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1

DECREASING SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS EXPLAIN UNIQUE 10.7 cm RADIO FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Infrared spectral observations of sunspots from 1998 to 2011 have shown that on average sunspots changed, the magnetic fields weakened, and the temperatures rose. The data also show that sunspots or dark pores can only form at the solar surface if the magnetic field strength exceeds about 1500 G. Sunspots appear at the solar surface with a variety of field strengths, and during the period from 1998 to 2002 a histogram of the sunspot magnetic fields shows a normal distribution with a mean of 2436 {+-} 26 G and a width of 323 {+-} 20 G. During this observing period the mean of the magnetic field distribution decreased by 46 {+-} 6 G per year, and we assume that as the 1500 G threshold was approached, magnetic fields appeared at the solar surface which could not form dark sunspots or pores. With this assumption we propose a quantity called the sunspot formation fraction and give an analytical form derived from the magnetic field distribution. We show that this fraction can quantitatively explain the changing relationship between sunspot number and solar radio flux measured at 10.7 cm wavelengths.

Livingston, W.; Penn, M. J. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States); Svalgaard, L. [HEPL, Via Ortega, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2012-09-20

2

The 10.7-cm microwave observations of AR 5395 and related terrestrial effects  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 10.7 cm flux patrols in Canada recorded 4 Great Bursts (peaks greater than 500 sfu) during the disk passage of AR 5395 in March 1989. The Great Bursts of 16 and 17 March were simple events of great amplitude and with half-life durations of only several minutes. Earlier Great Bursts, originating on 6 March towards the NE limb and on 10 March closer to the central meridian, belong to an entirely different category of event. Each started with a very strong impulsive event lasting just minutes. After an initial recovery, however, the emission climbed back to level as greater or greater than the initial impulsive burst. The events of 6 and 10 March stayed above the Great Burst threshold for at least 100 minutes. The second component of long duration in these cases is associated with Type 4 continuum emission and thus very likely with CMEs. Major geomagnetic disturbances did not occur as a result of the massive complex event of 6 March or the two simple but strong events of 16 and 17 March. But some 55 hours after the peak in the long-enduring burst of 10 March, a storm began which qualifies as the fourth strongest geomagnetic storm in Canada since 1932. The vertical component of the earth's field measured during the storm by a fluxgate magnetometer at a station in Manitoba is presented. Within a minute of the sudden commencement of this storm, a series of breakdowns began in the transmission system of Hydro-Quebec which resulted in a total loss of power, on a bitterly cold winter's day, for at least 10 hours. The loss of power provoked an enormous outcry from the public resulting in the power utilities being more receptive to the need to monitor solar as well as geomagnetic activity.

Gaizauskas, V.; Hughes, T. J.; Tapping, K. F.

1989-01-01

3

Study of Cosmic Ray Flux Modulation by Solar Activity Based on the 10.7 cm Flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on the relation between the Cosmic Ray Flux (CRF) and the radio flux at the 10.7 cm wavelength (F10.7), and also to the Sun Spot Number (SSN), an analysis of the CRF variations is done. Monitoring data of the 19-23 solar cycles is used. The cross-correlation between F10.7 and CRF is similar to that between SSN and CRF and, as in previous works, for odd cycles the correlation lasts longer than for even ones. The histograms of the CRF/ F10.7 ratio shows a maximum at low values whose location shifts from one cycle to other. This is a variation independent of the parity of the cycle that lasts for a time-scale close to half a century and that was not seen before. The relation between the inverted CRF amplitude and the F10.7 reveals a peculiar character of accumulating data around the unity for even cycles and at its sides for odd cycles. The comparison of CRF and F10.7 shows that, from one odd cycle to the next, the CRF has been decaying. This seems a long-term modulation of the odd cycles amplitude. The origin of these variations and the variations that do not depend on the cycle parity are not clear but we can not rule out the possibility of even a cause external to the Heliosphere.

Mendoza-Torres, Jose Eduardo

4

Barycentric Corrections at 1 cm s-1 for Precise Doppler Velocities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this paper is to establish the requirements of a barycentric correction with an rms of ?1 cm s-1, which is an order of magnitude better than necessary for the Doppler detection of true Earth analogs (˜9 cm s-1). We describe the theory and implementation of accounting for the effects on precise Doppler measurements of motion of the telescope through space, primarily from rotational and orbital motion of the Earth, and the motion of the solar system with respect to target star (i.e., the "barycentric correction"). We describe the minimal algorithm necessary to accomplish this and how it differs from a naïve subtraction of velocities (i.e., a Galilean transformation). We demonstrate the validity of code we have developed from the California Planet Survey code via comparison with the pulsar timing package, TEMPO2. We estimate the magnitude of various terms and effects, including relativistic effects, and the errors associated with incomplete knowledge of telescope position, timing, and stellar position and motion. We note that chromatic aberration will create uncertainties in the time of observation, which will complicate efforts to detect true Earth analogs. Our code is available for public use and validation.

Wright, J. T.; Eastman, J. D.

2014-11-01

5

Design of a 10**36 CM-2 S-1 Super-B Factory  

SciTech Connect

Parameters have been studied for a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon 4S that would deliver a luminosity of 1 to 4 x 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s. This collider, called a Super-B Factory, would use a combination of linear collider and storage ring techniques. In this scheme an electron beam and a positron beam are stored in low-emittance damping rings similar to those designed for a Linear Collider (LC) or the next generation light source. A LC style interaction region is included in the ring to produce sub-millimeter vertical beta functions at the collision point. A large crossing angle (+/- 24 mrad) is used at the collision point to allow beam separation. A crab-waist scheme is used to reduce the hourglass effect and restore peak luminosity. Beam currents of 1.8 A at 4 x 7 GeV in 1251 bunches can produce a luminosity of 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s with upgrade possibilities. Such a collider would produce an integrated luminosity of about 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year (10{sup 7} sec) at the {gamma}(4S) resonance. Further possibilities include having longitudinally polarized e- at the IR and operating at the J/Psi and Psi beam energies.

Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; /Pisa U.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2011-10-24

6

Differences in the temporal variations of solar UV flux, 10.7-cm solar radio flux, sunspot number, and Ca-K plage data caused by solar rotation and active region evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attention is given to two types of temporal variations in the solar UV spectral irradiance caused by solar rotation and active region evolution. It is noted that the first type of dissimilar temporal behavior occurs when concentrations of solar active regions evolve at solar longitudes nearly 180 deg apart. Both the UV observations and modeled UV fluxes based on Ca-K plage data then exhibit pronounced 13-day periodicity, whereas the 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number exhibit quite dissimilar temporal variations. This type of dissimilarity is related to the modeled UV flux and has a dependence on the solar central meridian distance that is narrower than that for the 10.7-cm radio flux or for sunspot numbers. A second case of marked dissimilarity is seen when major new solar active regions arise and dominate the full-disk fluxes for several rotations. It is found that the strongest peaks in 10.7 cm and sunspot numbers tend to occur on their first rotation, for example, during major dips in the total solar irradiance, whereas the Ca-K plages and UV enhancements peak on the next rotation and then decay more slowly on subsequent rotations.

Donnelly, R. F.; Heath, D. F.; Lean, J. L.; Rottman, G. J.

1983-01-01

7

A laser-lock concept to reach cm s-1-precision in Doppler experiments with Fabry-Pérot wavelength calibrators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

State-of-the-art Doppler experiments require wavelength calibration with precision at the cm s-1 level. A low-finesse Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) can provide a wavelength comb with a very large bandwidth as required for astronomical experiments, but unavoidable spectral drifts are difficult to control. Instead of actively controlling the FPI cavity, we propose to passively stabilize the interferometer and track the time-dependent cavity length drift externally using the 87Rb D2 atomic line. A dual-finesse cavity allows drift tracking during observation. In the low-finesse spectral range, the cavity provides a comb transmission spectrum tailored to the astronomical spectrograph. The drift of the cavity length is monitored in the high-finesse range relative to an external standard: a single narrow transmission peak is locked to an external cavity diode laser and compared to an atomic frequency from a Doppler-free transition. Following standard locking schemes, tracking at sub-mm s-1 precision can be achieved. This is several orders of magnitude better than currently planned high-precision Doppler experiments, and it allows freedom for relaxed designs including the use of a single-finesse interferometer under certain conditions. All components for the proposed setup are readily available, rendering this approach particularly interesting for upcoming Doppler experiments. We also show that the large number of interference modes used in an astronomical FPI allows us to unambiguously identify the interference mode of each FPI transmission peak defining its absolute wavelength solution. The accuracy reached in each resonance with the laser concept is then defined by the cavity length that is determined from the one locked peak and by the group velocity dispersion. The latter can vary by several 100 m s-1 over the relevant frequency range and severely limits the accuracy of individual peak locations, although their interference modes are known. A potential way to determine the absolute peak positions is to externally measure the frequency of each individual peak with a laser frequency comb (LFC). Thus, the concept of laser-locked FPIs may be useful for applying the absolute accuracy of an LFC to astronomical spectrographs without the need for an LFC at the observatory.

Reiners, A.; Banyal, R. K.; Ulbrich, R. G.

2014-09-01

8

A laser frequency comb that enables radial velocity measurements with a precision of 1 cm s$^{-1}$  

E-print Network

Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar spectral lines have recently achieved a precision of 60 cm/s (ref 1), which is sufficient to find a 5-Earth-mass planet in a Mercury-like orbit around a Sun-like star. To find a 1-Earth-mass planet in an Earthlike orbit, a precision of 5 cm/s is necessary. The combination of a laser frequency comb with a Fabry-Perot filtering cavity has been suggested as a promising approach to achieve such Doppler shift resolution via improved spectrograph wavelength calibration, with recent encouraging results. Here we report the fabrication of such a filtered laser comb with up to 40- GHz (1-A) line spacing, generated from a 1- GHz repetition-rate source, without compromising long-term stability, reproducibility or spectral resolution. This wide-line-spacing comb, or `astro-comb', is well matched to the resolving power of high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs. The astro-comb should allow a precision as high as 1 cm/s in astronomical radial velocity measurements.

Chih-Hao Li; Andrew J. Benedick; Peter Fendel; Alexander G. Glenday; Franz X. Kaertner; David F. Phillips; Dimitar Sasselov; Andrew Szentgyorgyi; Ronald L. Walsworth

2008-04-07

9

PbSe quantum dot field-effect transistors with air-stable electron mobilities above 7 cm2 V(-1) s(-1).  

PubMed

PbSe quantum dot (QD) field effect transistors (FETs) with air-stable electron mobilities above 7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) are made by infilling sulfide-capped QD films with amorphous alumina using low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD). This high mobility is achieved by combining strong electronic coupling (from the ultrasmall sulfide ligands) with passivation of surface states by the ALD coating. A series of control experiments rule out alternative explanations. Partial infilling tunes the electrical characteristics of the FETs. PMID:23452235

Liu, Yao; Tolentino, Jason; Gibbs, Markelle; Ihly, Rachelle; Perkins, Craig L; Liu, Yu; Crawford, Nathan; Hemminger, John C; Law, Matt

2013-04-10

10

Epitaxial growth of large area single-crystalline few-layer MoS2 with high space charge mobility of 192 cm2 V-1 s-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the vapor-solid growth of single crystalline few-layer MoS2 films on (0001)-oriented sapphire with excellent structural and electrical properties over centimeter length scale. High-resolution X-ray diffraction scans indicated that the films had good out-of-plane ordering and epitaxial registry. A carrier density of ˜2 × 1011 cm-2 and a room temperature mobility of 192 cm2/Vs were extracted from space-charge limited transport regime in the films. The electron mobility was found to exhibit in-plane anisotropy with a ratio of ˜1.8. Theoretical estimates of the temperature-dependent electron mobility including optical phonon, acoustic deformation potential, and remote ionized impurity scattering were found to satisfactorily match the measured data. The synthesis approach reported here demonstrates the feasibility of device quality few-layer MoS2 films with excellent uniformity and high quality.

Ma, Lu; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Lee, Edwin W.; Lee, Choong Hee; Yu, Mingzhe; Arehart, Aaron; Rajan, Siddharth; Wu, Yiying

2014-08-01

11

Mg dopant in Cu2ZnSnSe4: An n-type former and a promoter of electrical mobility up to 120 cm2 V-1 s-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mg-doped Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) bulk materials with the (Cu2-xMgx)ZnSnSe4 formula at x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 were prepared at 600 °C for 2 h with soluble sintering aids of Sb2S3 and Te. Defect chemistry was studied by measuring structural and electrical properties of Mg-doped CZTSe as a function of dopant concentration. Except at x=0, all Mg-doped CZTSe pellets showed an n-type behavior. The Mg-doped CZTSe pellets showed an n-type behavior. n-Type Mg-CZTSe pellets at x=0.1 showed the highest electrical conductivity of 24.6 S cm-1 and the net hole mobility of 120 cm2 V-1 s-1, while they were 11.8 S cm-1 and 36.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the undoped p-type CZTSe. Mg dopant is a strong promoter of electrical mobility. Mg dopant behaves as a donor defect in CZTSe at a 5% doping content, but is also used as an acceptor at a high content above 5%. Mg doping has further developed CZTSe into a promising semiconductor.

Kuo, Dong-Hau; Wubet, Walelign

2014-07-01

12

About possibility to search the electron EDM at the level $10^{-28} ÷ 10^{-30}$ e$\\cdot$cm and the constant of T-odd, P-odd scalar weak interaction of an electron with a nucleus at the level $10^{-5} ÷10^{-7}$ in the heavy atoms and ferroelectrics  

E-print Network

The T-odd phenomenon of induction of the magnetic field by a static electric field provides to study the electron EDM and constants of T-odd, P-odd interaction of an electron with a nucleus. Measurement of this magnetic field for ferroelectric materials (like PbTiO_3) at the level B~3 10^{-18} G allows to derive the electric dipole moment of an electron at the level d_e ~ 10^{-30} e cm and the constant of T-odd scalar weak interaction of an electron with a nucleus at the level k_1^{nuc}10^{-9}. The atomic magnetometry makes possible to measure fields ~ 10^{-13} G/\\sqrt{Hz} now. This means that for 10 days operation one can expect to obtain B at the level B ~ 10^{-16}G, and, therefore, the limits for d_e in PbTiO_3 at the level d_e ~ 10^{-28} and k_1^{nuc}~10^{-7}. that makes the discussed method beneficial for measuring d_e and k_1^{nuc}.

V. G. Baryshevsky

2005-08-26

13

44 CFR 10.7 - Planning.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

44 Emergency Management and Assistance...2010-10-01 false Planning. 10.7 Section 10.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...Procedures § 10.7 Planning. (a)...

2010-10-01

14

The Sources of F10.7 Emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solar radio flux at a wavelength of 10.7 cm, F10.7, serves as a proxy for the Sun’s ionizing flux striking the Earth and is a heavily used index for space weather studies. In principal both the coronal sources of ionizing flux and strong coronal magnetic fields contribute to F10.7 via the bremsstrahlung and gyroresonance mechanisms respectively. Recently the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) has added the capability to make high-spatial-resolution images of the Sun at 10.7 cm. We present the results of a trial study comparing an F10.7 image from the JVLA with the bremsstrahlung emission predicted to be present. The predicted bremsstrahlung image is calculated with spatially resolved differential emission measures derived from extreme ultra-violet images of the Sun acquired by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. Photospheric magnetograms are used to identify likely regions of strong coronal magnetic field, and the circular polarization measured by the JVLA is used as a tracer of gyroresonance contributions. We find that only a small fraction of the variable F10.7 flux can be attributed to gyroresonance emission.

Schonfeld, Samuel; White, Stephen; Henney, Carl; Arge, Nick; McAteer, James

2015-04-01

15

CM (S1 S12) Merdredi 15h45-17h45 Amphi Numroter par ordre de prfrence TD (S3 S12) 1 Mercredi 8h00-10h00 Salle UFR E31-TD1  

E-print Network

-12h30 Aquaboulevard ou LS3SPE9 Tennis de table Théorie 10h30-12h30 S1 à 6 Salle de réunion Gymn 10h15-12h15 Salle Bernard Jeu ou LS3SPE8 Tennis Théorie 8h00-10h00 S1 à 6 Salle UFR Pratique 10h30'APS choisie en " approfondissement" #12;et/ou Sports collectifs de petit terrain ou LS3ELAR3 Basket-ball

Pellier, Damien

16

S 1S 1S 1S 1S 1 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society  

E-print Network

S 1S 1S 1S 1S 1 Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Climate Assessment for 1997 Gerald a highly amplified and extended South Pacific jet stream brought increased storminess and above-normal rainfall during the winter and spring; 4) southeastern South America, where these same storms produced

17

Plastic Behavior of Polycrystalline Tantalum in the 5x10^7 (s-1) Regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this experiment is to investigate the plastic response of Tantalum to dynamic loading at high strain rates. The samples used were derived from high purity rolled plate, polished down to thicknesses in the range 25 -- 100 microns. Dynamic loading was applied by direct laser ablation of the sample, with pulses up to 10 ns long, at the Jupiter Laser Facility. The elastic-plastic wave structure was measured using two line VISAR systems of different sensitivity, and strain rates were inferred from the rise time of the waves. The elastic wave amplitudes indicated flow stresses between 2 and 3 GPa, depending on the sample thickness. Samples were recovered for post-shot metallographic analysis. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

Hammel, Benjamin; Swift, Damian; El-Dasher, Bassem; Kumar, Mukul; Collins, Gilbert; Florando, Jeff

2011-06-01

18

46 CFR 30.10-7 - Certificated-TB/ALL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certificated-TB/ALL. 30.10-7 Section 30.10-7 Shipping COAST...GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-7 Certificated—TB/ALL. The term certificated when applied to tank...

2010-10-01

19

"atomicphysicsproof" --2003/10/7 --page 1 --#11 ATOMIC STRUCTURE  

E-print Network

"atomicphysicsproof" -- 2003/10/7 -- page 1 -- #11 1 ATOMIC STRUCTURE 1.1 Ground state. The study of atomic structure continues to be an exciting field, with increasingly precise measurements of phosphorus One of the most important topics in atomic physics is the description of atomic energy levels

Budker, Dmitry

20

Mountain Lion Sighting DATE: 10/7/12  

E-print Network

WARNING Mountain Lion Sighting DATE: 10/7/12 TIME: 8:00 PM LOCATION: ALONG FENCE LINE NEAR. PRECAUTIONS: Although mountain lions are secretive and human attacks are rare they still occur. Mountain lions. If you encounter a mountain lion you should: 1. To avoid an attack, always keep children and pets close

Sze, Lawrence

21

Ubiquitous CM and DM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ubiquitous is a real word. I thank a former Total Quality Coach for my first exposure some years ago to its existence. My version of Webster's dictionary defines ubiquitous as "present, or seeming to be present, everywhere at the same time; omnipresent." While I believe that God is omnipresent, I have come to discover that CM and DM are present everywhere. Oh, yes; I define CM as Configuration Management and DM as either Data or Document Management. Ten years ago, I had my first introduction to the CM world. I had an opportunity to do CM for the Space Station effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center. I learned that CM was a discipline that had four areas of focus: identification, control, status accounting, and verification. I was certified as a CMIl graduate and was indoctrinated about clear, concise, and valid. Off I went into a world of entirely new experiences. I was exposed to change requests and change boards first hand. I also learned about implementation of changes, and then of technical and CM requirements.

Crowley, Sandra L.

2000-01-01

22

Towards 1-cm Orbits  

Microsoft Academic Search

TOPEX\\/POSEIDON (T\\/P) has demonstrated that using radar altimetry, the time variation of ocean topography can be determined with an accuracy of a few centimeters, and has also established the new capability for monitoring global sea level change with a precision of about 1 mm\\/year. This has become possible due to the high radial accuracy (2-3 cm) achieved for the T\\/P

N. P. Zelensky; B. D. Beckley; D. D. Rowlands; F. G. Lemoine; S. B. Luthcke; D. S. Chinn; T. A. Williams

2001-01-01

23

The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

2003-01-01

24

Small (?3 cm) hepatic lesions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three hundred ninety-five consecutive patients with sonographically detected hepatic lesions?3 cm in diameter were submitted to ultrasonically guided fine-needle biopsy: 24 (6.1%) were?1 cm in diameter; 142 (36%) were between 1.1 and 2 cm, and 229 (57.9%) were between 2.1 and 3 cm in diameter. In the 385 controlled cases, we obtained a cytohistological diagnosis of malignancy in 243 (63.1%):

Fabio Fornari; Carlo Filice; Gian Ludovico Rapaccini; Eugenio Caturelli; Luigi Cavanna; Giuseppe Civardi; Michele Di Stasi; Elisabetta Buscarini; Luigi Buscarini

1994-01-01

25

Observations of ultraluminous IRAS galaxies at 20 cm.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ultraluminous IRAS galaxy sample has been observed at 20 cm using the Australia Compact Array. The far-infrared luminosity in the sample, logLFIR(Lsun), is >11.8 (H0 = 50 km s-1Mpc-1, q0 = 0.5). Radio emission is detected from 19 sources among 37 IRAS galaxies. The radio parameters, for example, peak position, radio flux, etc, are obtained. The radio power P20 cm in the sample is in the range 22.9 < log P20 cm(W/Hz) < 23.8. The paper presents the preliminary observational results on the sample at 20 cm.

Li, Yongsheng; Su, Bumei; Norris, R. P.

1999-12-01

26

7S(1/2) ? 9S(1/2) two-photon spectroscopy of trapped francium.  

PubMed

We report on the spectroscopic measurement of the (210)Fr 9S(1/2) energy obtained by two-photon excitation of atoms confined and cooled in a magneto-optic trap. The resonant intermediate level 7P(3/2) is the upper state of the trapping transition. We have measured the energy difference between the 9S(1/2) state and the 7S(1/2) ground state to be 25 671.021 +/- 0.006 cm(-1). PMID:19881852

Simsarian, J E; Shi, W; Orozco, L A; Sprouse, G D; Zhao, W Z

1996-12-01

27

Newly Installed S-1 Truss  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Launched October 7, 2002 aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, the STS-112 mission lasted 11 days and performed three sessions of Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA). Its primary mission was to install the Starboard (S1) Integrated Truss Structure and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart to the International Space Station (ISS). The S1 truss provides structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels, which use ammonia to cool the Station's complex power system. The S1 truss, attached to the S0 (S Zero) truss installed by the previous STS-110 mission, flows 637 pounds of anhydrous ammonia through three heat rejection radiators. The truss is 45-feet long, 15-feet wide, 10-feet tall, and weighs approximately 32,000 pounds. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the International Space Station's railway providing a mobile work platform for future extravehicular activities by astronauts. This is a view of the newly installed S1 Truss as photographed during the mission's first scheduled EVA. The Station's Canadarm2 is in the foreground. Visible are astronauts Piers J. Sellers (lower left) and David A. Wolf (upper right), both STS-112 mission specialists.

2002-01-01

28

Solar F10.7 radiation - A short term model for Space Station applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new method is described for statistically modeling the F10.7 component of solar radiation for 91-day intervals. The resulting model represents this component of the solar flux as a quasi-exponentially correlated, Weibull distributed random variable, and thereby demonstrates excellent agreement with observed F10.7 data. Values of the F10.7 flux are widely used in models of the earth's upper atmosphere because of its high correlation with density fluctuations due to solar heating effects. Because of the direct relation between atmospheric density and drag, a realistic model of the short term fluctuation of the F10.7 flux is important for the design and operation of Space Station Freedom. The method of modeling this flux described in this report should therefore be useful for a variety of Space Station applications.

Vedder, John D.; Tabor, Jill L.

1991-01-01

29

Installation of Secondo on Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) Thomas Behr  

E-print Network

Installation of Secondo on Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) Thomas Behr 2011-12-16 This document describes how you can install the Secondo extensible DBMS on Mac OSX 10.7 (Lion). As a first step, you have://dna.fernuni-hagen.de/secondo/files/sdk/SDK MAC OSX LION.zip Run Finder and navigate to the directory containing the downloaded file. Unpack

Güting, Ralf Hartmut

30

Serpentine Nanotubes in CM Chondrites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The CM chondrites are primitive meteorites that formed during the early solar system. Although they retain much of their original physical character, their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained aqueous alteration early in their histories [1- 3]. Serpentine-group minerals are abundant products of such alteration, and information regarding their structures, compositions, and spatial relationships is important for determining the reactions that produced them and the conditions under which they formed. Our recent work on FGRs and matrices of the CM chondrites has revealed new information on the structures and compositions of serpentine-group minerals [4,5] and has provided insights into the evolution of these primitive meteorites. Here we report on serpentine nanotubes from the Mighei and Murchison CM chondrites [6].

Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Buseck, Peter R.

2004-01-01

31

43 CFR 10.7 - Disposition of unclaimed human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...patrimony. [Reserved] 10.7 Section 10.7 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATIVE AMERICAN GRAVES PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects, or Objects...

2014-10-01

32

Fitting a Cm -Smooth Function  

E-print Network

happens when we are allowed to discard some of the N given points as "outliers". We want to know which points to discard, and how much we can reduce the order of magnitude of the Cm norm of an optimal F, as a function of the number of points discarded. To state our results precisely, we introduce some notation

Fefferman, Charles

33

344 cm x 86 cm low mass vacuum window  

SciTech Connect

The LBL Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) superconducting magnet contains a 1 m x 3.45 m x 2 m vacuum tank in its gap. A full aperture thin window was needed to minimize background as the products of nuclear collisions move from upstream targets to downstream detectors. Six windows were built and tested in the development process. The final window's unsupported area is 3m/sup 2/ with a 25 cm inward deflection. The design consists of a .11 mm Nylon/aluminum/polypropylene laminate as a gas seal and .55 mm woven aramid fiber for strength. Total mass is 80 milligrams per cm/sup 2/. Development depended heavily on past experience and testing. Safety considerations are discussed.

Reimers, R.M.; Porter, J.; Meneghetti, J.; Wilde, S.; Miller, R.

1983-08-01

34

THE DEEP SWIRE FIELD. II. 90 cm CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS AND 20 cm-90 cm SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

We present one of the deepest radio continuum surveys to date at a wavelength {approx}>1 m. The observations were taken with the VLA at 324.5 MHz covering a region of the SWIRE Spitzer Legacy survey, centered at 10{sup h}46{sup m}00{sup s}, 59{sup 0}01'00'' (J2000). The data reduction and analysis are described and an electronic catalog of the sources detected above 5{sigma} is presented. We also discuss the observed angular size distribution for the sample. Using our deeper 20 cm survey of the same field, we calculate spectral indices for sources detected in both surveys. The spectral indices for 90 cm selected sources, defined as S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup -{alpha}}, shows a peak near 0.7 and only a few sources with very steep spectra, i.e., {alpha}{sup 90} {sub 20} > >1. Thus no large population of very steep spectrum {mu}Jy sources seems to exist down to the limit of our survey. For 20 cm selected sources, we find similar mean spectral indices for sources with S {sub 20} > 1 mJy. For weaker sources, below the detection limit for individual sources at 90 cm, we use stacking to study the radio spectra. We find that the spectral indices of small (<3'') 20 cm selected sources with S {sub 20} < 10 mJy have mean and median {alpha}{sup 90} {sub 20} {approx} 0.3-0.5. This is flatter than the spectral indices of the stronger source population. At the low end of the 20 cm survey, the spectral indices appear to be steepening again. We report log N-log S counts at 90 cm which show a flattening below 5 mJy. Given the median redshift of the population, z {approx} 1, the spectral flattening and the flattening of the log N-log S counts occur at radio luminosities normally associated with active galactic nuclei rather than with galaxies dominated by star formation.

Owen, Frazer N.; Klimek, Matthew D.; Greisen, Eric W. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Morrison, G. E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2009-06-15

35

AMR on the CM-2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe the development of a structured adaptive mesh algorithm (AMR) for the Connection Machine-2 (CM-2). We develop a data layout scheme that preserves locality even for communication between fine and coarse grids. On 8K of a 32K machine we achieve performance slightly less than 1 CPU of the Cray Y-MP. We apply our algorithm to an inviscid compressible flow problem.

Berger, Marsha J.; Saltzman, Jeff S.

1992-01-01

36

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Energy Efficiency 1  

E-print Network

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Energy Efficiency 1 Energy Efficiency Figure 1 shows total energy savings from efficiency programs, codes and standards, and price and market effects" standard for advanced levels of energy efficiency. The intent of the advanced, voluntary tiers

37

Observations of HI 21-cm absorption by the neutral IGM during the epoch of re-ionization with the Square Kilometer Array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore the possibility of detecting HI 21-cm absorption by the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) toward very high redshift radio sources, and by gas associated with the first collapsed structures, using the Square Kilometer Array at low frequency (100-200 MHz). The epoch considered is between the time when the first ionizing sources form and when the bulk of the neutral IGM becomes ionized. Expected IGM absorption signal includes ˜1% absorption by the mean neutral IGM (the radio 'Gunn-Peterson' effect), plus deeper, narrow lines (>5%, a few km s -1) arising in mild density inhomogeneities with typical values of cosmic overdensity ? ˜ 10, precisely the structures that at later times give rise to the Ly? forest (the '21-cm forest'). Absorption can also arise in gas associated with collapsed structures ( ? > 100), including 'minihalos' (?10 7M?) and protodisks (>10 8M?). We consider SKA sensitivity limits and the evolution of radio source populations, and conclude that it is reasonable to hypothesize the existence of an adequate number of high- z radio sources against which such absorption studies could be performed, provided that reionization occurs at z < 10. Lastly, we discuss the possibility of 'line confusion' due to radio recombination lines arising in the ionized IGM. Overall, SKA absorption studies should provide a fundamental probe of the thermal state of the neutral IGM during the epoch of reionization, as well as critical insight into the process and sources of reionization.

Carilli, C. L.; Gnedin, N.; Furlanetto, S.; Owen, F.

2004-12-01

38

An Absolute Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Temperature at 10.7 GHz  

Microsoft Academic Search

A balloon-borne experiment has measured the absolute temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 10.7 GHz to be TCMBR = 2.730 +\\/- 0.014 K. The error is the quadratic sum of several systematic errors, with a statistical error of less than 0.1 mK. The instrument is made up of a cooled corrugated horn antenna coupled to a total

S. T. Staggs; N. C. Jarosik; S. S. Meyer; D. T. Wilkinson

1996-01-01

39

CYP2S1: A short review  

SciTech Connect

A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

Saarikoski, Sirkku T. [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FI-00250 (Finland) and Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, FI-00250 (Finland)]. E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hankinson, Oliver [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FI-00250 (Finland)

2005-09-01

40

Safety assessment for the S-1 Spheromak  

SciTech Connect

The S-1 machine is part of the Magnetic Fusion Program. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. S-1 is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power.

Ellis, R. Jr.; Stencel, J.R. (eds.)

1984-02-01

41

An Absolute Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Temperature at 10.7 GHz  

Microsoft Academic Search

A balloon-borne experiment has measured the absolute temperature of the\\u000acosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 10.7 GHz to be Tcmbr = 2.730\\u000a+- .014 K. The error is the quadratic sum of several systematic errors, with\\u000astatistical error of less than 0.1 mK. The instrument comprises a cooled\\u000acorrugated horn antenna coupled to a total-power radiometer. A cryogenic\\u000amechanical

S. T. Staggs; N. C. Jarosik; S. S. Meyer; D. T. Wilkinson

1996-01-01

42

Nançay ``blind'' 21 CM line survey of the Canes Venatici group region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A radio spectroscopic driftscan survey in the 21 cm line with the Nançay decimetric radio telescope of 0.08 steradians of sky in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici covering a heliocentric velocity range of -350 < V_hel < 2350 km s(-1) produced 53 spectral features, which was further reduced to a sample of 33 reliably detected galaxies by extensive follow-up observations. With a typical noise level of rms = 10 mJy after Hanning smoothing, the survey is - depending on where the detections are located with regard to the centre of the beam - sensitive to M_HI = 1-2x10(8) {h}(-2) {M_sun} at 23 {h}(-1) Mpc and to M_HI = 4-8x10(7) {h}(-2) {M_sun} throughout the CVn groups. The survey region had been previously examined on deep optical plates by \\cite[Binggeli et al. (1990)]{bin90} and contains loose groups with many gas-rich galaxies as well as voids. No galaxies that had not been previously identified in these deep optical surveys were uncovered in our H{sigma c i} survey, neither in the groups nor the voids. The implication is that no substantial quantity of neutral hydrogen contained in gas-rich galaxies has been missed in these well-studied groups. All late-type members of our sample are listed in the \\cite[Fisher & Tully (1981b)]{fis81b} optically selected sample of nearby late-type galaxies; the only system not contained in Fisher and Tully's Catalog is the S0 galaxy NGC 4203. Within the well-sampled CVn group volume with distances corrected for flow motions, the H {sigma c i} mass function is best fitted with the \\cite[Zwaan et al. (1997)]{zwa97} H{sigma c i} mass function (alpha =-1.2) scaled by a factor of f=4.5 in account of the locally overdense region.

Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; van Driel, W.; Briggs, F.; Binggeli, B.; Mostefaoui, T. I.

1999-03-01

43

ATLAS: Australia Telescope Large Area Survey: Deep Radio Observations of the CDFS-SWIRE and ELAIS-S1 fields  

E-print Network

ATLAS: Australia Telescope Large Area Survey: Deep Radio Observations of the CDFS-SWIRE and ELAIS: University of Durham, UK. GOODS The Australia Telescope Compact Array used to make the radio images-S1 fields 1. Overview · We are imaging the CDFS and ELAIS-S1 SWIRE fields at 20 cm. Combining radio

Norris, Ray

44

H: Advising/Sr Yr Plan Sheet.docx Rev.10/7/2010 CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING  

E-print Network

H: Advising/Sr Yr Plan Sheet.docx Rev.10/7/2010 CIVIL & ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Senior Year Plan Sheet Overview: Students in the BSCE program meet with their faculty mentors during their junior year

45

An Absolute Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Temperature at 10.7 GHz  

E-print Network

A balloon-borne experiment has measured the absolute temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 10.7 GHz to be Tcmbr = 2.730 +- .014 K. The error is the quadratic sum of several systematic errors, with statistical error of less than 0.1 mK. The instrument comprises a cooled corrugated horn antenna coupled to a total-power radiometer. A cryogenic mechanical waveguide switch alternately connects the radiometer to the horn and to an internal reference load. The small measured temperature difference (radiation from the ground and the balloon. In-flight tests constrain the magnitude of ground radiation contamination, and low level interference is monitored through observations in several narrow frequency bands.

S. T. Staggs; N. C. Jarosik; S. S. Meyer; D. T. Wilkinson

1996-09-19

46

Hadronic transitions ?(2S)??(1S)  

E-print Network

Using a 73.6pb(-1) data sample of ?(2S) events collected with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the hadronic transitions between the ?(2S) and the ?(1S). The dipion transition ?(2S)??(1S...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

1998-08-07

47

Evolution of HIV Crandall et al. S1 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins S1  

E-print Network

Evolution of HIV Crandall et al. S1 © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins S1 From the a Department in understanding the evolution of HIV Keith A. Crandalla , Daniel Vascoa , David Posadaa and Hiromi Imamichib AIDS 1999, 13 (suppl A)S00­S00 Keywords: HIV, drug resistance, evolution, phylogeny, likelihood, model

Posada, David

48

Mapmaking for precision 21 cm cosmology  

E-print Network

In order to study the “Cosmic Dawn” and the Epoch of Reionization with 21 cm tomography, we need to statistically separate the cosmological signal from foregrounds known to be orders of magnitude brighter. Over the last ...

Liu, Adrian

49

PMMA Cementoplasty in Symptomatic Metastatic Lesions of the S1 Vertebral Body  

SciTech Connect

We describe a lateral transiliac direct puncture approach to the S1 vertebral body for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cementoplasty of painful metastatic lesions. This approach was performed using a 15-cm-long trocar needle with 3-mm outer diameter, introduced under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic control. A lateral projection was used to center the needle just in front of the spinal canal and subjacent to the superior plate of the S1 vertebral body. Needle progression was controlled using anteroposterior and lateral fluoroscopic projections alternately with a needle course parallel to an axial plane, avoiding conflict with the S1 foramen. After needle tip placement in the center of the S1 vertebral body, diluted PMMA with a setting time of 8 min was delivered. Ipsilateral lesions of the lateral sacral compartment were filled with the same needle by stepwise withdrawal and continuous PMMA injection.

Dehdashti, Amir R.; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Jean, Beatrix; Ruefenacht, Daniel A. [Neuroradiology-HUG, University Hospital of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

2000-03-15

50

Detection of Thermal 2 cm and 1 cm Formaldehyde Emission in NGC 7538  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Formaldehyde is a tracer of high density gas in massive star forming regions. The K-doublet lines from the three lowest rotational energy levels of ortho-formaldehyde correspond to wavelengths of 6, 2 and 1 cm. Thermal emission of these transitions is rare, and maser emission has only been detected in the 6 cm line. NGC 7538 is an active site of massive star formation in the Galaxy, and one of only a few regions known to harbor 6 cm formaldehyde (H2CO) masers. Using the NRAO 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT), we detected 2 cm H2CO emission toward NGC 7538 IRS1. The velocity of the 2 cm H2CO line is very similar to the velocity of one of the 6 cm H2CO masers but the linewidth is greater. To investigate the nature of the 2 cm emission, we conducted observations of the 1 cm H2CO transition, and obtained a cross-scan map of the 2 cm line. We detected 1 cm emission and found that the 2 cm emission is extended (greater than 30"), which implies brightness temperatures of ˜0.2 K. Assuming optically thin emission, LTE, and that the 1 cm and 2 cm lines originate from the same volume of gas, both these detections are consistent with thermal emission of gas at ˜30 K. We conclude that the 1 cm and 2 cm H2CO lines detected with the GBT are thermal, which implies molecular densities above ˜105 cm-3. LY acknowledges support from WIU. PH acknowledges partial support from NSF grant AST-0908901.

Yuan, Liang; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Pihlstrom, Y.

2011-05-01

51

High resolution electronic spectroscopy of 1-aminonaphthalene: S0 and S1 geometries and S1?S0 transition moment orientations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fluorescence excitation spectroscopy at both vibrational and rotational resolution has been used to probe the changes in energy, electronic distribution, and geometry that occur when 1-aminonaphthalene (1AN) absorbs light at ?332 nm. The 000 band of the S1?S0 transition of 1AN is red shifted by nearly 2000 cm?1 with respect to the corresponding band of naphthalene. Additionally, it is mainly

Giel Berden; W. Leo Meerts; David F. Plusquellic; Ikuo Fujita; David W. Pratt

1996-01-01

52

26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section 1.414(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(s)-1 Definition of compensation. (a)...

2010-04-01

53

26 CFR 1.414(s)-1 - Definition of compensation.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Definition of compensation. 1.414(s)-1 Section 1.414(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(s)-1 Definition of compensation. (a)...

2011-04-01

54

In Situ Investigation of Preirradiated Olivines in CM Chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most CM chondrites are breccias that contain fragments of primary rock representing densely packed agglomerates of chondrules, CAIs, etc., all of which are mantled by thick layers of fine-grained mineral dust [1]. These dust mantles seem to be the result of dust sampling by the various components during their isolated existence in the solar nebula prior to the formation of the CM parent body [1]. Metzler et al. [1] concluded that these rock fragments are well-preserved remnants of the freshly accreted CM parent body(ies). There is an opposing hypothesis that favors an origin of the dust mantles in an active regolith on the CM parent body [e.g., 2]. A list of arguments against the latter view is given by Metzler et al. [1], including a hint at the absence of solar-wind-implanted gases in dust mantles and in fragments of primary rock. In analogy to brecciated ordinary chondrites and lunar breccias, the most probable residence of the solar gases in CM chondrites is their clastic matrix. The same holds for track-rich olivines that were observed in CM chondrites. The occurrence of these grains in the clastic matrix and their absence in the primary rock would give an additional argument for the idea of a dust mantle origin in the solar nebula rather than in a planetary regolith. To answer this important question, mosaics of backscattered electron images of several large polished thin sections of Murchison and Cold Bokkeveld were prepared. The thin sections (1.5-5 cm^2 each) were etched in a WN solution [3] for about 4 hr to reveal the heavy ion tracks in olivines. Results: The background GCR track density produced during meteoroid transit is on the order of 10^4 tracks/cm^2, as was previously observed by [4]. Following the definition given by Goswami and Lal [4], olivines with track densities >10^5 tracks/cm^2 were classified as preirradiated grains and were found in both meteorites in a very small quantity. In both meteorites, 39 preirradiated isolated olivine grains were found in the clastic matrix, whereas the investigated fragments of primary rock do not contain preirradiated olivines. In Murchison about 1.8% (15 out of 850 investigated grains) of the isolated olivines in the clastic matrix show high track densities in the range between 1.9 x 10^6 and >5 x 10^7, comparable to the results of Goswami and co-workers [4,5]. Both Fe-poor and Fe-rich olivines with grain sizes between 40 and 710 micrometers were found to be preirradiated. Track gradients were found in 33% of these olivines, which is very similar to the values obtained by Goswami and Lal [4] and identical to those obtained by MacDougall and Phinney [6]. About 0.4% (2 out of 530) of the investigated olivine-bearing chondrules and chondrule fragments are preirradiated. In the case of Cold Bokkeveld, 3.7% (24 out of 650) of the isolated olivines show high track densities. Thirteen of these 24 grains were found to be concentrated in a distinct inclusion (1 x 4 mm) that is characterized by its elongated appearence and clastic fabric. The track densities of its preirradiated olivines show a very narrow range, indicating a common irradiation history of these grains. The petrography of this inclusion is currently under investigation. Conclusions: Track-rich (preirradiated) olivines in CM chondrites occur exclusively in the clastic matrix of these meteorites, comparable to observations in brecciated ordinary chondrites. Fragments of primary rock in CM chondrites do not contain solar-wind-implanted gases [1] or preirradiated grains. This confirms the view that the dust mantles around various components of these rocks are the products of dust accretion in the solar nebula rather than of regolith processes on the parent body surface. References: [1] Metzler K. et al. (1992) GCA, 56, 2873. [2] Kerridge J. (1992) personal communication. [3] Krishnaswami S. et al. (1971) Science, 174, 287. [4] Goswami J. N. and Lal D.(1979) Icarus, 40, 510. [5] Goswami J. N. and MacDougall J. D. (1983) Proc. LPSC 13th, in JGR, 88, A755. [6] MacDougall J. D. and Phinney D. (1977) Proc. LS

Metzler, K.

1993-07-01

55

The Parkes 21 CM multibeam receiver  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several extragalactic HI surveys using a 21-cm 13-beam focal plane array will begin in late 1996 using the Parkes 64-m telescope. These surveys are designed to detect efficiently nearby galaxies that have failed to be identified optically because of low optical surface brightness or high optical extinction. We discuss scientific and technical aspects of the multibeam receiver including astronomical objectives, feed, receiver and correlator design and data acquisition. A comparison with other telescopes shows that the Parkes multibeam receiver has significant speed advantages for any large-area 21- cm galaxy survey in the velocity range range 0 - 14000 km per sec.

Staveley-Smith, L.; Wilson, W. E.; Bird, T. S.; Disney, M. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Haynes, R. F.; Sinclair, M. W.; Vaile, R. A.; Webster, R. L.; Wright, A. E.

1996-11-01

56

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-38 Substance Abuse Policy  

E-print Network

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-38 ­ Substance Abuse Policy To: Vice Chancellors, Deans, Administrative, or being under the influence of alcohol and the illegal use, abuse, possession, manufacture, dispensation with this policy. III. Purpose Alcohol abuse and the illegal use or abuse of other drugs is associated

57

21cm Forest with the SKA  

E-print Network

An alternative to both the tomography technique and the power spectrum approach is to search for the 21cm forest, that is the 21cm absorption features against high-z radio loud sources caused by the intervening cold neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) and collapsed structures. Although the existence of high-z radio loud sources has not been confirmed yet, SKA-low would be the instrument of choice to find such sources as they are expected to have spectra steeper than their lower-z counterparts. Since the strongest absorption features arise from small scale structures (few tens of physical kpc, or even lower), the 21cm forest can probe the HI density power spectrum on small scales not amenable to measurements by any other means. Also, it can be a unique probe of the heating process and the thermal history of the early universe, as the signal is strongly dependent on the IGM temperature. Here we show what SKA1-low could do in terms of detecting the 21cm forest in the redshift range z = 7.5-15.

Ciardi, Benedetta; Mack, Katherine J; Xu, Yidong; Bernardi, Gianni

2015-01-01

58

Measurements of Output Factors For Small Photon Fields Up to 10 cm x 10 cm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field output factors (OF) for photon beams from a 6 MV medical accelerator were measured using five different detectors in a scanning water phantom. The measurements were taken for square field sizes of integral widths ranging from 1 cm to 10 cm for two reference source-to-surface distances (SSD) and depths in water. For the diode detectors, square field widths as small as 2.5 mm were also studied. The photon beams were collimated by using either the jaws or the multileaf collimators. Measured OFs are found to depend upon the field size, SSD, depth and also upon the type of beam collimation, size and type of detector used. For field sizes larger than 3 cm x 3 cm, the OF measurements agree to within 1% or less. The largest variation in OF occurs for jawsshaped field of size 1 cm x 1cm, where a difference of more than 18% is observed.

Bacala, Angelina

59

Magnetic susceptibility of curium pnictides. [/sup 248/CmP, /sup 248/CmSb  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic susceptibility of microgram quantities of /sup 248/CmP and /sup 248/CmSb has been determined with the use of a SQUID micromagnetic susceptometer over the temperature range 4.2 to 340 K and in the applied magnetic field range of 0.45 to 1600 G. The fcc (NaCl-type) samples yield magnetic transitions at 73K and 162 K for the phosphide and antimonide, respectively. Together with published magnetic data for CmN and CmAs, these results indicate spatially extended exchange interactions between the relatively localized 5f electrons of the metallic actinide atoms.

Nave, S.E.; Huray, P.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.

1981-09-01

60

Diphenyl [(S)-1-phenylpropanamido]-phosphate.  

PubMed

The title compound, C(21)H(22)NO(3)P, was synthesized from the reaction of (C(6)H(5)O)(2)P(O)(Cl) and S-1-phenyl-propyl-amine (1:2 mole ratio) at 273?K, followed by removal of the S-1-phenyl-propyl-amine hydro-chloride by-product by dissolving in H(2)O. The P atom is located in a distorted tetra-hedral environment. The bond angles at the P atom vary from 99.51?(12) to 116.68?(12)°. The sp(2) character of the N atom is reflected by the C-N-P angle [120.9?(2)°]. The P=O group and the N-H unit adopt an anti orientation with respect to one another. In the crystal, adjacent mol-ecules are linked via N-H?O(P) hydrogen bonds into a one-dimensional arrangement running parallel to the a axis. PMID:22064755

Sabbaghi, Fahimeh; Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Negari, Monireh; Ne?as, Marek

2011-09-01

61

Diphenyl [(S)-1-phenylpropanamido]­phosphate  

PubMed Central

The title compound, C21H22NO3P, was synthesized from the reaction of (C6H5O)2P(O)(Cl) and S-1-phenyl­propyl­amine (1:2 mole ratio) at 273?K, followed by removal of the S-1-phenyl­propyl­amine hydro­chloride by-product by dissolving in H2O. The P atom is located in a distorted tetra­hedral environment. The bond angles at the P atom vary from 99.51?(12) to 116.68?(12)°. The sp 2 character of the N atom is reflected by the C—N—P angle [120.9?(2)°]. The P=O group and the N—H unit adopt an anti orientation with respect to one another. In the crystal, adjacent mol­ecules are linked via N—H?O(P) hydrogen bonds into a one-dimensional arrangement running parallel to the a axis. PMID:22064755

Sabbaghi, Fahimeh; Pourayoubi, Mehrdad; Negari, Monireh; Ne?as, Marek

2011-01-01

62

Interpreting Sky-Averaged 21-cm Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the first ~billion years after the Big Bang, the intergalactic medium (IGM) underwent a remarkable transformation, from a uniform sea of cold neutral hydrogen gas to a fully ionized, metal-enriched plasma. Three milestones during this epoch of reionization -- the emergence of the first stars, black holes (BHs), and full-fledged galaxies -- are expected to manifest themselves as extrema in sky-averaged ("global") measurements of the redshifted 21-cm background. However, interpreting these measurements will be complicated by the presence of strong foregrounds and non-trivialities in the radiative transfer (RT) modeling required to make robust predictions.I have developed numerical models that efficiently solve the frequency-dependent radiative transfer equation, which has led to two advances in studies of the global 21-cm signal. First, frequency-dependent solutions facilitate studies of how the global 21-cm signal may be used to constrain the detailed spectral properties of the first stars, BHs, and galaxies, rather than just the timing of their formation. And second, the speed of these calculations allows one to search vast expanses of a currently unconstrained parameter space, while simultaneously characterizing the degeneracies between parameters of interest. I find principally that (1) physical properties of the IGM, such as its temperature and ionization state, can be constrained robustly from observations of the global 21-cm signal without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves, (2) translating IGM properties to galaxy properties is challenging, in large part due to frequency-dependent effects. For instance, evolution in the characteristic spectrum of accreting BHs can modify the 21-cm absorption signal at levels accessible to first generation instruments, but could easily be confused with evolution in the X-ray luminosity star-formation rate relation. Finally, (3) the independent constraints most likely to aide in the interpretation of global 21-cm signal measurements are detections of Lyman Alpha Emitters at high redshifts and constraints on the midpoint of reionization, both of which are among the primary science objectives of ongoing or near-future experiments.

Mirocha, Jordan

2015-01-01

63

Interaction of Integrin ?4 with S1P Receptors in S1P- and HGF-Induced Endothelial Barrier Enhancement†  

PubMed Central

We previously reported sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) augment EC barrier function and attenuate murine acute lung inury (ALI). While the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood, S1P and HGF both transactivate the S1P receptor, S1PR1 and integrin ?4 (ITGB4) at membrane caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs). In the current study, we investigated the roles of S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC signaling and their associations with ITGB4. Our studies confirmed ITGB4 and S1PR2/3 are recruited to CEMs in human lung EC in response to either S1P (1 ?M, 5 min) or HGF (25 ng/ml, 5 min). Co-immunopreciptation experiments identified an S1P/HGF-mediated interaction of ITGB4 with both S1PR2 and S1PR3. We then employed an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) to confirm a direct ITGB4-S1PR3 association induced by S1P/HGF although a direct association was not detectable between S1PR2 and ITGB4. S1PR1 knockdown (siRNA), however, abrogated S1P/HGF-induced ITGB4-S1PR2 associations while there was no effect on ITGB4-S1PR3 associations. Moreover, PLA confirmed a direct association between S1PR1 and S1PR2 induced by S1P and HGF. Finally, silencing of S1PR2 significantly attenuated S1P/HGF-induced EC barrier enhancement as measured by transendothelial resistance while silencing of S1PR3 significantly augmented S1P/HGF-induced barrier enhancement. These results confirm an important role for S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC barrier responses that are associated with their complex formation with ITGB4. Our findings elucidate novel mechanisms of EC barrier regulation that may ultimately lead to new therapeutic targets for disorders characterized by increased vascular permeability including ALI. PMID:24851274

Ni, Xiuqin; Epsthein, Yulia; Chen, Weiguo; Zhou, Tingting; Xie, Lishi; Garcia, Joe G.N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

2015-01-01

64

CM Magazine: Canadian Review of Materials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published by the Manitoba Library Association, the Canadian Review of Materials is the Web version of _CM Magazine_, a bi-weekly review of Canadian materials for young people. _CM Magazine_ contains book, media, and web reviews, as well as news, features, and stories of interest to teachers, librarians, parents, and kids. Though Web issues began appearing in June 1995, the site offers an archive of reviews, feature stories, interviews, and articles from the print version some back to 1971. The archives are indexed by date, author, title, age group, and media type. The site contains pictures, sound clips and video clips. You can search for authors, book titles, and reviewers. In concert with McNally Robinson Booksellers the site offers ordering services for any book reviewed in the magazine.

65

ICD-10-CM to ICD-10 Based on FY2014 ICD-10-CM codes  

Cancer.gov

ICD-10-CM to ICD-10 Based on FY2014 ICD-10-CM codes REPORTABLE NEOPLASMS Category and subcategory codes are shaded in grey and marked with an ^ Cells shaded in pink and marked with an *indicate the preferred code when a single code maps to multiple codes

66

ICD-10 to ICD-10-CM Based on FY2014 ICD-10-CM codes  

Cancer.gov

ICD-10 to ICD-10-CM Based on FY2014 ICD-10-CM codes REPORTABLE NEOPLASMS Category and subcategory codes are shaded in grey and marked with an ^ Cells shaded in pink and marked with an *indicate the preferred code when a single code maps to multiple codes

67

ICD-10 to ICD-9-CM Based on FY2014 ICD-9-CM codes  

Cancer.gov

ICD-10 to ICD-9-CM Based on FY2014 ICD-9-CM codes REPORTABLE NEOPLASMS Category and subcategory codes are shaded in grey and marked with an ^ Cells shaded in pink and marked with an *indicate the preferred code when a single code maps to multiple codes

68

Constraining dark matter through 21-cm observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beyond reionization epoch cosmic hydrogen is neutral and can be directly observed through its 21-cm line signal. If dark matter (DM) decays or annihilates, the corresponding energy input affects the hydrogen kinetic temperature and ionized fraction, and contributes to the Ly? background. The changes induced by these processes on the 21-cm signal can then be used to constrain the proposed DM candidates, among which we select the three most popular ones: (i) 25-keV decaying sterile neutrinos, (ii) 10-MeV decaying light dark matter (LDM) and (iii) 10-MeV annihilating LDM. Although we find that the DM effects are considerably smaller than found by previous studies (due to a more physical description of the energy transfer from DM to the gas), we conclude that combined observations of the 21-cm background and of its gradient should be able to put constrains at least on LDM candidates. In fact, LDM decays (annihilations) induce differential brightness temperature variations with respect to the non-decaying/annihilating DM case up to ??Tb = 8 (22) mK at about 50 (15) MHz. In principle, this signal could be detected both by current single-dish radio telescopes and future facilities as Low Frequency Array; however, this assumes that ionospheric, interference and foreground issues can be properly taken care of.

Valdés, M.; Ferrara, A.; Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.

2007-05-01

69

Mapmaking for precision 21 cm cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to study the "Cosmic Dawn" and the Epoch of Reionization with 21 cm tomography, we need to statistically separate the cosmological signal from foregrounds known to be orders of magnitude brighter. Over the last few years, we have learned much about the role our telescopes play in creating a putatively foreground-free region called the "EoR window." In this work, we examine how an interferometer's effects can be taken into account in a way that allows for the rigorous estimation of 21 cm power spectra from interferometric maps while mitigating foreground contamination and thus increasing sensitivity. This requires a precise understanding of the statistical relationship between the maps we make and the underlying true sky. While some of these calculations would be computationally infeasible if performed exactly, we explore several well-controlled approximations that make mapmaking and the calculation of map statistics much faster, especially for compact and highly redundant interferometers designed specifically for 21 cm cosmology. We demonstrate the utility of these methods and the parametrized trade-offs between accuracy and speed using one such telescope, the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, as a case study.

Dillon, Joshua S.; Tegmark, Max; Liu, Adrian; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Morales, Miguel F.; Neben, Abraham R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Zheng, Haoxuan

2015-01-01

70

Polyhedral Serpentine Grains in CM Chondrites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

CM chondrites are primitive rocks that experienced aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained the effects of alteration, and the minerals within them hold clues to the aqueous reactions. Sheet silicates are an important product of alteration, and those of the serpentine group are abundant in the CM2 chondrites. Here we expand on our previous efforts to characterize the structure and chemistry of serpentines in CM chondrites and report results on a polyhedral form that is structurally similar to polygonal serpentine. Polygonal serpentine consists of tetrahedral (T) sheets joined to M(2+)-centered octahedral (O) sheets (where (M2+) is primarily Mg(2+) and Fe(2+)), which give rise to a 1:1 (TO) layered structure with a 0.7-nm layer periodicity. The structure is similar to chrysotile in that it consists of concentric lizardite layers wrapped around the fiber axis. However, unlike the rolled-up chrysotile, the tetrahedral sheets of the lizardite layers are periodically inverted and kinked, producing sectors. The relative angles between sectors result in 15- and 30-sided polygons in terrestrial samples.

Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Buseck, Peter R.

2005-01-01

71

Neutral Hydrogen 21 CM Absorption at Redshift 2.6365toward the Gravitational Lens MG J0414+0534  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the detection of the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen in absorption at a redshift of 2.6365 toward the gravitationally lensed radio source MG J0414+0534. The absorption shows two velocity components, each with a width of ~150 km s^-1, separated by about 200 km s^-1. We determine a total H I column density of 7.5+\\/-1.3x10^18 (T_s) m^-2 assuming

Christopher B. Moore; C. L. Carilli; Karl M. Menten

1999-01-01

72

Twisted S1 excited state geometries in 4-dimethylaminobenzonitrile and dimethylaniline: New -d6 origin bands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The S1?S0 electronic spectra of 4-dimethylaminobenzonitrile-h6 and -d6 (DMABN) and dimethylaniline-h6 and -d6 have been reexamined, and new electronic origins have been observed for the -d6 species, approximately 65 cm-1 lower in energy than previously reported. The spectra of DMABN-h3d3 and several other isotopomers of DMABN are reported for the first time. A prominent low-frequency progression is assigned to dimethylamino torsion, and the S1 states are found to be twisted by about 26° with a small 190 cm-1 barrier to planarity. Other bands are tentatively assigned to inversion and methyl torsional motions.

Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Miyakoshi, Naoki; Mukai, Chisato; Fukagawa, Tomoyoshi; Kohtani, Shigeru; Nakagaki, Ryoichi; Gordon, Robert

2003-09-01

73

Overcoming the Challenges of 21cm Cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The highly-redshifted 21cm line of neutral hydrogen is one of the most promising and unique probes of cosmology for the next decade and beyond. The past few years have seen a number of dedicated experiments targeting the 21cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) begin operation, including the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER). For these experiments to yield cosmological results, they require new calibration and analysis algorithms which will need to achieve unprecedented levels of separation between the 21cm signal and contaminating foreground emission. Although much work has been spent developing these algorithms over the past decade, their success or failure will ultimately depend on their ability to overcome the complications associated with real-world systems and their inherent complications. The work in this dissertation is closely tied to the late-stage commissioning and early observations with PAPER. The first two chapters focus on developing calibration algorithms to overcome unique problems arising in the PAPER system. To test these algorithms, I rely on not only simulations, but on commissioning observations, ultimately tying the success of the algorithm to its performance on actual, celestial data. The first algorithm works to correct gain-drifts in the PAPER system caused by the heating and cooling of various components (the amplifiers and above ground co-axial cables, in particular). It is shown that a simple measurement of the ambient temperature can remove ˜ 10% gain fluctuations in the observed brightness of calibrator sources. This result is highly encouraging for the ability of PAPER to remove a potentially dominant systematic in its power spectrum and cataloging measurements without resorting to a complicated system overhaul. The second new algorithm developed in this dissertation solves a major calibration challenge not just for PAPER, but for nearly all of a large class of new wide-field, drift- scanning radio telescopes: primary beam calibration in the presence of a poorly measured sky. Since these telescopes lack the ability to steer their primary beams, while seeing nearly the entire sky at once, a large number of calibrator sources are necessary to probe the entire beam response. However, the catalogs of radio sources at low-frequencies are not reliable enough to achieve the level of primary beam accuraccy needed for 21cm cosmology experiments. I develop, test, and apply a new technique which -- using only the assumption of symmetry around a 180° rotation -- simultaneously solves for the primary beam and the flux density of large number of sources. In this dissertation, I also present the analysis of new observations from PAPER to test theoretical models which predict foreground emission is confined to a "wedge"-like region of cosmological Fourier space, leaving an "EoR window" free from contamination. For the first time in actual observations, these predictions are spectacularly confirmed. In many ways, this result shifts the burden for upcoming PAPER analysis from foreground removal to increased sensitivity. And although increasing sensitivity is no small feat in-and-of-itself, this result is highly encouraging for 21cm studies, as foreground removal was long-viewed as the principal challenge for this field. The final result in this dissertation is the application of the all the lessons learned building PAPER and the MWA to design a new experiment for 21cm studies at z ˜ 1 with the goal of measuring baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). The design of the BAO Broadband and Broad-beam (BAOBAB) Array is described, and cosmological forecasts are presented. The bottom line is highly encouraging, suggesting that z ˜ 1 21cm observations can detect the neutral hydrogen power spectrum with a very modest (16 - 32 element) array, and that still reasonably sized (128 - 256 elements) arrays can produce significant advances in our knowledge of dark energy.

Pober, Jonathan

74

WILL COMET ISON (C/2012 S1) SURVIVE PERIHELION?  

SciTech Connect

On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ?200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm{sup –3} are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm{sup –3}, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

Knight, Matthew M. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)] [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Walsh, Kevin J., E-mail: knight@lowell.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 400, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2013-10-10

75

Enhanced FEC OSNR gains in dispersion-uncompensated 10.7Gb\\/s duobinary transmission over 200-km SSMF  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the experimental comparison of 10.7-Gb\\/s duobinary transmissions using generic Reed-Solomon forward error correction (FEC) and an enhanced FEC. The coding gains of the two FECs after transmission over a dispersion-uncompensated 200-km standard single-mode fiber (SSMF) link are found to be much larger than those quoted in ideal case, with the enhanced FEC further outperforming the generic FEC by

Xiang Liu; Zheng Zheng; Noriaki Kaneda; Xing Wei; Moncef Tayahi; Mahan Movassaghi; Stojan Radic; S. Chandrasekhar; David Levy

2003-01-01

76

Infrared reflectivity spectra of GaS 1-xSe x mixed crystals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Infrared reflectivity spectra of GaS 1- xSe x mixed crystals are measured for E ? c in the wavenumber range from 180 to 4000 cm -1. Two-mode behaviour is found for the infrared active optical modes. The composition dependence of the mode frequencies can be described by the MREI model if a nonlinear change of the force constants with composition is assumed.

Riede, V.; Neumann, H.; Sobotta, H.; Lévy, F.

1980-04-01

77

A 30-cm diameter argon ion source  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

Sovey, J. S.

1976-01-01

78

Gravitational lensing of cosmological 21 cm emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the feasibility of measuring weak gravitational lensing using 21-cm intensity mapping with special emphasis on the performance of the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We find that the current design for SKA_Mid should be able to measure the evolution of the lensing power spectrum at z ˜ 2-3 using this technique. This will be a probe of the expansion history of the Universe and gravity at a unique range in redshift. The signal to noise is found to be highly dependent on evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction in the Universe with a higher H I density resulting in stronger signal. With realistic models for this, SKA Phase 1 should be capable of measuring the lensing power spectrum and its evolution. The dependence of signal to noise on the area and diameter of the array is quantified. We further demonstrate the applications of this technique by applying it to two specific coupled dark energy models that would be difficult to observationally distinguish without information from this range of redshift. We also investigate measuring the lensing signal with 21 cm emission from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) using SKA and find that it is unlikely to constrain cosmological parameters because of the small survey size, but could provide a map of the dark matter within a small region of the sky.

Pourtsidou, A.; Metcalf, R. Benton

2015-04-01

79

THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Feiden, Gregory A., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2012-11-20

80

TEM Observations of Aqueously Altered Phases in Maribo (CM2) and Murchison (CM2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

TEM observations of phases showing different types of aqueous alteration in two CM2 chondrites. In Murchison, some of these phases ehibit magnetite. In Maribo, a texturally unique phase reveals at least three different stages of aqueous alteration.

Barth, M.; Vollmer, C.; Bischoff, A.; Horstmann, M.

2013-09-01

81

Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

Fujii, Yasuyuki, E-mail: y.fujii@po.rd.taisho.co.jp [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Igarashi, Yasuyuki [Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Goitsuka, Ryo [Division of Development and Aging, Research Institute for Biological Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)] [Division of Development and Aging, Research Institute for Biological Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)

2012-03-23

82

Study of ?(3S,2S)???(1S) and ?(3S,2S)??+?-?(1S) hadronic transitions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the ?(3S,2S)???(1S) and ?(3S,2S)??+?-?(1S) transitions with 122×106?(3S) and 100×106?(2S) mesons collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. We measure B[?(2S)???(1S)]=(2.39±0.31(stat.)±0.14(syst.))×10-4 and ?[?(2S)???(1S)]/?[?(2S)??+?-?(1S)]=(1.35±0.17(stat.)±0.08(syst.))×10-3. We find no evidence for ?(3S)???(1S) and obtain B[?(3S)???(1S)]<1.0×10-4 and ?[?(3S)???(1S)]/?[?(3S)??+?-?(1S)]<2.3×10-3 as upper limits at the 90% confidence level. We also provide improved measurements of the ?(2S)-?(1S) and ?(3S)-?(1S) mass differences, 562.170±0.007(stat.)±0.088(syst.)MeV/c2 and 893.813±0.015(stat.)±0.107(syst.)MeV/c2, respectively.

Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; de Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.

2011-11-01

83

A New Galactic 6cm Formaldehyde Maser  

E-print Network

We report the detection of a new H2CO maser in the massive star forming region G23.71-0.20 (IRAS 18324-0820), i.e., the fifth region in the Galaxy where H2CO maser emission has been found. The new H2CO maser is located toward a compact HII region, and is coincident in velocity and position with 6.7 GHz methanol masers and with an IR source as revealed by Spitzer/IRAC GLIMPSE data. The coincidence with an IR source and 6.7 GHz methanol masers suggests that the maser is in close proximity to an embedded massive protostar. Thus, the detection of H2CO maser emission toward G23.71-0.20 supports the trend that H2CO 6cm masers trace molecular material very near young massive stellar objects.

E. Araya; P. Hofner; W. M. Goss; S. Kurtz; H. Linz; L. Olmi

2006-04-17

84

The 30-cm ion thruster power processor  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A power processor unit for powering and controlling the 30 cm Mercury Electron-Bombardment Ion Thruster was designed, fabricated, and tested. The unit uses a unique and highly efficient transistor bridge inverter power stage in its implementation. The system operated from a 200 to 400 V dc input power bus, provides 12 independently controllable and closely regulated dc power outputs, and has an overall power conditioning capacity of 3.5 kW. Protective circuitry was incorporated as an integral part of the design to assure failure-free operation during transient and steady-state load faults. The implemented unit demonstrated an electrical efficiency between 91.5 and 91.9 at its nominal rated load over the 200 to 400 V dc input bus range.

Herron, B. G.; Hopper, D. J.

1978-01-01

85

Relationships with CM-type Chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Colleagues still have trouble understanding how the dominant relationship between CM-type chondrites and AMMs was established. They also wonder about the meaning of this relationship in terms of solar system history, and they generally expect that it has been markedly altered upon atmospheric entry, except for the smallest particles collected in the stratosphere. They are also confused when hearing that in spite of strong similarities there are also marked differences between these two varieties of solar system materials. Consequently, some of them believe that this relationship has not been convincingly established. This section mostly relies on arguments already presented by Kurat and Maurette (1997) in a book published in French, which have only been improved recently through the analysis of the Concordia Antarctic micrometeorites (Duprat et al., 2003 and 2004).

Maurette, Michel

86

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES -0021  

E-print Network

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS MARSHALL COLLEGE #12;REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES / SBJUNIORSPHMREOTH FRNEW FRDEPT DESC #12;REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR

Tsien, Roger Y.

87

Detecting the 21 cm forest in the 21 cm power spectrum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a new technique for constraining the radio-loud population of active galactic nuclei at high redshift by measuring the imprint of 21 cm spectral absorption features (the 21 cm forest) on the 21 cm power spectrum. Using semi-numerical simulations of the intergalactic medium and a semi-empirical source population, we show that the 21 cm forest dominates a distinctive region of k-space, k ? 0.5 Mpc- 1. By simulating foregrounds and noise for current and potential radio arrays, we find that a next-generation instrument with a collecting area of the order of ˜ 0.1 km2 (such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array) may separately constrain the X-ray heating history at large spatial scales and radio-loud active galactic nuclei of the model we study at small ones. We extrapolate our detectability predictions for a single radio-loud active galactic nuclei population to arbitrary source scenarios by analytically relating the 21 cm forest power spectrum to the optical depth power spectrum and an integral over the radio luminosity function.

Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Dillon, Joshua S.; Mesinger, Andrei; Hewitt, Jacqueline

2014-07-01

88

Supplemental Material 1: Detailed description of experimental apparatus The reactor (see Table 1) consists of a stainless steel chamber (volume 2350 cm3  

E-print Network

, 250 l s-1 ) attached to the lower (analysis) chamber, which is separated from the upper reactor part) consists of a stainless steel chamber (volume 2350 cm3 ) under high vacuum (a few times 10-8 Torr and a liquid nitrogen Dewar open to the atmosphere are attached. An IR transparent window of silicon (0.78 cm2

Meskhidze, Nicholas

89

S-1-induced lung injury combined with pneumocystis pneumonia  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary injuries due to S-1 have been reported, and these reports have shown an increase in lung cancer following the increased usage of S-1 in treating lung cancer. We report the first case of lung injury due to S-1 in combination with pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), because the radiological findings and clinical courses were compatible with S-1-induced lung injury combined with PCP. We should consider that S-1 might induce lung injuries which might occur with PCP, especially with a history of drug-induced or radiation-induced lung injuries. PMID:23386491

Yano, Shuichi

2013-01-01

90

The Signatures of Particle Decay in 21 cm Absorption from the First Minihalos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The imprint of decaying dark matter (DM) particles on the characteristics of the "21 cm forest"—absorption at 21 cm from minihalos in the spectra of distant radio-loud sources—is considered within a one-dimensional, self-consistent hydrodynamic description of minihalos from their turnaround point to virialization. The most pronounced influence of decaying DM on the evolution of minihalos is found in the mass range M = 105-106 M ?, for which unstable DM with a current upper limit on its ionization rate of ? L = 0.59 × 10-25 s-1 reduces the 21 cm optical depth by an order of magnitude compared with the standard recombination scenario. Even a rather modest ionization, ? ~ 0.3? L , practically erases absorption features and results in a considerable decrease (by factor of more than 2.5) of the number of strong (W_\

Vasiliev, Evgenii O.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.

2013-11-01

91

A 40-cm infrared telescope in Antarctica  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In Antarctica the cold and dry air is expected to provide the best observing conditions on the Earth for astronomical observations from infra-red to sub-millimeter. To enjoy the advantages in Antarctica, we have a plan to make astronomical observations at Dome Fuji, which is located at inland Antarctica. However, the harsh environment is very problematic. For example, the temperature comes down to as low as-80 degree Celsius in winter, where instruments designed for temperate environment would not work. In this context, we have developed a 40 cm infra-red telescope, which is dedicated for the use even in winter at Dome Fuji. In designing the telescope, we took account of the difference of the thermal expansion rate among materials, which were used for the telescope. Movable parts like motors were lubricated with grease which would be effective at -80 degrees. Most parts of the telescope are made of aluminum to make the telescope as light as possible, so that it makes the transportation from seacoast to inland and assembling at Dome Fuji easier. We also report the experiment that we have done at Rikubetsu (the coldest city in Japan) in February 2008.

Murata, Chihiro; Ichikawa, Takashi; Lundock, Ramsey Guy; Taniguchi, Yuichiro; Okita, Hirohumi

2008-07-01

92

The 15 cm diameter ion thruster research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The startup reliability of a 15 cm diameter mercury bombardment ion thruster which employs a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode on the main and neutralizer cathodes is examined. Startup of the thruster is achieved 100% of the time on the main cathode and 98.7% of the time on the neutralizer cathode over a 3640 cycle test. The thruster was started from a 20 C initial condition and operated for an hour at a 600 mA beam current. An energy efficiency of 75% and a propellant utilization efficiency of 77% was achieved over the complete cycle. The effect of a single cusp magnetic field thruster length on its performance is discussed. Guidelines are formulated for the shaping of magnetic field lines in thrusters. A model describing double ion production in mercury discharges is presented. The production route is shown to occur through the single ionic ground state. Photographs of the interior of an operating-hollow cathode are presented. A cathode spot is shown to be present if the cathode is free of low work-function surfaces. The spot is observed if a low work-function oxide coating is applied to the cathode insert. Results show that low work-function oxide coatings tend to migrate during thruster operation.

Wilbur, P. J.

1974-01-01

93

Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

1978-01-01

94

A sub-cm micromachined electron microscope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new approach for fabricating macroscopic (approximately 10x10x10 mm(exp 3)) structures with micron accuracy has been developed. This approach combines the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies. A (100) silicon wafer is anisotropically etched to create four orthogonal v-grooves and an aperture on each 10x12 mm die. Precision 308 micron optical fibers are sandwiched between the die to align the v-grooves. The fiber is then anodically bonded to the die above and below it. This procedure is repeated to create thick structures and a stack of 5 or 6 die will be used to create a miniature scanning electron microscope (MSEM). Two die in the structure will have a segmented electrode to deflect the beam and correct for astigmatism. The entire structure is UHV compatible. The performance of an SEM improves as its length is reduced and a sub-cm 2 keV MSEM with a field emission source should have approximately 1 nm resolution. A low voltage high resolution MSEM would be useful for the examination of biological specimens and semiconductors with a minimum of damage. The first MSEM will be tested with existing 6 micron thermionic sources. In the future a micromachined field emission source will be used. The stacking technology presented in this paper can produce an array of MSEMs 1 to 30 mm in length with a 1 mm or larger period. A key question being addressed by this research is the optimum size for a low voltage MSEM which will be determined by the required spatial resolution, field of view, and working distance.

Feinerman, A. D.; Crewe, D. A.; Perng, D. C.; Shoaf, S. E.; Crewe, A. V.

1993-06-01

95

Naja mossambica mossambica venom. Purification, some properties and the amino acid sequences of three phospholipases A (CM-I, CM-II and CM-III).  

PubMed

Three phospholipases A, CM-I, CM-II and CM-III, were purified from Naja mossambica mossambica venom by gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 followed by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose. They comprise each 118 amino acid residues and are close-linked by seven intrachain disulphide bridges. The complete primary structure of the three phospholipases A have been elucidated. The sequences and the invariant amino acid residues of CM-I, CM-II and CM-III resemble those of phospholipases A from other snake venoms and also from porcine pancreas. However, the letality (LD50 values) of the three phospholipases A from Naja mossambica mossambica venom, differ among themselves, and are also much higher than the LD100 value encountered for notexin from Notechis scutatus scutatus venom. PMID:880314

Joubert, F J

1977-07-22

96

Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel, Plexiglass, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10- 8 to 10-7 strain amplitude.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A detailed evaluation on the method of internal friction measurement by the stress-strain hysteresis loop method from 0.01 to 1 Hz at 10-8-10-7 strain amplitude and 23.9oC is presented. Significant systematic errors in relative phase measurement can result from convex end surfaces of the sample and stress sensor and from end surface irregularities such as nicks and asperities. Preparation of concave end surfaces polished to optical smoothness having a radius of curvature >3.6X104 cm reduces the systematic error in relative phase measurements to <(5.5+ or -2.2)X10-4 radians. -from Authors

Hsi-Ping, Liu; Peselnick, L.

1983-01-01

97

Somatosensory evoked potential from S1 nerve root stimulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to detect cerebral potentials elicited by proximal stimulation of the first sacral (S1) nerve\\u000a root at the S1 dorsal foramen and to investigate latency and amplitude of the first cerebral potential. Tibial nerve SEP and\\u000a S1 nerve root SEP were obtained from 20 healthy subjects and 5 patients with unilateral sciatic nerve or tibial

Xiao-Dong Wu; Yu Zhu; Wen-Jun Chen; Xiang Jin; Nicholas Tsai; Huang-Yuan Huang; Jian-Yuan Jiang; Dong-Qing Zhu; Pei-Ying Li; Robert Weber; Wen Yuan; Hua-Jiang Chen

98

Lack of Ribosomal Protein S1 in Bacillus stearothermophilus  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 30S ribosomal subunit of Bacillus stearothermophilus migrated as a single band when electrophoresed on agarose-acrylamide composite gels. The addition of the ribosomal protein S1 purified from Escherichia coli resulted in the appearance of an additional band migrating more slowly; 14C-labeled S1 of E. coli was shown to be associated only with this form. Antibody against E. coli protein S1

Katsumi Isono; Setsuko Isono

1976-01-01

99

C.M. Brasier -Refereed Publications Brasier, C.M. (1986). Some genetical aspects of necrotophy with special reference to  

E-print Network

1 C.M. Brasier - Refereed Publications General Brasier, C.M. (1986). Some genetical aspects.J. Jellis, Eds.) pp. 297-310. Blackwells, Oxford. Brasier, C.M. (1987). The dynamics of fungal speciation. In `Evolutionary biology of the fungi' (A.D.M. Rayner, C.M. Brasier and D. Moore, Eds.) pp. 231-260. Cambridge

100

Macronized Vowels on a Mac (OS X 10.6 & 10.7) In order to type macrons using an Apple Macintosh you must make some  

E-print Network

1 Macronized Vowels on a Mac (OS X 10.6 & 10.7) In order to type macrons using an Apple Macintosh. Choose System Preferences from the Apple Menu. 2. From the System Preferences Window click on Language

Keegan, Te Taka

101

Imaging and Timing Performance of 1cm × 1cm Position-sensitive Solid-state Photomultiplier  

PubMed Central

We have designed and built a large-area 1cm × 1cm position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) for use in detector design for medical imaging applications. Our new large-area PS-SSPM concept implements resistive network between the micro-pixels, which are photodiodes operated in Geiger mode, called Geiger Photodiodes (GPDs), to provide continuous position sensitivity. Here we present imaging and timing performance of the large-area PS-SSPM for different temperatures and operating biases to find the optimum operating parameters for the device in imaging applications. A detector module was built by coupling a polished 8×8 LYSO array, with 1×1×20 mm3 elements, to a 1×1 cm2 PS-SSPM. Flood images recorded at room temperature show good crystal separation as all 64 elements were separated from each other. Cooling the device at 10 °C showed significant improvement. The device optimum bias voltage was ~4.5V over breakdown voltage. The coincidence timing resolution was improved significantly by increasing the operating bias, as well as by lowering the temperature to 0 °C. Results show excellent imaging performance and good timing response with a large-area PS-SSPM device. PMID:25540669

Schmall, J.; Stapels, C.; Christian, J.; Cherry, S.; Squillante, M. R.; Shah, K.

2014-01-01

102

A new global Earth's gravity field model from satellite orbit perturbations: GRIM5-S1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new model of the Earth's gravity field, called GRIM5-S1, was prepared in a joint German-French effort. The solution is based on satellite orbit perturbation analysis and exploits tracking data from 21 satellites to solve simultaneously for the gravitational and ocean tide potential and tracking station positions. The satellite-only solution results in a homogeneous representation of the geoid with an approximation error of about 45 cm in terms of 5×5 degree block mean values, and performs globally better in satellite orbit restitution than any previous gravity field model. The GRIM5 normals, which were generated taking into account the latest computational standards, shall be the reference for use during the coming geopotential satellite mission CHAMP and should provide new standards in computing orbits of next altimetric missions like Jason and ENVISAT. The GRIM5-S1 normals also give the basis for the tracking/surface data combined solution GRIM5-C1.

Biancale, Richard; Balmino, Georges; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Marty, Jean-Charles; Moynot, Bernard; Barlier, Francois; Exertier, Pierre; Laurain, Olivier; Gegout, Pascal; Schwintzer, Peter; Reigber, Christoph; Bode, Albert; König, Rolf; Massmann, Franz-Heinrich; Raimondo, Jean-Claude; Schmidt, Roland; Yuan Zhu, Sheng

2000-11-01

103

The contribution of AMSR-E 18.7 and 10.7 GHz measurements to improved boreal forest snow water equivalent retrievals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four seasons (2004–2007) of snow surveys across the boreal forest of northern Manitoba were utilized to determine relationships between vertically polarized Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures (TB) and ground measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE). Regression analysis identified moderate strength, yet statistically significant relationships between SWE and TB differences (36.5–18.7; 36.5–10.7; 18.7–10.7) for individual seasons. When multiple seasons

Chris Derksen

2008-01-01

104

S-1 in the treatment of pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

S-1 is an oral 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug, which is designed to improve the antitumor activity of 5-FU by inhibiting dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, the key enzyme of 5-FU catabolism. Recently, two important studies on the clinical use of S-1 for pancreatic cancer have been reported from Japan. In the first study (GEST study), S-1 demonstrated non-inferiority to gemcitabine (GEM) in overall survival (OS) for metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic cancer, but combination chemotherapy with GEM and S-1 did not show superiority to GEM in OS. In the second study (JASPAC-01 study), S-1 showed superiority to adjuvant chemotherapy with GEM in OS in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. In addition to GEM, S-1 is now regarded as the key drug in the management of pancreatic cancer in Japan. To date, many studies have investigated the effectiveness of S-1 in various settings, such as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic cancer, second-line chemotherapy after GEM failure, and chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced disease. In this review, we focus on recent clinical trials of S-1-based chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:25386059

Sudo, Kentaro; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Taketo

2014-01-01

105

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES -0021  

E-print Network

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS FOR STUDENTS WITH DOUBLE OR TRIPLE MAJORS PAGE 2 DATE: 10 / SBJUNIORSPHMREOTH FRNEW FRDEPT DESC #12;REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR

Tsien, Roger Y.

106

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES -0021  

E-print Network

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS COLLEGE #12;REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS FOR STUDENTS WITH DOUBLE OR TRIPLE MAJORS PAGE 3 DATE: 01

Tsien, Roger Y.

107

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES -0021  

E-print Network

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS FOR STUDENTS WITH DOUBLE OR TRIPLE/SPCSR / SBJUNIORSPHMREOTH FRNEW FRDEPT DESC #12;REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR

Tsien, Roger Y.

108

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES -0021  

E-print Network

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS FOR STUDENTS WITH DOUBLE OR TRIPLE MAJORS PAGE 2 DESC #12;REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL

Tsien, Roger Y.

109

Modeling radar scattering from icy lunar regoliths at 13 cm and 4 cm wavelengths  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two orbital synthetic aperture radars (SARs), the Chandrayaan-1 Mini-SAR (13 cm wavelength) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Mini-RF (13 and 4.2 cm wavelengths), have been imaging the lunar surface searching for ice deposits in the polar permanently shadowed areas. To understand the radar signatures of lunar polar ices, an empirical two-component model with parametric variations of the specular and diffuse components was developed and validated. This model estimates scattering differences associated with slopes, surface roughness, thin regolith over ice, and patches of ice. Lunar radar backscatter cross sections for the average surface for the Chandrayaan-1 and LRO instruments are estimated from the radar cross sections from the Moon at 3.8, 23, and 68 cm wavelengths measured in the 1960s at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This modeling predicts that enhanced diffuse scattering from near-surface ice can be separated from rocks if the scattering is characterized by both the high reflectivity and circular polarization ratios (CPRs) like those observed on Mercury, Mars, and the Galilean satellites. Scattering from near-surface ices covered by a thin regolith can be separated from rocks if the enhancement is twice the average or more. If, however, the lunar ice is dispersed throughout the regolith as ice-filling pores, then scattering differences might be too small to detect. Preliminary validation using LRO radar data for a few polar and midlatitude craters indicate that the observed CPRs are consistent with our models for different regolith ice and roughness conditions.

Thompson, Thomas W.; Ustinov, Eugene A.; Heggy, Essam

2011-01-01

110

A new atlas of infrared methane spectra between 1120 per cm and 1800 per cm  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An atlas of 1339 methane absorption lines in the range 1120 to 1800 reciprocal centimeters, including the nu(4) and nu(2) bands, is presented. Laboratory spectra were obtained by a Nicolet Fourier transform Michelson interferometer with a resolution of approximately 0.06 reciprocal cm and a path length of 6.35 m of 0.98, 4.86 and 19.97 torr. Observed spectra are also compared with spectral intensities calculated line-by-line on the basis of tabulated intensities of the observed spectral lines.

Blatherwick, R. D.; Goldman, A.; Lutz, B. L.; Silvaggio, P. M.; Boese, R. W.

1979-01-01

111

Investigation of spheromak configuration generated by inductive methods in the S-1 device  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the characteristics of the spheromak plasmas obtained during the past five-year operation period of S-1 experiments. The S-1 Spheromak device, which began operation in 1983, generates a compact toroid in which the self-generated toroidal field in the plasma is comparable to the poloidal field. The S-1 experiment is unique in that spheromak plasmas are formed by inductive transfer of magnetic flux from a toroidal-shaped ''flux core,'' and plasma stability is maintained by shaping of the externally applied equilibrium field and using loose-fitting passive conductors. The most important objective for the S-1 experiment is to investigate the confinement feature of the spheromak configuration. With a rather extensive diagnostic system for this size device, the transport characteristics of the S-1 spheromak have been measured for plasmas with 10 /approx lt/ T/sub e/ less than or equal to 130 eV and 2 /approx lt/ n/sub e/ /approx lt/ 15 /times/ 10/sup 13/ cm/sup /minus/3/. The scaling of electron temperature T/sub e/ and density n/sub e/ with plasma current density has been obtained in a wide operation regime. The most important finding is that the peak electron pressure scales as n/sub eo/T/sub eo/ /proportional to/ j/sub o//sup 2/ (j/sub o/ = peak toroidal current density) with T/sub eo/ /proportinal to/ j/sub o//sup 2/ and n/sub eo/ approx. = constant. These scaling results, which are similar to those obtained in the reversed-field pinch device, suggest that ..beta.. = constant. Energy and particle confinement times are determined. 44 refs., 35 figs.

Yamada, M.; Janos, A.C.; Ellis, R.A. Jr.; Hart, G.W.; Levinton, F.M.; Mayo, R.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mimura, M.; Motley, R.W.; Ono, Y.; Paul, S.; Ueda, Y.

1988-08-01

112

New lambda6cm observations of the Cygnus Loop  

E-print Network

Radio continuum and polarization observations of the entire Cygnus Loop at 6cm wavelength were made with the Urumqi 25m telescope. The 6cm map is analysed together with recently published maps from the Effelsberg 100m telescope at 21cm and 11cm. The integrated flux density of the Cygnus Loop at 6cm is 90+/-9Jy, which implies a spectral index of -0.40+/-0.06 being consistent with that of Uyaniker et al. (2004) in the wavelength range up to 11cm. This rules out any global spectral steepening up to 6cm. However, small spectral index variations in some regions of the source are possible, but there are no indications for any spectral curvature. The linear polarization data at 6cm show percentage polarizations up to 35% in some areas of the Cygnus Loop, exceeding those observed at 11cm. The Rotation Measure is around -21rad/m^2 in the southern area, which agrees with previous observations. However, the distribution of Rotation Measures is rather complex in the northern part of the Cygnus Loop, where the 21cm emission is totally depolarized. Rotation Measures based on 11cm and 6cm data are significantly larger than in the southern part. The difference in the polarization characteristic between the northern and southern part supports previous ideas that the Cygnus Loop consists of two supernova remnants.

X. H. Sun; W. Reich; J. L. Han; P. Reich; R. Wielebinski

2005-10-18

113

Plasma distribution of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) observed using the radio scintillation method  

E-print Network

We report the electron density in a plasma tail of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) derived from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations during November 1--28, 2013. Comet ISON showed a well-developed plasma tail (longer than 2.98 x 10^{7} km) before its perihelion passage on November 28. We identified a radio source whose line-of-sight approached the ISON's plasma tail in the above period and obtained its IPS data using the Solar Wind Imaging Facility at 327 MHz. We used the Heliospheric Imager onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relation Observatory to distinguish between the cometary tail and solar eruption origins of their enhanced scintillation. From our examinations, we confirmed three IPS enhancements of a radio source 1148-00 on November 13, 16, and 17, which could be attributed to the disturbance in the cometary tail. They showed no appreciable change of fluctuation power spectra during the occultation by the plasma tail of Comet ISON. We estimated the electron density in the ISON's plasma tail and found 84 ...

Iju, Tomoya; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

2014-01-01

114

Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope Detection of Two New H I 21 cm Absorbers at z ? 2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I report the detection of H I 21 cm absorption in two high column density damped Ly? absorbers (DLAs) at z ? 2 using new wide-band 250-500 MHz receivers on board the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. The integrated H I 21 cm optical depths are 0.85 ± 0.16 km s-1 (TXS1755+578) and 2.95 ± 0.15 km s-1 (TXS1850+402). For the z = 1.9698 DLA toward TXS1755+578, the difference in H I 21 cm and C I profiles and the weakness of the radio core suggest that the H I 21cm absorption arises toward radio components in the jet, and that the optical and radio sightlines are not the same. This precludes an estimate of the DLA spin temperature. For the z = 1.9888 DLA toward TXS1850+402, the absorber covering factor is likely to be close to unity, as the background source is extremely compact, with the entire 5 GHz emission arising from a region of <= 1.4 mas in size. This yields a DLA spin temperature of Ts = (372 ± 18) × (f/1.0) K, lower than typical Ts values in high-z DLAs. This low spin temperature and the relatively high metallicity of the z = 1.9888 DLA ([Zn/H] =(- 0.68 ± 0.04)) are consistent with the anti-correlation between metallicity and spin temperature that has been found earlier in damped Ly? systems.

Kanekar, N.

2014-12-01

115

Modal Mineralogy of CM1 and CM1/2 Chondrites by X-Ray Diffraction (PSD-XRD)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CM1 chondrites contain more (~90 vol%) phyllosilicate than the CM1/2s (~85 vol%), consistent with having experienced a greater degree of aqueous alteration. Based on total phyllosilicate abundance we suggest that LAP 031214 and MCY 05231 are CM2s.

King, A. J.; Schofield, P. F.; Russell, S. S.

2014-09-01

116

Energetic (0.1- to 16-keV/e) magnetospheric ion composition at different levels of solar F10.7  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of varying solar activity (as measured by the daily F10.7 index) on the composition of energetic magnetospheric ions H(+), He(2+), He(+), and O(+) were investigated using data obtained in the near-equatorial magnetosphere, between L = 3 and R = 23 earth radii, by the Plasma Composition Experiment on ISEE-1. The strongest effect was found in the number densities of the He(+) and the O(+) ions, which were found to increase by factors of about 3-5 and 5-10, respectively, over the full range of the F10.7. The peak density of the O(+) is about 20 times that of He(+) and is the highest at L of about 3-5. Both species showed a decreasing energy with increasing F10.7 at a radius less than 10 earth radii, from about 4-5 keV at low F10.7 to about 2-3 keV at high F10.7.

Lennartsson, W.

1989-01-01

117

A signature of transience in bedrock river incision rates over timescales of 10(4)-10(7) years.  

PubMed

Measured rates of river incision into bedrock are commonly interpreted as proxies for rates of rock uplift (see refs 1 and 2, for example) and indices of the strength of climatic forcing of erosion over time (see refs 3 and 4, for example). This approach implicitly assumes that river incision rates are in equilibrium with external forcings over a wide range of timescales. Here we directly test this assumption by examining the temporal scaling of bedrock river incision from 155 independent measurements of river incision compiled from 14 sites. Of these sites, 11 exhibit a negative power-law dependence of bedrock river incision rate on measurement interval, a relationship that is apparent over timescales of 10(4)-10(7) years and is independent of tectonic and geomorphic setting. Thus, like rates of sediment accumulation, rates of river incision into bedrock exhibit non-steady-state behaviour even over very long measurement intervals. Non-steady-state behaviour can be explained by episodic hiatuses in river incision triggered by alluvial deposition, if such hiatuses have a heavy-tailed length distribution. Regardless of its cause, the dependence of incision rate on measurement interval complicates efforts to infer tectonic or climatic forcing from changes in rates of river incision over time or from comparison of rates computed over different timescales. PMID:24429636

Finnegan, Noah J; Schumer, Rina; Finnegan, Seth

2014-01-16

118

Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 thin film solar cell with 10.7% conversion efficiency obtained by selenization of the na-doped spray-pyrolyzed sulfide precursor film.  

PubMed

Selenium-rich Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGSSe) thin films on an Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrate were fabricated by spray pyrolysis of an aqueous precursor solution containing Cu(NO3)2, In(NO3)3, Ga(NO3)3, and thiourea followed by selenization at 560 °C for 10 min. We studied the effects of intentional sodium addition on the structural and morphological properties of the fabricated CIGSSe films by dissolving NaNO3 in the aqueous precursor solution. The addition of sodium was found to affect the morphology of the final CIGSSe film: the film had denser morphology than that of the CIGSSe film obtained without addition of NaNO3. Photoelectrochemical measurements also revealed that the acceptor density of the nondoped CIGSSe film was relatively high (Na = 7.2 × 10(17) cm(-3)) and the addition of sodium led to a more favorable value for solar cell application (Na = 1.8 × 10(17) cm(-3)). As a result, a solar cell based on the sodium-modified CIGSSe film exhibited maximum conversion efficiency of 8.8%, which was significantly higher than that of the cell based on nondoped CIGSSe (4.4%). In addition, by applying MgF2 antireflection coating to the device, the maximum efficiency was further improved to 10.7%. PMID:25774908

Septina, Wilman; Kurihara, Masaaki; Ikeda, Shigeru; Nakajima, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Kawasaki, Yoshihito; Harada, Takashi; Matsumura, Michio

2015-04-01

119

S1Supplemental Data Mos Mediates the Mitotic Activation of  

E-print Network

frog sperm nuclei, cycloheximide-treated in- of p42 MAPK activation is quite small. terphase egg experiment in which described [S1, S2]. To drive interphase extracts into a permanent we drove cycloheximide

120

Visualization on massively parallel computers using CM/AVS  

SciTech Connect

CM/AVS is a visualization environment for the massively parallel CM-5 from Thinking Machines. It provides a backend to the standard commercially available AVS visualization product. At the Advanced Computing Laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have been experimenting and utilizing this software within our visualization environment. This paper describes our experiences with CM/AVS. The conclusions reached are applicable to any implimentation of visualization software within a massively parallel computing environment.

Krogh, M.F.; Hansen, C.D.

1993-09-01

121

Experimental determination of kQ factors for cylindrical ionization chambers in 10?cm × 10?cm and 3?cm × 3?cm photon beams from 4?MV to 25?MV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the ionometric determination of absorbed dose to water, Dw, in megavoltage photon beams from a linear accelerator, beam-quality-dependent correction factors, kQ, are used for the ionization chambers. By using a water calorimeter, these factors can be determined experimentally and with substantially lower standard uncertainties compared to calculated values of the kQ, which are published in various dosimetry protocols. In this investigation, kQ for different types of cylindrical ionization chambers (NE 2561, NE 2571, FC 65?G) were determined experimentally in 10?cm × 10?cm photon beams from 4?MV to 25?MV (corresponding beam quality index TPR20,10 from 0.64 to 0.80). The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factors for a single ionization chamber in 10?cm × 10?cm photon beams can be measured with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.31%. In addition to these measurements in 10?cm × 10?cm fields, kQ factors for the NE 2561 chamber were also determined in smaller 3?cm × 3?cm photon beams between 6?MV and 25?MV. In this case, relative standard uncertainties between 0.35 % and 0.38 % are achieved for the kQ factors. It is found for this ionization chamber, that the ratio of the kQ factors in 3?cm × 3?cm and in 10?cm × 10?cm beams increases with increasing TPR20,10 to reach a value of 1.0095 at TPR20,10 = 0.8 with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.4 %.

Krauss, A.; Kapsch, R. P.

2014-08-01

122

Experimental determination of kQ factors for cylindrical ionization chambers in 10?cm × 10?cm and 3?cm × 3?cm photon beams from 4?MV to 25?MV.  

PubMed

For the ionometric determination of absorbed dose to water, Dw, in megavoltage photon beams from a linear accelerator, beam-quality-dependent correction factors, kQ, are used for the ionization chambers. By using a water calorimeter, these factors can be determined experimentally and with substantially lower standard uncertainties compared to calculated values of the kQ, which are published in various dosimetry protocols. In this investigation, kQ for different types of cylindrical ionization chambers (NE 2561, NE 2571, FC 65?G) were determined experimentally in 10?cm × 10?cm photon beams from 4?MV to 25?MV (corresponding beam quality index TPR20,10 from 0.64 to 0.80). The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factors for a single ionization chamber in 10?cm × 10?cm photon beams can be measured with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.31%. In addition to these measurements in 10?cm × 10?cm fields, kQ factors for the NE 2561 chamber were also determined in smaller 3?cm × 3?cm photon beams between 6?MV and 25?MV. In this case, relative standard uncertainties between 0.35 % and 0.38 % are achieved for the kQ factors. It is found for this ionization chamber, that the ratio of the kQ factors in 3?cm × 3?cm and in 10?cm × 10?cm beams increases with increasing TPR20,10 to reach a value of 1.0095 at TPR20,10 = 0.8 with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.4 %. PMID:25017482

Krauss, A; Kapsch, R P

2014-08-01

123

Cis-trans isomerization in the S1 state of acetylene: Identification of cis-well vibrational levels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A systematic analysis of the S1-trans ({tilde A}1Au) state of acetylene, using IR-UV double resonance along with one-photon fluorescence excitation spectra, has allowed assignment of at least part of every single vibrational state or polyad up to a vibrational energy of 4200 cm-1. Four observed vibrational levels remain unassigned, for which no place can be found in the level structure of the trans-well. The most prominent of these lies at 46 175 cm-1. Its 13C isotope shift, exceptionally long radiative lifetime, unexpected rotational selection rules, and lack of significant Zeeman effect, combined with the fact that no other singlet electronic states are expected at this energy, indicate that it is a vibrational level of the S1-cis isomer ({tilde A}1A2). Guided by ab initio calculations [J. H. Baraban, A. R. Beck, A. H. Steeves, J. F. Stanton, and R. W. Field, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 244311 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3570823 of the cis-well vibrational frequencies, the vibrational assignments of these four levels can be established from their vibrational symmetries together with the 13C isotope shift of the 46 175 cm-1 level (assigned here as cis-3161). The S1-cis zero-point level is deduced to lie near 44 900 cm-1, and the ?6 vibrational frequency of the S1-cis well is found to be roughly 565 cm-1; these values are in remarkably good agreement with the results of recent ab initio calculations. The 46 175 cm-1 vibrational level is found to have a 3.9 cm-1 staggering of its K-rotational structure as a result of quantum mechanical tunneling through the isomerization barrier. Such tunneling does not give rise to ammonia-type inversion doubling, because the cis and trans isomers are not equivalent; instead the odd-K rotational levels of a given vibrational level are systematically shifted relative to the even-K rotational levels, leading to a staggering of the K-structure. These various observations represent the first definite assignment of an isomer of acetylene that was previously thought to be unobservable, as well as the first high resolution spectroscopic results describing cis-trans isomerization.

Merer, Anthony J.; Steeves, Adam H.; Baraban, Joshua H.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Field, Robert W.

2011-06-01

124

Reliability performance of 25 Gbit s-1 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multimode 850 nm vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) suitable for high bit rate operation are studied. VCSELs with oxide aperture diameters of 5-7 µm show a high -3 dB modulation bandwidth (˜20 GHz) and D-factor (˜ 8 GHz mA-1/2). To allow low capacitance a multiple layer oxide-confined aperture design was applied. Eye diagrams are clearly open up to 35 Gbit s-1 at the temperature of 25 °C. Using 35 µm diameter PIN photodiodes and 6 µm oxide aperture diameter VCSELs error-free 25 Gbit s-1 (defined as a bit error ration of ?1 × 10-12) optical fiber communication links were tested over 100 m of standard OM3 multimode optical fibers at 25 °C and 85 °C. The received optical power for error-free operation was below -4 dBm at both temperatures. A VCSEL reliability study at 95 °C was performed at the high current densities (˜18 kA cm-2) needed for error-free 25 Gbit s-1 operation at elevated temperatures. After 6000 h a slight increase (less than 5%) of the output optical power at a constant current was observed and most likely due to an ohmic contact burn in effect within the first 2000 h of the study. The results clearly indicate that 25 Gbit s-1 850 nm oxide-confined VCSELs with a complex AlGaO multilayer aperture design and with step-graded Al-compositions have the potential for reliable operation.

Karachinsky, L. Ya; Blokhin, S. A.; Novikov, I. I.; Maleev, N. A.; Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Bobrov, M. A.; Lott, J. A.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Shchukin, V. A.; Kropp, J.-R.; Bimberg, D.

2013-06-01

125

Reduced dimension rovibrational variational calculations of the S1 state of C2H2. II. The S1 rovibrational manifold and the effects of isomerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reduced dimension variational calculations have been performed for the rovibrational level structure of the S1 state of acetylene. The state exhibits an unusually complicated level structure, for various reasons. First, the potential energy surface has two accessible conformers, trans and cis. The cis conformer lies about 2700 cm-1 above the trans, and the barrier to cis-trans isomerization lies about 5000 cm-1 above the trans minimum. The trans vibrations ?4 (torsion) and ?6 (asym. bend) interact very strongly by Darling-Dennison and Coriolis resonances, such that their combination levels and overtones form polyads with unexpected structures. Both conformers exhibit very large x36 cross-anharmonicity since the pathway to isomerization is a combination of ?6 and ?3 (sym. bend). Near the isomerization barrier, the vibrational levels show an even-odd K-staggering of their rotational levels as a result of quantum mechanical tunneling through the barrier. The present calculations address all of these complications, and reproduce the observed K-structures of the bending and C-C stretching levels with good qualitative accuracy. It is expected that they will assist with the assignment of the irregular patterns near the isomerization barrier.

Changala, P. Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Stanton, John F.; Merer, Anthony J.; Field, Robert W.

2014-01-01

126

Effects of electron irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV electrons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 11th power e/sq cm/sec and fluences of 10 to the 13th power, 10 to the 14th power and 10 to the 15th power e/sq.cm. 1-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, - 63 C and + or - 143 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was used as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. The 10 OHM-cm cells appear more efficient than 1 OHM-cm cells after exposure to a fluence greater than 10 to the 14th power e/sq cm. The 1.0 MeV electron damage coefficients for both 1 OHM-cm and 10 OHM-cm cells are somewhat less than those for previously irradiated cells at room temperature. The values of the damage coefficients increase as the cell temperatures decrease. Efficiencies pertaining to maximum power output are about the same as those of n on p silicon cells evaluated previously.

Nicoletta, C. A.

1973-01-01

127

The Character of the Long-Lived State Formed from S_1 of Phenylacetylene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compared to other small aromatic molecules, phenylacetylene (PA) and benzonitrile exhibit strikingly anomalous photophysics on excitation to the S_1 state. Firstly, products are formed on S_1 excitation of a beam-cooled sample that seem to live indefinitely (as defined by the flight time through the apparatus), while action spectra of their formation mirror the rotationally-resolved absorption spectrum of the monomer. Secondly, the long lived products appear immediately during the nsec. laser pulse rather than build up during the lifetime of the singlet level, as is seen in benzene, for example. The question has therefore arisen: is the long lived product of the S_1 excitation the triplet state, as is assumed in all previous work on other molecules, or is it an isomer of some sort? New pump-probe ionization mass spectroscopy experiments have been performed to study the distribution of fragments and metastable ions produced by PA cation derived from the neutral S_1 state, and from the long-lived species. These combined with other experimental results showing weak long-lived components in both the S_1 fluorescence and pump-probe photoelectron spectra that we interpret as recurrence behavior, definitively show the long-lived state is a triplet state of PA, not an isomer. PA with a singlet-triplet gap of 10000 cm^{-1} is acting like intermediate case molecules with much smaller singlet-triplet gaps such as pyrazine and pyrimidine. Calculations point to the existence of four triplet states of PA at or below the energy of S_1 providing a very large density of vibronic states in which to distribute the energy from singlet-triplet crossing. PA T_1 is calculated to be non-planar, in contrast to what is found in benzene, possibly helping to explain the different photophysics. Acknowledgments: We gratefully acknowledge G. V. Lopez for his contributions to some of the experimental masurements. Work at Brookhaven National Laboratory was carried out under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy and supported by its Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. J. Hofstein, H. Xu, T. J. Sears and P. M. Johnson, J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 1195-1201 (1999)

Johnson, Philip M.; Sears, Trevor J.

2013-06-01

128

S1P signaling: new therapies and opportunities  

PubMed Central

Development of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) modulators to dampen inflammation and its sequelae is becoming increasingly promising for treating medical conditions characterized by significant immunopathology. As shown by the non-selective S1P receptor modulator FTY720 (fingolimod [Gilenya®]) in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the ability to use S1P1 modulation to precisely block immune cell traffic—immunomodulation—while maintaining immunosurveillance, has opened therapeutic opportunities in various other immune-derived chronic pathologies, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), lupus, psoriasis, as well as, potentially, in early acute viral respiratory infection. Proof-of-concept studies across validated animal models with S1P receptor modulators highly selective for S1P1, such as BAF-312 (Siponimod), KRP-203, ONO-4641 (Ceralifimod), ponesimod and RPC-1063, and emerging clinical trials for safety and efficacy in humans, particularly in MS, ulcerative colitis (UC) and psoriasis, have set the stage for us to consider additional testing in various other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25580263

Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Brown, Steve; Studer, Sean M.

2014-01-01

129

Modeling the HI 21-cm line profile from circumstellar shells around red giants  

E-print Network

We present HI line profiles for various models of circumstellar shells around red giants. In the calculations we take into account the effect of the background at 21 cm, and show that in some circumstances it may have an important effect on the shape and intensity of the observed line profiles. We show that self-absorption should also be considered depending on the mass loss rate and the temperature reached by circumstellar gas. HI emission from circumstellar shells has been mostly reported from stars with mass loss rates around 10$^{-7}$ solar masses per year. We discuss the possible reasons for the non detection of many sources with larger mass loss rates that are hallmarks of the end of the AGB phase. Although radiative transfer effects may weaken the line emission, they cannot alone account for this effect. Therefore, it seems likely that molecular hydrogen, rather than atomic hydrogen, dominates the composition of matter expelled by stars at the end of their evolution on the Asymptotic Giant Branch. Howe...

Hoai, Do Thi; Gérard, Eric; Matthews, Lynn D; Villaver, Eva; Bertre, Thibaut Le

2015-01-01

130

An investigation of angular and multiple scattering at 3.2-cm and 10.3-cm wave lengths  

E-print Network

AN INVESTIGATION OF ANGULAR AND MULTIPLE SCATTERING AT 3. 2-cm AND 10. 3-cm WAVE LENGTHS A Thesis By RANDALL CARROLL WEBB Capt. ain USAF Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1966 Ma]or Sub]ect: METEOROLOGY AN INVESTIGATION OF ANGULAR AND MULTIPLE SCATTERING AT 3. 2-cm AND 10. 3-cm WAVE LENGTHS A Thesis By RANDALL CARROLL WEBB Captain USAF Approved as to style and content by: ~f2...

Webb, Randall Carroll

1966-01-01

131

Photofraction of a 5 cm x 2 cm BGO scintillator. [bismuth germanate crystal for use in cosmic gamma ray detector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The photofraction of a 5.1 cm x 2.0 cm bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator was measured over a gamma-ray energy range of 0.2 to 6.1 MeV. Several methods, used to minimize the effect of room scattering on the measurement, are discussed. These include a gamma-gamma coincidence technique, a beta-gamma coincidence technique, and the use of sources calibrated with a standard 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm sodium iodide scintillator.

Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.

1985-01-01

132

Effects of proton irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV protons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 9th power P/sq cm-sec and fluences of 10 to the 10th power, 10 to the 11th power, 10 to the 12th power and 3 X 10 to the 12th power P/sq cm. I-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, 65 C and 165 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was taken as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. Degradation occurred for both uncovered 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm cells. Efficiencies are generally higher than those of comparable U.S. cells tested earlier. Damage (loss in maximum power efficiency) with proton fluence is somewhat higher for 10 ohm-cm cells, measured at the three temperatures, for fluences above 2 X 10 to the 11th power P/sq cm. Cell efficiency, as expected, changes drastically with temperature.

Nicoletta, C. A.

1973-01-01

133

Design and Performance of 40 cm Ion Optics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 40 cm ion thruster is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain input power and propellant throughput capabilities of 10 kW and 550 kg. respectively. The technical approach here is a continuation of the "derating" technique used for the NSTAR ion thruster. The 40 cm ion thruster presently utilizes the NSTAR ion optics aperture geometry to take advantage of the large database of lifetime and performance data already available. Dome-shaped grids were chosen for the design of the 40 cm ion optics because this design is naturally suited for large-area ion optics. Ion extraction capabilities and electron backstreaming limits for the 40 cm ion optics were estimated by utilizing NSTAR 30 cm ion optics data. A preliminary service life assessment showed that the propellant throughput goal of 550 kg of xenon may be possible with molybdenum 40 cm ion optics. One 40 cm ion optics' set has been successfully fabricated to date. Additional ion optics' sets are presently being fabricated. Preliminary performance tests were conducted on a laboratory model 40 cm ion thruster.

Soulas, George C.

2001-01-01

134

Schizophrenia Forum -Print News http://www.schizophreniaforum.org/new/detailprint.asp?id=1590 1 of 6 4/8/10 7:38 AM  

E-print Network

of 6 4/8/10 7:38 AM Print this page Working Memory, Cortical Circuitry Disrupted in 22q11DS Mouse Model in Nature on March 31. Mice engineered to mimic the human chromosome 22q11.2 deletion showed impaired with the 22q11.2 deletion also have schizophrenia, the deletion provides a toehold for researchers trying

135

S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

AIM: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). METHODS: We extracted reported endpoints, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time-to-treatment failure (TTF), objective response rate (ORR) and adverse effects, from randomized controlled trials identified in PubMed, the Cochrane library, Science Direct, EMBASE and American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings. Stata software was used to calculate the pooled values. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials involving 2176 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Compared to non-S-1-based regimens, the use of S-1-based regimens were associated with an increase in ORR (RR = 1.300; 95%CI: 1.028-1.645); OS (HR = 0.89; 95%CI: 0.81-0.99; P = 0.025), TTF (HR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.75-0.92; P = 0.000), and a lower risk of febrile neutropenia (RR = 0.225; P = 0.000) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032). OS, PFS and TTF were prolonged, especially in the Asian population. In subgroup analysis, statistically significant increases in ORR (RR = 1.454; P = 0.029), OS (HR = 0.895; P = 0.041) and TTF (HR = 0.832; P = 0.000) were found when S-1-based chemotherapy was compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. The incidence of leukopenia (RR = 0.584; P = 0.002) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032) was higher in the 5-FU-based arm. S-1-based regimens had no advantage in ORR, OS, PFS, TTF and grade 3 or 4 adverse events over capecitabine-based regimens. CONCLUSION: S-1-based chemotherapy may be a good choice for AGC because of longer survival times, better tolerance and more convenient use. PMID:25206296

Yang, Jian; Zhou, Yan; Min, Ke; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Ni

2014-01-01

136

Potential scattering on R$^{3}$ x S$^{1}$  

E-print Network

In this paper we consider non-relativistic quantum mechanics on a space with an additional internal compact dimension, i.e. R^3\\otimes S^1 instead of R^3. More specifically we study potential scattering for this case and the analyticity properties of the forward scattering amplitude, T_{nn}(K), where K^2 is the total energy and the integer n denotes the internal excitation of the incoming particle. The surprising result is that the analyticity properties which are true in R^3 do not hold in R^3\\otimes S^1. For example, T_{nn}(K), is \\underline{not} analytic in K for ImK>0, for n such that (|n|/R)>\\mu, where R is the radius of S^1, and \\mu^{-1} is the exponential range of the potential, V(r,\\phi)=O(e^{-\\mu r}) for large r. We show by explicit counterexample that T_{nn}(K) for n\

Khuri, N N

1994-01-01

137

The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

2011-01-01

138

Survival Probability of an Excited Al Atom in the 4s2S1/2 State Sputtered from an Al Surface under Ar+ Bombardment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The degree of electron-tunneling interaction between an excited Al atom in the 4s2S1/2 state and an Al surface was investigated by optical spectroscopy. Excited Al atoms near an Al surface suffer, to some extent, from being ionized due to resonance ionization. In conjunction to the phenomena, mean velocities of excited Al atoms in the 4s2S1/2 state sputtered from an Al surface by Ar+ bombardment were measured by observing line-intensity decay of the resonance line (396.152 nm, 4s2S1/2\\to 3p2P\\circ3/2) as a function of distance from the target surface in projectile energy ranging 30 to 75 keV. The result was analyzed by Thompson-Sigmund energy distribution multiplied by the survival-probability function. We obtained 4.0 × 104 m/s for the survival coefficient of the 4s2S1/2 state of Al atom at 1.2 × 10-7 Torr of oxygen pressure.

Nimura, Tomoaki; Tsurubuchi, Seiji

2002-02-01

139

L5 – S1 Segmental Kinematics After Facet Arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

Background Facet arthroplasty is a motion restoring procedure. It is normally suggested as an alternative to rigid fixation after destabilizing decompression procedures in the posterior lumbar spine. While previous studies have reported successful results in reproducing normal spine kinematics after facet replacement at L4-5 and L3-4, there are no data on the viability of facet replacement at the lumbosacral joint. The anatomy of posterior elements and the resulting kinematics at L5-S1 are distinctly different from those at superior levels, making the task of facet replacement at the lumbosacral level challenging. This study evaluated the kinematics of facet replacement at L5-S1. Methods Six human cadaveric lumbar spines (L1-S1, 46.7 ± 13.0 years) were tested in the following sequence: (1) intact (L1-S1), (2) complete laminectomy and bilateral facetectomy at L5-S1, and (3) implantation of TFAS-LS (Lumbosacral Total Facet Arthroplasty System, Archus Orthopedics, Redmond, Washington) at L5-S1 using pedicle screws. Specimens were tested in flexion (8Nm), extension (6Nm), lateral bending (LB, ± 6Nm), and axial rotation (AR, ± 5Nm). The level of significance was ? = .017 after Bonferroni correction for three comparisons: (1) intact vs. destabilized, (2) destabilized vs. reconstructed, and (3) intact vs. reconstructed. Results Laminectomy-facetectomy at L5-S1 increased the L5-S1 angular range of motion (ROM) in all directions. Flexion-extension (F-E) ROM increased from 15.3 ± 2.9 to 18.7 ± 3.5 degrees (P < .017), LB from 8.2 ± 1.8 to 9.3 ± 1.6 degrees (P < .017), and AR from 3.7 ± 2.0 to 5.9 ± 1.8 degrees (P < .017). The facet arthroplasty system decreased ROM compared to the laminectomy-facetectomy condition in all tested directions (P < .017). The facet arthroplasty system restored the L5-S1 ROM to its intact levels in LB and AR (P > .017). F-E ROM after the facet arthroplasty system implantation was smaller than the intact value (10.1 ± 2.2 vs. 15.3 ± 2.9 degrees, P < .017). The load-displacement curves after the facet arthroplasty system implantation at L5-S1 were sigmoidal, and quality of motion measures were similar to intact, demonstrating graded resistance to angular motion in F-E, LB and AR. Conclusions The facet arthroplasty system was able to restore stability to the lumbosacral segment after complete laminectomy and bilateral facetectomy, while also allowing near-normal kinematics in all planes. While F-E ROM after the facet arthroplasty system implantation was smaller than the intact value, it was within the physiologic norms for L5-S1. These results are consistent with previous studies of facet arthroplasty at L3-L4 and L4-L5 and demonstrate that TFAS technology can be adapted to the lumbosacral joint with functionality comparable to its application in superior lumbar levels.

Voronov, Leonard I.; Havey, Robert M.; Rosler, David M.; Sjovold, Simon G.; Rogers, Susan L.; Carandang, Gerard; Ochoa, Jorge A.; Yuan, Hansen; Webb, Scott

2009-01-01

140

Making Rectangles 1. Draw a rectangle that is 18cm by 10 cm on a centimeter grid paper.  

E-print Network

of rectangles and squares in Grade 3. In this activity, using both of these ideas, they will extendMaking Rectangles 1. Draw a rectangle that is 18cm by 10 cm on a centimeter grid paper. 2. Cover the rectangle with base-10 blocks, using as few blocks as possible. 3. Share and discuss your strategies

Watanabe, Tad

141

Radio polarization observations of large supernova remnants at ?6 cm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have observed 79 supernova remnants (SNRs) with the Urumqi 25 m telescope at ?6 cm during the Sino-German ?6 cm polarization survey of the Galactic plane. We measured flux densities of SNRs at ?6 cm, some of which are the first ever measured or the measurements at the highest frequency, so that we can determine or improve spectra of SNRs. Our observations have ruled out spectral breaks or spectral flattening that were suggested for a few SNRs, and confirmed the spectral break of S147. By combining our ?6 cm maps with ?11 cm and ?21 cm maps from the Effelsberg 100 m telescope, we calculated the spectral index maps of several large SNRs. For many remnants we obtained for the first time polarization images, which show the intrinsic magnetic field structures at ?6 cm. We disapproved three objects as being SNRs, OA184, G192.8-1.1 and G16.8-1.1, which show a thermal spectrum and no polarization. We have discovered two large supernova remnants, G178.2-4.2 and G25.1-2.3., in the survey maps.

Han, J. L.; Gao, X. Y.; Sun, X. H.; Reich, W.; Xiao, L.; Reich, P.; Xu, J. W.; Shi, W. B.; Fürst, E.; Wielebinski, R.

2014-01-01

142

Evaluation of CM5 Charges for Condensed-Phase Modeling  

PubMed Central

The recently developed Charge Model 5 (CM5) is tested for its utility in condensed-phase simulations. The CM5 approach, which derives partial atomic charges from Hirshfeld population analyses, provides excellent results for gas-phase dipole moments and is applicable to all elements of the periodic table. Herein, the adequacy of scaled CM5 charges for use in modeling aqueous solutions has been evaluated by computing free energies of hydration (?Ghyd) for 42 neutral organic molecules via Monte Carlo statistical mechanics. An optimal scaling factor for the CM5 charges was determined to be 1.27, resulting in a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 1.1 kcal/mol for the free energies of hydration. Testing for an additional 20 molecules gave an MUE of 1.3 kcal/mol. The high precision of the results is confirmed by free energy calculations using both sequential perturbations and complete molecular annihilation. Performance for specific functional groups is discussed; sulfur-containing molecules yield the largest errors. In addition, the scaling factor of 1.27 is shown to be appropriate for CM5 charges derived from a variety of density functional methods and basis sets. Though the average errors from the 1.27*CM5 results are only slightly lower than those using 1.14*CM1A charges, the broader applicability and easier access to CM5 charges via the Gaussian program are additional attractive features. The 1.27*CM5 charge model can be used for an enormous variety of applications in conjunction with many fixed-charge force fields and molecular modeling programs. PMID:25061445

2015-01-01

143

Evaluation of CM5 Charges for Condensed-Phase Modeling.  

PubMed

The recently developed Charge Model 5 (CM5) is tested for its utility in condensed-phase simulations. The CM5 approach, which derives partial atomic charges from Hirshfeld population analyses, provides excellent results for gas-phase dipole moments and is applicable to all elements of the periodic table. Herein, the adequacy of scaled CM5 charges for use in modeling aqueous solutions has been evaluated by computing free energies of hydration (?G hyd) for 42 neutral organic molecules via Monte Carlo statistical mechanics. An optimal scaling factor for the CM5 charges was determined to be 1.27, resulting in a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 1.1 kcal/mol for the free energies of hydration. Testing for an additional 20 molecules gave an MUE of 1.3 kcal/mol. The high precision of the results is confirmed by free energy calculations using both sequential perturbations and complete molecular annihilation. Performance for specific functional groups is discussed; sulfur-containing molecules yield the largest errors. In addition, the scaling factor of 1.27 is shown to be appropriate for CM5 charges derived from a variety of density functional methods and basis sets. Though the average errors from the 1.27*CM5 results are only slightly lower than those using 1.14*CM1A charges, the broader applicability and easier access to CM5 charges via the Gaussian program are additional attractive features. The 1.27*CM5 charge model can be used for an enormous variety of applications in conjunction with many fixed-charge force fields and molecular modeling programs. PMID:25061445

Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

2014-07-01

144

Sequence diversity in S1 genes and S1 translation products of 11 serotype 3 reovirus strains.  

PubMed Central

The S1 gene nucleotide sequences of 10 type 3 (T3) reovirus strains were determined and compared with the T3 prototype Dearing strain in order to study sequence diversity in strains of a single reovirus serotype and to learn more about structure-function relationships of the two S1 translation products, sigma 1 and sigma 1s. Analysis of phylogenetic trees constructed from variation in the sigma 1-encoding S1 nucleotide sequences indicated that there is no pattern of S1 gene relatedness in these strains based on host species, geographic site, or date of isolation. This suggests that reovirus strains are transmitted rapidly between host species and that T3 strains with markedly different S1 sequences circulate simultaneously. Comparison of the deduced sigma 1 amino acid sequences of the 11 T3 strains was notable for the identification of conserved and variable regions of sequence that correlate with the proposed domain organization of sigma 1 (M.L. Nibert, T.S. Dermody, and B. N. Fields, J. Virol. 64:2976-2989, 1990). Repeat patterns of apolar residues thought to be important for sigma 1 structure were conserved in all strains examined. The deduced sigma 1s amino acid sequences of the strains were more heterogeneous than the sigma 1 sequences; however, a cluster of basic residues near the amino terminus of sigma 1s was conserved. This analysis has allowed us to investigate molecular epidemiology of T3 reovirus strains and to identify conserved and variable sequence motifs in the S1 translation products, sigma 1 or sigma 1s. Images PMID:2398530

Dermody, T S; Nibert, M L; Bassel-Duby, R; Fields, B N

1990-01-01

145

Alteration and formation of rims on the CM parent body  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

All types of coarse-grained components in CM chondrites are surrounded by fine-grained dust coatings, but the origin of these rims is not yet clear. Although a strictly nebular origin seems likely for rims in the relatively unaltered type 3 chondrites, the rims in CM chondrites are dominated by secondary alteration phases. It has been argued that either the coarse-grained cores accreted altered rim materials while still in the nebula or that alteration of primary rim phases occurred on the CM parent body. To constrain the origin of alteration phases in rim material, we have analyzed the textures and mineral associations from 10 CM chondritic falls by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Our results indicate that the secondary phases in CM chondritic rims were produced by parent body fluid-rock interactions which redefined some primary rim textures and may have produced, in some cases, both coarse-grained components and the rims that surround them. Textural features demonstrate the interactive exchange of alteration fluids between rims, matrix, and chondrules on the CM parent body. For example, most matrix-rim contacts are gradational, suggesting the synchronous alteration of both components. Several observations suggest the possibility of in situ rim production. For example, tochilinite and phyllosilicates commonly form rims around matrix carbonates, which are generally believed to have precipitated from alteration fluids on the CM parent body. This suggests that the rims surrounding matrix carbonates may also have been produced by alteration processes. Partially replaced chondrule olivines bear a striking resemblance to many rimmed olivines in the matrix which suggests, by analogy, that site-specific precipitation of S-bearing phases may also be responsible for the occurrence of many tochilinite-rich rims around isolated matrix olivines. Non-silicate rims precipitate around olivines of any composition, but the process is most effective for fayalitic olivines. Most of the remaining olivines in CM chondrites are relatively Mg-rich, which suggests that the precipitation of S-bearing rims on olivines may not have been an important process in the aqueous alteration of CM chondrites. We conclude that: (1) precursor rim materials in CM chondrites were subjected to pervasive aqueous alteration on the CM parent body; and (2) textures and mineral associations observed in CM chondrites also suggest the possibility of in situ rim production.

Browning, Lauren B.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael

1994-01-01

146

Eight-cm mercury ion thruster system technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology status of 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5 cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8 cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

1974-01-01

147

Ion accelerator systems for high power 30 cm thruster operation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two and three-grid accelerator systems for high power ion thruster operation were investigated. Two-grid translation tests show that over compensation of the 30 cm thruster SHAG grid set spacing the 30 cm thruster radial plasma density variation and by incorporating grid compensation only sufficient to maintain grid hole axial alignment, it is shown that beam current gains as large as 50% can be realized. Three-grid translation tests performed with a simulated 30 cm thruster discharge chamber show that substantial beamlet steering can be reliably affected by decelerator grid translation only, at net-to-total voltage ratios as low as 0.05.

Aston, G.

1982-01-01

148

The Physics Of The Z 20 21cm Signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Detecting the 21cm line from the pre-reionization era, z 15-25, would reveal information about the formation of the first stellar populations and the thermal history of the Universe. Projects like LEDA and DARE are pursuing this exciting yet difficult venture. I will discuss new analytical and numerical work on the 21cm signal from z 20 that has vast implications for its detectability. I will show that shocks do not heat up the IGM and suppress the 21cm signal as had been speculated. I will also discuss the possibility of the signal being larger than anticipated.

McQuinn, Matthew

2012-05-01

149

The impending demise of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present evidence to conclude that it is very probable that comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) will disintegrate before reaching perihelion. Figs. 1 and 7 of this work are particularly revealing. The comet is following the path of disintegrating comets and not the path of normal Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that C/2012 S1 (ISON) is going to disintegrate. Note: the comet disintegrated on November 13th, according to this prediction while this paper was being refereed (CBET 3731). We present evidence to conclude that it is very probable that comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) will disintegrate before reaching perihelion. Some Oort Cloud comets exhibit a signature (a slope discontinuity event (SDE)+a magnitude dip after the event) that has predictive power. Figs. 1 and 7 of this work are particularly revealing. The comet is following the path of disintegrating comets and not the path of normal Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that C/2012 S1(ISON) is going to disintegrate. Note: the comet disintegrated on November 13th while this paper was being refereed (CBET 3731).

Ferrín, Ignacio

2014-06-01

150

Orientation effects on the fracture of pond (S1) ice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of structural anisotropy on the fracture toughness of S1 type freshwater ice was investigated by fabricating and testing three different fracture geometries from a single ice core. The ice was tested at ?16°C using the Chevron Edge Notch Round Bar in Bending (CENRBB), a Chevron Notched Tension (CNT) specimen and the Semi-Circular Bend (SCB) specimen. By this procedure,

John P. Dempsey

1995-01-01

151

Acute traumatic L5–S1 spondylolisthesis: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study Design: Case report of a patient treated surgically 2 months after sustaining a misdiagnosed acute traumatic lumbosacral dislocation is presented. Objectives: The aims is to report in full about an uncommon case of anterior traumatic L5–S1 spondylolisthesis treated successfully with combined posterior stabilization and anterior fusion. Summary of background data: Review of literature shows that traumatic lumbosacral dislocations and its

M. Reinhold; C. Knop; M. Blauth

2006-01-01

152

EH&S 1/2011 EMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION  

E-print Network

) required, and the safety training necessary for the job. Date reviewed with employee: Blank WHA formsEH&S 1/2011 EMPLOYEE SAFETY ORIENTATION (for Non-Office Settings) Attention Supervisors and Principal Investigators: Please complete, review with employee and return to EH&S nit 4097, FAX 6

Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

153

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES -0021  

E-print Network

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS FOR STUDENTS WITH DOUBLE OR TRIPLE MAJORS PAGE 2 DATE: 10 BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS FOR STUDENTS WITH DOUBLE OR TRIPLE MAJORS PAGE 3 DATE: 10

Talley, Lynne D.

154

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES -0021  

E-print Network

REPORT: RHRDUN05_S1 UCSD AES - 0021 REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS REGISTERED STUDENTS BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS FOR STUDENTS WITH DOUBLE OR TRIPLE MAJORS PAGE 2 BY COLLEGE AND MAJOR INCLUDES ALL MAJORS FOR STUDENTS WITH DOUBLE OR TRIPLE MAJORS PAGE 3 DATE: 10

Russell, Lynn

155

Video-assisted thoracic surgery left S1+2+3 segmentectomy for lung cancer  

PubMed Central

A 49-year-old female presented with a solitary pulmonary nodule on the chest screening computed tomography (CT) scan. The nodule was 1.3 cm in diameter and located in the apical segment of left upper lobe. The lesion was considered to be cT1aN0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a 3-port video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) wedge resection was performed. Intraoperative frozen sections revealed a lung adenocarcinoma. Therefore, sequential S1+2+3 segmentectomy of the left upper lobe was performed, also systematic lymph node dissection was carried out. The final pathological stage was pT1aN0M0 (Ia). PMID:25589985

Lu, Weishan; Zhou, Xinming

2014-01-01

156

Global 21 cm signal experiments: A designer’s guide  

E-print Network

The global (i.e., spatially averaged) spectrum of the redshifted 21 cm line has generated much experimental interest lately, thanks to its potential to be a direct probe of the epoch of reionization and the dark ages, ...

Liu, Adrian Chi-Yan

157

20. Credit CM. Water flowing through head gates (at left), ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

20. Credit CM. Water flowing through head gates (at left), into open forebay of power house. Note wooden stair enclosure in Turbine pit 1. Photo c. 1936. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

158

21 cm Radio Astrophysics MIT Department of Physics  

E-print Network

PROBLEMS 1. Explain the origin of the 21 cm line of atomic hy- drogen. 2. Describe the size and shape of the sun at 1420 MHz? Plot the power spectrum of galactic hy- drogen at 40 galactic longitude and identify

Seager, Sara

159

Benchmarking and performance analysis of the CM-2. [SIMD computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A suite of benchmarking routines testing communication, basic arithmetic operations, and selected kernel algorithms written in LISP and PARIS was developed for the CM-2. Experiment runs are automated via a software framework that sequences individual tests, allowing for unattended overnight operation. Multiple measurements are made and treated statistically to generate well-characterized results from the noisy values given by cm:time. The results obtained provide a comparison with similar, but less extensive, testing done on a CM-1. Tests were chosen to aid the algorithmist in constructing fast, efficient, and correct code on the CM-2, as well as gain insight into what performance criteria are needed when evaluating parallel processing machines.

Myers, David W.; Adams, George B., II

1988-01-01

160

Linestrengths of nitric acid from 850 to 920cm-1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several thousand line positions and strengths of HNO3 in the 850-920cm-1 region were retrieved from spectra at low sample pressures at 299K and high spectral resolution (0.0027cm-1) using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory located at Kitt Peak, AZ. Of these, 733 linestrengths of the nu5 band and 402 lines of the 2nu9 band were

Robert A. Toth; Linda R. Brown; Edward A. Cohen

2003-01-01

161

Linestrengths of nitric acid from 850 to 920 cm ?1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several thousand line positions and strengths of HNO3 in the 850–920cm?1 region were retrieved from spectra at low sample pressures at 299K and high spectral resolution (0.0027cm?1) using the McMath–Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) at the National Solar Observatory located at Kitt Peak, AZ. Of these, 733 linestrengths of the ?5 band and 402 lines of the 2?9 band were

Robert A Toth; Linda R Brown; Edward A Cohen

2003-01-01

162

The Network Architecture of the Connection Machine CM5  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Connection Machine Model CM-5 Supercomputer is a massively parallel computer system designed to offer performance inthe range of 1 teraflops (1012floating-point operations per second). The CM-5 obtains its high performance while offering easeof programming, flexibility, and reliability. The machine contains three communication networks: a data network, a controlnetwork, and a diagnostic network. This paper describes the organization of these

Charles Leiserson; Zahi S. Abuhamdeh; David C. Douglas; Carl R. Feynman; Mahesh N. Ganmukhi; Jeffrey V. Hill; W. Daniel Hillis; Bradley C. Kuszmaul; Margaret A. St. Pierre; David S. Wells; Monica C. Wong; Shaw-wen Yang; Robert Zak

1994-01-01

163

Calorimetric determination of kQ factors for NE 2561 and NE 2571 ionization chambers in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV photons  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relative uncertainty of the ionometric determination of the absorbed dose to water, Dw, in the reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams is in the order of 1.5% and is dominated by the uncertainty of the calculated chamber- and energy-dependent correction factors kQ. In the present investigation, kQ values were determined experimentally in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10

Achim Krauss; Ralf-Peter Kapsch

2007-01-01

164

Determination of the threshold value of F10.7 in the dependence of foF2 on solar activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By introducing the two-segmented linear regression model instead of the well known quadratic fit, we were able to describe the solar activity dependence of the F2 critical frequency. Saturation features were observed and the corresponding F10.7 values at which this phenomenon occurs were obtained for different hours. The seasonal average values were found to be around 154 sfu, 138 sfu, 177 sfu and 150 sfu for March equinox, June solstice, September equinox and December solstice respectively. These affirmed that saturation phenomenon is more pronounced at the equinoxes than solstices. On the average, the threshold value of F10.7 was obtained to be 154.5 sfu for this station in the African sector of the equatorial region.

Adeniyi, J. O.; Ikubanni, S. O.

2013-05-01

165

Chondrules in the Murray CM2 meteorite and compositional differences between CM-CO and ordinary chondrite chondrules  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thirteen of the least aqueously altered chondrules in Murray (CM2) were analyzed for bulk compositions, by means of a broad beam electron microprobe, to explore the compositional differences between the CM-CO, and the ordinary chondrite OC chondrules. The CO chondrules are richer in refractory lithophiles and poorer in Cr, Mn, and volatile lithophiles than the OC chondrules; much lower refractory lithophile abundances in CM chondrules resulted from aqueous alteration. Evidence is found for two important lithophile precursor components of CM-CO chondrite chondrules: (1) pyroxene- and refractory-rich, FeO-poor, and (2) olivine-rich, refractoryand FeO-poor. It is suggested that the pyroxene- and refractory-rich, FeO-poor lithophile precursor component has formed by an incomplete evaporation of presolar silicates that brought these materials into the enstatite stability field.

Rubin, A. E.; Wasson, J. T.

1986-02-01

166

Bienvenue aux quipes fminines et masculines U9, U10 (7 contre 7), U11 (9 contre 9) et U12 (11 contre 11).  

E-print Network

e édition Bienvenue aux équipes féminines et masculines U9, U10 (7 contre 7), U11 (9 contre 9) et U soccer des Carabins. Dates U9, U10 et U11 : 11 mai U12 : 12 mai Lieu CEPSUM 2100, boul. Édouard à la saison 9 #12;Tarifs U9 et U10 : 250$ par équipe / 225$ avant le 1er mars 2013 U11 et U12 : 300

Charette, André

167

Molecular structure of Si_xS_(1-x) glasses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bulk Si_xS_1-x glasses in the 0.15S_1/2)4 tetrahedra, S_8-ring and Sn chains. The observed lineshapes change systematically with x, in a manner qualitatively similar to the case of corresponding Selenide glasses( D. Selvanathan, W. J. Bresser, P. Boolchand, B. Goodman Solid State Comm. 111, 619(1999)). Glass transition temperatures established by T-modulated DSC show an increase with x. Results of Raman and MDSC will be correlated, and discussed in relation to the nature of stiffness transitions anticipated in this binary glass system near x ~0.20.

Wang, Y.; Boolchand, P.

2000-03-01

168

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

Takeshita, Harunori [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)] [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Kitano, Masayasu, E-mail: mkitano6@hyo-med.ac.jp [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)] [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi [Department of Pharmacy, Hyogo University of Health Sciences, 1-3-6 Minatojima Kobe, Hyogo 650-8530 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Hyogo University of Health Sciences, 1-3-6 Minatojima Kobe, Hyogo 650-8530 (Japan); Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)] [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Miyazawa, Keiji [Discovery Research III, Research and Development, Kissei Pharmaceutical Company, 4365-1 Hodakakashiwara, Azumino, Nagano 399-8304 (Japan)] [Discovery Research III, Research and Development, Kissei Pharmaceutical Company, 4365-1 Hodakakashiwara, Azumino, Nagano 399-8304 (Japan); Hla, Timothy [Center for Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 69, NY 10065 (United States)] [Center for Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 69, NY 10065 (United States); Sano, Hajime [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)] [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)

2012-03-09

169

Excitation and emission profiles of Cm(III) and Cm(IV) in neat samples and lead borosilicate glasses  

SciTech Connect

The authors have been investigating the spectroscopy of actinides in materials having relevance to nuclear waste management. Discussed here are the excitation and emission profiles of curium in high temperature borosilicate glasses, and pure halide compounds. Probing the local coordination environment of Cm(III) in these matrices has been one of the goals of this study. Comparison of the nephelauxetic effects indicate that the silicate matrix provides a more basic environment than either F{sup {minus}} or Cl{sup {minus}} surroundings found in pure compounds of curium. As a result, f-f transition energies are red shifted significantly in the silicate matrix as compared to that of the neat CmF{sub 3} system. Moreover, laser induced emissions have been noted with CmF{sub 4} after treatment at elevated temperatures. The higher energy spectral region, consisting of emission bands at 20100 and 16750, is assignable to f-f transitions in Cm(III), which is the expected thermal decomposition product. Energy transfer from Cm(III), followed by a second photon absorption is believed to be responsible for the strong emission bands at 12550, and 13580 cm{sup {minus}} from presently unidentified emitting species. Results are discussed in relation to the oxidation state and fluorescence dynamics of actinide species in neat compounds, as well as in matrices being considered for waste immobilization.

Assefa, Z.; Haire, R.G.; Stump, N.A.

1999-07-01

170

Saturn V First Stage (S-1C) At MSFC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This small group of unidentified officials is dwarfed by the gigantic size of the Saturn V first stage (S-1C) at the shipping area of the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

1960-01-01

171

Gaugino condensation in M theory on S1\\/Z2  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the low energy limit of M theory on S1\\/Z2, we calculate the gaugino condensate potential in four dimensions using the background solutions due to Horava. We show that this potential is free of delta-function singularities and has the same form as the potential in the weakly coupled heterotic string. A general flux quantization rule for the three-form field of

André Lukas; Burt A. Ovrut; Daniel Waldram

1998-01-01

172

Adjuvant S-1 Chemotherapy for Gastric Cancer and Peritoneal Wash  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the September issue of the World Journal of Surgery, Ito and colleagues evaluated the efficacy of postoperative S-1 chemotherapy in patients with stage II\\/III gastric cancer with detection by a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of free intraperitoneal cancer cells [1]. Based on the results of a large-scale, appropriately designed, multicenter, Japanese, Phase III, randomized controlled trial

John Spiliotis; Odysseas Zoras

2011-01-01

173

26 CFR 31.3121(s)-1 - Concurrent employment by related corporations with common paymaster.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...related corporations with common paymaster. 31.3121(s)-1 Section 31.3121(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(s)-1 Concurrent employment by related...

2011-04-01

174

26 CFR 31.3121(s)-1 - Concurrent employment by related corporations with common paymaster.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...related corporations with common paymaster. 31.3121(s)-1 Section 31.3121(s)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE...Code of 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(s)-1 Concurrent employment by related...

2010-04-01

175

Maribo—A new CM fall from Denmark  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Maribo is a new Danish CM chondrite, which fell on January 17, 2009, at 19:08:28 CET. The fall was observed by many eye witnesses and recorded by a surveillance camera, an all sky camera, a few seismic stations, and by meteor radar observatories in Germany. A single fragment of Maribo with a dry weight of 25.8 g was found on March 4, 2009. The coarse-grained components in Maribo include chondrules, fine-grained olivine aggregates, large isolated lithic clasts, metals, and mineral fragments (often olivine), and rare Ca,Al-rich inclusions. The components are typically rimmed by fine-grained dust mantles. The matrix includes abundant dust rimmed fragments of tochilinite with a layered, fishbone-like texture, tochilinite-cronstedtite intergrowths, sulfides, metals, and carbonates often intergrown with tochilinite. The oxygen isotopic composition: (?17O = -1.27‰; ?18O = 4.96‰; ?17O = -3.85‰) plots at the edge of the CM field, close to the CCAM line. The very low ?17O and the presence of unaltered components suggest that Maribo is among the least altered CM chondrites. The bulk chemistry of Maribo is typical of CM chondrites. Trapped noble gases are similar in abundance and isotopic composition to other CM chondrites, stepwise heating data indicating the presence of gas components hosted by presolar diamond and silicon carbide. The organics in Maribo include components also seen in Murchison as well as nitrogen-rich components unique to Maribo.

Haack, Henning; Grau, Thomas; Bischoff, Addi; Horstmann, Marian; Wasson, John; Sørensen, Anton; Laubenstein, Matthias; Ott, Ulrich; Palme, Herbert; Gellissen, Marko; Greenwood, Richard C.; Pearson, Victoria K.; Franchi, Ian A.; Gabelica, Zelimir; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

2012-01-01

176

Determining the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aqueous alteration of CM chondrites provides a record of the processes attending the earliest stages of parent body evolution. However, resolving the alteration pathways of chondritic evolution requires a means for distinguishing the relative extent of alteration that individual samples have experienced. Three new indices for gauging the relative degree of alteration in CM chondrites based on modal and compositional analyses of 7 CM falls were proposed. The proposed alteration parameters are consistent with the basic tenets of several previous models and correlate with additional indices to produce an integrated method for determining the relative extent of alteration. The model predicts the following order of progressive alteration: Murchison (MC) is less than or equal to Bells (BL) is less than Murray (MY) is less than Cochabamba (CC) is less than Mighei (MI) is less than Nogoya (NG) is less than or equal to Cold Bokkeveld (CB). The broad range of CM phyllosilicate compositions observed within individual meteorites is fundamental to the characterization of the aqueous alteration process. Chemical analyses of CM phyllosilicates suggest that these phases became systematically enriched in Mg and depleted in Fe with increasing alteration.

Browning, Lauren B.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael

1993-01-01

177

Simultaneous Evaluation of Fission Cross Sections for Cm Isotopes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fission Cross Sections for a complete set of Cm-isotopes, 240-250Cm, have been calculated in the incident energy range from above resonance region to 20 MeV. This work aims at providing the fission cross sections with consistent set of model parameters for Cm isotopes, as a part of a complete evaluation including covariance files for several minor actinides which play a great role in the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC) design and applications as well as the design of new generation of nuclear reactors (GEN-IV). This was accomplished by means of computational analyses carried out with the nuclear model code EMPIRE-2.19 which is the modular system of nuclear reaction codes. A Fission model of this work took into account transmission derived in the WKB approximation within an optical model through a double-humped fission barrier.

Kim, H. I.; Gil, C.-S.; Lee, Y.-O.

2010-03-01

178

VLA observations of Uranus at 1. 3-20 cm  

SciTech Connect

Observations of Uranus, obtained with resolution 0.5-1.2 arcsec at wavelengths 1.3, 2, 6, and 20 cm using the A and B configurations of the VLA in June-July 1982, October 1983, and February 1984, are reported. The disk-averaged brightness temperatures (DABTs) are determined by model fitting, and the results are presented in extensive graphs and contour maps and characterized in detail. Findings discussed include: (1) an overall spectrum which is relatively flat above 6 cm, (2) 1.3-6-cm brightness which is concentrated nearer to the pole than to the subsolar point, and (3) small changes in DABT from 1982 to 1983/1984 (consistent with an explanation based on a pole-equator temperature gradient). 16 references.

De Pater, I.; Gulkis, S.

1988-08-01

179

High resolution comparative modeling with RosettaCM  

PubMed Central

We describe an improved method for comparative modeling, RosettaCM, which optimizes a physically realistic all-atom energy function over the conformational space defined by homologous structures. Given a set of sequence alignments, RosettaCM assembles topologies by recombining aligned segments in Cartesian-space and building unaligned regions de novo in torsion space. The junctions between segments are regularized using a loop-closure method combining fragment superposition with gradient-based minimization. The energies of the resulting models are optimized by all-atom refinement, and the most representative low energy model is selected. The CASP10 experiment suggests RosettaCM yields models with more accurate sidechain and backbone conformations than other methods when the sequence identity to the templates is greater than ?15%. PMID:24035711

Song, Yifan; DiMaio, Frank; Wang, Ray Yu-Ruei; Kim, David; Miles, Chris; Brunette, TJ; Thompson, James; Baker, David

2013-01-01

180

Assessing soil hydrological variability at the cm- to dm-scale using air permeameter measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soils and surficial sediments are crucial elements in the hydrological cycle since they are the medium through which infiltrating precipitation percolates to the aquifer. At the same time, soil horizons and shallow stratigraphy may act as hydraulic barriers that can promote runoff or interflow and hamper deep infiltration. For most catchments little is known about the small-scale horizontal and vertical variability of soil hydrological properties. Such information is however required to calculate detailed soil water flow paths and estimate small scale spatial variability in recharge and run-off. We present the results from field air permeameter measurements to assess the small-scale variability of saturated hydraulic conductivity in heterogeneous 2-D soil profiles. To this end, several outcrops in the unsaturated zone (sandy soils with podzolisation) of an interfluve in the Kleine Nete river catchment (Campine area, Northern Belgium) were investigated using a hand-held permeameter. Measurements were done each 10 cm on ~ 2 x 1 m or ~ 2 x 0.5 m grids. The initial results of the measurements (air permeability Kair; millidarcy) are recalculated to saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks; m/s) using specific transfer functions (Loll et al., 1999; Iversen et al., 2003). Validation of the results is done with independent lab-based constant head Ks measurements. The results show that field based Ks values generally range between 10-3 m/s and 10-7 m/s within one profile, but extremely high values (up to 10-1 m/s) have been measured as well. The lowest values are found in the organic- and silt-rich Bh horizon of podzol soils observed within the profiles (~ 10-6-10-7m/s), while the highest values are observed in overlying dune sands less than 40 cm deep (up to 10-3 m/s with outliers to 10-1 m/s). Comparison of field and laboratory based Ks data reveals there is fair agreement between both methods, apart from several outliers. Scatter plots indicate that almost all points, regardless the transfer function used, are within 10% (logKs) from perfect correlation. However, it is not clear yet which transfer function would best fit to the data: both show a slight systematic offset of ca. 5% (logKs) from the line of perfect agreement. Reasons for the observed discrepancies can be differences in measurement scale (5-10 times smaller for the air permeameter compared to constant head core samples) and possibly effects of the soil's saturation degree. Despite the small but systematic offset, we conclude that field based air permeametry is a relatively cheap, quick and reliable method to map the spatial variability of saturated hydraulic conductivity in heterogeneous soil profiles.

Beerten, K.; Vandersmissen, N.; Rogiers, B.; Mallants, D.

2012-04-01

181

Detecting the redshifted 21 cm forest during reionization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 21 cm forest - H I absorption features in the spectra of high-redshift radio sources - can potentially provide a unique probe of the largely neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) during the epoch of reionization. We present semi-analytical models of the 21 cm forest due to the large-scale structure of the reionization-era IGM, including a prescription for X-ray heating and the percolation of photoionization bubbles. We explore a range of signal-analysis methods to show that, if detected with future instruments such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the 21 cm forest can provide a significant constraint on the thermal history of the IGM. Detection will be aided by consideration of the sudden increase in signal variance at the onset of 21 cm absorption. If radio foregrounds and the intrinsic source spectra are well understood, the flux decrement over wide bandwidths can also improve detection prospects. Our analysis accounts for the possibility of narrow absorption lines from intervening dense regions, but, unlike previous studies, our results do not depend on their properties. Assuming X-ray heating corresponding to a local stellar population and a simple reionization model, we estimate that a statistically significant detection of 21 cm absorption could be made by the SKA in less than a year of observing against a Cygnus A-type source at z ˜ 9, as opposed to nearly a decade for a significant detection of the detailed forest features. We discuss observational challenges due to uncertainties regarding the abundance of background sources and the strength of the 21 cm absorption signal.

Mack, Katherine J.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

2012-10-01

182

Signal Extraction for Sky-averaged 21-cm Experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The highly redshifted 21-cm line of hydrogen promises to be an excellent probe of the cosmic dawn (when the first stars ignited) and the epoch of reionization. Interferometric measurements of 21-cm fluctuations require large telescopes with many antennas. The sky-averaged, 'global' signal, however, may be accessible with single-dipole experiments, even during the cosmic dawn, which will not be probed with the current generation of interferometers. Moreover, the global signal provides complementary information to the fluctuations. Extracting the signal may be challenging, however: the very large foregrounds require accurate modelling, and place stringent demands on the quality of the instrumental calibration. The challenge at first appears similar to that faced by interferometric experiments, but in detail it is rather different and may well require novel approaches. A number of experiments are under way or are proposed to measure the global 21-cm signal, and it has become more urgent to address the problem of signal extraction. We present a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to extract the signal from data simulated for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) which would measure the 21-cm signal at 40-120 MHz from lunar orbit. Our modelling includes the 21-cm signal, diffuse Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, the Sun, radiation emitted by and reflected from the Moon, and a detailed parametrized description of the properties of the instrument. We demonstrate that the signal parameters can be recovered accurately from realistic, noisy spectra with an experiment of reasonable duration, exploiting the spectral smoothness of the foregrounds and the spatial uniformity of the signal. Our method demonstrates the feasibility of DARE and validates its observational strategy, but is general and could be applied to other global 21-cm experiments. Moreover it may shed light on how to improve the design of these experiments.

Harker, Geraint; Pritchard, J.; Burns, J.; Bowman, J.

2012-01-01

183

Identification and Tissue Distribution of the Novel Human Cytochrome P450 2S1 (CYP2S1)  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the aid of the htgs and dbEST databases, a novel cytochrome P450 cDNA was found by homology searches, and the corresponding gene was identified on chromosome 19. Nested PCR was used to amplify a full-length sequence of 1515 bp. The predicted 504 amino acid sequence displays 38–49% identity with CYP2 family members and the protein was designated CYP2S1. mRNA

Tove Rylander; Etienne P. A. Neve; Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg; Mikael Oscarson

2001-01-01

184

Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. The cycle life test results are presented along with results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

Wintucky, E. G.

1976-01-01

185

HI 21cm probes of reionization, and beyond  

E-print Network

I review the potential for observing cosmic reionization using the HI 21cm line of neutral hydrogren. Studies include observations of the evolution of large scale structure of the IGM (density, excitation temperature, and neutral fraction), through HI 21cm emission, as well as observations of small to intermediate scale structure through absorption toward the first discrete radio sources. I summarize predictions for the HI signals, then consider capabilities of facilities being built, or planned, to detect these signals. I also discuss the significant observational challenges.

C. L. Carilli

2005-09-02

186

Evidence for live 247Cm in the early solar system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Variations of the 238U/235U ratio in the Allende meteorite, ranging from -35% to + 19%, are interpreted as evidence of live 247Cm in the early Solar System. The amounts of these and other r-products in the Solar System indicate values of (9,000??3,000) Myr for the age of the Galaxy and ??? 8 Myr for the time between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of meteoritic grains. Three possible explanations are presented for the different values of the latter time period which are indicated by the decay products of 247Cm, 26Al, 244Pu and 129I. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

Tatsumoto, M.; Shimamura, T.

1980-01-01

187

Evidence for live Cm-247 in the early solar system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Variations of the U-238/U-235 ratio in the Allende meteorite, ranging from -35% to +19% are interpreted as evidence of live Cm-247 in the early solar system. The amounts of these and other r-products in the solar system indicate values of (9000 + or - 3000) million years for the age of the Galaxy and approximately 8 million years for the time between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of meteoritic grains. Three possible explanations are presented for the different values of the latter time period which are indicated by the decay of products of Cm-247, Al-27, Pu-244, and I-129.

Tatsumoto, M.; Shimamura, T.

1980-01-01

188

CHOOSING THE CORRECT ELLIPTIC CURVE IN THE CM METHOD  

E-print Network

cryptography or for pairing-based cryptography, one wants to find an elliptic curve E over some Fp with a givenCHOOSING THE CORRECT ELLIPTIC CURVE IN THE CM METHOD K. RUBIN AND A. SILVERBERG Abstract. We give an elementary way to distinguish between the twists of an ordinary elliptic curve E over Fp in order to identify

Rubin, Karl

189

ORIGINAL PAPER M. Grosell C.M. Wood  

E-print Network

from uptake across the gills. Drinking of silver-contaminated seawater resulted in substantial sil- verORIGINAL PAPER M. Grosell á C.M. Wood Branchial versus intestinal silver toxicity and uptake-Verlag 2001 Abstract Exposure to elevated waterborne silver as AgNO3 (4.07 lM=448 lg l±1 ) in seawater

Grosell, Martin

190

Selection between foreground models for global 21-cm experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The precise form of the foregrounds for sky-averaged measurements of the 21-cm line during and before the epoch of reionization is unknown. We suggest that the level of complexity in the foreground models used to fit global 21-cm data should be driven by the data, under a Bayesian model selection methodology. A first test of this approach is carried out by applying nested sampling to simplified models of global 21-cm data to compute the Bayesian evidence for the models. If the foregrounds are assumed to be polynomials of order n in log-log space, we can infer the necessity to use n = 4 rather than n = 3 with <2 h of integration with limited frequency coverage, for reasonable values of the n = 4 coefficient. Using a higher order polynomial does not necessarily prevent a significant detection of the 21-cm signal. Even for n = 8, we can obtain very strong evidence distinguishing a reasonable model for the signal from a null model with 128 h of integration. More subtle features of the signal may, however, be lost if the foregrounds are this complex. This is demonstrated using a simpler model for the signal that only includes absorption. The results highlight some pitfalls in trying to quantify the significance of a detection from errors on the parameters of the signal alone.

Harker, Geraint J. A.

2015-04-01

191

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-42 Information Technology (IT) Infrastructure  

E-print Network

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-42 ­ Information Technology (IT) Infrastructure To: Vice Chancellors-HCSD) information technology (IT) Infrastructure supports mission-critical and business-critical services, clinicians, students, and faculty depend on the SYSTEM IT Infrastructure for the electronic classroom

192

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-49 Sexual Harassment / Gender Discrimination  

E-print Network

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-49 ­ Sexual Harassment / Gender Discrimination To: Vice Chancellors written or oral statements regarding one's sexuality, gender or sexual experience; · Unnecessary touching of the LSUHSC-NO community, who has a workplace sexual harassment complaint against a supervisor, co

193

Reproducibility along a 10 cm vertical visual analogue scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproducibility along a vertical 10 cm visual analogue scale (VAS) was investigated. Eight normal volunteers attempted to duplicate a set of marked VAS. There was a tendency to estimate too high on the scale, and reproducibility was found to be variable along its length. This indicates that the error involved in the use of VASs is even more complex than

J S Dixon; H A Bird

1981-01-01

194

A New Formaldehyde 6 cm Emitter in the Galaxy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A survey for H2CO 6cm emission toward young massive stellar objects was conducted using the 305m Arecibo Telescope. We detected emission toward IRAS18566+0408, only the fifth source in the Galaxy known to show H2CO 6cm emission. We report VLA observations toward this source intended to determine the nature of the emission line. Our observations show that the H2CO source is due to maser emission, making IRAS18566+0408 the fourth Galactic H2CO 6cm maser source. We also report detection of a weak 2cm continuum source that is coincident with the H2CO maser. Given the current observational constraints, the maser could be due to the radiative pumping mechanism proposed by Boland & de Jong (1981), however the coincidence of the new H2CO maser with 22GHz H2O masers suggests that shocked molecular gas could also play a role in its excitation. P.H. acknowledges support from NSF grant AST-0098524 and the Research Corporation grant Nr. CC4996. H. L. was supported by the German Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under grant Ste 605/17-2. EBC acknowledges support from NSF grant AST-0303689.

Araya, E.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.; Sewilo, M.; Watson, C.; Churchwell, E.

2004-12-01

195

Search for Cm-248 in the early solar system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Possible evidence for the presence of Cm-248 in the early solar system was reported from fission gas studies (Rao and Gopalan, 1973) and recently from studies of very high nuclear track densities (not less than 5 x 10 exp 8/sq cm) in the merrillite of the H4 chondrite Forest Vale (F.V.) (Pellas et al., 1987). We report here an analysis of the isotopic abundances of xenon in F.V. phosphates and results of track studies in phosphate/pyroxene contacts. The fission xenon isotopic signature clearly identifies Pu-244 as the extinct progenitor. We calculate an upper limit Cm-248/Pu-244 to be less than 0.0015 at the beginning of Xe retention in F.V. phosphates. This corresponds to an upper limit of the ratio Cm-248/U-235 of not greater than 5 x 10 exp -5 further constraining the evidence for any late addition of freshly synthesized actinide elements just prior to solar system formation. The fission track density observed after annealing the phosphates at 290C (1 hr, which essentially erases spallation recoil tracks) is also in agreement with the Pu-244 abundance inferred from fission Xe. The spallation recoil tracks produced during the 76 Ma cosmic-ray exposure account for the very high track density in merrillites.

Lavielle, B.; Marti, K.; Pellas, P.; Perron, C.

1992-09-01

196

Bells and Essebi: To Be or Not To Be (CM)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Bells and Essebi carbonaceous chondrites have long been associated with the CM group, although petrographic and isotopic observations have questioned that relationship. Samples of Bells and Essebi were obtained for bulk compositional study by neutron activation analysis (INAA) in an attempt to further fuel the debate on this issue. The current INAA work for Bells is complete, but analysis

G. W. Kallemeyn

1995-01-01

197

Retrofit and acceptance test of 30-cm ion thrusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Six 30 cm mercury thrusters were modified to the J-series design and evaluated using standardized test procedures. The thruster performance meets the design objectives (lifetime objective requires verification), and documentation (drawings, etc.) for the design is completed and upgraded. The retrofit modifications are described and the test data for the modifications are presented and discussed.

Poeschel, R. L.

1981-01-01

198

Calorimetric determination of kQ factors for NE 2561 and NE 2571 ionization chambers in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV photons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relative uncertainty of the ionometric determination of the absorbed dose to water, Dw, in the reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams is in the order of 1.5% and is dominated by the uncertainty of the calculated chamber- and energy-dependent correction factors kQ. In the present investigation, kQ values were determined experimentally in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV bremsstrahlung by means of a water calorimeter operated at 4 °C. Ionization chambers of the types NE 2561 and NE 2571 were calibrated directly in the water phantom of the calorimeter. The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factor of a single ionization chamber can be measured with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.3%. No significant variations of kQ were found for the different lateral sizes of the radiation fields used in this investigation.

Krauss, Achim; Kapsch, Ralf-Peter

2007-10-01

199

Doping concentration Ndop [cm 1014 1015 1016 1017 1018 1019  

E-print Network

Doping concentration Ndop [cm -3 ] 1014 1015 1016 1017 1018 1019 1/n[1/µs] 10-2 10-1 100 101 102 electric field, which has to be taken into account in the device simulations below. The largest Al doping

200

Heterogeneous distribution of solar and cosmogenic noble gases in CM chondrites and implications for the formation of CM parent bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Distribution of solar, cosmogenic, and primordial noble gases in thin slices of Murchison, Murray, and Nogoya CM carbonaceous chondrites was determined by the laser microprobe analysis so as to put some constraints on the parent-body processes in the CM chondrite formation. The main lithological units of the three meteorite slices were located by electron microscope observations and classified into clastic matrix and clasts of primary accretionary rocks (PARs) based on the classification scheme of texture of CM chondrites. All sample slices contain both clastic matrix and PARs. Clastic matrix shows a comminuted texture formed by fragmentation and mechanical mixing of rocks due to impacts, whereas PARs preserve the original textures prior to the mechanical disruption. Solar-type noble gases are detected in all sample slices. They are located preferentially in clastic matrix. The distribution of solar gases is similar to that in ordinary chondrites where these gases reside in clastic dark portions of these meteorites. The heterogeneous distribution of solar gases in CM chondrites suggests that these gases were acquired not in a nebular accretion process but in parent body processes. Solar energetic particles (SEP) are predominant in CM chondrites. The low abundance of low energy solar wind (SW) component relative to SEP suggests preferential loss of SW from minerals comprising the clastic matrix, due to aqueous alteration in the parent bodies. Cosmogenic noble gases are also enriched in some portions in clastic matrix, indicating that some parts of clastic matrix were exposed to solar and galactic cosmic rays prior to the final consolidation of the CM parent bodies. Primordial noble gases are rich in fine-grained rims around chondrules in all three meteorites. However, average concentrations of heavy primordial gases in the rims differ among meteorites and correlate inversely to the degree of aqueous alteration that the meteorites have experienced. This appears to have been caused by aqueous alteration reactions between fluids and carbonaceous carrier phases of noble gases.

Nakamura, Tomoki; Nagao, Keisuke; Metzler, Knut; Takaoka, Nobuo

1999-01-01

201

Record high electron mobility of 6.3 cm² V?¹ s?¹ achieved for polymer semiconductors using a new building block.  

PubMed

A new electron acceptor building block, 3,6-di(pyridin-2-yl)pyrrolo[3,4-c ]pyrrole-1,4(2H ,5H)-dione (DBPy), is used to construct a donor-acceptor polymer, PDBPyBT. This polymer exhibits a strong self-assembly capability, to form highly crystalline and oriented thin films with a short ?-? stacking distance of 0.36 nm. PDBPyBT shows ambipolar charge-transport performance in organic thin-film transistors, reaching a record high electron-mobility value of 6.30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). PMID:24623497

Sun, Bin; Hong, Wei; Yan, Zhuangqing; Aziz, Hany; Li, Yuning

2014-05-01

202

The 21cm Signature of the First Stars  

E-print Network

We predict the 21-cm signature of the first metal-free stars. The soft X-rays emitted by these stars penetrate the atomic medium around their host halos, generating Lyman alpha photons that couple the spin and kinetic temperatures. These creates a region we call the Lyman alpha sphere, visible in 21-cm against the CMB, which is much larger than the HII region produced by the same star. The spin and kinetic temperatures are strongly coupled before the X-rays can substantially heat the medium, implying that a strong 21-cm absorption signal from the adiabatically cooled gas in Hubble expansion around the star is expected when the medium has not been heated previously. A central region of emission from the gas heated by the soft X-rays is also present although with a weaker signal than the absorption. The Lyman alpha sphere is a universal signature that should be observed around any first star illuminating its vicinity for the first time. The 21-cm radial profile of the Lyman alpha sphere can be calculated as a function of the luminosity, spectrum and age of the star. For a star of a few hundred solar masses and zero metallicity (as expected for the first stars), the physical radius of the Lyman alpha sphere can reach tens of kiloparsecs. The first metal-free stars should be strongly clustered because of high cosmic biasing; this implies that the regions producing a 21-cm absorption signal may contain more than one star and will generally be irregular and not spherical, because of the complex distribution of the gas. We discuss the feasiblity of detecting these Lyman alpha spheres, which would be present at redshifts $z\\sim 30$ in the Cold Dark Matter model. Their observation would represent a direct proof of the detection of a first star.

Xuelei Chen; Jordi Miralda-Escude

2007-12-24

203

Detection of HI 21 cm-line absorption in the Warm Neutral Medium and in the Outer Arm of the Galaxy  

E-print Network

Using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, we have detected HI 21 cm-line absorption in the Warm Neutral Medium of the Galaxy toward the extragalactic source 3C147. This absorption, at an LSR velocity of –29±4 km s ?1 with a full width at half maximum of 53±6 km s ?1, is associated with the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy. The observed optical depth is (1.9±0.2)×10 ?3. The estimated spin temperature of the gas is 3600±360 K. The volume density is 0.4 cm ?3 assuming pressure equilibrium. Toward two other sources, 3C273 and 3C295, no wide HI 21 cm-line absorption was detected. The highest of the 3? lower limits on the spin temperature of the Warm Neutral Medium is 2600 K. In addition, we have also detected HI 21 cm-line absorption from high velocity clouds in the Outer Arm toward 3C147 and 3C380 at LSR velocities of –117.3, –124.5 and –113.7 km s ?1 respectively. We find two distinct temperature components in the high velocity clouds with spin temperatures of greater than 1000 K and less than 200 K, respectively. Subject headings: Galaxy: fundamental parameters – ISM: atoms – ISM:structure – radio lines:ISM – 2 – 1.

K. S. Dwarakanath; C. L. Carilli; W. M. Goss

2001-01-01

204

Search for the Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Decay B0s-->mu+mu- in pp¯ Collisions at &surd;(s)=1.96 TeV with the D0 Detector  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B0s-->mu+mu- using a data set with integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at &surd;(s)=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We find the upper limit on the branching fraction to be B(B0s-->mu+mu-)<=5.0×10-7 at the 95% C.L. assuming

V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; M. Agelou; J.-L. Agram; S. H. Ahn; M. Ahsan; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; M. Anastasoaie; S. Anderson; B. Andrieu; Y. Arnoud; A. Askew; B. Åsman; O. Atramentov; C. Autermann; C. Avila; F. Badaud; A. Baden; B. Baldin; P. W. Balm; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Bargassa; P. Baringer; C. Barnes; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; D. Bauer; A. Bellavance; S. Beauceron; M. Begel; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; I. Bertram; M. Besançon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; M. Binder; K. M. Black; I. Blackler; G. Blazey; F. Blekman; S. Blessing; D. Bloch; U. Blumenschein; A. Boehnlein; O. Boeriu; T. A. Bolton; F. Borcherding; G. Borissov; K. Bos; T. Bose; A. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; N. J. Buchanan; D. Buchholz; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; S. Burdin; T. H. Burnett; E. Busato; J. M. Butler; J. Bystricky; W. Carvalho; B. C. Casey; N. M. Cason; H. Castilla-Valdez; S. Chakrabarti; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; D. Chapin; F. Charles; E. Cheu; L. Chevalier; D. K. Cho; S. Choi; T. Christiansen; L. Christofek; D. Coppage; B. Clément; C. Clément; Y. Coadou; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; M. Corcoran; J. Coss; A. Cothenet; M.-C. Cousinou; S. Crépé-Renaudin; M. Cristetiu; M. A. Cummings; D. Cutts; H. da Motta; B. Davies; G. Davies; G. A. Davis; K. de; P. de Jong; S. J. de Jong; E. de La Cruz-Burelo; C. de Oliveira Martins; S. Dean; F. Déliot; P. A. Delsart; M. Demarteau; R. Demina; P. Demine; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; M. Doidge; H. Dong; S. Doulas; L. Duflot; S. R. Dugad; A. Duperrin; J. Dyer; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; T. Edwards; J. Ellison; J. Elmsheuser; J. T. Eltzroth; V. D. Elvira; S. Eno; P. Ermolov; O. V. Eroshin; J. Estrada; D. Evans; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; J. Fast; S. N. Fatakia; L. Feligioni; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; M. Fortner; H. Fox; W. Freeman; S. Fu; S. Fuess; T. Gadfort; C. F. Galea; E. Gallas; E. Galyaev; C. Garcia; A. Garcia-Bellido; J. Gardner; V. Gavrilov; P. Gay; D. Gelé; R. Gelhaus; K. Genser; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; G. Ginther; T. Golling; B. Gómez; K. Gounder; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; S. Greder; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; Ph. Gris; J.-F. Grivaz; L. Groer; S. Grünendahl; M. W. Grünewald; S. N. Gurzhiev; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; N. J. Hadley; S. Hagopian; I. Hall; R. E. Hall; C. Han; L. Han; K. Hanagaki; K. Harder; R. Harrington; J. M. Hauptman; R. Hauser; J. Hays; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; J. M. Heinmiller; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; M. Hohlfeld; S. J. Hong; R. Hooper; P. Houben; Y. Hu; J. Huang; I. Iashvili; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffré; S. Jain; V. Jain; K. Jakobs; A. Jenkins; R. Jesik; K. Johns; M. Johnson; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; H. Jöstlein; A. Juste; M. M. Kado; D. Käfer; W. Kahl; S. Kahn; E. Kajfasz; A. M. Kalinin; J. Kalk; D. Karmanov; J. Kasper; D. Kau; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; S. Kesisoglou; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. M. Kharzheev; K. H. Kim; B. Klima; M. Klute; J. M. Kohli; M. Kopal; V. M. Korablev; J. Kotcher; B. Kothari; A. Koubarovsky; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kozminski; S. Krzywdzinski; S. Kuleshov; Y. Kulik; S. Kunori; A. Kupco; T. Kurca; S. Lager; N. Lahrichi; G. Landsberg; J. Lazoflores; A.-C. Le Bihan; P. Lebrun; S. W. Lee; W. M. Lee; A. Leflat; F. Lehner; C. Leonidopoulos; P. Lewis; J. Li; Q. Z. Li; J. G. Lima; D. Lincoln; S. L. Linn; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; L. Lobo; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; A. Lounis; H. J. Lubatti; L. Lueking; M. Lynker; A. L. Lyon; A. K. Maciel; R. J. Madaras; P. Mättig; A. Magerkurth; A.-M. Magnan; N. Makovec; P. K. Mal; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; H. S. Mao; Y. Maravin; M. Martens; S. E. Mattingly; A. A. Mayorov; R. McCarthy; R. McCroskey; D. Meder; H. L. Melanson; A. Melnitchouk; M. Merkin; K. W. Merritt; A. Meyer; H. Miettinen; D. Mihalcea; J. Mitrevski; N. Mokhov; J. Molina; N. K. Mondal; H. E. Montgomery; R. W. Moore; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulders; Y. D. Mutaf; E. Nagy; M. Narain; N. A. Naumann; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; S. Nelson; P. Neustroev; C. Noeding; A. Nomerotski; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; E. Nurse; V. O'dell; D. C. O'Neil; V. Oguri; N. Oliveira; N. Oshima; G. J. Otero Y Garzón; P. Padley; N. Parashar; S. K. Park; J. Parsons; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; P. M. Perea; E. Perez; O. Peters; P. Pétroff; M. Petteni; L. Phaf; R. Piegaia; P. L. Podesta-Lerma; V. M. Podstavkov; Y. Pogorelov; B. G. Pope; W. L. Prado da Silva; H. B. Prosper; S. Protopopescu; M. B. Przybycien; J. Qian; A. Quadt; B. Quinn; K. J. Rani; P. A. Rapidis; P. N. Ratoff; N. W. Reay; S. Reucroft; M. Rijssenbeek; I. Ripp-Baudot; F. Rizatdinova; C. Royon; P. Rubinov

2005-01-01

205

The Paris meteorite, the least altered CM chondrite so far  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Paris chondrite provides an excellent opportunity to study CM chondrules and refractory inclusions in a more pristine state than currently possible from other CMs, and to investigate the earliest stages of aqueous alteration captured within a single CM bulk composition. It was found in the effects of a former colonial mining engineer and may have been an observed fall. The texture, mineralogy, petrography, magnetic properties and chemical and isotopic compositions are consistent with classification as a CM2 chondrite. There are ?45 vol.% high-temperature components mainly Type I chondrules (with olivine mostly Fa0-2, mean Fa0.9) with granular textures because of low mesostasis abundances. Type II chondrules contain olivine Fa7 to Fa76. These are dominantly of Type IIA, but there are IIAB and IIB chondrules, II(A)B chondrules with minor highly ferroan olivine, and IIA(C) with augite as the only pyroxene. The refractory inclusions in Paris are amoeboid olivine aggregates (AOAs) and fine-grained spinel-rich Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). The CAI phases formed in the sequence hibonite, perovskite, grossite, spinel, gehlenite, anorthite, diopside/fassaite and forsterite. The most refractory phases are embedded in spinel, which also occurs as massive nodules. Refractory metal nuggets are found in many CAI and refractory platinum group element abundances (PGE) decrease following the observed condensation sequences of their host phases. Mn-Cr isotope measurements of mineral separates from Paris define a regression line with a slope of 53Mn/55Mn = (5.76 ± 0.76) × 106. If we interpret Cr isotopic systematics as dating Paris components, particularly the chondrules, the age is 4566.44 ± 0.66 Myr, which is close to the age of CAI and puts new constraints on the early evolution of the solar system. Eleven individual Paris samples define an O isotope mixing line that passes through CM2 and CO3 falls and indicates that Paris is a very fresh sample, with variation explained by local differences in the extent of alteration. The anhydrous precursor to the CM2s was CO3-like, but the two groups differed in that the CMs accreted a higher proportion of water. Paris has little matrix (?47%, plus 8% fine grained rims) and is less altered than other CM chondrites. Chondrule silicates (except mesostasis), CAI phases, submicron forsterite and amorphous silicate in the matrix are all well preserved in the freshest domains, and there is abundant metal preserved (metal alteration stage 1 of Palmer and Lauretta (2011)). Metal and sulfide compositions and textures correspond to the least heated or equilibrated CM chondrites, Category A of Kimura et al. (2011). The composition of tochilinite-cronstedtite intergrowths gives a PCP index of ?2.9. Cronstedtite is more abundant in the more altered zones whereas in normal highly altered CM chondrites, with petrologic subtype 2.6-2.0 based on the S/SiO2 and ?FeO/SiO2 ratios in PCP or tochilinite-cronstedtite intergrowths (Rubin et al., 2007), cronstedtite is destroyed by alteration. The matrix in fresh zones has CI chondritic volatile element abundances, but interactions between matrix and chondrules occurred during alteration, modifying the volatile element abundances in the altered zones. Paris has higher trapped Ne contents, more primitive organic compounds, and more primitive organic material than other CMs. There are gradational contacts between domains of different degree of alteration, on the scale of ?1 cm, but also highly altered clasts, suggesting mainly a water-limited style of alteration, with no significant metamorphic reheating.

Hewins, Roger H.; Bourot-Denise, Michèle; Zanda, Brigitte; Leroux, Hugues; Barrat, Jean-Alix; Humayun, Munir; Göpel, Christa; Greenwood, Richard C.; Franchi, Ian A.; Pont, Sylvain; Lorand, Jean-Pierre; Cournède, Cécile; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Rochette, Pierre; Kuga, Maïa; Marrocchi, Yves; Marty, Bernard

2014-01-01

206

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, rolls to a stop at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the I SS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communicatio ns systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an elec tric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building

1999-01-01

207

Euclidean quantum M5 brane theory on $S^1 \\times S^5$  

E-print Network

We consider Euclidean quantum M5 brane theory on $S^1\\times S^5$. Dimensional reduction along $S^1$ gives a 5d SYM on $S^5$. We derive this 5d SYM theory from a classical Lorentzian M5 brane Lagrangian on $S^1 \\times S^5$, where $S^1$ is a timelike circle of radius $T$, by performing a Scherk-Schwarz reduction along $S^1$ followed by Wick rotation of $T$.

Gustavsson, Andreas

2015-01-01

208

Euclidean quantum M5 brane theory on $S^1 \\times S^5$  

E-print Network

We consider Euclidean quantum M5 brane theory on $S^1\\times S^5$. Dimensional reduction along $S^1$ gives a 5d SYM on $S^5$. We derive this 5d SYM theory from a classical Lorentzian M5 brane Lagrangian on $S^1 \\times S^5$, where $S^1$ is a timelike circle of radius $T$, by performing a Scherk-Schwarz reduction along $S^1$ followed by Wick rotation of $T$.

Andreas Gustavsson

2015-01-28

209

Instrumental Simulations of the 21cm Epoch of Reionization Signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Epoch of Reionization (EoR) represents an unexplored phase in early cosmic history when the light from the first galaxies and stars ionized the majority of the hydrogen in the universe. A powerful way of probing EoR fluctuations is by mapping the red-shifted 21cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen, and current telescope arrays such as the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and their recently funded successor, the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA) aim to do this. Because the detection of EoR requires the difficult isolation of a signal ?105 times fainter than galactic foregrounds, as well as unprecedented levels of sensitivity, it is important to develop realistic end-to-end simulations that accurately capture instrumental effects. Here we present simulation efforts within the HERA collaboration, demonstrating capabilities that will be necessary for a confirmed detection of the cosmological 21cm signal.

Cheng, Carina; Parsons, Aaron; Liu, Adrian; Zheng, Haoxuan; HERA Collaboration

2015-01-01

210

IDENTIFYING IONIZED REGIONS IN NOISY REDSHIFTED 21 cm DATA SETS  

SciTech Connect

One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which {approx}20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z {approx} 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as {approx}150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam, E-mail: mattma@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

2013-04-10

211

Power distribution for an Am/Cm bushing melter  

SciTech Connect

Decades of nuclear material production at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has resulted in the generation of large quantities of the isotopes Am{sup 243} and Cm{sup 244}. Currently, the Am and Cm isotopes are stored as a nitric acid solution in a tank. The Am and Cm isotopes have great commercial value but must be transferred to ORNL for processing. The nitric acid solution contains other isotopes and is intensely radioactive, which makes storage a problem and precludes shipment in the liquid form. In order to stabilize the material for onsite storage and to permit transport the material from SRS to ORNL, it has been proposed that the Am and Cm be separated from other isotopes in the solution and vitrified. Vitrification will be effected by depositing a liquid feed stream containing the isotopes in solution, together with a stream of glass frit, onto the top of a molten glass pool in a melter. The glass is non-conducting and the melter is a Platinum/Rhodium alloy vessel which is heated by passing an electric current through it. Because most of the power is required to evaporate the liquid feed at the top of the glass pool, power demands differ for the upper and lower parts of the melter. In addition, the melter is batch fed so that the local power requirements vary with time. In order to design a unique split power supply, which ensures adequate local power delivery, an analysis of the melter power distribution was performed with the ABAQUS finite element code. ABAQUS was used to calculate the electric potential and current density distributions in the melter for a variety of current and potential boundary conditions. The results of the calculation were compared with test data and will be used to compute power densities for input to a computational fluid dynamics model for the melter.

Gong, C.; Hardy, B.J.

1996-12-31

212

The Paris CM chondrite: Secondary minerals and asteroidal processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a petrographic and mineralogical survey of Paris, a new CM chondrite considered to be the least-altered CM identified so far (Hewins et al.). Compared to other CMs, Paris exhibits (1) a higher concentration of Fe-Ni metal beads, with nickel contents in the range 4.1-8.1 wt%; (2) the systematic presence of thin lamellae and tiny blebs of pentlandite in pyrrhotite grains; and (3) ubiquitous tochilinite/cronstedtite associations with higher FeO/SiO2 and S/SiO2 ratios. In addition, Paris shows the highest concentration of trapped 36Ar reported so far for a CM chondrite (Hewins et al.). In combination with the findings of previous studies, our data confirm the reliability of (1) the alteration sequence based on the chemical composition of tochilinite/cronstedtite associations to quantify the fluid alteration processes and (2) the use of Cr content variability in type II ferroan chondrule olivine as a proxy of thermal metamorphism. In contrast, the scales based on (1) the Fe3+ content of serpentine in the matrix to estimate the degree of aqueous alteration and (2) the chemical composition of Fe-Ni metal beads for quantifying the intensity of the thermal metamorphism are not supported by the characteristics of Paris. It also appears that the amount of trapped 36Ar is a sensitive indicator of the secondary alteration modifications experienced by chondrites, for both aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. Considering Paris, our data suggest that this chondrite should be classified as type 2.7 as it suffered limited but significant fluid alteration and only mild thermal metamorphism. These results point out that two separated scales should be used to quantify the degree of the respective role of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism in establishing the characteristics of CM chondrites.

Marrocchi, Yves; Gounelle, Matthieu; Blanchard, Ingrid; Caste, Florent; Kearsley, Anton T.

2014-07-01

213

20-cm ECR plasma generator for xenon ion propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the development status of a 20-cm diameter microwave discharge ion thruster which generates 25?30 mN of thrust with an electric power of 1 kW. By optimizing the discharge chamber length, magnetic field and propellant flow injection, ion currents of up to 530 mA at a net microwave power of 100 W had been obtained at a frequency

Kazutaka Nishiyama; Hitoshi Kuninaka

2006-01-01

214

Distinct Distribution of Purines in CM and CR Carbonaceous Chondrites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Carbonaceous meteorites contain a diverse suite of organic molecules and delivered pre biotic organic compounds, including purines and pyrimidines, to the early Earth (and other planetary bodies), seeding it with the ingredients likely required for the first genetic material. We have investigated the distribution of nucleobases in six different CM and CR type carbonaceous chondrites, including fivc Antarctic meteorites never before analyzed for nucleobases. We employed a traditional formic acid extraction protocol and a recently developed solid phase extraction method to isolate nucleobases. We analyzed these extracts by high performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV -MS/MS) targeting the five canonical RNAIDNA bases and hypoxanthine and xanthine. We detected parts-per-billion levels of nucleobases in both CM and CR meteorites. The relative abundances of the purines found in Antarctic CM and CR meteorites were clearly distinct from each other suggesting that these compounds are not terrestrial contaminants. One likely source of these purines is formation by HCN oligomerization (with other small molecules) during aqueous alteration inside the meteorite parent body. The detection of the purines adenine (A), guanine (0), hypoxanthine (HX), and xanthine (X) in carbonaceous meteorites indicates that these compounds should have been available on the early Earth prior to the origin of the first genetic material.

Callahan, Michael P.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Smith, Karen E.; Martin, Mildred G.; Dworkin, Jason P.

2010-01-01

215

Laparoscopic adrenalectomy for a rare 14-cm adrenal schwannoma.  

PubMed

Laparoscopic surgery for adrenal tumors is the gold standard for benign tumors; however, its role for adrenal cancer, metastases, and large suspicious lesions remains controversial. This aspect becomes clinically more important as larger incidentaloma are being detected with increasing frequency. Here, we discuss a rare case of a giant 14-cm adrenal schwannoma, which presented as an incidentaloma and was excised laparoscopically. Epidemiology, histology, and surgical treatment options were reviewed. An abdominal computerized tomography scan of a 30-year-old female weighing 130 kg revealed a large left adrenal mass. Preoperative biochemical and endocrine workup confirmed that it was nonfunctioning. The patient had a laparoscopic adrenalectomy without complication. The nodular tumor measured 145 × 100 × 80 cm in size and weighed 312 g. Histopathology showed myxoid areas and spindle cells arranged in a palisading manner. Mitoses were not observed. Tumor cells were immunohistochemically strongly positive for S-100, but negative for CD117, desmin, and muscle-specific actin. There was no evidence of malignancy. The diagnosis was of a benign schwannoma. Adrenal schwannoma is an extremely rare entity and can grow considerably in size. So far, this is the largest adrenal schwannoma reported in literature. In agreement with a growing number of publications, laparoscopic adrenalectomy can also be used for potentially malignant tumors larger than 10 cm in diameter provided the tumor does not infiltrate into other organs, conversion to open surgery is carefully considered, and resection occurs within the anatomic planes, thus ensuring the intactness of the tumor capsule. PMID:22146188

Richter, Konrad Klaus; Premkumar, Rakesh; Yoon, Han-Seung; Mercer, Philippa

2011-12-01

216

Effect of anisotropy in the S=1 underscreened Kondo lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the effect of crystal field anisotropy in the underscreened S=1 Kondo lattice model. Starting from the two orbital Anderson lattice model and including a local anisotropy term, we show, through Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, that local anisotropy is equivalent to an anisotropic Kondo interaction (J??J?). The competition and coexistence between ferromagnetism and Kondo effect in this effective model is studied within a generalized mean-field approximation. Several regimes are obtained, depending on the parameters, exhibiting or not coexistence of magnetic order and Kondo effect. Particularly, we show that a re-entrant Kondo phase at low temperature can be obtained. We are also able to describe phases where the Kondo temperature is smaller than the Curie temperature (TK

Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Lacroix, Claudine; Iglesias, José Roberto; Coqblin, Bernard

2014-12-01

217

Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak  

SciTech Connect

The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (/beta//sub to/ /approximately/ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m/sup 2/. The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

1989-07-01

218

[A case of stage IV breast cancer responding to S-1 therapy after FEC and PTX therapies].  

PubMed

In November 2005, a 34-year-old female presented to our department with a bleeding tumor on her right breast. She noticed the tumor approximately two years ago but she left it untreated. An exposed tumor was observed with a diameter of approximately 8 cm located in the right breast. It was diagnosed as invasive ductal carcinoma by biopsy (ER (+), PgR (+), and HERS2: 1 +). The imaging showed multiple metastases to the bilateral lungs, right axillary lymph node, mediastinal lymph node and sternal. The diagnosis was made as right breast cancer (T4c, N3c, M1, and stage IV). The patient received 4 courses of FEC therapy and 4 courses of PTX therapy. The patient had a partial response (PR). However, tumor markers were elevated in September 2006. Thus, an administration of S-1 was initiated. The size of the tumor shown in the imaging was reduced, and the patient had a PR. Since December 2008, tumor markers have been elevated again. However, the patient has had SD in the imaging and S-1 administrations have been continued. A total of 24 courses have been performed to the present time, and the patient's conditions have not been aggravated in approximately 3 years and 5 months. She has maintained a good QOL and is being followed up on an outpatient basis. S-1 administrations can be an effective treatment for advanced breast cancer resistant to anthracycline and taxane when considering a satisfactory QOL of patients. PMID:20037460

Aoyagi, Haruhiko; Kaneko, Jun; Makinose, Takamichi; Someno, Yasunori; Katsuta, Eriko; Saguchi, Morihito; Okubo, Katsuhiko; Hamada, Setsuo; Sekine, Takeshi; Sato, Takanobu; Sugihara, Kenichi; Maejima, Shizuaki

2009-11-01

219

The fluorescence excitation spectrum of 1-naphthoic acid at rotational resolution: S0 and S1 potential energy surfaces along the R-COOH torsional coordinate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several vibronic bands that appear within 300 cm?1 of the electronic origin in the S1?S0 fluorescence excitation spectrum of 1-naphthoic acid (1NA) and carboxyl-deuterated 1NA have been examined at full rotational resolution. The data show that all bands belong to the s-cis isomer of 1NA. They also show that all bands are torsional in nature; i.e., that they involve displacements

Surya Jagannathan; David W. Pratt

1994-01-01

220

Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Carrier-dependent Regulation of Endothelial Barrier  

PubMed Central

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lysosphingolipid that acts to promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. In plasma, S1P is associated with both high density lipoproteins (HDL) and albumin, but it is not known whether the carriers impart different effects on S1P signaling. Here we establish that HDL-S1P sustains EC barrier longer than albumin-S1P. We showed that the sustained barrier effects of HDL-S1P are dependent on signaling by the S1P receptor, S1P1, and involve persistent activation of Akt and endothelial NOS (eNOS), as well as activity of the downstream NO target, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Total S1P1 protein levels were found to be higher in response to HDL-S1P treatment as compared with albumin-S1P, and this effect was not associated with increased S1P1 mRNA or dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Several pieces of evidence indicate that long term EC barrier enhancement activity of HDL-S1P is due to specific effects on S1P1 trafficking. First, the rate of S1P1 degradation, which is proteasome-mediated, was slower in HDL-S1P-treated cells as compared with cells treated with albumin-S1P. Second, the long term barrier-promoting effects of HDL-S1P were abrogated by treatment with the recycling blocker, monensin. Finally, cell surface levels of S1P1 and levels of S1P1 in caveolin-enriched microdomains were higher after treatment with HDL-S1P as compared with albumin-S1P. Together, the findings reveal S1P carrier-specific effects on S1P1 and point to HDL as the physiological mediator of sustained S1P1-PI3K-Akt-eNOS-sGC-dependent EC barrier function. PMID:23135269

Wilkerson, Brent A.; Grass, G. Daniel; Wing, Shane B.; Argraves, W. Scott; Argraves, Kelley M.

2012-01-01

221

Polymer waveguides for 100-cm (40") optical backplanes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical backplanes are attractive components for systems with high data rates between subsystems and a large number of interconnects. An optical backplane which uses multimode polymer waveguides was originally developed for avionic applications but can be used in telecom switching systems as well. For transmission distances in the range of 100cm and data rates up to 10Gbps, the modal dispersion can be negelected. The waveguides are fabricated on large substrates (aluminum, FR4 and others) by a direct writing technique. Splitters and couplers can be fabricated with the same technique. The waveguides have a low loss (0.04dB/cm) and high temperature stability (up to 250°C) and are used with 840nm vertical cavity lasers. The waveguide cross section can be chosen between approx. 250?m x 250?m and 50?m x 50?m. We have successfully transmitted up to 10Gbit/s over multimode polymer waveguides with lengths of 100cm. A free space, expanded beam coupling is used for the board-backplane transition, resulting in high alignment tolerances. The overall insertion loss for a backplane connection is typically between 2 and 8 dB, depending on waveguide length, radius of curvature, number of waveguide crossings etc. A typical transceiver power budget of 15-20dB allows the integration of star couplers with up to 16 ports. Several test systems with different interconnection schemes have been realized and tested. Tests include mechanical stability (vibration), thermal stability (cycles, shocks and accelerated aging) and gamma irradiation as well as optical power levels, signal integrity and bit error rates.

Moisel, Jorg; Guttmann, Joachim; Huber, Hans-Peter; Lunitz, Barbara; Rode, Manfred; Schoedlbauer, Reinhold; Bogenberger, Richard

2002-11-01

222

Evaluation of ICD-9-CM Codes for Craniofacial Microsomia  

PubMed Central

Background Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a congenital condition characterized by microtia and mandibular underdevelopment. Healthcare databases and birth defects surveillance programs could be used to improve knowledge of CFM. However, no specific ICD-9-CM code exists for this condition, which makes standardized data collection challenging. Our aim was to evaluate the validity of existing ICD-9-CM codes to identify individuals with CFM. Methods Study sample eligibility criteria were developed by an expert panel and matched to 11 ICD-9-CM codes. We queried hospital discharge data from two craniofacial centers and identified a total of 12,254 individuals who had ? 1 potentially CFM-related code(s). We reviewed all (n=799) medical records identified at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and 500 randomly selected records at Seattle Children’s Hospital (SCH). Individuals were classified as a CFM case or non-case. Results Thirty-two individuals (6%) at SCH and 93 (12%) at UNC met the CFM eligibility criteria. At both centers, 59% of cases and 95% of non-cases had only one code assigned. At both centers, the most frequent codes were 744.23 (microtia), 754.0 and 756.0 (nonspecific codes), and the code 744.23 had a positive predictive value (PPV) >80% and sensitivity >70%. The code 754.0 had a sensitivity of 3% (PPV<1%) at SCH and 36% (PPV=5%) at UNC, whereas 756.0 had a sensitivity of 38% (PPV=5%) at SCH and 18% (PPV=26%) at UNC. Conclusions These findings suggest the need for a specific CFM code to facilitate CFM surveillance and research. PMID:22903955

Luquetti, Daniela V.; Saltzman, Babette S.; Vivaldi, Daniela; Pimenta, Luiz A.; Hing, Anne V.; Cassell, Cynthia H.; Starr, Jacqueline R.; Heike, Carrie L.

2012-01-01

223

The 100 cm solar telescope primary mirror study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The manufacturing impact of primary mirror configuration on the performance of a 100 cm aperture solar telescope was studied. Three primary mirror configurations were considered: solid, standard lightweight, and mushroom. All of these are of low expansion material. Specifically, the study consisted of evaluating the mirrors with regard to: manufacturing metrology, manufacturing risk factors and ultimate quality assessment. As a result of this evaluation, a performance comparison of the configurations was made, and a recommendation of mirror configuration is the final output. These evaluations, comparisons and recommendations are discussed in detail. Other investigations were completed and are documented in the appendices.

1975-01-01

224

The use of 8 cm midlines in community IV therapy.  

PubMed

There is limited published literature on the use of 8 cm centimetre midlines for vascular access. This clinical audit was undertaken to provide a local evidence base for the insertion of midlines in patients receiving non-vesicant intravenous antibiotic therapy in the community setting over the medium term. The findings show their use has clear advantages for patients and clinicians. Although conducted in the community setting, the audit could be replicated in any community or hospital environment where medium-term intravenous therapy of non-vesicant fluids is administered. PMID:25345478

Owen, Kate

2014-10-22

225

Performance mapping of a 30 cm engineering model thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm thruster representative of the engineering model design has been tested over a wide range of operating parameters to document performance characteristics such as electrical and propellant efficiencies, double ion and beam divergence thrust loss, component equilibrium temperatures, operational stability, etc. Data obtained show that optimum power throttling, in terms of maximum thruster efficiency, is not highly sensitive to parameter selection. Consequently, considerations of stability, discharge chamber erosion, thrust losses, etc. can be made the determining factors for parameter selection in power throttling operations. Options in parameter selection based on these considerations are discussed.

Poeschel, R. L.; Vahrenkamp, R. P.

1975-01-01

226

Recycle Requirements for NASA's 30 cm Xenon Ion Thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electrical breakdowns have been observed during ion thruster operation. These breakdowns, or arcs, can be caused by several conditions. In flight systems, the power processing unit must be designed to handle these faults autonomously. This has a strong impact on power processor requirements and must be understood fully for the power processing unit being designed for the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Application Readiness program. In this study, fault conditions were investigated using a NASA 30 cm ion thruster and a power console. Power processing unit output specifications were defined based on the breakdown phenomena identified and characterized.

Pinero, Luis R.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

1994-01-01

227

Performance documentation of the engineering model 30-cm diameter thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of extensive testing of two 30-cm ion thrusters which are virtually identical to the 900 series Engineering Model Thruster in an ongoing 15,000-hour life test are presented. Performance data for the nominal fullpower (2650 W) operating point; performance sensitivities to discharge voltage, discharge losses, accelerator voltage, and magnetic baffle current; and several power throttling techniques (maximum Isp, maximum thrust/power ratio, and two cases in between are included). Criteria for throttling are specified in terms of the screen power supply envelope, thruster operating limits, and control stability. In addition, reduced requirements for successful high voltage recycles are presented.

Bechtel, R. T.; Rawlin, V. K.

1976-01-01

228

Status of 30 cm mercury ion thruster development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two engineering model 30-cm ion thrusters were assembled, calibrated, and qualification tested. This paper discusses the thruster design, performance, and power system. Test results include documentation of thrust losses due to doubly charged mercury ions and beam divergence by both direct thrust measurements and beam probes. Diagnostic vibration tests have led to improved designs of the thruster backplate structure, feed system, and harness. Thruster durability is being demonstrated over a thrust range of 97 to 113 mN at a specific impulse of about 2900 seconds. As of August 15, 1974, the thruster has successfully operated for over 4000 hours.

Sovey, J. S.; King, H. J.

1974-01-01

229

Long lifetime hollow cathodes for 30-cm mercury ion thrusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation of hollow cathodes for 30-cm Hg bombardment thrusters was carried out. Both main and neutralizer cathode configurations were tested with both rolled foil inserts coated with low work function material and impregnated porous tungsten inserts. Temperature measurements of an impregnated insert at various positions in the cathode were made. These, along with the cathode thermal profile are presented. A theory for rolled foil and impregnated insert operation and lifetime in hollow cathodes is developed. Several endurance tests, as long as 18000 hours at emission currents of up to 12 amps were attained with no degradation in performance.

Mirtich, M. J.; Kerslake, W. R.

1976-01-01

230

All-optical radiation reaction at 10²¹ W/cm².  

PubMed

Using full-scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations we show that the radiation reaction dominated regime can be reached in an all-optical configuration through the collision of a ~1 GeV laser wakefield accelerated electron bunch with a counterpropagating laser pulse. In this configuration the radiation reaction significantly reduces the energy of the particle bunch, thus providing clear experimental signatures for the process with currently available lasers. We also show that the transition between the classical and quantum radiation reaction could be investigated in the same configuration with laser intensities of 10²³ W/cm². PMID:25302892

Vranic, M; Martins, J L; Vieira, J; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

2014-09-26

231

Performance documentation of the Engineering Model 30 cm diameter Thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presented are the results of extensive testing of two 30-cm ion thrusters which are virtually identical to the 900 series Engineering Model Thruster in an ongoing 15,000-hour life test. Included are performance data for the nominal full-power (2650 W) operating point; performance sensitivities to discharge voltage, discharge losses, accelerator voltage, and magnetic baffle current; and several power throttling techniques (maximum Isp, maximum thrust/power ratio, and two cases in between). Criteria for throttling are specified in terms of the screen power supply envelope, thruster operating limits, and control stability. In addition, reduced requirements for successful high voltage recycles are presented.

Bechtel, R. T.; Rawlin, V. K.

1976-01-01

232

Radiated and conducted EMI from a 30-cm ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to properly assess the interaction of a spacecraft with the EMI environment produced by an ion thruster, the EMI environment was characterized. Therefore, radiated and conducted emissions were measured from a 30-cm mercury ion thruster. The ion thruster beam current varied from zero to 2.0 amperes and the emissions were measured from 5 KHz to 200 MHz. Several different types of antennas were used to obtain the measurements. The various measurements that were made included: magnetic field due to neutralizer/beam current loop; radiated electric fields of thruster and plume; and conducted emissions on arc discharge, neutralizer keeper and magnetic baffle lines.

Whittlesey, A. C.; Peer, W.

1981-01-01

233

Human Being Imaging with cm-Wave UWB Radar  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Possibilities of high-resolution human body imaging and concealed weapon detection using centimeter-wave microwave frequencies\\u000a are investigated. Dependencies of the cross-range resolution of different imaging techniques on operational bandwidth, center\\u000a frequency, imaging aperture size, and imaging topology have been studied. It has been demonstrated that the cross-range resolution\\u000a of 2 cm can be achieved using frequencies below 10 GHz. These findings have been

A. Yarovoy; X. Zhuge; T. Savelyev; J. Matuzas; B. Levitas

2010-01-01

234

Characterization of an 8-cm Diameter Ion Source System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of tests characterizing an 8-cm diameter ion source are presented. The tests were conducted in three separate vacuum test facilities at the University of Alabama-Huntsville, Colorado State University, and L3 Communications' ETI division. Standard ion optics tests describing electron backstreaming and total-voltage-limited impingement current behavior as a function of beam current were used as guidelines for selecting operating conditions where more detailed ion beam measurements were performed. The ion beam was profiled using an in-vacuum actuating probe system to determine the total ion current density and the ion charge state distribution variation across the face of the ion source. Both current density and ExB probes were utilized. The ion current density data were used to obtain integrated beam current, beam flatness parameters, and general beam profile shapes. The ExB probe data were used to determine the ratio of doubly to singly charged ion current. The ion beam profile tests were performed at over six different operating points that spanned the expected operating range of the DAWN thrusters being developed at L3. The characterization tests described herein reveal that the 8-cm ion source is suitable for use in (a) validating plasma diagnostic equipment, (b) xenon ion sputtering and etching studies of spacecraft materials, (c) plasma physics research, and (d) the study of ion thruster optics at varying conditions.

Li, Zhongmin; Hawk, C. W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Buttweiler, Mark S.; Williams, John D.; Buchholtz, Brett

2005-01-01

235

Discovery and First Observations of the 21-cm Hydrogen Line  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Unlike most of the great discoveries in the first decade of radio astronomy after World War II, the 21 cm hydrogen line was first predicted theoretically and then purposely sought. The story is familiar of graduate student Henk van de Hulst's prediction in occupied Holland in 1944 and the nearly simultaneous detection of the line by teams at Harvard, Leiden, and Sydney in 1951. But in this paper I will describe various aspects that are little known: (1) In van de Hulst's original paper he not only worked out possible intensities for the 21 cm line, but also for radio hydrogen recombination lines (not detected until the early 1960s), (2) in that same paper he also used Jansky's and Reber's observations of a radio background to make cosmological conclusions, (3) there was no "race" between the Dutch, Americans, and Australians to detect the line, (4) a fire that destroyed the Dutch team's equipment in March 1950 ironically did not hinder their progress, but actually speeded it up (because it led to a change of their chief engineer, bringing in the talented Lex Muller). The scientific and technical styles of the three groups will also be discussed as results of the vastly differing environments in which they operated.

Sullivan, W. T.

2005-08-01

236

Electric prototype power processor for a 30cm ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electrical prototype power processor unit was designed, fabricated and tested with a 30 cm mercury ion engine for primary space propulsion. The power processor unit used the thyristor series resonant inverter as the basic power stage for the high power beam and discharge supplies. A transistorized series resonant inverter processed the remaining power for the low power outputs. The power processor included a digital interface unit to process all input commands and internal telemetry signals so that electric propulsion systems could be operated with a central computer system. The electrical prototype unit included design improvement in the power components such as thyristors, transistors, filters and resonant capacitors, and power transformers and inductors in order to reduce component weight, to minimize losses, and to control the component temperature rise. A design analysis for the electrical prototype is also presented on the component weight, losses, part count and reliability estimate. The electrical prototype was tested in a thermal vacuum environment. Integration tests were performed with a 30 cm ion engine and demonstrated operational compatibility. Electromagnetic interference data was also recorded on the design to provide information for spacecraft integration.

Biess, J. J.; Inouye, L. Y.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

1977-01-01

237

Measuring the Cosmological 21 cm Monopole with an Interferometer  

E-print Network

A measurement of the cosmological 21 cm signal remains a promising but as-of-yet unattained ambition of radio astronomy. A positive detection would provide direct observations of key unexplored epochs of our cosmic history, including the cosmic dark ages and reionization. In this paper, we concentrate on measurements of the spatial monopole of the 21 cm brightness temperature as a function of redshift (the "global signal"). Most global experiments to date have been single-element experiments. In this paper, we show how an interferometer can be designed to be sensitive to the monopole mode of the sky, thus providing an alternate approach to accessing the global signature. We provide simple rules of thumb for designing a global signal interferometer and use numerical simulations to show that a modest array of tightly packed antenna elements with moderately sized primary beams (full-width-half-max of $\\sim$40$^\\circ$) can compete with typical single-element experiments in their ability to constrain phenomenologi...

Presley, Morgan; Parsons, Aaron

2015-01-01

238

Altimeter error sources at the 10-cm performance level  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Error sources affecting the calibration and operational use of a 10 cm altimeter are examined to determine the magnitudes of current errors and the investigations necessary to reduce them to acceptable bounds. Errors considered include those affecting operational data pre-processing, and those affecting altitude bias determination, with error budgets developed for both. The most significant error sources affecting pre-processing are bias calibration, propagation corrections for the ionosphere, and measurement noise. No ionospheric models are currently validated at the required 10-25% accuracy level. The optimum smoothing to reduce the effects of measurement noise is investigated and found to be on the order of one second, based on the TASC model of geoid undulations. The 10 cm calibrations are found to be feasible only through the use of altimeter passes that are very high elevation for a tracking station which tracks very close to the time of altimeter track, such as a high elevation pass across the island of Bermuda. By far the largest error source, based on the current state-of-the-art, is the location of the island tracking station relative to mean sea level in the surrounding ocean areas.

Martin, C. F.

1977-01-01

239

Presolar grains in the CM2 chondrite Sutter's Mill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AbstractThe Sutter's Mill (SM) carbonaceous chondrite is a regolith breccia, composed predominantly of <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 clasts with varying degrees of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. An investigation of presolar grains in four Sutter's Mill sections, SM43, SM51, SM2-4, and SM18, was carried out using NanoSIMS ion mapping technique. A total of 37 C-anomalous grains and one O-anomalous grain have been identified, indicating an abundance of 63 ppm for presolar C-anomalous grains and 2 ppm for presolar oxides. Thirty-one silicon carbide (SiC), five carbonaceous grains, and one Al-oxide (Al2O3) were confirmed based on their elemental compositions determined by C-N-Si and O-Si-Mg-Al isotopic measurements. The overall abundance of SiC grains in Sutter's Mill (55 ppm) is consistent with those in other <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. The absence of presolar silicates in Sutter's Mill suggests that they were destroyed by aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid. Furthermore, SM2-4 shows heterogeneous distributions of presolar SiC grains (12-54 ppm) in different matrix areas, indicating that the fine-grained matrix clasts come from different sources, with various thermal histories, in the solar nebula.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhao, Xuchao; Lin, Yangting; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Zhang, Jianchao; Hao, Jialong; Zolensky, Michael; Jenniskens, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2575047"> <span id="translatedtitle">Full pharmacological efficacy of a novel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 agonist that does not require <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-like head-group interactions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Strong evidence exists for interactions of zwitterionic phosphate and amine groups in Sphingosine-1 phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) to conserved R and E residues present at the extracellular face of transmembrane-3 (TM3) of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptors. The contribution of R120 and E121 for high affinity ligand-receptor interactions is essential, as single-point R120A or E121A <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 mutants neither bind <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P nor transduce <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P function. Because <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptors are therapeutically interesting, identifying potent selective agonists with different binding modes and in vivo efficacy is of pharmacological importance. Here we describe a modestly water-soluble highly-selective <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 agonist (CYM-5442) that does not require R120 or E121 residues for activating <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1-dependent p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation, which defines a new hydrophobic pocket in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1. CYM-5442 is a full agonist in vitro for <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 internalization, phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Importantly, CYM-5442 was a full agonist for induction and maintenance of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1-dependent lymphopenia, decreasing B-lymphocytes by 65% and T-lymphocytes by 85% of vehicle. Induction of CYM-5442 lymphopenia was dose and time-dependent, requiring serum concentrations in the 50 nM range. In vitro measures of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 activation by CYM-5442 were non-competitively inhibited by a specific <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 antagonist (W146), competitive for <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P, FTY720-P and SEW2871. In addition, lymphopenia by CYM-5442 was reversed by W146 administration or upon pharmacokinetic agonist clearance. Pharmacokinetics in mice also indicated that CYM-5442 partitions significantly in central nervous tissue. These data show that CYM-5442 activates <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1-dependent pathways in vitro and to levels of full efficacy in vivo through a hydrophobic pocket, separable from the orthosteric site of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P binding that is headgroup dependent. PMID:18708635</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Jo, Euijung; Sanna, M. Germana; Brown, Steven; Leaf, Nora; Marsolais, David; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Cameron, Michael; Guerrero, Miguel; Roberts, Edward; Rosen, Hugh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2835551"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cardiomyocyte <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 Receptor–mediated Extracellular Signal–related Kinase Signaling and Desensitization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the ability of sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) to desensitize extracellular signal–related kinase (ERK), a mitogen-activated protein kinase linked to antiapoptotic responses in the heart. In isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P (10 nM–5 ?M) induced ERK phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P stimulation of ERK was completely inhibited by an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1/3 subtype receptor antagonist (VPC23019), by a Gi protein inhibitor (pertussis toxin) and by a mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor (PD98059). A selective <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P3 receptor antagonist (CAY10444) had no effect on <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-induced ERK activation. The selective <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 agonist SEW2871 also induced ERK phosphorylation. Activation of ERK by restimulation with 100 nM <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P was suppressed after 1 hour of preincubation with 100 nM <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P but recovered fully the next day, suggesting receptor recycling. Similar results were obtained in protein kinase C?-null cardiomyocytes. Treatment with the nonselective <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor agonist FTY720 for 1 hour also reduced phospho-ERK expression in response to subsequent <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P stimulation. In contrast to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P, some desensitization to FTY720 persisted after overnight exposure. Cell death induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation was reduced by pretreatment with exogenous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P. This enhanced survival was abrogated by pretreatment with PD98059, VPC23019, or pertussis toxin. Thus, exogenous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P induces rapid and reversible <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1-mediated ERK phosphorylation. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-induced adult mouse cardiomyocyte survival requires ERK activation mediated via an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1–Gi pathway. PMID:19433984</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tao, Rong; Hoover, Holly E.; Zhang, Jianqing; Honbo, Norman; Alano, Conrad C.; Karliner, Joel S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008PhRvD..78k2002A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of hadronic transitions between ? states and observation of ?(4<span class="hlt">S</span>)???(<span class="hlt">1</span>S) decay</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a study of hadronic transitions between ?(mS) (m=4, 3, 2) and ?(nS) (n=2, 1) resonances based on 347.5fb-1 of data taken with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. We report the first observation of ?(4<span class="hlt">S</span>)???(<span class="hlt">1</span>S) decay with a branching fraction B(?(4<span class="hlt">S</span>)???(<span class="hlt">1</span><span class="hlt">S</span>))=(<span class="hlt">1</span>.96±0.06stat±0.09syst)×10-4 and measure the ratio of partial widths ?(?(4<span class="hlt">S</span>)???(<span class="hlt">1</span>S))/?(?(4<span class="hlt">S</span>)??+?-?(<span class="hlt">1</span>S))=2.41±0.40stat±0.12syst. We set 90% CL upper limits on the ratios ?(?(2<span class="hlt">S</span>)???(<span class="hlt">1</span>S))/?(?(2<span class="hlt">S</span>)??+?-?(<span class="hlt">1</span>S))<5.2×10-3 and ?(?(3<span class="hlt">S</span>)???(<span class="hlt">1</span>S))/?(?(3<span class="hlt">S</span>)??+?-?(<span class="hlt">1</span><span class="hlt">S</span>))<<span class="hlt">1</span>.9×10-2. We also present new measurements of the ratios ?(?(4S)??+?-?(2S))/?(?(4<span class="hlt">S</span>)??+?-?(<span class="hlt">1</span><span class="hlt">S</span>))=<span class="hlt">1</span>.16±0.16stat±0.14syst and ?(?(3S)??+?-?(2S))/?(?(3<span class="hlt">S</span>)??+?-?(<span class="hlt">1</span>S))=0.577±0.026stat±0.060syst.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D. S.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Metro..50.9002B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Final report on EURAMET.AUV.A-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The supplementary Regional Comparison EURAMET.AUV.A-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> has been carried out under the auspices of EURAMET's Technical Committee for Acoustics, Ultrasound and Vibration, and the Consultative Committee for Acoustics, Ultrasound and Vibration (CCAUV) of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM). The participating NMIs are the Centro Nacional de Metrología (CENAM, Mexico), the Danish Fundamental Metrology (DFM, Denmark) and the Directorate of Measures and Precious Metals (DMDM, Serbia). The role of the Pilot laboratory was jointly undertaken by the DFM and CENAM. The time schedule was organized in a single star configuration. Two LS1P microphones and two LS2aP were circulated among participants. This report includes the measurement results from the participants, and the analysis leading to a proposal for the reference values for the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barrera-Figueroa, Salvador; Nielsen, Lars</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://calpolynews.calpoly.edu/cpreport/13_reports/oct-9-print.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 1 of 7 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2013 3:21 PM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 2 of 7 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2013 3:21 PM #12;Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 3 of 7 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2013 3</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sze, Lawrence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010mss..confETE06O"> <span id="translatedtitle">New Measurements of H2 16O Line Intensities around 8800 <span class="hlt">CM</span>-1 and 1300 <span class="hlt">CM</span>-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A precise knowledge of spectroscopic parameters for atmospheric molecules is necessary for the control and the modelling of the Earth's atmosphere. The water vapor take a special key as it participate to the global radiative balance of the atmosphere. Our laboratory is engaged since many years in the study of H216O vapor and its isotopologues [1, 2, 3]. An important work has been already made in the spectral region of 4000 to 6600 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 [3] and it continues now in the following spectral window : 6600-9000 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. We have focused on the lines around 8800 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1, as the latest version of HITRAN database still relies on the work of Mandin et al. performed in 1988 [4, 5]. We have recorded several spectra of water vapor with our step-by-step Fourier Transform Spectrometer built in our laboratory [6, 7]. We present here our intensity measurements compared to recent literature data [8] and HITRAN2008 database. Also we have performed a study around 1300 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. The precise knowledge of water vapor for this spectral range is very useful for inversion of IASI spectra. We show some comparisons between our new intensity measurements and LISA database, HITRAN2004, and recent literature data [9]. References: [1] M. Carleer, A. Jenouvrier, A.-C. Vandaele, M.-F. Mérienne, R. Colin, N. F. Zobov, O. L. Polyansky, J. Tennyson and V. A. Savin, J. Chem Phys 111 (1999) 2444-2450. [2] M.-F. Mérienne, A. Jenouvrier, C. Hermans, A.-C. Vandaele, M. Carleer, C. Clerbaux, P.-F. Coheur, R. Colin, S. Fally, M. Bachc J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Trans. 82 (2003) 99-117. [3] A. Jenouvrier, L. Daumont, L. RÉgalia-Jarlot, Vl. G. Tyuterev, M. Carleer, A. C. Vandaele, S. Mikhailenko and S. Fally, JQSRT, 105 (2007) 326-355. [4] J.-Y. Mandin, J.-P. Chevillard, J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, Can. J. Phys, 66 (1988) 997-1011. [5] J.-Y. Mandin, J.-P. Chevillard, J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, J. Mol. Spectrosc, 132 (1988) 352-360. [6] J-J. Plateaux, A. Barbe and A. Delahaigue, Spectrochim. Acta, 51A (1995) 1169-1153 [7] L. Régalia, Thesis, Reims, 1996 (France). [8] R. N. Tolchenov, J. Tennyson, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 231 (2005) 23-27. [9] L.H. Coudert, G.Wagner, M.Birk, U.I. Baranov, M.J. Lafferty, J-M. Flaud, J. Mol. Spect, 251 (2008) 357-339</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oudot, C.; Regalia, L.; Le Wang; Daumont, L.; Thomas, X.; von der Heyden, P.; Decatoire, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.432.1178H"> <span id="translatedtitle">2MTF - II. New Parkes 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> observations of 303 southern galaxies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present new 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> neutral hydrogen (H I) observations of spiral galaxies for the 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) survey. Using the 64-m Parkes radio telescope multibeam system we obtain 152 high signal-to-noise ratio H I spectra from which we extract 148 high-accuracy (<5 per cent error) velocity widths and derive reliable rotation velocities. The observed sample consists of 303 southern (? < -40°) galaxies selected from the 2MASS Redshift Survey with Ks < 11.25 mag, cz < 10 000 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and axis ratio b/a < 0.5. The H I observations reported in this paper will be combined with new H I spectra from the Green Bank and Arecibo telescopes, together producing the most uniform Tully-Fisher survey ever constructed (in terms of sky coverage). In particular, due to its near-infrared selection, 2MTF will be significantly more complete at low Galactic latitude (|b| < 15°) and will provide a more reliable map of peculiar velocities in the local Universe.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hong, Tao; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Masters, Karen L.; Springob, Christopher M.; Macri, Lucas M.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Jones, D. Heath; Jarrett, Tom H.; Crook, Aidan C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9627841"> <span id="translatedtitle">Biochemical characterization of bovine alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein F and genotyping with sequence-specific primers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bovine alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein F (alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CN F) was found in a genetic resource of Deutsches Schwarzbuntes Niederungsrind cows at a frequency of 0.009. Biochemical characterization of this new variant was obtained by automated sequencing of reversed-phase HPLC-separated tryptic peptides of alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CN F and alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CN B. alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CN F was found to be a subtype of alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CN B with a single amino acid substitution (SerP/Leu) in position 66. DNA sequencing revealed a C/T transition in position 8418 of the gene. Sequence-specific primers were designed to perform an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction for detection of alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> CnF. Typing of artificial insemination sperm samples included in the genetic resource sperm pool identified one sire heterozygous for alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> CnF. PMID:9627841</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Prinzenberg, E M; Anglade, P; Ribadeau-Dumas, B; Erhardt, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://chemgroups.northwestern.edu/poeppelmeier/pubs/SSO/La4Cu3MoO12%20triangles.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Antiferromagnetic ordering of <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> 2 triangles in La4Cu3MoO12</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">investigated. Susceptibility data show that paramagnetic cupric spin (<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> 2) above room temperature forms <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> 2 of Material Science and Engineering, and Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, Northwestern</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..87d3002L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal experiments: A designer's guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The global (i.e., spatially averaged) spectrum of the redshifted 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> line has generated much experimental interest lately, thanks to its potential to be a direct probe of the epoch of reionization and the dark ages, during which the first luminous objects formed. Since the cosmological signal in question has a purely spectral signature, most experiments that have been built, designed, or proposed have essentially no angular sensitivity. This can be problematic because with only spectral information, the expected global 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal can be difficult to distinguish from foreground contaminants such as galactic synchrotron radiation, since both are spectrally smooth and the latter is many orders of magnitude brighter. In this paper, we establish a systematic mathematical framework for global signal data analysis. The framework removes foregrounds in an optimal manner, complementing spectra with angular information. We use our formalism to explore various experimental design trade-offs, and find that (1) with spectral-only methods, it is mathematically impossible to mitigate errors that arise from uncertainties in one’s foreground model; (2) foreground contamination can be significantly reduced for experiments with fine angular resolution; (3) most of the statistical significance in a positive detection during the dark ages comes from a characteristic high-redshift trough in the 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> brightness temperature; (4) measurement errors decrease more rapidly with integration time for instruments with fine angular resolution; and (5) better foreground models can help reduce errors, but once a modeling accuracy of a few percent is reached, significant improvements in accuracy will be required to further improve the measurements. We show that if observations and data analysis algorithms are optimized based on these findings, an instrument with a 5° wide beam can achieve highly significant detections (greater than 5?) of even extended (high ?z) reionization scenarios after integrating for 500 h. This is in strong contrast to instruments without angular resolution, which cannot detect gradual reionization. Ionization histories that are more abrupt can be detected with our fiducial instrument at the level of tens to hundreds of ?. The expected errors are similarly low during the dark ages, and can yield a 25? detection of the expected cosmological signal after only 100 h of integration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Adrian; Pritchard, Jonathan R.; Tegmark, Max; Loeb, Abraham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3148216"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Prokaryotic <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P Lyase Degrades Extracellular <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P In Vitro and In Vivo: Implication for Treating Hyperproliferative Disorders</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) regulates a broad spectrum of fundamental cellular processes like proliferation, death, migration and cytokine production. Therefore, elevated levels of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P may be causal to various pathologic conditions including cancer, fibrosis, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and aberrant angiogenesis. Here we report that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P lyase from the prokaryote Symbiobacterium thermophilum (StSPL) degrades extracellular <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P in vitro and in blood. Moreover, we investigated its effect on cellular responses typical of fibrosis, cancer and aberrant angiogenesis using renal mesangial cells, endothelial cells, breast (MCF-7) and colon (HCT 116) carcinoma cells as disease models. In all cell types, wild-type StSPL, but not an inactive mutant, disrupted MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by exogenous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P. Functionally, disruption of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor signaling by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P depletion inhibited proliferation and expression of connective tissue growth factor in mesangial cells, proliferation, migration and VEGF expression in carcinoma cells, and proliferation and migration of endothelial cells. Upon intravenous injection of StSPL in mice, plasma <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels rapidly declined by 70% within 1 h and then recovered to normal 6 h after injection. Using the chicken chorioallantoic membrane model we further demonstrate that also under in vivo conditions StSPL, but not the inactive mutant, inhibited tumor cell-induced angiogenesis as an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-dependent process. Our data demonstrate that recombinant StSPL is active under extracellular conditions and holds promise as a new enzyme therapeutic for diseases associated with increased levels of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor signaling. PMID:21829623</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huwiler, Andrea; Bourquin, Florence; Kotelevets, Nataliya; Pastukhov, Oleksandr; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus G.; Zangemeister-Wittke, Uwe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3716205"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical role of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2) in acute vascular inflammation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The endothelium, as the interface between blood and all tissues, plays a critical role in inflammation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) is a bioactive sphingolipid, highly abundant in plasma, that potently regulates endothelial responses through interaction with its receptors (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PRs). Here, we studied the role of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 in the regulation of the proadhesion and proinflammatory phenotype of the endothelium. By using genetic approaches and a <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2-specific antagonist (JTE013), we found that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 plays a key role in the permeability and inflammatory responses of the vascular endothelium during endotoxemia. Experiments with bone marrow chimeras (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr2+/+ ? <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr2+/+, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr2+/+ ? <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr2?/?, and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr2?/? ? <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr2+/+) indicate the critical role of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 in the stromal compartment, in the regulation of vascular permeability and vascular inflammation. In vitro, JTE013 potently inhibited tumor necrosis factor ?–induced endothelial inflammation. Finally, we provide detailed mechanisms on the downstream signaling of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 in vascular inflammation that include the activation of the stress-activated protein kinase pathway that, together with the Rho-kinase nuclear factor kappa B pathway (NF-kB), are required for <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2-mediated endothelial inflammatory responses. Taken together, our data indicate that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 is a key regulator of the proinflammatory phenotype of the endothelium and identify <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 as a novel therapeutic target for vascular disorders. PMID:23723450</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Guoqi; Yang, Li; Kim, Gab Seok; Ryan, Kieran; Lu, Shulin; O’Donnell, Rebekah K.; Spokes, Katherine; Shapiro, Nathan; Aird, William C.; Kluk, Michael J.; Yano, Kiichiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EPSC....9..203R"> <span id="translatedtitle">A young region on Enceladus revealed by 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span> radiometry?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On 5 November 2011, the Cassini spacecraft had a flyby of Enceladus dedicated to its synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument. In the course of that flyby, approximately 80% of Enceladus' surface was also observed serendipitously with the microwave radiometer operating concurrently at 2.2 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. The radiometry data is analyzed and shown to drop sharply in the leading hemisphere's smooth terrain. This drop is also demonstrated in a series of unresolved distant radiometry measurements spread out over the ten years of the Cassini mission. However, the anomaly is absent from distant unresolved RADAR measurements and not visible in SAR imaging. The anomaly is most likely caused by a young surface (<100MYr in age) which has not yet been processed by micrometeoroid impacts below the electromagnetic skin depth (3 m).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ries, P.; Janssen, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982OptCo..44..125E"> <span id="translatedtitle">A 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span> aperture, high quality TEA CO2 laser</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Construction characteristics and performance of a 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span> aperture, corona-type preionized CO2 laser which features a self-sustained discharge are reported. A mixture of CO2:N2:He gas at a ratio of 1:1:7 yielded an output of 34 J/1. An output of 40 J/1 was obtained with a 1:1:10 mixture ratio, with an overall efficiency of 18%. The system displayed a low self-inductance, thereby giving a high small-signal gain, a homogeneous discharge, and good shot-to-shot reproducibility. A low initial electron density level was indicated by the presence of a several hundreds nanoseconds delay in the current and voltage of the system after the preionization peak. The TEA CO2 laser is noted to have applications in plasma heating and other high-energy laser operations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ernst, G. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1982-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0612769v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitude-resolved imaging of Jupiter at lambda = 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a technique for creating a longitude-resolved image of Jupiter's thermal radio emission. The technique has been applied to VLA data taken on 25 January 1996 at a wavelength of 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. A comparison with infrared data shows a good correlation between radio hot spots and the 5 micron hot spots seen on IRTF images. The brightest spot on the radio image is most likely the hot spot through which the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere. We derived the ammonia abundance (= volume mixing ratio) in the hot spot, which is ~ 3 x 10^{-5}, about half that seen in longitude-averaged images of the NEB, or less than 1/3 of the longitude-averaged ammonia abundance in the EZ. This low ammonia abundance probably extends down to at least the 4 bar level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. Sault; C. Engel; Imke de Pater</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740005390&hterms=theories+pf+migration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dtheories%2Bpf%2Bmigration"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hollow cathode restartable 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of substituting high perveance dished grids for low perveance flat ones on performance variables and plasma properties within a 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> modified SERT II thruster are discussed. Results suggest good performance may be achieved as an ion thruster is throttled if the screen grid transparency is decreased with propellant flow rate. Thruster startup tests, which employ a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode between the keeper and the cathode to initiate the discharge, are described. High startup reliability at cathode tip temperatures of about 500 C without excessive component wear over 2000 startup cycles is demonstrated. Testing of a single cusp magnetic field concept of discharge plasma containment is discussed. A theory which explains the observed behavior of the device is presented and proposed thruster modifications and future testing plans are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilbur, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750015607&hterms=Alan+Schoenfeld&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DAlan%2BSchoenfeld"> <span id="translatedtitle">Power processor for a 30<span class="hlt">cm</span> ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thermal vacuum power processor for the NASA Lewis 30<span class="hlt">cm</span> Mercury Ion Engine was designed, fabricated and tested to determine compliance with electrical specifications. The power processor breadboard used the silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) series resonant inverter as the basic power stage to process all the power to an ion engine. The power processor includes a digital interface unit to process all input commands and internal telemetry signals so that operation is compatible with a central computer system. The breadboard was tested in a thermal vacuum environment. Integration tests were performed with the ion engine and demonstrate operational compatibility and reliable operation without any component failures. Electromagnetic interference data were also recorded on the design to provide information on the interaction with total spacecraft.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biess, J. J.; Inouye, L. Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23618036"> <span id="translatedtitle">11 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Haughton D left cervical aortic arch aneurysm.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 56 year old Caucasian man presented with sudden loss of consciousness while driving and was found to have an 11 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Haughton D type left cervical aortic arch aneurysm with normal brachiocephalic branching and normal descending thoracic laterality but with considerable tortuosity and redundancy of aortic arch. The aneurysm arose between the left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery. It compressed and stretched the left common carotid artery, compressed the pulmonary trunk and the left pulmonary artery, stretched the vagus, left recurrent laryngeal and left phrenic nerves and caused extreme deviation of trachea, severely compromising the tracheal lumen. Patient underwent successful interposition graft replacement of distal aortic arch under total circulatory arrest and selective unihemispherical cerebral perfusion. PMID:23618036</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kaul, Pankaj</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070022442&hterms=spine+evolution&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dspine%2Bevolution"> <span id="translatedtitle">Astronaut Risk Levels During Crew Module (<span class="hlt">CM</span>) Land Landing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) is investigating the merits of water and land landings for the crew exploration vehicle (CEV). The merits of these two options are being studied in terms of cost and risk to the astronauts, vehicle, support personnel, and general public. The objective of the present work is to determine the astronaut dynamic response index (DRI), which measures injury risks. Risks are determined for a range of vertical and horizontal landing velocities. A structural model of the crew module (<span class="hlt">CM</span>) is developed and computational simulations are performed using a transient dynamic simulation analysis code (LS-DYNA) to determine acceleration profiles. Landing acceleration profiles are input in a human factors model that determines astronaut risk levels. Details of the modeling approach, the resulting accelerations, and astronaut risk levels are provided.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lawrence, Charles; Carney, Kelly S.; Littell, Justin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1502.07596.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Foregrounds in Wide-Field Redshifted 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Power Spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Detection of 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> emission of HI from the epoch of reionization, at redshifts z>6, is limited primarily by foreground emission. We investigate the signatures of wide-field measurements and an all-sky foreground model using the delay spectrum technique that maps the measurements to foreground object locations through signal delays between antenna pairs. We demonstrate interferometric measurements are inherently sensitive to all scales, including the largest angular scales, owing to the nature of wide-field measurements. These wide-field effects are generic to all observations but antenna shapes impact their amplitudes substantially. A dish-shaped antenna yields the most desirable features from a foreground contamination viewpoint, relative to a dipole or a phased array. Comparing data from recent Murchison Widefield Array observations, we demonstrate that the foreground signatures that have the largest impact on the HI signal arise from power received far away from the primary field of view. We identify diffu...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Bowman, Judd D; Barry, N; Beardsley, A P; Bernardi, G; Briggs, F; Cappallo, R J; Carroll, P; Corey, B E; de Oliveira-Costa, A; Dillon, Joshua S; Emrich, D; Ewall-Wice, A; Feng, L; Goeke, R; Greenhill, L J; Hazelton, B J; Hewitt, J N; Hurley-Walker, N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P; Kratzenberg, E; Lenc, E; Line, J; Loeb, A; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Neben, A R; Oberoi, D; Offringa, A R; Ord, S M; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B; Pober, J C; Prabu, T; Procopio, P; Riding, J; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Sethi, Shiv K; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Sullivan, I S; Tegmark, M; Tingay, S J; Trott, C M; Waterson, M; Wayth, R B; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wu, C; Wyithe, J S B</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020062709&hterms=faraday+probe&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dfaraday%2Bprobe"> <span id="translatedtitle">Translation Optics for 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Ion Engine Thrust Vector Control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Data were obtained from a 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> xenon ion thruster in which the accelerator grid was translated in the radial plane. The thruster was operated at three different throttle power levels, and the accelerator grid was incrementally translated in the X, Y, and azimuthal directions. Plume data was obtained downstream from the thruster using a Faraday probe mounted to a positioning system. Successive probe sweeps revealed variations in the plume direction. Thruster perveance, electron backstreaming limit, accelerator current, and plume deflection angle were taken at each power level, and for each accelerator grid position. Results showed that the thruster plume could easily be deflected up to six degrees without a prohibitive increase in accelerator impingement current. Results were similar in both X and Y direction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haag, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7066626"> <span id="translatedtitle">Very Large Array observations of Uranus at 2. 0 <span class="hlt">cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radio observations of Uranus obtained at 2.0 <span class="hlt">cm</span> with the B configuration of the VLA during April 1985 are reported. The calibration and data-reduction procedures are described in detail, and the results are presented in tables, maps, and graphs and compared with IRIS 44-micron observations (Hanel et al., 1986). Features discussed include highest brightness centered on the pole rather than on the subearth point, a decrease in brightness temperature (by up to 9 K) at latitudes between -20 and -50 deg (well correlated with the IRIS data), and disk-center position (corrected for the observed radio asymmetry) in good agreement with that found on the basis of the outer contours of the image. 15 references.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berge, G.L.; Muhleman, D.O.; Linfield, R.P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003A%26A...408..961R"> <span id="translatedtitle">35 <span class="hlt">cm</span> observations of a sample of large supernova remnants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present radio maps of ten large-diameter supernova remnants observed at 35 <span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. The angular resolution is 14farcm5 . The sources are G126.2+1.6, G127.1+0.5, HB3, HB9, S147, IC 443, Cygnus Loop, W63 and HB21. For each object we give an integrated flux density and improved spectra when necessary. We also present a map of G213.0-0.6, which we tentatively identify as a new large supernova remnant with a very low surface brightness, apparently interacting with the H Ii region S284. Based on observations with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope operated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), Bonn, Germany.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reich, W.; Zhang, X.; Fürst, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0006150v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">M87 at 90<span class="hlt">cm</span>: A Different Picture</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report new radio imaging of the large scale radio structure of M87 with the VLA at 90 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. These new images show the complex structure of the radio emission more clearly than previous attempts, some of which date back to the 1940's. The images suggest that the outward flow from the M87 nucleus extends well beyond the 2 kpc jet. Two ``bubbles'' of synchrotron emission appear to be inflated by this flow. A simple model of the emission, combined with our knowledge of the inner jet, suggests that the energy input into this region from the M87 nucleus exceeds the energy being radiated away as X-rays. This argues that the region within 40 kpc of the center of M87 is currently dominated by energy input from the M87 nucleus. The gas in the region is expanding, not flowing inward as is envisioned in the cooling flow model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. N. Owen; J. a Eilek; N. E. Kassim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-06-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740048203&hterms=Atlas+Maps&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DAtlas%2B%2528Maps%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atlas of lunar radar maps at 70-<span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The intensity distribution of lunar radar echoes has been mapped for two-thirds of the earth-visible lunar surface at a wavelength of 70 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. The depolarizing effects of the lunar surface were observed by simultaneously receiving the radar echoes in opposite polarizations. These echoes were mapped with areal resolutions of 25-100 sq km. Mapping with this resolution confirmed that the young craters have enhanced returns. A few craters were found to have enhanced echoes only from their rims. Backscattering differences were also observed between various areas within a mare, between different highland areas, and between maria and adjacent highlands. These scattering differences were interpreted with a simple model, which assumed that the surface backscattered with varying amounts of quasi-specular and diffuse power. Only an increase in the diffuse power was needed to give the numerical values of the enhancements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, T. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0712.0497v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">De-contamination of cosmological 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> maps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a method for extracting the expected cosmological 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal from the epoch of reionization, taking into account contaminating radiations and random instrumental noise. The method is based on the maximum a-posteriori probability (MAP) formalism and employs the coherence of the contaminating radiation along the line-of-sight and the three-dimensional correlations of the cosmological signal. We test the method using a detailed and comprehensive modeling of the cosmological 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal and the contaminating radiation. The signal is obtained using a high resolution N-body simulation where the gas is assumed to trace the dark matter and is reionized by stellar radiation computed from semi-analytic galaxy formation recipes. We model contaminations to the cosmological signal from synchrotron and free-free galactic foregrounds and extragalactic sources including active galactic nuclei, radio haloes and relics, synchrotron and free-free emission from star forming galaxies, and free-free emission from dark matter haloes and the intergalactic medium. We provide tests of the reconstruction method for several rms values of instrumental noise from $\\sigma_{N}=1$ to 250 mK. For low instrumental noise, the recovered signal, along individual lines-of-sight, fits the true cosmological signal with a mean rms difference of $d_{rms}\\approx 1.7\\pm 0.6$ for $\\sigma_{N}=1$ mK, and $d_{rms}\\approx 4.2\\pm 0.4$ for $\\sigma_{N}=5$ mK. The one-dimensional power spectrum is nicely reconstructed for all values of $\\sigma_{N}$ considered here, while the reconstruction of the two-dimensional power spectrum and the Minkowski functionals is good only for noise levels of the order of few mK.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liron Gleser; Adi Nusser; Andrew J. Benson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992Metic..27R.228G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Not All Refractory Spherules in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2S are Chondrules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Refractory spherules in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 meteorites are small, <300 micrometers in diameter, inclusions composed predominantly of spinel, with accessory hibonite and perovskite (Macdougall 1981). On the basis of their chondrule-like morphology, and the inward-radiating habit of hibonite in some inclusions, it has been suggested that refractory spherules formed from liquid droplets (Macdougall 1981; MacPherson et al. 1983). Since many spherules are composed purely of spinel, Macdougall (1981) estimated that their 1-atm melting temperature might have been as high as 2135 degrees C. Melt temperatures in excess of 1550 degrees C were estimated by MacPherson et al. (1983) for the spinel-hibonite spherule BB1. Refractory spherules are a minor component of the Ca-Al rich inclusions (CAIs) found in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2s. Of 345 CAIs located in the <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 Cold Bokkeveld only 4 are refractory spherules (study in collaboration with M. Lee, University of Essex). Textural evidence from Cold Bokkeveld demonstrates that CAIs in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2s are highly fragmented and must have been derived by disruption of larger objects (Greenwood et al. 1991). That this is also the case for refractory spherules is clearly demonstrated by MSP1, an anhedral, spinel-bearing inclusion (300 mmicrometer longest dimension) located in situ in Murchison (<span class="hlt">CM</span>2). It comprises a rounded core (110 micrometers in diameter) of Fe-free spinel (V2O3 0.5wt%) surrounded by a rim of pyroxene (15-25 micrometers thick), in turn enclosed by a zone of olivine (Fo 99.7) and Mg-rich phyllosilicate. The spinel core contains 15% void space (estimated). The pyroxene rim is zoned outwards from fassaite to diopside. Blocky crystals of olivine <20 micrometers in diameter form a discontinuous rim to pyroxene and occur as isolated grains enclosed by Mg-phyllosilicate. The inclusion has an irregular outline and a sharp contact with surrounding matrix, indicating that it is a fragment of a larger, now disrupted CAI. In CV3 meteorites refractory spinel-rich spherules, similar to the Murchison example, occur within a number of different inclusion-types. Nodules, 5-300 micrometers in diameter, composed of spinel, melilite, perovskite, and pyroxene are common constituents of amoeboid olivine aggregates (Hashimoto and Grossman 1987). Melilite is also present in some Murchison spherules (MacPherson et al. 1983), and prior to aqueous alteration may have been an important constituent in many of these objects. Spherical clumps of spinel crystals, termed "framboids" by El Goresy et al. (1979) are common constituents of type B2 coarse-grained CAIs (Wark and Lovering 1982). One B2 CAI in Vigarano contains a 160-micrometer-diameter framboid with a 10-20-micrometer-thick rim of spinel enclosing a touching framework of rounded grains (5-15 micrometers in diameter). Melilite, present in the bulk inclusion, forms an outer rind to the framboid 5-10 micrometers thick and may be contiguous with crystals (angstrom k(sub)16.5) interstitial to spinel within the framboid. Individually rimmed spinel nodules, up to 300 micrometers in diameter, are also an important component of "fluffy" type A inclusions (MacPherson and Grossman 1984). The structure of the Murchison inclusion MSP1 indicates that at least some <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 refractory spherules were components of larger inclusions. In CV3s, experimental evidence suggests that spinel spherules represent residual solid material that acquired a rounded form during partial melting (Wark and Lovering 1982). The comparison made between chondrules and spherules may therefore be misleading and results in erroneously high estimates of the temperatures experienced by these objects. El Goresy A., Nagel K., and Ramdohr P. (1979) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 10th, 833-850. Greenwood R.C., Hutchison R., and Cressey G. (1991) Meteoritics (abstract) 26, 340. Hashimoto A. and Grossman L. (1987) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 51, 1685-1704. Macdougall J.D. (1981) Geophys. Res. Lett. 8, 966-969. MacPherson G.J. and Grossman, L. (1984) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 48, 29-46. MacPherson G.J., Bar-Matthews M., Tanak</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greenwood, R. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.inria.fr/docs/00/89/37/33/PDF/hal-00893733.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Mendelian polymorphism underlying quantitative variations of goat ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Mendelian polymorphism underlying quantitative variations of goat ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein F. GROSCLAUDE- les, designated a,,-Cn'-, ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CnF and ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-Cno, were identified at the goat a!-Cn locus superiority in casein content of milks from goats possessing the allele</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyer, Edmond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992PhRvD..46.4365U"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum cosmology of openR×S2×<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examine the classical and quantum cosmology of a Kantowski-Sachs spacetime manifold with a topology openR×S2×<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and a nonzero cosmological constant, within the framework of canonical quantum gravity. The classical trajectories are analyzed, and it is shown that the classical problem can be reduced to that of free particles. Both the Hartle-Hawking ``no-boundary'' proposal and the Vilenkin ``outgoing flux'' proposal are examined. First, the Hartle-Hawking proposal is generalized to canonical quantum gravity by imposing generic initial conditions on the solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation at small scale factors. The resulting wave function has essentially the same leading exponential behavior as the semiclassical approximation to the ``no-boundary'' Euclidean functional integral in the nonoscillatory region. It is further shown, by calculating overlap integrals with semiclassical wave functions, that the wave function diverges too quickly in this region to be interpreted probabilistically. An analogue of the Baum-Hawking factor appears, and is interpreted as indicating that, given a small ?, the wave function is highly peaked around a class of configurations in which the S2 radius is R=[1/(2G?1/2)]. These configurations are classically unstable. Second, given a complete set of solutions to the Wheeler-DeWitt equation, the outgoing flux proposal is found to be insufficient to select a unique wave function. A source is found for the Wheeler-DeWitt current of the above solutions. No analogue of the Baum-Hawking factor appears in the outgoing flux model.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Uglum, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4541309C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet Observations Of C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) By MAVEN</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On its journey to Mars, MAVEN has been serendipitously positioned to study the anticipated sungrazing comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(ISON) and offers important scientific observations. The MAVEN mission is the first to attempt to understand the evolution of the Martian atmosphere by determining the effects of atmospheric loss to space. The IUVS instrument has two large field of regard(55x11 and 24x11 degrees) and observes in the mid and far ultraviolet (115-340 nm). It was designed to be able to map the atmosphere in several neutral and some ionized species. These performance characteristics make IUVS ideal to study ISON, as it can take both two dimensional spatial scans as well as spectral data. Tentative plans indicate the comet can be acquired on Dec 8th, assuming that the comet survives the near sun encounter. If observations prove possible, IUVS will be able to study ISON shortly after perihelion, and from a different vantage point from Earth. Science goals include UV observations of D/H, morphology & time evolution of the hydrogen coma and UV spectroscopy of the inner coma. IUVS can potentially make a major contribution to the international community by measuring D/H, thus contributing to our understanding of the origin of Earth’s water. IUVS will also make MUV and FUV observations of molecular species in the inner coma, valuable for understanding the chemical evolution of cometary molecular gases. The poster will present provisional observation plans as well as simulated spectra and spatial profiles. We welcome input from the community on these plans, in the spirit of maximizing the scientific return of the international campaign. The work has been supported by the MAVEN project and NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX09AB59G.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crismani, Matteo; Schneider, N.; Stewart, I.; Combi, M.; Fougere, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/solv-int/9507006v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hamiltonian Structures on Coadjoint Orbits of Semidirect Product of $G=Diff_+(<span class="hlt">S</span>^{<span class="hlt">1</span>})$ and $C^{\\infty}(<span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>, {\\bf R})$</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider the semidirect product of diffeomorphisms of the circle $D={Diff}_+(<span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>)$ and $C^{\\infty}(<span class="hlt">S</span>^{<span class="hlt">1</span>}, {\\bf R})$ functions, classify its coadjoint orbits and prove the integrability of hamiltonian (Generalized Dispersive Water Waves (DWW) and KdV-type) systems related to corresponding Lie algebra centrally extended by Kac-Moody, Virasoro and semidirect product cocycles with arbitrary coefficients.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Zujewski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-08-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sci.utah.edu/publications/muralidhara11/Muralidhara_PLoSOne2011-appendix.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Muralidhara, Gross, Gutell & Alter (2011) PLoS One | Supplementary Appendix <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> | A-1 Supplementary Figures <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>S17</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Figures <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>­S17 Figure <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Significant 16S eigenpositions and their correlations with the NCBI Taxonomy;A-2 | alterlab.org/rRNA/ Muralidhara, Gross, Gutell & Alter (2011) Figure S2. Significant 23S Taxonomy Browser [19] (Figure S3). (b) Raster display of the 25 most significant 23S eigenpositions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Utah, University of</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/71/81/54/PDF/biochimie_2002.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ribosomal protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> induces a conformational change of tmRNA; more than one protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> per molecule of tmRNA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ribosomal protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> induces a conformational change of tmRNA; more than one protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> per molecule of tmRNA Valérie Bordeau, Brice Felden * Laboratoire de Biochimie Pharmaceutique, Faculté de cedex, France Received 15 March 2002; accepted 23 April 2002 Abstract tmRNA (10Sa RNA, ssrA) acts</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140003129&hterms=History&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DHistory"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Are Space Exposure Histories Telling Us about <span class="hlt">CM</span> Carbonaceous Chondrites?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chondrites are chemically primitive and carbonaceous (C) chondrites are potentially the most primitive among them because they mostly escaped thermal metamor-phism that affected the other chondrite groups and ratios of their major, non-volatile and most of the volatile elements are similar to those of the Sun. Therefore, C chondrites are ex-pected to retain a good record of the origin and early history of the solar system. Carbonaceous chondrites are chemically differentiated from other chondrites by their high Mg/Si ratios and refractory elements, and have experienced various degrees of aqueous alteration. They are subdivided into eight subgroups (CI, <span class="hlt">CM</span>, CO, CV, CK, CR, CB and CH) based on major element and oxygen isotopic ratios. Their elemental ratios spread over a wide range though those of ordinary and enstatite chondrites are relatively uniform. It is critical to know how many sepa-rate bodies are represented by the C chondrites. In this study, <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites, the most abundant carbona-ceous chondrites, are examined. They are water-rich, chon-drule- and CAI-bearing meteorites and most of them are brec-cias. High-temperature components such as chondrules, iso-lated olivine and CAIs in CMs are frequently altered and some of them are replaced by clay minerals and surrounded by sul-fides whose Fe was derived from mafic silicates. On the basis of degrees of aqueous alteration, CMs have been classified into subtypes from 1 to 2, although Rubin et al. [1] assigned subtype 1 to subtype 2 and subtype 2 to subtype 2.6 using various petrologic properties. The classification is based on petrographic and mineralogic properties. For example, though tochilinite (2[(Fe, Mg, Cu, Ni[])<span class="hlt">S</span>] <span class="hlt">1</span>.57-1.85 [(Mg, Fe, Ni, Al, Ca)(HH)2]) clumps are produced during aqueous alteration, they disappear and sulfide appears with increasing degrees of aqueous alteration. Cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age measurements of <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites reveal an unusual feature. Though CRE ages of other chondrite groups range from several Myr to tens of Myr, CMs exposure ages are not longer than 7 Myr with one-third of the <span class="hlt">CM</span> having less than 1 Myr CRE age. For those <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites that have CRE ages <1 Myr, there are two discern-able CRE peaks. Because a CRE age reflects how long a me-teorite is present as a separate body in space, the peaks pre-sumably represent collisional events on the parent body (ies) [2]. In this study we defined 4 distinct CRE age groups of CMs and systematically characterized the petrography in each of the 4 CRE age groups to determine whether the groups have significant petrographic differences, with such differences probably reflecting different parent body (asteroid) geological processing, or multiple original bodies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takenouchi, A.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M.; Velbel, M. A.; Ross, K.; Zolensky, P.; Le, L.; Imae, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010HiA....15..519G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-Gas in protoplanetary disks</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High resolution infrared spectroscopy is the key technique to look at the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. As molecular hydrogen is an inefficient emitter, CO gas is the single most important molecular probe of the disk. The energy gaps of the vibrationally excited levels (?E > 3000 K) and the critical density required to keep the molecules in the excited state (nc ~ 1010<span class="hlt">cm</span>-3) match well to the physical condition of the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. In order to resolve the vibrational lines of different rotational states, a spectral resolving power of ?/?? > 10000 is necessary; or even higher (> 30000 -100000), if we would like to fully resolve the gas kinematics. Scoville et al. (1980) provided the fundamentals of the excitation mechanisms, which is essential for the interpretation of the vibrational transitions of CO, and pioneered the study of the circumstellar environment with infrared CO lines in the observation of BN (Scoville et al. (1983)). The bandhead emission of CO at 2.3 ?m from young stars was unambiguously attributed to the circumstellar disks by Carr (1989) and Najita et al. (1996), because the gas kinematics matches well to what is expected from Keplerian rotation. Since then, the gas kinematics have been extensively used to shed light on peculiar disk structures, such as the inner truncation (Brittain et al. 2003), the outer truncation (Najita et al. 2008), and the gap (van der Plas et al. 2008; though this is an oxygen forbidden line).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goto, Miwa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.429.2380C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Associated 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption towards the cores of radio galaxies</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations to detect H I in absorption towards the cores of a sample of radio galaxies. From observations of a sample of 16 sources, we detect H I in absorption towards the core of only one source, the Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxy 3C 452 which has been reported earlier by Gupta & Saikia. In this paper we present the results for the remaining sources which have been observed to a similar optical depth as for a comparison sample of compact steep-spectrum (CSS) and gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) sources. We also compile available information on H I absorption towards the cores of extended radio sources observed with angular resolutions of a few arcsec or better. The fraction of extended sources with detection of H I absorption towards their cores is significantly smaller (7/47) than the fraction of H I detection towards CSS and GPS objects (28/49). For the cores of extended sources, there is no evidence of a significant correlation between H I column density towards the cores and the largest linear size of the sources. The distribution of the relative velocity of the principal absorbing component towards the cores of extended sources is not significantly different from that of the CSS and GPS objects. However, a few of the CSS and GPS objects have blueshifted components ?1000 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, possibly due to jet-cloud interactions. With the small number of detections towards cores, the difference in the detection rate between FR I (4/32) and FR II (3/15) sources is within the statistical uncertainties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chandola, Yogesh; Gupta, Neeraj; Saikia, D. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070023371&hterms=parameters+optical+potential&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dparameters%2Boptical%2Bpotential"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimentally Determined Plasma Parameters in a 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Ion Engine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Single planar Langmuir probes and fiber optic probes are used to concurrently measure the plasma properties and neutral density variation in a 30<span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter ion engine discharge chamber, from the immediate vicinity of the keeper to the near grid plasma region. The fiber optic probe consists of a collimated optical fiber recessed into a double bore ceramic tube fitted with a stainless steel light-limiting window. The optical fiber probe is used to measure the emission intensity of excited neutral xenon for a small volume of plasma, at various radial and axial locations. The single Langmuir probes, are used to generate current-voltage characteristics at a total of 140 spatial locations inside the discharge chamber. Assuming a maxwellian distribution for the electron population, the Langmuir probe traces provide spatially resolved measurements of plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density. Data reduction for the NSTAR TH8 and TH15 throttle points indicates an electron temperature range of 1 to 7.9 eV and an electron density range of 4e10 to le13 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(sup -3), throughout the discharge chamber, consistent with the results in the literature. Plasma potential estimates, computed from the first derivative of the probe characteristic, indicate potential from 0.5V to 11V above the discharge voltage along the thruster centerline. These values are believed to be excessively high due to the sampling of the primary electron population along the thruster centerline. Relative neutral density profiles are also obtained with a fiber optic probe sampling photon flux from the 823.1 nm excited to ground state transition. Plasma parameter measurements and neutral density profiles will be presented as a function of probe location and engine discharge conditions. A discussion of the measured electron energy distribution function will also be presented, with regards to variation from pure maxwellian. It has been found that there is a distinct primary population found along the thruster centerline, which causes estimates of electron temperature, electron density, and plasma potential, to err on the high side, due this energetic population. Computation of the energy distribution fimction of the plasma clearly indicates the presence of primaries, whose presence become less obvious with radial distance from the main discharge plume.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sengupta, Anita; Goebel, Dan; Fitzgerald, Dennis; Owens, Al; Tynan, George; Dorner, Russ</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...574A..56G"> <span id="translatedtitle">A 1.3 <span class="hlt">cm</span> line survey toward IRC +10216</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. IRC +10216 is the prototypical carbon star exhibiting an extended molecular circumstellar envelope. Its spectral properties are therefore the template for an entire class of objects. Aims: The main goal is to systematically study the ? ~ 1.3 <span class="hlt">cm</span> spectral line characteristics of IRC +10216. Methods: We carried out a spectral line survey with the Effelsberg-100 m telescope toward IRC +10216. It covers the frequency range between 17.8 GHz and 26.3 GHz (K-band). Results: In the circumstellar shell of IRC +10216, we find 78 spectral lines, among which 12 remain unidentified. The identified lines are assigned to 18 different molecules and radicals. A total of 23 lines from species known to exist in this envelope are detected for the first time outside the solar system and there are additional 20 lines first detected in IRC +10216. The potential orgin of "U" lines is also discussed. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we then determine rotational temperatures and column densities of 17 detected molecules. Molecular abundances relative to H2 are also estimated. A non-LTE analysis of NH3 shows that the bulk of its emission arises from the inner envelope with a kinetic temperature of 70 ± 20 K. Evidence for NH3 emitting gas with higher kinetic temperature is also obtained, and potential abundance differences between various 13C-bearing isotopologues of HC5N are evaluated. Overall, the isotopic 12C/13C ratio is estimated to be 49 ± 9. Finally, a comparison of detected molecules in the ? ~ 1.3 <span class="hlt">cm</span> range with the dark cloud TMC-1 indicates that silicate-bearing molecules are more predominant in IRC +10216. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgSpectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/574/A56</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gong, Y.; Henkel, C.; Spezzano, S.; Thorwirth, S.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Mao, R. Q.; Klein, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24909680"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis and SAR studies of benzyl ether derivatives as potent orally active <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? agonists.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report herein the synthesis and structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a series of benzyl ether compounds as an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? receptor modulator. From our SAR studies, the installation of substituents onto the central benzene ring of 2a was revealed to potently influence the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? agonistic activities, in particular, an ethyl group on the 2-position afforded satisfactory <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P?/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? selectivity. These changes of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? agonistic activities caused by the alteration of substituents on the 2-position were reasonably explained by a docking study using an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? X-ray crystal structure and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? homology modeling. We found that compounds 2b and 2e had a potent in vivo immunosuppressive efficacy along with acceptable <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P?/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P? selectivity, and confirmed that these compounds had less in vivo bradycardia risk through the evaluation of heart rate change after oral administration of the compounds (30 mg/kg, p.o.) in rats. PMID:24909680</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsuji, Takashi; Suzuki, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Goto, Taiji; Sekiguchi, Yukiko; Ikeda, Takuya; Fukuda, Takeshi; Takemoto, Toshiyasu; Mizuno, Yumiko; Kimura, Takako; Kawase, Yumi; Nara, Futoshi; Kagari, Takashi; Shimozato, Takaichi; Yahara, Chizuko; Inaba, Shinichi; Honda, Tomohiro; Izumi, Takashi; Tamura, Masakazu; Nishi, Takahide</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0511141v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Redshift space 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> power spectra from reionization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We construct a simple but self-consistent analytic ionization model for rapid exploration of 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> power spectrum observables in redshift space. It is fully described by the average ionization fraction $x_e(z)$ and HII patch size $R(z)$ and has the flexibility to accommodate various reionization scenarios. The model associates ionization regions with dark matter halos of the number density required to recover $x_e$ and treats redshift space distortions self-consistently with the virial velocity of such halos. Based on this model, we study the line-of-sight structures in the brightness fluctuations since they are the most immune to foreground contamination. We explore the degeneracy between the HII patch size and nonlinear redshift space distortion in the one dimensional power spectrum. We also discuss the limitations experimental frequency and angular resolutions place on their distinguishability. Angular resolution dilutes even the radial signal and will be a serious limitation for resolving small bubbles before the end of reionization. Nonlinear redshift space distortions suggest that a resolution of order 1 -- 10\\arcsec and a frequency resolution of 10kHz will ultimately be desirable to extract the full information in the radial field at $z\\sim 10$. First generation instruments such as LOFAR and MWA can potentially measure radial HII patches of a few comoving Mpc and larger at the end of reionization and are unlikely to be affected by nonlinear redshift space distortions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xiaomin Wang; Wayne Hu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040129576&hterms=pyrolytic+carbon&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dpyrolytic%2Bcarbon"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance and Vibration of 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Pyrolytic Ion Thruster Optics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbon has a sputter erosion rate about an order of magnitude less than that of molybdenum, over the voltages typically used in ion thruster applications. To explore its design potential, 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> pyrolytic carbon ion thruster optics have been fabricated geometrically similar to the molybdenum ion optics used on NSTAR. They were then installed on an NSTAR Engineering Model thruster, and experimentally evaluated over much of the original operating envelope. Ion beam currents ranged from 0.51 to 1.76 Angstroms, at total voltages up to 1280 V. The perveance, electron back-streaming limit, and screen-grid transparency were plotted for these operating points, and compared with previous data obtained with molybdenum. While thruster performance with pyrolytic carbon was quite similar to that with molybdenum, behavior variations can reasonably be explained by slight geometric differences. Following all performance measurements, the pyrolytic carbon ion optics assembly was subjected to an abbreviated vibration test. The thruster endured 9.2 g(sub rms) of random vibration along the thrust axis, similar to DS 1 acceptance levels. Despite significant grid clashing, there was no observable damage to the ion optics assembly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haag, Thomas; Soulas, George C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' 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id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a 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showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760007106&hterms=mercury+facts&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dmercury%2Bfacts"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> mercury ion thruster research 1975</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Doubly charged ion current measurements in the beam of a SERT II thruster are shown to introduce corrections which bring its calculated thrust into close agreement with that measured during flight testing. A theoretical model of doubly charged ion production and loss in mercury electron bombardment thrusters is discussed and is shown to yield doubly-to-singly charged ion density ratios that agree with experimental measurements obtained on a 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter thruster over a range of operating conditions. Single cusp magnetic field thruster operation is discussed and measured ion beam profiles, performance data, doubly charged ion densities, and discharge plasma characteristics are presented for a range of operating conditions and thruster geometries. Variations in the characteristics of this thruster are compared to those observed in the divergent field thruster and the cusped field thruster is shown to yield flatter ion beam profiles at about the same discharge power and propellant utilization operating point. An ion optics test program is described and the measured effects of grid system dimensions on ion beamlet half angle and diameter are examined. The effectiveness of hollow cathode startup using a thermionically emitting filament within the cathode is examined over a range of mercury flow rates and compared to results obtained with a high voltage tickler startup technique. Results of cathode plasma property measurement tests conducted within the cathode are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilbur, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8521E..05P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microbiological study of the Murchison <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 meteorite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1864, Louis Pasteur attempted to cultivate living microorganisms from pristine samples of the Orgueil CI1 carbonaceous meteorite. His results were negative and never published, but recorded it in his laboratory notebooks. At that time, only aerobic liquid or agar-based organic reach media were used, as his research on anaerobes had just started. In our laboratory the Murchison <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous meteorite was selected to expand on these studies for microbiological study by cultivation on anaerobic mineral media. Since the surface could have been more easily contaminated, interior fragments of a sample of the Murchison meteorite were extracted and crushed under sterile conditions. The resulting powder was then mixed in anoxic medium and injected into Hungate tubes containing anaerobic media with various growth substrates at different pH and salinity and incubated at different temperatures. The goal of the experiments was to determine if living cells would grow from the material of freshly fractured interior fragments of the stone. If any growth occurred, work could then be carried out to assess the nature of the environmental contamination by observations of the culture growth (rates of speed and biodiversity); live/dead fluorescent staining to determine contamination level and DNA analysis to establish the microbial species present. In this paper we report the results of that study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850004629&hterms=semen+volume+improvement&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dsemen%2Bvolume%2Bimprovement"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ion thruster system (8-<span class="hlt">cm</span>) cyclic endurance test</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the qualification test of an Engineering-Model 5-mN-thrust 8-<span class="hlt">cm</span>-diameter mercury ion thruster which is representative of the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) thrusters. Two of these thrusters are scheduled for future flight test. The cyclic endurance test described herein was a ground-based test performed in a vacuum facility with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled cryo-surface and a frozen mercury target. The Power Electronics Unit, Beam Shield, Gimal, and Propellant Tank that were used with the thruster in the endurance test are also similar to those of the IAPS. The IAPS thruster that will undergo the longest beam-on-time during the actual space test will be subjected to 7,055 hours of beam-on-time and 2,557 cycles during the flight test. The endurance test was successfully concluded when the mercury in the IAPS Propellant Tank was consumed. At that time, 8,471 hours of beam-on-time and 599 cycles had been accumulated. Subsequent post-test-evaluation operations were performed (without breaking vacuum) which extended the test values to 652 cycles and 9,489 hours of beam-on-time. The Power Electronic Unit (PEU) and thruster were in the same vacuum chamber throughout the test. The PEU accumulated 10,268 hr of test time with high voltage applied to the operating thruster or dummy load.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dulgeroff, C. R.; Beattie, J. R.; Poeschel, R. L.; Hyman, J., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010058591&hterms=iso+standards&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Diso%2Bstandards"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CM</span> and DM in an ISO R and D Environment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ISO 9000 - a common buzz word in industry is making inroads to government agencies. The National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) achieved ISO 9001 certification at each of its nine (9) Centers and Headquarters in 1998-1999. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) was recommended for certification in September 1999. Since then, each of the Centers has been going through the semi-annual surveillance audits. Growing out of the manufacturing industry, successful application of the international quality standard to a research and development (R&D) environment has had its challenges. This paper will address how GRC applied Configuration Management (<span class="hlt">CM</span>) and Data (or Document) Management (DM) to meet challenges to achieve ISO certification. One of the first challenges was to fit the ISO 9001-1994 elements to the GRC environment. Some of the elements fit well-Management Responsibility (4.1), Internal Audits (4.17), Document and Data Control (4.5). Other elements were not suited or applied easily to the R&D environment-Servicing (4.19), Statistical Techniques (4.20). Since GRC "builds" only one or two items at a time, these elements were considered not applicable to the environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crowley, Sandra L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20110014892&hterms=lever&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlever"> <span id="translatedtitle">Piezo-Operated Shutter Mechanism Moves 1.5 <span class="hlt">cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The figure shows parts of a shutter mechanism designed to satisfy a number of requirements specific to its original intended application as a component of an atomic clock to be flown in outer space. The mechanism may also be suitable for use in laboratory and industrial vacuum systems on Earth for which there are similar requirements. The requirements include the following: a) To alternately close, then open, a 1.5-<span class="hlt">cm</span>-diameter optical aperture twice per second, with a stroke time of no more than 15 ms, during a total operational lifetime of at least a year; b) To attenuate light by a factor of at least 1012 when in the closed position; c) To generate little or no magnetic field; d) To be capable of withstanding bakeout at a temperature of 200 C to minimize outgassing during subsequent operation in an ultrahigh vacuum; and e) To fit within a diameter of 12 in. (=305 mm) a size limit dictated by the size of an associated magnetic shield. The light-attenuation requirement is satisfied by use of overlapping shutter blades. The closure of the aperture involves, among other things, insertion of a single shutter blade between a pair of shutter blades. The requirement to minimize the magnetic field is satisfied by use of piezoelectric actuators. Because piezoelectric actuators cannot withstand bakeout, they must be mounted outside the vacuum chamber, and, hence, motion must be transmitted from the actuators to the shutter levers via a vacuum-chamber-wall diaphragm.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Glaser, Robert; Bamford, Robert</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4392055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Risk Factors for Discontinuation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Gastric Cancer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the risk factors for discontinuing tegafur/gimeracil/oteracil potassium (<span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>) adjuvant chemotherapy following gastrectomy in patients with gastric cancer. Methods: We retrospectively investigated patients with curatively-resected gastric cancer who received <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> adjuvant chemotherapy. <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> was administered orally at 80-120 mg/day, depending on body surface area, on days 1-28 every 6 weeks for 1 year. The dose and treatment schedule were modified at the clinicians' discretion, according to toxicity. Results: Seventy-one patients were included in the study, 26 of whom discontinued <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy. The relapse-free survival rates in the <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>-completed and <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>-discontinuation groups at 5 years post-surgery were 88.1% and 55.8%, respectively. The overall survival rates in the <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>-completed and <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>-discontinuation groups at 5 years post-surgery were 89.4% and 59.8%, respectively. The hazard ratios for relapse and death were significantly lower in the <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>-completed group compared with those in the <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>-discontinuation group (0.18; p<0.001 and 0.19; p=0.002, respectively). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> discontinuation was significantly associated with an initial overdose of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, having stage I cancer, creatinine clearance <66 mL/min, and a side effect of nausea. Conclusions: These results suggest that assessing renal function to avoid initial overdose of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, together with the early management of side effects, may support the continuation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:25874010</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kawazoe, Hitoshi; Shimasaki, Maya; Ueno, Masaki; Sumikawa, Satomi; Takatori, Shingo; Namba, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Motohira; Sato, Koichi; Kojima, Yoh; Watanabe, Yuji; Moriguchi, Toshihide; Tanaka, Akihiro; Araki, Hiroaki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.P24A..02L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pre-perihelion characterization of Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) is a dynamically new comet on a sungrazing orbit. As such, C/ISON represents a unique opportunity to study both the cosmic-ray-irradiated surface, produced during the comet's long residence in the Oort cloud, and much deeper layers in the nucleus, exposed when the comet passes within 2 solar radii of the Sun at perihelion. During the first phase of our investigation, we collected broadband images of C/ISON on April 10, 2012 at a heliocentric distance of 4.15 AU, using the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS. We used the F606W and F438W filters in three HST orbits covering a total span of ~19 hrs. The comet shows a well delineated coma in the sunward direction extending about 2" from the nucleus, and a dust tail at least 25" long. The coma has an average red color of 5%/0.1 micron within 1.6" from the nucleus, becoming redder towards the tail. Both the color and the size of the coma in the sunward direction are consistent with outflow of micron sized dust. Broadband photometry yielded Af? of 1376 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 589 nm, and 1281 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 433 nm, measured with a 1.6" radius aperture. The total brightness of the comet within a 0.12" radius aperture remained unchanged within 0.03 mag for the entire duration of the observations. A well defined sunward jet is visible after removing the 1/? brightness distribution. The jet is centered at position angle 290 deg (E of Celestial N), with a cone angle of 45 deg, a projected length of 1.6", and a slight curvature towards the north near the end. No temporal change in the morphology is observed, suggesting the jet is circumpolar. Under this assumption, the jet's apparent position constrains the rotational pole to lie within 30 deg of (RA, Dec) = (330, 0), and an obliquity of 50-80 deg. Preliminary analysis using a coma-nucleus separation technique suggests a nuclear radius less than 2 km. The survival of such a small nucleus during its perihelion at 2.7 solar radii is certainly questionable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, J.; Kelley, M. S.; Farnham, T. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Knight, M. M.; Weaver, H. A.; Mutchler, M.; Lamy, P. L.; Toth, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4540702L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early pre-perihelion characterization of Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) is a dynamically new comet on a sungrazing orbit. As such, C/ISON represents a unique opportunity to study both the cosmic-ray-irradiated surface, produced during the comet's long residence in the Oort cloud, and much deeper layers in the nucleus, exposed when the comet passes 1.7 solar radii from the Sun's surface at perihelion. During the first phase of our investigation, we collected broadband images of C/ISON on April 10, 2012 at a heliocentric distance of 4.15 AU, using the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS. We used the F606W and F438W filters in three HST orbits covering a total span of ~19 hrs. The comet shows a well delineated coma in the sunward direction extending about 2" from the nucleus, and a dust tail at least 25" long. The coma has an average red color of 5%/0.1 micron within 1.6" from the nucleus, becoming redder towards the tail. Both the color and the size of the coma in the sunward direction are consistent with outflow of micron sized dust. Broadband photometry yielded Af? of 1376 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 589 nm, and 1281 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 433 nm, measured with a 1.6" radius aperture. The total brightness of the comet within a 0.12" radius aperture remained unchanged within 0.03 mag for the entire duration of the observations. A well defined sunward jet is visible after removing the 1/? brightness distribution. The jet is centered at position angle 290 deg (E of Celestial N), with a cone angle of 45 deg, a projected length of 1.6", and a slight curvature towards the north near the end. No temporal change in the morphology is observed, suggesting the jet is circumpolar. Under this assumption, the jet’s apparent position constrains the rotational pole to lie within 30 deg of (RA, Dec) = (330, 0), and an obliquity of 50-80 deg. Preliminary analysis using a coma-nucleus separation technique suggests a nuclear radius less than 2 km. The survival of such a small nucleus during its sungrazing perihelion is certainly questionable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, M. S.; Farnham, T. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Knight, M. M.; Weaver, H. A.; Mutchler, M. J.; Lamy, P.; Toth, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014acm..conf..364M"> <span id="translatedtitle">The dust environment of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Monte Carlo comet dust tail model has been applied to extract the dust environment parameters of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) from both Earth-based and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) calibrated observations, performed from about 6 Astronomical Units (au) inbound, to right after perihelion passage, when just a small portion of the original comet nucleus survived in the form of a cloud of tiny particles. The early Af? and image data are consistent with particle ejection from an extended active area occupying a large region between latitudes 35°N to 90°N (for a prograde rotating nucleus), with the spin axis having a large obliquity (I ? 70°). This configuration fits nicely the early images and Af? data until approximately 3.9 au inbound, where the emission should become isotropic in order to fit the data. This isotropic ejection model perfectly mimics the minimum in the Af? data found observationally 60 days before perihelion and the steep rise afterwards owing to the strong outburst of activity detected by many observers during the first hours of November 14, 2013. The comparison of the derived dust loss rates with water production rates implies a dust-to-gas ratio which generally decreases with increasing heliocentric distance, and a particle ejection velocity law that is close to a r_h^{-2} dependence. The analysis of SOHO LASCO C3 images around comet's perihelion reveals that, assuming an original nucleus of R_N = 500 m with ? = 1000 kg m^{-3}, at least half of the mass of the nucleus was vaporized when the comet was at about 17 solar radii inbound. We conclude that at that time the nucleus suffered a cataclysmic fragmentation releasing a huge amount of material of 2.3×10^{11} kg, for a particle density of 1000 kg m^{-3}, equivalent to a sphere of 380 m in radius. The model results on a later pre-perihelion image at about 5.5 solar radii implies a further reduction in mass of about 300 to that at 17 solar radii, a consequence of vaporization of comet material. However, the total mass contained in the post-perihelion tails analyzed are about the same of that at 5.5 solar radii pre-perihelion, but with much smaller particles in the distribution, implying that the dominating process at perihelion was particle fragmentation. The total mass contained in the last SOHO LASCO C3 post-perihelion image analyzed, at 27.5 solar radii post-perihelion, the surviving ISON material is just 6.7×10^8 kg or a sphere of 54 m in radius with the density of 1000 kg m^{-3}. The dust contained in the post-perihelion tails is very small in size, with particles having 0.1-50 ? m in radius, distributed following a power law of index -3.5.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moreno, F.; Pozuelos, F.; Aceituno, F.; Casanova, V.; Duffard, R.; López-Moreno, J. J.; Molina, A.; Ortiz, J. L.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Sota, A.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Astronomical Association Cometas-Obs, Amateur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995Metic..30S.601W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solar Noble Gas Microdistributions in Murchison and <span class="hlt">CM</span> Rim Formation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Introduction. Identifiable components of certain carbonaceous chondrites have been interpreted as nebula products. MacPherson et al. [1] described some rims around refractory inclusions in Allende (C3V) as accretionary, and Metzler et al. [2] attributed a nebular origin to fine-grained dust mantles (rims) in <span class="hlt">CM</span> meteorites. In nebula formation scenarios such as that evoked by Metzler et al., we would expect rim material to be largely devoid of solar-implanted noble gases while the brecciated matrix material would be relatively solar gas-rich. Of particular interest in this study, therefore, is examining the microdistribution of solar noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites to attempt to assess the validity of current models for rim formation. Procedure. A polished thick section of Murchison (<span class="hlt">CM</span>) (~300 micrometers thick) was prepared without epoxy impregnation since epoxy is not compatible with the high-vacuum, noble gas mass spectrometer. Noble gases were extracted from targeted regions in situ by pulsed-laser excavation and measured by an ion-counting noble gas mass spectrometer [3]. Typical excavation volumes were about 150 micrometers x 150 micrometers x 100 micrometers. Previous Results. Neon isotopic data from these measurements were reported at LPSC XXVI [3]. All data extracted from the section's rim areas plot within the triangle defined by a three component mixture between 'planetary' (Ne-A), solar wind, and spallation. However, as pointed out by R. Wieler, the data could also be interpreted as a three component mixture between Ne-A, spallation and Q-Ne [4]. Current Results and Discussion. Figure 1 plots the noble gas elemental ratios for representative (other rim and matrix data, though in agreement, are not plotted in order to reduce clutter) rim and matrix analyses along with Q, referenced to 36Ar and normalized to solar wind (ilmenite 12001 [5]). As expected, the heavier noble gases are dominated by Q. In fact, the Xe and Kr isotopic data are indistinguishable from Q within error (not plotted). In contrast, the lighter gases are overabundant relative to their Q complement. While this enrichment might be interpreted as a contribution from an A-type planetary component (Ne,He-A), similarity between rims and matrix, as shown in Fig. 1, suggests the presence of solar gas since the matrix is certainly a solar gas carrier for this 'gas-rich' meteorite. An identical solar-enriched signature was measured in the inner as well as outer portion of a single ~300 micrometers thick rim, suggesting that all the material in this rim was similarly exposed. Thus, solar wind irradiation appears to be pervasive in this section of Murchison, present in both matrix and throughout all rims measured in this study. Therefore, modification of the simple one-stage model for nebula accretion of rimmed objects [2] may be required. References: [1] MacPherson G. J. et al. (1985) GCA, 49, 2267-2279. [2] Metzler K. et al., GCA, 56, 2873-2897. [3] Hohenberg C. M. (1980) Rev. Sci. Instrum., 51, 1075-1082. [4] Wieler R. et al. (1992) GCA, 56, 2907-2921. [5] Eberhardt P. et al. (1972) Proc. LSC Conf. 3rd, 1821-1856.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Woolum, D. S.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Kehm, K.; Poelstra, K.; Guntalilib, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ebi..confP2.13C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of asteroids from mm-<span class="hlt">cm</span> sized grains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. Asteroids and comets are intricately connected to life in the universe. Asteroids are the building blocks of terrestrial planets; water-rich asteroids and comets are likely to be the primary source of water for Earth's oceans and other volatiles (Morbidelli et al. 2000; Hartogh et al. 2011); and they may play role in mass extinctions. Yet, the formation of these objects is poorly understood. There is mounting evidence that the traditional picture of the formation of asteroids must be revised. The size distribution of asteroids is hard to reconcile with a traditional bottomup formation scenario. Instead, asteroids may form top-down, with large 100 - 1000 km sized objects forming first by the gravitational collapse of dense clumps of small particles. Experiments and simulations suggest that dust grains cannot grow to sizes larger than mm-<span class="hlt">cm</span> in protoplanetary disks (Zsom et al. 2010). Also, primitive meteorites from the asteroid belt contain a large mass fraction in chondrules of sizes from 0.1 mm to a few mm. Hence, it is desirable to find a model for asteroid formation from mm-sized particles. Aims. In this work, we model the dynamics of mm-<span class="hlt">cm</span> sized grains in dust-enriched inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We model the dust-gas interaction to determine whether dust grains of this size can form dense, self-gravitating clouds that can collapse to form asteroids. Methods. We perform shearing box simulations of the inner disk using the Pencil Code (Brandenburg & Dobler 2002). The simulations start with a Solar-type solids-to-gas ratio of 0.01 and we gradually increase the particle concentration. In a real protoplanetary disk, solid particles are expected to migrate from the outer regions and concentrate in the inner disk. Results. Our simulations show that mm-sized particles can form very dense clumps, driven by a run-away convergence in the radial-drift flow of these particles - this dynamic is known as the streaming instability (Youdin & Goodman 2005; Johansen et al. 2007). We show that the streaming instability can also occur for small grains, strongly coupled to the surouning gas. We further show that the resulting particle clumps can reach the density where gravitational collapse is expected to take place, giving rise to planetesimals and asteroids. This process requires either a very high solids-to-gas ratio, or a reduced background pressure gradient, such as that produced by large-scale pressure bumps in the disk. Interpretation. This result offers a promising avenue to the formation of asteroids and comets. Additional work with this model may provide insight on the initial distribution of the masses and orbits of asteroids and comets. This information is important because these are the initial conditions for the formation of terrestrial planets, and for the delivery of water and other volatiles to rocky planets in the habitable zone.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carrera, D.; Johansen, A.; Davies, M. B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...22013103H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mcmc Signal Extraction For 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> Global Signal Experiments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of the highly redshifted 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> line promise to provide a great deal of information about the dark ages of the Universe, the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization. It is generally accepted that strong astrophysical foregrounds are a major obstacle to overcome before this promise is realised, largely because of the way they are filtered through a complicated instrumental response. A great deal of work has therefore been devoted to studying foreground removal for observations with the low-frequency radio arrays which are starting to collect data. The case of so-called 'global signal' experiments has received less attention, however. I will compare the foreground fitting problem in these two types of experiments, and describe a foreground fitting methodology which has been developed for a proposed global signal experiment, the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE), which will make use of the pristine radio-frequency environment over the far side of the Moon. The method, a fully Bayesian technique based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code will, however, be applicable more generally to other space- and ground-based experiments, including the prototype DARE antenna being deployed in Western Australia. For ground-based experiments, we must also contend with effects from the Earth's ionosphere and low-level radio-frequency interference. I will show early results from applying our algorithm to data from the prototype and the EDGES experiment. GH is a member of the LUNAR consortium, which is funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute (via Cooperative Agreement NNA09DB30A) to investigate concepts for astrophysical observatories on the Moon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harker, Geraint</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2825425"> <span id="translatedtitle">Down-regulation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 Receptor Surface Expression by Protein Kinase C Inhibition*</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1) is important for the maintenance of lymphocyte circulation. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor surface expression on lymphocytes is critical for their egress from thymus and lymph nodes. Premature activation-induced internalization of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor in lymphoid organs, mediated either by pharmacological agonists or by inhibition of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P degrading enzyme <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-lyase, blocks lymphocyte egress and induces lymphopenia in blood and lymph. Regulation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor surface expression is therefore a promising way to control adaptive immunity. Hence, we analyzed potential cellular targets for their ability to alter <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor surface expression without stimulation. The initial observation that preincubation of mouse splenocytes with its natural analog sphingosine was sufficient to block TranswellTM chemotaxis to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P directed subsequent investigations to the underlying mechanism. Sphingosine is known to inhibit protein kinase C (PKC), and PKC inhibition with nanomolar concentrations of staurosporine, calphostin C, and GF109203X down-regulated surface expression of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 but not <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P4 in transfected rat hepatoma HTC4 cells. The PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate partially rescued FTY720-induced down-regulation of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor, linking PKC activation with <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor surface expression. FTY720, but not FTY720 phosphate, efficiently inhibited PKC. Cell-based efficacy was obvious with 10 nm FTY720, and in vivo treatment of mice with 0.3–3 mg/kg/day FTY720 showed increasing concentration-dependent effectiveness. PKC inhibition therefore may contribute to lymphopenia by down-regulating <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor cell surface expression independently from its activation. PMID:20032465</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sensken, Sven-Christian; Gräler, Markus H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010584&hterms=serpentine&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dserpentine"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact-Induced Chondrule Deformation and Aqueous Alteration of <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 Murchison</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Deformed chondrules in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 Murchison have been found to define a prominent foliation [1,2] and lineation [3] in 3D using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). It has been hypothesized that chondrules in foliated chondrites deform by "squeezing" into surrounding pore space [4,5], a process that also likely removes primary porosity [6]. However, shock stage classification based on olivine extinction in Murchison is consistently low (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-S2) [4-5,7] implying that significant intracrystalline plastic deformation of olivine has not occurred. One objective of our study is therefore to determine the microstructural mechanisms and phases that are accommodating the impact stress and resulting in relative displacements within the chondrules. Another question regarding impact deformation in Murchison is whether it facilitated aqueous alteration as has been proposed for the CMs which generally show a positive correlation between degree of alteration and petrofabric strength [7,2]. As pointed out by [2], <span class="hlt">CM</span> Murchison represents a unique counterpoint to this correlation: it has a strong petrofabric but a relatively low degree of aqueous alteration. However, Murchison may not represent an inconsistency to the proposed causal relationship between impact and alteration, if it can be established that the incipient aqueous alteration post-dated chondrule deformation. Methods: Two thin sections from Murchison sample USNM 5487 were cut approximately perpendicular to the foliation and parallel to lineation determined by XCT [1,3] and one section was additionally polished for EBSD. Using a combination of optical petrography, SEM, EDS, and EBSD several chondrules were characterized in detail to: determine phases, find microstructures indicative of strain, document the geometric relationships between grain-scale microstructures and the foliation and lineation direction, and look for textural relationships of alteration minerals (tochilinite and Mg-Fe serpentine) that indicate timing of their formation relative to deformation event(s). Preliminary Results: Deformed chondrules are dominated by forsterite and clinoenstatite with lesser amounts of Fe-Mg serpentine, sulfides, and low calcium pyroxene. Olivine grains are commonly fractured but generally show sharp optical extinction. The pyroxene, in contrast, is not only fractured but also often displays undulose extinction. In addition, the clinoenstatite is frequently twinned but it is unclear whether the twins are the result of mechanical deformation or inversion from protoenstatite [8]. EBSD work is currently ongoing to determine if areas of higher crystallographic strain can be imaged and mapped, and to determine the pyroxene twin orientations. In regards to alteration, we have found evidence for post-deformation formation of tochilinite and Mg-Fe serpentine indicating that aqueous alteration has indeed post-dated the deformation of the chondrules.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hanna, R. D.; Zolensky, M.; Ketcham, R. A.; Behr, W. M.; Martinez, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25788034"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cost-effectiveness analysis of gemcitabine, <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and gemcitabine plus <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> for treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gemcitabine (GEM) alone, <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> alone and gemcitabine plus <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> (GS) have shown a marginal clinical benefit for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. However, there is no clearly defined optimal cost-effectiveness treatment. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of GEM alone, <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> alone and GS for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer based on GEST study for public payers. A decision model compared GEM alone, <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> alone and GS. Primary base case data were identified using the GEST study and the literatures. Costs were estimated from West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. Survival benefits were reported in quality-adjusted life-months (QALMs). Sensitive analyses were performed by varying potentially modifiable parameters of the model. The base case analysis showed that the GEM cost $21,912 and yielded survival of 6.93 QALMs, <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> cost $19,371 and yielded survival of 7.90 QALMs and GS cost $22,943 and yielded survival of 7.46 QALMs in the entire treatment. The one-way sensitivity analyses showed that the ICER of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> was driven mostly by the <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> group utility score of stable state compared with GEM, and the GEM group utility score of progressed state played a key role on the ICER of GS compared with GEM. <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> represents an attractive cost-effective treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer, given the favorable cost per QALM and improvement in clinical efficacy, especially the limited available treatment options. PMID:25788034</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Rongce; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Pengfei; Tang, Ruilei; Du, Zedong; He, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Jian; Li, Qiu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4320342"> <span id="translatedtitle">Helicobacter pylori vacA <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>a and <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b alleles from clinical isolates from different regions of Chile show a distinct geographic distribution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">AIM: To establish the most common vacA alleles in Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) strains isolated from Chilean patients and its relationship with gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcers. METHODS: Two hundred and forty five H pylori clinical isolates were obtained from 79 biopsies from Chilean infected patients suffering from gastrointestinal diseases. An average of 2-3 strains per patient was isolated and the vacA genotype was analyzed by PCR and 3% agarose electrophoresis. Some genotypes were checked by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: The most prevalent vacA genotype in Chilean patients was <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 (76%), followed by <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>a m1 (21%). In contrast, the s2 m2 genotype was scarcely represented (3%). The <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 genotype was found most frequently linked to gastropathies (P<0.05) rather than ulcers. Ulcers were found more commonly in male and older patients. Curiously, patients living in cities located North and far South of Santiago, the capital and largest Chilean city, carried almost exclusively strains with the <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 genotype. In contrast, patients from Santiago and cities located South of Santiago carried strains with either one or both <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>a m1 and <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 genotypes. Regarding the s2 m2 genotype, comparison with GenBank sequences revealed that Chilean s2 sequence was identical to those of Australian, American, and Colombian strains but quite different from those of Alaska and India. CONCLUSION: Differences in geographic distribution of the s and m vacA alleles in Chile and a relationship of <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 genotype with gastritis were found. Sequence data in part support a hispanic origin for the vacA genotype. Asymmetric distribution of genotypes <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 and s2 m2 recedes H Pylori strain distribution in Spain and Portugal. PMID:16419167</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Díaz, MI; Valdivia, A; Martínez, P; Palacios, JL; Harris, P; Novales, J; Garrido, E; Valderrama, D; Shilling, C; Kirberg, A; Hebel, E; Fierro, J; Bravo, R; Siegel, F; Leon, G; Klapp, G; Venegas, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApJ...677..985L"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Effect of 53 ?m IR Radiation on 18 <span class="hlt">cm</span> OH Megamaser Emission</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">OH megamasers (OHMs) emit primarily in the main lines at 1667 and 1665 MHz and differ from their Galactic counterparts due to their immense luminosities, large line widths, and 1667/1665 MHz flux ratios, which are always greater than 1. We find that these maser properties result from strong 53 ?m radiative pumping combined with line overlap effects caused by turbulent line widths ~20 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> pumping calculations that do not include line overlap are unreliable. A minimum dust temperature of ~45 K is needed for inversion, and maximum maser efficiency occurs for dust temperatures ~80-140 K. We find that warmer dust can support inversion at lower IR luminosities, in agreement with observations. Our results are in good agreement with a clumpy model of OHMs, with clouds sizes <~1 pc and OH column densities ~5×1016 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-2, that is able to explain both the diffuse and compact emission observed for OHMs. We suggest that all OH main-line masers may be pumped by far-IR radiation, with the major differences between OHMs and Galactic OH masers caused by differences in line width produced by line overlap. Small Galactic maser line widths tend to produce stronger 1665 MHz emission. The large OHM line widths lead to inverted ground-state transitions having approximately the same excitation temperature, producing 1667/1665 MHz flux ratios greater than 1 and weak satellite line emission. Finally, the small observed ratio of pumping radiation to dense molecular gas, as traced by HCN and HCO+, is a possible reason for the lack of OH megamaser emission in NGC 6240.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lockett, Philip; Elitzur, Moshe</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.443.1044M"> <span id="translatedtitle">2MTF III. H I 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> observations of 1194 spiral galaxies with the Green Bank Telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present H I 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> observations of 1194 galaxies out to a redshift of 10 000 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> selected as inclined spirals (i ? 60°) from the 2MASS redshift survey. These observations were carried out at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This observing programme is part of the 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) survey. This project will combine H I widths from these GBT observations with those from further dedicated observing at the Parkes Telescope, from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey at Arecibo, and S/N > 10 and spectral resolution vres < 10 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> published widths from a variety of telescopes. We will use these H I widths along with 2MASS photometry to estimate Tully-Fisher distances to nearby spirals and investigate the peculiar velocity field of the local Universe. In this paper, we report on detections of neutral hydrogen in emission in 727 galaxies, and measure good signal to noise and symmetric H I global profiles suitable for use in the Tully-Fisher relation in 484.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Masters, Karen L.; Crook, Aidan; Hong, Tao; Jarrett, T. H.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Macri, Lucas; Springob, Christopher M.; Staveley-Smith, Lister</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25656338"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis of new ligands for targeting the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) influences various fundamental biological processes by interacting with a family of five G protein-coupled receptors (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1-5). FTY720, a sphingosine analogue, which was approved for treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, is phosphorylated in vivo and acts as an agonist of four of the five <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor subtypes. Starting from these lead structures we developed new agonists for the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor. The biological activity was tested in vivo and promising ligands were fluorinated at different positions to identify candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging after [(18)F]-labelling. The radioligands shall enable the imaging of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor expression in vivo and thus may serve as novel imaging markers of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-related diseases. PMID:25656338</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schilson, Stefanie S; Keul, Petra; Shaikh, Rizwan S; Schäfers, Michael; Levkau, Bodo; Haufe, Günter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/923103"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison between <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> and R/1 tests and damage density vs. fluence (rho(phi)) results for unconditioned and sub-nanosecond laser-conditioned KD2PO4 crystals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> and R/1 test results on unconditioned and 355 nm (3{omega}), 500 ps laser conditioned DKDP. We find up to {approx}2.5X improvement in fluence in the <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> performance after 3{omega}, 500 ps conditioning to 5 J/<span class="hlt">cm</span>{sup 2}. For the first time, we observe a shift to higher fluences in the R/1 results for DKDP at 3{omega}, 7 ns due to 500 ps laser conditioning. The <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> results are compared to {rho}({phi}) results previously measured on the same DKDP crystal [1]. A consistent behavior in fluence was found between the <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> and {rho}({phi}) results for unconditioned and 500 ps conditioned DKDP. We were successful at using Poisson statistics to derive a connection between the <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> and {rho}({phi}) results that could be tested with our data sets by trying to predict the shape of the {rho}({phi}) curve. The value for the power dependence on fluence of {rho}({phi}) derived from the <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> data was {approx}11 {+-} 50%. The results presented and discussed here imply a strong correlation between the damage probability (<span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span>) test and {rho}({phi}). We find a consistent description of the two test types in terms of a power law {rho}({phi}) and that this basic shape held for all cases, i.e. the shape was invariant between unconditioned and conditioned results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adams, J J; Jarboe, J; Feit, M; Hackel, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1307.2144v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chisholm-Caianiello-Fubini Identities for <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> Barut-Muzinich-Williams Matrices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The formulae of the relativistic products are found <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> Barut-Muzinich-Williams matrices. They are analogs of the well-known Chisholm-Caianiello-Fubini identities. The obtained results can be useful in the higher-order calculations of the high-energy processes with <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> particles in the framework of the 2(2<span class="hlt">S</span>+<span class="hlt">1</span>) Weinberg formalism, which recently attracted attention again. PACS numbers: 02.90.+p, 11.90.+t, 12.20.Ds</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. de G. Caldera Cabral; V. V. Dvoeglazov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/29344411"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1-selective agonist, SEW2871, ameliorates ischemic acute renal failure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The pathogenesis of renal ischemia\\/reperfusion (I\\/R) injury involves activating several signal transduction cascade systems in endothelial cells. Sphingosine 1-phospate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) maintains endothelial cell integrity and inhibits lymphocyte egress via the specific <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor, and may play a role in reducing ischemic renal injury. We examined the protective effects of a newly identified <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1-selective agonist, SEW2871, on mouse renal I\\/R injury.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y-HH Lien; K-C Yong; C Cho; S Igarashi; L-W Lai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/6473/2013/acp-13-6473-2013-supplement.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supplementary Information Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Main aqueous reactions and rate constants in MVK + HO</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">H2O2 + HO· HO2 · + H2O R2 k2 = 2.7Ã?107 M-1 <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> HO2 · + HO2 · H2O2 + O2 R3 k3 = 8.3Ã?105 M-1 <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> HO2 · + O2 ·- + H+ H2O2 + O2 R4 k4 = 1Ã?108 M-1 <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> MVK + HO· Products R5 kMVK = 7.4Ã?109 M-1 <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> #12 to prevent from O2 inhibiting the oligomer formation (Decker and Jenkins, 1985). 2,2'-Azobis(2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meskhidze, Nicholas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19947681"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)/S(2) excitonic splittings and vibronic coupling in the excited state of the jet-cooled 2-aminopyridine dimer.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We analyze the vibronic band structure of the excitonically coupled <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)<--S(0)/S(2)<--S(0) excitations of the 2-aminopyridine (2AP) self-dimer (2AP)(2), using a linear vibronic coupling model [R. Fulton and M. Gouterman, J. Chem. Phys. 41, 2280 (1964)]. The vibronic spectra of supersonically cooled (2AP)(2) and its (13)C-isotopomer were measured by two-color resonant two-photon ionization and UV/UV-depletion spectroscopies. In the C(2)-symmetric form of (2AP)(2), the <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)<--S(0) ((1)A<--(1)A) transition is very weak, while the close-lying S(2)<--S(0) ((1)B<--(1)A) transition is fully allowed. A single (12)C/(13)C isotopic substitution breaks the symmetry of the dimer so that the (2AP)(2)-(13)C isotopologue exhibits both <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>) and S(2) electronic origins, which are split by 11 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1). In Fulton-Gouterman-type treatments, the linear vibronic coupling is mediated by intramolecular vibrational modes and couplings to intermolecular vibrations are not considered. For (2AP)(2), a major vibronic coupling contribution arises from the intramolecular 6a(') vibration. However, the low-energy part of the spectrum is dominated by intermolecular shear (chi(')) and stretching (sigma(')) vibrational excitations that also exhibit excitonic splittings; we apply a linear vibronic coupling analysis for these also. The respective excitation transfer integrals V(AB) are 50%-80% of that of the intramolecular 6a(') vibration, highlighting the role of intermolecular vibrations in mediating electronic energy exchange. The <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)/S(2) electronic energy gap calculated by the approximate second-order coupled-cluster method is approximately 340 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1). This purely electronic exciton splitting is quenched by a factor of 40 by the vibronic couplings to the Franck-Condon active intramolecular vibrations. PMID:19947681</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ottiger, Philipp; Leutwyler, Samuel; Köppel, Horst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-11-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22207486"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blocking peptides against HBV: Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein selected from a phage display library</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. {yields} P7 could block Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> attachment. -- Abstract: The Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xiao, Gengfu, E-mail: xiaogf@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10868800"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mouse monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis B virus pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> produced after immunization with recombinant pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> peptide.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have efficiently generated mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), which bind specifically to amino acids 21-47 of the pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> domain of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by immunizing mice with the pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> peptide (amino acids, aa 1-56) conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Hybridomas were screened by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the purified pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> peptide as a coated antigen. Eighteen positive hybridomas were selected and subjected to isotyping. Of these, 5 clones secreted immunoglobulin G (IgG) and 13 clones secreted IgM. Four (KR1, KR2, KR3, and KR4) of the 5 IgG MAbs bound to pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> peptide (aa 21-47). Epitope mapping using bacterially expressed GST fusion proteins revealed that three clones (KR2, KR3, KR4) (IgG1, K) recognize aa 21-35, while KR1 (IgG2a, K) recognizes aa 35-47 of the pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. These MAbs immunoprecipitated HBV particles, demonstrating that they bind to native HBV particles. PMID:10868800</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryu, C J; Kim, Y K; Hur, H; Kim, H S; Oh, J M; Kang, Y J; Hong, H J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23582276"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of the molecular interactions of the potent analgesic <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>RA with the ?1 receptor.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The highly selective ?1 receptor antagonist <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>RA is endowed with a surprisingly high affinity for its target protein given a missing fundamental hydrophobic pharmacophoric requirement. Here we show that, with respect to other potent ?1 ligands, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>RA is able to compensate this loss by fulfilling all other pharmacophoric requirements and by gaining in solvation energy. PMID:23582276</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Laurini, Erik; Da Col, Valentina; Wünsch, Bernhard; Pricl, Sabrina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24682851"> <span id="translatedtitle">Resonance assignment of the ribosome binding domain of E. coli ribosomal protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ribosomal protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is an essential actor for protein synthesis in Escherichia coli. It is involved in mRNA recruitment by the 30S ribosomal subunit and recognition of the correct start codon during translation initiation. E. coli <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is a modular protein that contains six repeats of an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> motif, which have distinct functions despite structural homology. Whereas the three central repeats have been shown to be involved in mRNA recognition, the two first repeats that constitute the N-terminal domain of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> are responsible for binding to the 30S subunit. Here we report the almost complete (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of two fragments of the 30S binding region of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. The first fragment comprises only the first repeat. The second corresponds to the entire ribosome binding domain. Since <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is absent from all high resolution X-ray structures of prokaryotic ribosomes, these data provide a first step towards atomic level structural characterization of this domain by NMR. Chemical shift analysis of the first repeat provides evidence for structural divergence from the canonical OB-fold of an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> motif. In contrast the second domain displays the expected topology for an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> motif, which rationalizes the functional specialization of the two subdomains. PMID:24682851</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giraud, Pierre; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Uzan, Marc; Bontems, François; Sizun, Christina</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3979765"> <span id="translatedtitle">Memo Has a Novel Role in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P Signaling and Crucial for Vascular Development</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Memo is a conserved protein that was identified as an essential mediator of tumor cell motility induced by receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Here we show that Memo null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) are impaired in PDGF-induced migration and this is due to a defect in sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) signaling. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is a bioactive phospholipid produced in response to multiple stimuli, which regulates many cellular processes. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is secreted to the extracellular milieu where it exerts its function by binding a family of G-protein coupled receptors (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PRs), causing their activation in an autocrine or paracrine manner. The process, termed cell-autonomous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR signaling, plays a role in survival and migration. Indeed, PDGF uses cell-autonomous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR signaling to promote cell migration; we show here that this <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P pathway requires Memo. Using vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) with Memo knock-down we show that their survival in conditions of serum-starvation is impaired. Furthermore, Memo loss in HUVECs causes a reduction of junctional VE-cadherin and an increase in sprout formation. Each of these phenotypes is rescued by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P or <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P agonist addition, showing that Memo also plays an important role in cell-autonomous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR signaling in endothelial cells. We also produced conventional and endothelial cell-specific conditional Memo knock-out mouse strains and show that Memo is essential for embryonic development. Starting at E13.5 embryos of both strains display bleeding and other vascular problems, some of the phenotypes that have been described in mouse strains lacking <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PRs. The essential role of Memo in embryonic vascular development may be due in part to alterations in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P signaling. Taken together our results show that Memo has a novel role in the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P pathway and that Memo is needed to promote cell-autonomous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR activation. PMID:24714781</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kondo, Shunya; Bottos, Alessia; Allegood, Jeremy C.; Masson, Regis; Maurer, Francisca G.; Genoud, Christel; Kaeser, Patrick; Huwiler, Andrea; Murakami, Masato; Spiegel, Sarah; Hynes, Nancy E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999JSSCh.142..261V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamic Study of the SmS 2-Sm<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>.5System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A detailed thermodynamic study of the SmS 2-Sm<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>.5system in the temperature range 350-1000°C was performed using high-quality crystals of the highest Sm-polysulfide and a sensitive static tensimetric method, a quartz Bourdon gauge with a membrane as a null-point instrument. The P- T- xdiagram obtained has shown that the phase region covering the composition range SmS 2.00-Sm<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>.82, which was previously described as a single grossly nonstoichiometric phase, consists of three discrete stoichiometric phases, Sm<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>.900, Sm<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>.893, and Sm<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>.863. The polysulfide compositions were evaluated from the tensimetric data with an accuracy of ±0.001 f. u. The thermodynamic parameters of incongruent sublimation were calculated for each polysulfide, and then the standard heats of formation were estimated for these compounds.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vasilyeva, I. G.; Belyaeva, E. I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001PhRvD..63j5003H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vacuum structure of twisted scalar field theories on MD-1?<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Scalar field theories on MD-1?<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, which allow us to impose twisted boundary conditions for the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> direction, are studied in detail, and several novel features overlooked so far are revealed. One of the characteristic features is the appearance of critical radii of the circle <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, at which some symmetries are broken or restored. A phase transition can occur at the classical level or can be caused by quantum effects. Radiative corrections can restore broken symmetries or can break symmetries for a small radius R. A surprising feature is that the translational invariance for the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> direction can spontaneously be broken. A particular class of coordinate-dependent vacuum configurations is clarified and the O(N) ?4 model on MD-1?<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is extensively studied, as an illustrative example.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hatanaka, Hisaki; Matsumoto, Seiho; Ohnishi, Katsuhiko; Sakamoto, Makoto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://viterbi.usc.edu/assets/114/70955.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">9/28/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:30 PMHoles Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe -CBS News Page 1 of 4http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/09/26/national/main6903300.shtml</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">9/28/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:30 PMHoles Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe - CBS News Page 1 of 4http on the well kill 153 days after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. C Holes Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe Engineering Experts Question Thoroughness of Oil Giant's Internal Investigation on Massive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valero-Cuevas, Francisco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.geobacter.org/press/2005-10-03-eurekalert.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy Department awards $92 million http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2005-10/ddoe-eda100305.php 1 of 2 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2005 1:19 PM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">.php 1 of 2 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2005 1:19 PM Public release date: 3-Oct-2005 [ Print Article | E-mail Article | Close resource that can be applied to develop biology-based solutions to these challenges," said Dr. Raymond L projects, their funding, lead institutions, lead investigators and collaborating institutions are: Genome-Based</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lovley, Derek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004APS..DPPHP1050D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deformable contact liner implosion performed using 8 <span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter electrode apertures.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radiographic data indicate the feasibility of using a varying thickness in a long cylindrical solid liner, driven as a 12 megamp Z-pinch, to achieve factor 17 cylindrical convergence, while using 8 <span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter aperture electrodes. The Al liner was 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> long, with 9.78 <span class="hlt">cm</span> inner diameter for its full length, 10.0 <span class="hlt">cm</span> outer diameter for the central 18 <span class="hlt">cm</span> of its length, and outer diameter increased linearly to 10.2 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 1 <span class="hlt">cm</span> from either electrode, and to 11 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at electrode contacts. The electrode apertures allow injection of Field Reversed Configurations in proposed future experiments on magnetized target fusion. Sponsored by DOE-OFES.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Degnan, J. H.; Amdahl, D.; Kiuttu, G. F.; Lehr, F. M.; Letterio, J. D.; Peterkin, J. R.; Ruden, E. L.; Tucker, W.; Turchi, P. J.; Brown, A.; Coffey, S. K.; Craddock, G. G.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Guffey, B.; Cavazos, T.; Gale, D.; Grabowski, T. C.; Sommars, W.; Roderick, N. F.; Siemon, R. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3437903"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ribosomal protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> unwinds double-stranded RNA in multiple steps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The sequence and secondary structure of the 5?-end of mRNAs regulate translation by controlling ribosome initiation on the mRNA. Ribosomal protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is crucial for ribosome initiation on many natural mRNAs, particularly for those with structured 5?-ends, or with no or weak Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Besides a critical role in translation, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> has been implicated in several other cellular processes, such as transcription recycling, and the rescuing of stalled ribosomes by tmRNA. The mechanisms of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> functions are still elusive but have been widely considered to be linked to the affinity of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> for single-stranded RNA and its corresponding destabilization of mRNA secondary structures. Here, using optical tweezers techniques, we demonstrate that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> promotes RNA unwinding by binding to the single-stranded RNA formed transiently during the thermal breathing of the RNA base pairs and that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> dissociation results in RNA rezipping. We measured the dependence of the RNA unwinding and rezipping rates on <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> concentration, and the force applied to the ends of the RNA. We found that each <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> binds 10 nucleotides of RNA in a multistep fashion implying that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> can facilitate ribosome initiation on structured mRNA by first binding to the single strand next to an RNA duplex structure (“stand-by site”) before subsequent binding leads to RNA unwinding. Unwinding by multiple small substeps is much less rate limited by thermal breathing than unwinding in a single step. Thus, a multistep scheme greatly expedites <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> unwinding of an RNA structure compared to a single-step mode. PMID:22908248</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qu, Xiaohui; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F.; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/14716170"> <span id="translatedtitle">Origin of the Absorption Band at 1,550 <span class="hlt">cm</span>.-1 in Proteins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">THE infra-red spectra of proteins and polypeptides show strong absorption bands around 1,650 <span class="hlt">cm</span>.-1 and 1,550 <span class="hlt">cm</span>.-1 related to the peptide group. The 1,650 <span class="hlt">cm</span>.-1 band has been associated with the C = O stretching motions and the 1,550 <span class="hlt">cm</span>.-1 band has been assumed by some investigators to be an N-H deformation frequency of the monosubstituted amide (peptide) group1. Examination</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Lenormant; E. R. Blout</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1953-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.angelfire.com/nh/cpkumar/publication/barchi.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">c : solute concentration in solution, mol or g solutes/ <span class="hlt">cm</span>3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">% and 47% of rainfall (1241 mm to 1887 mm) while the runoff coefficient varied between 12% and 32 dispersion and diffusion coefficient, <span class="hlt">cm</span>2 /h K : hydraulic conductivity, <span class="hlt">cm</span>2 water/<span class="hlt">cm</span> soil/h q : water flux used for the simulations. Water balance components like runoff, evapotranspiration and drainage</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumar, C.P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://geddes.lbl.gov/papers/Messmer,Geddes%20cm%20scale%20simulations%202005.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF LOWER-DENSITY <span class="hlt">CM</span>-SCALE CAPILLARY CHANNELS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF LOWER-DENSITY <span class="hlt">CM</span>-SCALE CAPILLARY CHANNELS£ P. MessmerÝ , D. Geddes, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Capillary channels of <span class="hlt">cm</span>-length and at plasma density low plasma channels, gen- erated from ½¼½ <span class="hlt">cm</span> ¿ hydrogen gas in a capillary dis- charge [6]. For such plasma</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15783803"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B0s--> mu(+) mu(-) in pp Collisions at sqrt[<span class="hlt">s</span>] = <span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV with the D0 detector.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-) using a data set with integrated luminosity of 240 pb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[<span class="hlt">s</span>] = <span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We find the upper limit on the branching fraction to be B(B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-)) < or= 5.0 x <span class="hlt">10(-7</span>) at the 95% C.L. assuming no contributions from the decay B(0)(d)--> mu(+) mu(-) in the signal region. This limit is the most stringent upper bound on the branching fraction B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-) to date. PMID:15783803</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12580671"> <span id="translatedtitle">About possibility to search the electron EDM at the level $10^{-28} \\\\div 10^{-30}$ e$\\\\cdot$<span class="hlt">cm</span> and the constant of Todd, P-odd scalar weak interaction of an electron with a nucleus at the level $10^{-5} \\\\div <span class="hlt">10^{-7</span>}$ in the heavy atoms and ferroelectrics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The T-odd phenomenon of induction of the magnetic field by a static electric\\u000afield provides to study the electron EDM and constants of T-odd, P-odd\\u000ainteraction of an electron with a nucleus. Measurement of this magnetic field\\u000afor ferroelectric materials (like PbTiO_3) at the level B~3 10^{-18} G allows\\u000ato derive the electric dipole moment of an electron at the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. G. Baryshevsky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53271567"> <span id="translatedtitle">About possibility to search the electron EDM at the level $10^{-28} \\\\div 10^{-30}$ e$\\\\cdot$<span class="hlt">cm</span> and the constant of Todd, P-odd scalar weak interaction of an electron with a nucleus at the level $10^{-5} \\\\div <span class="hlt">10^{-7</span>}$ in the heavy atoms and ferroelectrics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The T-odd phenomenon of induction of the magnetic field by a static electric field provides to study the electron EDM and constants of T-odd, P-odd interaction of an electron with a nucleus. Measurement of this magnetic field for ferroelectric materials (like PbTiO_3) at the level B~3 10^{-18} G allows to derive the electric dipole moment of an electron at the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. G. Baryshevsky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23598093"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bk and Cf chromatographic separation and ²??Bk/²??<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and ²??Cf/²??<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios determination by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron flux. In this context a <span class="hlt">Cm</span> sample enriched in (248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> (?97%) was irradiated in a thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). The precise and accurate determination of Cf isotope ratios and of (249)Bk/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and (249)Cf/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios in the (248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> irradiated sample is crucial for the calculation of actinide neutron capture cross-sections. This work describes an analytical procedure for the separation and the isotope ratio measurement of Bk and Cf in the irradiated sample. The Bk and Cf separation is based on a lanthanides separation protocol previously developed by the laboratory. Well-defined retention times for Bk and Cf were obtained by coupling the Ionic Chromatography (IC) with an ICP-QMS. All conditions of element separation by IC and the different steps of the analytical protocol in order to obtain the isotopic and elemental ratios are presented. Relative uncertainties of Cf isotopic ratios range from 0.3% to 0.5% and the uncertainty of the (249)Bk/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and (249)Cf/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios are respectively 6.1% and 3.2%. This level of uncertainty for both isotopic and elemental ratios is in perfect agreement with the requirement for transmutation studies. PMID:23598093</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gourgiotis, A; Isnard, H; Nonell, A; Aubert, M; Stadelmann, G; Dupont, E; AlMahamid, I; Tiang, G; Rao, L; Lukens, W; Cassette, P; Panebianco, S; Letourneau, A; Chartier, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=191402"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of a second protein (<span class="hlt">CM</span>2) encoded by RNA segment 6 of influenza C virus.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The biochemical properties of a second protein (<span class="hlt">CM</span>2) encoded by RNA segment 6 of influenza C virus were investigated. Three forms of <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 with different electrophoretic mobilities (<span class="hlt">CM</span>2(0), <span class="hlt">CM</span>2a, and <span class="hlt">CM</span>2b) were detected in infected cells by immunoprecipitation with antiserum to the glutathione S-transferase (GST)-<span class="hlt">CM</span>2 fusion protein. Treatment of infected cells with tunicamycin and digestion of immunoprecipitated proteins with endoglycosidase H or peptide-N-glycosidase F suggested that a mannose-rich oligosaccharide core is added to unglycosylated <span class="hlt">CM</span>2(0) (Mr, approximately 16,000) to form <span class="hlt">CM</span>2a (Mr, approximately 18,000) and that the processing of the carbohydrate chain from the high-mannose type to the complex type converts <span class="hlt">CM</span>2a into <span class="hlt">CM</span>2b, which is heterogeneous in electrophoretic mobility (Mr, approximately 22,000 to 30,000). Labeling of infected cells with [3H]palmitic acid showed that <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 is fatty acylated. The fatty acid bond was sensitive to treatment with hydroxylamine and mercaptoethanol, which indicates a labile thioester-type linkage. The <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 protein was also found to form disulfide-linked dimers and tetramers on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels under nonreducing conditions. Trypsin treatment of infected cell surfaces as well as of microsome vesicles from infected cells followed by immunoprecipitation with antiserum to the GST fusion protein containing the 56 C-terminal amino acid residues of <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 suggested that this C-terminal domain is intracellular and exposed to the cytoplasms of microsomes. Furthermore, evidence that a small amount of <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 is incorporated into progeny virus particles was obtained by Western blot analysis. These results, altogether, suggest that <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 is an integral membrane protein with biochemical properties similar to those of influenza A virus M2 and influenza B virus NB proteins. PMID:9060633</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hongo, S; Sugawara, K; Muraki, Y; Kitame, F; Nakamura, K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25497224"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expression and characterization of myristoylated pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-conjugated nanocages for targeted cell delivery.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Lipid modification of proteins plays key roles in cellular signaling pathways. We describe the development of myristoylated pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-nanocages (myr-pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-nanocages) that specifically target human hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells in which a specific receptor-binding peptide (pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) is joined to the surface of naturally occurring ferritin cages. Using a genetic engineering approach, the pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> peptide was joined to the N-terminal regions of the ferritin cage via flexible linker moieties. Myristoylation of the pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> peptide was achieved by co-expression with yeast N-myristoyltransferase-1 in the presence of myristic acid in Escherichia coli cells. The myristoylated pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-nanocages exhibited significantly greater specificity for human hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells than the unmyristoylated pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-nanocages. These results suggest that the lipid-modified nanocages have great potential for effective targeted delivery to specific cells. PMID:25497224</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Murata, Masaharu; Piao, Jing Shu; Narahara, Sayoko; Kawano, Takahito; Hamano, Nobuhito; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Asai, Daisuke; Ugawa, Ryo; Hashizume, Makoto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4288201"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structural basis for the interaction of protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> with the Escherichia coli ribosome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In Gram-negative bacteria, the multi-domain protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is essential for translation initiation, as it recruits the mRNA and facilitates its localization in the decoding centre. In sharp contrast to its functional importance, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is still lacking from the high-resolution structures available for Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus ribosomes and thus the molecular mechanism governing the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>–ribosome interaction has still remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> domain D1 when bound to the ribosome at atomic resolution by using a combination of NMR, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Together with biochemical assays, the structure reveals that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is anchored to the ribosome primarily via a stabilizing ?-stacking interaction within the short but conserved N-terminal segment that is flexibly connected to domain D1. This interaction is further stabilized by salt bridges involving the zinc binding pocket of protein S2. Overall, this work provides one hitherto enigmatic piece in the ?ribosome puzzle?, namely the detailed molecular insight into the topology of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>–ribosome interface. Moreover, our data suggest novel mechanisms that have the potential to modulate protein synthesis in response to environmental cues by changing the affinity of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> for the ribosome. PMID:25510494</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byrgazov, Konstantin; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Arenz, Stefan; Coudevylle, Nicolas; Temmel, Hannes; Wilson, Daniel N.; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Moll, Isabella</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.physics.umd.edu/rgroups/amo/orozco/publications/Simsarian_OL_1996(9s_Fr_energy).pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">December 1, 1996 / Vol. 21, No. 23 / OPTICS LETTERS 1939 7<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> 2 ! 9<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> 2 two-photon spectroscopy of trapped francium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">for this purpose. Fr, as the heaviest alkali, offers the possibility of a most sensitive test of the standard model they are neutralized upon a heated yttrium surface. The neutral atoms are released into a nonstick dry-film-coated with a 1 e2 (power) diameter of 4 <span class="hlt">cm</span> and a power of 50 mW, with a magnetic field gradient of 9 G <span class="hlt">cm</span>. The 1</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orozco, Luis A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mlf.science.ru.nl/publ/1996/ami-naph.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">High resolution electronic spectroscopy of 1-aminonaphthalene: S0 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> geometries and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>--S0 transition moment orientations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">vibronic bands in the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>S0 transition exhibit significantly different rotational constants, inertial defects, and transition moment orientations. An explanation for these findings is given that is based to the inertial contributions of the substituents. a and b are the in-plane inertial axes, which are parallel to x</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nijmegen, University of</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24423960"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Urgent gastrectomy in a patient who developed perforated gastric cancer during preoperative chemotherapy with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> plus cisplatin].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 66 -year-old man presenting with a chief complaint of upper abdominal pain was diagnosed as having an advanced adenocarcinoma, type 2, of the lower third of the stomach after endoscopy was performed. An abdominal computed tomography( CT)scan revealed 4 lymph node metastases at the infrapyloric nodes(station No. 6)and the nodes around the proximal splenic artery(station No. 11p)and the abdominal aorta(station No. 16a2). The clinical stage was determined to be T3(SS)N2M1(LYM), Stage IV. Gastrectomy with D2 plus para-aortic node dissection was scheduled after 2 courses of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> plus cisplatin(CDDP)with curative intent. On day 14 after starting <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy, the patient complained of severe abdominal pain and peritoneal irritation of acute onset. Because the abdominal CT scan showed a large amount of intra-abdominal free air, we performed an urgent laparotomy with a tentative diagnosis of perforation of the gastric cancer. On laparotomy, we found a perforated malignant ulcer, 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> in maximum diameter, in the lesser curvature of the stomach; therefore, distal gastrectomy with D1 plus lymphadenectomy and reconstruction using the Roux-en-Y method were performed. At the end of the surgery, a macroscopic residual tumor remained in the para-aortic lymph node. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on day 23 after surgery. In the present case, despite the performance of urgent gastrectomy while the patient was receiving strong chemotherapy, perioperative management was successful, with no serious postoperative complication or adverse events as a result of the chemotherapy. PMID:24423960</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Okabe, Yasuyuki; Yajima, Kazuhito; Ishikawa, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Sakamoto, Kaoru; Sato, Yu; Kanda, Tatsuo; Wakai, Toshifumi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SeScT..30d5001K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Accelerated aging of 28 Gb <span class="hlt">s</span>?<span class="hlt">1</span> 850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with multiple thick oxide apertures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">850 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers with multiple thick oxide apertures suitable for temperature-insensitive error free transmission at 28 Gb <span class="hlt">s</span>?<span class="hlt">1</span> are subjected to accelerated aging at high current densities and chip temperatures. The devices withstand a 20% power change test at a high current density (18 kA <span class="hlt">c{{m</span>}-2}) at an ambient temperature of 120 {}^\\circ C for 2500 h. At 90–95 {}^\\circ C at this current density no degradation was observed up to 5000 h. We performed the studies at further elevated current densities and temperatures and define the acceleration factor as AF={{({{J}stress}/{{J}use})}8}exp [(1.3 eV/{{k}B})(1/{{T}use}-1/{{T}stress})]. The extrapolated lifetime for 20% power drop is estimated as 20 thousand years at 300 K at current density of 18 kA <span class="hlt">c{{m</span>}-2} which is sufficient for 28 Gb <span class="hlt">s</span>?<span class="hlt">1</span> error-free temperature-insensitive data transmission.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kropp, J. R.; Steinle, G.; Schäfer, G.; Shchukin, V. A.; Ledentsov, N. N.; Turkiewicz, J. P.; Zoldak, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998GeCoA..62.2573E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Neon-E in <span class="hlt">CM</span>-2 chondrite LEW90500 and collisional history of <span class="hlt">CM</span>-2 chondrites, Maralinga, and other CK chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present He, Ne, and Ar data on stepwise heating experiments for the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-2 chondrite LEW90500 and on noble gas isotopic abundances of the anomalous CK chondrite Maralinga. In LEW90500 we observe at least 0.20 × 10 -8 <span class="hlt">cm</span> 3STP/g Ne-E probably originating from the decay of presolar 22Na. Planetary He is characterized by 4He/ 3He = 6500. For planetary-type trapped noble gases we obtain 20Ne tr = 13.4 × 10 -8 <span class="hlt">cm</span> 3STP/g and ( 36Ar/ 20Ne) tr = 5.6. The cosmic-ray exposure age, based on 21Ne c is 0.24 Ma. We review the literature data of the other <span class="hlt">CM</span>-2 chondrites and find a Ne-E component in most of them; the largest concentration is observed in Mighei (0.53 × 10 -8 <span class="hlt">cm</span> 3STP/g). The exposure age distribution of the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-2 chondrites confirms previous studies that report generally young ages (<6.5 Ma). A cluster of four meteorites is observed around 0.28 Ma. Maralinga (anomalous CK-4) contains no solar gases and relatively low amounts of planetary trapped gases. The cosmic-ray exposure age is 6.1 Ma. This is the lowest age of the six known CK or CK-like chondrites. Three of them lie in the range of 38-45 Ma.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eugster, O.; Eberhardt, P.; Thalmann, Ch.; Weigel, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22612978"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CSN3 (?(<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-?-casein) composite genotype on milk production traits and milk coagulation properties in Mediterranean water buffalo.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this study was to estimate effects of CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CSN3 (?(<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-?-casein) composite genotypes on milk production traits and milk coagulation properties (MCP) in Mediterranean water buffalo. Genotypes at CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and CSN3 and coagulation properties [rennet clotting time (RCT), curd firming time (K??), and curd firmness (A??)] were assessed by reversed-phase HPLC and computerized renneting meter analysis, respectively, using single test-day milk samples of 536 animals. Alternative protein variants of ?(<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-CN and ?-CN were detected by HPLC, and identification of the corresponding genetic variants was carried out by DNA analysis. Two genetic variants were detected at CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (A and B variants) and 2 at CSN3 (X1 and X2 variants). Statistical inference was based on a linear model including the CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CSN3 composite genotype effect (7 genotypes), the effects of herd-test-day (8 levels), and a combined days in milk (DIM)-parity class. Composite genotype AB-X2X2 was associated with decreased test-day milk yield [-0.21 standard deviation (SD) units of the trait] relative to genotype BB-X2X2. Genotypes did not affect milk protein content, but genotype AB-X1X1 was associated with increased fat content compared with genotype BB-X2X2 (+0.28 SD units of the trait) and AB-X1X1 (+0.43 SD units of the trait). For RCT, the largest difference (+1.91 min; i.e., 0.61 SD units of the trait) was observed between genotype AA-X1X2 and AB-X1X1. Direction of genotype effects on K(20) was consistent with that for RCT. The maximum variation in K?? due to genotype effects (between AA-X1X2 and AB-X1X1 genotypes) was almost 0.9 SD units of the trait. Magnitude of genotype effects was smaller for A?? than for RCT and K??, with a maximum difference of 0.5 SD units of the trait between genotype AA-X1X2 and AA-X1X1. The B allele at CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> was associated with increased RCT and K?? and with weaker curds compared with allele A. Allele X2 at CSN3 exerted opposite effects on MCP relative to CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> B. Because of linkage disequilibrium, allele B at CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and allele X2 at CSN3 tend to be associated and this likely makes their effects cancel each other. This study indicates a role for casein genes in variation of MCP of buffalo milk. Further studies are necessary to estimate the effects of casein genetic variants on variation of cheese yield. PMID:22612978</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bonfatti, V; Giantin, M; Gervaso, M; Coletta, A; Dacasto, M; Carnier, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JCrGr.293...52C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth and optoelectronic characteristic of n-Si/p-CuIn(<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>-xSe x) 2 thin-film solar cell by solution growth technique</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The p-CuIn(<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>-xSe x) 2 (CISS) thin films have been grown on n-Si substrate by solution growth technique. The deposition parameters, such as pH (10.5), deposition time (60 min), deposition temperature (50 °C), and concentration of bath solution (0.1 M) were optimized. Elemental analysis of the p-CuIn(<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>-xSe x) 2 thin film was confirmed by energy-dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX). The SEM study of absorber layer shows the uniform morphology of film as well as the continuous smooth deposition onto the n-Si substrates, whose grain size is 130 nm. CuIn(<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>-xSe x) 2 ( x=0.5) reveals (1 1 2) orientation peak and exhibits the chalcopyrite structure with lattice constant a=5.28 Å and c=11.45 Å. The J- V characteristics were measured in dark and light. The device parameters have been calculated for solar cell fabrication, V=411.09 mV, and J=14.55 mA. FF=46.55% and ?=4.64% under an illumination of 60 mW/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2. The J- V characteristics of the device under dark condition were also studied and the ideality factor was calculated, which is equal to 2.2 for n-Si/p-CuIn(S 0.5Se 0.5) 2 heterojunction thin film.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chavhan, S.; Sharma, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-02-16/pdf/2010-3000.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 7027 - Airworthiness Directives; Turbomeca Arriel 2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Turboshaft Engines</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...flight loss of full automatic control occurred on an Arriel 2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> engine...untimely reset of its digital electronic control unit (DECU). Once this reset...perform an upgrade of the digital electronic control unit (DECU) software to...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-16</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.wsl.ch/staff/niklaus.zimmermann/papers/GlobalChangeBiol_Patsiou_2014si.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">14. Supporting Information <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Climate and geology of the Maritime Alps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 14. Supporting Information <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Climate and geology of the Maritime Alps are the two seasons with the heaviest precipitation in the Maritime Alps in autumn. During the last decades, the Maritime Alps experienced long summer</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zimmermann, Niklaus E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/76689"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paired chiral spin liquid with a Fermi surface in <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> model on the triangular lattice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motivated by recent experiments on Ba[subscript 3]NiSb[subscript 2]O[subscript 9], we investigate possible quantum spin liquid ground states for spin <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> Heisenberg models on the triangular lattice. We use variational Monte ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bieri, Samuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cs.armstrong.edu/liang/intro6e/review/08review.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chapter 8 Strings and Text I/O <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> == s2 => true</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">is Java and HTML. 18. public static void main(String[] args) can be replaced by public static void main(String args[]) public static void main(String[] x) public static void main(String x[]) but not static voidChapter 8 Strings and Text I/O 1. <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> == s2 => true s2 == s3 => false <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>.equals(s2) => true s2</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liang, Y. Daniel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3724173"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ceramide and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P signaling in embryonic stem cell differentiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Recent studies show that bioactive lipids are important regulators for stem cell survival and differentiation. The sphingolipid ceramide and its derivative, sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P), can act synergistically on embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. We show here simple methods to analyze sphingolipids in differentiating ES cells and to use ceramide and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P analogs for the guided differentiation of mouse ES cells toward neuronal and glial lineage. PMID:22528448</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bieberich, Erhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/28224239"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficacy of ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein hydrolysate on stress-related symptoms in women</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective:To examine the effects of ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein hydrolysate on females with stress-related symptoms.Design:Double-blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled trial.Setting:The ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein hydrolysate was manufactured by INGREDIA (Arras, France) and the placebo was manufactured by DIETAROMA (Bourg, France). Study was designed and performed at PROCLAIM (Rennes, France), and the statistical analyses were performed by D Desor (Nancy, France).Subjects:A total of 63 female volunteers suffering from</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J H Kim; D Desor; Y T Kim; W J Yoon; K S Kim; J S Jun; K H Pyun; I Shim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://stoltz.caltech.edu/publications/87-S-2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supporting Information -<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-Q. Sun, H. Nelson, T. Ly, B. M. Stoltz, R. R. Julian</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supporting Information -<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>- Q. Sun, H. Nelson, T. Ly, B. M. Stoltz, R. R. Julian Supporting Data.............................................S7 #12;Supporting Information -S2- Q. Sun, H. Nelson, T. Ly, B. M. Stoltz, R. R. Julian Figure <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Information -S3- Q. Sun, H. Nelson, T. Ly, B. M. Stoltz, R. R. Julian Figure S2 Figure S2a: CID of [RPPGFSPFR</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stoltz, Brian M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25550184"> <span id="translatedtitle">Decorin in human oral cancer: a promising predictive biomarker of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> neoadjuvant chemosensitivity.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We reported previously that decorin (DCN) is significantly up-regulated in chemoresistant cancer cell lines. DCN is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan that exists and functions in stromal and epithelial cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that DCN affects the biology of several types of cancer by directly/indirectly targeting the signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis, however, the molecular mechanisms of DCN in chemoresistance and its clinical relevance are still unknown. Here we assumed that DCN silencing cells increase chemosusceptibility to <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, consisted of tegafur, prodrug of 5-fluorouracil. We first established DCN knockdown transfectants derived from oral cancer cells for following experiments including chemosusceptibility assay to <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>. In addition to the in vitro data, DCN knockdown zenografting tumors in nude mice demonstrate decreasing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis with dephosphorylation of AKT after <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> chemotherapy. We also investigated whether DCN expression predicts the clinical responses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) using <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> (<span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> NAC) for oral cancer patients. Immunohistochemistry data in the preoperative biopsy samples was analyzed to determine the cut-off point for status of DCN expression by receiver operating curve analysis. Interestingly, low DCN expression was observed in five (83%) of six cases with complete responses to <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> NAC, and in one (10%) case of 10 cases with stable/progressive disease, indicating that <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> chemosensitivity is dramatically effective in oral cancer patients with low DCN expression compared with high DCN expression. Our findings suggest that DCN is a key regulator for chemoresistant mechanisms, and is a predictive immunomarker of the response to <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> NAC and patient prognosis. PMID:25550184</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Uzawa, Katsuhiro; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Ishige, Shunsaku; Kasama, Hiroki; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Takiguchi, Yuichi; Tanzawa, Hideki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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</span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4360865"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combination therapy with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and interferon-? in hepatocellular carcinoma patients with lung metastasis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Managing extrahepatic recurrence in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients is crucial for improving prognosis. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of using combination therapy with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and interferon (IFN)- ? in HCC patients with lung metastasis. Of the 646 patients who underwent radical surgery for HCC at our institute, 62 developed their first distant metastasis in the lung. Among these patients, 11 received <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> combination therapy, while the remaining 51 patients received other conventional therapy, such as 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin or best supportive care. We retrospectively evaluated the toxicity and efficiency of combination therapy with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and IFN- ?. Hematological toxicity was observed in 5 patients and was grade 1 or 2 in all cases, except 1 patient (9.1%) who developed grade 3 leukopenia. Non-hematological toxicity was observed in 6 patients and was grade 1 in all cases, except 1 patient who exhibited a grade 2 increase of serum bilirubin levels. No patient required discontinuation of the <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> combination therapy and no treatment-related mortality was reported during this study. Patients who received <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> treatment exhibited significantly better survival after distant recurrence (SADR) compared to those without <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> treatment (3-year survival rate, 81.8 vs. 43.1%, respectively; P=0.014). The multivariate analysis revealed that the <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> treatment was prognostically significant for SADR (P=0.0091; hazard ratio = 0.343). In conclusion, combination therapy with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and IFN- ? may be efficient for HCC patients with lung metastasis. PMID:25798261</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">AKITA, HIROFUMI; MARUBASHI, SHIGERU; WADA, HIROSHI; HAMA, NAOKI; KAWAMOTO, KOICHI; KOBAYASHI, SHOGO; EGUCHI, HIDETOSHI; DOKI, YUICHIRO; MORI, MASAKI; NAGANO, HIROAKI</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8760884"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular cloning of a RNA binding protein, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> proteins A-D constitute a nuclear protein family that are liberated rapidly in a set from chromatin by mild digestion with a DNA or RNA hydrolyzing enzyme. With an anti-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-protein B antiserum that reacted with B2, C1 and D1, a cDNA clone, p<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1, was obtained, which encoded a protein of 852 amino acids. The <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1 protein, encoded within the cells by a mRNA of 3480 nt, was a novel protein and could be distinguished from the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> proteins B, C and D by their amino acid sequences. The <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>-1 protein synthesized by in vitro translation bound to RNA homopolymers, with a preference for G and U polyribonucleotides and little for poly(A). The protein contained two tandem RNP motifs and several intriguing sequences, such as a novel repeat of five octamers with a consensus sequence DP-S(Q/G)YYY and a potentially perfect amphipathic alpha-helix of five turns with basic and acidic amino acids positioned in an ordered way. The two RNP motif sequences were similar, although homologies were low, to the RNP motif sequences of yeast NSR1 protein, animal nucleolins, Drosophila hnRNP Al and tobacco chloroplast RNP precursor protein, suggesting a functional uniqueness of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1 protein in RNA metabolism and also the evolution of its RNP motif structure before plants and animals diverged. These results indicate that the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1 protein encoded by the cDNA is a new class of RNA binding protein. PMID:8760884</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Inoue, A; Takahashi, K P; Kimura, M; Watanabe, T; Morisawa, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22389505"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) regulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent studies suggest that sphingolipid metabolism is altered during type 2 diabetes. Increased levels of the sphingolipid ceramide are associated with insulin resistance. However, a role for sphingolipids in pancreatic beta cell function, or insulin production, and release remains to be established. Our studies in MIN6 cells and mouse pancreatic islets demonstrate that glucose stimulates an intracellular rise in the sphingolipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P), whereas the levels of ceramide and sphingomyelin remain unchanged. The increase in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels by glucose is due to activation of sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2). Interestingly, rises in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P correlate with increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Decreasing <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels by treatment of MIN6 cells or primary islets with the sphingosine kinase inhibitor reduces GSIS. Moreover, knockdown of SphK2 alone results in decreased GSIS, whereas knockdown of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P phosphatase, Sgpp1, leads to a rise in GSIS. Treatment of mice with the sphingosine kinase inhibitor impairs glucose disposal due to decreased plasma insulin levels. Altogether, our data suggest that glucose activates SphK2 in pancreatic beta cells leading to a rise in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels, which is important for GSIS. PMID:22389505</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cantrell Stanford, Jamie; Morris, Andrew J; Sunkara, Manjula; Popa, Gabriel J; Larson, Kara L; Özcan, Sabire</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://deph.physik.uni-siegen.de/vorlesungen/mb_ws0405/mb_uebung1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Physik II fr Maschinenbauer Zwei Metallplatten, jeweils mit einer Flche von A = 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Physik II für Maschinenbauer WS 2004/5 Aufgabe 1. Zwei Metallplatten, jeweils mit einer Fläche von A = 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2 werden im Abstand l = 20 <span class="hlt">cm</span> in eine NaCl -Lösung getaucht und eine Spannung von 5 V angelegt Beweglichkeit besitzen ( + = - = 5 · 10-4 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2 /Vs ). Es wird ein Strom von I = 30 A gemessen. a. Berechnen Sie</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Siegen, Universität</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44200777"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amino acids in Antarctic <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 meteorites and their relationship to other carbonaceous chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites are the most primitive material present in the solar system, and some of their subtypes, the <span class="hlt">CM</span> and CI chondrites, contain up to 2 wt% of organic carbon. The <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of complex amino acids, while the CI1 meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna display a much simpler composition, with only glycine and beta-alanine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oliver Botta; Zita Martins; Pascale Ehrenfreund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.casemix.org/pubbl/pdf/1_2_2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CASEMIX CLASSIFICATION ISSUES AND CHANGE FROM ICD9<span class="hlt">CM</span> TO ICD10AM CODING</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Australia is in the throes of changing from ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> to the Australian Modification of ICD-10 (ICD-10-AM) for coding of morbidity and interventions in Australian acute care hospitals. The change is of great relevance to countries using casemix groupers based on ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>. This paper describes the Australian experience of change from ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> to the Australian Modification of ICD-10 (ICD-10-AM) and its</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosemary Roberts; Naarilla Hirsch; Kerry Innes; Donna Lee Truran</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20865502"> <span id="translatedtitle">FM-GA and <span class="hlt">CM</span>-GA for gene microarray analysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we propose two new approaches, FM-GA and <span class="hlt">CM</span>-GA, to identify significant genes from microarray datasets. FM-GA and <span class="hlt">CM</span>-GA combine our innovative FM-test and <span class="hlt">CM</span>-test with genetic algorithm (GA), respectively, and leverage the strengths of GA. The performance of FM-GA and <span class="hlt">CM</span>-GA was evaluated by the classification accuracy of decision trees constructed with the selected genes. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over other approaches. PMID:20865502</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liang, Lily R; Palomino, Rommel A Benites; Lu, Zhao; Mandal, Vinay; Kumar, Deepak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://geosci.uchicago.edu/~grossman/BWSG12.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous. Investigation of the magnesium isotopic compositions of chondrules can place stringent constraints on the timing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grossman, Lawrence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770030153&hterms=Ion+source&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DIon%2Bsource."> <span id="translatedtitle">Application of ion thruster technology to a 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> multipole sputtering ion source</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> electron-bombardment ion source has been designed and fabricated for micromachining and sputtering applications. This source has a multipole magnetic field that employs permanent magnets between permeable pole pieces. An average ion current density of 1 ma/sq <span class="hlt">cm</span> with 500-eV argon ions was selected as a design operating condition. The ion beam at this operating condition was uniform and well collimated, with an average variation of + or -5 percent over the center 20 <span class="hlt">cm</span> of the beam at a distance up to 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> from the ion source.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robinson, R. S.; Kaufman, H. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20414029"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Histological complete response in a case of advanced gastric cancer treated by neo-adjuvant chemotherapy with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>/CDDP].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 59-year-old male was found to have advanced gastric cancer with multiple lymph node metastasis including para-aortic lymph nodes(cT3, cN3, <span class="hlt">cM</span>0, cH0, cP0, cStage IV). Since curative surgery was deemed not feasible, we tried neoadjuvant chemotherapy expecting downstaging of the tumor. <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>(120 mg/body)was orally administered for three weeks followed by one week rest, and CDDP(60 mg/m2)was administered on day 8. Three courses of treatment resulted in a marked shrinkage of the primary lesion and a reduction of lymph nodes. He was judged as clinical PR by RECIST, and a radical resection was considered possible. Laparotomy revealed neither ascites nor peritoneal dissemination, and he underwent total gastrectomy, splenectomy and D2+para-aortic lymph node dissection with curative intent. The histological diagnosis revealed complete disappearance of cancer cells in the primary lesion of the stomach and lymph nodes, confirming a pathological complete response. The patient has been alive for six months without recurrence. PMID:20414029</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oshima, Noriko; Tanizawa, Yutaka; Bando, Etsuro; Kawamura, Taiichi; Tokunaga, Masanori; Sugisawa, Norihiko; Taki, Yusuke; Motegi, Yoko; Boku, Narikazu; Sasaki, Keiko; Terashima, Masanori</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhRvB..69v4405B"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span>= <span class="hlt">1</span> /2 Ising behavior in the two-dimensional molecular magnet Fe (NCS)2 (pyrazine)2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnetic ordering and critical behavior of antiferromagnetic Fe(NCS)2 (pyrazine)2 has been studied by neutron powder diffraction (NPD), inelastic neutron scattering (INS), Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements. The system can be regarded as a two-dimensional (2D) antiferromagnet even in the ordered phase, given that long-range magnetic ordering between the layers simply follows a necessary consequence of the establishment of long-range ordering within the planes. The INS data, which were taken on a cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer, reveals that when the temperature is lowered towards TN , the correlation length within the 2D layers increases and ultimately crosses over from two- to three-dimensional (3D) behavior. Indeed, 3D long-range antiferromagnetic order, associated with a propagation vector [ 1,0, 1 /4 +? ] , is observed in the NPD data below 6.8 K . Furthermore, in agreement with the behavior of both ?(T) and <span class="hlt">Cm</span> (T) data, the order parameter follows the exact Osanger solution for a 2D <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>/2 , Ising system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bordallo, H. N.; Chapon, L.; Manson, J. L.; Hernández-Velasco, J.; Ravot, D.; Reiff, W. M.; Argyriou, D. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3822960"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P on skeletal muscle repair/regeneration during eccentric contraction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abstract Skeletal muscle regeneration is severely compromised in the case of extended damage. The current challenge is to find factors capable of limiting muscle degeneration and/or potentiating the inherent regenerative program mediated by a specific type of myoblastic cells, the satellite cells. Recent studies from our groups and others have shown that the bioactive lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P), promotes myoblast differentiation and exerts a trophic action on denervated skeletal muscle fibres. In the present study, we examined the effects of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P on eccentric contraction (EC)-injured extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres and resident satellite cells. After EC, skeletal muscle showed evidence of structural and biochemical damage along with significant electrophysiological changes, i.e. reduced plasma membrane resistance and resting membrane potential and altered Na+ and Ca2+ current amplitude and kinetics. Treatment with exogenous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P attenuated the EC-induced tissue damage, protecting skeletal muscle fibre from apoptosis, preserving satellite cell viability and affecting extracellular matrix remodelling, through the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) expression. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P also promoted satellite cell renewal and differentiation in the damaged muscle. Notably, EC was associated with the activation of sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) and with increased endogenous <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P synthesis, further stressing the relevance of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P in skeletal muscle protection and repair/regeneration. In line with this, the treatment with a selective SphK1 inhibitor during EC, caused an exacerbation of the muscle damage and attenuated MMP-9 expression. Together, these findings are in favour for a role of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P in skeletal muscle healing and offer new clues for the identification of novel therapeutic approaches to counteract skeletal muscle damage and disease. PMID:21199328</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sassoli, Chiara; Formigli, Lucia; Bini, Francesca; Tani, Alessia; Squecco, Roberta; Battistini, Chiara; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Francini, Fabio; Meacci, Elisabetta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4163369"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radiofrequency Thermoablation of HCC Larger Than 3?<span class="hlt">cm</span> and Less Than 5?<span class="hlt">cm</span> Proximal to the Gallbladder without Gallbladder Isolation: A Single Center Experience</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an effective minimally invasive treatment for nonsurgical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but ablation of tumors close to the gallbladder could be associated with several complications. We report our experience on the treatment of HCC close to the gallbladder with RFA. Eight RFA procedures were performed in eight patients with HCC larger than 3?<span class="hlt">cm</span> and less than 5?<span class="hlt">cm</span> close to the gallbladder. In all cases, a percutaneous approach was used. There were no major complications. Only in two patients a minimal wall thickening of the gallbladder was observed. Contrast enhanced computed tomography carried out after 30 days from the first procedure showed complete necrosis in seven patients (87%). Only one patient had local recurrence at 11 months of followup. Although limited, our experience suggests that, after careful preprocedural planning, in experienced hands and with appropriate technology, percutaneous RFA could be safely performed even for lesions larger than 3?<span class="hlt">cm</span> located in close adjacency to the gallbladder. PMID:25247192</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orlacchio, Antonio; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Costanzo, Elisa; Simonetti, Giovanni</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007M%26PS...42...81B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amino acids in Antarctic <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 meteorites and their relationship to other carbonaceous chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites are the most primitive material present in the solar system, and some of their subtypes, the <span class="hlt">CM</span> and CI chondrites, contain up to 2 wt% of organic carbon. The <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of complex amino acids, while the CI1 meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna display a much simpler composition, with only glycine and ?-alanine present in significant abundances. <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 carbonaceous chondrites show a higher degree of aqueous alteration than <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 types and therefore provide an important link between the <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 and CI1 carbonaceous chondrites. Relative amino acid concentrations have been shown to be indicative for parent body processes with respect to the formation of this class of compounds. In order to understand the relationship of the amino acid composition between these three types of meteorites, we have analyzed for the first time three Antarctic <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 chondrites, Meteorite Hills (MET) 01070, Allan Hills (ALH) 88045, and LaPaz Icefield (LAP) 02277, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD). The concentrations of the eight most abundant amino acids in these meteorites were compared to those of the <span class="hlt">CM</span>2s Murchison, Murray, Mighei, Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, ALH 83100, as well as the CI1s Orgueil and Ivuna. The total amino acid concentration in <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 carbonaceous chondrites was found to be much lower than the average of the <span class="hlt">CM</span>2s. Relative amino acid abundances were compared in order to identify synthetic relationships between the amino acid compositions in these meteorite classes. Our data support the hypothesis that amino acids in <span class="hlt">CM</span>- and CI-type meteorites were synthesized under different physical and chemical conditions and may best be explained with differences in the abundances of precursor compounds in the source regions of their parent bodies in combination with the decomposition of amino acids during extended aqueous alteration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Botta, Oliver; Martins, Zita; Ehrenfreund, Pascale</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3765748"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is associated with chronic low back pain: a functional and structural MRI study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A fundamental characteristic of neural circuits is the capacity for plasticity in response to experience. Neural plasticity is associated with the development of chronic pain disorders. In this study, we investigated 1) brain resting state functional connectivity (FC) differences between patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) and matched healthy controls (HC); 2) FC differences within the cLBP patients as they experienced different levels of endogenous low back pain evoked by exercise maneuvers, and 3) morphometric differences between cLBP patients and matched HC. We found the dynamic character of FC in the primary somatosensory cortex (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) in cLBP patients, i.e., <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> FC decreased when the patients experienced low intensity LBP as compared with matched healthy controls, and FC at <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> increased when cLBP patients experienced high intensity LBP as compared with the low intensity condition. In addition, we also found increased cortical thickness in the bilateral <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> somatotopically associated with the lower back in cLBP patients as compared to healthy controls. Our results provide evidence of structural plasticity co-localized with areas exhibiting FC changes in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> in cLBP patients. PMID:23965184</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19580330"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of actin glutathionylation on the actomyosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ATPase.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Glutathionylation of intracellular proteins is an established physiological regulator of protein function. In multiple models, including ischemia-reperfusion of the heart, increased oxidative stress results in the glutathionylation of sarcomeric actin. We hypothesized that actin glutathionylation may play a role in the multifactorial change in cardiac muscle contractility observed during this pathophysiological state. Therefore, the functional impact of glutathionylated actin on the interaction with myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> was examined. Substituting glutathionylated F-actin for unmodified F-actin reduced the maximum actomyosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ATPase, and this was accompanied by an increase in the activation energy of the steady state ATPase. Measurement of steady state binding did not suggest a large impact of actin glutathionylation on the binding to myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. However, transient binding and dissociation kinetics determined by stopped-flow methods demonstrated that although actin glutathionylation did not significantly alter the rate constant of myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> binding, there was a significant decrease in the rate of ATP-induced myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> detachment in the presence of ADP. These results suggest that actin glutathionylation may play a limited but defined role in the alteration of contractility following oxidative stress to the myocardium, particularly through a decrease in the actomyosin ATPase activity. PMID:19580330</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pizarro, Gresin O; Ogut, Ozgur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2753222"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of Actin Glutathionylation on the Actomyosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ATPase†</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Glutathionylation of intracellular proteins is an established physiological regulator of protein function. In multiple models including ischemia-reperfusion of the heart, increased oxidative stress results in the glutathionylation of sarcomeric actin. We hypothesized that actin glutathionylation may play a role in the multi-factorial change in cardiac muscle contractility observed during this pathophysiological state. Therefore, the functional impact of glutathionylated actin on the interaction with myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> was examined. Substituting glutathionylated F-actin for unmodified F-actin reduced the maximum actomyosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ATPase, and this was accompanied by an increase in the activation energy of the steady state ATPase. Measurement of steady state binding did not suggest a large impact of actin glutathionylation on the binding to myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. However, transient binding and dissociation kinetics determined by stopped-flow methods demonstrated that although actin glutathionylation did not significantly alter the rate constant of myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> binding, there was a significant decrease in the rate of ATP-induced myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> detachment in the presence of ADP. These results suggest that actin glutathionylation may play a limited but defined role in the alteration of contractility following oxidative stress to the myocardium, particularly through a decrease in the actomyosin ATPase activity. PMID:19580330</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pizarro, Gresin O.; Ogut, Ozgur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4376272"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corneal Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency Associated with the Anticancer Drug <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ABSTRACT Purpose An oral antineoplastic drug, <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, is known to be more effective with less toxicity and fewer gastrointestinal side effects than the conventional intravenous 5-fluorouracil. We report a case of limbal stem cell deficiency that occurred in a patient receiving chemotherapy using <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> alone for gastric cancer. Case Report A 65-year-old woman with symptoms of grittiness and epiphora in both eyes for several months was referred to the ophthalmology clinic. She had been receiving <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> orally after total gastrectomy for advanced gastric cancer. Slit lamp examination revealed an irregular hazy corneal epithelium in both eyes that extended to the center of the cornea overlying the pupil and showed late staining with fluorescein dye. Palisades of Vogt at the superior limbus were absent in both eyes. Best-corrected distance vision was 20/50 in both eyes with all other structures of the anterior and posterior segment unremarkable including a patent lacrimal drainage system. There was no change in the corneal lesions of either eye despite 3 months of topical therapy. The lesions did resolve in 4 months after discontinuation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy owing to acute renal failure. Conclusions Early detection of this adverse reaction before significant visual loss through regular follow-up appears to be important in patients receiving <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy. PMID:25756340</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Kyeong Hwan; Kim, Wan Soo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0610368v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Transition from Atomic to Molecular Hydrogen in Interstellar Clouds: 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> Signature of the Evolution of Cold Atomic Hydrogen in Dense Clouds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have investigated the time scale for formation of molecular clouds by examining the conversion of HI to H2 using a time-dependent model. H2 formation on dust grains and cosmic ray and photo destruction are included in one-dimensional model slab clouds which incorporate time-independent density and temperature distributions. We calculate 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> spectral line profiles seen in absorption against a background provided by general Galactic HI emission, and compare the model spectra with HI Narrow Self-Absorption, or HINSA, profiles absorbed in a number of nearby molecular clouds. The time evolution of the HI and H2 densities is dramatic, with the atomic hydrogen disappearing in a wave propagating from the central, denser regions which have a shorter H2 formation time scale, to the edges, where the density is lower and the time scale for H2 formation longer. The model 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> spectra are characterized by very strong absorption at early times, when the HI column density through the model clouds is extremely large. The minimum time required for a cloud to have evolved to its observed configuration, based on the model spectra, is set by the requirement that most of the HI in the outer portions of the cloud, which otherwise overwhelms the narrow absorption, be removed. The characteristic time that has elapsed since cloud compression and initiation of the HI to H2 conversion is a few x 10^{14} s or ~ <span class="hlt">10^7</span> yr. This sets a minimum time for the age of these molecular clouds and thus for the star formation that may take place within them.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paul F. Goldsmith; Di Li; Marko Krco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/reprint/60/20/5740.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CM</span>101 Treatment Overrides Tumor-induced Immunoprivilege Leading to Apoptosis1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span>101, a bacterial polysaccharide exotoxin produced by group B Strep- tococcus (GBS), also referred to as GBS toxin, has been shown to target pathological neovasculature and activate complement (C3), thereby inducing neovascularitis, infiltration of inflammatory cells, inhibition of tumor growth, and apoptosis in murine tumor models. Data from refractory cancer patients in a Phase I clinical trial with <span class="hlt">CM</span>101 indicated</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Michael Yakes; Barbara D. Wamil; Fenglei Sun; He-Ping Yan; Clint E. Carter; Carl G. Hellerqvist</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/61303714"> <span id="translatedtitle">DS <span class="hlt">CM</span> 247 LC - enhanced mechanical properties response through optimized solutioning technique</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span> 247 LC is a Ni-base superalloy, derived from Mar M 247, developed for application in gas turbine directionally solidified (DS) blade vane castings. It exhibits exceptional resistance to grain boundary cracking and provides an improved carbide microstructure, relative to DS Mar M 247. DS <span class="hlt">CM</span> 247 LC also possesses an increased incipient melting point. Whereas DS Mar M 247</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. L. Erickson; K. Harris; R. E. Schwer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60592636"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy levels of ²Bk populated in the decay of ²³ Es and decay of ² <span class="hlt">Cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The level structure of ²Bk has been investigated by measuring the -ray spectra of an extremely pure ²³Es sample obtained by milking this nuclide from ²³Cf source material produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Additional information on the ²Bk levels was obtained from the -decay study of ²<span class="hlt">Cm</span>, produced by neutron irradiation of ²<span class="hlt">Cm</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. Ahmad; F. G. Kondev; E. F. Moore; M. P. Carpenter; R. R. Chasman; J. P. Greene; R. V. F. Janssens; T. Lauritsen; C. J. Lister; D. Seweryniak; R. W. Hoff; J. E. Evans; R. W. Lougheed; C. E. Porter; L. K. Felker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5253828"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907: a structurally novel anticonvulsant in mice, rats and baboons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 (3-(4-hydroxypiperidyl)-6-(2'-chlorophenyl)-pyridazine) is a chemically original compound which possesses the pharmacological properties of a potent, p.o. active anticonvulsant. The anticonvulsant activity of <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 was examined in mice, rats and photosensitive Papio-papio baboons and compared to that of phenobarbital, diphenylhydantoin, carbamazepine, sodium valproate and ethosuximide. In mice, <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 antagonized electroconvulsive shock and chemically induced seizures with an overall potency comparable to that of carbamazepine and a therapeutic ratio (ED50 rotorod/ED50 electroshock) superior to that of ethosuximide, sodium valproate, phenobarbital and carbamazepine. In the rat <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 suppressed completed kindled amygdaloid seizures and was approximately as active as phenobarbital. In naturally photosensitive Senegalese Papio-papio baboons <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 antagonized myoclonus and cortical paroxysmal discharges. In this model <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 was approximately one-fourth as potent as phenobarbital, twice as potent as carbamazepine and 6 times more potent than sodium valproate. In mice <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907, at anticonvulsant doses, increased the affinity of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam for its central receptor site. Based on these results it is postulated that <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 is a potent and relatively nonsedative anticonvulsant and may be of therapeutic benefit in epileptic disorders.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chambon, J.P.; Brochard, J.; Hallot, A.; Heaulme, M.; Brodin, R.; Roncucci, R.; Biziere, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/6067190"> <span id="translatedtitle">Automatic construction of rule-based ICD9<span class="hlt">CM</span> coding systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: In this paper we focus on the problem of automatically constructing ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> coding systems for radiology reports. ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes are used for billing purposes by health institutes and are assigned to clinical records manually following clinical treatment. Since this labeling task requires expert knowledge in the field of medicine, the process itself is costly and is prone to errors</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Richárd Farkas; György Szarvas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1472-6823-8-4.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validation of ICD9<span class="hlt">CM</span> coding algorithm for improved identification of hypoglycemia visits</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">BACKGROUND: Accurate identification of hypoglycemia cases by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>) codes will help to describe epidemiology, monitor trends, and propose interventions for this important complication in patients with diabetes. Prior hypoglycemia studies utilized incomplete search strategies and may be methodologically flawed. We sought to validate a new ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> coding algorithm for accurate identification of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adit A Ginde; Phillip G Blanc; Rebecca M Lieberman; Carlos A Camargo Jr</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020084975&hterms=flatness+table&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dflatness%2Btable"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance Evaluation of 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Ion Optics for the NEXT Ion Engine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of performance tests with two 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics sets are presented and compared to those of 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics with similar aperture geometries. The 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics utilized both NSTAR and TAG (Thick-Accelerator-Grid) aperture geometries. All 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics tests were conducted on a NEXT (NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster) laboratory model ion engine. Ion optics performance tests were conducted over a beam current range of 1.20 to 3.52 A and an engine input power range of 1.1 to 6.9 kW. Measured ion optics' performance parameters included near-field radial beam current density profiles, impingement-limited total voltages, electron backstreaming limits, screen grid ion transparencies, beam divergence angles, and start-up transients. Impingement-limited total voltages for 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics with the NSTAR aperture geometry were 60 to 90 V lower than those with the TAG aperture geometry. This difference was speculated to be due to an incomplete burn-in of the TAG ion optics. Electron backstreaming limits for the 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics with the TAG aperture geometry were 8 to 19 V higher than those with the NSTAR aperture geometry due to the thicker accelerator grid of the TAG geometry. Because the NEXT ion engine provided beam flatness parameters that were 40 to 63 percent higher than those of the NSTAR ion engine, the 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics outperformed the 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Patterson, Michael J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mae.cornell.edu/Psiaki/psiaki_iongnss2004.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">FFT-Based Acquisition of GPS L2 Civilian <span class="hlt">CM</span> and CL Signals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">FFT-Based Acquisition of GPS L2 Civilian <span class="hlt">CM</span> and CL Signals by Mark L. Psiaki Cornell University Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithms have been developed to do signal acquisition for the new <span class="hlt">CM</span> are launched. These algorithms have been developed to aid in the acquisition of weak GPS signals. FFT block</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Psiaki, Mark L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830040091&hterms=fossil+track+study&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dfossil%2Btrack%2Bstudy"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nuclear track and compositional studies of olivines in CI and <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The CI and <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites, with bulk chemical compositions closely resembling solar values, are important for the study of early solar system processes. Noble gas and particle track studies have revealed that a majority of the CI and <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites contain precompaction solar wind and solar flare irradiation records. A quantitative understanding of these records is important because it would allow constraints to be placed on the environment in which the irradiation occurred, and, therefore, on the mode of evolution of the CI and <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. The present investigation is concerned primarily with fossil track evidence, taking into account selected specimens of several CI and <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. In addition, the results are presented of extensive studies of the angular distributions of tracks in irradiated grains from four <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. The results provide information on the exposure geometry of the grains.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goswami, J. N.; Macdougall, J. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1405.2847v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Strong illposedness of the incompressible Euler equation in integer $<span class="hlt">C^m</span>$ spaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider the $d$-dimensional incompressible Euler equations. We show strong illposedness of velocity in any $<span class="hlt">C^m</span>$ spaces whenever $m\\ge 1$ is an \\emph{integer}. More precisely, we show for a set of initial data dense in the $<span class="hlt">C^m</span>$ topology, the corresponding solutions lose $<span class="hlt">C^m</span>$ regularity instantaneously in time. In the $C^1$ case, our proof is based on an anisotropic Lagrangian deformation and a short-time flow expansion. In the $<span class="hlt">C^m</span>$, $m\\ge 2$ case, we introduce a flow decoupling method which allows to tame the nonlinear flow almost as a passive transport. The proofs also cover illposedness in Lipschitz spaces $<span class="hlt">C^{m</span>-1,1}$ whenever $m\\ge 1$ is an integer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jean Bourgain; Dong Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/56/17/46/PDF/Primate_diet.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">HLADIK <span class="hlt">C.M</span>. & CHIVERS (1978) --Ecological factors and specific behaviou-ral patterns determining primate diet. In : <span class="hlt">C.M</span>. HLADIK & D.J. CHIVERS</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">primate diet. In : <span class="hlt">C.M</span>. HLADIK & D.J. CHIVERS (Eds.) Primate feeding behaviour in relation to food foli- vor ous primat es show a simil ar bi omass in di fferent par ts of the world (except ions./yr . Conclusions 435 Primates are usual ly only a smal l fraction of the vertebrates in the sec- ondary production</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1034824"> <span id="translatedtitle">TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 <span class="hlt">CM</span> BY 5 <span class="hlt">CM</span> BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> by 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> by 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1233769"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crystal structures of thrombin with thiazole-containing inhibitors: probes of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>' binding site.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Structures of the blood clotting enzyme thrombin complexed with hirugen and two active site inhibitors, RWJ-50353 10080(N-methyl-D-phenylalanyl-N-[5-[(aminoiminomethyl)amino]-1- [[(2-benzothiazolyl)carbonyl]butyl]-L-prolinamide trifluoroacetate hydrate) and RWJ-50215 (N-[4-(aminoiminomethyl)amino-1-[2- (thiazol-2-ylcarbonylethyl)piperidin- 1-ylcarbonyl]butyl]-5-(dimethylamino)naphthalenesulfonamide trifluoroacetate hydrate), were determined by x-ray crystallography. The refinements converged at R values of 0.158 in the 7.0-2.3-A range for RWJ-50353 and 0.155 in the 7.0-1.8-A range for RWJ-50215. Interactions between the protein and the thiazole rings of the two inhibitors provide new valuable information about the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>' binding site of thrombin. The RWJ-50353 inhibitor consists of an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>'-binding benzothiazole group linked to the D-Phe-Pro-Arg chloromethyl ketone motif. Interactions with the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-S3 sites are similar to the D-phenylalanyl-prolyl-arginyl chloromethylketone structure. In RWJ-50215, a <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>'-binding 2-ketothiazole group was added to the thrombin inhibitor-like framework of dansylarginine N-(3-ethyl-1,5-pentanediyl)amide. The geometry at the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-S3 sites here is also similar to that of the parent compound. The benzothiazole and 2-ketothiazole groups bind in a cavity surrounded by His57, Tyr60A, Trp60D, and Lys60F. This location of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>' binding site is consistent with previous structures of thrombin complexes with hirulog-3, CVS-995, and hirutonin-2 and -6. The ring nitrogen of the RWJ-50353 benzothiazole forms a hydrogen bond with His57, and Lys60F reorients because of close contacts. The oxygen and nitrogen of the ketothiazole of RWJ-50215 hydrogen bond with the NZ atom of Lys60F. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913620</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matthews, J H; Krishnan, R; Costanzo, M J; Maryanoff, B E; Tulinsky, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2848330"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular and immunological characterisation of the glycosylated orange allergen Cit <span class="hlt">s</span> <span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The IgE of sera from patients with a history of allergy to oranges (Citrus sinensis) bind a number of proteins in orange extract, including Cit <span class="hlt">s</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>, a germin-like protein. In the present study, we have analysed its immunological cross-reactivity and its molecular nature. Sera from many of the patients examined recognise a range of glycoproteins and neoglycoconjugates containing ?1,2-xylose and core ?1,3-fucose on their N-glycans. These reagents also inhibited the interaction of Cit <span class="hlt">s</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with patients’ sera, thus underlining the critical role of glycosylation in the recognition of this protein by patients’ IgE and extending previous data showing that deglycosylated Cit <span class="hlt">s</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> does not possess IgE epitopes. In parallel, we examined the peptide sequence and glycan structure of Cit <span class="hlt">s</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> using mass spectrometric techniques. Indeed, we achieved complete sequence coverage of the mature protein as compared to the translation of an expressed sequence tag cDNA clone and demonstrated that the single N-glycosylation site of this protein carries oligosaccharides with xylose and fucose residues. Due to the presumed requirement for multivalency for in vivo allergenicity, our molecular data showing that Cit <span class="hlt">s</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> is monovalent as regards glycosylation and that the single N-glycan is the target of the IgE response to this protein, therefore, explain the immunological cross-reactive properties of Cit <span class="hlt">s</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> as well as its equivocal nature as a clinically-relevant allergen. PMID:17095532</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pöltl, Gerald; Ahrazem, Oussama; Paschinger, Katharina; Ibañez, M. Dolores; Salcedo, Gabriel; Wilson, Iain B. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16904708"> <span id="translatedtitle">The acrylamide (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> differentially affects Kv7 (KCNQ) potassium channels.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The family of Kv7 (KCNQ) potassium channels consists of five members. Kv7.2 and 3 are the primary molecular correlates of the M-current, but also Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 display M-current characteristics. M-channel modulators include blockers (e.g., linopirdine) for cognition enhancement and openers (e.g., retigabine) for treatment of epilepsy and neuropathic pain. We investigated the effect of a Bristol-Myers Squibb compound (S)-N-[1-(3-morpholin-4-yl-phenyl)-ethyl]-3-phenyl-acrylamide [(<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span>] on cloned human Kv7.1-5 potassium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Using two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings we found that (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> blocks Kv7.1 and Kv7.1/KCNE1 currents. In contrast, (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> produced a hyperpolarizing shift of the activation curve for Kv7.2, Kv7.2/Kv7.3, Kv7.4 and Kv7.5. Further, the compound enhanced the maximal current amplitude at all potentials for Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 whereas the combined activation/block of Kv7.2 and Kv7.2/3 was strongly voltage-dependent. The tryptophan residue 242 in S5, known to be crucial for the effect of retigabine, was also shown to be critical for the enhancing effect of (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> and BMS204352. Furthermore, no additive effect on Kv7.4 current amplitude was observed when both retigabine and (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> or BMS204352 were applied simultaneously. In conclusion, (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> differentially affects the Kv7 channel subtypes and is dependent on a single tryptophan for the current enhancing effect in Kv7.4. PMID:16904708</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Schmitt, Nicole; Calloe, Kirstine; Dalby Brown, William; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19392822"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization and genetic analysis of bovine alpha <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein I variant.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this study was to identify the molecular genetic origin underlying the I variant of alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein and to develop a DNA-based test for this polymorphism as a tool for genetic analyses independent of milk sample testing. All coding exons and flanking regions of the alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein gene were sequenced in DNA samples from cattle of known alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein genotypes (BI, CI, II, CC), determined by isoelectric focusing of milk samples. A nucleotide substitution (A>T) in exon 11 (g.19836A>T) leads to the exchange of Glu with Asp at amino acid position 84 of the mature protein (p.Glu84Asp) and perfectly co-segregated with the presence of the alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein I variant in the milk of the analysed animals. Genotyping of a total of 680 DNA samples from 31 Bos taurus and Bos indicus cattle breeds and from Bos grunniens, Bison bison and Bison bonasus by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed the occurrence of Asp at position 84 at low frequencies in Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds and established its origin from the alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein C variant (p.Glu192Gly). Ten different intragenic haplotypes in the gene region from intron 8 to intron 12 were observed by sequencing, of which two occurred in Bison bison and one in Bison bonasus only. Using available casein gene complex information, an association of Asp at position 84 to beta-casein A(2) and kappa-casein B was shown in the Bos indicus breed Banyo Gudali. Taken together, we can postulate that the alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein variant I is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in exon 11 of the gene and that it originated within Bos indicus and spread to Bos taurus subsequently. PMID:19392822</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lühken, G; Caroli, A; Ibeagha-Awemu, E M; Erhardt, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CliPD..10.4647T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eastern Mediterranean Sea circulation inferred from the conditions of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> sapropel deposition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Holocene Eastern Mediterranean Sea sediments contain an organic-rich sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> layer that was formed in oxygen-depleted waters. The spatial distribution of this layer revealed that during <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> deposition deep waters were permanently anoxic below 1800 m in water depth. To provide further insight into past Eastern Mediterranean Sea circulation, a multi-proxy approach was applied to a core retrieved close to the 1800 m boundary (at 1780 m). We measured the bulk sediment elemental composition, the stable isotopic composition of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber, and the abundance of benthic foraminifera since the last deglaciation. The result indicates that authigenic U and Mo accumulation began around 13-12 cal ka BP, in concert with surface water freshening estimated from the G. ruber ?18O record. The onset of bottom/pore water oxygen depletion occurred prior to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> deposition inferred from barium enrichment. In the middle of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> deposition period, between 9 and 8 cal ka BP, reduced authigenic V, Fe and As contents and Br / Cl ratio indicated short-term bottom water re-oxygenation. A sharp Mn peak and maximal abundance for benthic foraminifera marked a total recovery for circulation at approximately 7 cal ka BP. Based on our results and existing data, we suggest that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> formation withinthe upper 1780 m of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea was preconditioned by reduced ventilation, resulting from excess fresh water inputs due to insolation changes under deglacial conditions, that initiated between 15 and 12 ka. Short-term re-oxygenation in the Levantine Basin is estimated to have affected bottom water below and above the anoxic boundary. We tentatively propose that complete ventilation recovery at the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> termination was attained earlier within the upper 1780 m than at deeper water depths. Our results provided new constraints for eastern Mediterranean Sea thermohaline circulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tachikawa, K.; Vidal, L.; Cornuault, M.; Garcia, M.; Pothin, A.; Sonzogni, C.; Bard, E.; Menot, G.; Revel, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23620482"> <span id="translatedtitle">The plant <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-like nuclease family has evolved a highly diverse range of catalytic capabilities.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plant <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-like nucleases, often referred to as nuclease I enzymes, are the main class of enzymes involved in nucleic acid degradation during plant programmed cell death. The catalytically active site of these enzymes shows a significant similarity to the well-described P1 nuclease from Penicillium citrinum. Previously published studies reported that plant <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-like nucleases possess catalytic activities similar to their fungal orthologs, i.e. they hydrolyze single-stranded DNA and RNA, and less efficiently double-stranded DNA, in the presence of zinc ions. Here we describe a comprehensive study of the nucleolytic activities of all Arabidopsis <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-like paralogs. Our results revealed that different members of this family are characterized by a surprisingly large variety of catalytic properties. We found that, in addition to Zn(2+)-dependent enzymes, this family also comprises nucleases activated by Ca(2+) and Mn(2+), which implies that the apparently well-known <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease active site in plant nucleases is able to cooperate with different activatory ions. Moreover, particular members of this class differ in their optimum pH value and substrate specificity. These results shed new light on the widely accepted classification of plant nucleases which is based on the assumption that the catalytic requirements of plant nucleases reflect their phylogenetic origin. Our results imply the need to redefine the understanding of the term 'nuclease I'. Analysis of the phylogenetic relationships between <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-like enzymes shows that plant representatives of this family evolve toward an increase in catalytic diversity. The importance of this process for the biological functions of plant <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-type enzymes is discussed. PMID:23620482</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lesniewicz, Krzysztof; Karlowski, Wojciech M; Pienkowska, Joanna R; Krzywkowski, Piotr; Poreba, Elzbieta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013M%26PS...48..879H"> <span id="translatedtitle">The nanoscale mineralogy of Fe,Ni sulfides in pristine and metamorphosed <span class="hlt">CM</span> and <span class="hlt">CM</span>/CI-like chondrites: Tapping a petrogenetic record</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have sampled sulfide grains from one pristine <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 chondrite (Yamato [Y-] 791198), one thermally metamorphosed <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 chondrite (Y-793321), and two anomalous, metamorphosed <span class="hlt">CM</span>/CI-like chondrites (Y-86720 and Belgica [B-] 7904) by the focused ion beam (FIB) technique and studied them by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our study aims at exploring the potential of sulfide assemblages and microstructures to decipher processes and conditions of chondrite petrogenesis. Complex exsolution textures of pyrrhotite (crystallographic NC-type with N ? 6), troilite, and pentlandite occur in grains of Y-791198 and Y-793321. Additionally, polycrystalline 4C-pyrrhotite-pentlandite-magnetite aggregates occur in Y-791198, pointing to diverse conditions of gas-solid interactions in the solar nebula. Coarser exsolution textures of Y-793321 grains indicate higher long-term average temperatures in the <100 °C range compared to Y-791198 and other <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. Sulfide mineralogy of Y-86720 and B-7904 is dominated by aggregates of pure troilite and metal, indicating metamorphic equilibration at sulfur fugacities (fS2) of the iron-troilite buffer. Absence of magnetite in equilibrium with sulfide and metal in Y-86720 indicates higher peak temperatures compared with B-7904, in which coexistence of troilite, metal, and magnetite constrains metamorphic temperature to less than 570 °C. NC-pyrrhotite occurs in both meteorites as nm-wide rims on troilite grains and, together with frequent anhydrite, indicates a retrograde metamorphic stage at higher fS2 slightly above the fayalite-magnetite-quartz-pyrrhotite buffer. Fine-grained troilite-olivine intergrowths in both meteorites suggest the pre-metamorphic presence of tochilinite-serpentine interlayer phases, pointing to mineralogical <span class="hlt">CM</span> affinity. Pseudomorphs after euhedral pyrrhotite crystals in Y-86720 in turn suggest CI affinity as do previously published O isotopic data of both meteorites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harries, Dennis; Langenhorst, Falko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp//issp_wms/DATA/OPTION/release20140502.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">-H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2Cat-(b) <span class="hlt">S</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>/2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">/ NIMS ) NIMS -H3(Cat- EDT-TTF)2Cat- EDT-TTF (b) <span class="hlt">S</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>/2 2(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 1 2 Cat-EDT-TTF 1(a) Cat-EDT-TTF <span class="hlt">S</span> =<span class="hlt">1</span>/2 3 20 K-253.15 3K -270.15 50mK-273.10 - (BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3 EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2 Cat-EDT-TTF 2 1(c) -H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 -H3(Cat</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Katsumoto, Shingo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012mss..confERB07N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preliminary Modeling of CH_3D from 4000 TO 4550 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New line positions, intensities and quantum assignments were obtained for 12CH_3D between 4000 and 4550 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 using high resolution spectra recorded with two Fourier transform spectrometers and enriched gas samples (98%-Deuterium) at room and cold (80 K) temperatures. The effective Hamiltonian and the effective Dipole moment expansions were expressed in terms of irreducible tensor operators adapted to symmetric top molecules. Over 4000 positions and 1300 line intensities in this region were reproduced with RMS values of 0.007 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 and 14%, respectively. With these new results included, the simultaneous modeling of the four lowest polyads of 12CH_3D from 0 to 4550 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 [Ground State, Triad (1000 ? 1600 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1), Nonad (2000 to 3300 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1), and Enneadecad (3400 to 4600 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1)] permitted over 19000 observed positions to be fitted within 0.003 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley Research Center under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Support from "CH4@Titan" contract (ANR France) and of SAMIA GDRI project for the modeling is acknowledged.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nikitin, A. V.; Brown, Linda R.; Sung, K.; Rey, M.; Tyuterev, Vl. G.; Smith, M. A. H.; Mantz, A. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004PhRvC..70d4610T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fission-product formation in the thermal-neutron-induced fission of odd <span class="hlt">Cm</span> isotopes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermal-neutron-induced fission of 243<span class="hlt">Cm</span> was studied at the Lohengrin mass separator. The light-mass peak of the fission-yield curve was investigated, and yields of masses from A=72 to A=120 were obtained. Independent-product yields were determined for nuclear charges Z=28 37 . The yield of masses in the superasymmetric region was found to be identical to other fission reactions studied at Lohengrin. The multimodal approach to fission and the macroscopic-microscopic method for the calculation of charge-distribution parameters in isobaric chains were used to analyze experimental results from the fission of 243<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and 245<span class="hlt">Cm</span> . A systematics on fission modes was derived from the analysis and extended to the 247<span class="hlt">Cm</span> case. The weight of the 132Sn mode was found to decrease in 243<span class="hlt">Cm</span> , relative to the 245<span class="hlt">Cm</span> nucleus. A prediction of the 78Ni yield in the fission of <span class="hlt">Cm</span> isotopes was made. The feasibility of the study of 78Ni at Lohengrin has been demonstrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsekhanovich, I.; Varapai, N.; Rubchenya, V.; Rochman, D.; Simpson, G. S.; Sokolov, V.; Fioni, G.; Mahamid, Ilham Al</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvD..89l3002D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Galactic Faraday rotation effect on polarization of 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> lines from the epoch of reionization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A redshifted 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal from neutral hydrogen is one of the most competitive probes of the epoch of reionization (EoR). Unpolarized 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> radiation acquires a certain level of linear polarization during the EoR due to Thompson scattering. This linear polarization, if measured, could probe important information about the EoR. We study the effect of Galactic Faraday rotation in the detection of polarization of 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> radiation. The effect of Faraday rotation is strong due to the large wavelength nature of the redshifted 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal. Thus, an initial E-mode signal carried by 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> photons is modified in its entirety. We show that a 99% accuracy on rotation measure data is necessary to recover the initial E-mode signal. We conclude that, given the current status of rotation measure observations, it is not possible to retrieve the initial polarization signal of 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> from the EoR. However, future radio observations of pulsar sources may improve the accuracy of the Galactic rotation measure to a high degree, making the reconstruction of the initial 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> polarization possible.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De, Soma; Tashiro, Hiroyuki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70035673"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fe-Ni metal and sulfide minerals in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites: An indicator for thermal history</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites were subjected to aqueous alteration and, in some cases, to secondary metamorphic heating. The effects of these processes vary widely, and have mainly been documented in silicate phases. Herein, we report the characteristic features of Fe-Ni metal and sulfide phases in 13 <span class="hlt">CM</span> and 2 <span class="hlt">CM</span>-related chondrites to explore the thermal history of these chondrites. The texture and compositional distribution of the metal in <span class="hlt">CM</span> are different from those in unequilibrated ordinary and CO chondrites, but most have similarities to those in highly primitive chondrites, such as CH, CR, and Acfer 094. We classified the <span class="hlt">CM</span> samples into three categories based on metal composition and sulfide texture. Fe-Ni metal in category A is kamacite to martensite. Category B is characterized by pyrrhotite grains always containing blebs or lamellae of pentlandite. Opaque mineral assemblages of category C are typically kamacite, Ni-Co-rich metal, and pyrrhotite. These categories are closely related to the degree of secondary heating and are not related to degree of the aqueous alteration. The characteristic features of the opaque minerals can be explained by secondary heating processes after aqueous alteration. Category A <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites are unheated, whereas those in category B experienced small degrees of secondary heating. CMs in category C were subjected to the most severe secondary heating process. Thus, opaque minerals can provide constraints on the thermal history for <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2011.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kimura, M.; Grossman, J.N.; Weisberg, M.K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.141x4310M"> <span id="translatedtitle">New observation and combined analysis of the Cs 2 0g - , 0u + , and 1g states at the asymptotes 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P1/2 and 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P3/2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on new observations of the photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold cesium molecules using a highly sensitive detection technique and a combined analysis with all observed electronic states. The technique is achieved by directly modulating the frequency of the trapping lasers of a magneto-optical trap. New observations of the Cs2 0g - , 0u + , and 1g states at the asymptotes 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P1/2 and 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P3/2 are reported. The spectral range is extended to the red detuning of 112 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 below the 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P3/2 dissociation limit. Dozens of vibrational levels of the ultracold Cs2 0g - , 0u + , and 1g states are observed for the first time. The available experimental binding energies of these states are analyzed simultaneously in a framework of the generalized LeRoy-Bernstein theory and the almost degenerate perturbation theory by Marinescu and Dalgarno [Phys. Rev. A: At., Mol., Opt. Phys. 52, 311 (1995)]. The unique atomic-related parameter c3 governing the dispersion forces of all the molecular states is estimated as (10.29 ± 0.05) a.u.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ma, Jie; Liu, Wenliang; Yang, Jinxin; Wu, Jizhou; Sun, Weiguo; Ivanov, Valery S.; Skublov, Alexei S.; Sovkov, Vladimir B.; Dai, Xingcan; Jia, Suotang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25186492"> <span id="translatedtitle">Challenges and remediation for Patient Safety Indicators in the transition to ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reporting of hospital adverse events relies on Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>) codes. The US transition to ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> in 2015 could result in erroneous comparisons of PSIs. Using the General Equivalent Mappings (GEMs), we compared the accuracy of ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> coded PSIs against recommended ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes from the Centers for Medicaid/Medicare Services (CMS). We further predict their impact in a cohort of 38,644 patients (1,446,581 visits and 399 hospitals). We compared the predicted results to the published PSI related ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> diagnosis codes. We provide the first report of substantial hospital safety reporting errors with five direct comparisons from the 23 types of PSIs (transfusion and anesthesia related PSIs). One PSI was excluded from the comparison between code sets due to reorganization, while 15 additional PSIs were inaccurate to a lesser degree due to the complexity of the coding translation. The ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> translations proposed by CMS pose impending risks for (1) comparing safety incidents, (2) inflating the number of PSIs, and (3) increasing the variability of calculations attributable to the abundance of coding system translations. Ethical organizations addressing 'data-, process-, and system-focused' improvements could be penalized using the new ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality PSIs because of apparent increases in PSIs bearing the same PSI identifier and label, yet calculated differently. Here we investigate which PSIs would reliably transition between ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> and ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span>, and those at risk of under-reporting and over-reporting adverse events while the frequency of these adverse events remain unchanged. PMID:25186492</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyd, Andrew D; Yang, Young Min; Li, Jianrong; Kenost, Colleen; Burton, Mike D; Becker, Bryan; Lussier, Yves A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3256774"> <span id="translatedtitle">Accuracy of ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> coding of cervical spine fractures: Implications for research using administrative databases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes are often used for trauma research due to their ready availability in administrative databases. They are also used to classify injury severity in trauma patients. However, errors in coding may limit the use of these codes. Prior studies have found coding accuracy ranging from 20 to 100%, casting doubt on the reliability of studies utilizing these codes. The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> coding for cervical spine fractures. Methods We used ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes to identify trauma admissions and cervical spine fractures at a Level I trauma center in 2006. Cervical spine CT or CTA reports were reviewed by two independent observers. Data were compared to ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes to determine accuracy. Results Of 1620 trauma admissions, 174 (11%) included a cervical spine fracture defined by ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes. A cervical spine fracture was the primary diagnosis in 79 admissions and a secondary diagnosis in 63 admissions. Of the 142 cervical spine fractures defined by ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> code, there were 133 (94%) cervical fractures by radiology report. Accuracy varied by primary diagnosis (97%) versus secondary diagnosis (89%). By cervical level, there were 230 fractures by CT report. Of these, 7% of ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes documented a fractured level not noted in the CT report. Conversely, 14% of fractured levels noted by CT report did not have a corresponding ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> code. Implications We found an overall 94% accuracy of ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> coding compared to radiology reports. Inaccuracy of coding fracture level ranged from 7 to 14%. Researchers using these codes should refer back to the medical record or perform a sensitivity analysis to improve reliability. PMID:19026227</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, Matthew L.; Wang, Marjorie C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010NIMPA.613..425K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of carbon foils with a thickness of up to 600 ?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbon foils are applied as stripper for the heavy-ion accelerator as well as targets in different experiments at GSI. Carbon foils in a thickness range 5-100 ?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2 are routinely produced with good homogeneity and excellent durability. Foils thicker than 100 ?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2 used to be purchased. To overcome problems that emerged and intensified in some applications we started to advance our own carbon production towards higher thickness. We describe the production of carbon foils up to a thickness of 600 ?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2, report on first tests as stripper foils and as targets, and discuss our future plans.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kindler, Birgit; Hartmann, Willi; Hübner, Annett; Lommel, Bettina; Steiner, Jutta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005AIPC..769..965R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mass and Isotopic Yields in Super-Asymmetric Fission of 245<span class="hlt">Cm</span>(nth,f)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mass, isotopic yields for thermal-neutron induced fission of 245<span class="hlt">Cm</span> at the Lohengrin fission-product mass separator are described. Using an ionization chamber coupled to the mass separator, we have measured the mass and isotopic yields from fragment mass A=67 up to A=77 over three yield decades. This considerably extends the data set previously known for the light peak. The results of mass and isotopic yields are compared with those of other compound nuclei to highlight the shell effect at mass 70 for the 246<span class="hlt">Cm</span>* compound-nucleus system. Finally, the neutron evaporation in the super-asymmetric fission of 245<span class="hlt">Cm</span> is investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rochman, D.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Simpson, G.; Gönnenwein, F.; Storrer, F.; Sokolov, V.; Serot, O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21085427"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calibrated 0.1-<span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) IR emission spectra from 80°N.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spectra from a 0.1-<span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) resolution absolutely calibrated emission interferometer installed near Eureka, Northwest Territories, Canada (80°N, 86°W), at the Arctic Stratospheric Observatory are presented. The Michelson-type interferometer has a maximum path difference of 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span> and uses a liquid-N(2)-cooled HgCdTe detector, which covers the spectral region from 650 to 1250 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1). Spectral intervals containing CO(2), HNO(3), and ozone have been modeled with a line-by-line radiative-transfer code and column amounts retrieved for the latter two constituents. The instrument and initial measurements are described. PMID:21085427</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Olson, J R; Van Allen, J; Fogal, P F; Murcray, F J; Goldman, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.utexas.edu/research/ctr/pdf_reports/0_2129_S.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Project Summary Report 2129-<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> The University of Texas at Austin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Project Summary Report 2129-<span class="hlt">S</span> ­ <span class="hlt">1</span> ­ The University of Texas at Austin Center for Transportation Research PROJECTSUMMARYREPORT CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN Project Summary Report Number 2129-S Project 0-2129: Innovative Project Delivery Methods Available for Immediate</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Texas at Austin, University of</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20957713"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photochemistry of methyl ethyl ketone: quantum yields and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/S0-diradical mechanism of photodissociation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pulsed laser photolysis (PLP) at ?=248 and 308 nm coupled with gas-chromatographic analysis is applied to determine the photodissociation quantum yield (QY) of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). Temperature dependent UV absorption cross-sections [?(MEK)(?,T)] are also determined. At 308 nm, the QY decreases with decreasing temperature (T=323-233 K) and with increasing pressure (P=67-998 mbar synthetic air). Stern-Volmer (SV) analysis of the T and P dependent QYs provides the experimental estimate of E(<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)=398±9 kJ mol(-1) (=300±6 nm) for the barrier of the first excited singlet state (<span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)). The QY at 248 nm is close to unity and independent of pressure (T=298 K). Theoretical reaction pathways are examined systematically on the basis of CASPT2/6-31+G* calculations. Among three possible pathways, a <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)/S(0)-diradical mechanism, which involves H atom transfer on the <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>) surface, followed by a nonadiabatic transition at a diradical isomer of MEK, explains the experimental data very well. Therefore, this unusual mechanism, which is not seen in any smaller carbonyl compounds, is proposed as an important pathway for the MEK dissociation. Our study supports the view that both the absorption cross-sections and the QYs of carbonyls have significant temperature dependences that should be taken into account for accurate modelling of atmospheric chemistry. PMID:20957713</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nádasdi, Rebeka; Zügner, Gábor L; Farkas, Mária; Dóbé, Sándor; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://web.maths.unsw.edu.au/~jasone/publications/deckeretal2014bsup.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supplementary Material <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Model uncertainty in transpiration and transpiration fraction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supplementary Material <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Model uncertainty in transpiration and transpiration fraction The transpiration anomaly estimates in this study are derived from MODIS, J2010, and GLEAM using the ET partitioning accurate than the transpiration as simulated by CLM4 or CABLE. Aside from this fundamental reason</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, Jason</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014DPS....4620914S"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-Dispersion Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) with the Subaru Telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) on UT 2013 November 15 with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 0.601 and 0.898 AU, respectively. We selected the slit size of 0”.5 x 9”.0 on the sky to achieve the spectral resolution of R = 72,000 from 550 to 830 nm. The total exposure time of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) was 1200 seconds. We detected many emission lines caused from radicals (e.g., CN, C2, NH2), ions (H2O+), atoms ([OI] and Na I) and also many unidentified lines in the spectra. We report the (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia estimated from the high-dispersion spectra of H2O+ and NH2, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the isotopic ratios of C2 (the carbon isotopic ratio from Swan band) and CN (the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from red band), (4) the sodium-to-continuum ratio of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Nagashima, Masayoshi; Hitomi, Kobayashi; Decock, Alice; Jehin, Emmanuel; Boice, Daniel C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18949713"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heteroduplex formation and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> digestion for mapping alternative splicing sites.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The identification of alternatively spliced transcripts has contributed to a better comprehension of developmental mechanisms, tissue-specific physiological processes and human diseases. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of alternatively spliced variants commonly leads to the formation of heteroduplexes as a result of base pairing involving exons common between the two variants. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease cleaves single-stranded loops of heteroduplexes and also nicks the opposite DNA strand. In order to establish a strategy for mapping alternative splice-prone sites in the whole transcriptome, we developed a method combining the formation of heteroduplexes between 2 distinct splicing variants and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease digestion. For 20 consensuses identified here using this methodology, 5 revealed a conserved splice site after inspection of the cDNA alignment against the human genome (exact splice sites). For 8 other consensuses, conserved splice sites were mapped at 2 to 30 bp from the border, called proximal splice sites; for the other 7 consensuses, conserved splice sites were mapped at 40 to 800 bp, called distal splice sites. These latter cases showed a nonspecific activity of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease in digesting double-strand DNA. From the 20 consensuses identified here, 5 were selected for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction validation, confirming the splice sites. These data showed the potential of the strategy in mapping splice sites. However, the lack of specificity of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease enzyme is a significant obstacle that impedes the use of this strategy in large-scale studies. PMID:18949713</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferreira, E N; Rangel, M C R; Pineda, P B; Vidal, D O; Camargo, A A; Souza, S J; Carraro, D M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.hnei.hawaii.edu/sites/web41.its.hawaii.edu.www.hnei.hawaii.edu/files/page/2012/12/121210%20Subtask%2011.2%20Deliverable%202.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">String Tests of 3<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P Configurations for Electric Energy Storage Applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">String Tests of 3<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P Configurations for Electric Energy Storage Applications Prepared for the U.2 Deliverable 2 Report on Results of Storage Tests Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of OceanPConfigurationsfor ElectricEnergyStorageApplications Matthieu Dubarry and Bor Yann Liaw Hawaii Natural Energy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://genetics.med.harvard.edu/reichlab/Reich_Lab/Publications_files/2012_Nature_NativeAmericans_Supplementary.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Table of Contents 1 Note <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Data set 2-6</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">from the Bering Strait 38 Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ­ Summary data for 52 Native American populations 39 Table S2 ­ Summary data for 17 Siberian populations 40 Table S3 ­ Individual data for 493 Native American samples 41 ­ Documentation of at least three streams of Asian gene flow into America 19-24 Note S7 ­ Modeling the peopling</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reich, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4394098"> <span id="translatedtitle">Efficacy of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> vs capecitabine for the treatment of gastric cancer: A meta-analysis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">AIM: To rationally evaluate the effect of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> vs capecitabine for the treatment of gastric cancer. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, Google Scholar, and China Journal Full Text Database were accessed to collect clinical randomized controlled trials regarding the effect of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> vs capecitabine for the treatment of gastric cancer patients. Statistical analysis was performed by meta-analysis. Four randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS: Compared with capecitabine regimens, the 1-year survival rate in gastric cancer patients was 0.80 (95%CI: 0.52-1.21, P = 0.29). The overall response rate of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> vs capecitabine was 0.94 (95%CI: 0.59-1.51, P = 0.93). Compared with capecitabine regimens, the most frequent hematologic toxicities were neutropenia (OR = 0.99, 95%CI: 0.65-1.49, P = 0.94) and thrombocytopenia (OR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.31-1.67, P = 0.44). The most frequent non-hematologic toxicities included nausea (OR = 0.85, 95%CI: 0.56-1.28, P = 0.43) and hand-foot syndrome (OR = 0.16, 95%CI: 0.10-0.27, P < 0.00001). CONCLUSION: The existing studies suggest that <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> is not more effective than capecitabine in the treatment of gastric cancer patients, but does exhibit less toxicity with regard to hand-foot syndrome.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">He, An-Bing; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Song, Jia; Zhang, Ji-Xing; Dong, Wei-Guo; Luo, Ren-Feng; Tang, Yan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.nott.ac.uk/~nza/G53KRR09/answers-defaults.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exercises on defaults Consider the following knowledge base: <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Cats don't attack people</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Exercises on defaults Consider the following knowledge base: <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Cats don't attack people S2 Wild cats are cats S3 Wild cats when threatened attack people S4 a is a cat S5 b is a wild cat implications, which are true without exceptions. Use unary predicates C for cat, W for wild cat, A for attack</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alechina, Natasha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk/genomes/madanm/evdy/evdy-sinfo.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: LIST OF 176 GENOMES USED IN THE ANALYSIS ..............................................................................S-2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">.............................................................................................................S-22 S11: ANALYSIS AND COMPARISON OF THE B. SUBTILIS TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATORY NETWORK WITH THE ES-1 SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: LIST OF 176 GENOMES USED IN THE ANALYSIS ..............................................................................S-2 S2: BENCHMARKING PREDICTED TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATORY INTERACTIONS USING EXPRESSION DATA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Babu, M. Madan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1349..875B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of the Vibrational Spectra of the Mixed Crystal Zn<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-xSex</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A simple transferable potential model has been employed to study the vibrational mode behavior of the mixed system Zn<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-xSex as a function of concentration and pressure. Further, the existence of a localized resonance mode has also been confirmed, in agreement with experimental data from Raman scattering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Basak, Tista; Rao, Mala N.; Chaplot, S. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://zhanglab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/papers/2009_2_support.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: List of 246 protein complex pairs identified by DM-align.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: List of 246 protein complex pairs identified by DM-align. Query.849 3.1 1dl5 (A,B) Transferase: Methyltransferas e activity 1utx (A,B) DNA binding protein: Sequence.917 1.6 1do5 (A,B) Chaperone: Copper ion binding activity 1xso (A,B) Superoxide Acceptor: Copper ion</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Yang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/hep-th/9602144v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">M-Theory on Orientifolds of $K_3 \\times <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>$</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present several Orientifolds of M-Theory on $K_3\\times <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>$ by additional projections with respect to the finite abelian automorphism groups of $K_3$. The resulting models correspond to anomaly free theories in six dimensions. We construct explicit examples which can be interpreted as models with eight, four, two and one vector multiplets and $N=1$ supersymmetry in six dimensions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alok Kumar; Koushik Ray</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-02-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.seas.ucla.edu/~pilon/Publications/JDST2010.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care Dmitry Yudovsky, M.<span class="hlt">S</span>.,<span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1099 Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care Dmitry Yudovsky, M.<span class="hlt">S</span>.,<span class="hlt">1</span> Aksone Nouvong, D mellitus are preceded by a foot ulcer.5 In fact, in 2006, diabetic foot ulcers were responsible for more cost, the associated financial cost of diabetic foot ulceration and amputations to the U.S. healthcare</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pilon, Laurent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/5b7am3dqy26jb3pf.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Domain wall theory of elementary excitations in anisotropic antiferromagnetic <span class="hlt">S</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span> chains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a theoretical investigation of elementary excitations in anisotropic antiferromagnetic <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> chains using the concept of domain walls in string (hidden) order. Domain walls are classified by the internal spin projection Szdw. We calculate energies and string correlation functions of low lying excited states of the domain wall type in the Haldane phase and compare the results to those</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">U. Neugebauer; H.-J. Mikeska</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56135072"> <span id="translatedtitle">Optical galaxies within 8000 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> - I. the density field</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The density field of optical galaxies to a depth of 8000 km <span class="hlt">s</span>^-<span class="hlt">1</span>^ over 67 per cent of the sky is determined using the UGC and ESO catalogues. The reconstruction method compensates for the varying completeness of the redshift data and for the galaxies that are not selected in the catalogues. The optical density field is dominated by supercluster complexes</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. J. Hudson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...06..181M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adjoint QCD on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with twisted fermionic boundary conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate QCD with adjoint Dirac fermions on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with generic boundary conditions for fermions along <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>. By means of perturbation theory, semiclassical methods and a chiral effective model, we elucidate a rich phase structure in the space spanned by the <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> compactification scale L, twisted fermionic boundary condition ? and the fermion mass m. We found various phases with or without chiral and center symmetry breaking, separated by first- and second-order phase transitions, which in specific limits ( ? = 0, ? = ?, L ? 0 and m ? ?) reproduce known results in the literature. In the center- symmetric phase at small L, we show that Ünsal's bion-induced confinement mechanism is at work but is substantially weakened at ? = 0 by a linear potential between monopoles. Through an analytic and numerical study of the PNJL model, we show that the order parameters for center and chiral symmetries (i.e., Polyakov loop and chiral condensate) are strongly intertwined at ? = 0. Due to this correlation, a deconfined phase can intervene between a weak-coupling center-symmetric phase at small L and a strong-coupling one at large L. Whether this happens or not depends on the ratio of the dynamical fermion mass to the energy scale of the Yang-Mills theory. Implication of this possibility for resurgence in gauge theories is briefly discussed. In an appendix, we study the index of the adjoint Dirac operator on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with twisted boundary conditions, which is important for semiclassical analysis of monopoles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Misumi, Tatsuhiro; Kanazawa, Takuya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.maths.otago.ac.nz/home/resources/david_fletcher/Burridge_et_al_2008_Supplement_3.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: Summary of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecular clock calibrations derived from fishes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: Summary of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecular clock calibrations derived from fishes based on growth hormone type-2 and mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 DNA sequences. Can. J a calibration of the divergence rate in the mitochondrial DNA central region of fishes. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fletcher, David</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18363278"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> monotherapy as a neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced gastric cancer.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, is an effective therapeutic agent for gastric cancer. Herein, we report a case with locally advanced gastric cancer that achieved a curative resection after <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> monotherapy as neoadjuvant treatment. A 68-year-old man was diagnosed with gastric cancer and massive lymphadenopathy involving the perigastric, celiac axis and splenic hilum. His clinical stage was cT3N2H0P0M0. Considering his relatively poor performance (ECOG 2, severe weight loss) and advanced age, we started the patient on <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> monotherapy at a dose of 35 mg/m2 bid for 4 consecutive weeks followed by a 2-week rest. Follow-up study after 4 treatment cycles revealed disappearance of the lymphadenopathy of the perigastric and celiac axis with diminished extension of the stomach mass. The patient had a partial response (PR) with a 72% tumor reduction, according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). His performance status was improved to an ECOG 1 and he gained 7 kg. A curative (R0) resection was achieved with a radical total gastrectomy and D2 dissection. The pathological stage was pT3N2M0, stage IIIB. In conclusion, <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> neoadjuvant chemotherapy aided in the treatment of gastric cancer in this patient. PMID:18363278</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jung, Jong Yul; Rha, Sun Young; Ahn, Joong Bae; Yang, Woo Ick; Noh, Sung Hoon; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Jeung, Hei-Cheul</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25003589"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultrafast excited state dynamics of S2 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> states of triphenylmethane dyes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Excited state dynamics of S2 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> states for a series of TPM dyes, pyrogallol red (PGR), bromopyrogallol red (Br-PGR) and aurin tricarboxylic acid (ATC), have been monitored by using ultrafast transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion techniques. Optical absorption studies indicate that all the TPM dyes exist as keto-enol tautomers depending upon the pH of the solution. Interestingly, all the TPM dyes give S2 emission (major emitting state) in addition to weak <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> emission. S2 emission lifetimes as fast as ?150-300 fs and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> emission lifetimes of 2-5 ns were observed depending upon the molecular structure of the dyes. Femtosecond transient absorption studies suggest the presence of an ultrafast non-radiative decay channel from the S2 state in addition to S2 luminescence. The vibrational relaxation time from hot <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> state is found to be 2-6 ps. The heavy atom effect has been observed in ultrafast relaxation dynamics of Br-PGR. PMID:25003589</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Singhal, Pallavi; Ghosh, Hirendra N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.chemistry.mtu.edu/pages/undergrad/pharma/whatis.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pharmaceutical Chemistry B.<span class="hlt">S</span>. <span class="hlt">1</span>. General description and characteristics of the program.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pharmaceutical Chemistry B.<span class="hlt">S</span>. <span class="hlt">1</span>. General description and characteristics of the program. Pharmaceutical Chemistry is the study of the molecular and mechanistic aspects of pharmaceuticals. The discipline. A bachelor's program in Pharmaceutical Chemistry will emphasize the molecular basis underlying the creation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25573299"> <span id="translatedtitle">SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment. PMID:25573299</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3493526"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Modulates Antigen Capture by Murine Langerhans Cells via the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 Receptor Subtype</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the development of cutaneous contact hypersensitivity (CHS) and atopic dermatitis as they capture and process antigen and present it to T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs. Recently, it has been indicated that a topical application of the sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) prevents the inflammatory response in CHS, but the molecular mechanism is not fully elucidated. Here we indicate that treatment of mice with <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is connected with an impaired antigen uptake by Langerhans cells (LCs), the initial step of CHS. Most of the known actions of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P are mediated by a family of five specific G protein-coupled receptors. Our results indicate that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P inhibits macropinocytosis of the murine LC line XS52 via <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 receptor stimulation followed by a reduced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. As down-regulation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 not only diminished <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-mediated action but also enhanced the basal activity of LCs on antigen capture, an autocrine action of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P has been assumed. Actually, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is continuously produced by LCs and secreted via the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCC1 to the extracellular environment. Consequently, inhibition of ABCC1, which decreased extracellular <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels, markedly increased the antigen uptake by LCs. Moreover, stimulation of sphingosine kinase activity, the crucial enzyme for <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P formation, is connected not only with enhanced <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels but also with diminished antigen capture. These results indicate that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is essential in LC homeostasis and influences skin immunity. This is of importance as previous reports suggested an alteration of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels in atopic skin lesions. PMID:23145172</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Japtok, Lukasz; Schaper, Katrin; Bäumer, Wolfgang; Radeke, Heinfried H.; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Kleuser, Burkhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23145172"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sphingosine 1-phosphate modulates antigen capture by murine Langerhans cells via the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 receptor subtype.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the development of cutaneous contact hypersensitivity (CHS) and atopic dermatitis as they capture and process antigen and present it to T lymphocytes in the lymphoid organs. Recently, it has been indicated that a topical application of the sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) prevents the inflammatory response in CHS, but the molecular mechanism is not fully elucidated. Here we indicate that treatment of mice with <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is connected with an impaired antigen uptake by Langerhans cells (LCs), the initial step of CHS. Most of the known actions of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P are mediated by a family of five specific G protein-coupled receptors. Our results indicate that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P inhibits macropinocytosis of the murine LC line XS52 via <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P(2) receptor stimulation followed by a reduced phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. As down-regulation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P(2) not only diminished <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-mediated action but also enhanced the basal activity of LCs on antigen capture, an autocrine action of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P has been assumed. Actually, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is continuously produced by LCs and secreted via the ATP binding cassette transporter ABCC1 to the extracellular environment. Consequently, inhibition of ABCC1, which decreased extracellular <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels, markedly increased the antigen uptake by LCs. Moreover, stimulation of sphingosine kinase activity, the crucial enzyme for <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P formation, is connected not only with enhanced <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels but also with diminished antigen capture. These results indicate that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is essential in LC homeostasis and influences skin immunity. This is of importance as previous reports suggested an alteration of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels in atopic skin lesions. PMID:23145172</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Japtok, Lukasz; Schaper, Katrin; Bäumer, Wolfgang; Radeke, Heinfried H; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Kleuser, Burkhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19276869"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of Channel Plan and Dispersion Map on Hybrid DWDM Transmission of 42.7Gb\\/s DQPSK and <span class="hlt">10.7</span>Gb\\/s OOK on 50GHz Grid</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate experimentally the performance of 42.7-Gb\\/s return-to-zero (RZ) differential quadrature phase-shift-keyed (DQPSK) channels in a dense wavelength-division-multiplexed transmission system having <span class="hlt">10.7</span>-Gb\\/s nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) on-off keyed (OOK) channels. Cross-phase modulation (XPM) from the OOK channels is found to be a dominating nonlinear penalty source for copropagating DQPSK channels in a dispersion-managed transmission link with multiple standard single-mode fiber spans. It</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Chandrasekhar; X. Liu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/57013928"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinear Tolerance of 53.5Gb\\/s Differential 6-ary PSK Surrounded by <span class="hlt">10.7</span>Gb\\/s NRZ-OOK Neighbors in SMF and DSF Transmission Links</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We demonstrate an optical transmission system based on a 53.5-Gb\\/s differential 6-ary phase-shift-keying (D6PSK) signal with copropagating <span class="hlt">10.7</span>-Gb\\/s nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) on–off keying (OOK) channels over either 320-km-long single-mode fiber link with in-line dispersion compensation or 320-km-long dispersion-shifted fiber link, and compare its performances with that of a classical polarization-division-multiplexing differential quadrature phase-shift-keying (DQPSK)-based system. The results show that the nonlinear</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hyeon Yeong Choi; Itsuro Morita</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20349560"> <span id="translatedtitle">A complementary approach for evaluating <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-root in diabetic neuropathic patients.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy. Conventional electrodiagnostic evaluation or even magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbosacral vertebrae cannot confirm radiculopathy (e.g <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-root irritation) in diabetic neuropathic patients definitely. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate spinal nerve pathway of H-reflex in diabetic neuropathic patients by the central loop of H-reflex when its conventional pathway was impaired. No similar study, however, has been done on this subject. Forty two diabetic neuropathic patients with impaired conventional H-reflex were studied by the central loop of H-reflex bilaterally. The central loop of H-reflex was elicited by monopolar needle stimulation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nerve root at the level of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> foramen and recorded in the half way of the line from popliteal crease to the medial malleolus. In 82 out of 84 (97.6%) limbs with impaired conventional H-reflex, the central loop of H-reflex was measurable with latency less than 8 ms. Therefore the central loop of H-reflex was a more reliable approach for investigating <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-root in these patients with significant statistical difference (P < 0.001). The central loop of H-reflex latency in this study was 6.34 +/- 0.96 ms with the range of 4.3-7.85 ms. In conclusion the presence of central loop of H-reflex with latency less than 8 ms can be used as a complementary approach for assessment of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-root sparing in diabetics. PMID:20349560</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emad, M Reza; Gheisi, A Reza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1370328"> <span id="translatedtitle">Protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> counteracts the inhibitory effect of the extended Shine-Dalgarno sequence on translation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There are two major components of Escherichia coli ribosomes directly involved in selection and binding of mRNA during initiation of protein synthesis-the highly conserved 3' end of 16S rRNA (aSD) complementary to the Shine-Dalgarno (SD) domain of mRNA, and the ribosomal protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. A contribution of the SD-aSD and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-mRNA interactions to translation yield in vivo has been evaluated in a genetic system developed to compare efficiencies of various ribosome-binding sites (RBS) in driving beta-galactosidase synthesis from the single-copy (chromosomal) lacZ gene. The in vivo experiments have been supplemented by in vitro toeprinting and gel-mobility shift assays. A shortening of a potential SD-aSD duplex from 10 to 8 and to 6 bp increased the beta-galactosidase yield (four- and sixfold, respectively) suggesting that an extended SD-aSD duplex adversely affects translation, most likely due to its redundant stability causing ribosome stalling at the initiation step. Translation yields were significantly increased upon insertion of the A/U-rich <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> binding targets upstream of the SD region, but the longest SD remained relatively less efficient. In contrast to complete 30S ribosomes, the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-depleted 30S particles have been able to form an extended SD-aSD duplex, but not the true ternary initiation complex. Taken together, the in vivo and in vitro data allow us to conclude that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> plays two roles in translation initiation: It forms an essential part of the mRNA-binding track even when mRNA bears a long SD sequence, and through the binding to the 5' untranslated region, it can ensure a substantial enhancing effect on translation. PMID:12358433</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Komarova, Anastassia V; Tchufistova, Ludmila S; Supina, Elena V; Boni, Irina V</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.bcn.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/BCN-Scholarship-Application-for-freshman.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CM</span> Alumni Club Scholarship for UF Freshman Amount: $4,000 Scholarships Available: Multiple</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">consideration for Fall semester or August 28th for the Spring semester. Please type or print clearly. Do you with any student organizations including <span class="hlt">CM</span> student organizations, University organizations, community</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mair, Bernard A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.bcn.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/BCN-Alumni-Club-Scholarship-info.-document-Transfer-Students.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CM</span> Alumni Club Scholarship for Transfer Students Amount: $2,000 Scholarships Available: Multiple</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and March 1st for the Fall semester. Please type or print clearly. Do you have an established financial need with any student organizations including <span class="hlt">CM</span> student organizations, University organizations, community</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mair, Bernard A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-19/pdf/2011-21167.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 51985 - ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Removal. ICD-10-PCS Topics Implantable meshes. ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Diagnosis Topics Aggressive periodontitis. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Chronic periodontitis. Gingival recession. Agenda items are subject to change as priorities dictate. Note:...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' 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