two glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isogenes from Candida versatilis SN-18 play an important role in glycerol biosynthesis under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Mizushima, Daiki; Iwata, Hisashi; Ishimaki, Yuki; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2016-05-01

    Two isogenes of glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) from Candida versatilis SN-18 were cloned and sequenced. These intronless genes (Cagpd1 and Cagpd2) were both predicted to encode a 378 amino acid polypeptide, and the deduced amino acid sequences mutually showed 76% identity. Interestingly, Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 were located tandemly in a locus of genomic DNA within a 262 bp interval. To our knowledge, this represents a novel instance of isogenic genes relating to glucose metabolism. The stress response element (STRE) was found respectively at -93 to -89 bp upstream of the 5'end of Cagpd1 and -707 to -703 bp upstream of Cagpd2, indicating that these genes are involved in osmotic stress response. In heterologous expression using a gpd1Δgpd2Δ double deletion mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 transformants complemented the function of GPD, with Cagpd2 being much more effective than Cagpd1 in promoting growth and glycerol synthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences suggested that Cagpd1p and Cagpd2p are NADP(+)-dependent GPDs (EC 1.1.1.94). However, crude enzyme extract from Cagpd1 and Cagpd2 transformants showed GPD activity with only NAD(+) as cofactor. Hence, both Cagpd1p and Cagpd2p are likely NAD(+)-dependent GPDs (EC 1.1.1.8), similar to GPDs from S. cerevisiae and Candida magnoliae. PMID:26906228

  11. A novel 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase transgene for glyphosate resistance stimulates growth and fecundity in weedy rice (Oryza sativa) without herbicide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Ting; Si, Hong Jiang; Cai, Xing Xing; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Snow, Allison A; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2014-04-01

    Understanding evolutionary interactions among crops and weeds can facilitate effective weed management. For example, gene flow from crops to their wild or weedy relatives can lead to rapid evolution in recipient populations. In rice (Oryza sativa), transgenic herbicide resistance is expected to spread to conspecific weedy rice (Oryza sativa f. spontanea) via hybridization. Here, we studied fitness effects of transgenic over-expression of a native 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (epsps) gene developed to confer glyphosate resistance in rice. Controlling for genetic background, we examined physiological traits and field performance of crop-weed hybrid lineages that segregated for the presence or absence of this novel epsps transgene. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic F2 crop-weed hybrids produced 48-125% more seeds per plant than nontransgenic controls in monoculture- and mixed-planting designs without glyphosate application. Transgenic plants also had greater EPSPS protein levels, tryptophan concentrations, photosynthetic rates, and per cent seed germination compared with nontransgenic controls. Our findings suggest that over-expression of a native rice epsps gene can lead to fitness advantages, even without exposure to glyphosate. We hypothesize that over-expressed epsps may be useful to breeders and, if deployed, could result in fitness benefits in weedy relatives following transgene introgression. PMID:23905647

  12. Phosphorus-31, sup 15 N, and sup 13 C NMR of glyphosate: Comparison of pH titrations to the herbicidal dead-end complex with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Castellino, S.; Leo, G.C.; Sammons, R.D.; Sikorski, J.A. )

    1989-05-02

    The herbicidal dead-end ternary complex (E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph}) of glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine) with 5-enolpyruvoylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) and the substrate shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P) has been characterized by {sup 31}P, {sup 15}N, and {sup 13}C NMR. The NMR spectra of EPSPS-bound glyphosate show unique chemical shifts ({delta}) for each of the three nuclei. By {sup 31}P NMR, glyphosate in the dead-end complex is a distinct species 3.5 ppm downfield from free glyphosate. The {sup 13}C signal of glyphosate in the dead-end complex is shifted 4 ppm downfield from that of free glyphosate. The {sup 15}N signal for glyphosate (99%) in the dead-end complex is 5 ppm further downfield than that of any free zwitterionic species and 10 ppm downfield from that of the average free species at pH 10.1. The structures of each ionic state of glyphosate are modeled with force field calculations by using MacroModel. A correlation is made for the {sup 31}P {delta} and the C-P-O bond angle, and the {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N {delta} values are postulated to be related to C-C-O and C-N-C bond angles, respectively. The downfield {sup 31}P chemical shift perturbation for S3P in the EPSPS binary complex is consistent with ionization of the 3-phosphate of S3P upon binding. Comparison with the S3P {sup 31}P {delta} vs pH titration curve specifies predominantly the dianion of the 3-phosphate in the E{sup S3P} binary complex, while the E{sup S3P}{sub Glyph} complex indicates net protonation at the 3-phosphate. Chemical shift perturbations of this latter type may be explained by changes in the O-P-O bond angle.

  13. Using a Personal Glucose Meter and Alkaline Phosphatase for Point-of-Care Quantification of Galactose-1-Phosphate Uridyltransferase in Clinical Galactosemia Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Xiang, Yu; Novak, Donna E; Hoganson, George E; Zhu, Junjie; Lu, Yi

    2015-10-01

    The personal glucose meter (PGM) was recently shown to be a general meter to detect many targets. Most studies, however, focus on transforming either target binding or enzymatic activity that cleaves an artificial substrate into the production of glucose. More importantly, almost all reports exhibit their methods by using artificial samples, such as buffers or serum samples spiked with the targets. To expand the technology to even broader targets and to validate its potential in authentic, more complex clinical samples, we herein report expansion of the PGM method by using alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that links the enzymatic activity of galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase to the production of glucose, which allows point-of-care galactosemia diagnosis in authentic human clinical samples. Given the presence of ALP in numerous enzymatic assays for clinical diagnostics, the methods demonstrated herein advance the field closer to point-of-care detection of a wide range of targets in real clinical samples. PMID:26350570

  14. Sphingosine 1-phosphate induces platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 phosphorylation in human endothelial cells through cSrc and Fyn.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Chen, Shee-Uan; Chou, Chia-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2008-08-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a multifunctional phospholipid which acts through a specific family of G protein-coupled receptors. Platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) form trans-homophilic binding at lateral cell border. Upon stimulation, its cytoplasmic tyrosine residues could be phosphorylated and interact with various downstream signaling molecules. In this study, we demonstrated that S1P induced PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in human umbilical cord vein cells (HUVECs). By pharmacological inhibitors, it was suggested that G(i) and Src family kinases were involved in PECAM-1 phosphorylation. Moreover, cSrc and Fyn siRNA significantly suppressed S1P-induced PECAM-1 phosphorylation. These results suggested that S1P-induced PECAM-1 phosphorylation through G(i) and subsequent cSrc and Fyn. Our findings provide further understanding of S1P and PECAM-1 signaling as well as their functions in endothelial cells. PMID:18502612

  15. Modulation of Intrathymic Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Levels Promotes Escape of Immature Thymocytes to the Periphery with a Potential Proinflammatory Role in Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flávia Nardy, Ana; Santos, Leonardo; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Morrot, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) system regulates both thymic and lymph nodes T cell egress which is essential for producing and maintaining the recycling T cell repertoire. Infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induces a hormonal systemic deregulation that has impact in the thymic S1P homeostasis that ultimately promotes the premature exit of immature CD4−CD8− T cells expressing TCR and proinflamatory cytokines to peripheral lymphoid organs, where they may interfere with adaptive immune responses. In what follows, we review recent findings revealing escape of these immature T cells exhibiting an activation profile to peripheral compartments of the immune system in both experimental murine and human models of Chagas disease. PMID:26347020

  16. Intracellular localization of sphingosine kinase 1 alters access to substrate pools but does not affect the degradative fate of sphingosine-1-phosphate[S

    PubMed Central

    Siow, Deanna L.; Anderson, Charles D.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; Skobeleva, Anastasia; Pitson, Stuart M.; Wattenberg, Binks W.

    2010-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) produces sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a potent signaling lipid. The subcellular localization of SK1 can dictate its signaling function. Here, we use artificial targeting of SK1 to either the plasma membrane (PM) or the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to test the effects of compartmentalization of SK1 on substrate utilization and downstream metabolism of S1P. Expression of untargeted or ER-targeted SK1, but surprisingly not PM-targeted SK1, results in a dramatic increase in the phosphorylation of dihydrosphingosine, a metabolic precursor in de novo ceramide synthesis. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous SK1 diminishes both dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate and S1P levels. We tested the effects of SK1 localization on degradation of S1P by depletion of the ER-localized S1P phosphatases and lyase. Remarkably, S1P produced at the PM was degraded to the same extent as that produced in the ER. This indicates that there is an efficient mechanism for the transport of S1P from the PM to the ER. In acute labeling experiments, we find that S1P degradation is primarily driven by lyase cleavage of S1P. Counterintuitively, when S1P-specific phosphatases are depleted, acute labeling of S1P is significantly reduced, indicative of a phosphatase-dependent recycling process. We conclude that the localization of SK1 influences the substrate pools that it has access to and that S1P can rapidly translocate from the site where it is synthesized to other intracellular sites.51: 2546–2559. PMID:20386061

  17. Animal Model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus: CD8+ T Cells Cause a Cytokine Storm That Is Chemically Tractable by Sphingosine-1-Phosphate 1 Receptor Agonist Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kevin B.; Teijaro, John R.; Brock, Linda G.; Fremgen, Daniel M.; Collins, Peter L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cytokine storm is an intensified, dysregulated, tissue-injurious inflammatory response driven by cytokine and immune cell components. The cytokine storm during influenza virus infection, whereby the amplified innate immune response is primarily responsible for pulmonary damage, has been well characterized. Now we describe a novel event where virus-specific T cells induce a cytokine storm. The paramyxovirus pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) is a model of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Unexpectedly, when C57BL/6 mice were infected with PVM, the innate inflammatory response was undetectable until day 5 postinfection, at which time CD8+ T cells infiltrated into the lung, initiating a cytokine storm by their production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). Administration of an immunomodulatory sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1P1R) agonist significantly inhibited PVM-elicited cytokine storm by blunting the PVM-specific CD8+ T cell response, resulting in diminished pulmonary disease and enhanced survival. IMPORTANCE A dysregulated overly exuberant immune response, termed a “cytokine storm,” accompanies virus-induced acute respiratory diseases (VARV), is primarily responsible for the accompanying high morbidity and mortality, and can be controlled therapeutically in influenza virus infection of mice and ferrets by administration of sphingosine-1-phosphate 1 receptor (S1P1R) agonists. Here, two novel findings are recorded. First, in contrast to influenza infection, where the cytokine storm is initiated early by the innate immune system, for pneumonia virus of mice (PVM), a model of RSV, the cytokine storm is initiated late in infection by the adaptive immune response: specifically, by virus-specific CD8 T cells via their release of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Blockading these cytokines with neutralizing antibodies blunts the cytokine storm and protects the host. Second, PVM infection is controlled by administration

  18. Phosphoryl transfer from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate catalyzed by Escherichia coli sugar-phosphate phosphatases of two protein superfamily types.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Rechberger, Gerald N; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    The Cori ester α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (αGlc 1-P) is a high-energy intermediate of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Its glycosidic phosphomonoester moiety primes αGlc 1-P for flexible exploitation in glucosyl and phosphoryl transfer reactions. Two structurally and mechanistically distinct sugar-phosphate phosphatases from Escherichia coli were characterized in this study for utilization of αGlc 1-P as a phosphoryl donor substrate. The agp gene encodes a periplasmic αGlc 1-P phosphatase (Agp) belonging to the histidine acid phosphatase family. Had13 is from the haloacid dehydrogenase-like phosphatase family. Cytoplasmic expression of Agp (in E. coli Origami B) gave a functional enzyme preparation (kcat for phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water, 40 s(-1)) that was shown by mass spectrometry to exhibit no free cysteines and the native intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys(189) and Cys(195). Enzymatic phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to water in H2 (18)O solvent proceeded with complete (18)O label incorporation into the phosphate released, consistent with catalytic reaction through O-1-P, but not C-1-O, bond cleavage. Hydrolase activity of both enzymes was not restricted to a glycosidic phosphomonoester substrate, and d-glucose 6-phosphate was converted with a kcat similar to that of αGlc 1-P. By examining phosphoryl transfer from αGlc 1-P to an acceptor substrate other than water (d-fructose or d-glucose), we discovered that Agp exhibited pronounced synthetic activity, unlike Had13, which utilized αGlc 1-P mainly for phosphoryl transfer to water. By applying d-fructose in 10-fold molar excess over αGlc 1-P (20 mM), enzymatic conversion furnished d-fructose 1-phosphate as the main product in a 55% overall yield. Agp is a promising biocatalyst for use in transphosphorylation from αGlc 1-P. PMID:25527541

  19. Intracellular sphingosine kinase 2-derived sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced ezrin-radixin-moesin phosphorylation and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Adada, Mohamad M; Canals, Daniel; Jeong, Nara; Kelkar, Ashwin D; Hernandez-Corbacho, Maria; Pulkoski-Gross, Michael J; Donaldson, Jane C; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-11-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) mediates cellular proliferation, mitogenesis, inflammation, and angiogenesis. These biologies are mediated through S1P binding to specific GPCRs [sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)1-5] and some other less well-characterized intracellular targets. Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, a family of adaptor molecules linking the cortical actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, are emerging as critical regulators of cancer invasion via regulation of cell morphology and motility. Recently, we identified S1P as an acute ERM activator (via phosphorylation) through its action on S1PR2. In this work, we dissect the mechanism of S1P generation downstream of epidermal growth factor (EGF) leading to ERM phosphorylation and cancer invasion. Using pharmacologic inhibitors, small interfering RNA technologies, and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that sphingosine kinase (SK)2, and not SK1, is essential and sufficient in EGF-mediated ERM phosphorylation in HeLa cells. In fact, knocking down SK2 decreased ERM activation 2.5-fold. Furthermore, we provide evidence that SK2 is necessary to mediate EGF-induced invasion. In addition, overexpressing SK2 causes a 2-fold increase in HeLa cell invasion. Surprisingly, and for the first time, we find that this event, although dependent on S1PR2 activation, does not generate and does not require extracellular S1P secretion, therefore introducing a potential novel model of autocrine/intracrine action of S1P that still involves its GPCRs. These results define new mechanistic insights for EGF-mediated invasion and novel actions of SK2, therefore setting the stage for novel targets in the treatment of growth factor-driven malignancies. PMID:26209696

  20. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for patients with primary testicular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Koresawa, Risa; Yamazaki, Kazuto; Oka, Daigo; Fujiwara, Hideyo; Nishimura, Hirotake; Akiyama, Takashi; Hamasaki, Shuji; Wada, Hideho; Sugihara, Takashi; Sadahira, Yoshito

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent lipid mediator that is produced during the metabolism of sphingolipid by sphingosine kinase. S1P has been implicated in the migration and trafficking of lymphocytes and several lymphoid malignancies through S1P receptors. Moreover, the overexpression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) has been correlated with the constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and poor prognosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Thus, in this study, we examined the expression of S1PR1 in 198 DLBCL samples collected from nodal and various extranodal sites and sub-classified formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples into germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) and non-GCB subgroups using immunohistochemistry. These analyses showed S1PR1 overexpression in 15·7% of all cases with DLBCL and in 54·2% of 24 cases with primary testicular (PT)-DLBCL; S1PR1 expression correlated with S1PR1mRNA expression and STAT3 phosphorylation in fresh samples. Analyses of data from a single institution suggested that S1PR1 overexpression was an independent negative prognostic marker in 68 patients with DLBCL of clinical stages I and II. The present high prevalence of S1PR1 overexpression warrants the consideration of PT-DLBCL as a distinct disease subtype and suggests the potential of the S1P/S1PR1 axis as a therapeutic target. PMID:27061580

  1. Apoptosis induces expression of sphingosine kinase 1 to release sphingosine-1-phosphate as a “come-and-get-me” signal

    PubMed Central

    Gude, David R.; Alvarez, Sergio E.; Paugh, Steven W.; Mitra, Poulami; Yu, JiaDe; Griffiths, Rachael; Barbour, Suzanne E.; Milstien, Sheldon; Spiegel, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that regulates myriad important cellular processes, including growth, survival, cytoskeleton rearrangements, motility, and immunity. Here we report that treatment of Jurkat and U937 leukemia cells with the pan-sphingosine kinase (SphK) inhibitor N,N-dimethylsphingosine to block S1P formation surprisingly caused a large increase in expression of SphK1 concomitant with induction of apoptosis. Another SphK inhibitor, d,l-threo-dihydrosphingosine, also induced apoptosis and produced dramatic increases in SphK1 expression. However, up-regulation of SphK1 was not a specific effect of its inhibition but rather was a consequence of apoptotic stress. The chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, a potent inducer of apoptosis in these cells, also stimulated SphK1 expression and activity and promoted S1P secretion. The caspase inhibitor ZVAD reduced not only doxorubicin-induced lethality but also the increased expression of SphK1 and secretion of S1P. Apoptotic cells secrete chemotactic factors to attract phagocytic cells, and we found that S1P potently stimulated chemotaxis of monocytic THP-1 and U937 cells and primary monocytes and macrophages. Collectively, our data suggest that apoptotic cells may up-regulate SphK1 to produce and secrete S1P that serves as a “come-and-get-me” signal for scavenger cells to engulf them in order to prevent necrosis.—Gude, D. R., Alvarez, S. E., Paugh, S. W., Mitra, P., Yu, J., Griffiths, R., Barbour, S. E., Milstien, S., Spiegel, S. Apoptosis induces expression of sphingosine kinase 1 to release sphingosine-1-phosphate as a “come-and-get-me” signal. PMID:18362204

  2. First evidence of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase protein expression and activity downregulation in human neoplasm: implication for resistance to therapeutics in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Leyre; Ader, Isabelle; Mazerolles, Catherine; Bocquet, Magalie; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2012-09-01

    This is the first report of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase (SPL) protein expression and enzymatic activity in human neoplasm. This enzyme drives irreversible degradation of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid associated with resistance to therapeutics in various cancers, including prostate adenocarcinoma. In fresh human prostatectomy specimens, a remarkable decrease in SPL enzymatic activity was found in tumor samples, as compared with normal adjacent tissues. A significant relationship between loss of SPL expression and higher Gleason score was confirmed in tissue microarray (TMA) analysis. Moreover, SPL protein expression and activity were inversely correlated with those of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1), the enzyme producing S1P. SPL and SphK1 expressions were independently predictive of aggressive cancer on TMA, supporting the relevance of S1P in prostate cancer. In human C4-2B and PC-3 cell lines, silencing SPL enhanced survival after irradiation or chemotherapy by decreasing expression of proteins involved in sensing and repairing DNA damage or apoptosis, respectively. In contrast, enforced expression of SPL sensitized cancer cells to irradiation or docetaxel by tilting the ceramide/S1P balance toward cell death. Interestingly, the S1P degradation products failed to sensitize to chemo- and radiotherapy, supporting the crucial role of ceramide/S1P balance in cancer. Of note, the combination of SPL enforced expression with a SphK1 silencing strategy by further decreasing S1P content made prostate cancer cells even more sensitive to anticancer therapies, suggesting that a dual strategy aimed at stimulating SPL, and inhibiting SphK1 could represent a future approach to sensitize cancer cells to cancer treatments. PMID:22784711

  3. Identification and characterization of a mirror-image oligonucleotide that binds and neutralizes sphingosine 1-phosphate, a central mediator of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Purschke, Werner G; Hoehlig, Kai; Buchner, Klaus; Zboralski, Dirk; Schwoebel, Frank; Vater, Axel; Klussmann, Sven

    2014-08-15

    The sphingolipid S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate) is known to be involved in a number of pathophysiological conditions such as cancer, autoimmune diseases and fibrosis. It acts extracellularly through a set of five G-protein-coupled receptors, but its intracellular actions are also well documented. Employing in vitro selection techniques, we identified an L-aptamer (Spiegelmer®) to S1P designated NOX-S93. The binding affinity of NOX-S93 to S1P had a Kd value of 4.3 nM. The Spiegelmer® shows equal binding to dihydro-S1P, but no cross-reactivity to the related lipids sphingosine, lysophosphatidic acid, ceramide, ceramide-1-phosphate or sphingosine phosphocholine. In stably transfected CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cell lines expressing the S1P receptors S1PR1 or S1PR3, NOX-S93 inhibits S1P-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and intracellular calcium release respectively, with IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. The pro-angiogenic activity of S1P, and of the growth factors VEGF-A (vascular endothelial growth factor-A), FGF-2 (fibroblast growth factor-2) and IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1), was effectively blocked by NOX-S93 in a cellular angiogenesis assay employing primary human endothelial cells. These data provide further evidence for the relevance of extracellular S1P as a central mediator of angiogenesis, suggesting pharmacological S1P neutralization as a promising treatment alternative to current anti-angiogenesis approaches. PMID:24832383

  4. HDL-bound sphingosine 1-phosphate acts as a biased agonist for the endothelial cell receptor S1P1 to limit vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Sylvain; Sanson, Marie; Blaho, Victoria A.; Swendeman, Steven L.; Obinata, Hideru; Conger, Heather; Dahlbäck, Björn; Kono, Mari; Proia, Richard L.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hla, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) is abundant in endothelial cells, where it regulates vascular development and microvascular barrier function. In investigating the role of endothelial cell S1P1 in adult mice, we found that the endothelial S1P1 signal was enhanced in regions of the arterial vasculature experiencing inflammation. The abundance of proinflammatory adhesion proteins, such as ICAM-1, was enhanced in mice with endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 and suppressed in mice with endothelial cell–specific overexpression of S1pr1, suggesting a protective function of S1P1 in vascular disease. The chaperones ApoM+HDL (HDL) or albumin bind to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) in the circulation; therefore, we tested the effects of S1P bound to each chaperone on S1P1 signaling in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Exposure of HUVECs to ApoM+HDL-S1P, but not to albumin-S1P, promoted the formation of a cell surface S1P1–β-arrestin 2 complex and attenuated the ability of the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα to activate NF-κB and increase ICAM-1 abundance. Although S1P bound to either chaperone induced MAPK activation, albumin-S1P triggered greater Gi activation and receptor endocytosis. Endothelial cell–specific deletion of S1pr1 in the hypercholesterolemic Apoe−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis enhanced atherosclerotic lesion formation in the descending aorta. We propose that the ability of ApoM+HDL to act as a biased agonist on S1P1 inhibits vascular inflammation, which may partially explain the cardiovascular protective functions of HDL. PMID:26268607

  5. Identification and characterization of a mirror-image oligonucleotide that binds and neutralizes sphingosine 1-phosphate, a central mediator of angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Purschke, Werner G.; Hoehlig, Kai; Buchner, Klaus; Zboralski, Dirk; Schwoebel, Frank; Vater, Axel; Klussmann, Sven

    2014-01-01

    The sphingolipid S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate) is known to be involved in a number of pathophysiological conditions such as cancer, autoimmune diseases and fibrosis. It acts extracellularly through a set of five G-protein-coupled receptors, but its intracellular actions are also well documented. Employing in vitro selection techniques, we identified an L-aptamer (Spiegelmer®) to S1P designated NOX-S93. The binding affinity of NOX-S93 to S1P had a Kd value of 4.3 nM. The Spiegelmer® shows equal binding to dihydro-S1P, but no cross-reactivity to the related lipids sphingosine, lysophosphatidic acid, ceramide, ceramide-1-phosphate or sphingosine phosphocholine. In stably transfected CHO (Chinese-hamster ovary) cell lines expressing the S1P receptors S1PR1 or S1PR3, NOX-S93 inhibits S1P-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and intracellular calcium release respectively, with IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. The pro-angiogenic activity of S1P, and of the growth factors VEGF-A (vascular endothelial growth factor-A), FGF-2 (fibroblast growth factor-2) and IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1), was effectively blocked by NOX-S93 in a cellular angiogenesis assay employing primary human endothelial cells. These data provide further evidence for the relevance of extracellular S1P as a central mediator of angiogenesis, suggesting pharmacological S1P neutralization as a promising treatment alternative to current anti-angiogenesis approaches. PMID:24832383

  6. Secretion of the housekeeping protein glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by the LEE-encoded type III secretion system in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Laura; Ferreira, Elaine; Giménez, Rosa; Fernández, Francisco José; Taulés, Marta; Aguilar, Juan; Vega, M Cristina; Badia, Josefa; Baldomà, Laura

    2012-06-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional housekeeping protein secreted by pathogens and involved in adhesion and/or virulence. Previously we reported that enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteropathogenic (EPEC) Escherichia coli secrete GAPDH into the culture medium. This bacterial protein binds human plasminogen and fibrinogen and remains associated with Caco-2 cells upon infection. In these pathogens, GAPDH secretion is not linked to outer membrane vesicles and depends on growth conditions, although the secretion mechanism is still unknown. EPEC is an attaching and effacing pathogen able to secrete and translocate multiple effector proteins into infected cells through a type III secretion system (T3SS). The secretion process is often dependent on a bacterial chaperone. The chaperone CesT displays broad substrate specificity and plays a central role in the recruitment of multiple type III effectors to the T3SS apparatus. Here we provide genetic evidences on GAPDH secretion through T3SS by EPEC grown in DMEM. Secretion of GAPDH is increased in ΔsepD mutants and abolished in mutants defective in the type III ATPase EscN. Complementation with escN gene restores GAPDH secretion. In addition, we prove by means of pull down experiments, overlay immunoblotting and biolayer interferometry a novel interaction between GAPDH and the chaperone CesT. This interaction, which is strong and slow dissociating, may stabilize a population of GAPDH molecules in a secretion competent-state and target them to the type III secretion apparatus. This is the first description of CesT interaction with a housekeeping protein and its export through T3SS. PMID:22433988

  7. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-4-deficient mice are protected from diet-induced insulin resistance by the enhanced association of mTOR and rictor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongben; Cooper, Daniel E; Grevengoed, Trisha J; Li, Lei O; Klett, Eric L; Eaton, James M; Harris, Thurl E; Coleman, Rosalind A

    2014-08-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) activity is highly induced in obese individuals with insulin resistance, suggesting a correlation between GPAT function, triacylglycerol accumulation, and insulin resistance. We asked whether microsomal GPAT4, an isoform regulated by insulin, might contribute to the development of hepatic insulin resistance. Compared with control mice fed a high fat diet, Gpat4(-/-) mice were more glucose tolerant and were protected from insulin resistance. Overexpression of GPAT4 in mouse hepatocytes impaired insulin-suppressed gluconeogenesis and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. Impaired glucose homeostasis was coupled to inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(Ser⁴⁷³) and Akt(Thr³⁰⁸). GPAT4 overexpression inhibited rictor's association with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) activity. Compared with overexpressed GPAT3 in mouse hepatocytes, GPAT4 overexpression increased phosphatidic acid (PA), especially di16:0-PA. Conversely, in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes, both mTOR/rictor association and mTORC2 activity increased, and the content of PA in Gpat4(-/-) hepatocytes was lower than in controls, with the greatest decrease in 16:0-PA species. Compared with controls, liver and skeletal muscle from Gpat4(-/-)-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet were more insulin sensitive and had a lower hepatic content of di16:0-PA. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GPAT4-derived lipid signal, likely di16:0-PA, impairs insulin signaling in mouse liver and contributes to hepatic insulin resistance. PMID:24939733

  8. DNA vaccine encoding the moonlighting protein Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) leads to partial protection in a mouse model of human filariasis.

    PubMed

    Steisslinger, Vera; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W; Erttmann, Klaus D

    2015-10-26

    River blindness, caused by the filarial parasite Onchocerca volvulus, is a major socio-economic and public health problem in Sub-Saharan Africa. In January 2015, The Onchocerciasis Vaccine for Africa (TOVA) Initiative has been launched with the aim of providing new tools to complement mass drug administration (MDA) of ivermectin, thereby promoting elimination of onchocerciasis in Africa. In this context we here present Onchocerca volvulus glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ov-GAPDH) as a possible DNA vaccine candidate. We report that in a laboratory model for filariasis, immunization with Ov-GAPDH led to a significant reduction of adult worm load and microfilaraemia in BALB/c mice after challenge infection with the filarial parasite Litomosoides sigmodontis. Mice were either vaccinated with Ov-GAPDH.DNA plasmid (Ov-pGAPDH.DNA) alone or in combination with recombinantly expressed Ov-GAPDH protein (Ov-rGAPDH). During the following challenge infection of immunized and control mice with L. sigmodontis, those formulations which included the DNA plasmid, led to a significant reduction of adult worm loads (up to 57% median reduction) and microfilaraemia (up to 94% reduction) in immunized animals. In a further experiment, immunization with a mixture of four overlapping, synthetic Ov-GAPDH peptides (Ov-GAPDHpept), with alum as adjuvant, did not significantly reduce worm loads. Our results indicate that DNA vaccination with Ov-GAPDH has protective potential against filarial challenge infectio