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1

The 10.7 cm solar radio flux (F10.7)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 10.7 cm solar radio flux, or F10.7 is, along with sunspot number, one of the most widely used indices of solar activity. This paper describes the equipment and procedures used to make the measurements and to calibrate them, and discusses some of the "most-asked" questions about the data.

Tapping, K. F.

2013-07-01

2

Historical Dataset Reconstruction and a Prediction Method of Solar 10.7cm Radio Flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We reconstruct the developing history of solar 10.7 cm radio flux (F10.7) since 1848, based on the yearly sunspot number and the variations. A relationship between the maximum and the linear regression slope of the first 3 years starting from minimum of the solar cycle is considered. We put forward a method of predicting the maximum of F10.7 by means of the slope-maximum relationship. Running tests for cycles 19 to 23 indicate that the method can properly predict the peak of F10.7.

Zhao, Juan; Han, Yan-Ben

2008-08-01

3

Relative phase analyses of 10.7 cm solar radio flux with sunspot numbers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three nonlinear approaches, including the cross-recurrence plot, line of synchronization and cross-wavelet transform, have been proposed to analyze the phase asynchrony between 10.7 cm solar radio flux and sunspot numbers during the period of 1947 February to 2012 June. It is found that, (1) the amplitude variation of the two indicators become more asynchronous around the minimum and maximum of a solar cycle than at the ascending and descending phases of the cycle; (2) the phase relationship between them is not only time-dependent but also frequency-dependent, which may be related to the processes of accumulation and dissipation of solar magnetic energy from the lower to the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that bright regions and large sunspot groups are more likely to shed light on solar energy radiation than active regions and small sunspot groups.

Deng, L. H.; Li, B.; Zheng, Y. F.; Cheng, X. M.

2013-10-01

4

DECREASING SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS EXPLAIN UNIQUE 10.7 cm RADIO FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Infrared spectral observations of sunspots from 1998 to 2011 have shown that on average sunspots changed, the magnetic fields weakened, and the temperatures rose. The data also show that sunspots or dark pores can only form at the solar surface if the magnetic field strength exceeds about 1500 G. Sunspots appear at the solar surface with a variety of field strengths, and during the period from 1998 to 2002 a histogram of the sunspot magnetic fields shows a normal distribution with a mean of 2436 {+-} 26 G and a width of 323 {+-} 20 G. During this observing period the mean of the magnetic field distribution decreased by 46 {+-} 6 G per year, and we assume that as the 1500 G threshold was approached, magnetic fields appeared at the solar surface which could not form dark sunspots or pores. With this assumption we propose a quantity called the sunspot formation fraction and give an analytical form derived from the magnetic field distribution. We show that this fraction can quantitatively explain the changing relationship between sunspot number and solar radio flux measured at 10.7 cm wavelengths.

Livingston, W.; Penn, M. J. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States); Svalgaard, L. [HEPL, Via Ortega, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2012-09-20

5

Decreasing Sunspot Magnetic Fields Explain Unique 10.7 cm Radio Flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infrared spectral observations of sunspots from 1998 to 2011 have shown that on average sunspots changed, the magnetic fields weakened, and the temperatures rose. The data also show that sunspots or dark pores can only form at the solar surface if the magnetic field strength exceeds about 1500 G. Sunspots appear at the solar surface with a variety of field strengths, and during the period from 1998 to 2002 a histogram of the sunspot magnetic fields shows a normal distribution with a mean of 2436 ± 26 G and a width of 323 ± 20 G. During this observing period the mean of the magnetic field distribution decreased by 46 ± 6 G per year, and we assume that as the 1500 G threshold was approached, magnetic fields appeared at the solar surface which could not form dark sunspots or pores. With this assumption we propose a quantity called the sunspot formation fraction and give an analytical form derived from the magnetic field distribution. We show that this fraction can quantitatively explain the changing relationship between sunspot number and solar radio flux measured at 10.7 cm wavelengths.

Livingston, W.; Penn, M. J.; Svalgaard, L.

2012-09-01

6

Solar-cycle variation of long-duration 10. 7-cm and soft x-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect

Gradual rise-and fall (GRF) microwave bursts and long-duration soft x-ray events (LDEs) are generally accompanied by solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Reports from the Ottawa and Penticton stations are used to examine the annual variations from 1965 to 1985 of 10.7-cm GRF bursts with total durations of at least 4 hr. The annual numbers of such bursts are well correlated with the quiet-Sun 10.7-cm flux densities. This result is in contrast with the finding of Koomen et al. (1985) that the annual numbers of > or = 4 hr GOES soft x-ray events are not well correlated with sunspot numbers. We show that the latter result is biased by the large variation of the quiet-Sun x-ray background throughout the solar cycle. Four-hour events are more easily detected in x-ray data than in 10.7-cm data at solar minimum, but, conversely, these events are much more easily detected in 10.7-cm data around solar maximum. About 70% of the most energetic CMEs are associated with > or = 4-hr x-ray or 10.7-cm bursts. A one-to-one relationship does not exist between CMEs and either LDEs or GRF bursts viewed in full-Sun detectors.

Kahler, S.; Cliver, E.W.

1988-01-01

7

Two Unusual Episodes of ?13-Day Variations II. Implications for the Solar Radio Flux Density, F10.7 cm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Additional analysis of the behavior of the international sunspot number (R) series and the solar radio flux density (F10.7 cm) series during two long (250 500 days) and distinct episodes of persistent ?13-day variations (Crane, Solar Phys. 1998, 253, 177) is reported. The conclusion is that while the center-to-limb behavior of R does not change between solar minimum and solar maximum, F10.7 cm exhibits significantly less limb brightening at solar maximum than at solar minimum.

Crane, Patrick C.

2005-06-01

8

The Effect of Relative Sunspot Numbers, Solar Flare Numbers and Variable Component of 10.7 CM Solar Flux on The Seasonal Variation of 6300 Å Line Intensity at Calcutta  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the seasonal variation of 6300 Å line intensity at Calcutta with relative sunspot number, solar flare number and variable component of 10.7 cm solar flux. A study has been made and important results have been obtained which are as follows.

S. K. Midya; R. Chattopadhyay; C. M. Pal

1997-01-01

9

Design of a 10**36 CM-2 S-1 Super-B Factory  

SciTech Connect

Parameters have been studied for a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon 4S that would deliver a luminosity of 1 to 4 x 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s. This collider, called a Super-B Factory, would use a combination of linear collider and storage ring techniques. In this scheme an electron beam and a positron beam are stored in low-emittance damping rings similar to those designed for a Linear Collider (LC) or the next generation light source. A LC style interaction region is included in the ring to produce sub-millimeter vertical beta functions at the collision point. A large crossing angle (+/- 24 mrad) is used at the collision point to allow beam separation. A crab-waist scheme is used to reduce the hourglass effect and restore peak luminosity. Beam currents of 1.8 A at 4 x 7 GeV in 1251 bunches can produce a luminosity of 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s with upgrade possibilities. Such a collider would produce an integrated luminosity of about 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year (10{sup 7} sec) at the {gamma}(4S) resonance. Further possibilities include having longitudinally polarized e- at the IR and operating at the J/Psi and Psi beam energies.

Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; /Pisa U.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2011-10-24

10

The Effect of Relative Sunspot Numbers, Solar Flare Numbers and Variable Component of 10.7 cm Solar Flux on The Seasonal Variation of 6300 Å Line Intensity at Calcutta  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the seasonal variation of 6300 line intensity at Calcutta with relative sunspot number, solar flare number\\u000a and variable component of 10.7 cm solar flux. A study has been made and important results have been obtained which are as\\u000a follows.\\u000a \\u000a (i) Intensity of 6300 line shows periodic variation with relative sunspot number, solar flare number and variable component

S. K. Midya; R. Chattopadhyay; C. M. Pal

1997-01-01

11

Nondispersive hole transport in a polyfluorene copolymer with a mobility of 0.01 cm2 V-1 s-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The hole mobility in the fluorene copolymer poly[(9,9-dioctylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-co-(4,4'-(N-(4-sec-butylphenyl)) diphenylamine)] (TFB) was measured using the time-of-flight technique. Transport was found to be nondispersive throughout the temperature range between 220 and 350 K, indicating the absence of intrinsic traps in this material. At room temperature, TFB shows a hole mobility of 0.01 cm2 V-1 s-1, with a weak field dependence. The hole mobility is independent of sample thickness in the range between 0.9 and 6.4 ?m. These results are in agreement with a narrow transport manifold, with a width of 65.9+/-0.5 meV.

Fong, H. H.; Papadimitratos, Alexios; Malliaras, George G.

2006-10-01

12

Epitaxial SrTiO3 films with electron mobilities exceeding 30,000 cm2 V(-1) s(-1).  

PubMed

The study of quantum phenomena in semiconductors requires epitaxial structures with exceptionally high charge-carrier mobilities. Furthermore, low-temperature mobilities are highly sensitive probes of the quality of epitaxial layers, because they are limited by impurity and defect scattering. Unlike many other complex oxides, electron-doped SrTiO(3) single crystals show high (approximately 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) electron mobilities at low temperatures. High-mobility, epitaxial heterostructures with SrTiO(3) have recently attracted attention for thermoelectric applications, field-induced superconductivity and two-dimensional (2D) interface conductivity. Epitaxial SrTiO(3) thin films are often deposited by energetic techniques, such as pulsed laser deposition. Electron mobilities in such films are lower than those of single crystals. In semiconductor physics, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is widely established as the deposition method that produces the highest mobility structures. It is a low-energetic, high-purity technique that allows for low defect densities and precise control over doping concentrations and location. Here, we demonstrate controlled doping of epitaxial SrTiO(3) layers grown by MBE. Electron mobilities in these films exceed those of single crystals. At low temperatures, the films show Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. These high-mobility SrTiO(3) films allow for the study of the intrinsic physics of SrTiO(3) and can serve as building blocks for high-mobility oxide heterostructures. PMID:20364139

Son, Junwoo; Moetakef, Pouya; Jalan, Bharat; Bierwagen, Oliver; Wright, Nicholas J; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Stemmer, Susanne

2010-04-04

13

Electron-Deficient Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) Provides Electron Mobility over 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) under Ambient Conditions.  

PubMed

Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) derivatives (PPVs) are one of the most widely investigated p-type polymers in organic electronics. PPVs generally exhibit electron mobilities lower than 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), thus hindering their applications in high-performance polymer field-effect transistors and organic photovoltaics. Herein, we design and synthesize a novel electron-deficient PPV derivative, benzodifurandione-based PPV (BDPPV). This new PPV derivative displays high electron mobilities up to 1.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) under ambient conditions (4 orders of magnitude higher than those of other PPVs), because it overcomes common defects in PPVs, such as conformational disorder, weak interchain interaction, and a high LUMO level. BDPPV represents the first polymer that can transport electrons over 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) under ambient conditions. PMID:23675890

Lei, Ting; Dou, Jin-Hu; Cao, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Jie-Yu; Pei, Jian

2013-05-28

14

In-situ determination of astro-comb calibrator lines to better than 10 cm s(-1).  

PubMed

Improved wavelength calibrators for high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs will be essential for precision radial velocity (RV) detection of Earth-like exoplanets and direct observation of cosmological deceleration. The astro-comb is a combination of an octave-spanning femtosecond laser frequency comb and a Fabry-Pérot cavity used to achieve calibrator line spacings that can be resolved by an astrophysical spectrograph. Systematic spectral shifts associated with the cavity can be 0.1-1 MHz, corresponding to RV errors of 10-100 cm/s, due to the dispersive properties of the cavity mirrors over broad spectral widths. Although these systematic shifts are very stable, their correction is crucial to high accuracy astrophysical spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate an in-situ technique to determine the systematic shifts of astro-comb lines due to finite Fabry-Pérot cavity dispersion. The technique is practical for implementation at a telescope-based spectrograph to enable wavelength calibration accuracy better than 10 cm/s. PMID:20588453

Li, Chih-Hao; Glenday, Alexander G; Benedick, Andrew J; Chang, Guoqing; Chen, Li-Jin; Cramer, Claire; Fendel, Peter; Furesz, Gabor; Kärtner, Franz X; Korzennik, Sylvain; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

2010-06-01

15

Nanocrystalline silicon thin-film transistors with 50-nm-thick deposited channel layer, 10 cm2V-1s-1 electron mobility and 108 on\\/off current ratio  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Thin-film transistors were made using 50-nm-thick directly deposited nanocrystalline silicon channel layers. The transistors\\u000a have a coplanar top gate structure. The nanocrystalline silicon was deposited from discharges in silane, hydrogen and silicon\\u000a tetrafluoride. The transistors combine a high electron field effect mobility of ?10 cm2?V-1s-1 with a low ‘off’ current of ?10-14 A per ?m of channel length and an ‘on’\\/‘off’

R. B. Min; S. Wagner

2002-01-01

16

Nanocrystalline silicon thin-film transistors with 50-nm-thick deposited channel layer, 10 cm2V-1s-1 electron mobility and 108 on/off current ratio  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thin-film transistors were made using 50-nm-thick directly deposited nanocrystalline silicon channel layers. The transistors have a coplanar top gate structure. The nanocrystalline silicon was deposited from discharges in silane, hydrogen and silicon tetrafluoride. The transistors combine a high electron field effect mobility of 10 cm2V-1s-1 with a low `off' current of 10-14 A per ?m of channel length and an `on'/`off' current ratio of 108. This result shows that transistors made from directly deposited silicon can combine high mobility with low `off' currents.

Min, R. B.; Wagner, S.

17

Correlation of the Solar Activity Indicators Sunspot, F(10, 7), and X-Ray Radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are close correlation between three parameters of solar activities : sunspot number (R), flux 10,7 cm. (F10,7) and the intensity of Soft X-ray radiation (ISXR.). The correlation between them are F10,7 = 0,96 R + 57,54, ISXR = 3,5x10-7 R(sup 1,63), and ISXR= 1,25 x 10-12(F10,7(sup 3,05), respectively, with correlation coefficient more than 95%. The radiation of flux 10.7 cm and Soft X-ray always exists, without the emergencies of sunspot (R=O). Based on these investigations, the authors propose that the sun is active if the value of R, F10,7, and ISXR are R greater than 100, F10,7 greater than 180 sfu, dan SXR greater than 10-6 Watt per square meters respectively.

Jasman, Suprijatno; Suratno

2001-06-01

18

46 CFR 111.10-7 - Dead ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead ship. 111.10-7 Section 111.10-7... Power Supply § 111.10-7 Dead ship. (a) The generating plant of each...start the main propulsion plant from a dead ship condition. (b) If the...

2012-10-01

19

Clarifying CM vs. CM At-Risk.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explains the difference between construction manager (CM) and construction manager at-risk and explores management versus delivery aspects of both. Concluding comments address why the a decision on CM vs. CM at-risk is not an either/or process. (GR)

Kenig, Michael

2000-01-01

20

The exoplanet hunter HARPS: unequalled accuracy and perspectives toward 1 cm s-1 precision  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present results from the first two years of operations of the HARPS spectrograph installed on the ESO 3.6m telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile. This instrument, primarily built to detect extrasolar planetary systems, was designed to achieve the highest radial velocity precision ever, thanks to high mechanical and environmental stability, stable illumination, accurate wavelength calibration and tracking of instrumental

Christophe Lovis; Francesco Pepe; François Bouchy; Gaspare Lo Curto; Michel Mayor; Luca Pasquini; Didier Queloz; Gero Rupprecht; Stéphane Udry; Shay Zucker

2006-01-01

21

Extension of the F10.7 index to 1905 using Mt. Wilson Ca K spectroheliograms  

Microsoft Academic Search

The F10.7 index provides a daily record of solar microwave emissions, which vary in rough proportion to the projected area of bright magnetic structures called plages and network, and also sunspots, on the sun's disk. The daily observations used to form the index only began in 1947. Recently, we digitized the archive of daily Ca K spectroheliograms obtained at Mt.

Peter Foukal

1998-01-01

22

43 CFR 10.7 - Disposition of unclaimed human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Reserved] 10.7 Section 10.7 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects of Cultural...

2009-10-01

23

Switched-capacitor bandpass delta-sigma A\\/D modulation at 10.7 MHz  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two second-order bandpass delta-sigma A\\/D modulators have been implemented in a 0.8 ? BiCMOS process to demonstrate the feasibility of converting a 10.7 MHz radio IF signal to digital form. The circuits, based on switched-capacitor biquads, demonstrated 57 dB SNR in a 200 kHz bandwidth when clocked at 42.8 MHz, dissipating 60 mW from a 5 V supply. The two

Frank W. Singor; W. Martin Snelgrove

1995-01-01

24

7S(1/2) ? 9S(1/2) two-photon spectroscopy of trapped francium.  

PubMed

We report on the spectroscopic measurement of the (210)Fr 9S(1/2) energy obtained by two-photon excitation of atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optic trap. The resonant intermediate level 7P(3/2) is the upper state of the trapping transition. We have measured the energy difference between the 9S(1/2) state and the 7S(1/2) ground state to be 25 671.021 +/- 0.006 cm(-1). PMID:19881852

Simsarian, J E; Shi, W; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D; Zhao, W Z

1996-12-01

25

Evaluation of 242Cm and 244Cm decay data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The decay data evaluation results are presented for the 242Cm and 244Cm radionuclides decaying to the levels in 238Pu and 240Pu, respectively. The evaluated data have been obtained using information published up to 2005.

Chechev, V. P.

2006-07-01

26

344 cm x 86 cm low mass vacuum window  

SciTech Connect

The LBL Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) superconducting magnet contains a 1 m x 3.45 m x 2 m vacuum tank in its gap. A full aperture thin window was needed to minimize background as the products of nuclear collisions move from upstream targets to downstream detectors. Six windows were built and tested in the development process. The final window's unsupported area is 3m/sup 2/ with a 25 cm inward deflection. The design consists of a .11 mm Nylon/aluminum/polypropylene laminate as a gas seal and .55 mm woven aramid fiber for strength. Total mass is 80 milligrams per cm/sup 2/. Development depended heavily on past experience and testing. Safety considerations are discussed.

Reimers, R.M.; Porter, J.; Meneghetti, J.; Wilde, S.; Miller, R.

1983-08-01

27

CYP2S1: A short review  

SciTech Connect

A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

Saarikoski, Sirkku T. [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FI-00250 (Finland) and Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, FI-00250 (Finland)]. E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hankinson, Oliver [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FI-00250 (Finland)

2005-09-01

28

Safety assessment for the S-1 Spheromak  

SciTech Connect

The S-1 machine is part of the Magnetic Fusion Program. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. S-1 is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power.

Ellis, R. Jr.; Stencel, J.R. (eds.)

1984-02-01

29

Spectral Investigations of CM Dra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present an analysis of a high resolution (R=47000) echelle spectra of the low-mass eclipsing binary CM Draconis, which were obtained on the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. Spectra were obtained for various phases of the orbit. There are some difficulties in echelle spectra processing of cool stars, since it is hard to get energy distribution in a large scale in such spectra. We proposed an efficient method for making the continuum of spectrum of cool stars. We refined the parameters (effective temperature, rotational velocity and metallicity) of the components of the system CM Dra using the method of stellar atmospheres. The data that we obtained are in good agreement with the results obtained by other authors. It is indicate on efficiency of our technique. The errors of temperature and metallicity determinations is about 100 K and 0.3 dex respectively.

Kuznetsov, M. K.; Pavlenko, Y. V.; Pinfield, D.; Jones, H.

2010-12-01

30

Vascular sphingosine-1-phosphate S1P1 and S1P3 receptors.  

PubMed

The sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) acts on five subtypes of G-protein- coupled receptors, termed S1P(1) (formerly endothelial differentiation gene-1 [Edg-1]), S1P(2) (Edg-5), S1P(3) (Edg-3), S1P(4) (Edg-6) and S1P(5) (Edg-8), and possibly several other "orphan" receptors, such as GPR3, GPR6 and GPR12. These receptors are coupled to different intracellular second messenger systems, including adenylate cyclase, phospholipase C, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as Rho- and Ras-dependent pathways. Consistently with this receptor multiplicity and pleiotropic signaling mechanisms, S1P influences numerous cell functions. S1P(1)1, S1P(2) and S1P(3) receptors are the major S1P receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system, where they mediate the effects of S1P released from platelets, and possibly other tissues (such as brain). Thus S1P(1) and S1P(3) receptors enhance endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, playing a key role in developmental and pathological angiogenesis. In contrast, S1P(2) receptors inhibit migration of these cell types, probably because of their unique stimulatory effect on a GTPase-activating protein inhibiting the activity of Rac. S1P receptors can also cause relaxation and constriction of blood vessels. The former effect is mediated by pertussis toxin-sensitive receptors (possibly S1P(1)) located on the endothelium and stimulating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The vasoconstricting effect of S1P is likely to be mediated by S1P(2) and/or S1P(3) receptors, via Rho-Rho-kinase, and is more potent in coronary and cerebral blood vessels. Finally, S1P also protects endothelial cells from apoptosis through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/eNOS via S1P(1) and S1P(3) receptors. The variety of these effects, taken together with the existence of multiple receptor subtypes, provides an abundance of therapeutic targets that currently still await the development of selective agents. PMID:15334188

Waeber, Christian; Blondeau, Nicolas; Salomone, Salvatore

31

21 cm Tomography with Foregrounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Twenty-one centimeter tomography is emerging as a powerful tool to explore the reionization epoch and cosmological parameters, but it will only be as good as our ability to accurately model and remove astrophysical foreground contamination. Previous treatments of this problem have focused on the angular structure of the signal and foregrounds and what can be achieved with limited spectral resolution (channel widths in the 1 MHz range). In this paper we introduce and evaluate a ``blind'' method to extract the multifrequency 21 cm signal by taking advantage of the smooth frequency structure of the Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds. We find that 21 cm tomography is typically limited by foregrounds on scales of k<<1 h Mpc-1 and is limited by noise on scales of k>>1 h Mpc-1, provided that the experimental channel width can be made substantially smaller than 0.1 MHz. Our results show that this approach is quite promising even for scenarios with rather extreme contamination from point sources and diffuse Galactic emission, which bodes well for upcoming experiments such as LOFAR, MWA, PAST, and SKA.

Wang, Xiaomin; Tegmark, Max; Santos, Mário G.; Knox, Lloyd

2006-10-01

32

Winding Hopfions on R2×S1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study Hopfions in the Faddeev-Skyrme model with potential terms on R2×S1. Apart from the conventional Hopfions, there exist winding Hopfions, that is, the lump (baby Skyrmion) strings with the lump charge Q with the U(1) modulus twisted P times along S1, having the Hopf charge PQ. We consider two kinds of potential terms, that is, the potential linear in the field and the ferromagnetic potential with two easy axes, and present stable solutions numerically. We also point out that a Q-lump carries the unit Hopf charge per the period in d=2+1.

Kobayashi, Michikazu; Nitta, Muneto

2013-11-01

33

The effect of primordial black holes on 21-cm fluctuations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 21-cm signal produced by non-evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs) is investigated. X-ray photons emitted by accretion of matter onto a PBH ionize and heat the intergalactic medium (IGM) gas near the PBH. Using a simple analytic model, we show that this X-ray heating can produce an observable differential 21-cm brightness temperature. The region of the observable 21-cm brightness temperature can extend to 1-10 Mpc comoving distance from a PBH, depending on the PBH mass. The angular power spectrum of 21-cm fluctuations resulting from PBHs is also calculated. The peak position of the angular spectrum depends on the PBH mass, while the amplitude is independent of mass. On comparing this power spectrum with the angular power spectrum caused by primordial density fluctuations, it is found that the two spectra are comparable if the density parameter of PBHs is ?PBH = 10-11(M/103 M?)-0.2 at z = 30 and if ?PBH = 10-12(M/103 M?)-0.2 at z = 20 for a PBH mass from 10 M? to 108 M?. Finally, we find that the Square Kilometre Array can detect the signal caused by PBHs up to ?PBH = 10-5(M/103 M?)-0.2 at z = 30 and up to ?PBH = 10-7(M/103 M?)-0.2 at z = 20 for PBHs with mass in the range from 102 M? to 108 M?.

Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

2013-11-01

34

Identification of benzoxazole analogs as novel, S1P(3) sparing S1P(1) agonists.  

PubMed

A novel series of benzoxazole-derived S1P(1) agonists were designed based on scaffold hopping molecular design strategy combined with computational approaches. Extensive SAR studies led to the discovery of compound 17d as a selective S1P(1) agonist (over S1P(3)) with high CNS penetration and favorable DMPK properties. 17d also demonstrated in vivo pharmacological efficacy to reduce blood lymphocyte in mice after oral administration. PMID:22583616

Deng, Guanghui; Meng, Qinghua; Liu, Qian; Xu, Xuesong; Xu, Qiongfeng; Ren, Feng; Guo, Taylor B; Lu, Hongtao; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen

2012-04-28

35

(S - 1, S) Policies for Perishable Inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

We consider (S - 1, S) policies for a single item whose lifetime is fixed and known with certainty. Demands are generated by a stationary Poisson process and there is a positive leadtime for replenishment. We believe this study gives the only analysis for perishables with a positive order leadtime. The analysis involves the derivation of the stationary distribution of

Charles P. Schmidt; Steven Nahmias

1985-01-01

36

Spectroscopic Properties and Potential Energy Surfaces for Curium Hydrides: CmH2, CmH2+, CmH, and CmH+  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A relativistic complete active space multiconfigurational self-consistent field followed by multireference singles + doubles configuration interaction computations are carried out on the potential energy surfaces of electronic states of CmH2 and CmH2+ for the insertion reaction of Cm and Cm+ into H2. We have also carried out corresponding computations on several electronic states of CmH and CmH+. Moreover, multireference relativistic configuration interaction computations including spin-orbit coupling were carried out on 75 electronic states of CmH+, which were found to be below the 45 000 cm-1 region. We have computed the first ionization energy of Cm as 5.94 eV in excellent agreement with experimental value of 5.99 eV. Our computations reveal barriers for the insertion of Cm and Cm+ in their ground electronic states into H2, but once the barriers are surmounted, both Cm + H2 and Cm+ + H2 form stable products. The potential energy curves of CmH and CmH+ reveal the existence of several low-lying open-shell excited states with varied ? quantum numbers and spin multiplicities. The excited states of these species exhibit intermediate coupling, although the spin-orbit splittings of the 9?- and 8?- ground states of CmH and CmH+ are small, exhibiting nearly inverted multiplets.

Balasubramanian, K.; Cao, Zhiji

2009-09-01

37

Spectroscopic properties and potential energy surfaces for curium hydrides: CmH(2), CmH(2)(+), CmH, and CmH(+).  

PubMed

A relativistic complete active space multiconfigurational self-consistent field followed by multireference singles + doubles configuration interaction computations are carried out on the potential energy surfaces of electronic states of CmH(2) and CmH(2)(+) for the insertion reaction of Cm and Cm(+) into H(2). We have also carried out corresponding computations on several electronic states of CmH and CmH(+). Moreover, multireference relativistic configuration interaction computations including spin-orbit coupling were carried out on 75 electronic states of CmH(+), which were found to be below the 45 000 cm(-1) region. We have computed the first ionization energy of Cm as 5.94 eV in excellent agreement with experimental value of 5.99 eV. Our computations reveal barriers for the insertion of Cm and Cm(+) in their ground electronic states into H(2), but once the barriers are surmounted, both Cm + H(2) and Cm(+) + H(2) form stable products. The potential energy curves of CmH and CmH(+) reveal the existence of several low-lying open-shell excited states with varied Lambda quantum numbers and spin multiplicities. The excited states of these species exhibit intermediate coupling, although the spin-orbit splittings of the (9)Sigma(-) and (8)Sigma(-) ground states of CmH and CmH(+) are small, exhibiting nearly inverted multiplets. PMID:19736953

Balasubramanian, K; Cao, Zhiji

2009-11-12

38

Cache coherency on the S-1 AAP  

SciTech Connect

A cache coherency scheme for shared-memory multiprocessors is described. Unlike most cache coherency schemes, the proposed method does not require the client caches to be connected by a shared bus. Participating caches need only expend cycles to process cache blocks which are shared --- there is no performance penalty for caches which do not contain shared data. The S-1 AAP, a multiprocessor under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, uses this scheme. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Bruner, J.D.; Hagensen, G.W.; Jensen, E.H.; Pattin, J.C.; Broughton, J.M.

1987-11-11

39

Solubility of methane in heavy normal paraffins at temperatures from 323 to 423 K and pressures to 10. 7 MPa  

SciTech Connect

Solubility data are presented for methane in four heavy normal paraffins at temperatures from 323 to 423 K and pressures up to 10.7 MPa. The paraffins studied are eicosane (n-C[sub 20]), octacosane(n-C[sub 28]), hexatriacontane (n-C[sub 36]), and tetratetracontane (n-C[sub 44]). The data obtained for the solubility of methane in n-C[sub 20], n-C[sub 28], and n-C[sub 36] are in good agreement with the earlier measurements of Chao and co-workers. The new data can be described with RMS errors of about 0.001 in mole fraction by the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) or Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state when two interaction parameters per isotherm are used. Henry's constants and partial molar volumes at infinite dilution for methane have also been evaluated from the data.

Darwish, N.A.; Fathikalajahi, J.; Gasem, K.A.M.; Robinson, R.L. Jr. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). School of Chemical Engineering)

1993-01-01

40

Ternary ? and triton emission in the spontaneous fission of 244Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm and in the neutron induced fission of 243Cm, 245Cm and 247Cm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The emission probabilities and the energy distributions of tritons and ? particles emitted in the spontaneous ternary fission (zero excitation energy) of 244Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm and in the cold neutron induced fission (excitation energy ?6.5 MeV) of 243Cm, 245Cm and 247Cm are determined. The particle identification was done with suited ?E-E telescope detectors, at the IRMM (Geel, Belgium) for the spontaneous fission and at the ILL (Grenoble, France) for the neutron induced fission measurements. Hence particle emission characteristics of the fissioning systems 244Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm are obtained at zero excitation energy and at an excitation energy around 6.5 MeV. Whilst the triton emission probability is hardly influenced by the excitation energy, the 4He emission probability in spontaneous fission is about 20% higher than for neutron induced fission. This could be explained by the influence of the cluster preformation probability on the ternary ? emission.

Vermote, S.; Wagemans, C.; Serot, O.; Heyse, J.; van Gils, J.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.

2008-06-01

41

Will Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) Survive Perihelion?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ~200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm–3 are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm–3, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

Knight, Matthew M.; Walsh, Kevin J.

2013-10-01

42

Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO  

SciTech Connect

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

2008-12-08

43

Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ - Thermodynamics of Neutral and Ionized CmO  

SciTech Connect

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O] (M ) Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+] (M ) Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electrontransfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO] ) 6.4 ( 0.2 eV; IE[CmO+] ) 15.8 ( 0.4 eV; D[Cm-O] ) 710 ( 45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O] ) 670 ( 40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O] ) 342 ( 55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M ) Cm, La, Gd, and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O] and D[OC-O] - that is, 167 kJ mol-1 < D[M2+-O] < 532 kJ mol-1 - such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic oxygen-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+, and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2 + ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled - although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2 + is a stable species.

Gibson, John K [ORNL; Haire, Richard G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Santos, Marta [ORNL; Pires de Matos, Antonio [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem, Portugal; Marcalo, Joaquim [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem, Portugal

2008-01-01

44

Gas-phase oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ --thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO.  

PubMed

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm (+) and Cm (2+); parallel studies were carried out with La (+/2+), Gd (+/2+) and Lu (+/2+). Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M (+)-O] (M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO (+) with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO (+)] (M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO (2+) ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO] = 6.4 +/- 0.2 eV; IE[CmO (+)] = 15.8 +/- 0.4 eV; D[Cm-O] = 710 +/- 45 kJ mol (-1); D[Cm (+)-O] = 670 +/- 40 kJ mol (-1); and D[Cm (2+)-O] = 342 +/- 55 kJ mol (-1). Estimates for the M (2+)-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd, and Lu are all intermediate between D[N 2-O] and D[OC-O] - that is, 167 kJ mol (-1) < D[M (2+)-O] < 532 kJ mol (-1) - such that the four MO (2+) ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic oxygen-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO (2+), LaO (2+), GdO (2+), and LuO (2+) dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO 2 (+) ion appeared during the reaction of Cm (+) with O 2 when the intermediate, CmO (+), was not collisionally cooled - although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO 2 (+) is a stable species. PMID:18921989

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G; Santos, Marta; de Matos, António Pires; Marçalo, Joaquim

2008-10-16

45

Progressive aqueous alteration of CM carbonaceous chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CM chondrites are aqueously altered rocks that contain ˜9 wt% H 2O + (i.e., indigenous water) bound in phyllosilicates; also present are clumps of serpentine-tochilinite intergrowths (previously called "poorly characterized phases" or PCP), pentlandite and Ni-bearing pyrrhotite. We studied 11 CM chondrites that span the known range from least altered to most altered. We used various petrologic properties (many previously identified) that provide information regarding the degree of aqueous alteration. There are no known unaltered or slightly altered CM chondrites (e.g., rocks containing numerous chondrules with primary igneous glass). Some CM properties result from processes associated with early and intermediate stages of the alteration sequence (i.e., hydration of matrix, alteration of chondrule glass, and production of large PCP clumps). Other petrologic properties reflect processes active throughout the alteration sequence; these include oxidation of metallic Fe-Ni, alteration of chondrule phenocrysts, changes in PCP composition (reflecting an increase in the phyllosilicate/sulfide ratio), and changes in carbonate mineralogy (reflecting the development of dolomite and complex carbonates at the expense of Ca carbonate). On the basis of these parameters, we propose a numerical alteration sequence for CM chondrites. Because there are no known CM samples that display only incipient alteration, the least altered sample was arbitrarily assigned to subtype 2.6. The most altered CM chondrites, currently classified CM1, are assigned to subtype 2.0. These highly altered rocks have essentially no mafic silicates; they contain chondrule pseudomorphs composed mainly of phyllosilicate. However, their bulk compositions are CM-like, and they are closer in texture to other C2 chondrites than to CI1 chondrites (which lack chondrule pseudomorphs). Using several diagnostic criteria, we assigned petrologic subtypes (±0.1) to every CM chondrite in our study: QUE 97990, CM2.6; Murchison, CM2.5; Kivesvaara, CM2.5; Murray, CM2.4/2.5; Y 791198, CM2.4; QUE 99355, CM2.3; Nogoya, CM2.2; Cold Bokkeveld, CM2.2; QUE 93005, CM2.1; LAP 02277, CM2.0; MET 01070, CM2.0. The proposed CM numerical alteration sequence improves upon the existing scheme of Browning et al. (1996) in that it does not require a complicated algorithm applied to electron-microprobe data to determine the average matrix phyllosilicate composition. The new sequence is more comprehensive and employs petrologic subtypes that are easier to use and remember than mineralogic alteration index values. New neutron-activation analyses of QUE 97990, QUE 93005, MET 01070, Murchison and Crescent, together with literature data, confirm the compositional uniformity of the CM group; different degrees of alteration among CM chondrites do not lead to resolvable bulk compositional differences. This suggests that the textural differences among individual CM chondrites reflect progressive alteration of similar hypothetical CM3.0 starting materials in different regions of the same parent body, with minimal aqueous transport of materials over appreciable (e.g., meters) distances.

Rubin, Alan E.; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Huber, Heinz; Wasson, John T.

2007-05-01

46

PMMA Cementoplasty in Symptomatic Metastatic Lesions of the S1 Vertebral Body  

SciTech Connect

We describe a lateral transiliac direct puncture approach to the S1 vertebral body for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cementoplasty of painful metastatic lesions. This approach was performed using a 15-cm-long trocar needle with 3-mm outer diameter, introduced under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic control. A lateral projection was used to center the needle just in front of the spinal canal and subjacent to the superior plate of the S1 vertebral body. Needle progression was controlled using anteroposterior and lateral fluoroscopic projections alternately with a needle course parallel to an axial plane, avoiding conflict with the S1 foramen. After needle tip placement in the center of the S1 vertebral body, diluted PMMA with a setting time of 8 min was delivered. Ipsilateral lesions of the lateral sacral compartment were filled with the same needle by stepwise withdrawal and continuous PMMA injection.

Dehdashti, Amir R.; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Jean, Beatrix; Ruefenacht, Daniel A. [Neuroradiology-HUG, University Hospital of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

2000-03-15

47

Association between prenatal exposure to methylmercury and visuospatial ability at 10.7 years in the seychelles child development study.  

PubMed

The Seychelles Child Development Study was designed to test the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to MeHg from maternal consumption of a diet high in fish is detrimental to child neurodevelopment. To date, no consistent pattern of adverse associations between prenatal exposure and children's development has appeared. In a comprehensive review of developmental studies involving MeHg, a panel of experts recommended a more consistent use of the same endpoints across studies to facilitate comparisons. Both the SCDS and the Faeroe Islands studies administered the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test. However, the method of test administration and scoring used was different. We repeated the test on the SCDS Main Study children (mean age 10.7 years) using the same testing and scoring procedure reported by the Faeroe studies to obtain Copying Task and Reproduction Task scores. We found no association between prenatal MeHg exposure and Copying Task scores which was reported from the Faeroese study. However, our analysis did show a significant adverse association between MeHg and Reproduction Task scores with all the data (p=0.04), but not when the single outlier was removed (p=0.07). In a population whose exposure to MeHg is from fish consumption, we continue to find no consistent adverse association between MeHg and visual motor coordination. PMID:18400302

Davidson, Philip W; Jean-Sloane-Reeves; Myers, Gary J; Hansen, Ole Nørby; Huang, Li-Shan; Georger, Leslie A; Cox, Christopher; Thurston, Sally W; Shamlaye, Conrad F; Clarkson, Thomas W

2008-03-02

48

Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-co...

M. T. Ritsche

2005-01-01

49

Migrating CM Fortran applications to HPF  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the course of developing pghpf, the PGI High Performance Fortran compiler, several CM Fortran applications have been converted to HPF and run on multiple platforms as part of customer benchmarking exercises. The existing base of CM Fortran codes, along with MP Fortran codes developed for the MasPar machines, represent perhaps the largest body of existing data parallel applications. With

L. Meadows; D. Miles

1995-01-01

50

V ect(S 1 ) Action on Pseudodierential Symbols on S 1 and (Noncommutative) Hydrodynamic Type Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The standard embedding of the Lie algebra V ect(S 1 ) of smooth vector fields on the circle V ect(S 1 ) into the Lie algebra D(S 1 ) of pseudodierential symbols on S 1 identifies vector field f(x) @ @x 2 V ect(S 1 ) and its dual as (f(x) @ @x ) = f(x) (u(x)dx 2 ) =

Partha GUHA

2006-01-01

51

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) regulates vascular contraction via S1P3 receptor: investigation based on a new S1P3 receptor antagonist.  

PubMed

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) induces diverse biological responses in various tissues by activating specific G protein-coupled receptors (S1P(1)-S1P(5) receptors). The biological signaling regulated by S1P(3) receptor has not been fully elucidated because of the lack of an S1P(3) receptor-specific antagonist or agonist. We developed a novel S1P(3) receptor antagonist, 1-(4-chlorophenylhydrazono)-1-(4-chlorophenylamino)-3,3-dimethyl- 2-butanone (TY-52156), and show here that the S1P-induced decrease in coronary flow (CF) is mediated by the S1P(3) receptor. In functional studies, TY-52156 showed submicromolar potency and a high degree of selectivity for S1P(3) receptor. TY-52156, but not an S1P(1) receptor antagonist [(R)-phosphoric acid mono-[2-amino-2-(3-octyl-phenylcarbamoyl)-ethyl] ester; VPC23019] or S1P(2) receptor antagonist [1-[1,3-dimethyl-4-(2-methylethyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-6-yl]-4-(3,5-dichloro-4-pyridinyl)-semicarbazide; JTE013], inhibited the decrease in CF induced by S1P in isolated perfused rat hearts. We further investigated the effect of TY-52156 on both the S1P-induced increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) and Rho activation that are responsible for the contraction of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells. TY-52156 inhibited both the S1P-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and Rho activation. In contrast, VPC23019 and JTE013 inhibited only the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and Rho activation, respectively. We further confirmed that TY-52156 inhibited FTY-720-induced S1P(3) receptor-mediated bradycardia in vivo. These results clearly show that TY-52156 is both sensitive and useful as an S1P(3) receptor-specific antagonist and reveal that S1P induces vasoconstriction by directly activating S1P(3) receptor and through a subsequent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and Rho activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:20097776

Murakami, Akira; Takasugi, Hiroshi; Ohnuma, Shinya; Koide, Yuuki; Sakurai, Atsuko; Takeda, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Sasamori, Jun; Konno, Takashi; Hayashi, Kenji; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Mori, Koji; Sato, Yoshimichi; Takahashi, Atsuo; Mochizuki, Naoki; Takakura, Nobuyuki

2010-01-22

52

Nançay ``blind'' 21 CM line survey of the Canes Venatici group region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A radio spectroscopic driftscan survey in the 21 cm line with the Nançay decimetric radio telescope of 0.08 steradians of sky in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici covering a heliocentric velocity range of -350 < V_hel < 2350 km s(-1) produced 53 spectral features, which was further reduced to a sample of 33 reliably detected galaxies by extensive follow-up observations. With a typical noise level of rms = 10 mJy after Hanning smoothing, the survey is - depending on where the detections are located with regard to the centre of the beam - sensitive to M_HI = 1-2x10(8) {h}(-2) {M_sun} at 23 {h}(-1) Mpc and to M_HI = 4-8x10(7) {h}(-2) {M_sun} throughout the CVn groups. The survey region had been previously examined on deep optical plates by \\cite[Binggeli et al. (1990)]{bin90} and contains loose groups with many gas-rich galaxies as well as voids. No galaxies that had not been previously identified in these deep optical surveys were uncovered in our H{sigma c i} survey, neither in the groups nor the voids. The implication is that no substantial quantity of neutral hydrogen contained in gas-rich galaxies has been missed in these well-studied groups. All late-type members of our sample are listed in the \\cite[Fisher & Tully (1981b)]{fis81b} optically selected sample of nearby late-type galaxies; the only system not contained in Fisher and Tully's Catalog is the S0 galaxy NGC 4203. Within the well-sampled CVn group volume with distances corrected for flow motions, the H {sigma c i} mass function is best fitted with the \\cite[Zwaan et al. (1997)]{zwa97} H{sigma c i} mass function (alpha =-1.2) scaled by a factor of f=4.5 in account of the locally overdense region.

Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; van Driel, W.; Briggs, F.; Binggeli, B.; Mostefaoui, T. I.

1999-03-01

53

Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

Ritsche, MT

2005-01-01

54

Half-Lives and Alpha Energies of Cm248 and Cm246  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new isotope Cm248, the daughter of Cf252, has been separated from a sample of californium. Cm248 decays by the emission of a 5.054+\\/-0.015 Mev alpha particle with an alpha half-life of (4.7+\\/-0.4)×105 years. The spontaneous fission half-life of Cm248 was found to be (4.6+\\/-0.5)×106 years. Cm246 was also observed in the curium daughters isolated from the californium sample; the

J. P. Butler; T. A. Eastwood; H. G. Jackson; R. P. Schuman

1956-01-01

55

Faint HI 21-cm Emission Line Wings at Forbidden Velocities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a search for faint HI 21-cm emission line wings at velocities forbidden by the galactic rotation in large-scale (?,v) diagrams of the galactic plane using the Leiden & Dwingeloo (LD) Survey. These ``forbidden-velocity (FV) wings" protrude from their surroundings over more than 20 km s-1 in limited (< 2 °) spatial regions. They are different from high-velocity clouds, but must be associated with some dynamical processes. We have found 73 FV wings in the region mid b mid ? 13 ° and 0

Kang, J.; Koo, B.-C.; Heiles, C.

2004-12-01

56

S-1-induced lung injury combined with pneumocystis pneumonia.  

PubMed

Pulmonary injuries due to S-1 have been reported, and these reports have shown an increase in lung cancer following the increased usage of S-1 in treating lung cancer. We report the first case of lung injury due to S-1 in combination with pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), because the radiological findings and clinical courses were compatible with S-1-induced lung injury combined with PCP. We should consider that S-1 might induce lung injuries which might occur with PCP, especially with a history of drug-induced or radiation-induced lung injuries. PMID:23386491

Yano, Shuichi

2013-02-04

57

Nançay ``blind'' 21 CM line survey of the Canes Venatici group region  

Microsoft Academic Search

A radio spectroscopic driftscan survey in the 21 cm line with the Nançay decimetric radio telescope of 0.08 steradians of sky in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici covering a heliocentric velocity range of -350 < V_hel < 2350 km s(-1) produced 53 spectral features, which was further reduced to a sample of 33 reliably detected galaxies by extensive

R. C. Kraan-Korteweg; W. van Driel; F. Briggs; B. Binggeli; T. I. Mostefaoui

1999-01-01

58

21 cm Synthesis Observations of VIRGOHI 21-A Possible Dark Galaxy in the Virgo Cluster  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many observations indicate that dark matter dominates the extragalactic universe, yet no totally dark structure of galactic proportions has ever been convincingly identified. Previously, we have suggested that VIRGOHI 21, a 21 cm source we found in the Virgo Cluster using Jodrell Bank, was a possible dark galaxy because of its broad line width (~200 km s-1) unaccompanied by any

Robert Minchin; Jonathan Davies; Michael Disney; Marco Grossi; Sabina Sabatini; Peter Boyce; Diego Garcia; Chris Impey; Christine Jordan; Robert Lang; Andrew Marble; Sarah Roberts; Wim van Driel

2007-01-01

59

Targeting sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) levels and S1P receptor functions for therapeutic immune interventions.  

PubMed

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of many different immune functions including lymphocyte circulation, antigen presentation, and T cell development. It stimulates five G protein-coupled receptors designated S1P(1-5), which are also expressed by immune cells. S1P receptors couple to different heterotrimeric G proteins including G alpha i, q, and 12/13, and elicit cellular signalling events by activating the small GTPases Rac and Rho and protein kinases Akt, ERK, and JNK, and by inducing cellular calcium flux and inhibiting cAMP accumulation, amongst others. S1P is the exit signal for lymphocytes leaving lymphoid organs and present in blood and lymph at high nanomolar concentrations due to the S1P-producing activity of sphingosine kinases (SK). The S1P-degrading enzyme S1P-lyase maintains low amounts of S1P in lymphoid organs. Disrupting this concentration difference by S1P receptor agonists and antagonists like FTY720, SEW2871, and VPC23019, by an anti-S1P antibody, or by inhibiting the S1P-lyase has therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) and rheumatoid arthritis and for many other disorders like cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. This report aims to provide a brief overview of concepts, approaches, pharmaceutical compounds, and targets that are currently used to modulate S1P-driven immune functions. PMID:20502007

Gräler, Markus H

2010-05-18

60

The Parkes 21 CM multibeam receiver  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several extragalactic HI surveys using a 21-cm 13-beam focal plane array will begin in late 1996 using the Parkes 64-m telescope. These surveys are designed to detect efficiently nearby galaxies that have failed to be identified optically because of low optical surface brightness or high optical extinction. We discuss scientific and technical aspects of the multibeam receiver including astronomical objectives, feed, receiver and correlator design and data acquisition. A comparison with other telescopes shows that the Parkes multibeam receiver has significant speed advantages for any large-area 21- cm galaxy survey in the velocity range range 0 - 14000 km per sec.

Staveley-Smith, L.; Wilson, W. E.; Bird, T. S.; Disney, M. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Haynes, R. F.; Sinclair, M. W.; Vaile, R. A.; Webster, R. L.; Wright, A. E.

1996-11-01

61

Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel, Plexiglass, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10- 8 to 10-7 strain amplitude.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A detailed evaluation on the method of internal friction measurement by the stress-strain hysteresis loop method from 0.01 to 1 Hz at 10-8-10-7 strain amplitude and 23.9oC is presented. Significant systematic errors in relative phase measurement can result from convex end surfaces of the sample and stress sensor and from end surface irregularities such as nicks and asperities. Preparation of concave end surfaces polished to optical smoothness having a radius of curvature >3.6X104 cm reduces the systematic error in relative phase measurements to <(5.5+ or -2.2)X10-4 radians. -from Authors

Hsi-Ping, Liu; Peselnick, L.

1983-01-01

62

Low Voltage 30-cm Ion Thruster Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The basic goal was to advance the development status of the 30-cm electron bombardment ion thruster from a laboratory model to a flight-type engineering model (EM) thruster. This advancement included the more conventional aspects of mechanical design and ...

H. J. King

1974-01-01

63

The Multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM) helps teachers to better prepare gifted and able students for our changing world, acquiring much needed skills. It is influenced by general learning theory of constructivism, notions of preparing students for 21st century, Teaching the Future Model, and current comprehensive curriculum models for…

Vidergor, Hava E.

2010-01-01

64

S1P2 receptor promotes mouse skeletal muscle regeneration.  

PubMed

Sphingosine 1-phosphate is a bioactive lipid that modulates skeletal muscle growth through its interaction with specific receptors localized in the cell membrane of muscle fibers and satellite cells. This study analyzes the role of S1P(2) receptor during in vivo regeneration of soleus muscle in two models of S1P(2) deficiency: the S1P(2)-null mouse and wild-type mice systemically treated with the S1P(2) receptor antagonist JTE-013. To stimulate regeneration, muscle degeneration was induced by injecting into soleus muscle the myotoxic drug notexin. Both ablation of S1P(2) receptor and its functional inactivation delayed regeneration of soleus muscle. The exogenous supplementation of S1P or its removal, by a specific antibody, two conditions known to stimulate or inhibit, respectively, soleus muscle regeneration, were without effects when the S1P(2) receptor was absent or inactive. The delayed regeneration was associated with a lower level of myogenin, a muscle differentiation marker, and reduced phosphorylation of Akt, a key marker of muscle growth. Consistently, silencing of S1P(2) receptor abrogated the pro-myogenic action of S1P in satellite cells, paralleled by low levels of the myogenic transcription factor myogenin. The study indicates that S1P(2) receptor plays a key role in the early phases of muscle regeneration by sustaining differentiation and growth of new-forming myofibers. PMID:22744969

Germinario, Elena; Peron, Samantha; Toniolo, Luana; Betto, Romeo; Cencetti, Francesca; Donati, Chiara; Bruni, Paola; Danieli-Betto, Daniela

2012-06-28

65

[Antigenicity tests of a new antineoplastic agent S-1].  

PubMed

The antigenicity was tested of a new antineoplastic agent S-1 (a combination of tegafur (FT), CDHP and potassium oxonate (Oxo)) in mice and guinea pigs. 1. Male BALB/c or C3H/He mice were sensitized with S-1, CDHP, Oxo, and conjugates of CDHP (or Oxo) and human serum albumin (HSA). S-1 was administered by oral gavage, and the other compounds were administered intraperitoneally with adjuvant (alum). In the heterologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) test, using Sprague-Dawley rats as recipients, no IgE antibodies against S-1, CDHP, or Oxo were detected to any serum obtained from the sensitized mice, and no eliciting antigenicities were seen for CDHP or Oxo. 2. Male Hartley guinea pigs were sensitized with S-1, CDHP, Oxo, and conjugates of CDHP (or Oxo) and HSA. S-1 was administered by oral gavage, and the other compounds were administered subcutaneously with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). The homologous PCA test, active systemic anaphylaxis test, and passive hemagglutination test showed no production of antibodies against S-1, CDHP, or Oxo in any sensitized guinea pig, and no eliciting antigenicities for CDHP or Oxo. 3. Female Hartley guinea pigs were sensitized with S-1 subcutaneously with FCA. The active cutaneous anaphylaxis test revealed that S-1 did not induce cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity. 4. These results indicated that S-1, Oxo, and CDHP were not antigenic in mice and guinea pigs. PMID:9021667

Maeda, Y; Morinaga, H; Izumi, K; Ikebuchi, K; Kouchi, Y

1996-11-01

66

Infrared methane spectra between 1120 per CM and 1800 per CM - A new atlas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new atlas of CH4 lines in the 1120-1800-per cm region has been generated, based on laboratory spectra taken with a Nicolet interferometer at 0.06-per cm resolution with 635-cm path length at pressures of 0.98 torr, 4.86 torr, and 19.97 torr. A compilation of line positions and line intensities includes 1339 CH4 lines, several hundred of which have not been

R. D. Blatherwick; A. Goldman; B. L. Lutz; P. M. Silvaggio; R. W. Boese

1979-01-01

67

Signal processing aspects of the S-1 multiprocessor project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The S-1 family of uni- and multiprocessors is an extremely-high-performance but relatively inexpensive general-purpose set of digital processing systems being developed for the most demanding National security applications. A typical S-1 system consists of from one to sixteen S-1 uniprocessors sharing up to 4 gigawords of uniformly addressed main memory. Each uniprocessor of the current (Mark IIA) generation has computational

P. Michael Farmwald; William Bryson; John L. Manferdelli

1980-01-01

68

{alpha} decay of {sup 238}Cm and the new isotope {sup 237}Cm  

SciTech Connect

Alpha decays of {sup 237}Cm and {sup 238}Cm have been studied using a gas-jet coupled on-line isotope separator. The new isotope {sup 237}Cm has been identified through the detection of 6656{+-}10 keV {alpha} particles. The {alpha} energy of {sup 238}Cm has been revised more precisely than the previous one. The {alpha} transition to the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 234}Pu has also been observed. It was found that the 2{sup +} energy in {sup 234}Pu is much higher than those in heavier Pu isotopes.

Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Ichikawa, S.; Nishinaka, I.; Nagame, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sakama, M. [Department of Radiologic Science and Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8509 (Japan); Haba, H. [Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Goto, S. [Department of Chemistry, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Kojima, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Oura, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Shibata, M. [Radioisotope Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2006-06-15

69

S1P and the birth of platelets.  

PubMed

Recent work has highlighted the multitude of biological functions of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which include roles in hematopoietic cell trafficking, organization of immune organs, vascular development, and neuroinflammation. Indeed, a functional antagonist of S1P(1) receptor, FTY720/Gilenya, has entered the clinic as a novel therapeutic for multiple sclerosis. In this issue of the JEM, Zhang et al. highlight yet another function of this lipid mediator: thrombopoiesis. The S1P(1) receptor is required for the growth of proplatelet strings in the bloodstream and the shedding of platelets into the circulation. Notably, the sharp gradient of S1P between blood and the interstitial fluids seems to be essential to ensure the production of platelets, and S1P appears to cooperate with the CXCL12-CXCR4 axis. Pharmacologic modulation of the S1P(1) receptor altered circulating platelet numbers acutely, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for controlling thrombocytopenic states. However, the S1P(4) receptor may also regulate thrombopoiesis during stress-induced accelerated platelet production. This work reveals a novel physiological action of the S1P/S1P(1) duet that could potentially be harnessed for clinical translation. PMID:23166370

Hla, Timothy; Galvani, Sylvain; Rafii, Shahin; Nachman, Ralph

2012-11-19

70

S1P and the birth of platelets  

PubMed Central

Recent work has highlighted the multitude of biological functions of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which include roles in hematopoietic cell trafficking, organization of immune organs, vascular development, and neuroinflammation. Indeed, a functional antagonist of S1P1 receptor, FTY720/Gilenya, has entered the clinic as a novel therapeutic for multiple sclerosis. In this issue of the JEM, Zhang et al. highlight yet another function of this lipid mediator: thrombopoiesis. The S1P1 receptor is required for the growth of proplatelet strings in the bloodstream and the shedding of platelets into the circulation. Notably, the sharp gradient of S1P between blood and the interstitial fluids seems to be essential to ensure the production of platelets, and S1P appears to cooperate with the CXCL12–CXCR4 axis. Pharmacologic modulation of the S1P1 receptor altered circulating platelet numbers acutely, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for controlling thrombocytopenic states. However, the S1P4 receptor may also regulate thrombopoiesis during stress-induced accelerated platelet production. This work reveals a novel physiological action of the S1P/S1P1 duet that could potentially be harnessed for clinical translation.

Galvani, Sylvain; Rafii, Shahin; Nachman, Ralph

2012-01-01

71

CM Magazine: Canadian Review of Materials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published by the Manitoba Library Association, the Canadian Review of Materials is the Web version of _CM Magazine_, a bi-weekly review of Canadian materials for young people. _CM Magazine_ contains book, media, and web reviews, as well as news, features, and stories of interest to teachers, librarians, parents, and kids. Though Web issues began appearing in June 1995, the site offers an archive of reviews, feature stories, interviews, and articles from the print version some back to 1971. The archives are indexed by date, author, title, age group, and media type. The site contains pictures, sound clips and video clips. You can search for authors, book titles, and reviewers. In concert with McNally Robinson Booksellers the site offers ordering services for any book reviewed in the magazine.

1995-01-01

72

Spectral investigations of CM Draconis - new results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CM Draconis is spectroscopic and eclipsing binary system that consists of two nearly identical M dwarfs. The masses and radii for the components are known with high accuracy. The period of the system is P = 1.268 day. In the course of this work we used 29 medium resolution (R=47,000) echelle spectra of CM Dra which were obtained at several different orbital phases at the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope. We calculated synthetic spectra for a region of Na I 8185 Å, Na I 8197 Å and Rb I 7818 Å lines and fitted the spectra for all of the orbital phases. We refined the effective temperature and metallicity of the system components, using similarity function (S function) of the observed and synthetic spectra for different phases.

Kuznetsov, M. K.; Pavlenko, Ya. V.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pinfield, D. J.

2012-03-01

73

The cm-wave continuum in PNe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Excess 20-30GHz emission, above that expected from synchrotron or free-free templates and sub-millimetre dust emission, has been reported in HII regions, planetary nebulae (PNe), dark clouds and in the ISM at large. The excess may perhaps be due to electric dipole radiation from spinning very small grains, or `spinning dust'. The cm-wave excess confronts the free-free paradigm in PNe. It implies that the level of free-free emission, in the optically thin regime above 10GHz, was overestimated by up to 100%, resulting in spurious diagnostics of physical conditions. The evidence for the cm-wave excess in PNe stems from a CBI/SIMBA survey of ~20 objects, highlighting a systematic 250~GHz deficit from the level of 30GHz emission. We have selected the best candidates for an exhaustive continuum study with ATCA. Here we propose to acquire W-band flux densities in 4 selected PNe.

Casassus, Simon; Burton, Michael; Roche, Patrick; Dickinson, Clive; Nyman, Lars-Ake; Indermuehle, Balthasar

2008-04-01

74

Graphs for Isotopes of 96-Cm (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 96-Cm (Curium, atomic number Z = 96).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

75

The cm-wave continuum in PNe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excess 20-30GHz emission, above that expected from synchrotron or free-free templates and sub-millimetre dust emission, has been reported in HII regions, planetary nebulae (PNe), dark clouds and in the ISM at large. The excess may perhaps be due to electric dipole radiation from spinning very small grains, or `spinning dust'. The cm-wave excess confronts the free-free paradigm in PNe. It

Simon Casassus; Michael Burton; Patrick Roche; Clive Dickinson; Lars-Ake Nyman; Balthasar Indermuehle

2008-01-01

76

Targeting Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) Levels and S1P Receptor Functions for Therapeutic Immune Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of many different immune functions including lymphocyte circulation, antigen presentation, and T cell development. It stimulates five G protein-coupled receptors designated S1P1-5, which are also expressed by immune cells. S1P receptors couple to different heterotrimeric G proteins including G alpha i, q, and 12\\/13, and elicit cellular signalling events by activating the small

Markus H. Gräler

2010-01-01

77

Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP): evaluation of the main 243Cm and 245Cm decay characteristics.  

PubMed

The results of new decay data evaluations are presented for (243)Cm (?) decay to nuclear levels in (239)Pu and (245)Cm (?) decay to nuclear levels in (241)Pu. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2011. PMID:22425420

Chechev, Valery P

2012-03-05

78

Operating System and Memory Switch for the S-1 Computer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During this period the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory worked on many aspects of the S-1 project. These included: (1) the first architectural manual and various features of the architecture, (2) simulator for PDP-10 on S-1, simulator for YUK-7...

J. Rubin T. Panofsky M. Frost M. LeBrun

1984-01-01

79

Energetics of conformational transition in proteolytically nicked myosin S-1  

SciTech Connect

Force production in muscle contraction results from structural changes in myosin crossbridges. During ATP hydrolysis myosin crossbridges exhibit at least two conformational states referred to as prepower stroke and postpower stroke respectively. Conformational changes in myosin proteolytic fragment S-1, which represent cross-bridges were studied in this research using UV absorption difference spectroscopy and /sup 19/F NMR. The heavy chain of S-1 is nicked, but left intact, by trypsin and several other proteases at different sites under controlled conditions. This was used to localize the site for non-denaturational reversible conformational change observed in S-1. Two specific tryptic S-1 fragments nicked at one and two sites have been used here, i.e., 27k-70k and 27k-50k-20k. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) studies of chymotryptic S-1 and trypsin treated S-1 indicate that the thermal stability of S-1 is unaffected by nicking. Nucleotide induced conformational changes were monitored with the UV difference absorption of tryptophan residues. The difference spectra induced by ATP differed from that induced by ADP. AMPPNP induced both forms of the spectra by varying temperature. When the 50k-20k junction was intact the non-denaturational structural transition between S1 states was retained.

Kamath, U.G.

1987-01-01

80

Stomach Cancer Drug, S-1, Shows Promise in Japanese Trial  

Cancer.gov

In this Japanese clinical trial, patients with advanced, inoperable stomach cancer who received combination therapy with cisplatin and a drug called S-1 lived about two months longer than patients treated with S-1 alone, according to the March 2008 Lancet Oncology.

81

Diagnostic advantage of S1 foramen-evoked H-reflex for S1 radiculopathy in patients with diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Hoffmann reflex to tibial nerve stimulation at the popliteal fossa (tibial H-reflex) is routinely used to evaluate S1 radiculopathy. However, it lacks sensitivity because other lesions along this reflex circuit affect the H-reflex bilaterally. This study was undertaken to determine whether the H-reflex evoked by stimulating proximally at the S1 foramen (S1 foramen H-reflex) could improve S1 root lesion evaluation sensitivity in patients with diabetes mellitus. A randomized paired study was designed to evaluate tibial and S1 foramen H-reflexes; bilateral H-M interval (HMI) and H-reflex latency were compared in 22 diabetic patients with unilateral S1 radiculopathy. Other electrophysiological evaluations included standard tibial conduction studies, sural conduction studies and needle electromyography (EMG). The S1 foramen H-reflex had a significantly higher sensitivity (91.0%, 20 of 22) in evaluating S1 radiculopathy than the conventional tibial H-reflex (63.6%, 14 of 22, p < 0.05). Bilateral tibial compound muscle action potential amplitudes were reduced in 3 patients, and sural sensory nerve action potential amplitudes decreased in 7 patients. Needle EMG revealed denervation restricted to the paraspinal muscle and myotomes supplied by the S1 nerve root on the ipsilateral side in 18 patients, and multiple lumbosacral nerve roots were involved bilaterally in the other 4 patients. Our results demonstrate that the S1 foramen H-reflex is a more sensitive assessment of S1 compressive radiculopathy in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:23724973

Zheng, Chaojun; Zhu, Yu; Lu, Feizhou; Xia, Xinlei; Jin, Xiang; Weber, Robert; Jiang, Jianyuan

2013-06-17

82

Ejs CM Lagrangian Pendulum Spring Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lagrangian Pendulum Spring model asks students to solve the Lagrangian for a spring-pendulum and then develop a computational model of it. The model framework is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double-clicking the ejs_CM_Lagrangian_pendulum_spring.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. In order to run correctly, the student must add the correct physics to the EJS differential equation solver and parameter definitions. If EJS is installed on your computer, you can right-click within the simulation window and select Open Ejs Model from the pop-up menu. Information about Ejs (Easy Java Simulations) is available at: http://www.um.es/fem/Ejs/. The CM Lagrangian Pendulum Spring model is one of several Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) models used to incorporate computational physics in Classical Mechanics. Ejs, a part of the Open Source Physics Project, is designed to make it easier to access, modify and generate computer models. Additional models can be found by searching ComPADRE for Ejs.

Cox, Anne

2008-06-04

83

THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Feiden, Gregory A., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2012-11-20

84

Wavelength-tunable lasing in single-crystal CdS1-XSeX nanoribbons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Alloyed ternary CdS1-XSeX nanoribbons of variable composition X were synthesized by the combination of thermal evaporation and laser ablation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction showed that the ternary CdS1-XSeX nanoribbons were single phase and highly crystalline. Room-temperature optical measurements showed that band-gap engineering could be realized in CdS1-XSeX nanoribbons via modulation in composition X. Lasing emission between the band-gap energy of CdS (512 nm) and that of CdSe (710 nm) was observed for composition 0cm-2. Cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy of single CdS1-XSeX nanoribbons reveal the uniform optical properties of the nanoribbons, which supports the absence of phase segregation within the nanoribbon. Fine tuning of the lasing wavelength via composition changes is shown to be smaller than 0.1 nm, and is capable of overlapping thermally induced tuning, demonstrating the possibility of continuous tuning in the lasing wavelength. The broad and fine tunable lasing properties of ternary nanoribbons have potential applications in color-tuned nanolasers, biological labels, and nano-optoelectronics.

Liu, Y. K.; Zapien, J. A.; Shan, Y. Y.; Tang, H.; Lee, C. S.; Lee, S. T.

2007-09-01

85

Determination of the threshold value of F10.7 in the dependence of foF2 on solar activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By introducing the two-segmented linear regression model instead of the well known quadratic fit, we were able to describe the solar activity dependence of the F2 critical frequency. Saturation features were observed and the corresponding F10.7 values at which this phenomenon occurs were obtained for different hours. The seasonal average values were found to be around 154 sfu, 138 sfu, 177 sfu and 150 sfu for March equinox, June solstice, September equinox and December solstice respectively. These affirmed that saturation phenomenon is more pronounced at the equinoxes than solstices. On the average, the threshold value of F10.7 was obtained to be 154.5 sfu for this station in the African sector of the equatorial region.

Adeniyi, J. O.; Ikubanni, S. O.

2013-05-01

86

Balloon observations of the radiance of the earth between 2100 cm(-1) and 2700 cm(-1).  

PubMed

A grating spectrometer capable of measuring small radiation fluxes with a spectral resolution of 95 at 4.3 micro is described. Bands of CO(2), N(2)O, and O(3) are identified in spectra between 2100 cm(-1) and 2700 cm(-1) of the earth and lower atmosphere obtained from an altitude of 30 km with this instrument. Scattering of solar radiation by clouds was observed between 2400 cm(-1) and 2700 cm(-1). A temperature profile of the atmosphere to 30 km determined from an analysis of the measurements in the region of the 4.3 micro CO(2) band is compared with radiosonde observations made during the flight. PMID:20057732

Shaw, J H; McClatchey, R A; Schaper, P W

1967-02-01

87

21 Cm Tomography With the Alfalfa Survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm intensity mapping, or HI tomography is a promising technique being utilized by several upcoming experiments (LOFAR, MWA, SKA). The measurement of volume averaged neutral hydrogen mass density in synoptic sky surveys can be applied to the study of the HI mass function, the distribution of large scale structure, the reionization of the universe, and the expansion history of the universe through such standard rulers as baryonic acoustic oscillations. In order to prepare for future experiments, in particular the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), we analyze the Arecbo Legacy Fast ALFA (Arecibo L-Band Feed Array) Feed Array (ALFALFA) survey data to probe the spatial density variations of HI in our local universe (z <0.06) where data is currently available. We address challenges unique to data of this kind, such as identifying and subtracting out signal from RFI and local galactic sources, and characterizing the ALFA array beam pattern which dictates sensitivity and resolution.

Fry, Alexander B.; Boutan, C.; Carroll, P. A.; Hazelton, B.; Morales, M. F.

2011-01-01

88

Equatorial evening prereversal vertical drift dependence on solar EUV flux and F10.7 index during quiet and disturbed periods over Brazil  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A study of the dependence of the equatorial evening F region vertical drift velocity on solar EUV flux and F10.7 index is presented here, based on the vertical drift data obtained from Digisondes operated in São Luis (44.2° W, 2.33° S, dip angle: -2.7°) and Fortaleza (38.45° W, 3.9° S, dip angle: -11.5°) in Brazil. Previous studies on the vertical drift dependence on solar flux have addressed only the dependence on F10.7 index. The data analyzed here are from the months of October, November, and December of the years from 2001 to 2009, and the analysis was done for magnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. The results show that while the drift velocity peak is strongly dependent on both solar emission fluxes, the degrees of such dependence are higher for the EUV flux than for the F10.7 index in a consistent way as judged from its identical behavior at both São Luis and Fortaleza. The study also reveals different degrees of the vertical drift dependence on solar flux for magnetically quiet and disturbed conditions, the nature of which is investigated using an example of a storm time case study.

Santos, A. M.; Abdu, M. A.; Sobral, J. H. A.; Mascarenhas, M.; Nogueira, P. A. B.

2013-07-01

89

Decontamination of cosmological 21-cm maps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a method for extracting the expected cosmological 21-cm signal from the epoch of re-ionization, taking into account contaminating radiations and random instrumental noise. The method is based on the maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) formalism and employs the coherence of the contaminating radiation along the line-of-sight and the three-dimensional correlations of the cosmological signal. We test the method using a detailed and comprehensive modelling of the cosmological 21-cm signal and the contaminating radiation. The signal is obtained using a high-resolution N-body simulation where the gas is assumed to trace the dark matter and is re-ionized by stellar radiation computed from semi-analytic galaxy formation recipes. We model contaminations to the cosmological signal from synchrotron and free-free galactic foregrounds and extragalactic sources including active galactic nuclei, radio haloes and relics, synchrotron and free-free emission from star-forming galaxies and free-free emission from dark matter haloes and the intergalactic medium. We provide tests of the reconstruction method for several rms values of instrumental noise from ?N = 1 to 250mK. For low instrumental noise, the recovered signal, along individual lines-of-sight, fits the true cosmological signal with a mean rms difference of drms ~ 1.7 +/- 0.6 for ?N = 1mK, and drms ~ 4.2 +/- 0.4 for ?N = 5mK. The one-dimensional power spectrum is nicely reconstructed for all values of ?N considered here, while the reconstruction of the two-dimensional power spectrum and the Minkowski functionals is good only for noise levels of the order of few mK.

Gleser, Liron; Nusser, Adi; Benson, Andrew J.

2008-11-01

90

The p-difluorobenzene-argon S1 excited state intermolecular potential energy surface.  

PubMed

The first excited state (S1) intermolecular potential energy surface for the p-difluorobenzene-Ar van der Waals complex is evaluated using the coupled-cluster method and the augmented correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set extended with a set of 3s3p2d1f1g midbond functions. In order to calculate the S1 interaction energies we use the ground state surface evaluated with the same basis set and the coupled-cluster singles and doubles [CCSD] including connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] model, and interaction and excitation energies evaluated at the CCSD level. The surface minima are characterized by the Ar atom located above and below the p-difluorobenzene center of mass at a distance of 3.4736 A. The corresponding interaction energy is -435.233 cm-1. The surface is used in the evaluation of the intermolecular level structure of the complex. PMID:17149844

Fajín, José Luis Cagide; Fernandez, Berta; Felker, Peter M

2006-12-14

91

Fourier Transform Spectroscopy of 18O-Enriched Carbonyl Sulfide from 1825 to 2700 cm ?1  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have measured the Fourier transform spectrum of carbonyl sulfide from 1825 to 2700 cm?1, using a sample enriched in both18O (94.0%) and17O (1.54%). A careful calibration yields a line-position accuracy between 1.5 and 3.0 10?5cm?1. We have observed and analyzed 118 infrared bands of which 93 are measured for the first time: 55 for18O12C32S, 20 for18O12C34S, 11 for18O12C33S, 1

T. Strugariu; A. Fayt; H. Bredohl; J.-F. Blavier; I. Dubois

1998-01-01

92

Energetics of conformational transition in proteolytically nicked myosin S-1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Force production in muscle contraction results from structural changes in myosin crossbridges. During ATP hydrolysis myosin crossbridges exhibit at least two conformational states referred to as prepower stroke and postpower stroke respectively. Conformational changes in myosin proteolytic fragment S-1, which represent cross-bridges were studied in this research using UV absorption difference spectroscopy and ¹⁹F NMR. The heavy chain of S-1

Kamath

1987-01-01

93

?-ray performance of a 1242 cm3 LaCl3:Ce scintillation spectrometer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of ?-ray measurements on a large 4?×6? LaCl3:Ce crystal, characterized using radioactive sources over the range 14 3220 keV. The response of the crystal was found to be largely linear over the upper 90% of its dynamic range—the deviations at lower energies can be attributed to the shortcomings of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) and is in fact a generic problem when using high-gain PMTs with lanthanum halide scintillators. At 662 keV, a measured energy resolution of 4.1% FWHM was recorded at room temperature. In comparison to earlier generations of LaCl3 detectors, the internal background spectrum shows significantly less X-ray, ?, ?-ray and ? contamination. The integral background count rate in the energy region 20 keV 3 MeV was determined to be 1.8 cm-3 s-1, of which most (1.5 cm-3 s-1) can be attributed to the ? continuum from 138La and only ˜0.04 cm-3 s-1 to the ? complex from 227Ac and daughters. Using these data, we have determined the light output of ? particles relative to the equivalent energy electrons (or alternately ?-rays) to be, ?/?=0.35±0.02.

Owens, Alan; Bos, A. J. J.; Brandenburg, S.; Dathy, C.; Dorenbos, P.; Kraft, S.; Ostendorf, R. W.; Ouspenski, V.; Quarati, F.

2007-04-01

94

Spin S = 1 centers: a universal type of paramagnetic defects in nanodiamonds of dynamic synthesis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Intrinsic paramagnetic defects in ˜5 nm sized nanodiamonds, produced by various dynamic synthesis (DySND) techniques (detonation, shock-wave, pulsed laser ablation of solid carbon containing targets), have been studied by multi-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). X-band (9-10 GHz) EPR spectra of DySND, in addition to the main intensive singlet Lorentzian-like EPR signal, reveal a low intensity doublet pattern within the half-field (HF) region (g ˜ 4). On transferring spectra to the Q-band (34 GHz) the shape of the HF pattern changes and splitting between doublet components is reduced from 10.4 to 2.6 mT. The HF patterns observed are attributed to the ‘forbidden’ ?MS = 2 transitions between the Zeeman levels of some spin-triplet (S = 1) centers. The model of two triplet centers with g ˜ 2.003 and zero-field splitting parameters D1 = 0.095 cm-1 (TR1) and D2 = 0.030 cm-1 (TR2) satisfactorily describes experimental results at both microwave frequencies. The spin-triplet-type defects are observed in a wide variety of DySND samples irrespective of industrial supplier, cooling and carbon soot refinement methods, initial purity, disintegration, or subsequent targeted chemical modification. This indicates that the intrinsic defects with S = 1 in DySND systems are of universal origin.

Shames, A. I.; Osipov, V. Yu; von Bardeleben, H. J.; Vul', A. Ya

2012-06-01

95

The Signatures of Particle Decay in 21 cm Absorption from the First Minihalos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The imprint of decaying dark matter (DM) particles on the characteristics of the "21 cm forest"—absorption at 21 cm from minihalos in the spectra of distant radio-loud sources—is considered within a one-dimensional, self-consistent hydrodynamic description of minihalos from their turnaround point to virialization. The most pronounced influence of decaying DM on the evolution of minihalos is found in the mass range M = 105-106 M ?, for which unstable DM with a current upper limit on its ionization rate of ? L = 0.59 × 10–25 s–1 reduces the 21 cm optical depth by an order of magnitude compared with the standard recombination scenario. Even a rather modest ionization, ? ~ 0.3? L , practically erases absorption features and results in a considerable decrease (by factor of more than 2.5) of the number of strong (W_\

Vasiliev, Evgenii O.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.

2013-11-01

96

Rectocutaneous fistula and nonunion after TranS1 axial lumbar interbody fusion L5-S1 fixation: case report.  

PubMed

The authors report a case of rectal injury, rectocutaneous fistula, and pseudarthrosis after a TranS1 axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF) L5-S1 fixation. The TranS1 AxiaLIF procedure is a percutaneous minimally invasive approach to transsacral fusion of the L4-S1 vertebral levels. It is gaining popularity due to the ease of access to the sacrum through the presacral space, which is relatively free from intraabdominal and neurovascular structures. This 35-year-old man had undergone the procedure for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The patient subsequently presented with fever, syncope, and foul-smelling gas and bloody drainage from the surgical site. A CT fistulagram and flexible sigmoidoscopy showed evidence of rectocutaneous fistula, which was managed with intravenous antibiotic therapy and bowel rest with total parenteral nutrition. Subsequent studies performed 6 months postoperatively revealed evidence of pseudarthrosis. The patient's rectocutaneous fistula symptoms gradually subsided, but his preoperative back pain recurred prompting a revision of his L5-S1 spinal fusion. PMID:23790047

Siegel, Geoffrey; Patel, Nilesh; Ramakrishnan, Rakesh

2013-06-21

97

A new atlas of infrared methane spectra between 1120 per cm and 1800 per cm  

Microsoft Academic Search

An atlas of 1339 methane absorption lines in the range 1120 to 1800 reciprocal centimeters, including the nu(4) and nu(2) bands, is presented. Laboratory spectra were obtained by a Nicolet Fourier transform Michelson interferometer with a resolution of approximately 0.06 reciprocal cm and a path length of 6.35 m of 0.98, 4.86 and 19.97 torr. Observed spectra are also compared

R. D. Blatherwick; A. Goldman; B. L. Lutz; P. M. Silvaggio; R. W. Boese

1979-01-01

98

EVALUATION OF CROSS SECTIONS FOR Cm242, -243, -244  

Microsoft Academic Search

The work is devoted to the analysis of available experimental and evaluated data on the neutron cross sections for Cm-242, Cm-243, Cm-244. A comparison of experimental data with the results of theoretical calculations and the evaluations of the most important cross sections were performed. As a result the new version of complete files of evaluated neutron cross sections for Cm-242,

A. I. Blokhin; A. S. Badikov; A. V. Ignatyuk; V. P. Lunev; V. N. Manokhin; G. Ya; K. I. Zolotarev

99

Dimerization in Nematic S=1 Quantum Spin Chains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

``Mott-insulating'' states of an odd number of trapped cold bosonic S=1 atoms per site in a 1D optical lattice may provide a new physical realization of isotropic S=1 spin chains. Unlike Heisenberg spin chains, they may be expected to be close to the ``SU(3) ferromagnet'' point in the Heisenberg + ``biquadratic exchange'' parameter space of isotropic S=1 chains, with an additional Heisenberg coupling that favors either ferromagnetic or nematic order. For intermediate-strength antiferromagnetic additional coupling, the ``pure biquadratic'' model (known to have long-range dimer order) is reached; for still larger coupling, there is a transition to the ``Haldane gap'' phase. There has been controversy about whether the dimer phase is separated from the SU(3) ferromagnet by a distinct gapped (locally) ``nematic'' phase. I show that such a ``gapped nematic'' phase is also dimerized. There is a smooth crossover from nematic to dimer character: the gapped spin-2 nematic collective mode disappears into the continuum of unbound two-soliton (domain wall) states at the ``pure biquadratic'' point. I also show how the ``pure biquadratic'' model is continuously connected to a generalization of the Majumdar-Ghosh chain to S=1, with an exact ``unentangled dimer'' ground state.

Haldane, F. D. M.

2004-03-01

100

Pseudohypertrophy of the calf following S1 radiculopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Development of unilateral calf enlargement following chronic S1 radiculopathy occurred in a 39-year-old woman. Computed tomographic examination of the leg musculature showed that the calf enlargement was due to pseudohypertrophy, as the increased area in the posterior leg muscles showed a decrease in density.

M. de Visser; B. Verbeeten Jr; K. C. H. Lyppens

1986-01-01

101

Modeling radar scattering from icy lunar regoliths at 13 cm and 4 cm wavelengths  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two orbital synthetic aperture radars (SARs), the Chandrayaan-1 Mini-SAR (13 cm wavelength) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Mini-RF (13 and 4.2 cm wavelengths), have been imaging the lunar surface searching for ice deposits in the polar permanently shadowed areas. To understand the radar signatures of lunar polar ices, an empirical two-component model with parametric variations of the specular and diffuse components was developed and validated. This model estimates scattering differences associated with slopes, surface roughness, thin regolith over ice, and patches of ice. Lunar radar backscatter cross sections for the average surface for the Chandrayaan-1 and LRO instruments are estimated from the radar cross sections from the Moon at 3.8, 23, and 68 cm wavelengths measured in the 1960s at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This modeling predicts that enhanced diffuse scattering from near-surface ice can be separated from rocks if the scattering is characterized by both the high reflectivity and circular polarization ratios (CPRs) like those observed on Mercury, Mars, and the Galilean satellites. Scattering from near-surface ices covered by a thin regolith can be separated from rocks if the enhancement is twice the average or more. If, however, the lunar ice is dispersed throughout the regolith as ice-filling pores, then scattering differences might be too small to detect. Preliminary validation using LRO radar data for a few polar and midlatitude craters indicate that the observed CPRs are consistent with our models for different regolith ice and roughness conditions.

Thompson, Thomas W.; Ustinov, Eugene A.; Heggy, Essam

2011-01-01

102

Polar phonons in the antiferromagnetic S=1\\/2 spin-chain system CuSb2O6  

Microsoft Academic Search

Optical properties of an S=1\\/2 antiferromagnetic spin-chain system beta-CuSb2O6 are measured in the frequency range 50 10 000 cm-1 at temperatures of 5 300 K for the electric field polarized along the [010] and [001] crystallographic directions. The number of observed polar phonon modes at low temperature is in agreement with the factor-group analysis for the monoclinic form of beta-CuSb2O6.

V. I. Torgashev; V. B. Shirokov; A. S. Prokhorov; B. Gorshunov; P. Haas; M. Dressel; B. J. Gibson; R. K. Kremer; A. V. Prokofiev; W. Assmus

2003-01-01

103

The temperature of the diffuse H I in the Milky Way - I. High resolution H I-21 cm absorption studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have carried out deep, high velocity resolution, interferometric Galactic H I-21 cm absorption spectroscopy towards 32 compact extragalactic radio sources with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The optical depth spectra for most sources have root-mean-square noise values ?10-3 per 1 km s-1 velocity channel and are thus sufficiently sensitive to detect absorption by warm neutral hydrogen with H I column densities NHI ? 1020 cm-2, spin temperatures Ts ? 5000 K and line widths equal to the thermal width (20 km s-1). H I-21 cm absorption was detected against all background sources but one, B0438-436. The spectra of sources observed separately with GMRT and WSRT show excellent agreement, indicating that spectral baseline problems and contamination from H I-21 cm emission are negligible. This paper presents the absorption spectra, the emission spectra along neighbouring sightlines from the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn survey and the derived spin temperature spectra. On every sightline, the maximum spin temperature detected (at ?3? significance) even at a velocity resolution of 1 km s-1 is ?1000 K, indicating that we are detecting the warm neutral medium along most sightlines. This is by far the largest sample of Galactic H I-21 cm absorption spectra of this quality, providing a sensitive probe of physical conditions in the neutral atomic interstellar medium.

Roy, Nirupam; Kanekar, Nissim; Braun, Robert; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

2013-10-01

104

The specificity of the S1 subsite of papain  

PubMed Central

The specificity of the S1? subsite of the proteolytic enzyme papain was investigated by studying the effect of l-?-amino acid amides on the enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonylglycine p-nitrophenyl ester and by determining the kinetic parameters for the enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis of some N-benzyloxycarbonylglycyl-l-amino acid amides. These studies showed that the S1? subsite has a predilection for hydrophobic residues, in particular l-leucine and l-tryptophan. The specificity for these residues is manifest in both the binding and acylation steps. N-Benzyloxycarbonylglycine amide is not hydrolysed under comparable conditions, indicating that the amide group adjacent to and on the C-terminal side of the peptide bond about to be cleaved makes an important contribution to the rate of the papain-catalysed hydrolysis of peptides.

Alecio, M. Robert; Dann, Malcolm L.; Lowe, Gordon

1974-01-01

105

Overscreened Kondo fixed point in S=1 spin liquid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a possible realization of the overscreened Kondo impurity problem by a magnetic s=1/2 impurity embedded in a two-dimensional S=1 U(1) spin liquid with a Fermi surface. This problem contains an interesting interplay between non-Fermi-liquid behavior induced by a U(1) gauge field coupled to fermions and a non-Fermi-liquid fixed point in the overscreened Kondo problem. Using a large-N expansion together with an expansion in the dynamical exponent of the gauge field, we find that the coupling to the gauge field leads to weak but observable changes in the physical properties of the system at the overscreened Kondo fixed point. We discuss the extrapolation of this result to a physical case and argue that the realization of overscreened Kondo physics could lead to observations of effects due to gauge fields.

Serbyn, Maksym; Senthil, T.; Lee, Patrick A.

2013-07-01

106

Pairing of Solitons in Two-Dimensional S=1 Magnets  

SciTech Connect

We study a general model of isotropic two-dimensional spin-1 magnet, which is relevant for the physics of ultracold atoms with hyperfine S=1 spins in an optical lattice at odd filling. We demonstrate a novel mechanism of soliton pairing occurring in the vicinity of a special point with an enhanced SU(3) symmetry: upon perturbing the SU(3) symmetry, solitons with odd CP{sup 2} topological charge are confined into pairs that remain stable objects.

Ivanov, B. A. [Institute of Magnetism, National Academy of Sciences and Ministry of Education, 03142 Kiev (Ukraine); T. Shevchenko Kiev National University, 03127 Kiev (Ukraine); Khymyn, R. S. [T. Shevchenko Kiev National University, 03127 Kiev (Ukraine); Kolezhuk, A. K. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik C, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

2008-02-01

107

Intracellular S1P Generation Is Essential for S1P-Induced Motility of Human Lung Endothelial Cells: Role of Sphingosine Kinase 1 and S1P Lyase  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEarlier we have shown that extracellular sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) induces migration of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) through the activation of S1P1 receptor, PKC?, and PLD2-PKC?-Rac1 signaling cascade. As endothelial cells generate intracellular S1P, here we have investigated the role of sphingosine kinases (SphKs) and S1P lyase (S1PL), that regulate intracellular S1P accumulation, in HPAEC motility.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsInhibition of SphK activity

Evgeny V. Berdyshev; Irina Gorshkova; Peter Usatyuk; Satish Kalari; Yutong Zhao; Nigel J. Pyne; Susan Pyne; Roger A. Sabbadini; Joe G. N. Garcia; Viswanathan Natarajan; Maria Deli

2011-01-01

108

Osmo-, Thermo- and Ethanol- Tolerances of Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1  

PubMed Central

Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1, which is a locally isolated and improved strain showed viability at 40, 45 and 50°C and produced ethanol at 40, 43 and 45°C. When the cells were given heat shock at 45°C for 30min and grown at 40°C, 100% viability was observed for 60h, and addition of 200gL?1 ethanol has led to complete cell death at 30h. Heat shock given at 45°C (for 30min) has improved the tolerance to temperature induced ethanol shock leading to 37% viability at 30h. When the cells were subjected to ethanol (200gL?1 for 30 min) and osmotic shock (sorbitol 300gL?1), trehalose contents in the cells were increased. The heat shocked cells showed better viability in presence of added ethanol. Soy flour supplementation has improved the viability of S. cerevisiae S1 to 80% in presence of 100gL?1 added ethanol and to 60% in presence of 300gL?1sorbitol. In presence of sorbitol (200gL?1) and ethanol (50gL?1) at 40°C, 46% viability was retained by S. cerevisiae S1 at 48h and it was improved to 80% by soy flour supplementation.

Balakumar, Sandrasegarampillai; Arasaratnam, Vasanthy

2012-01-01

109

S1P metabolism in cancer and other pathological conditions  

PubMed Central

Nearly two decades ago, the sphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate was discovered to function as a lipid mediator and regulator of cell proliferation. Since that time, sphingosine 1-phosphate has been shown to mediate a diverse array of fundamental biological processes including cell proliferation, migration, invasion, angiogenesis, vascular maturation and lymphocyte trafficking. Sphingosine 1-phosphate acts primarily via signaling through five ubiquitously expressed G protein-coupled receptors. Intracellular sphingosine 1-phosphate molecules are transported extracellularly and gain access to its cognate receptors for autocrine and paracrine fashion and for signaling at distant sites reached through blood and lymphatic circulation systems. Intracellular pools of sphingosine 1-phosphate available for signaling are tightly regulated by three enzymes that include sphinosine kinase, S1P lyase and S1P phosphatase. Alterations in S1P levels as well as the enzymes involved in its synthesis and catabolism have been observed in many types of malignancy. These enzymes are being evaluated for their role in mediating cancer formation and progression, as well as their potential to serve as targets of anti-cancer therapeutics. In this review, the impact of sphingosine 1-phosphate, its cognate receptors, and the enzymes of sphingosine 1-phosphate metabolism on cell survival, apoptosis, autophagy, cellular transformation, invasion, angiogenesis and hypoxia in relation to cancer biology and treatment are discussed.

Leong, Weng In

2010-01-01

110

Corps Level Command, Control, and Communications Countermeasures (C3CM).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This thesis focuses on development of a Command, Control, and Communications Countermeasures (C3CM) planning architecture for corps level operations. Initially, the research describes previous uses of C3CM in recent wars and reviews the lessons learned wi...

K. P. McGovern

1991-01-01

111

Drug Resistance of Enteric Bacteria VI. Introduction of Bacteriophage P1CM into Salmonella typhi and Formation of P1dCM and F-CM Elements  

PubMed Central

Kondo, Eiko (Gunma University, Maebashi, Japan), and Susumu Mitsuhashi. Drug resistance of enteric bacteria. VI. Introduction of bacteriophage P1CM into Salmonella typhi and formation of P1dCM and F-CM elements. J. Bacteriol. 91:1787–1794. 1966.—Bacteriophage P1CM was introduced into Salmonella typhi by means of both phage infection and conjugation with Escherichia coli F+ lysogenic for the phage. Upon incubation with a P1CM phage lysate, S. typhi and S. abony yield CMr cells which are lysogenic for P1CM, but S. typhimurium LT2 does not. The P1CM phage is adsorbed slightly to S. typhi, but no infectious centers are formed when the phage is plated on this strain. Tests on P1CM-adsorbing capacity of the S. typhi P1CM+ strain and on plaque formation and transduction ability of the recovered phage from this strain indicated that the cell and the phage population did not have any special advantage over the original cell and phage population. Conjugation of S. typhi with E. coli F+ carrying P1CM+ gave three types of S. typhi CMr clones: those which carry the whole P1CM phage, those with the P1dCM element, and those with nontransferable CMr. The second type has the F factor and is sensitive to f phages in spite of its typical behavior, serologically and biochemically, as S. typhi. It can donate the P1dCM and F+ characters to E. coli F? or F?/P1 strains. As a consequence of conjugation with the E. coli F+ strain, the CMr character of the third type of S. typhi, the nontransferable CMr element, acquired conjugational transferability, owing to the formation of the element, F-CM. This element can be transferred to an E. coli F? strain at a very high frequency (ca. 100). Both the F and CMr determinants are jointly transduced with P1 phage and are jointly eliminated by acridine dye treatment.

Kondo, Eiko; Mitsuhashi, Susumu

1966-01-01

112

Vibrational and Fluorescence Excitation Spectra and Carbonyl Wagging Potential Energy Function of 2-METHYLCYCLOPENTAN-1-ONE in its S_1(n,? ^*) Excited State  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2-methycyclopentan-1-one molecule possesses three low-frequency vibrations: the ring-bending, the ring-twisting, and the methyl torsion. These occur at 75, 251, and 209 cm-1, respectively, in the electronic ground state as determined by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The presence of these modes complicates the interpretation of the fluorescence excitation spectra associated with the S_1(n,? ^*)state. The fluorescence spectra of the jet-cooled molecules show bands from these low-frequency modes and also bands arising from the carbonyl wagging mode. The energy separations for the wagging are at 304, 321, 602, and 618 cm-1 in the S_1(n,? ^*) state and these are consistent with an asymmetric one-dimensional carbonyl wagging potential energy function. The two energy minima are 300 cm-1 apart and the barrier to inversion for the low energy form is approximately 1000 cm-1.

del Rosario, Arnold; Morris, Kevin; Laane, Jaan

1998-03-01

113

[A comparative study of S-1 plus cisplatin and S-1 plus weekly cisplatin for unresectable gastric cancer].  

PubMed

Clinical efficacy and safety were analyzed in patients with unresectable gastric cancer receiving S-1 plus CDDP(CS) therapy or S-1 plus weekly CDDP (w-CS) therapy as first-line treatment between April 2007 and December 2010. Fifteen patients received CS therapy and 17 received w-CS therapy. CS therapy was used according to the SPIRITS regimen, and w-CS therapy of S-1 80 mg/(m2·day) was administered for 2 weeks followed by a 1-week rest, with CDDP 20 mg/m2 being injected intravenously on days 1 and 8. In the CS therapy group and w-CS therapy group, the overall response rates were 33.3% and 70.1%, the median overall survival periods were 135 and 174 days (p=0.113), and the median follow- up times were 196 and 352 days (p=0.196), respectively. The w-CS therapy group showed less adverse events than did the CS therapy group. This study suggested that the w-CS regimen is a useful treatment modality showing clinical efficacy and safety for unresectable gastric cancer. PMID:23268059

Kemmochi, Takeshi; Egawa, Tomohisa; Sato, Aya; Umakoshi, Tomoko; Ito, Yasuhiro; Nagashima, Atsushi; Makino, Hiroyuki; Yamamuro, Wataru

2012-11-01

114

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor agonists mediate pro-fibrotic responses in normal human lung fibroblasts via S1P2 and S1P3 receptors and Smad-independent signaling.  

PubMed

Synthetic sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 modulators constitute a new class of drugs for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling, however, is also involved in the development of fibrosis. Using normal human lung fibroblasts, we investigated the induction of fibrotic responses by the S1P receptor (S1PR) agonists S1P, FTY720-P, ponesimod, and SEW2871 and compared them with the responses induced by the known fibrotic mediator TGF-?1. In contrast to TGF-?1, S1PR agonists did not induce expression of the myofibroblast marker ?-smooth muscle actin. However, TGF-?1, S1P, and FTY720-P caused robust stimulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and increased pro-fibrotic marker gene expression including connective tissue growth factor. Ponesimod showed limited and SEW2871 showed no pro-fibrotic potential in these readouts. Analysis of pro-fibrotic signaling pathways showed that in contrast to TGF-?1, S1PR agonists did not activate Smad2/3 signaling but rather activated PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signaling to induce ECM synthesis. The strong induction of ECM synthesis by the nonselective agonists S1P and FTY720-P was due to the stimulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptors, whereas the weaker induction of ECM synthesis at high concentrations of ponesimod was due to a low potency activation of S1P3 receptors. Finally, in normal human lung fibroblast-derived myofibroblasts that were generated by TGF-?1 pretreatment, S1P and FTY720-P were effective stimulators of ECM synthesis, whereas ponesimod was inactive, because of the down-regulation of S1P3R expression in myofibroblasts. These data demonstrate that S1PR agonists are pro-fibrotic via S1P2R and S1P3R stimulation using Smad-independent pathways. PMID:23589284

Sobel, Katrin; Menyhart, Katalin; Killer, Nina; Renault, Bérengère; Bauer, Yasmina; Studer, Rolf; Steiner, Beat; Bolli, Martin H; Nayler, Oliver; Gatfield, John

2013-04-15

115

New S1 vibronic level assignments for s-tetrazine vapor: Polarization and lifetime measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New fluorescence excitation and dispersed SVL fluorescence spectra of s-tetrazine vapor in supersonic expansions of helium and argon are reported. A forbidden in-plane-polarized component of the A~1B3u-X~1Ag transition is discovered at (0, 0) + 578 cm-1 with a type-B band contour in rotationally resolved excitation spectra obtained with a single-frequency cw ring dye laser. Linewidth measurements of single rovibronic transitions provide data to calculate lifetimes of low-lying S1 vibronic states of the isolated molecule. Depending on the vibrational mode involved, the lifetime varies from 0.05 to greater than 1 nsec. The number of cold-band assignments in the absorption spectrum of s-tetrazine vapor now confirmed by analysis of SVL fluorescence spectra increases from three to ten.

Brumbaugh, Donald V.; Haynam, Christopher A.; Levy, Donald H.

1982-08-01

116

Production of metastable 23S1 helium in a laser produced plasma at low pressures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We used cavity ringdown spectroscopy to study how the laser ablation of various materials (graphite, aluminum and iron) influences production of 23S1 metastable helium in the regime of low pressure helium gas. Plasma was produced by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm with irradiance from 0.8 to 10.9 × 109 W/cm2. Helium pressure ranged from 0.03 to 0.2 mbar. It was found that at higher irradiances, metastable production for all materials reaches saturation due to plasma shielding and is more pronounced for graphite. The highest yield of metastables was found in the case of aluminum target (0.05%). For metals, production rate is discussed in terms of work function and ionization potential.

Biš?an, M.; Miloševi?, S.

2013-03-01

117

Probing the S1/S1' substrate binding pocket geometry of HIV-1 protease with modified aspartic acid analogues.  

PubMed

Aspartates 25 and 125, the active site residues of HIV-1 protease, participate functionally in proteolysis by what is believed to be a general acid-general base mechanism. However, the structural role that these residues may play in the formation and maintenance of the neighboring S1/S1' substrate binding pockets remains largely unstudied. Because the active site aspartic acids are essential for catalysis, alteration of these residues to any other naturally occurring amino acid by conventional site-directed mutagenesis renders the protease inactive, and hence impossible to characterize functionally. To investigate whether Asp-25 and Asp-125 may also play a structural role that influences substrate processing, a series of active site protease mutants has been produced in a cell-free protein synthesizing system via readthrough of mRNA nonsense (UAG) codons by chemically misacylated suppressor tRNAs. The suppressor tRNAs were activated with the unnatural aspartic acid analogues erythro-beta-methylaspartic acid, threo-beta-methylaspartic acid, or beta,beta-dimethylaspartic acid. On the basis of the specific activity measurements of the mutants that were produced, the introduction of the beta-methyl moiety was found to alter protease function to varying extents depending upon its orientation. While a beta-methyl group in the erythro orientation was the least deleterious to the specific activity of the protease, a beta-methyl group in the threo orientation, present in the modified proteins containing threo-beta-methylaspartate and beta,beta-dimethylaspartate, resulted in specific activities between 0 and 45% of that of the wild type depending upon the substrate and the substituted active site position. Titration studies of pH versus specific activity and inactivation studies, using an aspartyl protease specific suicide inhibitor, demonstrated that the mutant proteases maintained bell-shaped pH profiles, as well as suicide-inhibitor susceptibilities that are characteristic of aspartyl proteases. A molecular dynamics simulation of the beta-substituted aspartates in position 25 of HIV-1 protease indicated that the threo-beta-methyl moiety may partially obstruct the adjacent S1' binding pocket, and also cause reorganization within the pocket, especially with regard to residues Val-82 and Ile-84. This finding, in conjunction with the biochemical studies, suggests that the active site aspartate residues are in proximity to the S1/S1' binding pocket and may be spatially influenced by the residues presented in these pockets upon substrate binding. It thus seems possible that the catalytic residues cooperatively interact with the residues that constitute the S1/S1' binding pockets and can be repositioned during substrate binding to orient the active site carboxylates with respect to the scissile amide bond, a process that likely affects the facility of proteolysis. PMID:10913288

Short, G F; Laikhter, A L; Lodder, M; Shayo, Y; Arslan, T; Hecht, S M

2000-08-01

118

Estimating 13.8-GHz path-integrated attenuation from 10.7-GHz brightness temperatures for the TRMM combined PR-TMI precipitation algorithm  

SciTech Connect

This study presents research in support of the design and implementation of a combined radar-radiometer algorithm to be used for precipitation retrieval during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The combined algorithm approach is expected to overcome various difficulties that arise with a radar-only approach, particularly related to estimates of path-integrated attenuation (PIA)along the TRMM radar beam. A technique is described for estimating PIA at the 13.8-GHz frequency of the TRMM precipitation radar (PR) from 10.7-GHz brightness temperature T{sub B} measurements obtained from the TRMM microwave imager. Through the use of variational or probabilistic techniques, the independent PIA calculations provide a means to adjust for errors that accumulate in estimates of range-dependent rain rates at progressively increasing range positions from radar reflectivity vectors. The accepted radar approach for obtaining PIA from ocean-viewing radar reflectivity measurements is called the surface reference technique, a scheme based on the difference in ocean surface cross sections between cloud-free and raining radar pixels. This technique has encountered problems, which are discussed and analyzed with the aid of coordinated aircraft radar (Airborne Rain Mapping Radar) and radiometer (Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer) measurements obtained during the west Pacific Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment in 1993. 97 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

Smith, E.A.; Farrar, M.R.; Xiang, X. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Turk, F.J. [Naval Research Lab., Monterey, CA (United States); Mugnai, A. [Instituto di Fisica dell`Atmosfera-CNR, Frascati (Italy)

1997-04-01

119

The fluorobenzene-argon S(1) excited-state intermolecular potential energy surface.  

PubMed

We evaluate the first excited-state (S1) intermolecular potential energy surface for the fluorobenzene-Ar van der Waals complex using the coupled cluster method and the augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set extended with a set of 3s3p2d1f1g midbond functions. To calculate the S(1) interaction energies, we use ground-state interaction energies evaluated with the same basis set and the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) including connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] model and interaction and excitation energies evaluated at the CCSD level. The surface minima are characterized by the Ar atom located above and below the fluorobenzene ring at a distance of 3.5060 A with respect to the fluorobenzene center of mass and at an angle of 5.89 degrees with respect to the axis perpendicular to the fluorobenzene plane. The corresponding interaction energy is -425.226 cm(-1). The surface is used in the evaluation of the intermolecular level structure of the complex, and the results are compared to the experimental data available and to those found in previous theoretical papers on ground-state potentials for similar complexes. PMID:17658771

Fajín, José Luis Cagide; Capelo, Silvia Bouzón; Fernandez, Berta; Felker, Peter M

2007-07-21

120

New insight into Cm(III) interaction with kaolinite - Influence of mineral dissolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cm(III) speciation in natural kaolinite (St. Austell, UK) suspensions under alkaline conditions was studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The spectroscopic investigations were performed under argon atmosphere (O2 < 1 ppm) using a constant curium concentration, ionic strength and mineral content of 2 × 10-7 M, 1 mM NaClO4 and 0.25 g/L, respectively, throughout the study. The impact of kaolinite mineral dissolution on the speciation of the trivalent actinide was investigated in oversaturation experiments where excess amounts of aluminum and/or silicon were added to alkaline kaolinite suspensions. Only silicon addition was found to influence the curium ligand-field under the experimental conditions indicating the formation of a curium-silicate complex in the kaolinite environment. In experiments with 10-3 M added silicon but no solid phase for curium attachment only the hydrolysis species Cm(OH)2+ could be detected at pH 10. Thus, the formation of colloidal silicate species for the attachment of curium could be excluded and the observed species in alkaline kaolinite environments could be assigned to a ternary kaolinite/curium/silicate complex forming between adsorbed curium at the mineral surface and dissolved silicates in solution. A similar curium-silicate complex with identical spectroscopic features was also found in investigations with ?-alumina as sorbent phase upon addition of silicon to the mineral suspensions, suggesting that silicon complexation with surface-bound curium is independent of the sorbent material.

Huittinen, N.; Rabung, Th.; Schnurr, A.; Hakanen, M.; Lehto, J.; Geckeis, H.

2012-12-01

121

Energy Levels of the Nitrate Radical Below 2000 CM-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Highly sophisticated quantum chemistry techniques have been employed to build a three-state diabatic Hamiltonian for the nitrate radical (NO_3). Eigenvalues of this Hamiltonian (which includes effects beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation) are consistent with the known ``vibrational'' levels of NO_3 up to ca. 2100 cm-1 above the zero-point level; with a small empirical adjustment of the diabatic coupling strength, calculated levels are within 20 cm-1 of the measured level positions for those that have been observed experimentally. Of the eleven states with e' symmetry calculated below 2000 cm-1, nine of these have been observed either in the gas phase by Hirota and collaborators as well as Neumark and Johnston, or in frozen argon by Jacox. However, the Hamiltonian produces two levels that have not been seen experimentally: one calculated to lie at 1075 cm-1 (which is the third e' state, above ?_4 and 2?_4) and another at 1640 cm-1 which is best assigned as one of the two e' sublevels of 4?_4. A significant result is that the state predicted at 1075 cm-1 is not far enough above the predicted 2?_4 level (777 cm-1 v. ca. 760 cm-1 from experiment) to be plausibly assigned as 3?_4 (which is at 1155 cm-1: experimental position: 1173 cm-1), nor is its nodal structure consistent with such an idea. Rather, it is quite unambiguously the ?_3 level. Given the fidelity of the results generated by this model Hamiltonian as compared to experiment, it can safely be concluded that the prominent infrared band seen at 1492 cm-1 (corresponding to a calculated level at 1500 cm-1) is not ?_3, but rather a multiquantum state best viewed as a sublevel of the ?_3 + ?_4 combination.

Stanton, J. F.; Simmons, C. S.

2012-06-01

122

Power distribution for an Am\\/Cm bushing melter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decades of nuclear material production at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has resulted in the generation of large quantities of the isotopes Am²⁴³ and Cm²⁴⁴. Currently, the Am and Cm isotopes are stored as a nitric acid solution in a tank. The Am and Cm isotopes have great commercial value but must be transferred to ORNL for processing. The nitric

C. Gong; B. J. Hardy

1996-01-01

123

Visualization on massively parallel computers using CM/AVS  

SciTech Connect

CM/AVS is a visualization environment for the massively parallel CM-5 from Thinking Machines. It provides a backend to the standard commercially available AVS visualization product. At the Advanced Computing Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have been experimenting and utilizing this software within our visualization environment. This paper describes our experiences with CM/AVS. The conclusions reached are applicable to any implimentation of visualization software within a massively parallel computing environment.

Krogh, M.F.; Hansen, C.D.

1993-09-01

124

Raman scattering for the Heisenberg S=1/2 antiferromagnet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the full Raman intensity for the Heisenberg S=1/2 antiferromagnet on the triangular lattice by simultaneously considering the effects of the renormalization of the spectrum by 1/S corrections, and the final state magnon-magnon interactions. The analysis of the Raman intensity without final state interactions shows, that it has two peaks, corresponding to two maxima of the bare magnon spectrum Ek. Then we calculate Raman intensity with the renormalized spectrum. We obtain that at the energy at which the renormalized dispersion has a plateau, and, therefore, density of states is large, the Raman intensity is strongly enhanced. We also derive explicit expressions for the vertex functions to order 1/S, and calculate Raman intensity including 1/S self-energy and the vertex corrections on equal footing. The vertex corrections is calculated by a summation of ladder diagrams with magnon-magnon interactions. Once interactions are included, the peak smears out and shifts to lower energies.

Perkins, Natalia; Brenig, Wolfram

2008-03-01

125

Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak  

SciTech Connect

The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (/beta//sub to/ /approximately/ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m/sup 2/. The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

1989-07-01

126

Nature and degree of aqueous alteration in CM and CI carbonaceous chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigated the petrologic, geochemical, and spectral parameters that relate to the type and degree of aqueous alteration in nine CM chondrites and one CI (Ivuna) carbonaceous chondrite. Our underlying hypothesis is that the position and shape of the 3 ?m band is diagnostic of phyllosilicate mineralogy. We measured reflectance spectra of the chondrites under dry conditions (elevated temperatures) and vacuum (10-8 to 10-7 torr) to minimize adsorbed water and mimic the space environment, for subsequent comparison with reflectance spectra of asteroids. We have identified three spectral CM groups in addition to Ivuna. "Group 1," the least altered group as determined from various alteration indices, is characterized by 3 ?m band centers at longer wavelengths, and is consistent with cronstedtite (Fe-serpentine). "Group 3," the most altered group, is characterized by 3 ?m band centers at shorter wavelengths and is consistent with antigorite (serpentine). "Group 2" is an intermediate group between group 1 and 3. Ivuna exhibits a unique spectrum that is distinct from the CM meteorites and is consistent with lizardite and chrysotile (serpentine). The petrologic and geochemical parameters, which were determined using electron microprobe analyses and microscopic observations, are found to be consistent with the three spectral groups. These results indicate that the distinct parent body aqueous alteration environments experienced by these carbonaceous chondrites can be distinguished using reflectance spectroscopy. High-quality ground-based telescopic observations of Main Belt asteroids can be expected to reveal not just whether an asteroid is hydrated, but also details of the alteration state.

Takir, Driss; Emery, Joshua P.; McSween, Harry Y.; Hibbitts, Charles A.; Clark, Roger N.; Pearson, Neil; Wang, Alian

2013-09-01

127

The 60 cm Ritchey-Chrétien telescope and its instruments.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 60 cm Ritchey-Chrétien optical system has been manufactured and installed in the tube of the 40 cm Schmidt telescope in replacement of the Schmidt optical system. The mirror systerm is described together with the correcting lens. Descriptions are also given for observation instruments, i.e., a photographic camera, a CCD camera, spectronebulagraph, and a multi-object photoelectric photometer.

Ohtani, H.; Uesugi, A.; Tomita, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Kosugi, G.; Noumaru, J.; Araya, S.; Ohta, K.; Mikayama, Y.

1992-03-01

128

Tank testing of a 2500-cm2 solar panel  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 50 cm by 50 cm solar array panel test patch was investigated for spacecraft charging and arcing effects. Bombardment with monochromatic electron was carried out. Some objectives of the test were: (1) to estimate at what voltage of electron bombardment arcing would be probable (2) to find whether the arc's energy would be tolerable or damagingly large (3) to

R. S. Bever; J. Staskus

1981-01-01

129

"The 5 cm Rule": Biopower, Sexuality and Schooling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores "the 5 cm rule", a regulation around student contact discovered during an investigation of the sexual culture of schooling with 16-19-year-olds in New Zealand. Implemented to stem "inappropriate and unwanted" touching, it stipulates that students must maintain a physical distance of 5 cm at all times. It is argued this rule…

Allen, Louisa

2009-01-01

130

Extension to third-order Coriolis terms of the analysis of ?10, ?7, and ?4 levels of ethylene on the basis of Fourier transform and diode laser spectra  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ?7, ?10, and ?4 levels of ethylene have been studied based on waveguide laser, Fourier transform, and diode laser spectra in the range from 798 to 1091 cm-1. The absolute calibration of these spectra is better than 0.0002 cm-1. To deal with so many and so accurate experimental data, we have developed in our analysis programs the Watson Hamiltonian up to the sextic centrifugal distortion coefficients and the interaction Hamiltonian up to the third-order Coriolis resonance terms. The molecular parameters of the vibrational ground state have been significantly improved on the basis of more than 4000 GSCD. In the analysis of ?7, ?10, and ?4 levels, we had to introduce the ?12 level, which contributes to the indirect coupling of ?7 and ?4 through strong Coriolis interactions. We obtain a statistical agreement with all experimental data with an estimated standard deviation equal to 0.84. The intrinsic intensity of the ?10 band has been determined to be 16 500 +/- 2500 times lower than the intensity of the ?7 band.

Cauuet, I.; Walrand, J.; Blanquet, G.; Valentin, A.; Henry, L.; Lambeau, Ch.; de Vleeschouwer, M.; Fayt, A.

1990-01-01

131

Quantitative trait loci that determine plasma lipids and obesity in C57BL/6J and 129S1/SvImJ inbred mice.  

PubMed

The plasma lipid concentrations and obesity of C57BL/6J (B6) and 129S1/SvImJ (129) inbred mouse strains fed a high-fat diet containing 15% dairy fat, 1% cholesterol, and 0.5% cholic acid differ markedly. To identify the loci controlling these traits, we conducted a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of 294 (B6 x 129) F(2) females fed a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. Non-HDL cholesterol concentrations were affected by five significant loci: Nhdlq1 [chromosome 8, peak centimorgan (cM) 38, logarithm of odds [LOD] 4.4); Nhdlq4 (chromosome 10, cM 70, LOD 4.0); Nhdlq5 (chromosome 6, cM 0) interacting with Nhdlq4; Nhdlq6 (chromosome 7, cM 10) interacting with Nhdlq1; and Nhdlq7 (chromosome 15, cM 0) interacting with Nhdlq4. Triglyceride (TG) concentrations were affected by three significant loci: Tgq1 (chromosome 18, cM 42, LOD 3.2) and Tgq2 (chromosome 9, cM 66) interacting with Tgq3 (chromosome 4, cM 58). Obesity measured by percentage of body fat mass and body mass index was affected by two significant loci: Obq16 (chromosome 8, cM 48, LOD 10.0) interacting with Obq18 (chromosome 9, cM 65). Knowing the genes for these QTL will enhance our understanding of obesity and lipid metabolism. PMID:15210844

Ishimori, Naoki; Li, Renhua; Kelmenson, Peter M; Korstanje, Ron; Walsh, Kenneth A; Churchill, Gary A; Forsman-Semb, Kristina; Paigen, Beverly

2004-06-21

132

Quantitative trait loci that determine lipoprotein cholesterol levels in an intercross of 129S1/SvImJ and CAST/Ei inbred mice.  

PubMed

To identify genetic determinants of lipoprotein levels, we are performing quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis on a series of mouse intercrosses in a "daisy chain" experimental design, to increase the power of detecting QTL and to identify common variants that should segregate in multiple intercrosses. In this study, we intercrossed strains CAST/Ei and 129S1/SvImJ, determined HDL, total, and non-HDL cholesterol levels, and performed QTL mapping using Pseudomarker software. For HDL cholesterol, we identified two significant QTL on chromosome (Chr) 1 (Hdlq5, 82 cM, 60-100 cM) and Chr 4 (Hdlq10, 20 cM, 10-30 cM). For total cholesterol, we identified three significant QTL on Chr 1 (Chol7, 74 cM, 65-80 cM), Chr 4 (Chol8, 12 cM, 0-30 cM), and Chr 17 (Chol9, 54 cM, 20-60 cM). For non-HDL cholesterol, we identified significant QTL on Chr 8 (Nhdlq1, 34 cM, 20-60 cM) and Chr X (Nhdlq2, 6 cM, 0-18 cM). Hdlq10 was the only QTL detected in two intercrosses involving strain CAST/Ei. Hdlq5, Hdlq10, Nhdlq1, and two suggestive QTL at D7Mit246 and D15Mit115 coincided with orthologous human lipoprotein QTL. Our analysis furthers the knowledge of the genetic control of lipoprotein levels and points to the importance of Hdlq10, which was detected repeatedly in multiple studies. PMID:14701919

Lyons, Malcolm A; Wittenburg, Henning; Li, Renhua; Walsh, Kenneth A; Korstanje, Ron; Churchill, Gary A; Carey, Martin C; Paigen, Beverly

2004-03-12

133

Biodegradation of cyanide compounds by a Pseudomonas species (S1).  

PubMed

A Pseudomonas sp. (S1), isolated from soil by an enrichment technique was tested for its potential to degrade different cyanide compounds. Further, biodegradation/biotransformation of binary mixtures of the cyanide compounds by the culture was also studied. The results indicated that the culture could grow on the following nitriles by using them as carbon and nitrogen sources: acetonitrile, butyronitrile, acrylonitrile, adiponitrile, benzonitrile, glutaronitrile, phenylacetonitrile, and succinonitrile. Studies on the biodegradation of these cyanide compounds in binary mixtures showed that the presence of acrylonitrile or KCN delayed the degradation of acetonitrile in a mixture, while none of the other cyanide compounds affected the degradation of one another. The transformation products of the nitriles were their corresponding acids, and similarly, KCN was also directly transformed to formic acid. Studies on the transformation of these cyanide compounds showed that the rate of transformation of nitriles to their corresponding carboxylic acids was acrylonitrile > acetonitrile > adiponitrile > benzonitrile > KCN. This culture has the unique characteristic of transforming representatives of saturated aliphatic, aliphatic olefinic, aromatic, and aralkyl nitriles, as well as alkali cyanide, to their corresponding carboxylic acids. PMID:10408092

Dhillon, J K; Shivaraman, N

1999-03-01

134

SpS1-SOFIA studies of stellar evolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S./German Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA, Figure 1) is a 2.5-meter infrared airborne telescope in a Boeing 747-SP flying in the stratosphere at altitudes as high as 45,000 feet where the atmospheric transmission averages ? 80% throughout the 0.3 - 1600 ?m spectral region. SOFIA's first-generation instruments include broadband imagers, moderate resolution spectrographs capable of resolving broad features due to dust and large molecules, and high resolution spectrometers suitable for kinematic studies of molecular and atomic gas lines at km s-1 resolution. These and future instruments will enable SOFIA to make unique contributions to studies of the physics and chemistry of stellar evolution for many decades. Science flights will begin in 2010. A full operations schedule of at least 100 flights per year will begin in 2014 and will continue for 20 years. The SOFIA Guest Investigator (GI) program, open to investigators worldwide, will constitute the major portion of the SOFIA observing program.

Gehrz, R. D.; Becklin, E. E.; Roellig, T. L.

2010-11-01

135

Search for heavy metastable particles decaying to jet pairs in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A search is performed for heavy metastable particles that decay into jet pairs with a macroscopic lifetime (c?˜1cm) in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV using data from the CDF II detector at Fermilab corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2fb-1. To estimate the standard model background, a data-driven approach is used. Probability-density functions are constructed to model secondary vertices from known processes. No statistically significant excess is observed above the background. Limits on the production cross section in a hidden valley benchmark phenomenology are set for various Higgs boson masses as well as metastable particle masses and lifetimes.

Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.

2012-01-01

136

Observing Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) With Spitzer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk we discuss the design, implementation, and reduction of observations of Comet ISON from space using the Spitzer Space Telescope on 13.00 - 13.96 Jun UT and from the ground at Lowell Observatory on Jun 11.16 UT and from APO on 14.13 Jun UT. The comet was at distance rh = 3.34 AU from the Sun, distance ?Spitzer = 3.29 AU and 17.4o phase from SST, and distance ?Earth = 4.25 AU and 6.8 - 7.3o phase at the time of observation. Preliminary analyses show ISON's Spitzer coma morphology was relatively compact and simple, with a linear anti-solar dust tail > 3x105 km in length and a 1/p profile gas coma extending > 105 km from the nucleus. Afp values in an 18,200 km radius aperture of 840, 890, and 840 ± 80 cm were found at VRI, and 650 ± 100 cm were found at 3.6 micron. Together, the ground-based and Spitzer photometry imply near-neutral dust scattering from the visual through the infrared. An excess at 4.5 µm due to emission from a neutral gas coma is clearly found both morphologically and photometrically. The gas coma total flux and spatial profile and ISON’s discovery distance imply a coma dominated by the stronger CO_2 line emission at 4.67 ?m, but we cannot rule out a preponderance of CO emission at 4.26 ?m. No variability in our Spitzer photometry at the 0.03 mag level over 24 hrs was seen. We present our imagery, spectrophotometry, and lightcurves, and discuss the physical implications of these measurements of the comet made well outside the ice line.

Lisse, Carey M.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Bauer, J. M.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Kelley, M. S.; Knight, M. M.; Hines, D. C.; Li, J.; Reach, W. T.; Sitko, M. L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Meech, K. J.; Rayner, J. T.

2013-10-01

137

The Physics Of The Z 20 21cm Signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detecting the 21cm line from the pre-reionization era, z 15-25, would reveal information about the formation of the first stellar populations and the thermal history of the Universe. Projects like LEDA and DARE are pursuing this exciting yet difficult venture. I will discuss new analytical and numerical work on the 21cm signal from z 20 that has vast implications for its detectability. I will show that shocks do not heat up the IGM and suppress the 21cm signal as had been speculated. I will also discuss the possibility of the signal being larger than anticipated.

McQuinn, Matthew

2012-05-01

138

Atomic physics and the cosmological 21 cm signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Upcoming low-frequency radio interferometers, such as MWA and SKA, offer the prospect of using 21 cm tomography to map the evolution of hydrogen reionization. The existence of a detectable signal is dependent upon the existence of a background of Lyman alpha photons able to decouple the 21 cm spin temperature from that of the CMB. In this talk, I will discuss the details of the relevant atomic physics and compare the results of simulations and analytical calculations of the effect of inhomogeneities in the Lya and X-ray background on the 21 cm power spectrum.

Pritchard, Jonathan

2010-03-01

139

A 244Cm irradiator for protracted exposure of cultured Mammalian cells with alpha particles.  

PubMed

A 244Cm alpha-particle irradiator was designed and constructed for radiobiological studies where protracted exposure at a low dose rate of cultured mammalian cells is required. It allows irradiation of a cell monolayer attached to the Mylar bottom of a specially designed Petri dish of 56 mm diameter (approximately 25 cm(2) area). The irradiator is based on a 20-mm-diameter stainless steel chamber containing a 148 kBq 244Cm source. The chamber, flushed with helium gas at a pressure kept slightly above the external pressure, is inserted into a cell incubator where temperature and CO2 concentration are controlled. Spectrometric and dosimetric characterization of the irradiator was carried out by means of an ion-implanted-silicon charged-particle detector, CR39 detectors, and Monte Carlo simulations with the TRIM code. Average LET of particles incident on the cells at the center of the Petri dish was evaluated to be 120 keV microm(-1) at 59 mm from the source, and the average dose rate was 5.69 x 10 Gy s(-1), with +12% and -8% variations at the center and the edge, respectively. The irradiator has been successfully tested and used for several experiments involving 16-d exposure of human fibroblasts monolayers. PMID:16340609

Esposito, G; Belli, M; Simone, G; Sorrentino, E; Tabocchini, M A

2006-01-01

140

Ultraviolet Observations Of C/2012 S1 (ISON) By MAVEN  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On its journey to Mars, MAVEN has been serendipitously positioned to study the anticipated sungrazing comet C/2012 S1(ISON) and offers important scientific observations. The MAVEN mission is the first to attempt to understand the evolution of the Martian atmosphere by determining the effects of atmospheric loss to space. The IUVS instrument has two large field of regard(55x11 and 24x11 degrees) and observes in the mid and far ultraviolet (115-340 nm). It was designed to be able to map the atmosphere in several neutral and some ionized species. These performance characteristics make IUVS ideal to study ISON, as it can take both two dimensional spatial scans as well as spectral data. Tentative plans indicate the comet can be acquired on Dec 8th, assuming that the comet survives the near sun encounter. If observations prove possible, IUVS will be able to study ISON shortly after perihelion, and from a different vantage point from Earth. Science goals include UV observations of D/H, morphology & time evolution of the hydrogen coma and UV spectroscopy of the inner coma. IUVS can potentially make a major contribution to the international community by measuring D/H, thus contributing to our understanding of the origin of Earth’s water. IUVS will also make MUV and FUV observations of molecular species in the inner coma, valuable for understanding the chemical evolution of cometary molecular gases. The poster will present provisional observation plans as well as simulated spectra and spatial profiles. We welcome input from the community on these plans, in the spirit of maximizing the scientific return of the international campaign. The work has been supported by the MAVEN project and NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX09AB59G.

Crismani, Matteo; Schneider, N.; Stewart, I.; Combi, M.; Fougere, N.

2013-10-01

141

Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ?N spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the ?+p(3S1, T = 3/2)- and ?N(1S0,T = l/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

2010-10-01

142

Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ?N spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the ?+p(3S1,T = 3/2)- and ?N(1S0,T = 1/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

143

Spectral reflectance properties of carbonaceous chondrites: 2. CM chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have examined the spectral reflectance properties and available modal mineralogies of 39 CM carbonaceous chondrites to determine their range of spectral variability and to diagnose their spectral features. We have also reviewed the published literature on CM mineralogy and subclassification, surveyed the published spectral literature and added new measurements of CM chondrites and relevant end members and mineral mixtures, and measured 11 parameters and searched pair-wise for correlations between all quantities. CM spectra are characterized by overall slopes that can range from modestly blue-sloped to red-sloped, with brighter spectra being generally more red-sloped. Spectral slopes, as measured by the 2.4:0.56 ?m and 2.4 ?m:visible region peak reflectance ratios, range from 0.90 to 2.32, and 0.81 to 2.24, respectively, with values <1 indicating blue-sloped spectra. Matrix-enriched CM spectra can be even more blue-sloped than bulk samples, with ratios as low as 0.85. There is no apparent correlation between spectral slope and grain size for CM chondrite spectra - both fine-grained powders and chips can exhibit blue-sloped spectra. Maximum reflectance across the 0.3-2.5 ?m interval ranges from 2.9% to 20.0%, and from 2.8% to 14.0% at 0.56 ?m. Matrix-enriched CM spectra can be darker than bulk samples, with maximum reflectance as low as 2.1%. CM spectra exhibit nearly ubiquitous absorption bands near 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 ?m, with depths up to 12%, and, less commonly, absorption bands in other wavelength regions (e.g., 0.4-0.5, 0.65, 2.2 ?m). The depths of the 0.7, 0.9, and 1.1 ?m absorption features vary largely in tandem, suggesting a single cause, specifically serpentine-group phyllosilicates. The generally high Fe content, high phyllosilicate abundance relative to mafic silicates, and dual Fe valence state in CM phyllosilicates, all suggest that the phyllosilicates will exhibit strong absorption bands in the 0.7 ?m region (due to Fe3+-Fe2+ charge transfers), and the 0.9-1.2 ?m region (due to Fe2+ crystal field transitions), and generally dominate over mafic silicates. CM petrologic subtypes exhibit a positive correlation between degree of aqueous alteration and depth of the 0.7 ?m absorption band. This is consistent with the decrease in fine-grained opaques that accompanies aqueous alteration. There is no consistent relationship between degree of aqueous alteration and evidence for a 0.65 ?m region saponite-group phyllosilicate absorption band. Spectra of different subsamples of a single CM can show large variations in absolute reflectance and overall slope. This is probably due to petrologic variations that likely exist within a single CM chondrite, as duplicate spectra for a single subsample show much less spectral variability. When the full suite of available CM spectra is considered, few clear spectral-compositional trends emerge. This indicates that multiple compositional and physical factors affect absolute reflectance, absorption band depths, and absorption band wavelength positions. Asteroids with reflectance spectra that exhibit absorption features consistent with CM spectra (i.e., absorption bands near 0.7 and 0.9 ?m) include members from multiple taxonomic groups. This suggests that on CM parent bodies, aqueous alteration resulted in the consistent production of serpentine-group phyllosilicates, however resulting absolute reflectances and spectral shapes seen in CM reflectance spectra are highly variable, accounting for the presence of phyllosilicate features in reflectance spectra of asteroids across diverse taxonomic groups.

Cloutis, E. A.; Hudon, P.; Hiroi, T.; Gaffey, M. J.; Mann, P.

2011-11-01

144

Robert Steven Daum MD, CM, B.Sc., M. Sc  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... People's Gas Corporation. ... Goldstein KP, Glushak C, Kviz FJ, Olin AC, Niersbach-Walerowicz CM, Walter J, Woodson AL, Middleton MS, Daum RS. ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

145

Management of 1-2 cm renal stones  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The preferred treatment of >1cm stone is shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), while that of stone <2 cm is percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), but treatment of 1-2 cm renal stones is a controversial issue. We searched the literature to present a comprehensive review on this group. Material and Methods: Pubmed search of literature was done using the appropriate key words. We separately discussed the literature in lower polar and non lower polar stone groups. Results: For non lower polar renal stones of 1-2 cm, SWL is preferred approach, while for the lower polar stones; literature favors the use of PCNL. Retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) is emerging as a promising technique for these calculi. Conclusions: Treatment of renal stone disease depends on stone and patient related, as well as on renal anatomical factors. Treatment should be individualized according to site of stone and available expertise.

Srivastava, Aneesh; Chipde, Saurabh S

2013-01-01

146

20. Credit CM. Water flowing through head gates (at left), ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Credit CM. Water flowing through head gates (at left), into open forebay of power house. Note wooden stair enclosure in Turbine pit 1. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

147

The Network Architecture of the Connection Machine CM5  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Connection Machine Model CM-5 Supercomputer is a massively parallel computer system designed to offer performance inthe range of 1 teraflops (1012floating-point operations per second). The CM-5 obtains its high performance while offering easeof programming, flexibility, and reliability. The machine contains three communication networks: a data network, a controlnetwork, and a diagnostic network. This paper describes the organization of these

Charles Leiserson; Zahi S. Abuhamdeh; David C. Douglas; Carl R. Feynman; Mahesh N. Ganmukhi; Jeffrey V. Hill; W. Daniel Hillis; Bradley C. Kuszmaul; Margaret A. St. Pierre; David S. Wells; Monica C. Wong; Shaw-wen Yang; Robert Zak

1994-01-01

148

Spectroscopic identification of ternary Cm-carbonate surface complexes.  

PubMed

The influence of dissolved CO(2) on the sorption of trivalent curium (Cm) on alumina (gamma-Al(2)O(3)) and kaolinite was investigated by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) using the optical properties of Cm as a local luminescent probe. Measurements were performed at T < 20 K on Cm loaded gamma-Al(2)O(3) and kaolinite wet pastes prepared in the absence and presence of carbonate in order to pictorially illustrate any changes through a direct comparison of spectra from both systems. The red-shift of excitation and emission spectra, as well as the increase of fluorescence lifetimes observed in the samples with carbonate, clearly showed the influence of carbonate and was fully consistent with the formation of Cm(III) surface species involving carbonate complexes. In addition, the biexponential decay behavior of the fluorescence lifetime indicated that at least two different Cm(III)-carbonate species exist at the mineral-water interface. These results provide the first spectroscopic evidence for the formation of ternary Cm(III)-carbonate surface complexes. PMID:20050656

Fernandes, M Marques; Stumpf, T; Baeyens, B; Walther, C; Bradbury, M H

2010-02-01

149

Evolution of the 21cm signal throughout cosmic history  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The potential use of the redshifted 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen for probing the epoch of reionization is motivating the construction of several low-frequency interferometers. There is also much interest in the possibility of constraining the initial conditions from inflation and the nature of the dark matter and dark energy by probing the power spectrum of density perturbations in three dimensions and on smaller scales than probed by the microwave background anisotropies. Theoretical understanding of the 21 cm signal has been fragmented into different regimes of physical interest. In this paper, we make the first attempt to describe the full redshift evolution of the 21 cm signal between 0cm signal from fluctuations in the gas density, temperature, and neutral fraction, as well as the Ly? flux, and allow for a post-reionization signal from damped Ly? systems. Our comprehensive analysis provides a useful foundation for optimizing the design of future arrays whose goal is to separate the particle physics from the astrophysics, either by probing the peculiar velocity distortion of the 21 cm power spectrum, or by extending the 21 cm horizon to z?25 before the first galaxies had formed, or to z?6 when the residual pockets of hydrogen trace large-scale structure.

Pritchard, Jonathan R.; Loeb, Abraham

2008-11-01

150

Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS  

PubMed Central

We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family.

Schurer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

2008-01-01

151

SpS1-Gas in protoplanetary disks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High resolution infrared spectroscopy is the key technique to look at the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. As molecular hydrogen is an inefficient emitter, CO gas is the single most important molecular probe of the disk. The energy gaps of the vibrationally excited levels (?E > 3000 K) and the critical density required to keep the molecules in the excited state (nc ~ 1010cm-3) match well to the physical condition of the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. In order to resolve the vibrational lines of different rotational states, a spectral resolving power of ?/?? > 10000 is necessary; or even higher (> 30000 -100000), if we would like to fully resolve the gas kinematics. Scoville et al. (1980) provided the fundamentals of the excitation mechanisms, which is essential for the interpretation of the vibrational transitions of CO, and pioneered the study of the circumstellar environment with infrared CO lines in the observation of BN (Scoville et al. (1983)). The bandhead emission of CO at 2.3 ?m from young stars was unambiguously attributed to the circumstellar disks by Carr (1989) and Najita et al. (1996), because the gas kinematics matches well to what is expected from Keplerian rotation. Since then, the gas kinematics have been extensively used to shed light on peculiar disk structures, such as the inner truncation (Brittain et al. 2003), the outer truncation (Najita et al. 2008), and the gap (van der Plas et al. 2008; though this is an oxygen forbidden line).

Goto, Miwa

2010-11-01

152

Development of Activity in Comet C/2012 S1 ISON  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 ISON obtained immediately after discovery (22 Sep. 2012; r = 6.28 AU) until moving into solar conjunction in mid-June 2013 using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, and the VYSOS-5 and VYSOS-20 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawai’i. An additional pre-discovery data point from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 28 Jan. 2012 (r = 8.4 AU). The images showed similar tail morphology throughout this period, largely because of projection effects. Additional observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 9 March (r = 4.52 AU) and 16 June 2013 (r = 3.35 AU) were used to search for CO J(3-2), CO J(2-1), HCN J(4-3), and HCN J(3-2) rotation lines. No gas was detected, with preliminary upper limits for CO during 14-15 June (r = 3.3 AU) of Q < 6.4 x 10^27 molec/s based on the observations of the CO J(2-1) line. Using these production rates, the Q(H2O) published by Schleicher (2013; IAUC 9254), and the preliminary radius from the HST measurements (J.-Y. Li et al., 2013; STScI-2013-14) we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO or CO2; at these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. Without more sensitive limits on CO, we cannot yet constrain which of these volatiles is controlling the activity. It is clear from the photometric light curve that the fractional active area of the nucleus increased linearly by about a factor of 2 from Jan. 2012 until mid Jan. 2013 (r ~ 5 AU) at which point the activity decreased by 30% by early May 2013. This suggests that a limited supply of volatile material was driving the current activity.

Meech, Karen J.; Yang, B.; Keane, J. V.; Ansdell, M.; Riesen, T. E.; Kleyna, J.; Hsieh, H.; Mottola, S.; Kuehrt, E.; Chiang, H.; Reipurth, B.; Milani, G.; Bryssinck, E.; Michaud, P.; Rector, T.

2013-10-01

153

Study of hadronic transitions between ? states and observation of ?(4S)???(1S) decay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a study of hadronic transitions between ?(mS) (m=4, 3, 2) and ?(nS) (n=2, 1) resonances based on 347.5fb-1 of data taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. We report the first observation of ?(4S)???(1S) decay with a branching fraction B(?(4S)???(1S))=(1.96±0.06stat±0.09syst)×10-4 and measure the ratio of partial widths ?(?(4S)???(1S))/?(?(4S)??+?-?(1S))=2.41±0.40stat±0.12syst. We set 90% CL upper limits on the ratios ?(?(2S)???(1S))/?(?(2S)??+?-?(1S))<5.2×10-3 and ?(?(3S)???(1S))/?(?(3S)??+?-?(1S))<1.9×10-2. We also present new measurements of the ratios ?(?(4S)??+?-?(2S))/?(?(4S)??+?-?(1S))=1.16±0.16stat±0.14syst and ?(?(3S)??+?-?(2S))/?(?(3S)??+?-?(1S))=0.577±0.026stat±0.060syst.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.

2008-12-01

154

Large-eddy simulations of turbulence on the CM-2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports the development and performance of a computer program for large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulence on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine-2 (CM-2). The computer program solves the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations for large scales of turbulence using a second-order time and space accurate, semiimplicit, finite-difference scheme. The effects of small scales of turbulence are represented by a subgrid closure model. The computer program is written in CM FORTRAN but uses some of the CM Scientific Subroutine Library routines for line inversions and discrete Fourier transforms. Calculations are performed for fully developed channel flow, and results are compared with previously published numerical and experimental data. In comparison with a similar calculation on a single-processor Cray-2, a speedup factor of 2.1 has been achieved with a 32 K CM-2. It is observed that the CM-2 provides a promising environment for turbulence simulations. Details of the physical problem, the numerical algorithm, and the performance of the machine are reported.

Robichaux, Joseph; Tafti, D. K.; Vanka, S. P.

1992-06-01

155

Sphingosine 1-Phosphate induces filopodia formation through S1P2R activation of ERM proteins  

PubMed Central

Previously we demonstrated that the sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) regulate phosphorylation of the ERM family of cytoskeletal proteins [1]. Herein, we show that exogenously applied or endogenously generated S1P (in a sphingosine kinase-dependent manner) result in significant increases in phosphorylation of ERM proteins as well as filopodia formation. Utilizing phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable ezrin mutants, we show that the S1P-induced cytoskeletal protrusions are dependent on ERM phosphorylation. Employing various pharmacological S1P receptor agonists and antagonists, along with small interfering RNA techniques and genetic knockout approaches, we identify the S1P Receptor 2 (S1P2R) as the specific and necessary receptor to induce phosphorylation of ERM proteins and subsequent filopodia formation. Taken together, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which S1P regulates cellular architecture that requires S1P2R and subsequent phosphorylation of ERM proteins.

Gandy, K. Alexa Orr; Canals, Daniel; Adada, Mohamad; Wada, Masayuki; Roddy, Patrick; Snider, Ashley J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

2013-01-01

156

Short communication: Effect of alphaS1-casein (CSN1S1) and kappa-casein (CSN3) genotypes on milk composition in Murciano-Granadina goats.  

PubMed

The effects of the caprine alpha(S1)-casein (CSN1S1) polymorphisms on milk quality have been widely demonstrated. However, much less is known about the consequences of the kappa-casein (CSN3) genotype on milk composition in goats. Moreover, the occurrence of interactions between CSN3 and CSN1S1 genotypes has not been investigated. In this study, an association analysis between CSN1S1 and CSN3 genotypes and milk quality traits was performed in 89 Murciano-Granadina goats. Total milk yield as well as total protein, fat, solids-not-fat, lactose, alpha(S1)-casein (CSN1S1), and alpha(S2)-casein (CSN1S2) contents were recorded every other month during a whole lactation (316 observations). Data analysis using a linear mixed model for repeated observations revealed no interaction between the CSN1S1 and CSN3 genotypes. With regard to the effect of the CSN3 locus, AB and BB genotypes were significantly associated with higher levels of total casein and protein content compared with the AA CSN3 genotype. In strong contrast with French breeds, the CSN1S1 genotype did not affect protein, casein, and fat concentrations in Murciano-Granadina goats. These results highlight the importance of taking into consideration the CSN3 genotype when performing selection for milk composition in dairy goats. PMID:19448028

Caravaca, F; Carrizosa, J; Urrutia, B; Baena, F; Jordana, J; Amills, M; Badaoui, B; Sánchez, A; Angiolillo, A; Serradilla, J M

2009-06-01

157

VLA observations of Uranus at 1. 3-20 cm  

SciTech Connect

Observations of Uranus, obtained with resolution 0.5-1.2 arcsec at wavelengths 1.3, 2, 6, and 20 cm using the A and B configurations of the VLA in June-July 1982, October 1983, and February 1984, are reported. The disk-averaged brightness temperatures (DABTs) are determined by model fitting, and the results are presented in extensive graphs and contour maps and characterized in detail. Findings discussed include: (1) an overall spectrum which is relatively flat above 6 cm, (2) 1.3-6-cm brightness which is concentrated nearer to the pole than to the subsolar point, and (3) small changes in DABT from 1982 to 1983/1984 (consistent with an explanation based on a pole-equator temperature gradient). 16 references.

De Pater, I.; Gulkis, S.

1988-08-01

158

Laparoscopic resection of a large (11 cm) adrenal phaeochromocytoma  

PubMed Central

Pheochromocytoma is a rare cause of hypertension. Usually the tumour arises in the adrenal and the only cure is surgical extirpation. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is the gold standard. Traditionally, laparoscopic removal of adrenal tumour of more than 5–6 cm in size is contraindicated. The authors removed a 11×8 cm phaeochromocytoma by laparoscopic approach without any complications. A 52-year-old male presented with complaints of throbbing headache with palpitations. On evaluation, he was found to be severely hypertensive and his blood sugar levels were moderately elevated. Radiological investigations revealed a 11×8 cm left supra renal mass. A provisional diagnosis of left pheochromocytoma was made which was strengthened by the fact that 24 hourly urine sample revealed elevated vanillylmandelic acid levels. The authors decided to surgically extirpate the adrenal mass. This was successfully accomplished by a laparoscopic transperitoneal approach. No complications were encountered. Histopathology showed pheochromocytoma of left adrenal gland without capsular involvement.

Chaudhary, Ranjit; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Singh, Kulwant; Biswas, Rakesh

2011-01-01

159

The cm-wave continuum in compact PNe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Excess 20-30GHz emission, above that expected from synchrotron or free-free templates and sub-millimetre dust emission, has been reported in HII regions, planetary nebulae (PNe), dark clouds and in the ISM at large. The excess has been modelled in terms of dipole radiation from spinning very small grains, or `spinning dust'. The cm-wave excess confronts the free-free paradigm in PNe. A CBI/SIMBA survey of 22 objects highlighted a systematic 250~GHz deficit from the level of optically thin free-free extrapolated from 30GHz. Although we find a correlation between the fractional cm-wave excess and the ratio IRAS100um/5GHz, the low-frequency data rule out existing spinning dust models. We have selected the best candidates for an exhaustive continuum study. ATCA can provide adequately sampled spectral energy distributions with which to test various interpretations of the cm-wave excess in PNe.

Casassus, Simon; Burton, Michael; Roche, Patrick; Nyman, Lars-Ake; Dickinson, Clive; Rodriguez, Luis Felipe

2007-10-01

160

Critical role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) in acute vascular inflammation.  

PubMed

The endothelium, as the interface between blood and all tissues, plays a critical role in inflammation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid, highly abundant in plasma, that potently regulates endothelial responses through interaction with its receptors (S1PRs). Here, we studied the role of S1PR2 in the regulation of the proadhesion and proinflammatory phenotype of the endothelium. By using genetic approaches and a S1PR2-specific antagonist (JTE013), we found that S1PR2 plays a key role in the permeability and inflammatory responses of the vascular endothelium during endotoxemia. Experiments with bone marrow chimeras (S1pr2(+/+) ? S1pr2(+/+), S1pr2(+/+) ? S1pr2(-/-), and S1pr2(-/-) ? S1pr2(+/+)) indicate the critical role of S1PR2 in the stromal compartment, in the regulation of vascular permeability and vascular inflammation. In vitro, JTE013 potently inhibited tumor necrosis factor ?-induced endothelial inflammation. Finally, we provide detailed mechanisms on the downstream signaling of S1PR2 in vascular inflammation that include the activation of the stress-activated protein kinase pathway that, together with the Rho-kinase nuclear factor kappa B pathway (NF-kB), are required for S1PR2-mediated endothelial inflammatory responses. Taken together, our data indicate that S1PR2 is a key regulator of the proinflammatory phenotype of the endothelium and identify S1PR2 as a novel therapeutic target for vascular disorders. PMID:23723450

Zhang, Guoqi; Yang, Li; Kim, Gab Seok; Ryan, Kieran; Lu, Shulin; O'Donnell, Rebekah K; Spokes, Katherine; Shapiro, Nathan; Aird, William C; Kluk, Michael J; Yano, Kiichiro; Sanchez, Teresa

2013-05-30

161

HI 21-cm absorption at z ~ 3.39 towards PKS 0201+113  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope detection of HI 21-cm absorption from the z ~ 3.39 damped Lyman ? absorber (DLA) towards PKS 0201+113, the highest redshift at which 21-cm absorption has been detected in a DLA. The absorption is spread over ~115 km s-1 and has two components, at z = 3.387144(17) and z = 3.386141 (45). The stronger component has a redshift and velocity width in agreement with the tentative detection of Briggs, Brinks & Wolfe, but a significantly lower optical depth. The core size and DLA covering factor are estimated to be <~100 pc and f ~ 0.69, respectively, from a Very Long Baseline Array 328-MHz image. If one makes the conventional assumption that the HI column densities towards the optical and radio cores are the same, this optical depth corresponds to a spin temperature of Ts ~ [(955 +/- 160) × (f/0.69)] K. However, this assumption may not be correct, given that no metal-line absorption is seen at the redshift of the stronger 21-cm component, indicating that this component does not arise along the line of sight to the optical quasi-stellar object (QSO), and that there is structure in the 21-cm absorbing gas on scales smaller than the size of the radio core. We model the 21-cm absorbing gas as having a two-phase structure with cold dense gas randomly distributed within a diffuse envelope of warm gas. For such a model, our radio data indicate that, even if the optical QSO lies along a line of sight with a fortuitously high (~50 per cent) cold gas fraction, the average cold gas fraction is low, <~17 per cent, when averaged over the spatial extent of the radio core. Finally, the large mismatch between peak 21-cm and optical redshifts and the complexity of both profiles makes it unlikely that the z ~ 3.39 DLA will be useful in tests of fundamental constant evolution.

Kanekar, N.; Chengalur, J. N.; Lane, W. M.

2007-03-01

162

Detecting the redshifted 21 cm forest during reionization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 21 cm forest - H I absorption features in the spectra of high-redshift radio sources - can potentially provide a unique probe of the largely neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) during the epoch of reionization. We present semi-analytical models of the 21 cm forest due to the large-scale structure of the reionization-era IGM, including a prescription for X-ray heating and the percolation of photoionization bubbles. We explore a range of signal-analysis methods to show that, if detected with future instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the 21 cm forest can provide a significant constraint on the thermal history of the IGM. Detection will be aided by consideration of the sudden increase in signal variance at the onset of 21 cm absorption. If radio foregrounds and the intrinsic source spectra are well understood, the flux decrement over wide bandwidths can also improve detection prospects. Our analysis accounts for the possibility of narrow absorption lines from intervening dense regions, but, unlike previous studies, our results do not depend on their properties. Assuming X-ray heating corresponding to a local stellar population and a simple reionization model, we estimate that a statistically significant detection of 21 cm absorption could be made by the SKA in less than a year of observing against a Cygnus A-type source at z ˜ 9, as opposed to nearly a decade for a significant detection of the detailed forest features. We discuss observational challenges due to uncertainties regarding the abundance of background sources and the strength of the 21 cm absorption signal.

Mack, Katherine J.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

2012-10-01

163

Signal Extraction for Sky-averaged 21-cm Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The highly redshifted 21-cm line of hydrogen promises to be an excellent probe of the cosmic dawn (when the first stars ignited) and the epoch of reionization. Interferometric measurements of 21-cm fluctuations require large telescopes with many antennas. The sky-averaged, 'global' signal, however, may be accessible with single-dipole experiments, even during the cosmic dawn, which will not be probed with the current generation of interferometers. Moreover, the global signal provides complementary information to the fluctuations. Extracting the signal may be challenging, however: the very large foregrounds require accurate modelling, and place stringent demands on the quality of the instrumental calibration. The challenge at first appears similar to that faced by interferometric experiments, but in detail it is rather different and may well require novel approaches. A number of experiments are under way or are proposed to measure the global 21-cm signal, and it has become more urgent to address the problem of signal extraction. We present a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to extract the signal from data simulated for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) which would measure the 21-cm signal at 40-120 MHz from lunar orbit. Our modelling includes the 21-cm signal, diffuse Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, the Sun, radiation emitted by and reflected from the Moon, and a detailed parametrized description of the properties of the instrument. We demonstrate that the signal parameters can be recovered accurately from realistic, noisy spectra with an experiment of reasonable duration, exploiting the spectral smoothness of the foregrounds and the spatial uniformity of the signal. Our method demonstrates the feasibility of DARE and validates its observational strategy, but is general and could be applied to other global 21-cm experiments. Moreover it may shed light on how to improve the design of these experiments.

Harker, Geraint; Pritchard, J.; Burns, J.; Bowman, J.

2012-01-01

164

21 cm radiation: A new probe of fundamental physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New low frequency radio telescopes currently being built open up the possibility of observing the 21 cm radiation from redshifts 200 > z > 30, also known as the dark ages, see Furlanetto, Oh, & Briggs(2006) for a review. At these high redshifts, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is absorbed by neutral hydrogen at its 21 cm hyperfine transition. This redshifted 21 cm signal thus carries information about the state of the early Universe and can be used to test fundamental physics. The 21 cm radiation probes a volume of the early Universe on kpc scales in contrast with CMB which probes a surface (of some finite thickness) on Mpc scales. Thus there is many orders of more information available, in principle, from the 21 cm observations of dark ages. We have studied the constraints these observations can put on the variation of fundamental constants (Khatri & Wandelt(2007)). Since the 21 cm signal depends on atomic physics it is very sensitive to the variations in the fine structure constant and can place constraints comparable to or better than the other astrophysical experiments (??/?= < 10-5) as shown in Figure 1. Making such observations will require radio telescopes of collecting area 10 - 106 km2 compared to ~ 1 km2 of current telescopes, for example LOFAR. We should also expect similar sensitivity to the electron to proton mass ratio. One of the challenges in observing this 21 cm cosmological signal is the presence of the synchrotron foregrounds which is many orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal but the two can be separated because of their different statistical nature (Zaldarriaga, Furlanetto, & Hernquist(2004)). Terrestrial EM interference from radio/TV etc. and Earth's ionosphere poses problems for telescopes on ground which may be solved by going to the Moon and there are proposals for doing so, one of which is the Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI). In conclusion 21 cm cosmology promises a large wealth of data and provides the only way to observe the redshift range between recombination and reionization.

Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

2010-11-01

165

Evidence for live 247Cm in the early solar system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Variations of the 238U/235U ratio in the Allende meteorite, ranging from -35% to + 19%, are interpreted as evidence of live 247Cm in the early Solar System. The amounts of these and other r-products in the Solar System indicate values of (9,000??3,000) Myr for the age of the Galaxy and ??? 8 Myr for the time between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of meteoritic grains. Three possible explanations are presented for the different values of the latter time period which are indicated by the decay products of 247Cm, 26Al, 244Pu and 129I. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

Tatsumoto, M.; Shimamura, T.

1980-01-01

166

WSRC Am/Cm Stabilization Program - Cylindrical Induction Melter Studies  

SciTech Connect

1.1.1 Kilogram quantities of Americium and Curium isotopes (Am/Cm) have been produced at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. These highly radioactive isotopes have both government and commercial value and are currently stored as a nitric acid solution at the Savannah River Site. The material represents the largest source term in the F canyon at SRS. It is proposed that the Am/Cm material be vitrified to stabilize the material for long term, recoverable storage. This paper reviews the progress made during the process development phase of this program using the Cylindrical Induction Melter.

Henderson, W.A.

1999-02-17

167

Fuzzy Number Subtraction Convolution on the CM-2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The running time of data-parallel algorithms can be reduced by avoiding global reduction operations. Using fuzzy number subtraction convolution as an example, this paper illustrates how data-parallel programs can be restructured to eliminate global reduction operations. This is done by using techniques from systolic array design. The algorithms are programmed in CM Fortran and have been run on a Connection Machine CM-2. The running time results show that advantages can be achieved in a considerable domain of the problem size space. At the same time the results show that for obtaining shortest running times different algorithms have to be used in different domains.

Petkov, Nikolay

168

21-cm absorption from galaxies at z ~ 0.3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the detection of 21-cm absorption from foreground galaxies towards quasars, specifically zgal = 0.3120 towards SDSS J084957.97+510829.0 (zqso = 0.584; Pair-I) and zgal = 0.3714 towards SDSS J144304.53+021419.3 (zqso = 1.82; Pair-II). In both the cases, the integrated 21-cm optical depth is consistent with the absorbing gas being a damped Lyman-? (DLA) system. In the case of Pair-I, strong Na i and Ca ii absorption lines are also detected at zgal in the QSO spectrum. We identify an early-type galaxy at an impact parameter of b ~ 14 kpc whose photometric redshift is consistent with that of the detected metal and 21-cm absorption lines. This would be the first example of an early-type galaxy associated with an intervening 21-cm absorber. The gas detected in 21-cm and metal absorption lines on the outskirts of this luminous red galaxy could be associated with the reservoir of cold H i gas with a low level of star formation activity in the outer regions of the galaxy as reported in the literature for z ~ 0.1 early-type galaxies. In the case of Pair-II, the absorption is associated with a low surface brightness galaxy that, unlike most other known quasar-galaxy pairs (QGPs), i.e. QSO sight lines passing through disks or halos of foreground galaxies, is identified only via narrow optical emission lines detected on top of the QSO spectra. Using SDSS spectra we infer that the emission lines originate within ~5 kpc of the QSO sight line, and the gas has metallicity [12+O/H] ~ 8.4 and star formation rate ~0.7-0.8 M? yr-1. The measured 21-cm optical depth can be reconciled with the N(H i) we derive from the measured extinction (AV = 0.6) if either the H i gas is warm or the extinction per hydrogen atom in this galaxy is much higher than the mean value of the Small Magellanic Cloud. Finally, using a sample of 9 QGPs with 21-cm absorption detection from our observations and literature, we report a weak anti-correlation (Spearman rank, rs = -0.3) between the 21-cm optical depth and galaxy impact parameter. Milliarcsecond scale images and spectra are required to understand the implications of this.

Gupta, N.; Srianand, R.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Muzahid, S.

2013-10-01

169

Cross section for {sup 246}Cm subbarrier fission  

SciTech Connect

The cross section for {sup 246}Cm fission induced by neutrons of energy in the range 0.1 eV-20 keV was measured by the neutron lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS-100) of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The parameters of the resonance area and of the fission width were evaluated for several low-lying s-wave neutron resonances. The parameters of the intermediate structure in the cross section for the subbarrier fusion of {sup 246}Cm nuclei were found. The results obtained in this way were compared with available experimental data and with recommended evaluated data.

Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Samylin, B. F.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S., E-mail: shorin@ippe.r [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15

170

Cross section for the subbarrier fission of {sup 244}Cm  

SciTech Connect

The cross section for {sup 244}Cm fission induced by neutrons of energy in the range between 0.07 eV and 20 keV was measured by using the lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS-100) of the Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The parameters of the resonance areas were determined for the lowest eight s-wave neutron resonances, and the respective fission widths were evaluated. Also, the parameters of the intermediate structure in the cross section for the subbarrier fission of {sup 244}Cm nuclei were evaluated. The results were compared with available data and recommendations based on evaluations.

Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Samylin, B. F.; Svirin, M. I.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S., E-mail: shorin@ippe.r [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-09-15

171

Synthesis and characterization of (4S)-1-chloroalkylsilatrane-4-carboxylic acids; cruytal structures of (3R,4S)-1-chloromethyl-3-methylsilatrane-4-carboxylic acid and (3R,4S)-1-(3-chloropropyl)-3-methylsilatrane-4-carboxylic acid  

Microsoft Academic Search

(4S)-1-(chloromethyl)silatrane-4-carboxylic acid 1 and (3R,4S)-1-chloromethyl-3-methylsilatrane-4-carboxylic acid 2 were synthesized by the transesterification of chlormethyltriethoxysilane with l-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyenthyl)serine or l-N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethy)threonine in teh presence of pyridine. (4S)-1-(3-chloropropyl)silatrane-4-caroxylic acid 3 and (3R,4S)-1-(3-chloropropyl)-3-methylsilstrane-4-carboxylic acid 4 were similarly synthesized from the reaction of 3-chloropropyltrimethoxysilane with the chiral ligands. The compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, 1H and 13C NMR spectra and mass spectra. The

Zheng-Rong Lu; Ren-Xi Zhuo; Liao-Rong Shen; Xiao-Dong Zhang; Lian-Fang Shen

1995-01-01

172

The S1/S2 exciton interaction in 2-pyridone.6-methyl-2-pyridone: Davydov splitting, vibronic coupling, and vibronic quenching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The excitonic splitting between the S1 and S2 electronic states of the doubly hydrogen-bonded dimer 2-pyridone.6-methyl-2-pyridone (2PY.6M2PY) is studied in a supersonic jet, applying two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI), UV-UV depletion, and dispersed fluorescence spectroscopies. In contrast to the C2h symmetric (2-pyridone)2 homodimer, in which the S1 <-- S0 transition is symmetry-forbidden but the S2 <-- S0 transition is allowed, the symmetry-breaking by the additional methyl group in 2PY.6M2PY leads to the appearance of both the S1 and S2 origins, which are separated by ?exp = 154 cm-1. When combined with the separation of the S1 <-- S0 excitations of 6M2PY and 2PY, which is ? = 102 cm-1, one obtains an S1/S2 exciton coupling matrix element of VAB, el = 57 cm-1 in a Frenkel-Davydov exciton model. The vibronic couplings in the S1/S2 <-- S0 spectrum of 2PY.6M2PY are treated by the Fulton-Gouterman single-mode model. We consider independent couplings to the intramolecular 6a' vibration and to the intermolecular ?' stretch, and obtain a semi-quantitative fit to the observed spectrum. The dimensionless excitonic couplings are C(6a') = 0.15 and C(?') = 0.05, which places this dimer in the weak-coupling limit. However, the S1/S2 state exciton splittings ?calc calculated by the configuration interaction singles method (CIS), time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF), and approximate second-order coupled-cluster method (CC2) are between 1100 and 1450 cm-1, or seven to nine times larger than observed. These huge errors result from the neglect of the coupling to the optically active intra- and intermolecular vibrations of the dimer, which lead to vibronic quenching of the purely electronic excitonic splitting. For 2PY.6M2PY the electronic splitting is quenched by a factor of ~30 (i.e., the vibronic quenching factor is ?exp = 0.035), which brings the calculated splittings into close agreement with the experimentally observed value. The 2C-R2PI and fluorescence spectra of the tautomeric species 2-hydroxypyridine.6-methyl-2-pyridone (2HP.6M2PY) are also observed and assigned.

Heid, Cornelia G.; Ottiger, Philipp; Leist, Roman; Leutwyler, Samuel

2011-10-01

173

Reproducibility along a 10 cm vertical visual analogue scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproducibility along a vertical 10 cm visual analogue scale (VAS) was investigated. Eight normal volunteers attempted to duplicate a set of marked VAS. There was a tendency to estimate too high on the scale, and reproducibility was found to be variable along its length. This indicates that the error involved in the use of VASs is even more complex than

J S Dixon; H A Bird

1981-01-01

174

Evaluation of Neutron Nuclear Data for exp 244 Cm.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Evaluation of neutron nuclear data for exp 244 Cm was performed below 16 MeV. The energy region above 1000 eV was separated from the lower region where the resonance parameters were given. Evaluation was made to select suitable resonance parameters, and t...

S. Igarasi T. Nakagawa

1977-01-01

175

A Survey of Elliptical Galaxies at 6 CM.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The paper reports the results of a 6 cm radio continuum survey of 191 E and SO galaxies with known redshifts. Nineteen galaxies were detected. These were reobserved at higher resolution and could be divided into well separated classes of compact and exten...

R. D. Ekers J. A. Ekers

1972-01-01

176

A 32.5 CM infrared airborne telescope  

Microsoft Academic Search

An infrared telescope has been designed to be mounted open port on board different types of aircraft without modifying their frames. The 32.5 cm Cassegrain telescope with a wobbling secondary mirror is adapted to an emergency door equipped with an aerodynamic spoiler. The instrument package is supported by a 2 axis gimbal centered on the chamber in which the telescope

G. Vanhabost; P. Gigan; K. Hammal; J. Mondellini; C. Darpentigny; J. P. Michel; D. Lux

1977-01-01

177

32-cm wavelength radar mapping of the Moon  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present our effort for producing a high-resolution 32-cm wavelength synthetic aperture radar map of the Moon using ground based measurements with the EISCAT UHF radar. We discuss coding, decoding, Doppler north-south ambiguity mitigation, focusing, and clock error mitigation. We also show preliminary results from a test measurement.

Juha Vierinen; Markku S. Lehtinen

2009-01-01

178

Search for Cm-248 in the early solar system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Possible evidence for the presence of Cm-248 in the early solar system was reported from fission gas studies (Rao and Gopalan, 1973) and recently from studies of very high nuclear track densities (not less than 5 x 10 exp 8/sq cm) in the merrillite of the H4 chondrite Forest Vale (F.V.) (Pellas et al., 1987). We report here an analysis of the isotopic abundances of xenon in F.V. phosphates and results of track studies in phosphate/pyroxene contacts. The fission xenon isotopic signature clearly identifies Pu-244 as the extinct progenitor. We calculate an upper limit Cm-248/Pu-244 to be less than 0.0015 at the beginning of Xe retention in F.V. phosphates. This corresponds to an upper limit of the ratio Cm-248/U-235 of not greater than 5 x 10 exp -5 further constraining the evidence for any late addition of freshly synthesized actinide elements just prior to solar system formation. The fission track density observed after annealing the phosphates at 290C (1 hr, which essentially erases spallation recoil tracks) is also in agreement with the Pu-244 abundance inferred from fission Xe. The spallation recoil tracks produced during the 76 Ma cosmic-ray exposure account for the very high track density in merrillites.

Lavielle, B.; Marti, K.; Pellas, P.; Perron, C.

1992-09-01

179

A New Formaldehyde 6 cm Emitter in the Galaxy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A survey for H2CO 6cm emission toward young massive stellar objects was conducted using the 305m Arecibo Telescope. We detected emission toward IRAS18566+0408, only the fifth source in the Galaxy known to show H2CO 6cm emission. We report VLA observations toward this source intended to determine the nature of the emission line. Our observations show that the H2CO source is due to maser emission, making IRAS18566+0408 the fourth Galactic H2CO 6cm maser source. We also report detection of a weak 2cm continuum source that is coincident with the H2CO maser. Given the current observational constraints, the maser could be due to the radiative pumping mechanism proposed by Boland & de Jong (1981), however the coincidence of the new H2CO maser with 22GHz H2O masers suggests that shocked molecular gas could also play a role in its excitation. P.H. acknowledges support from NSF grant AST-0098524 and the Research Corporation grant Nr. CC4996. H. L. was supported by the German Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under grant Ste 605/17-2. EBC acknowledges support from NSF grant AST-0303689.

Araya, E.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.; Sewilo, M.; Watson, C.; Churchwell, E.

2004-12-01

180

CM 247 LC Superalloy: Microstructure and Heat Treatment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Directional solidification (DS) superalloy CM 247 LC has been used in the laboratory of foundry technology of TKK to make DS turbine blades. The purpose of the report is to give some information about this alloy with emphasis on its microstructure and hea...

C. Cingi J. J. Vuorinen

1993-01-01

181

Value of the bipolar lead CM5 in electrocardiography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Only bipolar lead recording are available during ambulatory monitoring. Their sensitivity in detecting ST segment changes in relation to standard electrocardiographic leads is not known. The magnitude and direction of ST segment changes in the bipolar lead CM5 were compared with those in standard electrocardiographic leads in patients during exercise testing and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. Thirty patients with coronary

A A Quyyumi; T Crake; L J Mockus; C A Wright; A F Rickards; K M Fox

1986-01-01

182

Cosmological constraints from 21cm surveys after reionization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

21cm emission from residual neutral hydrogen after the epoch of reionization can be used to trace the cosmological power spectrum of density fluctuations. Using a Fisher matrix formulation, we provide a detailed forecast of the constraints on cosmological parameters that are achievable with this probe. We consider two designs: a scaled-up version of the MWA observatory as well as a Fast Fourier Transform Telescope. We find that 21cm observations dedicated to post-reionization redshifts may yield significantly better constraints than next generation Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. We find the constraints on ??, ?mh2, and ??h2 to be the strongest, each improved by at least an order of magnitude over the Planck CMB satellite alone for both designs. Our results do not depend as strongly on uncertainties in the astrophysics associated with the ionization of hydrogen as similar 21cm surveys during the epoch of reionization. However, we find that modulation of the 21cm power spectrum from the ionizing background could potentially degrade constraints on the spectral index of the primordial power spectrum and its running by more than an order of magnitude. Our results also depend strongly on the maximum wavenumber of the power spectrum which can be used due to non-linearities.

Visbal, Eli; Loeb, Abraham; Wyithe, Stuart

2009-10-01

183

ICD-9-CM coding from a manager's perspective.  

PubMed

This article discusses how a clinical manager can work with staff to select the best diagnoses and ICD-9-CM code for each patient. The selection of diagnoses must be based on all available information and be directly related to the home care services provided. Case studies are presented to show application. PMID:12695697

Greaves, Peggy

2003-04-01

184

Photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of S1(1B2u ?,?*) benzene via 6(1)1n (n = 0-3) levels.  

PubMed

We report resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization photo-electron spectroscopy of jet-cooled benzene via the 6(1)1(n) (n = 0-3) vibronic levels in S(1)((1)B(2u) ?,?*) using a nanosecond UV laser and photoelectron imaging. The best energy resolution (?E/E) was 0.7%. The photoelectron spectrum from the S(1) 6(1)1(3) level (E(vib) = 3284 cm(-1)) in the channel three region exhibited a clear signature of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR). The spectral features were consistent with picosecond zero kinetic energy photoelectron (ZEKE) spectra reported by Smith et al. [ J. Phys. Chem. 1995, 99, 1768]. The photoelectron angular anisotropy parameter ?(2) was found to be negative in ionization from the 6(1)1(n) (n = 0-3) levels with photoelectron kinetic energies up to 5000 cm(-1). No influence of a shape resonance was identified. PMID:21366302

Niu, Dongmei; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshi-Ichi; Suzuki, Toshinori

2011-03-02

185

Heterogeneous distribution of solar and cosmogenic noble gases in CM chondrites and implications for the formation of CM parent bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Distribution of solar, cosmogenic, and primordial noble gases in thin slices of Murchison, Murray, and Nogoya CM carbonaceous chondrites was determined by the laser microprobe analysis so as to put some constraints on the parent-body processes in the CM chondrite formation. The main lithological units of the three meteorite slices were located by electron microscope observations and classified into clastic matrix and clasts of primary accretionary rocks (PARs) based on the classification scheme of texture of CM chondrites. All sample slices contain both clastic matrix and PARs. Clastic matrix shows a comminuted texture formed by fragmentation and mechanical mixing of rocks due to impacts, whereas PARs preserve the original textures prior to the mechanical disruption. Solar-type noble gases are detected in all sample slices. They are located preferentially in clastic matrix. The distribution of solar gases is similar to that in ordinary chondrites where these gases reside in clastic dark portions of these meteorites. The heterogeneous distribution of solar gases in CM chondrites suggests that these gases were acquired not in a nebular accretion process but in parent body processes. Solar energetic particles (SEP) are predominant in CM chondrites. The low abundance of low energy solar wind (SW) component relative to SEP suggests preferential loss of SW from minerals comprising the clastic matrix, due to aqueous alteration in the parent bodies. Cosmogenic noble gases are also enriched in some portions in clastic matrix, indicating that some parts of clastic matrix were exposed to solar and galactic cosmic rays prior to the final consolidation of the CM parent bodies. Primordial noble gases are rich in fine-grained rims around chondrules in all three meteorites. However, average concentrations of heavy primordial gases in the rims differ among meteorites and correlate inversely to the degree of aqueous alteration that the meteorites have experienced. This appears to have been caused by aqueous alteration reactions between fluids and carbonaceous carrier phases of noble gases.

Nakamura, Tomoki; Nagao, Keisuke; Metzler, Knut; Takaoka, Nobuo

1999-01-01

186

The 21 cm Signature of the First Stars  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We predict the 21 cm signature of the first metal-free stars. The soft X-rays emitted by these stars penetrate the atomic medium around their host halos, generating Ly? photons that couple the spin and kinetic temperatures. These create a region we call the ``Ly? sphere,'' visible in 21 cm against the CMB, which is much larger than the H II region produced by the same star. The spin and kinetic temperatures are strongly coupled before the X-rays can substantially heat the medium, implying that a 21 cm absorption signal from the adiabatically cooled gas in Hubble expansion around the star is expected when the medium has not been heated previously. A central region of emission from the gas heated by the soft X-rays is also present, although with a weaker signal than the absorption. The Ly? sphere is a universal signature that should be observed around any first star illuminating its vicinity for the first time. The 21 cm radial profile of the Ly? sphere can be calculated as a function of the luminosity, spectrum, and age of the star. For a star of a few hundred Msolar and zero metallicity (as expected for the first stars), the physical radius of the Ly? sphere can reach tens of kiloparsecs. The first metal-free stars should be strongly clustered because of high cosmic biasing; this implies that the regions producing a 21 cm absorption signal may contain more than one star and will generally be irregular and not spherical, because of the complex distribution of the gas. We discuss the feasibility of detecting these Ly? spheres, which would be present at redshifts z~30 in the cold dark matter model. Their observation would represent a direct proof of the detection of a first star.

Chen, Xuelei; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi

2008-09-01

187

The S1(n, pi *) states of acetaldehyde and acetone in supersonic nozzle beam: Methyl internal rotation and C=O out-of-plane wagging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorescence excitation spectra of CH3CHO, CH3CDO, (CH3)2CO, and (CD3)2CO have been observed in an Ar supersonic nozzle beam. Vibrational analyses have been performed for vibronic bands in the region at wavelengths longer than 313 nm. The 0–0 bands of the S1(n, ?*) states were located at 29 771, 29 813, 30 435, and 30 431 cm?1, respectively. The spectra could

Masaaki Baba; Ichiro Hanazaki; Umpei Nagashima

1985-01-01

188

Search for Neutral, Long-Lived Particles Decaying into Two Muons in pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a search for a neutral particle, pair produced in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV, which decays into two muons and lives long enough to travel at least 5 cm before decaying. The analysis uses ≈380pb-1 of data recorded with the D0 detector. The background is estimated to be about one event. No candidates are observed, and limits are set

V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; M. Agelou; S. H. Ahn; M. Ahsan; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; M. Anastasoaie; T. Andeen; S. Anderson; B. Andrieu; M. S. Anzelc; Y. Arnoud; M. Arov; A. Askew; B. Åsman; A. C. S. Assis Jesus; O. Atramentov; C. Autermann; C. Avila; C. Ay; F. Badaud; A. Baden; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; P. Banerjee; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Bargassa; P. Baringer; C. Barnes; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; D. Bauer; A. Bean; M. Begalli; M. Begel; C. Belanger-Champagne; L. Bellantoni; A. Bellavance; J. A. Benitez; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; L. Berntzon; I. Bertram; M. Besançon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; M. Binder; C. Biscarat; K. M. Black; I. Blackler; G. Blazey; F. Blekman; S. Blessing; D. Bloch; K. Bloom; U. Blumenschein; A. Boehnlein; O. Boeriu; T. A. Bolton; G. Borissov; K. Bos; T. Bose; A. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; N. J. Buchanan; D. Buchholz; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; S. Burdin; S. Burke; T. H. Burnett; E. Busato; C. P. Buszello; J. M. Butler; P. Calfayan; S. Calvet; J. Cammin; S. Caron; W. Carvalho; B. C. K. Casey; N. M. Cason; H. Castilla-Valdez; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; F. Charles; E. Cheu; F. Chevallier; D. K. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; L. Christofek; D. Claes; B. Clément; C. Clément; Y. Coadou; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; D. Coppage; M. Corcoran; M.-C. Cousinou; B. Cox; S. Crépé-Renaudin; D. Cutts; M. Cwiok; H. da Motta; A. Das; M. Das; B. Davies; G. Davies; G. A. Davis; K. de; P. de Jong; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; C. De Oliveira Martins; J. D. Degenhardt; F. Déliot; M. Demarteau; R. Demina; P. Demine; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; M. Doidge; A. Dominguez; H. Dong; L. V. Dudko; L. Duflot; S. R. Dugad; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; J. Dyer; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; T. Edwards; J. Ellison; J. Elmsheuser; V. D. Elvira; S. Eno; P. Ermolov; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; S. N. Fatakia; L. Feligioni; A. V. Ferapontov; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; I. Fleck; M. Ford; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fu; S. Fuess; T. Gadfort; C. F. Galea; E. Gallas; E. Galyaev; C. Garcia; A. Garcia-Bellido; J. Gardner; V. Gavrilov; A. Gay; P. Gay; D. Gelé; R. Gelhaus; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; D. Gillberg; G. Ginther; N. Gollub; B. Gómez; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J.-F. Grivaz; S. Grünendahl; M. W. Grünewald; F. Guo; J. Guo; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; N. J. Hadley; P. Haefner; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; I. Hall; R. E. Hall; L. Han; K. Hanagaki; K. Harder; A. Harel; R. Harrington; J. M. Hauptman; R. Hauser; J. Hays; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; J. G. Hegeman; J. M. Heinmiller; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; H. Hoeth; M. Hohlfeld; S. J. Hong; R. Hooper; P. Houben; Y. Hu; Z. Hubacek; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffré; S. Jain; K. Jakobs; C. Jarvis; A. Jenkins; R. Jesik; K. Johns; C. Johnson; M. Johnson; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; A. Juste; D. Käfer; S. Kahn; E. Kajfasz; A. M. Kalinin; J. M. Kalk; J. R. Kalk; S. Kappler; D. Karmanov; J. Kasper; P. Kasper; I. Katsanos; D. Kau; R. Kaur; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. M. Kharzheev; D. Khatidze; H. Kim; T. J. Kim; M. H. Kirby; B. Klima; J. M. Kohli; J.-P. Konrath; M. Kopal; V. M. Korablev; J. Kotcher; B. Kothari; A. Koubarovsky; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kozminski; D. Krop; A. Kryemadhi; T. Kuhl; A. Kumar; S. Kunori; A. Kupco; T. Kurca; J. Kvita; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; J. Lazoflores; A.-C. Le Bihan; P. Lebrun; W. M. Lee; A. Leflat; F. Lehner; V. Lesne; J. Leveque; P. Lewis; J. Li; Q. Z. Li; J. G. R. Lima; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; Z. Liu; L. Lobo; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; A. Lounis; P. Love; H. J. Lubatti; M. Lynker; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; R. J. Madaras; P. Mättig; C. Magass; A. Magerkurth; A.-M. Magnan; N. Makovec; P. K. Mal; H. B. Malbouisson; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; H. S. Mao; Y. Maravin; M. Martens; R. McCarthy; D. Meder; A. Melnitchouk; A. Mendes; L. Mendoza; M. Merkin; K. W. Merritt; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; M. Michaut; H. Miettinen; T. Millet; J. Mitrevski; J. Molina; N. K. Mondal; J. Monk; R. W. Moore; T. Moulik; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulders; M. Mulhearn; L. Mundim; Y. D. Mutaf; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; N. A. Naumann; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; C. Noeding; A. Nomerotski; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; V. O'Dell; D. C. O'Neil; G. Obrant; V. Oguri; N. Oliveira; N. Oshima; R. Otec; G. J. Otero Y Garzón; M. Owen; P. Padley; N. Parashar; S.-J. Park; S. K. Park; J. Parsons; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; G. Pawloski; P. M. Perea

2006-01-01

189

Bells and Essebi: To Be or Not To Be (CM)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Bells and Essebi carbonaceous chondrites have long been associated with the CM group, although petrographic and isotopic observations have questioned that relationship. Samples of Bells and Essebi were obtained for bulk compositional study by neutron activation analysis (INAA) in an attempt to further fuel the debate on this issue. The current INAA work for Bells is complete, but analysis of Essebi is ongoing, and therefore the data is preliminary. Although CM chondrites typically contain <3 wt% magnetite, Bells and Essebi contain approximately 16 wt% and 11 wt% magnetite, respectively [1]. Both Bells and Essebi seem to have suffered more intense aqueous alteration than typical CM chondrites [2]. Bells has a phyllosilicate matrix composition closer to CI chondrites than CM chondrites [3]. The delta 15N value for Bells is much higher than any of the established carbonaceous chondrite groups[4]. Carbonate material in Essebi has delta 13C compositions (+62 per mil to +80 per mil) higher than the CM mode of +40 per mil to +50 per mil [5]. Both Bells and Essebi have whole rock O-isotope compositions in the CM chondrite range, but Essebi has separated matrix and magnetite values similar to whole rock and magnetite values in CI chondrites [6]. Samples of Bells were from two different stones collected after the fall. One stone was collected the day after the fall, the other was collected several days later after a hurricane went through the area. The samples will be referred to as 'normal' Bells and 'weathered' Bells, respectively. The 'normal' and 'weathered' Bells samples are very similar in composition with a few notable exceptions. The Mg-normalized abundances of Na, K and Br in 'weathered' Bells are markedly depleted relative to 'normal' Bells. The abundance of Ca is also lower to a smaller extent. One must be cautious of compositional studies of late-collected Bells specimens as they may have been altered by the affects of rainwater. Refractory lithophile abundances (Mg-normalized) in Bells are at CI chondrite levels, not CM, but volatile lithophile abundances follow a normal CM depletion pattern relative to CI chondrites. Common siderophile (Fe, Co, Ni) abundances are also at CI chondrite levels, but normalized refractory siderophile abundances are elevated relative to CI chondrites, and greater than even CM chondrite abundances. The Au abundance in Bells is lower than those of the common siderophiles, a pattern unlike CM chondrites where the abundances are all very similar. On a Zn/Mn vs. Al/Mn diagram Bells plots just outside the tight cluster of CM chondrites in the direction of CI chondrites. Bells does not easily fall into any classification scheme. It does not appear to be a CM chondrite, though. Only preliminary data is available for Essebi. Refractory siderophile abundances (Ni-normalized) are similar to CM, but volatile siderophile and chalcophile element abundances appear to be noticeably lower, a pattern similar to the anomalous chondrite Al Rais. On a Zn/Mn vs. Al/Mn diagram Essebi plots just outside the CM chondrite cluster on the side opposite Bells and very near Al Rais. Essebi may be related to the same clan as Al Rais, an idea that is also supported by their very similar whole-rock O-isotope compositions [6,7]. It is also probably not closely related to Bells. The picture on Essebi may become clearer once the INAA analysis is complete (including key lithophile elements). References: [1] Hyman M. and Rowe M. W. (1983) LPS XIV, 341-342. [2] Metzler K. et al. (1992) GCA, 56, 2873-2897. [3] Davis A. M. and Olsen E. (1984) LPS XV, 190-191. [4] Kerridge J. F. (1985) GCA, 49, 1707-1714. [5] Grady M. M. et al. (1988) GCA, 52, 2855-2866. [6] Rowe M. W. et al. (1994) GCA, 58, 5341-5347. [7] Weisberg M. K. et al. (1993) GCA, 57, 1567-1586. _

Kallemeyn, G. W.

1995-09-01

190

Properties of CM-SAF's cloud products -a statistical analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clouds have a major impact on the earth radiation budget and contribute significantly to the state of the climate system. Additionally, the space-based retrieval of other atmospheric pa-rameters is highly influenced by clouds. Therefor it is essential to assess the strengths and limitations of the satellite-derived cloud properties as accurately as possible. This study deals with those cloud products, that are operationally generated by the EUMETSAT's Satellite Ap-plication Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF). CM-SAF uses space-based observations from geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites and polar orbiting NOAA and MetOp satellites to provide satellite-derived geophysical parameter data sets suitable for climate monitoring. CM-SAF's product suite includes cloud parameters, radiation fluxes, sur-face albedo, and atmospheric water vapor, temperature and humidity profiles on a regional and partially on a global scale and thereby focuses on geophysical parameters describing the elements of the energy and water cycle. Since 2005 a threshold technique is used within the CM-SAF to derive various cloud products from satellite data, some are further estimated with an iterative look-up table approach. The properties of CM-SAF's cloud products which are cloud top variables (in here: Cloud Top Height (CTH)), Liquid Water Path (LWP), Cloud Type (CTY), Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) and Cloud Fraction (CFC) are explored and analyzed statistically. The individual products are related to each other via for example two-dimensional frequency distributions in order to verify their consistency. From these statistics average properties for certain classified types are derived, such as LWP-distributions for five different CM-SAF cloud types. Each cloud type can be characterized by an average LWP dis-tribution. Also temporal variations for the cloud properties are studied. The Cloud Top Height product for example shows strong seasonal variations, depending on latitude. Locating the maximal CTH near the equator makes it possible to easily monitor the meridional traveling of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone during the the seasons.

Kniffka, Anke; Lockhoff, Maarit; Hollmann, Rainer; Weber, Ralf

191

The nature of dark matter from the global high-redshift H I 21 cm signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the imprint of dark matter (DM) annihilation on the global 21 cm signal from the Dark Ages to Cosmic Reionization. Motivated by recent observations, we focus on three DM candidates: (i) a 10 GeV Bino-like neutralino; (ii) a 200 GeV Wino and (iii) a 1 TeV heavier particle annihilating into leptons. For each DM candidate we assume two values for the thermally averaged annihilation cross-section , the standard thermal value th = 3 × 10-26 cm3 s-1 and the maximum value allowed by WMAP7 data, max. We include the enhancement of DM annihilations due to collapsed structures, detailed estimates of energy deposition into the intergalactic medium (IGM), as well realistic prescriptions for astrophysical sources of UV and X-ray radiation. In these models, the additional heat input from DM annihilation suppresses the mean 21 cm brightness temperature offset by ?Tb ˜ a few-100 mK. In particular, the very deep ?Tb ˜ -150 mK absorption feature at ˜20 ? z ? 25 predicted by popular models of the first galaxies is considerably reduced or totally erased by some of the considered DM candidates. Such an enhancement in IGM heating could come from either DM annihilations or a stronger-than-expected astrophysical component (i.e. abundant early X-ray sources). However, we find that the two signatures are not degenerate, since the DM heating is dominated by haloes several orders of magnitude smaller than those hosting galaxies, whose fractional abundance evolves more slowly resulting in a smaller gradient: d?Tb/d? ? 4 mK MHz-1 in the range ? ˜ 60-80 MHz. The detection of such signals by future radio telescopes would be clear evidence of DM energy injection at high redshifts.

Valdés, M.; Evoli, C.; Mesinger, A.; Ferrara, A.; Yoshida, N.

2013-02-01

192

Neptune's microwave spectrum from 1 mm to 20 cm  

SciTech Connect

Total flux densities and disk-averaged brightness temperatures have been tabulated on the basis of VLA observations of Neptune at 1.3, 2, 6, and 20 cm wavelengths; a recalibration is also conducted of previous observations in order to accurately ascertain the spectral shape of this planet, which is found to have increasing brightness temperature with increasing wavelength, in contrast with that of Uranus. If all the detected emission is atmospheric thermal radiation, ammonia abundance must either be a factor of about 50 lower than the solar N value throughout the Neptune atmosphere, or the planet must emit about 0.3-0.5 mJy synchrotron radiation at 20 cm; the latter possibility is consistent with a planetary magnetic field strength of about 0.5 G at the surface. 39 refs.

De Pater, I.; Richmond, M. (California Univ., Berkeley (USA))

1989-07-01

193

Precision measurement of cosmic magnification from 21 cm emitting galaxies  

SciTech Connect

We show how precision lensing measurements can be obtained through the lensing magnification effect in high redshift 21cm emission from galaxies. Normally, cosmic magnification measurements have been seriously complicated by galaxy clustering. With precise redshifts obtained from 21cm emission line wavelength, one can correlate galaxies at different source planes, or exclude close pairs to eliminate such contaminations. We provide forecasts for future surveys, specifically the SKA and CLAR. SKA can achieve percent precision on the dark matter power spectrum and the galaxy dark matter cross correlation power spectrum, while CLAR can measure an accurate cross correlation power spectrum. The neutral hydrogen fraction was most likely significantly higher at high redshifts, which improves the number of observed galaxies significantly, such that also CLAR can measure the dark matter lensing power spectrum. SKA can also allow precise measurement of lensing bispectrum.

Zhang, Pengjie; /Fermilab; Pen, Ue-Li; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.

2005-04-01

194

Searching For Cosmic Reionization With The Hi 21cm Signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most difficult challenges for the detection of the HI 21cm signal during cosmological reionization is the accuracy of the foreground source removal. We show that bright sources (<1 Jy) need to be removed from observations of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) with a positional accuracy of approximately 0.1 arc-second. This is less than 1% of the synthesized array beam. We also demonstrate that foreground subtraction can only tolerate a residual calibration error of 0.2% in amplitude per UV cell, assuming that individual visibility errors average down over consecutive days. We present power spectra of simulated residual foreground subtraction with position and calibration errors. This thesis also includes a search for the HI 21cm absorption towards z 5 radio loud objects to search for residual neutral HI from reionization.

Datta, Abhirup; Carilli, C. L.; Bhatnagar, S.; Bowman, J. D.

2010-01-01

195

5-cm, no iron SSC 6-m dipole test program  

SciTech Connect

Magnet Design B for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) consists of a 5 cm diameter collared coil assembly 12 m long with concentric aluminum thermal shields at 10 K and 80 K, a G-10 post type support system and a minimal iron vacuum vessel located at a large radius from the coil. In order to determine the behavior of such a magnet under both direct current and quenching conditions, a 6 m model was built using Tevatron tooling to produce a 7.6 cm diameter coil. The dc operation demonstrated that the post type suspension has acceptable rigidity. Distortions in the aluminum thermal shield during quench resulted from stresses in the material below the yield values. Temperature increases in the thermal shield due to eddy currents were larger than those calculated using simple assumptions, demonstrating the value of using a model to verify eddy current behavior in complex situations.

Mazur, P.O.; Carson, J.A.; Engler, N.H.; Fisk, H.E.; Gonczy, J.D.; Hanft, R.W.; Kuchnir, M.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Nicol, T.H.

1986-02-01

196

Power distribution for an Am/Cm bushing melter  

SciTech Connect

Decades of nuclear material production at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has resulted in the generation of large quantities of the isotopes Am{sup 243} and Cm{sup 244}. Currently, the Am and Cm isotopes are stored as a nitric acid solution in a tank. The Am and Cm isotopes have great commercial value but must be transferred to ORNL for processing. The nitric acid solution contains other isotopes and is intensely radioactive, which makes storage a problem and precludes shipment in the liquid form. In order to stabilize the material for onsite storage and to permit transport the material from SRS to ORNL, it has been proposed that the Am and Cm be separated from other isotopes in the solution and vitrified. Vitrification will be effected by depositing a liquid feed stream containing the isotopes in solution, together with a stream of glass frit, onto the top of a molten glass pool in a melter. The glass is non-conducting and the melter is a Platinum/Rhodium alloy vessel which is heated by passing an electric current through it. Because most of the power is required to evaporate the liquid feed at the top of the glass pool, power demands differ for the upper and lower parts of the melter. In addition, the melter is batch fed so that the local power requirements vary with time. In order to design a unique split power supply, which ensures adequate local power delivery, an analysis of the melter power distribution was performed with the ABAQUS finite element code. ABAQUS was used to calculate the electric potential and current density distributions in the melter for a variety of current and potential boundary conditions. The results of the calculation were compared with test data and will be used to compute power densities for input to a computational fluid dynamics model for the melter.

Gong, C.; Hardy, B.J.

1996-12-31

197

Active Bragg Compressor of 3-cm Wavelength Microwave Pulses  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of studies of the active compressor of 3-cm wavelength microwave pulses, which uses a high-Q storage\\u000a Bragg resonator excited at the H01 mode and new types of plasma switches. Phase variation during a compressed pulse and phase correlation of the input and compressed\\u000a microwave pulses are studied both experimentally and theoretically. Using a single-channel compressor excited

A. L. Vikharev; A. M. Gorbachev; O. A. Ivanov; V. A. Isaev; S. V. Kuzikov; B. Z. Movshevich; J. L. Hirshfield; S. H. Gold

2008-01-01

198

Hydrologic Applications of the Connection Machine CM2  

Microsoft Academic Search

Massively parallel computers will play an increasingly dominant role in hydrological computing. One such computer is the Connection Machine model CM-2, a single-instruction stream, multiple-data stream computer with up to 65,536 processors, as much as 8 gigabytes (Gbyte) of random access memory distributed among the processors, and a FORTRAN compiler based on the proposed FORTRAN-90 standard. One-, two-, and three-dimensional

David E. Dougherty

1991-01-01

199

LARGE-EDDY SIMULATIONS OF TURBULENCE ON THE CM2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the development and performance of a computer program for large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulence on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine-2 (CM-2). The computer program solves the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations for large scales of turbulence using a second-order time and space accurate, semi-implicit, finite-difference scheme. The effects of small scales of turbulence are represented by a

Joseph Robichaux; D. K. Tafti; S. P. Vanka

1992-01-01

200

Large-eddy simulations of turbulence on the CM2  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports the development and performance of a computer program for large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulence on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine-2 (CM-2). The computer program solves the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations for large scales of turbulence using a second-order time and space accurate, semiimplicit, finite-difference scheme. The effects of small scales of turbulence are represented by a

Joseph Robichaux; D. K. Tafti; S. P. Vanka

1992-01-01

201

Cosmic Background Noise Temperature Measurements at 13-cm Wavelength  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cosmic background noise temperature measurements which were made at 13.05-cm wavelength (2297 MHz) resulted in an experimental value of [266 ± 0.77 (3¿)] K. The two largest error sources were due to uncertainties in the calibration of the liquid helium cooled termination and the antenna transmission line. The 2.66 K value is in good agreement with the currently accepted value

Tom Y. Otoshi; Charles T. Stelzried

1975-01-01

202

Semi-Lagrangian shallow water modeling on the CM-5  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the parallel implementation of a semi-Lagrangian shallow-water model on the massively parallel Connection Machine CM-5. The four important issues we address in this article are (i) two alternative formulations of the elliptic problem and their relative efficiencies, (ii) the performance of two successive orders of a generalized conjugate residual elliptic solver, (iii) the time spent in unstructured communication -- an unavoidable feature of semi-Lagrangian schemes, and (iv) the scalability of the algorithm.

Nadiga, B.T.; Margolin, L.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smolarkiewicz, P.K. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-09-01

203

The cm-wave continuum in compact PNe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Excess 20-30GHz emission, above that expected from synchrotron or free-free templates and sub-millimetre dust emission, has been reported in HII regions, planetary nebulae (PNe), dark clouds and in the ISM at large. The excess has been modelled in terms of dipole radiation from spinning very small grains, or `spinning dust'. The cm-wave excess confronts the free-free paradigm in PNe. A

Simon Casassus; Michael Burton; Patrick Roche; Lars-Ake Nyman; Clive Dickinson; Luis Felipe Rodriguez

2007-01-01

204

Probing reionization with LOFAR using 21-cm redshift space distortions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most promising ways to study the epoch of reionization (EoR) is through radio observations of the redshifted 21-cm line emission from neutral hydrogen. These observations are complicated by the fact that the mapping of redshifts to line-of-sight positions is distorted by the peculiar velocities of the gas. Such distortions can be a source of error if they are not properly understood, but they also encode information about cosmology and astrophysics. We study the effects of redshift space distortions on the power spectrum of 21-cm radiation from the EoR using large-scale N-body and radiative transfer simulations. We quantify the anisotropy introduced in the 21-cm power spectrum by redshift space distortions and show how it evolves as reionization progresses and how it relates to the underlying physics. We go on to study the effects of redshift space distortions on LOFAR observations, taking instrument noise and foreground subtraction into account. We find that LOFAR should be able to directly observe the power spectrum anisotropy due to redshift space distortions at spatial scales around k ˜ 0.1 Mpc-1 after ?1000 h of integration time. At larger scales, sample errors become a limiting factor, while at smaller scales detector noise and foregrounds make the extraction of the signal problematic. Finally, we show how the astrophysical information contained in the evolution of the anisotropy of the 21-cm power spectrum can be extracted from LOFAR observations, and how it can be used to distinguish between different reionization scenarios.

Jensen, Hannes; Datta, Kanan K.; Mellema, Garrelt; Chapman, Emma; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Iliev, Ilian T.; Mao, Yi; Santos, Mario G.; Shapiro, Paul R.; Zaroubi, Saleem; Bernardi, G.; Brentjens, M. A.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Ciardi, B.; Harker, G. J. A.; Jeli?, V.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Labropoulos, P.; Martinez, O.; Offringa, A. R.; Pandey, V. N.; Schaye, J.; Thomas, R. M.; Veligatla, V.; Vedantham, H.; Yatawatta, S.

2013-10-01

205

Low velocity collisions of cm-sized dust-aggregates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low velocity collisions between dust aggregates are very important to understand the mecha-nism leading to planetesimal formation. Especially, the complete chain of processes in the post-fractal growth of proto-planetary dust-aggregates is still unknown. For most binary collisions between dust aggregates, short-duration microgravity experiments are required. Therefore, we built a laboratory vacuum drop tower, allowing us to perform up to 10 collision experiments per day. The setup consists of an evacuated glass tube of 22 cm diameter with a free-fall height of 1.5m, providing us with 0.56 s of microgravity. Using a two-level particle release mechanism, we can perform particle-particle collisions with relative velocities between less than 1 cm/s and several m/s. For a three-dimensional observation of the experiment, we placed two free-falling high-speed cameras outside the vacuum tube, separated by an angle of 90° , which are able to observe the dust aggregates before, during and after their encounter. We will present the results of collisions between cm-sized dust aggregates, consisting of µm-sized, monodisperse SiO2 spheres. We measured the coefficient of restitution in bouncing collisions, the mass loss and the total disruption energy for fragmenting collisions. With these measurements, we are able to refine the model of planetesimal formation.

Beitz, Eike; Blum, Jurgen; Güttler, Carsten

206

21cm angular-power spectrum from the dark ages  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At redshifts z?30 neutral hydrogen gas absorbs cosmic microwave background radiation at the 21 cm spin-flip frequency. In principle this is observable and a high-precision probe of cosmology. We calculate the linear-theory angular-power spectrum of this signal and cross correlation between redshifts on scales much larger than the linewidth. In addition to the well-known redshift distortion and density perturbation sources, a full linear analysis gives additional contributions to the power spectrum. On small scales there is a percent-level linear effect due to perturbations in the 21 cm optical depth, and perturbed recombination modifies the gas temperature perturbation evolution (and hence spin temperature and 21 cm power spectrum). On large scales there are several post-Newtonian and velocity effects; although negligible on small scales, these additional terms can be significant at l?100 and can be nonzero even when there is no background signal. We also discuss the linear effect of reionization rescattering, which damps the entire spectrum and gives a very small polarization signal on large scales. On small scales we also model the significant nonlinear effects of evolution and gravitational lensing. We include full results for numerical calculation and also various approximate analytic results for the power spectrum and evolution of small-scale perturbations.

Lewis, Antony; Challinor, Anthony

2007-10-01

207

21 cm angular-power spectrum from the dark ages  

SciTech Connect

At redshifts z > or approx. 30 neutral hydrogen gas absorbs cosmic microwave background radiation at the 21 cm spin-flip frequency. In principle this is observable and a high-precision probe of cosmology. We calculate the linear-theory angular-power spectrum of this signal and cross correlation between redshifts on scales much larger than the linewidth. In addition to the well-known redshift distortion and density perturbation sources, a full linear analysis gives additional contributions to the power spectrum. On small scales there is a percent-level linear effect due to perturbations in the 21 cm optical depth, and perturbed recombination modifies the gas temperature perturbation evolution (and hence spin temperature and 21 cm power spectrum). On large scales there are several post-Newtonian and velocity effects; although negligible on small scales, these additional terms can be significant at l < or approx. 100 and can be nonzero even when there is no background signal. We also discuss the linear effect of reionization rescattering, which damps the entire spectrum and gives a very small polarization signal on large scales. On small scales we also model the significant nonlinear effects of evolution and gravitational lensing. We include full results for numerical calculation and also various approximate analytic results for the power spectrum and evolution of small-scale perturbations.

Lewis, Antony [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Challinor, Anthony [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2007-10-15

208

Multi-cm Long Magnetically Controlled Optical Plasma Channel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental results from the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which show multi-cm long plasma channels with minimum plasma densities below 5x10^17 cm-3 are presented. These results are obtained using an external magnetic field (<5 Tesla) to limit the radial heat flux from a pre-forming laser beam. The resulting increased plasma pressure gradient produces a parabolic density gradient which is shown to be tunable by changing the external magnetic field strength. These results are compared with 3-D resistive MHD modeling. For these channel conditions, quasi-static kinetic simulations show that 90% of the energy in a 150 TW short pulse beam is guided over 5 cm and predict electron energy gains of 3 GeV from Laser Wakefield Acceleration. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was partially funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program under project tracking code 06-ERD-056.

Pollock, Bradley; Froula, Dustin; Tynan, George; Divol, Laurent; Davis, Paul; Palastro, John; Price, Dwight; Glenzer, Siegfried

2008-11-01

209

Circulating monocytes are reduced by sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor modulators independently of S1P3.  

PubMed

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors are critical for lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid organs, and S1P receptor modulators suppress lymphocyte circulation. However, the role of S1P receptors on monocytes is less clear. To elucidate this, we systematically evaluated monocytes in rats and mice, both in naive and inflammatory conditions, with S1P receptor modulators FTY720 and BAF312. We demonstrate that S1P receptor modulators reduce circulating monocytes in a similar time course as lymphocytes. Furthermore, total monocyte numbers were increased in the spleen and bone marrow, suggesting that S1P receptor modulation restricts egress from hematopoietic organs. Monocytes treated ex vivo with FTY720 had reduced CD40 expression and TNF-? production, suggesting a direct effect on monocyte activation. Similar reductions in protein expression and cytokine production were also found in vivo. Suppression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice and rats by FTY720 correlated with reduced numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes. These effects on monocytes were independent of S1P3, as treatment with BAF312, a S1P1,4,5 modulator, led to similar results. These data reveal a novel role for S1P receptors on monocytes and offer additional insights on the mechanism of action of S1P receptor modulators in disease. PMID:23436932

Lewis, Nuruddeen D; Haxhinasto, Sokol A; Anderson, Shawn M; Stefanopoulos, Dimitria E; Fogal, Steven E; Adusumalli, Prathima; Desai, Sudha N; Patnaude, Lori A; Lukas, Susan M; Ryan, Kelli R; Slavin, Anthony J; Brown, Maryanne L; Modis, Louise K

2013-02-22

210

Discovery, design and synthesis of a selective S1P3 receptor allosteric agonist.  

PubMed

Potent and selective S1P3 receptor (S1P3-R) agonists may represent important proof-of-principle tools used to clarify the receptor biological function and assess the therapeutic potential of the S1P3-R in cardiovascular, inflammatory and pulmonary diseases. N,N-Dicyclohexyl-5-propylisoxazole-3-carboxamide was identified by a high-throughput screening of MLSMR library as a promising S1P3-R agonist. Rational chemical modifications of the hit allowed the identification of N,N-dicyclohexyl-5-cyclopropylisoxazole-3-carboxamide, a S1P3-R agonist endowed with submicromolar activity and exquisite selectivity over the remaining S1P1,2,4,5-R family members. A combination of ligand competition, site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling studies showed that the N,N-dicyclohexyl-5-cyclopropylisoxazole-3-carboxamide is an allosteric agonist and binds to the S1P3-R in a manner that does not disrupt the S1P3-R-S1P binding. The lead molecule herein disclosed constitutes a valuable pharmacological tool to explore the molecular basis of the receptor function, and provides the bases for further rational design of more potent and drug-like S1P3-R allosteric agonists. PMID:24135724

Guerrero, Miguel; Poddutoori, Ramulu; Urbano, Mariangela; Peng, Xuemei; Spicer, Timothy P; Chase, Peter S; Hodder, Peter S; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Brown, Steven; Rosen, Hugh; Roberts, Edward

2013-10-01

211

Randomised phase II study of S-1/cisplatin plus TSU-68 vs S-1/cisplatin in patients with advanced gastric cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: This study aimed to determine whether combination S-1 plus cisplatin (CDDP) therapy, the most widely used therapy for Japanese patients with advanced gastric cancer, and the novel oral antiangiogenic agent TSU-68 could contribute to gastric cancer treatment. Methods: Ninety-three patients with chemotherapy-naïve unresectable or recurrent advanced gastric cancers were randomised into two groups: TSU-68 plus S-1/CDDP (group A) and S-1/CDDP (group B) groups. Both patient groups received identical S-1 and CDDP dosages. TSU-68 was orally administered for 35 consecutive days. Group B patients received S-1 orally twice daily for three consecutive weeks, followed by intravenous CDDP on day 8. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Median PFS periods were 208 and 213 days in groups A and B, respectively (P=0.427). Median survival periods for groups A and B were 497.0 and 463.5 days, respectively (P=0.219). No statistically significant differences were noted for PFS, survival or the adverse event (AE) incidence rate. All AEs were expected according to previous reports for TSU-68, TS-1, and CDDP. Conclusion: Combination therapy involving TSU-68, S-1, and CDDP was safe and well tolerated in patients with chemotherapy-naïve unresectable or recurrent advanced gastric cancers. However, factors related to therapeutic efficacy should be investigated further.

Koizumi, W; Yamaguchi, K; Hosaka, H; Takinishi, Y; Nakayama, N; Hara, T; Muro, K; Baba, H; Sasaki, Y; Nishina, T; Fuse, N; Esaki, T; Takagi, M; Gotoh, M; Sasaki, T

2013-01-01

212

Randomised phase II study of S-1/cisplatin plus TSU-68 vs S-1/cisplatin in patients with advanced gastric cancer.  

PubMed

Background:This study aimed to determine whether combination S-1 plus cisplatin (CDDP) therapy, the most widely used therapy for Japanese patients with advanced gastric cancer, and the novel oral antiangiogenic agent TSU-68 could contribute to gastric cancer treatment.Methods:Ninety-three patients with chemotherapy-naïve unresectable or recurrent advanced gastric cancers were randomised into two groups: TSU-68 plus S-1/CDDP (group A) and S-1/CDDP (group B) groups. Both patient groups received identical S-1 and CDDP dosages. TSU-68 was orally administered for 35 consecutive days. Group B patients received S-1 orally twice daily for three consecutive weeks, followed by intravenous CDDP on day 8. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS).Results:Median PFS periods were 208 and 213 days in groups A and B, respectively (P=0.427). Median survival periods for groups A and B were 497.0 and 463.5 days, respectively (P=0.219). No statistically significant differences were noted for PFS, survival or the adverse event (AE) incidence rate. All AEs were expected according to previous reports for TSU-68, TS-1, and CDDP.Conclusion:Combination therapy involving TSU-68, S-1, and CDDP was safe and well tolerated in patients with chemotherapy-naïve unresectable or recurrent advanced gastric cancers. However, factors related to therapeutic efficacy should be investigated further. PMID:24045669

Koizumi, W; Yamaguchi, K; Hosaka, H; Takinishi, Y; Nakayama, N; Hara, T; Muro, K; Baba, H; Sasaki, Y; Nishina, T; Fuse, N; Esaki, T; Takagi, M; Gotoh, M; Sasaki, T

2013-09-17

213

Post-marketing Safety Evaluation of S-1 in Patients with Inoperable or Recurrent Breast Cancer: Especially in Patients Treated with S-1 + Trastuzumab  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of S-1 in Japanese in inoperable or recurrent breast cancer patients. Methods A prospective post-marketing surveillance was performed at 313 sites in Japan in patients with inoperable or recurrent breast cancer treated with S-1. We examined 1361 patients between January 2006 and December 2007 with regard to the incidence of adverse drug reactions graded by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. Results At least one adverse drug reaction was encountered by 858 patients, with an overall incidence of 63.0% (858/1361). The incidence of Grade 3 or higher adverse drug reactions in a descending order was 14.7% (200/1361). In this study, the most common combination drug was trastuzumab. The overall incidence of adverse drug reactions was 63.5% (431/679 patients) in patients treated with S-1 alone, and 55.9% (66/118 patients) in patients treated with S-1 + trastuzumab. Conclusions Monotherapy with S-1 or combination therapy with S-1 + trastuzumab was well tolerated for inoperable or recurrent breast cancer patients.

Saito, Yuki; Oshitanai, Risa; Terao, Mayako; Terada, Mizuho; Tsuda, Banri; Okamura, Takuho; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Tokuda, Yutaka

2011-01-01

214

GMRT mini-survey to search for 21-cm absorption in quasar-galaxy pairs at z ~ 0.1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results from our 21-cm absorption survey of a sample of five quasar-galaxy pairs (QGPs), with the redshift of the galaxies in the range 0.03 <= zg <= 0.18, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The HI 21-cm absorption was searched towards the nine sightlines with impact parameters ranging from ~10 to ~55 kpc using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). 21-cm absorption was detected only in one case, i.e. towards the quasar (zq = 2.625 SDSS J124157.54+633241.6)-galaxy (zg = 0.143 SDSS J124157.26+633237.6) pair with the impact parameter ~11 kpc. The quasar sightline in this case pierces through the stellar disc of a galaxy having near solar metallicity [i.e. (O/H)+12 = 8.7] and star formation rate uncorrected for dust attenuation of 0.1 Msolar yr-1. The quasar spectrum reddened by the foreground galaxy is well fitted with the Milky Way extinction curve (with an AV of 0.44) and the estimated HI column density is similar to the value obtained from 21-cm absorption assuming a spin temperature (TS) of 100 K. In the remaining cases, our GMRT spectra provide upper limit on N(HI) in the range (1017-1018) × TS cm-2. Combining our sample with the z <= 0.1 data available in the literature, we find the detectability of 21-cm absorption with integrated optical depth greater than 0.1 km s-1 to be 50 per cent for the impact parameter less than 20 kpc. Using the surface brightness profiles and a well-established relationship between the optical size and extent of the HI disc known for nearby galaxies, we conclude that in most of the cases of 21-cm absorption non-detection, the sightlines may not be passing through the HI gas (1? column density of a few times 1019 cm-2). We also find that in comparison to the absorption systems associated with these QGPs, z < 1 damped Lyman-? absorbers (DLAs) with 21-cm absorption detections have lower CaII equivalent widths despite having higher 21-cm optical depths and smaller impact parameters. This suggests that the current sample of DLAs may be a biased population that avoids sightlines through dusty star-forming galaxies. A systematic survey of QGPs over a wider redshift range using a large sample is needed to confirm these findings and understand the nature of 21-cm absorbers.

Gupta, N.; Srianand, R.; Bowen, D. V.; York, D. G.; Wadadekar, Y.

2010-10-01

215

Early pre-perihelion characterization of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) is a dynamically new comet on a sungrazing orbit. As such, C/ISON represents a unique opportunity to study both the cosmic-ray-irradiated surface, produced during the comet's long residence in the Oort cloud, and much deeper layers in the nucleus, exposed when the comet passes 1.7 solar radii from the Sun's surface at perihelion. During the first phase of our investigation, we collected broadband images of C/ISON on April 10, 2012 at a heliocentric distance of 4.15 AU, using the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS. We used the F606W and F438W filters in three HST orbits covering a total span of ~19 hrs. The comet shows a well delineated coma in the sunward direction extending about 2" from the nucleus, and a dust tail at least 25" long. The coma has an average red color of 5%/0.1 micron within 1.6" from the nucleus, becoming redder towards the tail. Both the color and the size of the coma in the sunward direction are consistent with outflow of micron sized dust. Broadband photometry yielded Af? of 1376 cm at 589 nm, and 1281 cm at 433 nm, measured with a 1.6" radius aperture. The total brightness of the comet within a 0.12" radius aperture remained unchanged within 0.03 mag for the entire duration of the observations. A well defined sunward jet is visible after removing the 1/? brightness distribution. The jet is centered at position angle 290 deg (E of Celestial N), with a cone angle of 45 deg, a projected length of 1.6", and a slight curvature towards the north near the end. No temporal change in the morphology is observed, suggesting the jet is circumpolar. Under this assumption, the jet’s apparent position constrains the rotational pole to lie within 30 deg of (RA, Dec) = (330, 0), and an obliquity of 50-80 deg. Preliminary analysis using a coma-nucleus separation technique suggests a nuclear radius less than 2 km. The survival of such a small nucleus during its sungrazing perihelion is certainly questionable.

Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, M. S.; Farnham, T. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Knight, M. M.; Weaver, H. A.; Mutchler, M. J.; Lamy, P.; Toth, I.

2013-10-01

216

Search for the Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Decay B0s-->mu+mu- in pp¯ Collisions at &surd;(s)=1.96 TeV with the D0 Detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B0s-->mu+mu- using a data set with integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at &surd;(s)=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We find the upper limit on the branching fraction to be B(B0s-->mu+mu-)<=5.0×10-7 at the 95% C.L. assuming

V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; M. Agelou; J.-L. Agram; S. H. Ahn; M. Ahsan; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; M. Anastasoaie; S. Anderson; B. Andrieu; Y. Arnoud; A. Askew; B. Åsman; O. Atramentov; C. Autermann; C. Avila; F. Badaud; A. Baden; B. Baldin; P. W. Balm; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Bargassa; P. Baringer; C. Barnes; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; D. Bauer; A. Bellavance; S. Beauceron; M. Begel; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besançon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; M. Binder; K. M. Black; I. Blackler; G. Blazey; F. Blekman; S. Blessing; D. Bloch; U. Blumenschein; A. Boehnlein; O. Boeriu; T. A. Bolton; F. Borcherding; G. Borissov; K. Bos; T. Bose; A. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; N. J. Buchanan; D. Buchholz; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; S. Burdin; T. H. Burnett; E. Busato; J. M. Butler; J. Bystricky; W. Carvalho; B. C. Casey; N. M. Cason; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; D. Chapin; F. Charles; E. Cheu; L. Chevalier; D. K. Cho; S. Choi; T. Christiansen; L. Christofek; D. Coppage; B. Clément; C. Clément; Y. Coadou; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; J. Coss; A. Cothenet; M.-C. Cousinou; S. Crépé-Renaudin; M. Cristetiu; M. A. Cummings; D. Cutts; H. da Motta; B. Davies; G. Davies; G. A. Davis; K. de; P. de Jong; S. J. de Jong; E. de La Cruz-Burelo; C. de Oliveira Martins; S. Dean; F. Déliot; P. A. Delsart; M. Demarteau; R. Demina; P. Demine; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; M. Doidge; H. Dong; S. Doulas; L. Duflot; S. R. Dugad; A. Duperrin; J. Dyer; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; T. Edwards; J. Ellison; J. Elmsheuser; J. T. Eltzroth; V. D. Elvira; S. Eno; P. Ermolov; O. V. Eroshin; J. Estrada; D. Evans; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; J. Fast; S. N. Fatakia; L. Feligioni; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; W. Freeman; S. Fu; S. Fuess; T. Gadfort; C. F. Galea; E. Gallas; E. Galyaev; C. Garcia; A. Garcia-Bellido; J. Gardner; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; D. Gelé; R. Gelhaus; K. Genser; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; T. Golling; B. Gómez; K. Gounder; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; Ph. Gris; J.-F. Grivaz; L. Groer; S. Grünendahl; M. W. Grünewald; S. N. Gurzhiev; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; N. J. Hadley; S. Hagopian; I. Hall; R. E. Hall; C. Han; L. Han; K. Hanagaki; K. Harder; R. Harrington; J. M. Hauptman; R. Hauser; J. Hays; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; J. M. Heinmiller; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; S. J. Hong; R. Hooper; P. Houben; Y. Hu; J. Huang; I. Iashvili; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffré; S. Jain; V. Jain; K. Jakobs; A. Jenkins; R. Jesik; K. Johns; M. Johnson; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; H. Jöstlein; A. Juste; M. M. Kado; D. Käfer; W. Kahl; S. Kahn; E. Kajfasz; A. M. Kalinin; J. Kalk; D. Karmanov; J. Kasper; D. Kau; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; S. Kesisoglou; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. M. Kharzheev; K. H. Kim; B. Klima; M. Klute; J. M. Kohli; M. Kopal; V. M. Korablev; J. Kotcher; B. Kothari; A. Koubarovsky; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kozminski; S. Krzywdzinski; S. Kuleshov; Y. Kulik; S. Kunori; A. Kupco; T. Kurca; S. Lager; N. Lahrichi; G. Landsberg; J. Lazoflores; A.-C. Le Bihan; P. Lebrun; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; A. Leflat; F. Lehner; C. Leonidopoulos; P. Lewis; J. Li; Q. Z. Li; J. G. Lima; D. Lincoln; S. L. Linn; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; L. Lobo; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; A. Lounis; H. J. Lubatti; L. Lueking; M. Lynker; A. L. Lyon; A. K. Maciel; R. J. Madaras; P. Mättig; A. Magerkurth; A.-M. Magnan; N. Makovec; P. K. Mal; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; H. S. Mao; Y. Maravin; M. Martens; S. E. Mattingly; A. A. Mayorov; R. McCarthy; R. McCroskey; D. Meder; H. L. Melanson; A. Melnitchouk; M. Merkin; K. W. Merritt; A. Meyer; H. Miettinen; D. Mihalcea; J. Mitrevski; N. Mokhov; J. Molina; N. K. Mondal; H. E. Montgomery; R. W. Moore; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulders; Y. D. Mutaf; E. Nagy; M. Narain; N. A. Naumann; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; S. Nelson; P. Neustroev; C. Noeding; A. Nomerotski; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; E. Nurse; V. O'dell; D. C. O'Neil; V. Oguri; N. Oliveira; N. Oshima; G. J. Otero Y Garzón; P. Padley; N. Parashar; S. K. Park; J. Parsons; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; P. M. Perea; E. Perez; O. Peters; P. Pétroff; M. Petteni; L. Phaf; R. Piegaia; P. L. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; Y. Pogorelov; B. G. Pope; W. L. Prado da Silva; H. B. Prosper; S. Protopopescu; M. B. Przybycien; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; K. J. Rani; P. A. Rapidis; P. N. Ratoff; N. W. Reay; S. Reucroft; M. Rijssenbeek; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; C. Royon; P. Rubinov

2005-01-01

217

Influence of salt and pyrophosphate on bovine fast and slow myosin S1 dissociation from actin  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetics of myosin dissociation from actin was investigated and also the impact of salt, MgPPi, and myosin heavy chain isoform on myosin subfragment 1 (S1) dissociation from actin using purified proteins and fluorescence spectroscopy. Both NaCl and MgPPi increased myosin S1 dissociation rate. When salt concentrations increased from 0.1 to 1.0M, the dissociation rate of S1 from bovine masseter

Qingwu W. Shen; Darl R. Swartz

2010-01-01

218

S1P1 receptor expression regulates emergence of NKT cells in peripheral tissues  

Microsoft Academic Search

The S1P1 receptor, on the surface of lymphocytes and endothelial cells, regulates the unique trafficking behavior of certain lymphocyte populations. We have examined whether the S1P1 receptor also dictates the distinctive tissue distribution of V14-J18 natural killer T (NKT) cells, whose trafficking pattern is not well understood. Mice (TCS1P1KO) were estab- lished with a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor

Maria L. Allende; Dapeng Zhou; Danielle N. Kalkofen; Sonia Benhamed; Galina Tuymetova; Christine Borowski; Albert Bendelac; Richard L. Proia

2007-01-01

219

Observations of the 18-cm OH lines of Comet 103P/Hartley 2 at Nançay in support to the EPOXI and Herschel missions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 18-cm radio lines of the OH radical were observed in Comet 103P/Hartley 2 with the Nançay radio telescope in support to its flyby by the EPOXI mission and to observations with the Herschel Space Observatory. The OH lines were detected from 24 September to 15 December 2010. These observations are used to estimate the gas expansion velocity within the coma to 0.83 ± 0.08 km s-1 in October 2010. The water production increased steeply but progressively before perihelion, and reached 1.9 ± 0.3 × 1028 s-1 just before the EPOXI flyby.

Crovisier, Jacques; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Boissier, Jérémie

2013-02-01

220

Flow-regulated endothelial S1P receptor-1 signaling sustains vascular development  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY During angiogenesis, nascent vascular sprouts fuse to form vascular networks enabling efficient circulation. Mechanisms that stabilize the vascular plexus are not well understood. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lipid mediator implicated in the regulation of vascular and immune systems. Here we describe a mechanism by which the G protein-coupled S1P receptor-1 (S1P1) stabilizes the primary vascular network. A gradient of S1P1 expression from the mature regions of the vascular network to the growing vascular front was observed. In the absence of endothelial S1P1, adherens junctions are destabilized, barrier function is breached, and flow is perturbed resulting in abnormal vascular hypersprouting. Interestingly, S1P1 responds to S1P as well as laminar shear stress to transduce flow-mediated signaling in endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that blood flow and circulating S1P activate endothelial S1P1 to stabilize blood vessels in development and homeostasis.

Jung, Bongnam; Obinata, Hideru; Galvani, Sylvain; Mendelson, Karen; Ding, Bisen; Skoura, Athanasia; Kinzel, Bernd; Brinkmann, Volker; Rafii, Shahin; Evans, Todd; Hla, Timothy

2012-01-01

221

S1P? localizes to the colonic vasculature in ulcerative colitis and maintains blood vessel integrity.  

PubMed

Signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor? (S1P?) promotes blood vessel barrier function. Degradation of S1P? results in increased vascular permeability in the lung and may explain side effects associated with administration of FTY720, a functional antagonist of the S1P? receptor that is currently used to treat multiple sclerosis. Ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by an increased density of abnormal vessels. The expression or role of S1P? in blood vessels in the colon has not been investigated. In the present study, we show that S1P? is overexpressed in the colonic mucosa of UC patients. This increase in S1P? levels reflects increased vascular density in the inflamed mucosa. Genetic deletion of S1pr1 in mice increases colonic vascular permeability under basal conditions and increases bleeding in experimental colitis. In contrast, neither FTY720 nor AUY954, two S1P receptor-targeting agents, increases bleeding in experimental colitis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that S1P? is critical to maintaining colonic vascular integrity and may play a role in UC pathogenesis. PMID:23296878

Montrose, David C; Scherl, Ellen J; Bosworth, Brian P; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Jung, Bongnam; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Hla, Timothy

2013-01-07

222

Human Being Imaging with cm-Wave UWB Radar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Possibilities of high-resolution human body imaging and concealed weapon detection using centimeter-wave microwave frequencies are investigated. Dependencies of the cross-range resolution of different imaging techniques on operational bandwidth, center frequency, imaging aperture size, and imaging topology have been studied. It has been demonstrated that the cross-range resolution of 2 cm can be achieved using frequencies below 10 GHz. These findings have been verified experimentally by producing high-resolution images of a foil-covered doll and some weapons.

Yarovoy, A.; Zhuge, X.; Savelyev, T.; Matuzas, J.; Levitas, B.

223

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-322 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-322 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 322).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

224

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-317 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-317 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 317).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

225

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-279 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-279 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 279).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

226

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-309 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-309 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 309).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

227

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-287 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-287 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 287).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

228

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-273 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-273 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 273).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

229

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-321 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-321 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 321).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

230

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-323 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-323 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 323).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

231

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-289 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-289 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 289).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

232

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-314 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-314 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 314).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

233

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-313 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-313 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 313).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

234

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-312 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-312 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 312).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

235

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-299 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-299 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 299).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

236

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-275 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-275 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 275).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

237

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-305 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-305 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 305).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

238

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-310 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-310 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 310).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

239

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-306 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-306 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 306).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

240

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-324 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-324 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 324).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

241

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-291 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-291 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 291).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

242

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-288 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-288 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 288).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

243

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-318 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-318 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 318).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

244

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-290 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-290 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 290).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

245

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-300 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-300 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 300).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

246

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-320 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-320 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 320).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

247

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-301 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-301 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 301).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

248

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-308 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-308 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 308).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

249

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-326 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-326 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 326).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

250

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-298 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-298 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 298).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

251

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-302 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-302 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 302).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

252

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-311 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-311 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 311).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

253

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-292 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-292 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 292).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

254

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-297 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-297 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 297).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

255

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-274 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-274 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 274).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

256

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-296 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-296 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 296).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

257

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-278 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-278 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 278).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

258

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-325 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-325 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 325).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

259

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-281 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-281 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 281).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

260

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-276 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-276 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 276).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

261

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-315 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-315 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 315).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

262

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-319 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-319 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 319).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

263

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-293 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-293 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 293).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

264

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-307 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-307 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 307).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

265

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-284 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-284 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 284).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

266

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-282 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-282 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 282).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

267

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-295 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-295 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 295).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

268

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-286 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-286 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 286).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

269

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-303 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-303 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 303).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

270

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-316 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-316 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 316).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

271

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-294 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-294 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 294).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

272

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-280 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-280 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 280).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

273

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-277 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-277 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 277).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

274

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-283 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-283 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 283).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

275

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-304 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-304 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 304).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

276

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-285 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-285 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 285).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

277

CM_SAF's climate monitoring products for the Arctic  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The low cloud amounts over the Western Arctic Ocean in summer 2007 have been proposed as one contributing factor to the unprecedented rapid melting of sea ice during the polar summer of 2007. Such analyses and the continuous monitoring of such processes require stable long-term satellite based climate monitoring products. As component of EUMETSAT's activities in climate monitoring, the Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF; www.cmsaf.eu) provides climate monitoring products derived from meteorological satellites. In 2009 the CM-SAF's product suite has been extended to the Arctic. Several cloud parameters (cloud fraction; cloud type; cloud top height / temperature / pressure) as well as surface albedo are derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on-board polar-orbiting satellites (NOAA-17/18 and MetOP2). CM-SAF's operational processing environment generates daily and monthly mean products with a spatial resolution of 15km*15km on a day-to-day basis. The processing exploits AVHRR data at full spatial resolution (~1.1 km at nadir) for all available overpaths (~43 per day for the three satellites) and is based on algorithms that were provided by the "EUMETSAT SAF in Support to Nowcasting and Very Short-Range Forecasting". These are based on multi-spectral threshold techniques applied to each pixel of the satellite scenes. Operational processing has been started with January 2009. Selected months in 2007 had been generated for product validation. In this contribution we illustrate features of these datasets and show results of validations against ground-based measurements (synoptic manual observations). In agreement with other studies, the data indicate that for some part of the Arctic, low cloud amounts occurred in summer 2007 which could be a contributing factor to the ice melt during the summer of 2007. In support of the International Polar Year CM-SAF has also processed these data for winter 2007/08. Currently the reprocessing of a long-time series starting 1982 is prepared.

Kaspar, Frank; Hollmann, Rainer; Lockhoff, Maarit; Karlsson, Karl-Göran; Stein, Diana; Fuchs, Petra

2010-05-01

278

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-221 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-221 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 221).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

279

Soft Li-Ti-Zn ferrites with resistivity > 108?.cm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lithium-Titanium-Zinc spinel ferrites are shown to be candidates to replace Mn-Zn or Mn-Mg-Zn ferrites in industrial applications such as television deflection yokes where moderate initial permeability (500 to 1000) but high resistivity (>108?cm) are needed. The best compromises are found in the composition range given by0.45 leq z leq 0.60and0 leq t leq 0.15in the following formula : Li0.5(1+t-z)ZnzMnmFe2.5(1-0.2z-0.6t-0.4m-?)TitO4where the

W. Simonet; A. Hermosin

1978-01-01

280

Conformational Isomerization of bis-(4-HYDROXYPHENYL)METHANE in a Supersonic Jet Expansion. Part II: Internal Mixing and Low Barrier Potential Energy Surface in the S_{1} State.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The close proximity of two identical ultraviolet chromophores render bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)methane (B4HPM) an interesting case for the study of the dependence of excitonic coupling on the distortion along low-frequency large-amplitude vibrational coordinates, in particular the phenol ring torsional coordinates present in B4HPM. We have studied the fluorescence excitation spectrum, the UV-UV holeburning spectra and several single vibronic level fluorescence spectra of the tilde{A}^{1}B(S_{1}) ? tilde{X}^{1}A(S_{0}) and the tilde{B}^{1}A(S_{2}) ? tilde{X}^{1}A(S_{0}) transition of all three conformers of B4HPM in a supersonic jet. Excitonic splitting between the two chromophores shifts the second excited state S_{2} ? S_{0} by merely 132 cm^{-1} from the S_{1} ? S_{0} origin in both symmetric conformers. The analysis of the dispersed fluorescence spectra of the S_{2} origins reveals that these levels are internally mixed with nearby S_{1} vibronic levels, providing a fingerprint of the levels involved in the mixing. The dispersed fluorescence spectra of several low-energy S_{1} ? S_{0} vibronic transitions of a specific conformer were taken under systematic variation of the collision frequency in the region where supersonic jet and laser pulse train intersect. These spectra reveal fluorescence contributions from the other two conformers, thus indicating the presence of low-energy conformational barriers (˜ 40-80 cm^{-1}) in the S_{1} state of B4HPM.

Müller, Christian W.; Rodrigo, Chirantha P.; James, William H. James, III; Pillsbury, Nathan R.; Zwier, Timothy S.

2009-06-01

281

1 cm Observations of Asteroids and Galilelean Satellites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Asteroids 1 Ceres, 2 Pallas, and 4 Vesta and Galilean satellites Ganymede, Callisto, and Europa were observed in February and March, 2012 near 1 cm with the Green Bank Telescope in order to look for and characterize any deviations from a blackbody curve. The Caltech Continuum Backend instrument on that telescope provides uniquely useful information by simultaneously measuring 4 continuum bands between 7 and 11 mm, thus enabling the direct measurement of continuum slope. Ceres and Vesta are both successfully detected and show non-zero slopes in brightness temperature. Vesta's 1 cm continuum also shows some change with longitude that may be related to the previously detected light-curve at 3 mm (Müller and Barnes 2007). Observing the icy Galilean satellites is complicated by contamination from Jupiter's presence in the sidelobes of a single dish telescope. A technique for detecting and removing this contamination is applied. Overall, brightness temperature numbers are in agreement with previous observations at other wavelengths, but non-zero slopes in brightness temperature are also detected which require further analysis.

Ries, Paul

2012-10-01

282

Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to discuss the findings of the Am/Cm Oxalate Precipitation and Washing Demonstration carried out at TNX during December 1995. This demonstration consisted of two steps: oxalate precipitation and precipitate washing. The first step reacted Am/Cm stimulant solution with oxalic acid resulting in the formation of insoluble lanthanide oxalates and soluble metal oxalates. The second step consisted of washing the precipitate with equal volumes of a nitric acid/oxalic acid solution to remove unwanted cations (miscellaneous metals) from the slurry. Quantitative results consist of: the solubility of the metallic impurities and lanthanide oxalates under process conditions, the settling rate of the oxalates, the specific volume of the oxalate precipitate, and the minimum distance the solution transfer jet can be place from the oxalate solids to prevent entrainment. Finally, discussion of how to decrease lanthanide losses is presented in terms of transfer jet location, initial nitric acid concentration, and wash nitric acid concentration. Solubilizing the precipitate and adjusting the nitric acid concentration prior to vitrification were not performed in this demonstration.

Beck, S.B.

1996-06-11

283

Wouthuysen-Field coupling strength and application to high-redshift 21-cm radiation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first ultraviolet sources in the universe are expected to have coupled the HI spin temperature to the gas kinetic temperature via scattering in the Ly? resonance (the `Wouthuysen-Field effect'). By establishing an HI spin temperature different from the temperature of the cosmic microwave background, the Wouthuysen-Field effect should allow observations of HI during the reionization epoch in the redshifted 21-cm hyperfine line. This paper investigates four mechanisms that can affect the strength of the Wouthuysen-Field effect that were not previously considered. (1) Photons redshifting into the HI Lyman resonances may excite an H atom and result in a radiative cascade terminating in two-photon 2s1/2-> 1s1/2 emission, rather than always degrading to Ly? as usually assumed. (2) The fine structure of the Ly? resonance alters the photon frequency distribution and leads to a suppression of the scattering rate. (3) The spin-flip scatterings change the frequency of the photon and cause the photon spectrum to relax not to the kinetic temperature of the gas but to a temperature between the kinetic and spin temperatures, effectively reducing the strength of the Wouthuysen-Field coupling. (4) Near line centre, a photon can change its frequency by several times the line width in a single scattering event, thus potentially invalidating the usual calculation of the Ly? spectral distortion based on the diffusion approximation. It is shown that (1) suppresses the Wouthuysen-Field coupling strength by a factor of up to ~2, while (2) and (3) are important only at low kinetic temperatures. Effect (4) has a <=3 per cent effect for kinetic temperatures Tk>= 2K. In particular, if the pre-reionization intergalactic medium was efficiently heated by X-rays, only effect (1) is important. Fitting formulae for the Wouthuysen-Field coupling strength are provided for the range of Tk>= 2K and Gunn-Peterson optical depth 105 < ?GP < 107 so that all of these effects can be easily incorporated into 21-cm codes.

Hirata, Christopher M.

2006-03-01

284

Alveolar Gas - Mac 10.7 Version  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Alveolar Gas is a computer program that lets you study some of the physiological factors that affect the composition of alveolar and expired gases. Such factors include dead space, tidal volume, the frequency of breathing, and the rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production. A worksheet is included.

2012-09-20

285

FDA PAGE 10-7-02  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

Text Version... Problem: The Food & Drug Administration has received six medication error reports involv- ing cases of inadvertent administra- tion of methadone ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/drugsafety

286

New Measurements of H2 16O Line Intensities around 8800 CM-1 and 1300 CM-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A precise knowledge of spectroscopic parameters for atmospheric molecules is necessary for the control and the modelling of the Earth's atmosphere. The water vapor take a special key as it participate to the global radiative balance of the atmosphere. Our laboratory is engaged since many years in the study of H216O vapor and its isotopologues [1, 2, 3]. An important work has been already made in the spectral region of 4000 to 6600 cm-1 [3] and it continues now in the following spectral window : 6600-9000 cm-1. We have focused on the lines around 8800 cm-1, as the latest version of HITRAN database still relies on the work of Mandin et al. performed in 1988 [4, 5]. We have recorded several spectra of water vapor with our step-by-step Fourier Transform Spectrometer built in our laboratory [6, 7]. We present here our intensity measurements compared to recent literature data [8] and HITRAN2008 database. Also we have performed a study around 1300 cm-1. The precise knowledge of water vapor for this spectral range is very useful for inversion of IASI spectra. We show some comparisons between our new intensity measurements and LISA database, HITRAN2004, and recent literature data [9]. References: [1] M. Carleer, A. Jenouvrier, A.-C. Vandaele, M.-F. Mérienne, R. Colin, N. F. Zobov, O. L. Polyansky, J. Tennyson and V. A. Savin, J. Chem Phys 111 (1999) 2444-2450. [2] M.-F. Mérienne, A. Jenouvrier, C. Hermans, A.-C. Vandaele, M. Carleer, C. Clerbaux, P.-F. Coheur, R. Colin, S. Fally, M. Bachc J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Trans. 82 (2003) 99-117. [3] A. Jenouvrier, L. Daumont, L. RÉgalia-Jarlot, Vl. G. Tyuterev, M. Carleer, A. C. Vandaele, S. Mikhailenko and S. Fally, JQSRT, 105 (2007) 326-355. [4] J.-Y. Mandin, J.-P. Chevillard, J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, Can. J. Phys, 66 (1988) 997-1011. [5] J.-Y. Mandin, J.-P. Chevillard, J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, J. Mol. Spectrosc, 132 (1988) 352-360. [6] J-J. Plateaux, A. Barbe and A. Delahaigue, Spectrochim. Acta, 51A (1995) 1169-1153 [7] L. Régalia, Thesis, Reims, 1996 (France). [8] R. N. Tolchenov, J. Tennyson, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 231 (2005) 23-27. [9] L.H. Coudert, G.Wagner, M.Birk, U.I. Baranov, M.J. Lafferty, J-M. Flaud, J. Mol. Spect, 251 (2008) 357-339

Oudot, C.; Regalia, L.; Le Wang; Daumont, L.; Thomas, X.; von der Heyden, P.; Decatoire, D.

2010-06-01

287

Effects of ? s1-casein (CSN1S1) and ?-casein (CSN3) genotypes on milk coagulation properties in Murciano-Granadina goats.  

PubMed

The effects of the caprine ? s1-casein (CSN1S1) polymorphisms on milk quality and cheese yield have been widely studied in French and Italian goat breeds. Much less is known about the consequences of ?-casein (CSN3) genotype on the technological and coagulation properties of goat milk. In the current study, we have performed an association analysis between polymorphisms at the goat CSN1S1 and CSN3 genes and milk coagulation (rennet coagulation time, curdling rate and curd firmness) and technological (time to cutting of curd and cheese yield) properties. In this analysis, we have included 193 records from 74 Murciano-Granadina goats (with genotypes constituted by different combinations of alleles B, E and F of the gene CSN1S1 and alleles A and B of the gene CSN3) distributed in three herds, which were collected bimonthly during a whole lactation. Data analysis, using a linear mixed model for repeated observations, revealed significant associations between CSN1S1 genotypes and the rate of the curdling process. In this way, milk from EE goats had a significantly higher curdling rate than milk from BB individuals (P<0·05). Contrary to previous experiments performed in French breeds, cheese yield was not significantly different in BB, EE and EF goats. Moreover, we have shown that CSN3 genotype has a significant effect on the rennet coagulation time (BB>AB, P<0·05) but not on cheese yield. No interaction between the CSN1S1 and CSN3 genotypes was observed. PMID:21214964

Caravaca, Francisco; Ares, José Luis; Carrizosa, Juan; Urrutia, Baltasar; Baena, Francisca; Jordana, Jordi; Badaoui, Bouabid; Sànchez, Armand; Angiolillo, Antonella; Amills, Marcel; Serradilla, Juan Manuel

2011-02-01

288

Global 21 cm signal experiments: A designer's guide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The global (i.e., spatially averaged) spectrum of the redshifted 21 cm line has generated much experimental interest lately, thanks to its potential to be a direct probe of the epoch of reionization and the dark ages, during which the first luminous objects formed. Since the cosmological signal in question has a purely spectral signature, most experiments that have been built, designed, or proposed have essentially no angular sensitivity. This can be problematic because with only spectral information, the expected global 21 cm signal can be difficult to distinguish from foreground contaminants such as galactic synchrotron radiation, since both are spectrally smooth and the latter is many orders of magnitude brighter. In this paper, we establish a systematic mathematical framework for global signal data analysis. The framework removes foregrounds in an optimal manner, complementing spectra with angular information. We use our formalism to explore various experimental design trade-offs, and find that (1) with spectral-only methods, it is mathematically impossible to mitigate errors that arise from uncertainties in one’s foreground model; (2) foreground contamination can be significantly reduced for experiments with fine angular resolution; (3) most of the statistical significance in a positive detection during the dark ages comes from a characteristic high-redshift trough in the 21 cm brightness temperature; (4) measurement errors decrease more rapidly with integration time for instruments with fine angular resolution; and (5) better foreground models can help reduce errors, but once a modeling accuracy of a few percent is reached, significant improvements in accuracy will be required to further improve the measurements. We show that if observations and data analysis algorithms are optimized based on these findings, an instrument with a 5° wide beam can achieve highly significant detections (greater than 5?) of even extended (high ?z) reionization scenarios after integrating for 500 h. This is in strong contrast to instruments without angular resolution, which cannot detect gradual reionization. Ionization histories that are more abrupt can be detected with our fiducial instrument at the level of tens to hundreds of ?. The expected errors are similarly low during the dark ages, and can yield a 25? detection of the expected cosmological signal after only 100 h of integration.

Liu, Adrian; Pritchard, Jonathan R.; Tegmark, Max; Loeb, Abraham

2013-02-01

289

Sphingosine 1-phosphate induces filopodia formation through S1PR2 activation of ERM proteins.  

PubMed

Previously we demonstrated that the sphingolipids ceramide and S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate) regulate phosphorylation of the ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) family of cytoskeletal proteins [Canals, Jenkins, Roddy, Hernande-Corbacho, Obeid and Hannun (2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285, 32476-3285]. In the present article, we show that exogenously applied or endogenously generated S1P (in a sphingosine kinase-dependent manner) results in significant increases in phosphorylation of ERM proteins as well as filopodia formation. Using phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable ezrin mutants, we show that the S1P-induced cytoskeletal protrusions are dependent on ERM phosphorylation. Employing various pharmacological S1PR (S1P receptor) agonists and antagonists, along with siRNA (small interfering RNA) techniques and genetic knockout approaches, we identify the S1PR2 as the specific and necessary receptor to induce phosphorylation of ERM proteins and subsequent filopodia formation. Taken together, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which S1P regulates cellular architecture that requires S1PR2 and subsequent phosphorylation of ERM proteins. PMID:23106337

Gandy, K Alexa Orr; Canals, Daniel; Adada, Mohamad; Wada, Masayuki; Roddy, Patrick; Snider, Ashley J; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

2013-02-01

290

Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis Strain S1-4, Which Degrades Feathers Efficiently.  

PubMed

Bacillus subtilis strain S1-4, with the capacity to efficiently degrade feathers, was isolated from chicken feathers. Sequencing showed that the genome of strain S1-4 differs from that of other B. subtilis strains, with limited insertions and deletions. The genome encodes multiple extracellular proteases and keratinases. PMID:24072866

Yong, Bin; Yang, Bin-Qing; Zhao, Chuan-Wu; Feng, Hong

2013-09-26

291

Tactile Hyperacuity Thresholds Correlate with Finger Maps in Primary Somatosensory Cortex (S1)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behavioral tactile discrimination thresholds were compared with functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements of cortical finger representations within primary somatosensory cortex (S1) for 10 human subjects to determine whether cortical magnification in S1 could account for the variation in tactile hyperacuity thresholds of the fingers. Across 10 subjects, the increase in tactile thresholds from the index finger to the little finger

Robert O. Duncan; Geoffrey M. Boynton

2007-01-01

292

Analysis of the molecular interactions of the potent analgesic S1RA with the ?1 receptor.  

PubMed

The highly selective ?1 receptor antagonist S1RA is endowed with a surprisingly high affinity for its target protein given a missing fundamental hydrophobic pharmacophoric requirement. Here we show that, with respect to other potent ?1 ligands, S1RA is able to compensate this loss by fulfilling all other pharmacophoric requirements and by gaining in solvation energy. PMID:23582276

Laurini, Erik; Da Col, Valentina; Wünsch, Bernhard; Pricl, Sabrina

2013-03-30

293

Draft Genome Sequence of Bacillus subtilis Strain S1-4, Which Degrades Feathers Efficiently  

PubMed Central

Bacillus subtilis strain S1-4, with the capacity to efficiently degrade feathers, was isolated from chicken feathers. Sequencing showed that the genome of strain S1-4 differs from that of other B. subtilis strains, with limited insertions and deletions. The genome encodes multiple extracellular proteases and keratinases.

Yong, Bin; Yang, Bin-Qing; Zhao, Chuan-Wu

2013-01-01

294

Hyperfine structure of the excited state 1s1/2(e)2s1/2(?) of the muonic helium atom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recoil, vacuum polarization, and electron vertex corrections of first and second orders in the fine structure constant ? and the ratio of electron to muon and electron to ?-particle masses are calculated for the hyperfine splitting of the 1s1/2(e)2s1/2(?) state of muonic helium atom (?e24He) on the basis of perturbation theory. We obtain a total result for the muonically excited state hyperfine splitting ??hfs=4295.66 MHz, which improves previous calculations, taking additional corrections into account, and a more accurate treatment of the electron vertex contribution.

Krutov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P.

2012-11-01

295

Short communication: Carora cattle show high variability in alpha(s1)-casein.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to analyze the genetic variability of milk proteins of the Carora, a shorthorned Bos taurus cattle breed in Venezuela and in other Southern American countries that is primarily used for milk production. A total of 184 individual milk samples were collected from Carora cattle in 5 herds in Venezuela. The milk protein genes alpha(s1)-casein (CN) (CSN1S1), beta-CN (CSN2), kappa-CN (CSN3), and beta-lactoglobulin (LGB) were typed at the protein level by isoelectrofocusing. It was necessary to further analyze CSN1S1 at the DNA level by a PCR-based method to distinguish CSN1S1*G from B. Increased variation was found in particular at the CSN1S1 gene, where 4 variants were identified. The predominant variant was CSN1S1*B (frequency = 0.8). The second most common CSN1S1 variant was CSN1S1*G (0.101), followed by CSN1S1*C (0.082). Moreover, a new isoelectrofocusing pattern was identified, which may result from a novel CSN1S1 variant, named CSN1S1*I, migrating at an intermediate position between CSN1S1*B and CSN1S1*C. Six cows carried the variant at the heterozygous condition. For the other loci, predominance of CSN2*A2 (0.764), CSN3*B (0.609), and LGB*B (0.592) was observed. Haplotype frequencies (AF) at the CSN1S1-CSN2-CSN3 complex were also estimated by taking association into account. Only 7 haplotypes showed AF values >0.05, accounting for a cumulative frequency of 0.944. The predominant haplotype was B-A2-B (frequency = 0.418), followed by B-A2-A (0.213). The occurrence of the G variant is at a rather high frequency, which is of interest for selection within the Carora breed because of the negative association of this variant with the synthesis of the specific protein. From a cheese-making point of view, this variant is associated with improved milk-clotting parameters but is negatively associated with cheese ripening. Thus, milk protein typing should be routinely carried out in the breed, with particular emphasis on using a DNA test to detect the CSN1S*G variant. The CSN1S*G allele is likely to have descended from the Brown Swiss, which contributed to the Carora breed and also carries this allele. PMID:18096958

Caroli, A; Chessa, S; Chiatti, F; Rignanese, D; Meléndez, B; Rizzi, R; Ceriotti, G

2008-01-01

296

Very Large Array observations of Uranus at 2. 0 cm  

SciTech Connect

Radio observations of Uranus obtained at 2.0 cm with the B configuration of the VLA during April 1985 are reported. The calibration and data-reduction procedures are described in detail, and the results are presented in tables, maps, and graphs and compared with IRIS 44-micron observations (Hanel et al., 1986). Features discussed include highest brightness centered on the pole rather than on the subearth point, a decrease in brightness temperature (by up to 9 K) at latitudes between -20 and -50 deg (well correlated with the IRIS data), and disk-center position (corrected for the observed radio asymmetry) in good agreement with that found on the basis of the outer contours of the image. 15 references.

Berge, G.L.; Muhleman, D.O.; Linfield, R.P.

1988-07-01

297

Cosmic (Super)String Constraints from 21 cm Radiation  

SciTech Connect

We calculate the contribution of cosmic strings arising from a phase transition in the early Universe, or cosmic superstrings arising from brane inflation, to the cosmic 21 cm power spectrum at redshifts z{>=}30. Future experiments can exploit this effect to constrain the cosmic string tension G{mu} and probe virtually the entire brane inflation model space allowed by current observations. Although current experiments with a collecting area of {approx}1 km{sup 2} will not provide any useful constraints, future experiments with a collecting area of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} km{sup 2} covering the cleanest 10% of the sky can, in principle, constrain cosmic strings with tension G{mu} > or approx. 10{sup -10}-10{sup -12} (superstring/phase transition mass scale >10{sup 13} GeV)

Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Departments of Physics and Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2008-03-07

298

Stratospheric measurements of continuous absorption near 2400 cm(-1).  

PubMed

Solar occultation spectra obtained with a balloon-borne interferometer have been used to study continuous absorption by N(2) and CO(2) near 2400 cm(-1) in the lower stratosphere. Synthetic continuum transmittances, calculated from published coefficients for far-wing absorption by CO(2) lines and for pressure-induced absorption by the fundamental band of N(2), are in fair agreement with the observed stratospheric values. The continuum close to the nu(3) R-branch band head of CO(2) is sensitive to the CO(2) far-wing line shape. Therefore, given highly accurate knowledge of the N(2) continuum from laboratory data, high-resolution stratospheric spectra provide a sensitive means for in situ testing of various air-broadened CO(2) line shapes at low temperatures. PMID:20372347

Rinsland, C P; Smith, M A; Russell Iii, J M; Park, J H; Farmer, C B

1981-12-15

299

Generation of a monoclonal antibody to s1 protein of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus.  

PubMed

Gene encoding the N-terminal half of spike protein (S1) of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was cloned and expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Then, female BALB/c mice were immunized with the purified recombinant S1 protein (rS1), and a monoclonal antibody (MAb designated as 5E12) against the rS1 protein was achieved by hybridoma technique. MAb 5E12 not only reacted with rS1 protein indirect ELISA and Western blot, but also recognized PEDV transiently expressed in Vero E6 cells in indirect immunofluorescence examinations. This work suggests that 5E12 would be a useful tool as a specific diagnostic reagent for detecting PEDV S protein. PMID:24111871

Cao, Liyan; Qin, Zhaoheng; Ge, Xuying; Yin, Xiangping; Xia, Cheng; Bu, Ri-E; Fang, Ying; Liu, Jixing; Gao, Yu; Ren, Xiaofeng

2013-10-01

300

Cytochrome P450 2S1 is Reduced by NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Reductase  

PubMed Central

Cytochrome P450 (P450) 2S1 is one of the orphan P450s without a clear physiological function. Controversy has arisen as to whether it can interact with NADPH-P450 reductase and accept electrons. The reduction of 1,4-bis{[2-(dimethylamino-N-oxide)ethyl]amino}-5,8-dihydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (AQ4N) by P450 2S1 was confirmed, and the NADPH consumption rates were measured aerobically and anaerobically in the absence and presence of the drug. The reduction kinetics of P450 2S1 were rapid, as measured by stopped-flow kinetics. These results confirm that P450 2S1 can be reduced by NADPH-P450 reductase and suggest normal mixed-function oxidase roles of P450 2S1 to be revealed.

Xiao, Yi; Shinkyo, Raku

2011-01-01

301

Laser Guiding at > 10^18 W/cm^2 in cm - scale Gas Jets using the Ignitor Heater Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser wakefield accelerators in the self guided regime and in pre formed channels are studied at LBNL's l'OASIS facility (10TW, 2×10^19W/cm^2) with the goal of a compact 0.1-1GeV accelerator module. A self modulated, self guided drive beam produced nC electron beams up to 50MeV with large energy spread. Simulations indicate plasma channeled accelerators can substantially increase particle energy and reduce energy spread. We have used channels formed by hydrodynamic shock to guide acceleration relevant intensities of 10^18 W/cm^2 with 40 % efficiency in initial experiments. Channel optimization and characterization of effects on the electron energy spectrum are under way. Gas target development and injection experiments are also in progress. Recent experimental results will be presented. Work supported by Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy & Nuclear Physics, High Energy Physics Division, of the U.S. Dept. of Energy, under Contract DE-AC03-76SF00098 C.Geddes also supported by Hertz foundation.

Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Faure, Jerome; Leemans, Wim; Toth, Csaba; Vantilborg, Jeroen

2003-10-01

302

CM-SAF high-resolution radiation budget products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper the system employed at the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium (RMIB) within the Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility (CM-SAF) for the production of Top Of the Atmosphere (TOA) radiation budget components is described. One of the goals of the CM-SAF is to provide consistent TOA and surface radiation budget components and cloud properties at high spatial resolution and on an approximate equal area grid for a region that covers at least Europe and part of the North Atlantic Ocean. The TOA radiation products will be based on data from polar orbiting satellites for northern latitudes, and on data from MSG (METEOSAT Second Generation) for mid latitudes. The instruments used for the reflected solar and emitted thermal flux estimates will be GERB (Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget) and SEVIRI as the geostationary instruments and CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) for the non geostationary instruments. Daily means, monthly means and monthly mean diurnal cycles are to be provided. Until MSG fluxes will become available, fluxes from METEOSAT and CERES are used for development. At the TOA the three radiative flux components of incoming solar radiation, reflected solar radiation and emitted thermal radiation will be given. The daily mean GERB and CERES fluxes will be merged to produce a homogenized TOA flux product. The method used for the merging of the TOA fluxes and together with results using currently available input data are shown. The merging consists in the collocation of the two instruments, detection and the removal of the systematic dependencies of the flux estimates on scene type and viewing angles and regridding on a common grid.

Nicula, Bogdan; Dewitte, Steven; Clerbaux, Nicolas

2003-04-01

303

An anatomical update on the morphologic variations of S1 and S2.  

PubMed

Although percutaneous fixation with iliosacral screws has been shown to be a safe and reproducible method for sacroiliac dislocation and sacral fractures, it is a technically demanding technique, and one of its contraindications is sacral anatomical variations and dysmorphism. The incidence and pattern of S1 and S2 anatomical variations were evaluated in 61 patients (35 women and 26 men) using magnetic resonance imaging of the sacrum in an attempt to explore the possible existence of groups of individuals in whom percutaneous sacroiliac fixation is difficult due to local anatomy. S1 and S2 dimensions in both the transverse and coronal planes were recorded and evaluated. In each individual, S1 and S2 dimensions both in the coronal and transverse planes were proportional, with S2 dimensions being 80% of those of S1 on average. Patients were separated into 4 groups based on the S1 and S2 body size and the asymmetry of dimensions in the transverse and coronal planes. In 48 patients (78.6%), dimensions in both planes were symmetrical despite the varying size of the S1 and S2 body. In 2 patients (3.3%) there was a combination of large transverse plane and small coronal plane dimensions, with large S1 and S2 body size. In 9 patients (14.8%), coronal plane dimensions were disproportionately smaller compared to those of the transverse plane, with a varying size of S1 and S2 body making effective sacroiliac screw insertion a difficult task. Thus, a preoperative imaging study, preferably computed tomography scan, of S1 and S2 body size and coronal plane dimensions and an intraoperative fluoroscopic control of S1 and S2 dimensions on the coronal plane are suggested for safe sacroiliac screw fixation. PMID:20954663

Karachalios, Theofilos; Zibis, Aristides H; Zintzaras, Elias; Bargiotas, Konstantinos; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Malizos, Konstantinos N

2010-10-11

304

Narrowband Observations of Comets ISON (2012 S1) and 2P/Encke: Extremes of the New and the Old  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on narrowband filter observations of Comets ISON (2012 S1) and 2P/Encke obtained from Lowell Observatory. Observations of dynamically new Comet ISON include the first successful gas measurements of the apparition on March 5 (r = 4.57 AU) with a CN production rate of 1.3x1024 molecules/s, implying a water production rate of 1-10x1026 molecules/s for a normal range of CN-to-OH abundance ratios. Two months later the measured CN and inferred water values were about 70% higher. During the same interval the apparent dust production more than doubled, with Af? increasing from 120 cm to 270 cm. Further observations, both photometry and imaging, are scheduled for early September and early October, and the results from these will be presented. In contrast to ISON, Comet Encke is highly evolved both thermally and physically, having made hundreds of close passages by the Sun. As a result, only a small fraction of its surface remains active and almost no micron-sized dust particles are released during outgassing. This fall's apparition will be the ninth for which we will have obtained gas production rates. The existing data imply a strong secular decrease in water production but a much smaller decrease for the minor species. These and new observations will be presented and we will examine whether or not these trends continue and the possible meaning. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Atmospheres Programs.

Schleicher, David G.; Knight, M. M.; Bair, A. N.

2013-10-01

305

Associated 21-cm absorption towards the cores of radio galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations to detect H I in absorption towards the cores of a sample of radio galaxies. From observations of a sample of 16 sources, we detect H I in absorption towards the core of only one source, the Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxy 3C 452 which has been reported earlier by Gupta & Saikia. In this paper we present the results for the remaining sources which have been observed to a similar optical depth as for a comparison sample of compact steep-spectrum (CSS) and gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) sources. We also compile available information on H I absorption towards the cores of extended radio sources observed with angular resolutions of a few arcsec or better. The fraction of extended sources with detection of H I absorption towards their cores is significantly smaller (7/47) than the fraction of H I detection towards CSS and GPS objects (28/49). For the cores of extended sources, there is no evidence of a significant correlation between H I column density towards the cores and the largest linear size of the sources. The distribution of the relative velocity of the principal absorbing component towards the cores of extended sources is not significantly different from that of the CSS and GPS objects. However, a few of the CSS and GPS objects have blueshifted components ?1000 km s-1, possibly due to jet-cloud interactions. With the small number of detections towards cores, the difference in the detection rate between FR I (4/32) and FR II (3/15) sources is within the statistical uncertainties.

Chandola, Yogesh; Gupta, Neeraj; Saikia, D. J.

2013-03-01

306

Tetrad effects in REE abundance patterns of chondrules from CM meteorites: Implications for aqueous alteration on the CM parent asteroid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lanthanide tetrad effect in bulk chondrules from two moderately altered CM chondrites, Murchison and Yamato-793321 (Y-793321), are reported for the first time. Twenty-three chondrules were petrographically characterized and analyzed for 10 rare earth elements (REE) and other trace and major elements (Ba, Sr, Rb, K, Ca, Mg and Fe) using the precise isotope dilution technique. The results indicate systematic depletion (several times) of alkali and alkaline earths compared to CV and CO chondrules. Most of the porphyritic olivine (8 PO) and olivine-pyroxene (4 POP), porphyritic and radial pyroxene (2 PP, 1 RP), and granular olivine (1 GO) chondrules show a light-REE (L-REE) depleted, heavy-REE (H-REE) smoothly fractionated pattern composed of four (upward convex) segments possessing a relatively large negative Eu anomaly (CI-normalized La/Sm, Lu/Er and Eu/Eu* ratios = 0.3-1: Eu*, normal value). On the other hand, all barred-olivine (5 BO) chondrules, a few PO and POP indicate almost a flat L-REE pattern. In addition, regardless of their textural types, nearly half of the chondrules have a variable degree of Ce and Yb anomalies, and/or L/H-REE discontinuity, which is similar to CV and CO chondrules. The observed L- and H-convex REE patterns accompanied with the negative Eu anomaly is the first known case for chondrules as well as meteoritic materials, but have been previously reported for geological samples such as sedimentary rocks, late stage igneous and metamorphic rocks, and are explained as the lanthanide tetrad effect, which plausibly results from fluid-rock interaction. We suggest that the marked REE fractionations occurred by the selective incorporation of L-, H-REEs and Eu into alteration products in the matrix during alteration processes on the CM parent body, but that the gas/solid REE fractionation characteristics established in the nebula have basically remained unchanged. We suggest that the tetrad effects observed here represent a new index of physico-chemical conditions of fluid-rock interactions prevalent on the CM parent body.

Inoue, Mutsuo; Nakamura, Noboru; Kimura, Makoto

2009-09-01

307

2MTF - II. New Parkes 21-cm observations of 303 southern galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present new 21-cm neutral hydrogen (H I) observations of spiral galaxies for the 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) survey. Using the 64-m Parkes radio telescope multibeam system we obtain 152 high signal-to-noise ratio H I spectra from which we extract 148 high-accuracy (<5 per cent error) velocity widths and derive reliable rotation velocities. The observed sample consists of 303 southern (? < -40°) galaxies selected from the 2MASS Redshift Survey with Ks < 11.25 mag, cz < 10 000 km s-1 and axis ratio b/a < 0.5. The H I observations reported in this paper will be combined with new H I spectra from the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes, together producing the most uniform Tully-Fisher survey ever constructed (in terms of sky coverage). In particular, due to its near-infrared selection, 2MTF will be significantly more complete at low Galactic latitude (|b| < 15°) and will provide a more reliable map of peculiar velocities in the local Universe.

Hong, Tao; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Masters, Karen L.; Springob, Christopher M.; Macri, Lucas M.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Jones, D. Heath; Jarrett, Tom H.; Crook, Aidan C.

2013-06-01

308

Site-directed mutagenesis combined with chemical modification as a strategy for altering the specificity of the S1 and S1' pockets of subtilisin Bacillus lentus.  

PubMed

By combining site-directed mutagenesis with chemical modification, we have altered the S1 and S1' pocket specificity of subtilisin Bacillus lentus (SBL) through the incorporation of unnatural amino acid moieties, in the following manner: WT --> Cysmutant + H3CSO2SR --> Cys-SR, where R may be infinitely variable. A paradigm between extent of activity changes and surface exposure of the modified residue has emerged. Modification of M222C, a buried residue in the S1' pocket of SBL, caused dramatic changes in kcat/KM, of an up to 122-fold decrease, while modification of S166C, which is located at the bottom of the S1 pocket and is partially surface exposed, effected more modest activity changes. Introduction of a positive charge at S166C does not alter kcat/KM, whereas the introduction of a negative charge results in lowered activity, possibly due to electrostatic interference with oxyanion stabilization. Activity is virtually unaltered upon modification of S156C, which is located toward the bottom of the S1 pocket and surface exposed and whose side chain is solvated. An unexpected structure-activity relationship was revealed for S166C-SR enzymes in that the pattern of activity changes observed with increasing steric size of R was not monotonic. Molecular modeling analysis was used to analyze this unprecedented structure-activity relationship and revealed that the position of the beta-carbon of Cys166 modulates binding of the P1 residue of the AAPF product inhibitor. PMID:9558332

DeSantis, G; Berglund, P; Stabile, M R; Gold, M; Jones, J B

1998-04-28

309

Large-area (over 50 cm × 50 cm) freestanding films of colloidal InP/ZnS quantum dots.  

PubMed

We propose and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible, freestanding films of InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) using fatty acid ligands across very large areas (greater than 50 cm × 50 cm), which have been developed for remote phosphor applications in solid-state lighting. Embedded in a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix, although the formation of stand-alone films using other QDs commonly capped with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and oleic acid is not efficient, employing myristic acid as ligand in the synthesis of these QDs, which imparts a strongly hydrophobic character to the thin film, enables film formation and ease of removal even on surprisingly large areas, thereby avoiding the need for ligand exchange. When pumped by a blue LED, these Cd-free QD films allow for high color rendering, warm white light generation with a color rendering index of 89.30 and a correlated color temperature of 2298 K. In the composite film, the temperature-dependent emission kinetics and energy transfer dynamics among different-sized InP/ZnS QDs are investigated and a model is proposed. High levels of energy transfer efficiency (up to 80%) and strong donor lifetime modification (from 18 to 4 ns) are achieved. The suppression of the nonradiative channels is observed when the hybrid film is cooled to cryogenic temperatures. The lifetime changes of the donor and acceptor InP/ZnS QDs in the film as a result of the energy transfer are explained well by our theoretical model based on the exciton-exciton interactions among the dots and are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The understanding of these excitonic interactions is essential to facilitate improvements in the fabrication of photometrically high quality nanophosphors. The ability to make such large-area, flexible, freestanding Cd-free QD films pave the way for environmentally friendly phosphor applications including flexible, surface-emitting light engines. PMID:22783904

Mutlugun, Evren; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Eroglu, Cuneyt; Coskun, Yasemin; Erdem, Talha; Sharma, Vijay K; Unal, Emre; Panda, Subhendu K; Hickey, Stephen G; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

2012-07-13

310

[Phase I study of sequential S-1 and cyclophosphamide therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer].  

PubMed

S-1 is a novel oral anticancer agent consisting of tegafur, a prodrug of 5-fluorouracil, and 2 modulators. A phase I study of sequential S-1 and cyclophosphamide(CPA)therapy was conducted to determine the dose-limiting toxicities(DLTs)and recommended doses(RDs)in patients with metastatic or recurrent breast cancer(MBC). Patients with MBC received sequential S-1 and CPA. Chemotherapy consisted of administration of S-1 twice daily on days 1-14 at escalating doses of 40, 50, 65, and 80mg/m2/day and CPA at 100 mg/body/day on days 15-28. The schedule was repeated twice at a 4-week interval. The purposes of this study were to determine the RDs, safety, and efficacy of the regimen. A total of 12 patients were registered. No patients experienced DLTs, and the RDs of S-1 and CPA were 80mg/m2/day and 100 mg/body/day, respectively. The response rate was 50. 0%. In conclusion, sequential therapy with S-1 and CPA could be safely and effectively used for the treatment of MBC, and the RDs for this regimen were determined to be 80mg/m2/day for S-1 and 100 mg/m2/day for CPA. PMID:24047774

Horiguchi, Jun; Takata, Daisuke; Rokutanda, Nana; Nagaoka, Rin; Tokiniwa, Hideaki; Odawara, Hiroki; Kikuchi, Mami; Sato, Ayako; Takeyoshi, Izumi

2013-09-01

311

Cost analysis of S1 and XELOX as adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer.  

PubMed

Both S1 and XELOX (capecitabine+oxaliplatin) have been recommended as an adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer according to the guidelines of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). This study compared the two regimens in terms of monetary costs, assuming equal efficacy of both regimens. Chemotherapy cost data of 188 patients were collected from the medical records, 91 for the S1 group and 97 for XELOX. Costs were classified as direct costs (chemotherapy, hospitalization, venous access, and tests), adverse event-related treatments costs, and societal (travel and time) costs. The total direct costs of S1 and XELOX per cycle per patient were $1938±236 and $2317±315, respectively. S1 cost $27 and $9 less than XELOX on total adverse event-related costs and societal costs, respectively. The total costs of S1 and XELOX were $1994±322 versus $2410±391 per cycle per patient, respectively. The total cost of S1 was 17.3% less than that of XELOX for the average patient. All the differences were statistically significant. S1, compared with XELOX, could be a more affordable option as an adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer when all healthcare resources are taken into account in China. PMID:23629479

He, Jianping; Wen, Feng; Yin, Xude; Zhang, Pengfei; Du, Zedong; He, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yi; Tang, Ruilei; Li, Meng; Li, Qiu

2013-08-01

312

Genetic contributors to lipoprotein cholesterol levels in an intercross of 129S1/SvImJ and RIIIS/J inbred mice.  

PubMed

To determine the genetic contribution to variation among lipoprotein cholesterol levels, we performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses on an intercross between mouse strains RIIIS/J and 129S1/SvImJ. Male mice of the parental strains and the reciprocal F1 and F2 populations were fed a high-cholesterol, cholic acid-containing diet for 8-12 wk. At the end of the feeding period, plasma total, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and non-HDL cholesterol were determined. For HDL cholesterol, we identified three significant QTLs on chromosomes (Chrs) 1 (D1Mit507, 88 cM, 72-105 cM, 4.8 LOD), 9 (D11Mit149, 14 cM, 10-25 cM, 9.4 LOD), and 12 (D12Mit60, 20 cM, 0-50 cM, 5.0 LOD). These QTLs were considered identical to QTLs previously named Hdlq5, Hdlq17, and Hdlq18, respectively, in crosses sharing strain 129. For total cholesterol, we identified two significant QTLs on Chrs 1 and 9, which were named Chol10 (D1Mit507, 88 cM, 10-105 cM, 3.9 LOD) and Chol11 (D11Mit149, 14 cM, 0-30 cM, 4.4 LOD), respectively. In addition, for total cholesterol, we identified two suggestive QTLs on Chrs 12 (distal) and 17, which remain unnamed. For non-HDL cholesterol, we identified and named one new QTL on Chr 17, Nhdlq3 (D17Mit221, 58 cM, 45-60 cM, 3.4 LOD). Nhdlq3 colocalized with orthologous human QTLs for lipoprotein phenotypes, and with Abcg5 and Abcg8. Overall, we detected eight QTLs for lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations on Chrs 1, 9, 12, and 17 (each two per chromosome), including a new QTL for non-HDL cholesterol, Nhdlq3, on Chr 17. PMID:14872007

Lyons, Malcolm A; Korstanje, Ron; Li, Renhua; Walsh, Kenneth A; Churchill, Gary A; Carey, Martin C; Paigen, Beverly

2004-04-13

313

The ?6 parallel band of cyclopropane at 3100 cm-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ?6 fundamental of cyclopropane has been recorded on a 4.5-m vacuum spectrometer. Deconvolution of the spectrum has revealed considerably more detail than found in previous investigations. New information of a qualitative nature has been learned about the highly perturbed upper state and improved values of the band center and the upper-state rotational constant have been obtained. A lower-state combination-difference analysis using J values up to J = 23 has resulted in values of B'' and D''J which are in excellent agreement with recent investigations. The following values of molecular constants, in wavenumber units (cm-1), have been determined: B'' = 0.67023, D''J = 0.93 × 10-6, ?0 = 3101.529, and B' - B'' = -0.0019. The present data have been used with data from recent Raman and infrared spectra of C3H6 in a combined least-squares fit to the ground-state constants.

Rubin, Barry; Polo, S. R.; McCubbin, T. K.

1980-12-01

314

Line Broadening Parameters of Methane at 6000 CM^{-1}  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Being one of the most important greenhouse gases, methane (CH_4) is also modified by anthropogenic activity. Nowadays, it can be monitored globally from space on the long-term scale using combinations of different remote sensing instruments. The critical point for the retrieval algorithms is the knowledge of the spectroscopic parameters. Although a significant amount of spectroscopic data on CH_4 is available, the information on the line parameters in mid infrared (MIR) spectral region is inadequate for accurate remote sensing applications and there is a need for improved spectroscopic line parameters. We report on the improved spectroscopic line parameters for CH_4 in the spectral regions used by SCIAMACHY and TANSO instruments around 6000 cm^{-1}. New data were obtained using high resolution absorption spectra of CH_4, perturbed by oxygen, nitrogen and air. Spectra were measured using Fourier transform spectrometer in a broad range of total pressures from 2 to 1000 mbar and temperatures down to 196 K. Calculations of broadening parameters were performed using Reference Forward Model assuming Voigt line profile within international collaboration between the Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory in IUP Bremen, and Earth Observation Science Group, University of Leicester, UK. Accuracy of the new data matches the level of the demands of modern datasets and remote sensing. The new data were compared with the data included in the latest HITRAN edition and other published works. Before release for the general scientific community, the new data was tested on the TANSO and SCIAMACHY retrievals.

Gorshelev, Victor; Serdyuchenko, Anna; Buchwitz, M.; Burrows, J.; Humpage, Neil; Remedios, J.

2013-06-01

315

Spectroscopic Line Parameters of Methane Around 6000 cm-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Methane (CH4) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, also being modified by anthropogenic activity. Nowadays, it can be monitored globally from space on the long-term scale using combinations of different remote sensing instruments. The critical point for the retrieval algorithms is the knowledge of the spectroscopic parameters. Although a significant amount of spectroscopic data on CH4 is available, the information on the line parameters in mid infrared (MIR) spectral region is inadequate for accurate remote sensing applications and there is a need for improved spectroscopic line parameters. We report on the improved spectroscopic line parameters for CH4 in the spectral regions used by SCIAMACHY and TANSO instruments around 6000 cm-1. New data were obtained using high resolution absorption spectra of CH4, perturbed by oxygen, nitrogen and air. Spectra were measured using Fourier transform spectrometer in a broad range of total pressures from 2 to 1000 mbar and temperatures down to 196 K. Calculations of broadening parameters were performed using Reference Forward Model assuming Voigt line profile within international collaboration between the Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory in IUP Bremen, and Earth Observation Science Group, University of Leicester, UK. Accuracy of the new data matches the level of the demands of modern datasets and remote sensing. The new data were compared with the data included in the latest HITRAN edition and other published works. Before release for the general scientific community, the new data was tested on the TANSO and SCIAMACHY retrievals.

Gorshelev, Victor; Serdyuchenko, Anna; Buchwitz, Michael; Burrows, John; Humpage, Neil; Remedios, John

2013-04-01

316

The CM diagram of the nearby globular cluster NGC 6397  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CCD photometry for faint stars in NGC 6397, combined with a digital reinvestigation of the photographic plates originally used by Alcaino and Liller (1980), has been used to obtain statistically significant samples for the various evolutionary phases, down to V ? 21 mag, i.e., more than 5 mag below the turnoff. With a cluster distance modulus of the order of 12.50 mag this implies that main-sequence stars were observed down to MV ? 8.5 mag, corresponding to M ? 0.5 M_sun;. The authors report evidence for a flattening of the luminosity function for MS stars fainter than MV ? 6 mag (M ? 0.7 M_sun;), in agreement with previous indications by other authors. It is shown that, to reconcile the cluster age with current estimates for other galactic globular clusters, one needs to assume Z = 10-4 and a cluster reddening of E(B-V) ? 0.20 mag, plus an additional reddening of ?(B-V) = 0.04 mag in the location of theoretical isochrones in the CM diagram.

Alcaino, G.; Buonanno, R.; Caloi, V.; Castellani, V.; Corsi, C. E.; Iannicola, G.; Liller, W.

1987-10-01

317

Enhanced Detectability of Pre-reionization 21 cm Structure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Before the universe was reionized, it was likely that the spin temperature of intergalactic hydrogen was decoupled from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by UV radiation from the first stars through the Wouthuysen-Field effect. If the intergalactic medium (IGM) had not yet been heated above the CMB temperature by that time, then the gas would appear in absorption relative to the CMB. Large, rare sources of X-rays could inject sufficient heat into the neutral IGM, so that ?Tb >0 at comoving distances of tens to hundreds of Mpc, resulting in large 21 cm fluctuations with ?Tb ~= 250 mK on arcminute to degree angular scales, an order of magnitude larger in amplitude than that caused by ionized bubbles during reionization, ?Tb ~= 25 mK. This signal could therefore be easier to detect and probe higher redshifts than that due to patchy reionization. For the case in which the first objects to heat the IGM are QSOs hosting 107 M sun black holes with an abundance exceeding ~1 Gpc-3 at z ~ 15, observations with either the Arecibo Observatory or the Five Hundred Meter Aperture Spherical Telescope could detect and image their fluctuations at greater than 5? significance in about a month of dedicated survey time. Additionally, existing facilities such as MWA and LOFAR could detect the statistical fluctuations arising from a population of 105 M sun black holes with an abundance of ~104 Gpc-3 at z ~= 10-12.

Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Pen, Ue-Li; Chang, Tzu-Ching

2010-11-01

318

Dose-finding study of docetaxel, oxaliplatin, and S-1 for patients with advanced gastric cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended dose (RD), and activity of combined docetaxel, oxaliplatin, and\\u000a S-1 (DOS) chemotherapy on metastatic gastric cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Patients and methods  Docetaxel and oxaliplatin were administered intravenously on day 1 and S-1 was administered orally on days 1–14 of every 21-day\\u000a cycle. The doses of docetaxel\\/oxaliplatin\\/S-1 in the phase I study were level ?1A, 52.5\\/80\\/60 mg\\/m2;

Dae Young Zang; Dae Hyun Yang; Min-Jeong Kim; Kyung Mi Jang; Se Won Hwang; Kyo-Sang Yoo; Taeho Han; Ho Young Kim; Hyo Jung Kim; Jung Hye Kwon; Hun Ho Song; Sarah Park; Joo Young Jung; Hyeong Su Kim; Jung Han Kim

2009-01-01

319

Mcmc Signal Extraction For 21-cm Global Signal Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Measurements of the highly redshifted 21-cm line promise to provide a great deal of information about the dark ages of the Universe, the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization. It is generally accepted that strong astrophysical foregrounds are a major obstacle to overcome before this promise is realised, largely because of the way they are filtered through a complicated instrumental response. A great deal of work has therefore been devoted to studying foreground removal for observations with the low-frequency radio arrays which are starting to collect data. The case of so-called 'global signal' experiments has received less attention, however. I will compare the foreground fitting problem in these two types of experiments, and describe a foreground fitting methodology which has been developed for a proposed global signal experiment, the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE), which will make use of the pristine radio-frequency environment over the far side of the Moon. The method, a fully Bayesian technique based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code will, however, be applicable more generally to other space- and ground-based experiments, including the prototype DARE antenna being deployed in Western Australia. For ground-based experiments, we must also contend with effects from the Earth's ionosphere and low-level radio-frequency interference. I will show early results from applying our algorithm to data from the prototype and the EDGES experiment. GH is a member of the LUNAR consortium, which is funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute (via Cooperative Agreement NNA09DB30A) to investigate concepts for astrophysical observatories on the Moon.

Harker, Geraint

2012-05-01

320

Preparation of (S)-1-Halo-2-octanols Using Ionic Liquids and Biocatalysts.  

PubMed

Preparation of (S)-1-chloro-2-octanol and (S)-1-bromo-2-octanol was carried out by the enzymatic hydrolysis of halohydrin palmitates using biocatalysts. Halohydrin palmitates were prepared by various methods from palmitic acid and 1,2-octanediol. A tandem hydrolysis was carried out using lipases from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435), Rhizomucor miehei (Lipozyme IM), and "resting cells" from a Rhizopus oryzae strain that was not mycotoxigenic. The influence of the enzyme and the reaction medium on the selective hydrolysis of isomeric mixtures of halohydrin esters is described. Novozym 435 allowed preparation of (S)-1-chloro-2-octanol and (S)-1-bromo-2-octanol after 1-3 h of reaction at 40 degrees C in [BMIM][PF(6)]. PMID:19924063

Oromí-Farrús, Mireia; Eras, Jordi; Sala, Núria; Torres, Mercè; Canela, Ramon

2009-10-23

321

[Effective chemotherapy with S-1 alone in a patient with lung metastases of breast cancer].  

PubMed

We report a 50-year-old female with pulmonary metastases from breast cancer who responded to S-1. In September 2003, she underwent surgery for breast cancer. Four years 8 months after the operation, lung relapse was detected. After the treatment failure of FEC60 (5-FU 500 mg/m², epirubicin 60 mg/m², cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m²) and taxane antitumor drugs, oral administration of S-1 80 mg/body/day was initiated. At the end of three courses, thoracic CT revealed the disappearance of the lung metastasis. Advanced reactions during the administration period were mild. After 14 courses of S-1 therapy (during 11 months), a complete response was clinically maintained. S-1 showed a good antitumor effect and tolerance, and it might be useful for treating metastatic and recurrent breast cancers. PMID:21403446

Tazawa, Kenichi; Tsuchiya, Yasunori; Shinbo, Masahiro; Yamagishi, Fuminori; Shimada, Katsuo; Matsui, Koshi; Nagata, Takuya; Shimada, Yutaka; Tsukada, Kazuhiro

2011-03-01

322

Is NiS1-xSex a strongly correlated electron system?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The magnetic susceptibility, ?, and the electronic specific heat coefficient, ?, were measured for the metal-insulator transition system NiS1-xSex. Based on the results, the electron correlation in the metallic state is discussed.

Wada, H.; Mori, G.; Imai, H.; Shiga, M.

1997-07-01

323

Occurrence of Type S1A Serine Proteases in Sponge and Jellyfish.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Although serine proteases are found in all kinds of cellular organisms and many viruses, the classic 'chymotrypsin family' (Group S1A by the 1998 Barrett nomenclature) has an unusual phylogenetic distribution, being especially common in animals, entirely ...

A. Rojas R. F. Doolittle

2003-01-01

324

Characterization of the sugar-O-methyltransferase LobS1 in lobophorin biosynthesis.  

PubMed

Lobophorins A (1) and B (2) belong to a large group of spirotetronate natural products with potent antibacterial and antitumor activities. The cloning of the lobophorin biosynthesis gene cluster from the deep-sea-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSIO 01127 identified a sugar-O-methyltransferase-encoding gene lobS1. The lobS1 inactivation mutant accumulated two new lobophorin analogs 3 and 4, different from 1 and 2 by lacking the 4-methyl group at the terminal L-digitoxose, respectively. Biochemical experiments verified that LobS1 was a SAM-dependent sugar-O-methyltransferase that required divalent metal ions for better activity. Antibacterial assays revealed compounds 3 and 4 were generally less potent than compounds 1 and 2. These findings suggest that the methylation on the terminal digitoxose by LobS1 tailors lobophorin biosynthesis and highlights the importance of this methylation for antibacterial potence. PMID:23868295

Xiao, Ji; Zhang, Qingbo; Zhu, Yiguang; Li, Sumei; Zhang, Guangtao; Zhang, Haibo; Saurav, Kumar; Zhang, Changsheng

2013-07-20

325

Electron cryomicroscopy of acto-myosin-S1 during steady-state ATP hydrolysis.  

PubMed Central

The structure of the complex of actin and myosin subfragment-1 (S1) during steady-state ATP hydrolysis has been examined by electron microscopy. This complex is normally dissociated by ATP in vitro but was stabilized here by low ionic strength. Optimal conditions for attachment were established by light-scattering experiments that showed that approximately 70% of S1 could be bound in the presence of ATP. Micrographs of the unstained complex in vitreous water suggest that S1 attaches to actin in a variety of configurations in ATP; this contrasts with the single attached configuration seen in the presence of ADP. The data are therefore compatible with the idea that a change in attached configuration of the myosin cross-bridge is the origin of muscle force. In control experiments where ATP was allowed to hydrolyze completely the binding of the S1 seemed cooperative. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6

Walker, M; White, H; Belknap, B; Trinick, J

1994-01-01

326

Comparison between S/1 and R/1 tests and damage density vs. fluence (rho(phi)) results for unconditioned and sub-nanosecond laser-conditioned KD2PO4 crystals  

SciTech Connect

We present S/1 and R/1 test results on unconditioned and 355 nm (3{omega}), 500 ps laser conditioned DKDP. We find up to {approx}2.5X improvement in fluence in the S/1 performance after 3{omega}, 500 ps conditioning to 5 J/cm{sup 2}. For the first time, we observe a shift to higher fluences in the R/1 results for DKDP at 3{omega}, 7 ns due to 500 ps laser conditioning. The S/1 results are compared to {rho}({phi}) results previously measured on the same DKDP crystal [1]. A consistent behavior in fluence was found between the S/1 and {rho}({phi}) results for unconditioned and 500 ps conditioned DKDP. We were successful at using Poisson statistics to derive a connection between the S/1 and {rho}({phi}) results that could be tested with our data sets by trying to predict the shape of the {rho}({phi}) curve. The value for the power dependence on fluence of {rho}({phi}) derived from the S/1 data was {approx}11 {+-} 50%. The results presented and discussed here imply a strong correlation between the damage probability (S/1) test and {rho}({phi}). We find a consistent description of the two test types in terms of a power law {rho}({phi}) and that this basic shape held for all cases, i.e. the shape was invariant between unconditioned and conditioned results.

Adams, J J; Jarboe, J; Feit, M; Hackel, R

2007-10-31

327

A novel Ta.AGP.S.1b transcript in Chinese common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).  

PubMed

ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), the key enzyme of starch synthesis in plants, is composed of two small and two large subunits, and has plastidial and cytosolic isoforms. In kernels of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), transcripts for cytosolic (Ta.AGP.S1a) and plastidial (Ta.AGP.S1b) small subunits of AGPase were encoded by the same gene (Ta.AGP.S.1) by use of the alternative first exons. In this study, a cDNA sequence (1631 bp) [NCBI: EU586278] encoding a novel Ta.AGP.S1b transcript was isolated in kernels of Chinese common wheat cultivars. Compared with another Ta.AGP.S1b transcript [NCBI: FJ643609] isolated in kernels of non-Chinese wheat cultivars, EU586278 lacked a long fragment (117 bp) at its 5'terminal, resulting in a shorten transit peptide. The lacked fragments of Ta.AGP.S1b (EU586278) were universally found in surveyed 22 Chinese common wheat cultivars. Partial genomic DNA sequence [NCBI: FJ907395] of Ta.AGP.S.1 gene, which was corresponded to 5'terminal of EU586278 transcript, was also isolated in Chinese common cultivars and sequencing indicated that FJ907395 contained the corresponding lacked fragment of EU586278 transcript, inferring the lacked fragment in EU586278 transcript was not present in the genome, but possibly occurred at transcription level. Using TargetP software, the predicated transit peptide of putative plastidial SSU encoded by EU586278 contained merely 25 amino acids, considerably shorter than those of other plant AGP. S.1bs (54-70 amino acids). Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that the amino acid sequence of EU586278 transit peptide was not clustered together with those of other wheat Ta.AGP.S1bs [NCBI: AF536819 and FJ643609] and barley AGP.S1b [NCBI: Z48563]. These implied that EU586278 could be a novel Ta.AGP.S1b transcript. Semi-quantitative PCR analysis indicated that transcripts of EU586278 were abundantly expressed in leaf, moderately in endosperm and stem, and weakly in root. PMID:20965441

Kang, Guo-Zhang; Zheng, Bei-Bei; Shen, Bing-Quan; Peng, Hui-Fang; Guo, Tian-Cai

2010-08-23

328

Sorafenib augments cytotoxic effect of S-1 in vitro and in vivo through TS suppression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Sorafenib, a multikinase and tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, has anti-tumor activity in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma\\u000a (RCC). Recently, we reported that S-1 was active and well tolerated for the treatment of cytokine-refractory metastatic RCC.\\u000a Therefore, we hypothesized that S-1 might be a good candidate for combination therapy with molecular targeting agents. In\\u000a this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying for

Masaki Shiota; Katsunori Tatsugami; Akira Yokomizo; Masatoshi Eto; Junichi Inokuchi; Kentaro Kuroiwa; Keijiro Kiyoshima; Seiji Naito

329

Quenching, electronic energy transfer, and rotational relaxation of S1 formaldehyde  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three types of fluorescence decay measurement are reported in order to clarify the collisional decay mechanisms of S1 formaldehyde. From the fluorescence decay of an H2CO\\/D2CO mixture after selective excitation of 40 H2CO, the rate constant for electronic energy transfer from S1 H2CO to S0 D2CO is derived to be less than 2% of the gas kinetic collision rate. The

James C. Weisshaar; Douglas J. Bamford; Eliot Specht; C. Bradley Moore

1981-01-01

330

Chiropractic rehabilitation of a patient with S1 radiculopathy associated with a large lumbar disk herniation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To describe the nonsurgical treatment of acute S1 radiculopathy from a large (12 × 12 × 13 mm) L5-S1 disk herniation. Clinical Features: A 31-year-old man presented with severe lower back pain and pain, paresthesia, and plantar flexion weakness of the left leg. His symptoms began 5 days before the initial visit and progressed despite nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and

Craig E. Morris

1999-01-01

331

Short Communication: Carora Cattle Show High Variability in ?s1Casein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Theobjectiveofthisstudywastoanalyzethegenetic variability of milk proteins of the Carora, a short- horned Bos taurus cattle breed in Venezuela and in other Southern American countries that is primarily used formilk production.A totalof 184individual milk samples were collected from Carora cattle in 5 herds in Venezuela. The milk protein genes ?s1-casein (CN) (CSN1S1), ?-CN (CSN2), ?-CN (CSN3), and ?-lacto- globulin (LGB) were typed

A. Caroli; S. Chessa; F. Chiatti; D. Rignanese; B. Meléndez; R. Rizzi; G. Ceriotti

2008-01-01

332

SYNTHESIS OF (R)- AND (S)-1,2-DIACYLOXYPROPYL-3-ARSONIC ACIDS: OPTICALLY ACTIVE ARSONOLIPIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reaction of trisodium arsenite with (R)- and (S)-glycidol affords in good yields the (R)- and (S)-1,2-dihydroxypropyl-3-arsonic acid, the tetrabutylammonium salt of which upon acylation with myristic, palmitic and stearic anhydrides in the presence of pyridine gives, in moderate to low yields, optically active arsonolipids, i.e., (R)- and (S)-1,2-diacyloxypropyl-3-arsonic acids. The thermotropic phase transitions of these arsonolipids are characterized. Results show

Spyros V. Serves; Gerasimos M. Tsivgoulis; Demetrios N. Sotiropoulos; Panayiotis V. Ioannou; Mahendra K. Jain

1992-01-01

333

6S-1 RNA Function Leads to a Delay in Sporulation in Bacillus subtilis  

PubMed Central

We have discovered that 6S-1 RNA (encoded by bsrA) is important for appropriate timing of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis in that cells lacking 6S-1 RNA sporulate earlier than wild-type cells. The time to generate a mature spore once the decision to sporulate has been made is unaffected by 6S-1 RNA, and, therefore, we propose that it is the timing of onset of sporulation that is altered. Interestingly, the presence of cells lacking 6S-1 RNA in coculture leads to all cell types exhibiting an early-sporulation phenotype. We propose that cells lacking 6S-1 RNA modify their environment in a manner that promotes early sporulation. In support of this model, resuspension of wild-type cells in conditioned medium from ?bsrA cultures also resulted in early sporulation. Use of Escherichia coli growth as a reporter of the nutritional status of conditioned media suggested that B. subtilis cells lacking 6S-1 RNA reduce the nutrient content of their environment earlier than wild-type cells. Several pathways known to impact the timing of sporulation, such as the skf- and sdp-dependent cannibalism pathways, were eliminated as potential targets of 6S-1 RNA-mediated changes, suggesting that 6S-1 RNA activity defines a novel mechanism for altering the timing of onset of sporulation. In addition, 6S-2 RNA does not influence the timing of sporulation, providing further evidence of the independent influences of these two related RNAs on cell physiology.

Cavanagh, Amy T.

2013-01-01

334

Safety and efficacy of S-1 chemotherapy in recurrent\\/metastatic head and neck cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

S-1 is an oral 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) anticancer agent and has shown promising effects in the treatment of a wide range of\\u000a carcinomas, including head and neck cancer. In addition to being used as adjuvant chemotherapy, S-1 is a promising agent for\\u000a palliative treatment. Its ease of administration makes it an ideal drug to treat patients in the outpatient setting while

Shinsuke Suzuki; Kazuo Ishikawa

2009-01-01

335

Phase 1 trial of S-1 in combination with sorafenib for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a Purpose Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor, which was approved as first-line treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular\\u000a carcinoma (HCC). We conducted a phase 1 study of sorafenib plus S-1 in patients with advanced HCC. Experimental design We designed to escalate S-1 at 4 different dose levels with fixed dose of sorafenib. Four dose levels were as follows: level\\u000a 1,

Su Jin Lee; Jeeyun Lee; Se Hoon Park; Joon Oh Park; Young Suk Park; Won Ki Kang; Jongtae Lee; Dong-Seok Yim; Ho Yeong Lim

336

ON THE COMPLEX MOMENTS OF SYMMETRIC POWER L-FUNCTIONS AT s = 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Investigations about the distribution of values of L-functions at s = 1 (in this paper, all L- functions are normalized so that the center of the critical strip is s = 1\\/2) began with the works of Chowla and Chowla\\/Erdos in the case of L-functions associated to the family of real Dirich- let characters. Via Dirichlet's class number formula these

J. COGDELL; P. MICHEL

2004-01-01

337

Tracking the stilbene photoisomerization in the S1 state using RASSCF.  

PubMed

In this work we compute the S1 potential energy curve responsible for stilbene cis-trans photoisomerisation employing the RASSCF approach, since the standard CASPT2//CASSCF protocol appears to be unsatisfactory in describing the stilbene S1 state. We find that RASSCF calculations, which are based on relatively few (but well chosen) configurations, produce qualitatively correct results and accurate relative excited state energies, both in the twisted and in the cis and trans regions of stilbene. PMID:24141234

Tomasello, Gaia; Garavelli, Marco; Orlandi, Giorgio

2013-10-21

338

Phase II study of S-1 in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, S-1, in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer. Patients with pathologically confirmed advanced biliary tract cancer, a measurable lesion, and no history of radiotherapy or chemotherapy were enrolled. S-1 was administered orally (40 mg m?2 b.i.d.) for 28 days, followed by a 14-day

H Ueno; T Okusaka; M Ikeda; Y Takezako; C Morizane

2004-01-01

339

Influence of salt and pyrophosphate on bovine fast and slow myosin S1 dissociation from actin.  

PubMed

The kinetics of myosin dissociation from actin was investigated and also the impact of salt, MgPPi, and myosin heavy chain isoform on myosin subfragment 1 (S1) dissociation from actin using purified proteins and fluorescence spectroscopy. Both NaCl and MgPPi increased myosin S1 dissociation rate. When salt concentrations increased from 0.1 to 1.0 M, the dissociation rate of S1 from bovine masseter (slow) and cutaneous trunci (fast) muscle increased 38 and 78 fold, respectively. MgPPi had an even greater effect on S1 dissociation from actin. With the addition of MgPPi to the mixture of pyrene actin and S1, the fluorescence increased about 85% within the dead time of the mixing approach.. Unlike salt, MgPPi had no apparent difference in its ability to dissociate slow or fast S1 isoforms from actin. The results reveal that salt and MgPPi increase myosin extraction and functionality in meat by weakening the actomyosin interaction and that some of the difference in the functionality of red and white muscle may be related to actomyosin dissociation. PMID:20161643

Shen, Qingwu W; Swartz, Darl R

2010-03-01

340

Molecular and immunological characterisation of the glycosylated orange allergen Cit s 1  

PubMed Central

The IgE of sera from patients with a history of allergy to oranges (Citrus sinensis) bind a number of proteins in orange extract, including Cit s 1, a germin-like protein. In the present study, we have analysed its immunological cross-reactivity and its molecular nature. Sera from many of the patients examined recognise a range of glycoproteins and neoglycoconjugates containing ?1,2-xylose and core ?1,3-fucose on their N-glycans. These reagents also inhibited the interaction of Cit s 1 with patients’ sera, thus underlining the critical role of glycosylation in the recognition of this protein by patients’ IgE and extending previous data showing that deglycosylated Cit s 1 does not possess IgE epitopes. In parallel, we examined the peptide sequence and glycan structure of Cit s 1 using mass spectrometric techniques. Indeed, we achieved complete sequence coverage of the mature protein as compared to the translation of an expressed sequence tag cDNA clone and demonstrated that the single N-glycosylation site of this protein carries oligosaccharides with xylose and fucose residues. Due to the presumed requirement for multivalency for in vivo allergenicity, our molecular data showing that Cit s 1 is monovalent as regards glycosylation and that the single N-glycan is the target of the IgE response to this protein, therefore, explain the immunological cross-reactive properties of Cit s 1 as well as its equivocal nature as a clinically-relevant allergen.

Poltl, Gerald; Ahrazem, Oussama; Paschinger, Katharina; Ibanez, M. Dolores; Salcedo, Gabriel; Wilson, Iain B. H.

2010-01-01

341

A novel role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 in mouse thrombopoiesis.  

PubMed

Millions of platelets are produced each hour by bone marrow (BM) megakaryocytes (MKs). MKs extend transendothelial proplatelet (PP) extensions into BM sinusoids and shed new platelets into the blood. The mechanisms that control platelet generation remain incompletely understood. Using conditional mutants and intravital multiphoton microscopy, we show here that the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) serves as a critical directional cue guiding the elongation of megakaryocytic PP extensions from the interstitium into BM sinusoids and triggering the subsequent shedding of PPs into the blood. Correspondingly, mice lacking the S1P receptor S1pr1 develop severe thrombocytopenia caused by both formation of aberrant extravascular PPs and defective intravascular PP shedding. In contrast, activation of S1pr1 signaling leads to the prompt release of new platelets into the circulating blood. Collectively, our findings uncover a novel function of the S1P-S1pr1 axis as master regulator of efficient thrombopoiesis and might raise new therapeutic options for patients with thrombocytopenia. PMID:23148237

Zhang, Lin; Orban, Martin; Lorenz, Michael; Barocke, Verena; Braun, Daniel; Urtz, Nicole; Schulz, Christian; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Tirniceriu, Anca; Gaertner, Florian; Proia, Richard L; Graf, Thomas; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Montanez, Eloi; Prinz, Marco; Müller, Alexandra; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Billich, Andreas; Sixt, Michael; Fässler, Reinhard; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Junt, Tobias; Massberg, Steffen

2012-11-12

342

A novel role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 in mouse thrombopoiesis  

PubMed Central

Millions of platelets are produced each hour by bone marrow (BM) megakaryocytes (MKs). MKs extend transendothelial proplatelet (PP) extensions into BM sinusoids and shed new platelets into the blood. The mechanisms that control platelet generation remain incompletely understood. Using conditional mutants and intravital multiphoton microscopy, we show here that the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) serves as a critical directional cue guiding the elongation of megakaryocytic PP extensions from the interstitium into BM sinusoids and triggering the subsequent shedding of PPs into the blood. Correspondingly, mice lacking the S1P receptor S1pr1 develop severe thrombocytopenia caused by both formation of aberrant extravascular PPs and defective intravascular PP shedding. In contrast, activation of S1pr1 signaling leads to the prompt release of new platelets into the circulating blood. Collectively, our findings uncover a novel function of the S1S1pr1 axis as master regulator of efficient thrombopoiesis and might raise new therapeutic options for patients with thrombocytopenia.

Zhang, Lin; Orban, Martin; Lorenz, Michael; Barocke, Verena; Braun, Daniel; Urtz, Nicole; Schulz, Christian; von Bruhl, Marie-Luise; Tirniceriu, Anca; Gaertner, Florian; Proia, Richard L.; Graf, Thomas; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Montanez, Eloi; Prinz, Marco; Muller, Alexandra; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Billich, Andreas; Sixt, Michael; Fassler, Reinhard; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Junt, Tobias

2012-01-01

343

ROXA J081009.9+384757.0: a 1047 erg s-1 blazar with hard X-ray synchrotron peak or a new type of radio loud AGN?  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the discovery of ROXA J081009.9+384757.0 = SDSS J081009.9+384757.0, a z=3.95 blazar with a highly unusual Spectral Energy Distribution. This object was first noticed as a probable high f_x\\/f_r, high-luminosity blazar within the error region of a ≈10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 ROSAT source which, however, also included a much brighter late-type star. We describe the results of a recent

P. Giommi; E. Massaro; P. Padovani; M. Perri; E. Cavazzuti; S. Turriziani; G. Tosti; S. Colafrancesco; G. Tagliaferri; G. Chincarini; D. N. Burrows; M. McMath Chester; N. Gehrels

2007-01-01

344

Human CYP2S1 Metabolizes Cyclooxygenase- and Lipoxygenase-Derived EicosanoidsS?  

PubMed Central

CYP2S1 is a recently described dioxin-inducible cytochrome P450. We previously demonstrated that human CYP2S1 oxidizes a number of carcinogens but only via the peroxide shunt. In this article, we investigated whether human CYP2S1 can metabolize cyclooxygenase- and lipoxygenase-derived lipid peroxides in a NADPH-independent fashion. Human CYP2S1 metabolizes prostaglandin G2 (PGG2) (Km = 0.267 ± 0.072 ?M) into several products including 12S-hydroxy-5Z,8E,10E-heptadecatrienoic acid (12-HHT). It also metabolizes prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) (Km = 11.7 ± 2.8 ?M) into malondialdehyde, 12-HHT, and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The turnover to 12-HHT by human CYP2S1 (1.59 ± 0.04 min?1) is 40-fold higher than that of TXA2 (0.04 min?1). In addition to PGG2 and PGH2 metabolism, human CYP2S1 efficiently metabolizes the hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acids (5S-, 12S-, and 15S-) and 13S-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid into 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid (turnover = 16.7 ± 0.3 min?1), 12-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid 1 (11.5 ± 0.9 min?1), 15-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid (16.9 ± 0.8 min?1), and 13-octadecadienoic acid (20.2 ± 0.9 min?1), respectively. Other cytochromes P450 such as CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, and 3A4 underwent similar conversions but at slower rates. The fatty acid hydroperoxides were also converted by human CYP2S1 to several epoxyalcohols. Our data indicate that fatty acid endoperoxides and hydroperoxides represent endogenous substrates of CYP2S1 and suggest that the enzyme CYP2S1 may play an important role in the inflammatory process because some of the products that CYP2S1 produces play important roles in inflammation.

Bui, Peter; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Beedanagari, Sudheer Reddy; Reddy, Srinivasa T.

2011-01-01

345

Roles of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors in malignant behavior of glioma cells. Differential effects of S1P{sub 2} on cell migration and invasiveness  

SciTech Connect

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid that signals through a family of five G-protein-coupled receptors, termed S1P{sub 1-5}. S1P stimulates growth and invasiveness of glioma cells, and high expression levels of the enzyme that forms S1P, sphingosine kinase-1, correlate with short survival of glioma patients. In this study we examined the mechanism of S1P stimulation of glioma cell proliferation and invasion by either overexpressing or knocking down, by RNA interference, S1P receptor expression in glioma cell lines. S1P{sub 1}, S1P{sub 2} and S1P{sub 3} all contribute positively to S1P-stimulated glioma cell proliferation, with S1P{sub 1} being the major contributor. Stimulation of glioma cell proliferation by these receptors correlated with activation of ERK MAP kinase. S1P{sub 5} blocks glioma cell proliferation, and inhibits ERK activation. S1P{sub 1} and S1P{sub 3} enhance glioma cell migration and invasion. S1P{sub 2} inhibits migration through Rho activation, Rho kinase signaling and stress fiber formation, but unexpectedly, enhances glioma cell invasiveness by stimulating cell adhesion. S1P{sub 2} also potently enhances expression of the matricellular protein CCN1/Cyr61, which has been implicated in tumor cell adhesion, and invasion as well as tumor angiogenesis. A neutralizing antibody to CCN1 blocked S1P{sub 2}-stimulated glioma invasion. Thus, while S1P{sub 2} decreases glioma cell motility, it may enhance invasion through induction of proteins that modulate glioma cell interaction with the extracellular matrix.

Young, Nicholas [Integrated Biomedical Science Graduate Program, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Van Brocklyn, James R. [Division of Neuropathology, Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, 4164 Graves Hall, 333 W. 10th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)]. E-mail: james.vanbrocklyn@osumc.edu

2007-05-01

346

Intrinsic susceptibility and bond defects in the novel two dimensional frustrated antiferromagnet Ba2Sn2ZnCr7pGa10-7pO22.  

PubMed

We present microscopic and macroscopic magnetic properties of the highly frustrated antiferromagnet Ba(2)Sn(2)ZnCr(7p)Ga(10-7p)O22, respectively, probed with NMR and SQUID experiments. The T variation of the intrinsic susceptibility of the Cr3+ frustrated Kagomé bilayer, chi(Kag), displays a maximum around 45 K. The dilution of the magnetic lattice has been studied in detail for 0.29

Bono, D; Mendels, P; Collin, G; Blanchard, N

2004-05-27

347

Experimental shock metamorphism of the Murchison CM carbonaceous chondrite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of shock-recovery experiments were carried out on the Murchison CM carbonaceous chondrite by using a single-stage propellant gun. The Murchison samples were shocked in nine experiments at peak pressures from 4 to 49 GPa. The recovered samples were studied in detail by using an optical microscope, a scanning electron microscope and an electron-probe microanalyzer. Chondrules are flattened in the plane of the shock front at 4 to 30 GPa. The mean aspect ratio of chondrules increases from 1.17 to 1.57 roughly in proportion to the intensity of shock pressure up to ˜25 GPa. At 25 to 30 GPa, the mean aspect ratio does not increase further, and chondrules show increasingly more random orientations and degrade their preferred orientations, and at ˜35 GPa, they are extensively disrupted. Most coarse grains of olivine and pyroxene are irregularly fractured, fracture density increases with increasing shock pressure and at ˜30 GPa almost all are thoroughly fractured with subgrains of <1 to 5 ?m in size. At ˜20 GPa, subparallel fractures begin to form in the matrix in directions roughly perpendicular to the compression axis and their densities increase with pressure, especially dramatically at 25 to 30 GPa; thus, the sample is increasingly comminuted and becomes fragile. Local shock melting occurs as melt veins and pockets at 20 to 30 GPa. Fracture-filling veins of fine grains of matrix are also produced at 25 to 30 GPa. The melts and the fine grains seem to result mainly from frictional heating due to displacement along fractures. At ˜35 GPa, melting occurs pervasively throughout the matrix. The melts are mainly produced from the matrix; however, they are consistently more enriched in Fe, S, and Ca, which indicates that these elements are selectively incorporated into the melts. The melts contain tiny spherules of Fe-Ni metal, Fe sulfide, and numerous vesicles. At 49 GPa, the matrix is totally melted and coarse grains of olivine are partially melted. The melts contain much larger vesicles (50-300 ?m in diameter) than those in the samples shocked at lower pressures, which indicates that much more intense devolatilization and gas expansion took place. For the purpose of comparing shock thermal effects between the experimentally shocked samples and naturally shocked targets (surface materials in the Murchison parent body), we calculated internal energy increase for compression by multiple shock wave reflections (experimental case) and for compression by a single shock wave (natural case). The results suggest that postshock thermal effects observed at each experiment may be attained by impact on the natural targets at a considerably lower shock pressure than the peak shock pressure. From the results of our experiments and calculations, we conclude that if the Murchison parent body were shocked on the surface at pressures higher than ˜25 GPa, shocked material would probably undergo drastic increase in the degree of comminution and simultaneous generation of strong expansive forces on pressure release. Thus the results support the hypothesis of Scott et al. (1992) that volatile-rich carbonaceous chondrites shocked above 20 to 30 GPa escaped from the parent body and formed particles that are too small to survive as meteorites.

Tomeoka, Kazushige; Yamahana, Yasuhiro; Sekine, Toshimori

1999-11-01

348

Identification of a pepducin acting as S1P3 receptor antagonist.  

PubMed

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid with key functions in the immune, inflammatory, and cardiovascular systems. S1P exerts its action through the interaction with a family of five known G protein-coupled receptors, named S1P1-5 . Among them, S1P3 has been implicated in the pathological processes of a number of diseases, including sepsis and cancer. KRX-725 (compound 1) is a pepducin that mimics the effects of S1P by triggering specifically S1P3 . Here, aiming to identify novel S1P3 antagonists, we carried out an alanine scanning analysis to address the contribution of the side chains of each amino acid residue to the peptide function. Then, deleted peptides from both the C- and N-terminus were prepared in order to determine the minimal sequence for activity and to identify the structural requirements for agonistic and, possibly, antagonistic behaviors. The pharmacological results of the Ala-scan derived compounds (2-10) suggested a high tolerance of the pepducin 1 to amino acid substitutions. Importantly, the deleted peptide 16 has the ability to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, both pepducin 1-induced vasorelaxation and fibroblast proliferation. Finally, a computational analysis was performed on the prepared compounds, showing that the supposed antagonists 16 and 17 appeared to be aligned with each other but not with the others. These results suggested a correlation between specific conformations and activities. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24133031

Severino, Beatrice; Incisivo, Giuseppina Maria; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Bertolino, Antonio; Frecentese, Francesco; Barbato, Francesco; Manganelli, Serena; Maggioni, Giada; Capasso, Domenica; Caliendo, Giuseppe; Santagada, Vincenzo; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Roviezzo, Fiorentina; Perissutti, Elisa

2013-09-20

349

New Evidence for Mass Loss from ? Cephei from H I 21 cm Line Observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently published Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the classical Cepheid archetype ? Cephei revealed an extended dusty nebula surrounding this star and its hot companion HD 213307. At far-infrared wavelengths, the emission resembles a bow shock aligned with the direction of space motion of the star, indicating that ? Cephei is undergoing mass loss through a stellar wind. Here we report H I 21 cm line observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) to search for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with this wind. Our VLA data reveal a spatially extended H I nebula (~13' or 1 pc across) surrounding the position of ? Cephei. The nebula has a head-tail morphology, consistent with circumstellar ejecta shaped by the interaction between a stellar wind and the interstellar medium (ISM). We directly measure a mass of circumstellar atomic hydrogen M_H I ? 0.07 M_{?}, although the total H I mass may be larger, depending on the fraction of circumstellar material that is hidden by Galactic contamination within our band or that is present on angular scales too large to be detected by the VLA. It appears that the bulk of the circumstellar gas has originated directly from the star, although it may be augmented by material swept from the surrounding ISM. The H I data are consistent with a stellar wind with an outflow velocity V o = 35.6 ± 1.2 km s-1 and a mass-loss rate of {\\dot{M}}? (1.0+/- 0.8)× 10^{-6} M_{?} yr-1. We have computed theoretical evolutionary tracks that include mass loss across the instability strip and show that a mass-loss rate of this magnitude, sustained over the preceding Cepheid lifetime of ? Cephei, could be sufficient to resolve a significant fraction of the discrepancy between the pulsation and evolutionary masses for this star.

Matthews, L. D.; Marengo, M.; Evans, N. R.; Bono, G.

2012-01-01

350

Arthrodesis to L5 versus S1 in long instrumentation and fusion for degenerative lumbar scoliosis  

PubMed Central

There is a debate regarding the distal fusion level for degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Whether a healthy L5-S1 motion segment should be included or not in the fusion remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal indication for the fusion to the sacrum, and to compare the results of distal fusion to L5 versus the sacrum in the long instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar scoliosis. A total of 45 patients who had undergone long instrumentation and fusion for degenerative lumbar scoliosis were evaluated with a minimum 2 year follow-up. Twenty-four patients (mean age 63.6) underwent fusion to L5 and 21 patients (mean age 65.6) underwent fusion to the sacrum. Supplemental interbody fusion was performed in 12 patients in the L5 group and eleven patients in the sacrum group. The number of levels fused was 6.08 segments (range 4–8) in the L5 group and 6.09 (range 4–9) in the sacrum group. Intraoperative blood loss (2,754 ml versus 2,938 ml) and operative time (220 min versus 229 min) were similar in both groups. The Cobb angle changed from 24.7° before surgery to 6.8° after surgery in the L5 group, and from 22.8° to 7.7° in the sacrum group without statistical difference. Correction of lumbar lordosis was statistically better in the sacrum group (P = 0.03). Less correction of lumbar lordosis in the L5 group seemed to be associated with subsequent advanced L5-S1 disc degeneration. The change of coronal and sagittal imbalance was not different in both groups. Subsequent advanced L5-S1 disc degeneration occurred in 58% of the patients in the L5 group. Symptomatic adjacent segment disease at L5-S1 developed in five patients. Interestingly, the development of adjacent segment disease was not related to the preoperative grade of disc degeneration, which proved minimal degeneration in the five patients. In the L5 group, there were nine patients of complications at L5-S1 segment, including adjacent segment disease at L5-S1 and loosening of L5 screws. Seven of the nine patients showed preoperative sagittal imbalance and/or lumbar hypolordosis, which might be risk factors of complications at L5-S1. For the patients with sagittal imbalance and lumbar hypolordosis, L5-S1 should be included in the fusion even if L5-S1 disc was minimal degeneration.

Cho, Kyu-Jung; Suk, Se-Il; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Choi, Sung-Wook; Yoon, Young-Hyun; Won, Man-Hee

2009-01-01

351

Search for Excess Dimuon Production in the Radial Region (1.6 < r < 10) cm at the D0 Experiment  

SciTech Connect

We report on a study of dimuon events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using 0.9 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the D0 experiment during 2008. Using information from the inner-layer silicon tracking detector, we observe 712 {+-} 462 {+-} 942 events in which one or both muons are produced in the range 1.6 < r {approx}< 10 cm, which is expressed as a fraction (0.40 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.53)% of the total dimuon sample. We therefore see no significant excess of muons produced a few centimeters away from the interaction point.

Williams, Mark; Collaboration, for the D0

2009-06-01

352

Determination of the 243,246,248Cm thermal neutron induced fission cross sections  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The minor actinide waste produced in nuclear power plants contains various Cm-isotopes, and transmutation scenarios require improved fission cross section data. The available thermal neutron induced fission cross section data for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm are not very accurate, so new cross section measurements have been performed at the high flux reactor of the ILL in Grenoble (France) under better experimental conditions (highly enriched samples, very intense and clean neutron beam). The measurements were performed at a neutron energy of 5.38 meV, yielding fission cross section values of (1240+/-28)b for 243Cm, (25+/-47)mb for 246Cm and (685+/-84)mb for 248Cm. From these results, thermal fission cross section values of (572+/-14)b (12+/-25)mb and (316+/-43)mb have been deduced for 243Cm, 246Cm and 248Cm, respectively.

Serot, O.; Wagemans, C.; Vermote, S.; Heyse, J.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.

2005-11-01

353

DNA-remethylation around a STAT5-binding enhancer in the  S1-casein promoter is associated with abrupt shutdown of  S1-casein synthesis during acute mastitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

ProlactinstimulatestheexpressionofmilkgenesduringlactationthroughtheactivationofSTAT5transcriptionfactors,which subsequently bind to their cognate target sequence on the promoters. Demethylation of 5methylCpG dinucleotides permits the tissue-specific accessibility of transcription factor-binding sites during development, but remethylation has not been showntocontributetoacutesuppressionofgeneexpression.WecharacterizefunctionallyanovelSTAT5-bindinglactational enhancer in the far upstream promoter (wK10 kbp) of the bovine aS1-casein-encoding gene. This promoter area is hypo- methylatedinthelactatingudder only.Remethylationofthisareaaccompaniesanexperimentallyelicitedacuteshutdownof casein synthesis in fully lactating cows, whose udder quarters

Jens Vanselow; Wei Yang; Jens Herrmann; Holm Zerbe; Hans-Joachim Schuberth; Wolfram Petzl; Wolfgang Tomek; Hans-Martin Seyfert

2006-01-01

354

Cyanobacterial cytochrome c(M): probing its role as electron donor for Cu(A) of cytochrome c oxidase.  

PubMed

It is well known that efficient functioning of photosynthetic (PET) and respiratory electron transport (RET) in cyanobacteria requires the presence of either cytochrome c(6) (Cytc(6)) or plastocyanin (PC). By contrast, the interaction of an additional redox carrier, cytochrome c(M) (Cytc(M)), with either PET or RET is still under discussion. Here, we focus on the (putative) role of Cytc(M) in cyanobacterial respiration. It is demonstrated that genes encoding the main terminal oxidase (cytochrome c oxidase, COX) and cytochrome c(M) are found in all 44 totally or partially sequenced cyanobacteria (except one strain). In order to check whether Cytc(M) can act as electron donor to COX, we investigated the intermolecular electron transfer kinetics between Cytc(M) and the soluble Cu(A) domain (i.e. the donor binding and electron entry site) of subunit II of COX. Both proteins from Synechocystis PCC6803 were expressed heterologously in E. coli. The forward and the reverse electron transfer reactions were studied yielding apparent bimolecular rate constants of (2.4+/-0.1)x10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and (9.6+/-0.4)x10(3) M(-1) s(-1) (5 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7, 50 mM KCl). A comparative analysis with Cytc(6) and PC demonstrates that Cytc(M) functions as electron donor to Cu(A) as efficiently as Cytc(6) but more efficient than PC. Furthermore, we demonstrate the association of Cytc(M) with the cytoplasmic and thylakoid membrane fractions by immunobloting and discuss the potential role of Cytc(M) as electron donor for COX under stress conditions. PMID:19138661

Bernroitner, Margit; Tangl, Daniela; Lucini, Chantal; Furtmüller, Paul G; Peschek, Günter A; Obinger, Christian

2008-12-24

355

Global radiation damage at 300 and 260 K with dose rates approaching 1 MGy s?1  

PubMed Central

Global radiation damage to 19 thaumatin crystals has been measured using dose rates from 3 to 680?kGy?s?1. At room temperature damage per unit dose appears to be roughly independent of dose rate, suggesting that the timescales for important damage processes are less than ?1?s. However, at T = 260?K approximately half of the global damage manifested at dose rates of ?10?kGy?s?1 can be outrun by collecting data at 680?kGy?s?1. Appreciable sample-to-sample variability in global radiation sensitivity at fixed dose rate is observed. This variability cannot be accounted for by errors in dose calculation, crystal slippage or the size of the data sets in the assay.

Warkentin, Matthew; Badeau, Ryan; Hopkins, Jesse B.; Mulichak, Anne M.; Keefe, Lisa J.; Thorne, Robert E.

2012-01-01

356

[Surgical resection and S-1 administration for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma].  

PubMed

A 57-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). He underwent right hepatectomy with preoperative adjuvant transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. A follow-up computed tomography scan revealed a single pulmonary metastasis. After 2 courses of S-1 administration, he underwent left lower lobectomy, and a pathological specimen taken at the time was diagnosed as pulmonary metastasis of HCC. Although adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 resulted in relapse-free survival for 2 years after pulmonary resection, he was found to have recurrence of liver cancer and underwent partial hepatectomy. This case report suggests that surgical resection and S-1 administration would be a useful treatment option for hepatocellular carcinoma with distant metastasis. PMID:23267954

Furukawa, Kenta; Kawamoto, Koichi; Hama, Naoki; Akita, Hirofumi; Wada, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shogo; Marubashi, Shigeru; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Umeshita, Koji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Nagano, Hiroaki

2012-11-01

357

On S-duality of 5d super Yang-Mills on S 1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study a duality of 5d maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills on S 1, which exchanges the tower of Kaluza-Klein W-bosons and the tower of instantonic monopoles. This duality maps a non-simply-laced gauge theory to a simply-laced gauge theory twisted by an outer automorphism around S 1, and is closely related to the Langlands dual of affine Lie algebras. We also discuss how this S-duality is implemented in terms of 6d mathcal{N} = (2, 0) theory. This is straightforward except for the 6d theory of type SU(2 n + 1) with {mathbb{Z}_2} outer-automorphism twist, for which a few new properties are deduced. For example, this 6d theory, when reduced on an S 1 with {mathbb{Z}_2} twist, gives 5d USp(2 n) theory with nontrivial discrete 5d theta angle.

Tachikawa, Yuji

2011-11-01

358

Effect of ?-electron conjugation length on the solvent-dependent S 1 lifetime of peridinin  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Peridinin exhibits an anomalous solvent dependence of its S 1 excited state lifetime attributed to the presence of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state. The nature of this state has yet to be elucidated. Ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been performed on a synthetic analog, C 35-peridinin, having one less conjugated double bond than peridinin. The data reveal the lifetime decreases from 1.5 ns in n-hexane to 9.2 ps in methanol, an order of magnitude larger than peridinin. This is the strongest solvent dependence on the lifetime of an S 1 state of a carotenoid yet reported. The data support the view that the S 1 and ICT states are strongly coupled.

Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Kajikawa, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Shinji; Katsumura, Shigeo; Frank, Harry A.

2008-09-01

359

S1 and KH domains of polynucleotide phosphorylase determine the efficiency of RNA binding and autoregulation.  

PubMed

To better understand the roles of the KH and S1 domains in RNA binding and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) autoregulation, we have identified and investigated key residues in these domains. A convenient pnp::lacZ fusion reporter strain was used to assess autoregulation by mutant PNPase proteins lacking the KH and/or S1 domains or containing point mutations in those domains. Mutant enzymes were purified and studied by using in vitro band shift and phosphorolysis assays to gauge binding and enzymatic activity. We show that reductions in substrate affinity accompany impairment of PNPase autoregulation. A remarkably strong correlation was observed between ?-galactosidase levels reflecting autoregulation and apparent KD values for the binding of a model RNA substrate. These data show that both the KH and S1 domains of PNPase play critical roles in substrate binding and autoregulation. The findings are discussed in the context of the structure, binding sites, and function of PNPase. PMID:23457244

Wong, Alexander G; McBurney, Kristina L; Thompson, Katharine J; Stickney, Leigh M; Mackie, George A

2013-03-01

360

TLR4 and S1P receptors cooperate to enhance inflammatory cytokine production in human gingival epithelial cells  

PubMed Central

Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pattern recognition receptors for highly conserved microbial molecular patterns. Activation of TLR is a pivotal step in the initiation of innate, inflammatory, and immune defense mechanisms. Recent findings indicate that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) may modulate TLR signaling, but it is unclear which GPCR are involved in this process. One such cooperation between GPCR and TLR can be attributed to the sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor family. The S1P receptors (S1P1–5) are a family of GPCR with a high affinity for S1P, a serum-borne bioactive lipid associated with diverse biological activities such as inflammation and healing. In this study, we show that pro-inflammatory cytokine production, including IL-6 and IL-8, was increased with LPS and concomitant S1P stimulation. Furthermore, elevated cytokine production following LPS and S1P challenge in human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC) was significantly reduced when TLR4, S1P1 or S1P3 signaling was blocked. Our study also shows that S1P1 and S1P3 expression was induced by LPS in HGEC, and this elevated expression enhanced the influence of S1P in its cooperation with TLR4 to increase cytokine production. This cooperation between TLR4 and S1P1 or S1P3 demonstrates that TLR4 and GPCR can interact to enhance cytokine production in epithelial cells.

Eskan, Mehmet A.; Rose, Beate G.; Benakanakere, Manjunatha R.; Zeng, Qun; Fujioka, Daisuke; Martin, Michael H.; Lee, Menq-Jer; Kinane, Denis F.

2009-01-01

361

The plant s1-like nuclease family has evolved a highly diverse range of catalytic capabilities.  

PubMed

Plant S1-like nucleases, often referred to as nuclease I enzymes, are the main class of enzymes involved in nucleic acid degradation during plant programmed cell death. The catalytically active site of these enzymes shows a significant similarity to the well-described P1 nuclease from Penicillium citrinum. Previously published studies reported that plant S1-like nucleases possess catalytic activities similar to their fungal orthologs, i.e. they hydrolyze single-stranded DNA and RNA, and less efficiently double-stranded DNA, in the presence of zinc ions. Here we describe a comprehensive study of the nucleolytic activities of all Arabidopsis S1-like paralogs. Our results revealed that different members of this family are characterized by a surprisingly large variety of catalytic properties. We found that, in addition to Zn(2+)-dependent enzymes, this family also comprises nucleases activated by Ca(2+) and Mn(2+), which implies that the apparently well-known S1 nuclease active site in plant nucleases is able to cooperate with different activatory ions. Moreover, particular members of this class differ in their optimum pH value and substrate specificity. These results shed new light on the widely accepted classification of plant nucleases which is based on the assumption that the catalytic requirements of plant nucleases reflect their phylogenetic origin. Our results imply the need to redefine the understanding of the term 'nuclease I'. Analysis of the phylogenetic relationships between S1-like enzymes shows that plant representatives of this family evolve toward an increase in catalytic diversity. The importance of this process for the biological functions of plant S1-type enzymes is discussed. PMID:23620482

Lesniewicz, Krzysztof; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Pienkowska, Joanna R; Krzywkowski, Piotr; Poreba, Elzbieta

2013-04-24

362

Autoantibodies to ?S1-Casein Are Induced by Breast-Feeding  

PubMed Central

Background The generation of antibodies is impaired in newborns due to an immature immune system and reduced exposure to pathogens due to maternally derived antibodies and placental functions. During nursing, the immune system of newborns is challenged with multiple milk-derived proteins. Amongst them, caseins are the main constituent. In particular, human ?S1-casein (CSN1S1) was recently shown to possess immunomodulatory properties. We were thus interested to determine if auto-antibodies to CSN1S1 are induced by breast-feeding and may be sustained into adulthood. Methods 62 sera of healthy adult individuals who were (n?=?37) or were not (n?=?25) breast-fed against human CSN1S1 were investigated by a new SD (surface display)-ELISA. For cross-checking, these sera were tested for anti Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibodies by a commercial ELISA. Results IgG-antibodies were predominantly detected in individuals who had been nursed. At a cut-off value of 0.4, the SD-ELISA identified individuals with a history of having been breast-fed with a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 92%. Under these conditions, 35 out of 37 sera from healthy donors, who where breast-fed, reacted positively but only 5 sera of the 25 donors who were not breast-fed. The duration of breast-feeding was of no consequence to the antibody reaction as some healthy donors were only short term breast-fed (5 days minimum until 6 weeks maximum), but exhibited significant serum reaction against human CSN1S1 nonetheless. Conclusion We postulate that human CSN1S1 is an autoantigen. The antigenicity is orally determined, caused by breast-feeding, and sustained into adulthood.

Petermann, Klaudia; Vordenbaumen, Stefan; Maas, Ruth; Braukmann, Achim; Bleck, Ellen; Saenger, Thorsten; Schneider, Matthias; Jose, Joachim

2012-01-01

363

S-1 plus CIK as second-line treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of S-1 (Tegafur, Gimeracil, and Oteracil Potassium Capsules) plus CIK (Cytokine-induced killer cells) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer who had previously received gemcitabine-based therapy. In this prospective study, fifty-eight patients were randomly divided into two groups. One group (CT group) was given S-1 alone, and the other group (immuno-CT group) was given S-1 plus CIK. S-1 was administered orally twice a day at 80 mg/m(2)/day on days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle till disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. CIK was given for one cycle of 28 days. The disease control rate for S-1 and CIK was 40.0 and 53.6%, respectively (p = 0.621). The serum CA19-9 level decreased for more than 25% was significantly different (33.3 and 60.7 % in CT group and immuno-CT group, respectively, p = 0.037). The median time to progression was 2.5 (95% CI 2.3-2.8) and 2.9 (95% CI 2.6-3.2) months (p = 0.037) for CT group and immuno-CT group, respectively. The median overall survival was 6.1 (95% CI 5.7-6.5) and 6.6 (95% CI 6.1-7.1) months (p = 0.09) for CT group and immuno-CT group, respectively. The difference in hematological toxicity, including leukocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia, was insignificant between the two groups. In contrast, the differences in non-hematological toxicity, fatigue, and non-infective fever were significantly different between the two groups (p < 0.05). The S-1 plus CIK regimen was well tolerated in a second-line setting in patients with gemcitabine-refractory and advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:24122257

Wang, Meng; Shi, Sheng-bin; Qi, Jie-lin; Tang, Xiao-yong; Tian, Jing

2013-10-13

364

The acrylamide (S)-1 differentially affects Kv7 (KCNQ) potassium channels.  

PubMed

The family of Kv7 (KCNQ) potassium channels consists of five members. Kv7.2 and 3 are the primary molecular correlates of the M-current, but also Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 display M-current characteristics. M-channel modulators include blockers (e.g., linopirdine) for cognition enhancement and openers (e.g., retigabine) for treatment of epilepsy and neuropathic pain. We investigated the effect of a Bristol-Myers Squibb compound (S)-N-[1-(3-morpholin-4-yl-phenyl)-ethyl]-3-phenyl-acrylamide [(S)-1] on cloned human Kv7.1-5 potassium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Using two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings we found that (S)-1 blocks Kv7.1 and Kv7.1/KCNE1 currents. In contrast, (S)-1 produced a hyperpolarizing shift of the activation curve for Kv7.2, Kv7.2/Kv7.3, Kv7.4 and Kv7.5. Further, the compound enhanced the maximal current amplitude at all potentials for Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 whereas the combined activation/block of Kv7.2 and Kv7.2/3 was strongly voltage-dependent. The tryptophan residue 242 in S5, known to be crucial for the effect of retigabine, was also shown to be critical for the enhancing effect of (S)-1 and BMS204352. Furthermore, no additive effect on Kv7.4 current amplitude was observed when both retigabine and (S)-1 or BMS204352 were applied simultaneously. In conclusion, (S)-1 differentially affects the Kv7 channel subtypes and is dependent on a single tryptophan for the current enhancing effect in Kv7.4. PMID:16904708

Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Schmitt, Nicole; Calloe, Kirstine; Dalby Brown, William; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

2006-08-10

365

Traumatic L5-S1 spondylolisthesis in a 15-year-old: a case report.  

PubMed

Traumatic spondylolisthesis is a rare injury resulting from complex trauma and high-energy mechanisms. We present a case report of traumatic spondylolisthesis at the L5-S1 disc space of a patient who was buried after a wall fell on his back. In the physical examination, bilaterally decreased muscle strength was observed. Examination images indicated a 90% slip at L5-S1. Surgical treatment was provided with a posterior and anterior approach using pedicle fixation and an anterior cage. After 4 months, there was significant recovery of muscle strength in the lower limbs. PMID:23903285

Rodrigues, Luciano M R; Valesin, Edgar S; Pohl, Pedro Henrique I; Milani, Carlo

2013-09-01

366

Observation of an exotic S = +1 baryon in exclusive photoproduction from the deuteron.  

PubMed

In an exclusive measurement of the reaction gammad-->K(+)K(-)pn, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S=+1 is seen in the K(+)n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1.542+/-0.005 GeV/c(2) with a measured width of 0.021 GeV/c(2) FWHM, which is largely determined by experimental mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is (5.2+/-0.6)sigma. The mass and width of the observed peak are consistent with recent reports of a narrow S=+1 baryon by other experimental groups. PMID:14754107

Stepanyan, S; Hicks, K; Carman, D S; Pasyuk, E; Schumacher, R A; Smith, E S; Tedeschi, D J; Todor, L; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S P; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carnahan, B; Chen, S; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; De Vita, R; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuang, Y; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Lawrence, D; Li, J; Lima, A; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Murphy, L Y; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Brien, J; O'Rielly, G V; Opper, A K; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J; Sapunenko, V; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Strakovsky, I I; Stavinsky, A; Stoler, P; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

2003-12-19

367

A late phase II study of S-1 for metastatic pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated the antitumor effect and safety of S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, in patients with metastatic\\u000a pancreatic cancer. Chemo-naive patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and measurable metastatic lesions were enrolled. S-1\\u000a was administered orally twice daily after meals at a dose of 80, 100, or 120 mg\\/day for body surface areas (BSAs) of less\\u000a than 1.25 m2, between 1.25 m2 and less

Takuji Okusaka; Akihiro Funakoshi; Junji Furuse; Narikazu Boku; Kenji Yamao; Shinichi Ohkawa; Hiroshi Saito

2008-01-01

368

Observation of an Exotic S=+1 Baryon in Exclusive Photoproduction from the Deuteron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In an exclusive measurement of the reaction ?d?K+K-pn, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S=+1 is seen in the K+n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1.542±0.005 GeV/c2 with a measured width of 0.021 GeV/c2 FWHM, which is largely determined by experimental mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is (5.2±0.6)?. The mass and width of the observed peak are consistent with recent reports of a narrow S=+1 baryon by other experimental groups.

Stepanyan, S.; Hicks, K.; Carman, D. S.; Pasyuk, E.; Schumacher, R. A.; Smith, E. S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Todor, L.; Adams, G.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S. P.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Berman, B. L.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carnahan, B.; Chen, S.; Ciciani, L.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; de Vita, R.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dhuga, K. S.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fatemi, R.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Forest, T. A.; Funsten, H.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Gordon, C. I.; Gothe, R.; Griffioen, K.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Heimberg, P.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Juengst, H. G.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuang, Y.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Lawrence, D.; Li, J.; Lima, A.; Livingston, K.; Lukashin, K.; Manak, J. J.; McAleer, S.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Melone, J. J.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L. Y.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Brien, J.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Opper, A. K.; Osipenko, M.; Park, K.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J.; Sapunenko, V.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stavinsky, A.; Stoler, P.; Suleiman, R.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.

2003-12-01

369

High-pressure sequence of Ba3NiSb2O9 structural phases: new S = 1 quantum spin liquids based on Ni2+.  

PubMed

Two new gapless quantum spin-liquid candidates with S = 1 (Ni(2+)) moments: the 6H-B phase of Ba(3)NiSb(2)O(9) with a Ni(2+)-triangular lattice and the 3C phase with a Ni(2/3)Sb(1/3)-three-dimensional edge-shared tetrahedral lattice were obtained under high pressure. Both compounds show no magnetic order down to 0.35 K despite Curie-Weiss temperatures ?(CW) of -75.5 (6H-B) and -182.5 K (3C), respectively. Below ~25 K, the magnetic susceptibility of the 6H-B phase saturates to a constant value ?(0) = 0.013 emu/mol, which is followed below 7 K by a linear-temperature-dependent magnetic specific heat (C(M)) displaying a giant coefficient ? = 168 mJ/mol K(2). Both observations suggest the development of a Fermi-liquid-like ground state. For the 3C phase, the C(M) perpendicular T(2) behavior indicates a unique S = 1, 3D quantum spin-liquid ground state. PMID:22181641

Cheng, J G; Li, G; Balicas, L; Zhou, J S; Goodenough, J B; Xu, Cenke; Zhou, H D

2011-11-04

370

Relative strength (. Delta. S =1)/((. Delta. S =0)+(. Delta. S =1)) of isovector spin excitations in the high-lying resonance region of sup 12 C  

SciTech Connect

The relative strength ({Delta}{ital S}=1)/(({Delta}{ital S}=0)+({Delta}{ital S}=1)) of isovector spin excitations, {ital P}{sub sf}, in the high-lying resonance region of {sup 12}C was investigated with the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be) reaction at {ital E}{sub {ital L}}=26 MeV/nucleon and {theta}{sub {ital L}}=0{degree} by separately measuring the ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{sub g.s.}) and ({sup 7}Li,{sup 7}Be{sub 0.43} MeV) reaction channels with the {sup 7}Be-{gamma} coincidence technique. The relative strength {ital P}{sub sf} was derived up to an excitation energy of 18 MeV in {sup 12}B and found to have a constant value of 0.4--0.5 for the continuum irrespective of excitation energy and 0.5 for the isovector dipole resonance centered at {ital E}{sub {ital x}}=7.6 MeV.

Nakayama, S.; Yamagata, T.; Tanaka, M.; Inoue, M.; Yuasa, K.; Itahashi, T.; Ogata, H.; Koori, N.; Shima, K. (College of General Education, University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770 (Japan) Department of Physics, Konan University, Higashinada, Kobe 658 (Japan) Kobe Tokiwa Junior College, Nagata, Kobe 653 (Japan) Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611 (Japan) Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567 (Japan))

1991-08-26

371

Crossed-Beam Dynamics, Low-Temperature Kinetics, and Theoretical Studies of the Reaction S(1D) + C2H4  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reaction between sulfur atoms in the first electronically excited state, S(1D), and ethene (C2H4) has been investigated in a complementary fashion in (a) crossed-beam dynamic experiments with mass spectrometric detection and time-of-flight (TOF) analysis at two collision energies (37.0 and 45.0 kJ mol-1), (b) low temperature kinetics experiments ranging from 298 K down to 23 K, and (c) electronic structure calculations of stationary points and product energetics on the C2H4S singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces. The rate coefficients for total loss of S(1D) are found to be very large (ca. 4 × 10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) down to very low temperatures indicating that the overall reaction is barrierless. From laboratory angular and TOF distributions at different product masses, three competing reaction channels leading to H + CH2CHS (thiovinoxy), H2 + CH2CS (thioketene), and CH3 + HCS (thioformyl) have been unambiguously identified and their dynamics characterized. Product branching ratios have also been estimated. Interpretation of the experimental results on the reaction kinetics and dynamics is assisted by high-level theoretical calculations on the C2H4S singlet potential energy surface. RRKM (Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus) estimates of the product branching ratios using the newly developed singlet potential energy surface have also been performed and compared with the experimental determinations.

Leonori, Francesca; Petrucci, Raffaele; Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Rosi, Marzio; Skouteris, Dimitris; Berteloite, Coralie; Le Picard, Sébastien D.; Canosa, André; Sims, Ian R.

2009-09-01

372

Growth and optoelectronic characteristic of n-Si/p-CuIn(S1-xSex)2 thin-film solar cell by solution growth technique  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The p-CuIn(S1-xSex)2 (CISS) thin films have been grown on n-Si substrate by solution growth technique. The deposition parameters, such as pH (10.5), deposition time (60 min), deposition temperature (50 °C), and concentration of bath solution (0.1 M) were optimized. Elemental analysis of the p-CuIn(S1-xSex)2 thin film was confirmed by energy-dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX). The SEM study of absorber layer shows the uniform morphology of film as well as the continuous smooth deposition onto the n-Si substrates, whose grain size is 130 nm. CuIn(S1-xSex)2 (x=0.5) reveals (1 1 2) orientation peak and exhibits the chalcopyrite structure with lattice constant a=5.28Å and c=11.45Å. The J V characteristics were measured in dark and light. The device parameters have been calculated for solar cell fabrication, V=411.09mV, and J=14.55mA. FF=46.55% and ?=4.64% under an illumination of 60 mW/cm2. The J V characteristics of the device under dark condition were also studied and the ideality factor was calculated, which is equal to 2.2 for n-Si/p-CuIn(S0.5Se0.5)2 heterojunction thin film.

Chavhan, S.; Sharma, R.

2006-07-01

373

[A long-term survival case in advanced mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the appendix using cytoreductive surgery and S-1/CDDP chemotherapy].  

PubMed

Prognosis of patients with advanced mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the appendix (AMCA) is extremely poor. However, there has been no established treatment strategy. We preliminary report here a successfully treated case with AMCA using intensive cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy. A 61-year-old woman had a right lower abdominal pain and was diagnosed as acute appendicitis. At surgery, about 5 cm tumor with mucosal fluid was detected at the distal part of the appendix. The tumor was invading the ileum and bladder. We performed appendectomy with tumor, partial resection of the small intestine and debridement of mucosal fluid. Histopathology revealed AMCA invading the ileum and bladder. After non curative surgery, we started S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy, which S-1 was given orally, twice daily for 3 consecutive weeks, and cisplatin was given intravenously on day 1, 8 and 15 followed by a 3-week rest period. After 6 courses starting with chemotherapy, a complete response was obtained. We followed by S-1 until two years after the initial surgery. At 36 months after the initial surgery, CT scan demonstrated a peritoneal recurrence. Then, she underwent intensive peritonectomy with intraperitoneal hyperthermic chemotherapy. Currently, she had no apparent recurrence for 59 months after initial surgery. PMID:22202431

Hirajima, Shoji; Komatsu, Shuhei; Adachi, Tetsuo; Sakuyama, Akira; Habuchi, Yoshizumi; Otsuj, Eigo; Fukushima, Masanobu

2011-11-01

374

High pressure sequence of Ba3NiSb2O9 structural phases: new S = 1 quantum spin-liquids based on Ni^2+  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quantum spin-liquid (QSL) is a ground-state where strong quantum- mechanical ?uctuations prevents a phase-transition towards conventional magnetic order and makes the spin ensemble to remain in a liquid-like state. Most QSL candidates studied to date are two-dimensional frustrated magnets with either a triangular or a kagome lattice composed of S = 1/2 spins. Here, we report the use of a high pressure, high temperature technique to transform the antiferromagnetically ordered (TN = 13.5 K) 6H-A phase of Ba3NiSb2O9 into two new QSL candidates with larger S = 1 (Ni^2+) moments: the 6H-B phase of Ba3NiSb2O9 which crystallizes in a triangular lattice and the 3C-phase of Ba3NiSb2O9 which forms a three-dimensional edge-shared tetrahedral lattice. Both compounds show no evidence for magnetic order down to T = 0.35 K despite Curie-Weiss temperatures ?CW of -75.5 K (6H-B) and -182.5 K (3C), respectively. Below ˜25 K the magnetic susceptibility of the 6H-B phase is found to saturate at a constant value ? = 0.013 emu/mol which is followed below 7 K, by a linear in temperature dependence for the magnetic contribution to the specificheat (CM) which displays a giant coefficient ? = 168 mJ/mol-K^2 comparable to values observed in heavy-fermion metallic systems. Taken together, both observations indicate the development of a Fermi-liquid like ground-state characterized by a Wilson ratio of 5.6 in this otherwise insulating material It also points to the formation at finite temperatures of a well defined Fermi surface of S = 1 spin-excitations which behave as charged quasiparticles. For the 3C phase one observes CM T ^2 indicating a unique S = 1 three-dimensional QSL ground-state as previously reported for Na3Ir4O8 although this later compound is composed of Ir^4+ ions having S = 1/2. [4pt] Work done in collaboration with J. G. Cheng, G. Li, J. S. Zhou, J. B. Goodenough, C Xu and H. D. Zhou.

Balicas, Luis

2012-02-01

375

Polar phonons in the antiferromagnetic S=1/2 spin-chain system CuSb2O6  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical properties of an S=1/2 antiferromagnetic spin-chain system ?-CuSb2O6 are measured in the frequency range 50 10 000 cm-1 at temperatures of 5 300 K for the electric field polarized along the [010] and [001] crystallographic directions. The number of observed polar phonon modes at low temperature is in agreement with the factor-group analysis for the monoclinic form of ?-CuSb2O6. The mode parameters are determined by using the dispersion analysis of the reflectivity spectra at different temperatures. The parameters of several phonon modes show anomalies around 60 K, at the temperature where the one-dimensional magnetic correlations in the copper chains are largest. This may indicate a finite interaction between the phonon and electron subsystems in ?-CuSb2O6. The theoretical group analysis of the possible rutile low-symmetry phases is performed within the framework of Landau’s theory of phase transitions. The trirutile-rutile phase transformation can be uniquely described by an order parameter which transforms according to the two-dimensional irreducible representation ?4 with k=1/3 b3 of the Brillouin zone of the proper rutile unit cell only. Optical modes assignment of ?-CuSb2O6 performed with use of the aristotype rutile structure allows one to reproduce the tentative picture of the ?-CuSb2O6 phonon dispersion curves.

Torgashev, V. I.; Shirokov, V. B.; Prokhorov, A. S.; Gorshunov, B.; Haas, P.; Dressel, M.; Gibson, B. J.; Kremer, R. K.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Assmus, W.

2003-04-01

376

Sphingosine 1-phosphate analogue recognition and selectivity at S1P4 within the endothelial differentiation gene family of receptors  

PubMed Central

Synergistic computational and experimental studies provided previously unforeseen details concerning the structural basis of S1P (sphingosine 1-phosphate) recognition by the S1P4 G-protein-coupled receptor. Similarly to reports on the S1P1 receptor, cationic and anionic residues in the third transmembrane domain (R3.28 and E3.29 at positions 124 and 125) form ion pairs with the phosphate and ammonium of S1P, and alanine mutations at these positions abolished specific S1P binding, S1P-induced receptor activation and cell migration. Unlike findings on the S1P1 receptor, no cationic residue in the seventh transmembrane domain interacts with the phosphate. Additionally, two previously undiscovered interactions with the S1P polar headgroup have been identified. Trp186 at position 4.64 in the fourth transmembrane domain interacts by a cation-? interaction with the ammonium group of S1P. Lys204 at position 5.38 forms an ion pair with the S1P. The S1P4 and S1P1 receptors show differences in binding-pocket shape and electrostatic distributions that correlate with the published structure–activity relationships. In particular, the binding pocket of mS1P4 (mouse S1P4) has recognition sites for the anionic phosphate and cationic ammonium groups that are equidistant from the end of the non-polar tail. In contrast, the binding pocket of hS1P1 (human S1P4) places the ammonium recognition site 2 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) closer to the end of the non-polar tail than the phosphate recognition site.

Inagaki, Yuichi; Pham, TrucChi T.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Kohno, Takayuki; Osborne, Daniel A.; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tigyi, Gabor; Parrill, Abby L.

2005-01-01

377

Three-weekly S-1 plus cisplatin chemotherapy as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Combination chemotherapy of S-1 and cisplatin has shown promising activity against advanced gastric cancer, but the schedules\\u000a and dose intensities of S-1 and cisplatin have not been consistent in several clinical trials. We investigated the efficacy\\u000a and toxicity of 3-weekly S-1\\/cisplatin chemotherapy as first-line treatment in metastatic or relapsed gastric cancer (MRGC).\\u000a Forty-six patients with MRGC were prospectively enrolled. S-1

In Sil Choi; Keun-Wook Lee; Ki Hwan Kim; Yu Jung Kim; Jee Hyun Kim; Jong Seok Lee

2010-01-01

378

SUMO mediating fusion expression of antimicrobial peptide CM4 from two joined genes in Escherichia coli.  

PubMed

Antibacterial peptide CM4 (ABP-CM4) is a small cationic peptide with broad-spectrum activities against bacteria, fungi, and tumor cells, which may possibly be used as an antimicrobial agent. To improve the expression level of CM4 in Escherichia coli, two tandem repeats of CM4 genes were cloned into the vector pSUMO to construct an expression vector pSUMO-2CM4. The fusion protein SUMO-2CM4, purified by Ni(2+)-chelating chromatography, was cleaved by hydroxylamine hydrochloride to release recombinant CM4. After the cleaved sample was re-applied to a Ni-IDA column, finally, about 48 mg recombinant CM4 was obtained from 1 L bacterial culture with no less than 96% purity, which was the highest yield of CM4 reported so far. PMID:20640425

Li, Jian Feng; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Zhen; Kang, Chun Tao; Zhang, Shuang Quan

2010-07-17

379

Search for cold gas in strong Mg II absorbers at 0.5 < z < 1.5: nature and evolution of 21-cm absorbers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report four new detections of 21-cm absorption from a systematic search of 21-cm absorption in a sample of 17 strong (rest equivalent width, Wr(Mg ii?2796) ? 1 Å) intervening Mg ii absorbers at 0.5 < zabs < 1.5. We also present 20-cm milliarcsecond scale maps of 40 quasars having 42 intervening strong Mg ii absorbers for which we have searched for 21-cm absorption. These maps are used to understand the dependence of 21-cm detection rate on the radio morphology of the background quasar and address the issues related to the covering factor of absorbing gas. Combining 21-cm absorption measurements for 50 strong Mg ii systems from our surveys with the measurements from literature, we obtain a sample of 85 strong Mg ii absorbers at 0.5 < zabs < 1 and 1.1 < zabs < 1.5. We present detailed analysis of this 21-cm absorption sample, taking into account the effect of the varying 21-cm optical depth sensitivity and covering factor associated with the different quasar sight lines. We find that the 21-cm detection rate is higher towards the quasars with flat or inverted spectral index at cm wavelengths. About 70% of 21-cm detections are towards the quasars with linear size, LS < 100 pc. The 21-cm absorption lines having velocity widths, ?V > 100 km s-1 are mainly seen towards the quasars with extended radio morphology at arcsecond scales. However, we do not find any correlation between the integrated 21-cm optical depth, ??dv, or the width of 21-cm absorption line, ?V, with the LS measured from the milliarcsecond scale images. All this can be understood if the absorbing gas is patchy with a typical correlation length of ~30-100 pc. We confirm our previous finding that the 21-cm detection rate for a given optical depth threshold can be increased by up to a factor 2 by imposing the following additional constraints: Mg ii doublet ratio < 1.1, W(Mg ii)/W(Fe ii) < 1.47 and W(Mg i)/W(Mg ii) > 0.27. This suggests that the probability of detecting 21-cm absorption is higher in the systems with high N(H i). We show that within the measurement uncertainty, the 21-cm detection rate in strong Mg ii systems is constant over 0.5 < zabs < 1.5, i.e., over ~30% of the total age of universe. We show that the detection rate can be underestimated by up to a factor 2 if 21-cm optical depths are not corrected for the partial coverage estimated using milliarcsecond scale maps. Since stellar feedback processes are expected to diminish the filling factor of cold neutral medium over 0.5 < z < 1, this lack of evolution in the 21-cm detection rate in strong Mg ii absorbers is intriguing. Large blind surveys of 21-cm absorption lines with the upcoming Square Kilometre Array pathfinders will provide a complete view of the evolution of cold gas in galaxies and shed light on the nature ofMg ii systems and DLAs, and their relationship with stellar feedback processes. Table 4 and appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

Gupta, N.; Srianand, R.; Petitjean, P.; Bergeron, J.; Noterdaeme, P.; Muzahid, S.

2012-08-01

380

Conference on Learning Disabilities: A Review of Indiana's Rule S-1. LD Series #5.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The document is a collection of papers presented at a conference on the delivery of services to learning disabled children in Indiana that focused on Indiana's Rule S-1, which implements the mandatory special education act through multidisciplinary identification, assessment, and placement of handicapped children. Titles and authors include "The…

Gillespie, Patricia H., Ed.; Middleton, Thomas O., Ed.

381

Colloidal synthesis of homogeneously alloyed CdSexS1-x nanorods with compositionally tunable photoluminescence.  

PubMed

Homogenously alloyed CdSexS1-x nanorods with controlled aspect ratios are synthesised by a hot-injection colloidal route. The optical absorption and photoluminescence emission are compositionally tunable with chalcogen ratios. The synthetic protocol is sufficiently robust to allow good control of rod aspect ratios, with low polydispersities, suited for their rational assembly into superstructures. PMID:24066355

Singh, Shalini; Singh, Ajay; Palaniappan, Kumaranand; Ryan, Kevin M

2013-10-01

382

Role of FAK in S1P-Regulated Endothelial Permeability  

PubMed Central

The vascular endothelium serves as a semi-selective barrier between the circulating contents of the blood and the tissues through which they flow. Disruption of this barrier results in significant organ dysfunction during devastating inflammatory syndromes such as sepsis and acute lung injury (ALI). Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an endogenous lipid regulator of endothelial permeability that produces potent barrier enhancement via actin and junctional protein rearrangement and resultant cytoskeletal changes. A key effector protein in this S1P response is focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a highly conserved cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase involved in the engagement of integrins and assembly of focal adhesions (FA) through the catalysis of multiple downstream signals. After stimulation by S1P, endothelial FAK undergoes specific tyrosine phosphorylation that results in activation of the kinase and dynamic interactions with other effector molecules to improve the endothelial barrier. FAK participates in peripheral actin cytoskeletal rearrangement as well as cell-matrix (FA) and cell-cell (adherens junction) junctional complex strengthening that combine to decrease vascular permeability. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the role of FAK in mediating enhanced endothelial barrier function by S1P.

Belvitch, Patrick; Dudek, Steven M.

2013-01-01

383

Cystoid Macular Edema Associated with Oral Antineoplastic Agent S-1 in a Patient with Diabetic Retinopathy  

PubMed Central

A 60-year-old man with neovascular glaucoma due to diabetic retinopathy received an intravitreal injection of 1.25 mg bevacizumab (IVB) followed by extensive panretinal photocoagulation in the right eye. The anterior segment neovascularization regressed within 10 days after IVB. One and a half months later, the patient underwent gastrectomy for stage IIIb gastric cancer. Two months later, he was started on S-1 orally (100 mg/day for 48, 26, and 32 consecutive days in the first, second, and third treatment cycle, respectively). The interval between the first and second treatment cycle was 20 days and between the second and third cycle it was 24 days. The patient developed anemia and diarrhea. At the end of the second S-1 cycle, cystoid macular edema developed in the right eye, although diabetic retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma were stable. Macular edema persisted for 5 months despite another IVB, and disappeared 3 months after termination of S-1 therapy. The time course of the magnitude of macular edema correlated well with the severity of anemia. The macular edema was possibly associated with anemia, which is a major side effect of S-1. Further studies are warranted to investigate the relationship between anemia and macular edema in patients with diabetic retinopathy.

Higashide, Tomomi; Murotani, Eiji; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa

2012-01-01

384

Kidney transcriptome reveals altered steroid homeostasis in NaS1 sulfate transporter null mice.  

PubMed

Sulfate is essential for human growth and development, and circulating sulfate levels are maintained by the NaS1 sulfate transporter which is expressed in the kidney. Previously, we generated a NaS1-null (Nas1(-/-)) mouse which exhibits hyposulfatemia. In this study, we investigated the kidney transcriptome of Nas1(-/-) mice. We found increased (n=25) and decreased (n=60) mRNA levels of genes with functional roles that include sulfate transport and steroid metabolism. Corticosteroid-binding globulin was the most up-regulated gene (110% increase) in Nas1(-/-) mouse kidney, whereas the sulfate anion transporter-1 (Sat1) was among the most down-regulated genes (>or=50% decrease). These findings led us to investigate the circulating and urinary steroid levels of Nas1(-/-) and Nas1(+/+) mice, which revealed reduced blood levels of corticosterone ( approximately 50% decrease), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, approximately 30% decrease) and DHEA-sulfate ( approximately 40% decrease), and increased urinary corticosterone ( approximately 16-fold increase) and DHEA ( approximately 40% increase) levels in Nas1(-/-) mice. Our data suggest that NaS1 is essential for maintaining a normal metabolic state in the kidney and that loss of NaS1 function leads to reduced circulating steroid levels and increased urinary steroid excretion. PMID:18790054

Dawson, Paul Anthony; Gardiner, Brooke; Lee, Soohyun; Grimmond, Sean; Markovich, Daniel

2008-08-22

385

[A case of urachal carcinoma treated with S-1/CDDP combination chemotherapy].  

PubMed

No established treatment exists for urachal carcinoma,except curative resection,and its prognosis is poor. More than 80% of urachal carcinomas are adenocarcinomas. We report a case of advanced urachal carcinoma treated with S-1 and cisplatin combination (S-1/CDDP) chemotherapy. The patient,a 61-year-old woman,presented with macroscopic hematuria. A tumor was detected on the bladder dome and transurethral resection was performed. Histopathological findings indicated poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were 3.5 ng/ml and 140 U/ml respectively. Magnetic resonance images indicated an extension of this tumor to the retroperioneal space. Metastasis to her right ischium was suspected from bone scintigraphy results. The tumor was diagnosed as stage IVB (Sheldon's category) urachal carcinoma. After one cycle of S-1/CDDP chemotherapy,the size of the tumor on the bladder dome decreased,after which total cystectomy was performed. The surgical margin of the cystectomy specimen was negative for malignant cells,although poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was still observed in this specimen. The findings of this study indicate that this therapy might be beneficial for treating advanced urachal carcinomas. This is the second report of successful treatment of advanced urachal carcinoma with S-1/CDDP chemotherapy. PMID:20808064

Sekita, Nobuyuki; Fujimura, Masaaki; Arai, Hiroko; Shibata, Naoki; Nishikawa, Rika; Sugano, Isamu; Mikami, Kazuo

2010-08-01

386

Effects of a concurrent chemoradiotherapy with S-1 for locally advanced oral cancer  

PubMed Central

A number of regimens composed of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) have been attempted as radical or adjuvant therapies for locally advanced oral cancer. CCRT with S-1 is considered promising due to its efficacy and simplicity of application. Patients (n=16) with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity were enrolled. Chemotherapy consisted of oral administration of S-1 (65 mg/m2) for 14 consecutive days followed by a 1-week rest. Radiation treatment at a dose of 30 Gy in 15 fractions was administered concomitantly with S-1. A course schedule of 3 weeks of treatment was applied twice. The overall response rate was 87.5%. Median progression-free survival and median overall survival were 6.3 and 42.5 months, respectively. Although no grade 4 adverse events were observed, grade 3 adverse events, such as anemia (12.5%), stomatitis (25%) and anorexia (18.8%) were present. Thus, CCRT with S-1 is an effective modality that can be safely conducted with minimal burden on patients.

Hino, Satoshi; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Youji; Ryoke, Kazuo; Sekine, Jyouji; Sasaki, Akira; Yamamoto, Tetsuya

2011-01-01

387

Thermodynamic properties of S=1 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains as Haldane systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thermodynamic properties of S=1 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains with free and periodic boundaries are investigated by a quantum Monte Carlo method. In particular, temperature dependences of the specific heat, the magnetic susceptibility, and the hidden order parameter, which are inherent to the Haldane phase, are investigated. The specific heat turns out to have a peak at a temperature Tpeak~2Delta, where Delta

Shoji Yamamoto; Seiji Miyashita

1993-01-01

388

ZIP II Post Flight Report (Flight A24.6S1-2).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Under the cognizance of the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory, an ARIES, designated Flight No A24,6S1-2, was launched from White Sands Missile Range on July 31, 1981. This report provides a general summary of the vehicle, booster data, heat sink data, fligh...

R. E. Scarboro

1981-01-01

389

Northern analysis of highly folded goat ? s1 Casein mRNA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Northern blotting using glyoxal to denature a highly folded mRNA, such as goat ?s1-Casein E, can lead to the detection of multiple incompletely denatured forms. Formaldehyde appears to be the most suitable agent for Northern blotting due to its effective denaturing capacity and lower toxicity than methylmercuric hydroxide.

Marta JansàPérez; Christine Leroux; Armand Sànchez Bonastre; Patrice Martin

1996-01-01

390

Survival analysis of adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 plus cisplatin for stage III gastric cancer.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: We previously reported that S-1 plus cisplatin was feasible as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage III gastric cancer after D2 gastrectomy. Herein we evaluate the recurrence-free survival and overall survival rates as secondary endpoints based on updated follow-up data. METHODS: Patients with stage III gastric cancer who underwent D2 gastrectomy were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 3 cycles of S-1 (40 mg/m(2) PO) twice daily on days 1-21 and cisplatin (60 mg/m(2) IV) on day 8, and S-1 was given on days 1-28 every 6 weeks until 1 year after surgery. RESULTS: From August 2007 to September 2009, 63 patients were accrued. Overall, 34 and 25 patients had stage IIIA and IIIB disease, respectively. After a median follow-up of 3.9 years, 16 patients experienced recurrence and 11 patients died. The 3-year recurrence-free survival rate was 74.1 % (95 % CI: 60.8-83.5 %, IIIA 81.8 %, IIIB 64.0 %). The 3-year overall survival rate was 84.5 % (95 % CI: 72.3-91.6 %, IIIA 87.9 %, IIIB 80.0 %). Recurrence sites included the peritoneum (n = 8), hematogenous sites (n = 6), and lymph nodes (n = 4). CONCLUSION: The present results indicate that adjuvant therapy with S-1 plus 3 cycles of cisplatin may provide a survival benefit to patients with stage III gastric cancer. PMID:23719867

Takahari, Daisuke; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Katai, Hitoshi; Ito, Seiji; Fuse, Nozomu; Konishi, Masaru; Yasui, Hirofumi; Terashima, Masanori; Goto, Masahiro; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko; Shirao, Kuniaki; Sano, Takeshi; Sasako, Mitsuru

2013-05-30

391

Equine alpha S1-casein: characterization of alternative splicing isoforms and determination of phosphorylation levels.  

PubMed

alpha(S1)-Casein was isolated from Haflinger mare's milk by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and displayed great micro-heterogeneity by 2-dimensional electrophoresis, probably because of a variable degree of phosphorylation and alternative splicing events. The aim of the present work was to investigate the complexity of the mare's alpha(S1)-casein. The different isoforms present in milk were submitted to a double treatment of dephosphorylation, first by using alkaline phosphatase and then acid phosphatase to achieve complete dephosphorylation. The apoforms were then analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The results revealed the existence of a full-length protein and 7 variants resulting from posttranscriptional modifications; that is, exon skipping involving exon 7, exon 14, or both and use of a cryptic splice site encoding a glutamine residue. The determination of the different phosphorylation degrees of the native isoforms of alpha(S1)-casein was finally achieved by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis after fractionation of the isoforms by ion-exchange chromatography. Thus, 36 different variants of equine alpha(S1)-casein were identified with several phosphate groups ranging from 2 to 6 or 8 depending on whether exon 7 was skipped. PMID:19620641

Matéos, A; Miclo, L; Mollé, D; Dary, A; Girardet, J-M; Gaillard, J-L

2009-08-01

392

A perishable inventory system with modified (S-1, S) policy and arbitrary processing times  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we analyze a lost sales (S?1,S) perishable system, under Poisson demands and exponential lifetimes, in which the reorders are placed at every demand epoch so as to take the inventory position back to its maximum level S. The items are replenished one at a time and the resupply time has arbitrary distribution. The various operating characteristics are

S. Kalpakam; S. Shanthi

2001-01-01

393

Procedure for Polishing PbS and PbS(1-x)Se(x).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

For the fabrication of quality p-n junction diodes in PbS and PbS(1-x)Se(x), an etchant which leaves a smooth, uncamaged, film-tree surface is necessary. The etchant procedures previously reported in the literature were found to either badly pit the surfa...

G. A. Ferrante J. A. Donelly M. C. Lavine T. C. Harman

1972-01-01

394

Tissue-specific and nutrient regulation of the branched-chain ?-keto acid dehydrogenase phosphatase, protein phosphatase 2Cm (PP2Cm).  

PubMed

Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) homeostasis is maintained through highly regulated catabolic activities where the rate-limiting step is catalyzed by branched-chain ?-keto dehydrogenase (BCKD). Our previous study has identified a mitochondria-targeted protein phosphatase, PP2Cm, as the BCKD phosphatase and thus serves as a key regulator for BCAA catabolism. In this report, we performed comprehensive molecular and biochemical studies of PP2Cm regulation using both in vivo and in vitro systems. We show that PP2Cm expression is highly enriched in brain, heart, liver, kidney, and diaphragm, but low in skeletal muscle. The PP2Cm expression is regulated at the transcriptional level in response to nutrient status. Furthermore, we have established that PP2Cm interacts with the BCKD E2 subunit and competes with the BCKD kinase in a substrate-dependent and mutually exclusive manner. These data suggest that BCAA homeostasis is at least in part contributed by nutrient-dependent PP2Cm expression and interaction with the BCKD complex. Finally, a number of human PP2Cm single nucleotide polymorphic changes as identified in the public data base can produce either inactive or constitutive active mutant phosphatases, suggesting that putative PP2Cm mutations may contribute to BCAA catabolic defects in human. PMID:22589535

Zhou, Meiyi; Lu, Gang; Gao, Chen; Wang, Yibin; Sun, Haipeng

2012-05-15

395

A Triplet Repeat Expansion Genetic Mouse Model of Infantile Spasms Syndrome, Arx(GCG)10+7, with Interneuronopathy, Spasms in Infancy, Persistent Seizures, and Adult Cognitive and Behavioral Impairment  

PubMed Central

Infantile spasms syndrome (ISS) is a catastrophic pediatric epilepsy with motor spasms, persistent seizures, mental retardation, and in some cases, autism. One of its monogenic causes is an insertion mutation (c.304ins (GCG)7) on the X chromosome, expanding the first polyalanine tract of the interneuron-specific transcription factor ARX from 16 to 23 alanine codons. Null mutation of the Arx gene impairs GABA- and cholinergic interneuronal migration but results in a neonatal lethal phenotype. We developed the first viable genetic mouse model of ISS that spontaneously recapitulates salient phenotypic features of the human triplet-repeat expansion mutation. Arx (GCG)10+7 (“Arx Plus7”) pups display abnormal spasm-like myoclonus and other key EEG features, including multifocal spikes, electrodecremental episodes, and spontaneous seizures persisting into maturity. The neurobehavioral profile of Arx mutants was remarkable for lowered anxiety, impaired associative learning, and abnormal social interaction. Laminar decreases of Arx+ cortical interneurons and a selective reduction of calbindin-, but not parvalbumin- or calretinin-expressing interneurons in neocortical layers and hippocampus indicate that specific classes of synaptic inhibition are missing from the adult forebrain, providing a basis for the seizures and cognitive disorder. A significant reduction of calbindin, NPY-expressing and cholinergic interneurons in the mutant striatum suggest that dysinhibition within this network may contribute to the dyskinetic motor spasms. This mouse model narrows the range of critical pathogenic elements within brain inhibitory networks essential to recreate this complex neurodevelopmental syndrome.

Price, Maureen G.; Yoo, Jong W.; Burgess, Daniel L.; Deng, Fang; Hrachovy, Richard A.; Frost, James D.; Noebels, Jeffrey L.

2009-01-01

396

Towards the complete experiment: measurement of S((1)D2) polarization in correlation with single rotational states of CO(J) from the photodissociation of oriented OCS(v2 = 1|JlM = 111).  

PubMed

In this paper we report slice imaging polarization experiments on the state-to-state photodissociation at 42,594 cm(-1) of spatially oriented OCS(v(2) = 1|JlM = 111) ? CO(J) + S((1)D(2)). Slice images were measured of the three-dimensional recoil distribution of the S((1)D(2)) photofragment for different polarization geometries of the photolysis and probe laser. The high resolution slice images show well separated velocity rings in the S((1)D(2)) velocity distribution. The velocity rings of the S((1)D(2)) photofragment correlate with individual rotational states of the CO(J) cofragment in the J(CO) = 57-65 region. The angular distribution of the S((1)D(2)) velocity rings are extracted and analyzed using two different polarization models. The first model assumes the nonaxial dynamics evolves after excitation to a single potential energy surface of an oriented OCS(v(2) = 1|JlM = 111) molecule. The second model assumes the excitation is to two potential energy surfaces, and the OCS molecule is randomly oriented. In the high J region (J(CO) = 62-65) it appears that both models fit the polarization very well, in the region J(CO) = 57-61 both models seem to fit the data less well. From the molecular frame alignment moments the m-state distribution of S((1)D(2)) is calculated as a function of the CO(J) channel. A comparison is made with the theoretical m-state distribution calculated from the long-range electrostatic dipole-dipole plus quadrupole interaction model. The S((1)D(2)) photofragment velocity distribution shows a very pronounced strong peak for S((1)D(2)) fragments born in coincidence with CO(J = 61). PMID:21431125

Lipciuc, M Laura; Rakitzis, T Peter; Meerts, W Leo; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; Janssen, Maurice H M

2011-03-22

397

Stat3-induced S1PR1 expression is critical for persistent Stat3 activation in tumors  

PubMed Central

IL-6/Jak2 signaling is viewed critical for persistent Stat3 activation in cancer. However, IL-6-induced Stat3 activity is transient in normal physiology. Here we identify a mechanism important for persistent Stat3 activation in tumor cells and the tumor microenvironment. We show that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1), a G-protein-coupled receptor for lysophospholipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), is elevated in Stat3-positive tumors. Stat3 is a transcription factor for the S1pr1 gene. Enhanced S1pr1 expression activates Stat3 and upregulates Il6 gene expression, thereby accelerating tumor growth and metastasis. Conversely, silencing S1pr1 in tumor cells or immune cells inhibits tumor Stat3 activity, tumor growth and metastasis. S1P/S1PR1-induced Stat3 activation is persistent, in contrast to transient Stat3 activation by IL-6. S1PR1 activates Stat3 in part by upregulating Jak2 tyrosine kinase activity. We demonstrate that Stat3-induced S1pr1 expression, as well as S1P/S1PR1 pathway, is important for persistent Stat3 activation in cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment and for malignant progression.

Lee, Heehyoung; Deng, Jiehui; Kujawski, Maciej; Yang, Chunmei; Liu, Yong; Herrmann, Andreas; Kortylewski, Marcin; Horne, David; Somlo, George; Forman, Stephen; Jove, Richard; Yu, Hua

2011-01-01

398

Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra, conformation, and carbonyl wagging potential energy function of cyclopentanone and its deuterated isotopomers in the S1 (n,pi *) electronic excited states  

Microsoft Academic Search

The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra of cyclopentanone and its 2,2,5,5-d4 isotopomer have been recorded in the 305–335 nm region. In addition, the spectra of d1, d2, and d3 species were obtained from isotopic mixtures. The electronic band origin of the d0 molecule for the S1 (n,?*) state of A2 symmetry occurs at 30 276 cm?1, while that of the d4

Jian Zhang; Whe-Yi Chiang; Jaan Laane

1993-01-01

399

Jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectrum, carbonyl wagging, and ring-puckering potential energy functions of 3-cyclopenten-1-one in its S1(n,pi *) electronic excited state  

Microsoft Academic Search

The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectrum of 3-cyclopenten-1-one has been recorded in the 308–330 nm region, and the electronic origin for the S1(n,?*) state of A2 symmetry was observed at 30 229 cm?1. The observed spectrum consists of more than 80 bands involving primarily ?3 (carbonyl stretch), ?29 (carbonyl out-of-plane wagging), and ?30 (ring puckering). Bands were also assigned to combinations

Paul Sagear; Jaan Laane

1995-01-01

400

High-Resolution Spectra of CH4 IN the 2700 to 3200/cm Region.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Idealab 2-m path-difference interferometer was used to obtain data of CH4 in the 2700/cm to 3200/cm region to a resolution of .006/cm. Obtained spectral data are presented as well as the results of analysis to calculate line positions and strengths. A...

H. Sakai

1976-01-01

401

Full Axial Coverage Radiography of Deformable Contact Liner Implosion Performed with 8 cm Diameter Electrode Apertures  

Microsoft Academic Search

We obtained full axial coverage radiography of a deformable contact imploding liner. This radiographic data indicates the feasibility of using a varying thickness in a long cylindrical solid liner, driven as a 12 megamp Z-pinch, to achieve factor- 16 cylindrical convergence, while using 8 cm diameter aperture electrodes. The Al liner was 30 cm long, with 9.78 cm inner diameter

J. H. Degnan; D. Amdahl; A. Brown; T. Cavazos; S. K. Coffey; G. G. Craddock; M. H. Frese; S. D. Frese; D. Gale; T. C. Grabowski; B. Guffey; G. F. Kiuttu; F. M. Lehr; J. D. Letterio; R. E. Peterkin; N. F. Roderick; E. L. Ruden; R. E. Siemond; W. Sommarsb; Y. F. C. Thioe; W. Tucker; P. J. Turchi

2005-01-01

402

Observation of an Exotic S=+1 Baryon in Exclusive Photoproduction from the Deuteron  

SciTech Connect

In an exclusive measurement of the reaction {gamma} {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} pn, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S = +1 is seen in the K{sup +}n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1542 {+-} 5 MeV/c{sup 2} with a measured width of 21 MeV/c{sup 2} FWHM, equivalent to the experimental invariant mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is 5.3 {+-} 0.5 {sigma} for a Gaussian peak shape on top of a smooth background. The mass and width of the observed peak are consistent with reports of a narrow S = +1 baryon from inclusive measurements by other experimental groups.

Stepan Stepanyan; Kenneth Hicks; Daniel Carman; Evgueni Pasyuk; Reinhard Schumacher; Elton Smith; David Tedeschi; Luminita Todor; et. al.

2003-07-16

403

IPA-CuCl3: a S=1/2 Ladder with Ferromagnetic Rungs  

SciTech Connect

The spin gap material IPA-CuCl{sub 3} has been extensively studied as a ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic bond-alternating S = 1/2 chain. This description of the system was derived from structural considerations and bulk measurements. New inelastic neutron scattering experiments reveal a totally different picture: IPA-CuCl{sub 3} consists of weakly coupled spin ladders with antiferromagnetic legs and ferromagnetic rungs. The ladders run perpendicular to the originally supposed bond-alternating chain direction. The ferromagnetic rungs make this system equivalent to a Haldane S = 1 antiferromagnet. With a gap energy of 1.17(1) meV, a zone-boundary energy of 4.1(1) meV, and almost no magnetic anisotropy, IPA-CuCl{sub 3} may be the best Haldane-gap material yet, in terms of suitability for neutron scattering studies in high magnetic fields.

Masuda, Takatsugu [ORNL; Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Manaka, H. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima JAPAN; Chung, J.-H. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

2006-01-01

404

Direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) at the lumbosacral junction L5-S1.  

PubMed

The direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF), a minimally invasive lateral approach for placement of an interbody fusion device, does not require nerve root retraction or any contact with the great vessels and can lead to short operative times with little blood loss. Due to anatomical restrictions, this procedure has not been used at the lumbosacral (L5-S1) junction. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV), a structural anomaly of the lumbosacral spine associated with low back pain, can result in a level being wrongly identified pre-operatively due to misnumbering of the vertebral levels. To our knowledge, use of the DLIF graft in this patient is the first report of an interbody fusion graft being placed at the disc space between the LSTV and S1 via the transpsoas route. We present a review of the literature regarding the LSTV variation as well as the lateral placement of interbody fusion grafts at the lumbosacral junction. PMID:22551586

Shirzadi, Ali; Birch, Kurtis; Drazin, Doniel; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank

2012-05-01

405

The effect of polysaccharide k with s-1 based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer.  

PubMed

Background/Aims: Polysaccharide K (PSK) is widely used in Japan as a biological response modifier for cancer patients. We investigated the effects of PSK with S-1 based chemotherapy for advanced gastric cancer patients in immune response. Methodology: Nine advanced gastric cancer patients who underwent chemotherapy at the University of Tokushima were included in this study. In all patients, 3g PSK was received orally and S-1 based chemotherapy for 2 weeks alternately for 8 weeks. Serial changes in immunological parameters (Foxp3, Natural killer (NK), CD4/CD8) were monitored. Results: The levels of Foxp3 at 8 weeks was significantly decreased compared with 2 weeks (4.26% vs. 3.11%). In NK activity at 8 weeks was significantly increased compared with 2 weeks (27% vs. 47%). Conclusions: These results of this study suggested that chemotherapy with PSK improved the immune response in advanced gastric cancer patients. Especially Foxp3 was concerned in this mechanism. PMID:23933930

Yoshikawa, Kozo; Shimada, Mitsuo; Kurita, Nobuhiro; Sato, Hirohiko; Iwata, Takashi; Nishioka, Masanori; Morimoto, Shinya; Miyatani, Tomohiko; Komatsu, Masato; And, R Nhideya Kashihara

2013-08-01

406

Internal conversion in the S1B3u state of pyrene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluorescence excitation spectra and fluorescence lifetimes at single vibronic levels in the S1 state have been observed for jet-cooled pyrene. The fluorescence lifetimes at the zero-vibrational levels of the S1B3u states of pyrene-h10 and pyrene-d10 are 1480 and 1470 ns, respectively, and the relaxation is considered to be dominated by the radiative process. For some vibrational levels, however, the lifetimes are remarkably shorter such as 765 ns at the 221 vibronic level of pyrene-h10 (?22 (b1g); C-H bending and skeletal deforming mode), indicating that nonradiative transition occurs at a specific vibrational level. In this study, we demonstrate that the main process is internal conversion to the S0Ag state caused by nonadiabatic vibronic interaction via b3u promoting modes.

Kowaka, Yasuyuki; Nakayama, Naofumi; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Nagashima, Umpei; Yamanaka, Takaya; Ozawa, Norifumi; Baba, Masaaki

2012-05-01

407

Low-energy spin dynamics of the s = 1/2 kagome system herbertsmithite  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The low-energy (? = ?? < 1 meV), low-temperature (T = 0.05 K) spin dynamics of the s = 1/2 kagome candidate herbertsmithite are probed in the presence of magnetic fields up to 2.5 T. The zero-field spectra reveal a very weak continuum of scattering at T = 10 K and a broad inelastic peak centred at ?max = 0.2 meV at lower temperatures, T < 1 K. The broad peak is found to be strongly damped, with a liquid-like structure factor implying correlations at length scales up to r = 6 Å. The field dependence of the peak appears to follow the Zeeman splitting of s = 1/2 excitations, consistent with the weakly split ‘doublets’ observed in low-temperature specific heat. A possible explanation of these observations is a short-range correlated state involving defect spins between the kagome planes and moments in the kagome layers.

Nilsen, G. J.; de Vries, M. A.; Stewart, J. R.; Harrison, A.; Rønnow, H. M.

2013-03-01

408

Search for excited electrons in p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of a search for the production of an excited state of the electron, e*, in proton-antiproton collisions at s=1.96TeV. The data were collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1fb-1. We search for e* in the process p pmacr -->e*e, with the e* subsequently decaying

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