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1

DECREASING SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS EXPLAIN UNIQUE 10.7 cm RADIO FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Infrared spectral observations of sunspots from 1998 to 2011 have shown that on average sunspots changed, the magnetic fields weakened, and the temperatures rose. The data also show that sunspots or dark pores can only form at the solar surface if the magnetic field strength exceeds about 1500 G. Sunspots appear at the solar surface with a variety of field strengths, and during the period from 1998 to 2002 a histogram of the sunspot magnetic fields shows a normal distribution with a mean of 2436 {+-} 26 G and a width of 323 {+-} 20 G. During this observing period the mean of the magnetic field distribution decreased by 46 {+-} 6 G per year, and we assume that as the 1500 G threshold was approached, magnetic fields appeared at the solar surface which could not form dark sunspots or pores. With this assumption we propose a quantity called the sunspot formation fraction and give an analytical form derived from the magnetic field distribution. We show that this fraction can quantitatively explain the changing relationship between sunspot number and solar radio flux measured at 10.7 cm wavelengths.

Livingston, W.; Penn, M. J. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States); Svalgaard, L. [HEPL, Via Ortega, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2012-09-20

2

The Cosmic Ray and the 10.7 cm flux variations during solar cycles 19-23  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cosmic ray flux (CRF) and 10.7 cm flux (F10.7) are studied for solar cycles 19-23. The cross-correlations show longer time-dependence at odd than at even cycles. A shift of the maximum at the histograms of CRF{^1}/F10.7{^1} (the ratios of normalized values), does not depend on the polarity of the cycle. The behavior of CRF{^1} vs F10.7{^1} differs for odd and even cycles and also for different cycle phases. We fitted an inverted CRF{^1} profile to the F10.7{^1} profile with a linear function. The F10.7{^1}/CRF{^{inv}} histogram differs for odd and even cycles. The results for sunspot number (SSN) are similar to F10.7 but differ for the F10.7{^1}/CRF{^{inv}} histograms. Summarizing, besides the differences between odd and even cycles, there occur variations at different phases of the cycles and also variations independent of the polarity of the cycle, the latter perhaps arising outside the heliosphere.

Mendoza-Torres, J. E.; Luo, X.; Salazar, H.

2014-10-01

3

Study of Cosmic Ray Flux Modulation by Solar Activity Based on the 10.7 cm Flux  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on the relation between the Cosmic Ray Flux (CRF) and the radio flux at the 10.7 cm wavelength (F10.7), and also to the Sun Spot Number (SSN), an analysis of the CRF variations is done. Monitoring data of the 19-23 solar cycles is used. The cross-correlation between F10.7 and CRF is similar to that between SSN and CRF and, as in previous works, for odd cycles the correlation lasts longer than for even ones. The histograms of the CRF/ F10.7 ratio shows a maximum at low values whose location shifts from one cycle to other. This is a variation independent of the parity of the cycle that lasts for a time-scale close to half a century and that was not seen before. The relation between the inverted CRF amplitude and the F10.7 reveals a peculiar character of accumulating data around the unity for even cycles and at its sides for odd cycles. The comparison of CRF and F10.7 shows that, from one odd cycle to the next, the CRF has been decaying. This seems a long-term modulation of the odd cycles amplitude. The origin of these variations and the variations that do not depend on the cycle parity are not clear but we can not rule out the possibility of even a cause external to the Heliosphere.

Mendoza-Torres, Jose Eduardo

4

Multi-technique Analysis of the Solar 10.7 cm Radio Flux Time-Series in Relation to Predictability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We studied the predictability of the 10.7 cm solar radio flux by using stationary and non-stationary time-series analysis techniques of fractal theory to find the correlation exponent, the spectral exponent, the Hurst exponent, and the fluctuation exponent of the time series. The Hurst exponent was determined, from which the fractal dimension and consequently the predictability was evaluated. The results suggest that stationary methods of analysis yield inconsistent result, that is, amongst the four techniques used, the values of the exponents show great disparity. While two of the techniques, namely the auto-correlation function analysis and the spectral analysis, indicate long-term positive correlation, the other two methods, specifically the Hurst rescaled range-analysis and the fluctuation analysis, clearly exhibit the anti-correlated nature of the time series. The two non-stationary methods, that is, the discrete wavelet transform and the centered moving-average analysis, yielded values of the Hurst exponent that are indicative of positive correlation, of persistent behavior, and also showed that the time series is predictable to a certain extent.

Ghosh, Oindrilla; Ghosh, Tanushree; Chatterjee, T. N.

2014-06-01

5

Centrifugal Pump for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-Diameter Mercury Jet  

E-print Network

Centrifugal Pump for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-Diameter Mercury Jet Ernst de Haas, Kirk T. McDonald Joseph) centrifugal pump from R.S. Cor- coran, powered by a 20-hp, 480 V motor from Baldor. A photograph of this pump

McDonald, Kirk

6

Barycentric Corrections at 1 cm s-1 for Precise Doppler Velocities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this paper is to establish the requirements of a barycentric correction with an rms of ?1 cm s-1, which is an order of magnitude better than necessary for the Doppler detection of true Earth analogs (˜9 cm s-1). We describe the theory and implementation of accounting for the effects on precise Doppler measurements of motion of the telescope through space, primarily from rotational and orbital motion of the Earth, and the motion of the solar system with respect to target star (i.e., the "barycentric correction"). We describe the minimal algorithm necessary to accomplish this and how it differs from a naïve subtraction of velocities (i.e., a Galilean transformation). We demonstrate the validity of code we have developed from the California Planet Survey code via comparison with the pulsar timing package, TEMPO2. We estimate the magnitude of various terms and effects, including relativistic effects, and the errors associated with incomplete knowledge of telescope position, timing, and stellar position and motion. We note that chromatic aberration will create uncertainties in the time of observation, which will complicate efforts to detect true Earth analogs. Our code is available for public use and validation.

Wright, J. T.; Eastman, J. D.

2014-11-01

7

Design of a 10**36 CM-2 S-1 Super-B Factory  

SciTech Connect

Parameters have been studied for a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon 4S that would deliver a luminosity of 1 to 4 x 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s. This collider, called a Super-B Factory, would use a combination of linear collider and storage ring techniques. In this scheme an electron beam and a positron beam are stored in low-emittance damping rings similar to those designed for a Linear Collider (LC) or the next generation light source. A LC style interaction region is included in the ring to produce sub-millimeter vertical beta functions at the collision point. A large crossing angle (+/- 24 mrad) is used at the collision point to allow beam separation. A crab-waist scheme is used to reduce the hourglass effect and restore peak luminosity. Beam currents of 1.8 A at 4 x 7 GeV in 1251 bunches can produce a luminosity of 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s with upgrade possibilities. Such a collider would produce an integrated luminosity of about 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year (10{sup 7} sec) at the {gamma}(4S) resonance. Further possibilities include having longitudinally polarized e- at the IR and operating at the J/Psi and Psi beam energies.

Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; /Pisa U.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2011-10-24

8

PbSe quantum dot field-effect transistors with air-stable electron mobilities above 7 cm2 V(-1) s(-1).  

PubMed

PbSe quantum dot (QD) field effect transistors (FETs) with air-stable electron mobilities above 7 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) are made by infilling sulfide-capped QD films with amorphous alumina using low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD). This high mobility is achieved by combining strong electronic coupling (from the ultrasmall sulfide ligands) with passivation of surface states by the ALD coating. A series of control experiments rule out alternative explanations. Partial infilling tunes the electrical characteristics of the FETs. PMID:23452235

Liu, Yao; Tolentino, Jason; Gibbs, Markelle; Ihly, Rachelle; Perkins, Craig L; Liu, Yu; Crawford, Nathan; Hemminger, John C; Law, Matt

2013-04-10

9

Epitaxial growth of large area single-crystalline few-layer MoS2 with high space charge mobility of 192 cm2 V-1 s-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the vapor-solid growth of single crystalline few-layer MoS2 films on (0001)-oriented sapphire with excellent structural and electrical properties over centimeter length scale. High-resolution X-ray diffraction scans indicated that the films had good out-of-plane ordering and epitaxial registry. A carrier density of ˜2 × 1011 cm-2 and a room temperature mobility of 192 cm2/Vs were extracted from space-charge limited transport regime in the films. The electron mobility was found to exhibit in-plane anisotropy with a ratio of ˜1.8. Theoretical estimates of the temperature-dependent electron mobility including optical phonon, acoustic deformation potential, and remote ionized impurity scattering were found to satisfactorily match the measured data. The synthesis approach reported here demonstrates the feasibility of device quality few-layer MoS2 films with excellent uniformity and high quality.

Ma, Lu; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Lee, Edwin W.; Lee, Choong Hee; Yu, Mingzhe; Arehart, Aaron; Rajan, Siddharth; Wu, Yiying

2014-08-01

10

Mg dopant in Cu2ZnSnSe4: An n-type former and a promoter of electrical mobility up to 120 cm2 V-1 s-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mg-doped Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) bulk materials with the (Cu2-xMgx)ZnSnSe4 formula at x=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 were prepared at 600 °C for 2 h with soluble sintering aids of Sb2S3 and Te. Defect chemistry was studied by measuring structural and electrical properties of Mg-doped CZTSe as a function of dopant concentration. Except at x=0, all Mg-doped CZTSe pellets showed an n-type behavior. The Mg-doped CZTSe pellets showed an n-type behavior. n-Type Mg-CZTSe pellets at x=0.1 showed the highest electrical conductivity of 24.6 S cm-1 and the net hole mobility of 120 cm2 V-1 s-1, while they were 11.8 S cm-1 and 36.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the undoped p-type CZTSe. Mg dopant is a strong promoter of electrical mobility. Mg dopant behaves as a donor defect in CZTSe at a 5% doping content, but is also used as an acceptor at a high content above 5%. Mg doping has further developed CZTSe into a promising semiconductor.

Kuo, Dong-Hau; Wubet, Walelign

2014-07-01

11

Nanocrystalline silicon thin-film transistors with 50-nm-thick deposited channel layer, 10 cm2V-1s-1 electron mobility and 108 on/off current ratio  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thin-film transistors were made using 50-nm-thick directly deposited nanocrystalline silicon channel layers. The transistors have a coplanar top gate structure. The nanocrystalline silicon was deposited from discharges in silane, hydrogen and silicon tetrafluoride. The transistors combine a high electron field effect mobility of 10 cm2V-1s-1 with a low `off' current of 10-14 A per ?m of channel length and an `on'/`off' current ratio of 108. This result shows that transistors made from directly deposited silicon can combine high mobility with low `off' currents.

Min, R. B.; Wagner, S.

12

The Sources of F10.7 Emission  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solar radio flux at a wavelength of 10.7 cm, F10.7, serves as a proxy for the Sun’s ionizing flux striking the Earth and is a heavily used index for space weather studies. In principal both the coronal sources of ionizing flux and strong coronal magnetic fields contribute to F10.7 via different emission mechanisms. Recently the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) has added the capability to make high-spatial-resolution images of the Sun at 10.7 cm. In this work we compare a trial F10.7 image from the EVLA with the radio emission predicted to be present from EUV images of the Sun acquired by the AIA telescope on the Solar Dynamics Observatory at 6 wavelengths covering the coronal temperature range. Photospheric magnetograms are used to identify likely regions of strong coronal magnetic field, and the circular polarization measured by the EVLA is used as a tracer of gyroresonance contributions to F10.7. We discuss the conversion of the EUV data to bremsstrahlung radio fluxes via the construction of differential emission measure images, and analyze the relative contributions of the different sources of F10.7 flux.

Schonfeld, Samuel J.; White, Stephen M.; Henney, Carl John; McAteer, James; Arge, Charles

2014-06-01

13

Capillary Pressure - Mac OS 10.7  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Computer program for Mac OS 10.7 to illustrate the vascular control of capillary hydrostatic pressure. Possible simulations include arteriolar vasoconstriction and dilation, venous obstruction, hypotension, reflex vasoconstriction, etc.

2004-10-01

14

Recent solar radio astronomy at centimeter wavelengths: the temporal variability of the 10. 7-cm flux  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies made by means of high-resolution radio telescopes indicate that solar centrimetric emission contains contributions from many different sources and involves more than one radiation mechanism. Two emission components have been identified: bright, compact sources and weaker, diffuse emission which is distributed over the plage and surrounding areas of enhanced magnetic field. There is evidence for the occurrence of weaker

K. F. Tapping

1987-01-01

15

Particle decay and 21 cm absorption from first minihaloes  

E-print Network

We consider the influence of decaying dark matter (DM) particles on the characteristics of 21 cm absorption in spectra of distant radio-loud sources - "21 cm forest" - from minihaloes with masses $M=10^5-10^7\\msun$ virialized at $z_{vir} = 10$. We use 1D self-consistent hydrodynamic description to study evolution of minihaloes, and follow up their absorption characteristics from turnaround to virialization. We find that in the presence of decaying dark matter both thermal and dynamical evolution of minihaloes demonstrate significant deviation from those in the model without dark matter decay (standard recombination). We show that optical depth in 21 cm line is strongly suppressed in the presence of decaying particles: for $M=10^5-10^6\\msun$ decaying dark matter with the energy rate deposited in baryonic gas $\\xi_{L} = 0.59\\times 10^{-25}$ s$^{-1}$ - the current upper limit of the energy deposit - decreases the optical depth and the equivalent width by an order of magnitude compared to the standard recombinati...

Vasiliev, E O

2012-01-01

16

RESEARCH PAPER: Forecast daily indices of solar activity, F10.7, using support vector regression method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 10.7 cm solar radio flux (F10.7), the value of the solar radio emission flux density at a wavelength of 10.7 cm, is a useful index of solar activity as a proxy for solar extreme ultraviolet radiation. It is meaningful and important to predict F10.7 values accurately for both long-term (months-years) and short-term (days) forecasting, which are often used as inputs in space weather models. This study applies a novel neural network technique, support vector regression (SVR), to forecasting daily values of F10.7. The aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of SVR in short-term F10.7 forecasting. The approach, based on SVR, reduces the dimension of feature space in the training process by using a kernel-based learning algorithm. Thus, the complexity of the calculation becomes lower and a small amount of training data will be sufficient. The time series of F10.7 from 2002 to 2006 are employed as the data sets. The performance of the approach is estimated by calculating the norm mean square error and mean absolute percentage error. It is shown that our approach can perform well by using fewer training data points than the traditional neural network.

Huang, Cong; Liu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jing-Song

2009-06-01

17

A 10.7 ?m InGaAs/InAlAs Quantum Cascade Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A 10.7?m quantum cascade detector based on lattice matched InGaAs/InAlAs/InP is demonstrated and characterized in terms of responsivity, resistivity and detectivity. The device operates in the 8-14 ?m atmospheric window up to 140K and shows a peak reponsivity of 14.4mA/W at 78K. With a resistance-area product value of 159?cm2, the Johnson noise limited detectivity D*J is 2.8 × 109 Jones (cmHz1/2 W-1) at 78K.

Kong, Ning; Liu, Jun-Qi; Li, Lu; Liu, Feng-Qi; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Zhan-Guo; Lu, Wei

2010-12-01

18

A CM chondrite cluster and CM streams  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An elongate year-day concentration of CM meteoroid falls between 1921 and 1969 is inconsistent with a random flux of CM meteoroids and suggests that most or all such meteorites, and perhaps the Kaidun C-E chondrite breccia, resulted from streams of meteoroids in nearly circular, Earth-like orbits. To establish whether the post-1920 cluster might have arisen from random sampling, we determined the year-day distribution of 14 falls between 1879 and 1969 by treating each as the corner of a cell of specified dimensions (e.g. 30 years x 30 days) and calculated how many falls occurred in that cell. We then compared the CM cell distribution with random distributions over the same range of years. The results show that for 30 x 30 and 45 x 45 cells, fewer than 5 percent of random sets match the CM distribution with respect to maximum cell content and number of one-fall cells.

Dodd, R. T.; Lipschutz, M. E.

1993-01-01

19

"atomicphysicsproof" --2003/10/7 --page 1 --#11 ATOMIC STRUCTURE  

E-print Network

"atomicphysicsproof" -- 2003/10/7 -- page 1 -- #11 1 ATOMIC STRUCTURE 1.1 Ground state. The study of atomic structure continues to be an exciting field, with increasingly precise measurements of phosphorus One of the most important topics in atomic physics is the description of atomic energy levels

Budker, Dmitry

20

Ubiquitous CM and DM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Ubiquitous is a real word. I thank a former Total Quality Coach for my first exposure some years ago to its existence. My version of Webster's dictionary defines ubiquitous as "present, or seeming to be present, everywhere at the same time; omnipresent." While I believe that God is omnipresent, I have come to discover that CM and DM are present everywhere. Oh, yes; I define CM as Configuration Management and DM as either Data or Document Management. Ten years ago, I had my first introduction to the CM world. I had an opportunity to do CM for the Space Station effort at the NASA Lewis Research Center. I learned that CM was a discipline that had four areas of focus: identification, control, status accounting, and verification. I was certified as a CMIl graduate and was indoctrinated about clear, concise, and valid. Off I went into a world of entirely new experiences. I was exposed to change requests and change boards first hand. I also learned about implementation of changes, and then of technical and CM requirements.

Crowley, Sandra L.

2000-01-01

21

The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

2003-01-01

22

CM-458/U Signal Comparator  

SciTech Connect

The development history, the physical and functional characteristics, and the production activity of the CM-458/U Signal Comparator is described. The CM-458/U Signal Comparator is a test device used to verify proper delivery by the aircraft control equipment of the unique signal used in the prearming of modern nuclear weapons. CM-458/U monitors voltage levels, pulse widths and signal sequence to verify correctness.

Merritt, W. G.; Kestly, J. D.

1980-06-01

23

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Installed Capacity 1  

E-print Network

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Installed Capacity 1 Installed Capacity The capacities 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Capacity (MW) Wind Solar Small Hydro Large Hydro Reporting #12;Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Installed Capacity 2 Table 1 provides the data

24

Record Retention Policy Page 1 of 3 10.7 Record Retention Policy  

E-print Network

Record Retention Policy Page 1 of 3 10.7 Record Retention Policy Policy Number & Name: 10.7 Record Retention #12;Record Retention Policy Page 2 of 3 Period for a Record does not change when a properly Retention Policy Approval Authority: Administrative Council Responsible Executive: Vice President

Yang, Eui-Hyeok

25

344 cm x 86 cm low mass vacuum window  

SciTech Connect

The LBL Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) superconducting magnet contains a 1 m x 3.45 m x 2 m vacuum tank in its gap. A full aperture thin window was needed to minimize background as the products of nuclear collisions move from upstream targets to downstream detectors. Six windows were built and tested in the development process. The final window's unsupported area is 3m/sup 2/ with a 25 cm inward deflection. The design consists of a .11 mm Nylon/aluminum/polypropylene laminate as a gas seal and .55 mm woven aramid fiber for strength. Total mass is 80 milligrams per cm/sup 2/. Development depended heavily on past experience and testing. Safety considerations are discussed.

Reimers, R.M.; Porter, J.; Meneghetti, J.; Wilde, S.; Miller, R.

1983-08-01

26

S1P Control of Endothelial Integrity  

PubMed Central

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a lipid mediator produced by sphingolipid metabolism, promotes endothelial cell spreading, vascular maturation/stabilization, and barrier function. S1P is present at high concentrations in the circulatory system, whereas in tissues its levels are low. This so-called vascular S1P gradient is essential for S1P to regulate much physiological and pathophysiological progress such as the modulation of vascular permeability. Cellular sources of S1P in blood has only recently begun to be identified. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of S1P in regulating vascular integrity. In particular, we discuss the recent discovery of the endothelium-protective functions of HDL-bound S1P which is chaperoned by apolipoprotein M. PMID:24728594

Xiong, Yuquan

2014-01-01

27

Spectroscopic Properties and Potential Energy Surfaces for Curium Hydrides: CmH2, CmH2+, CmH, and CmH+  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A relativistic complete active space multiconfigurational self-consistent field followed by multireference singles + doubles configuration interaction computations are carried out on the potential energy surfaces of electronic states of CmH2 and CmH2+ for the insertion reaction of Cm and Cm+ into H2. We have also carried out corresponding computations on several electronic states of CmH and CmH+. Moreover, multireference relativistic configuration interaction computations including spin-orbit coupling were carried out on 75 electronic states of CmH+, which were found to be below the 45 000 cm-1 region. We have computed the first ionization energy of Cm as 5.94 eV in excellent agreement with experimental value of 5.99 eV. Our computations reveal barriers for the insertion of Cm and Cm+ in their ground electronic states into H2, but once the barriers are surmounted, both Cm + H2 and Cm+ + H2 form stable products. The potential energy curves of CmH and CmH+ reveal the existence of several low-lying open-shell excited states with varied ? quantum numbers and spin multiplicities. The excited states of these species exhibit intermediate coupling, although the spin-orbit splittings of the 9?- and 8?- ground states of CmH and CmH+ are small, exhibiting nearly inverted multiplets.

Balasubramanian, K.; Cao, Zhiji

2009-09-01

28

Spectroscopic properties and potential energy surfaces for curium hydrides: CmH(2), CmH(2)(+), CmH, and CmH(+).  

PubMed

A relativistic complete active space multiconfigurational self-consistent field followed by multireference singles + doubles configuration interaction computations are carried out on the potential energy surfaces of electronic states of CmH(2) and CmH(2)(+) for the insertion reaction of Cm and Cm(+) into H(2). We have also carried out corresponding computations on several electronic states of CmH and CmH(+). Moreover, multireference relativistic configuration interaction computations including spin-orbit coupling were carried out on 75 electronic states of CmH(+), which were found to be below the 45 000 cm(-1) region. We have computed the first ionization energy of Cm as 5.94 eV in excellent agreement with experimental value of 5.99 eV. Our computations reveal barriers for the insertion of Cm and Cm(+) in their ground electronic states into H(2), but once the barriers are surmounted, both Cm + H(2) and Cm(+) + H(2) form stable products. The potential energy curves of CmH and CmH(+) reveal the existence of several low-lying open-shell excited states with varied Lambda quantum numbers and spin multiplicities. The excited states of these species exhibit intermediate coupling, although the spin-orbit splittings of the (9)Sigma(-) and (8)Sigma(-) ground states of CmH and CmH(+) are small, exhibiting nearly inverted multiplets. PMID:19736953

Balasubramanian, K; Cao, Zhiji

2009-11-12

29

Switched-capacitor bandpass delta-sigma A\\/D modulation at 10.7 MHz  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two second-order bandpass delta-sigma A\\/D modulators have been implemented in a 0.8 ? BiCMOS process to demonstrate the feasibility of converting a 10.7 MHz radio IF signal to digital form. The circuits, based on switched-capacitor biquads, demonstrated 57 dB SNR in a 200 kHz bandwidth when clocked at 42.8 MHz, dissipating 60 mW from a 5 V supply. The two

Frank W. Singor; W. Martin Snelgrove

1995-01-01

30

CYP2S1: A short review  

SciTech Connect

A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

Saarikoski, Sirkku T. [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FI-00250 (Finland) and Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, FI-00250 (Finland)]. E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hankinson, Oliver [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FI-00250 (Finland)

2005-09-01

31

Vascular sphingosine-1-phosphate S1P1 and S1P3 receptors.  

PubMed

The sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) acts on five subtypes of G-protein- coupled receptors, termed S1P(1) (formerly endothelial differentiation gene-1 [Edg-1]), S1P(2) (Edg-5), S1P(3) (Edg-3), S1P(4) (Edg-6) and S1P(5) (Edg-8), and possibly several other "orphan" receptors, such as GPR3, GPR6 and GPR12. These receptors are coupled to different intracellular second messenger systems, including adenylate cyclase, phospholipase C, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinases, as well as Rho- and Ras-dependent pathways. Consistently with this receptor multiplicity and pleiotropic signaling mechanisms, S1P influences numerous cell functions. S1P(1)1, S1P(2) and S1P(3) receptors are the major S1P receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system, where they mediate the effects of S1P released from platelets, and possibly other tissues (such as brain). Thus S1P(1) and S1P(3) receptors enhance endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, playing a key role in developmental and pathological angiogenesis. In contrast, S1P(2) receptors inhibit migration of these cell types, probably because of their unique stimulatory effect on a GTPase-activating protein inhibiting the activity of Rac. S1P receptors can also cause relaxation and constriction of blood vessels. The former effect is mediated by pertussis toxin-sensitive receptors (possibly S1P(1)) located on the endothelium and stimulating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). The vasoconstricting effect of S1P is likely to be mediated by S1P(2) and/or S1P(3) receptors, via Rho-Rho-kinase, and is more potent in coronary and cerebral blood vessels. Finally, S1P also protects endothelial cells from apoptosis through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/eNOS via S1P(1) and S1P(3) receptors. The variety of these effects, taken together with the existence of multiple receptor subtypes, provides an abundance of therapeutic targets that currently still await the development of selective agents. PMID:15334188

Waeber, Christian; Blondeau, Nicolas; Salomone, Salvatore

2004-01-01

32

A fully differential BiCMOS OTA for a 10.7MHz bandpass filter  

E-print Network

. . a. Pole-zero matching 2. Design approach for the cascade filter 3. A fourth-order 10. 7MHz bandpass filter IV AUTOMATIC TUNING A. Survey of Previous Schemes 1. PLL based frequency tuning scheme 2. Bandwidth tuning based on peak detection 3... consumption and bulk effects which causing phase errors {excess phase). The pro- posed transconductor has been used in a third-order elliptic low-pass filter with a 4 MHz cutoff frequency. The filter with on-chip automatic tuning has been integrated in a 3@m...

Ali, Muhammad Imtiaz

2012-06-07

33

Gas-phase oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ --thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO.  

PubMed

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm (+) and Cm (2+); parallel studies were carried out with La (+/2+), Gd (+/2+) and Lu (+/2+). Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M (+)-O] (M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO (+) with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO (+)] (M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO (2+) ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO] = 6.4 +/- 0.2 eV; IE[CmO (+)] = 15.8 +/- 0.4 eV; D[Cm-O] = 710 +/- 45 kJ mol (-1); D[Cm (+)-O] = 670 +/- 40 kJ mol (-1); and D[Cm (2+)-O] = 342 +/- 55 kJ mol (-1). Estimates for the M (2+)-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd, and Lu are all intermediate between D[N 2-O] and D[OC-O] - that is, 167 kJ mol (-1) < D[M (2+)-O] < 532 kJ mol (-1) - such that the four MO (2+) ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic oxygen-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO (2+), LaO (2+), GdO (2+), and LuO (2+) dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO 2 (+) ion appeared during the reaction of Cm (+) with O 2 when the intermediate, CmO (+), was not collisionally cooled - although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO 2 (+) is a stable species. PMID:18921989

Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G; Santos, Marta; de Matos, António Pires; Marçalo, Joaquim

2008-11-13

34

Magnetohydrodynamics of the 10.7 hr Magnetic Periodicities in Saturn's Magnetosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The observed features of the global 10.7 hour period magnetic signals of the Saturn system are analysed using the reasonable guiding hypothesis that the phenomena are magnetohydrodynamic in origin. In uniform plasma shear and compressional waves are separated. Inhomogeneity causes the coupling of the shear and compressional plasma motion but because of the anisotropy of the magnetic stress, it is still important to analyse compressional and shear effects independently and then allow for coupling. Three regimes can be defined where behavior of fields is very different. These are the flux tubes that are permanently closed and those that are permanently open (polar cap) and the open-closed boundary regime between these regions, where field lines open and sporadically (and periodically) release trapped material into interplanetary space. A central question to deriving a global picture is the manner in which the 10.7 hour signals connect across the interfaces between regimes. Globally the model we deduce predicts fields and plasma behavior largely indistinguishable from the recent global computations of Jia et al.[1] However there are limitations to the detail that any computation can reproduce. Moreover, we show that the source vortices introduced in the computations arise as a natural feature of the Saturn plasma environment.

Southwood, D. J.

2013-09-01

35

Nançay ``blind'' 21 CM line survey of the Canes Venatici group region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A radio spectroscopic driftscan survey in the 21 cm line with the Nançay decimetric radio telescope of 0.08 steradians of sky in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici covering a heliocentric velocity range of -350 < V_hel < 2350 km s(-1) produced 53 spectral features, which was further reduced to a sample of 33 reliably detected galaxies by extensive follow-up observations. With a typical noise level of rms = 10 mJy after Hanning smoothing, the survey is - depending on where the detections are located with regard to the centre of the beam - sensitive to M_HI = 1-2x10(8) {h}(-2) {M_sun} at 23 {h}(-1) Mpc and to M_HI = 4-8x10(7) {h}(-2) {M_sun} throughout the CVn groups. The survey region had been previously examined on deep optical plates by \\cite[Binggeli et al. (1990)]{bin90} and contains loose groups with many gas-rich galaxies as well as voids. No galaxies that had not been previously identified in these deep optical surveys were uncovered in our H{sigma c i} survey, neither in the groups nor the voids. The implication is that no substantial quantity of neutral hydrogen contained in gas-rich galaxies has been missed in these well-studied groups. All late-type members of our sample are listed in the \\cite[Fisher & Tully (1981b)]{fis81b} optically selected sample of nearby late-type galaxies; the only system not contained in Fisher and Tully's Catalog is the S0 galaxy NGC 4203. Within the well-sampled CVn group volume with distances corrected for flow motions, the H {sigma c i} mass function is best fitted with the \\cite[Zwaan et al. (1997)]{zwa97} H{sigma c i} mass function (alpha =-1.2) scaled by a factor of f=4.5 in account of the locally overdense region.

Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; van Driel, W.; Briggs, F.; Binggeli, B.; Mostefaoui, T. I.

1999-03-01

36

ATLAS: Australia Telescope Large Area Survey: Deep Radio Observations of the CDFS-SWIRE and ELAIS-S1 fields  

E-print Network

ATLAS: Australia Telescope Large Area Survey: Deep Radio Observations of the CDFS-SWIRE and ELAIS: University of Durham, UK. GOODS The Australia Telescope Compact Array used to make the radio images-S1 fields 1. Overview · We are imaging the CDFS and ELAIS-S1 SWIRE fields at 20 cm. Combining radio

Norris, Ray

37

The Mid-term Forecast Method of Solar Radiation Index {F}_{10.7}  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the low earth orbit satellite's orbit computation, the solar radiation index F_{10.7} is an important parameter, which is usually used to describe the solar activity's effect on the thermosphere density and the orbit perturbation. So the accuracy of index F_{10.7} will affect the precision of orbit prediction. In this paper, based on the characteristics of the solar 27-day short-term activity, we bring up a forecast method of F_{10.7} which can use the historical indices of the past 135 days to predict the solar radiation indices in the next 54 days. That is to say, the method is able to forecast the variations of solar radiation for about two rotation-cycles in the future. In this paper, we compare this method with those widely-used methods. The detail results are as follows: (1) This paper's method is observably better than the traditional triangle function method; (2) In the short-term forecast (7 days) , this paper's method is little better than the method developed by Space Weather Prediction Center in America, since the root mean square could be reduced by about 19% when using this paper's method; (3) In the mid-termforecast (2 7 days), the accuracy of this paper's method is almost equal to the 54-order self-regression method which is used widely in our country. However, fewer parameters and observation data are needed in this paper's method, leading to the more convenient application in orbit computation. Moreover, on the 54th day the correlation coefficient between the prediction and actual index is still greater than 0.92, implying that the method can keep stable in mid-term forecast. All in all, the advantage of this paper's method is that it could use fewer historical indices to predict the mid-term solar radiation independent of extra solar real-time observation, and it is very helpful to the orbit short- and mid-term predictions in some space flight missions.

Wang, H. B.; Xiong, J. N.; Zhao, C. Y.

2014-07-01

38

Constraining dark matter through 21-cm observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Beyond reionization epoch cosmic hydrogen is neutral and can be directly observed through its 21-cm line signal. If dark matter (DM) decays or annihilates, the corresponding energy input affects the hydrogen kinetic temperature and ionized fraction, and contributes to the Lyalpha background. The changes induced by these processes on the 21-cm signal can then be used to constrain the proposed

M. Valdés; A. Ferrara; M. Mapelli; E. Ripamonti

2007-01-01

39

Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ??=??/T? in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ?? in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

2014-09-01

40

Conducting Retrospective Ontological Clinical Trials in ICD-9-CM in the Age of ICD-10-CM  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To quantify the impact of International Classification of Disease 10th Revision Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) transition in cancer clinical trials by comparing coding accuracy and data discontinuity in backward ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM mapping via two tools, and to develop a standard ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM bridging methodology for retrospective analyses. BACKGROUND While the transition to ICD-10-CM has been delayed until October 2015, its impact on cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses has been inadequately explored. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three high impact journals with broad national and international readerships were reviewed for cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses codes in study design, methods, or results. Forward ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM mapping was performing using a translational methodology with the Motif web portal ICD-9-CM conversion tool. Backward mapping from ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM was performed using both Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) general equivalence mappings (GEMs) files and the Motif web portal tool. Generated ICD-9-CM codes were compared with the original ICD-9-CM codes to assess data accuracy and discontinuity. RESULTS While both methods yielded additional ICD-9-CM codes, the CMS GEMs method provided incomplete coverage with 16 of the original ICD-9-CM codes missing, whereas the Motif web portal method provided complete coverage. Of these 16 codes, 12 ICD-9-CM codes were present in 2010 Illinois Medicaid data, and accounted for 0.52% of patient encounters and 0.35% of total Medicaid reimbursements. Extraneous ICD-9-CM codes from both methods (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services general equivalent mapping [CMS GEMs, n = 161; Motif web portal, n = 246]) in excess of original ICD-9-CM codes accounted for 2.1% and 2.3% of total patient encounters and 3.4% and 4.1% of total Medicaid reimbursements from the 2010 Illinois Medicare database. DISCUSSION Longitudinal data analyses post-ICD-10-CM transition will require backward ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM coding, and data comparison for accuracy. Researchers must be aware that all methods for backward coding are not comparable in yielding original ICD-9-CM codes. CONCLUSIONS The mandated delay is an opportunity for organizations to better understand areas of financial risk with regards to data management via backward coding. Our methodology is relevant for all healthcare-related coding data, and can be replicated by organizations as a strategy to mitigate financial risk. PMID:25452683

Venepalli, Neeta K; Shergill, Ardaman; Dorestani, Parvaneh; Boyd, Andrew D

2014-01-01

41

Hadronic transitions ?(2S)??(1S)  

E-print Network

)?(+)?(-) was studied using two different analysis techniques. Selecting events in which ?(1S)?e(+)e(-),?(+)?(-) (“exclusive” analysis), and using the ?(1S) leptonic branching fractions world averages from the PDG review, we obtained B(?(2S)??(1S)?(+)?(-))=0.189±0.004±0...

Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

1998-08-07

42

Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

Ritsche, MT

2005-01-01

43

Evolution of HIV Crandall et al. S1 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins S1  

E-print Network

of HIV In 1995, a highly divergent strain of HIV-1 from Cameroon was isolated by Simon et al. [6].ThisEvolution of HIV Crandall et al. S1 © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins S1 From the a Department in understanding the evolution of HIV Keith A. Crandalla , Daniel Vascoa , David Posadaa and Hiromi Imamichib AIDS

Posada, David

44

A deep 13 cm survey of the ATLAS fields  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose to continue project C1621, for which the TAC last year awarded roughly half the requested 1200h, with a suggestion that we include a progress report with our request for the remaining time. Here we request 563 hours to image the ATLAS-ELAIS-S1 field at 13 cm. There are three distinct science drivers for this project: (1) to measure the spectral indices of the sources to distinguish between star-forming galaxies and AGN; (2) to identify ultra-steep-spectrum sources to understand why they are located predominantly at high redshifts, and (3) to measure the rotation measure of the polarised flux so that we can measure or constrain the strength and scale of the intergalactic magnetic field.

Norris, Ray; Gaensler, Bryan; Middelberg, Enno; Cornwell, Tim; Jackson, Carole; Ekers, Ron; Feain, Ilana; Boyle, Brian

2007-10-01

45

8.500" [21.59cm] .600" [1.52cm  

E-print Network

.72cm] 2.750" [6.99cm] TFEEp Blind holes for PEM studs "Shoebox" Shaped Top 0.090 5052 H32 Aluminum] .850" [2.16cm] tolerance +/- 0.010" [0.03cm] Tray Feet: End View Material: 5052 H32 Aluminum Sheet. One (1) Tray Top Assy (Views 2, 3, 4, & 5) 0.090" 5052 H32 Aluminum Sheet Stock 2. One (1) Tray Bottom

Llope, William J.

46

Raman spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a in the S1 state  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The S 1 Raman spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a is reported for the first time. A one-color experiment using the 351 nm picosecond pulses (duration 50 ps and repetition 1 kHz) for tetrahydrofuran solution detected a transient species, which showed distinct Raman lines at 1567, 1409 and 1320 cm -1 and weak profiles around 1169, 1092, 1051 and 794 cm -1. The other one-color experiment using the 355 nm nanosecond pulses (duration 12 ns and repetition 10 Hz) detected the T 1 species reported previously showing Raman lines at 1578 and 1330 cm -1. Thus, the newly identified transient species, which was pumped and probed within 50 ps, is assigned to S 1.

Nishizawa, Ei-ichi; Hashimoto, Hideki; Koyama, Yasushi

1991-07-01

47

PMMA Cementoplasty in Symptomatic Metastatic Lesions of the S1 Vertebral Body  

SciTech Connect

We describe a lateral transiliac direct puncture approach to the S1 vertebral body for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cementoplasty of painful metastatic lesions. This approach was performed using a 15-cm-long trocar needle with 3-mm outer diameter, introduced under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic control. A lateral projection was used to center the needle just in front of the spinal canal and subjacent to the superior plate of the S1 vertebral body. Needle progression was controlled using anteroposterior and lateral fluoroscopic projections alternately with a needle course parallel to an axial plane, avoiding conflict with the S1 foramen. After needle tip placement in the center of the S1 vertebral body, diluted PMMA with a setting time of 8 min was delivered. Ipsilateral lesions of the lateral sacral compartment were filled with the same needle by stepwise withdrawal and continuous PMMA injection.

Dehdashti, Amir R.; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Jean, Beatrix; Ruefenacht, Daniel A. [Neuroradiology-HUG, University Hospital of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

2000-03-15

48

21-cm line observations of galaxies from Kazarian's lists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 21-cm neutral hydrogen line has been measured for the first time in 39 non-Seyfert type galaxies from Kazarian list, with the Nancay radiotelescope. The line profiles, widths at 20% and 50% of the peak intensity, radial velocities as well as total fluxes are presented. The values of radial velocity are in fairly good agreement with those obtained from optical spectra. The width values at 20% of the peak vary in wide range from 113 km s^{-1} (KAZ 579) to 608 km s^{-1} for KAZ 566. Nine of our objects remained undetected, whether their HI-flux was too faint, the integration time too short, or the frequency sighted wrong. However, for part of them, there were positive hint of detection. Comments on individual objects are given. Tables 1 and 3 are only available in electronic form at CDS. Table 2 is also available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

Tamazian, V. S.; Theureau, G.; Coudreau-Durand, N.

1997-12-01

49

Characterization of s = 1 molecular magnetic chains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical quantum transfer-matrix approach to S = 1 macroscopic chains with single-site anisotropy and alternating bonds is worked out. A fit of the experimental susceptibility data for a number of the bond-alternating quasi-one-dimensional molecular magnets is performed down to the low-temperature region. New microscopic parameters for the non-uniform antiferromagnetic systems are established.

Caramico D'Auria, A.; Esposito, U.; Esposito, F.; Gatteschi, Dante; Kamieniarz, G.; Wa?cerz, S.

1999-05-01

50

10.7 Gb/s reflective electroabsorption modulator monolithically integrated with semiconductor optical amplifier for colorless WDM-PON.  

PubMed

We demonstrated 10.7 Gb/s reflective electroabsorption modulator monolithically integrated with semiconductor optical amplifier (REAM-SOA) using simplified fabrication process. Good performance at 10.7 Gb/s was obtained with an extinction ratio of > 10 dB and a power penalty of < 1 dB at a 10(-9) bit error rate (BER) up to 20 km transmission. The device operated over a 50 nm spectral range within 1 dB received power variation at a 10(-9) BER. PMID:21164673

Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Dong Churl; Kim, Ki-Soo; Choi, Byung-Seok; Kwon, O-Kyun

2010-10-25

51

Photometry of distant active comet C/2010 S1 (LINEAR)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of photometric observations of a dynamically new comet C/2010 S1 (LINEAR), conducted on June 18, 2012. The comet demonstrated a considerable level of physical activity at a heliocentric distance of 6.3 AU. The brightness, measured under a phase angle of 8.9 degrees, was equal to 14.55^{m}±0.06^{m} and 14.21^{m}±0.04^{m} in V- and R-bands, respectively. The brightness distribution over the coma was found to be inversely proportional to the projected onto the sky plane nucleocentric distance, with a slope of approximately -1. Therefore, the calculated Af? parameter, approximately 8400 cm and 8200 cm for V and R filters, respectively, was used to estimate the dust production rate. Assuming a steady outflow of dust particles from the nucleus, the dust production rate was estimated to be between 20 and 60 kg/s, depending on the assumed value of the grain's albedo. The V-R colour index obtained from the near-nucleus region of the coma is in agreement with the solar V-R colour index, and does not indicate significant reddening of the reflected solar radiation in the spectral region of 540-683 nm.

Shubina, O.; Kulyk, I.; Korsun, P.; Romanjuk, Ya.

2014-12-01

52

21cm Forest with the SKA  

E-print Network

An alternative to both the tomography technique and the power spectrum approach is to search for the 21cm forest, that is the 21cm absorption features against high-z radio loud sources caused by the intervening cold neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) and collapsed structures. Although the existence of high-z radio loud sources has not been confirmed yet, SKA-low would be the instrument of choice to find such sources as they are expected to have spectra steeper than their lower-z counterparts. Since the strongest absorption features arise from small scale structures (few tens of physical kpc, or even lower), the 21cm forest can probe the HI density power spectrum on small scales not amenable to measurements by any other means. Also, it can be a unique probe of the heating process and the thermal history of the early universe, as the signal is strongly dependent on the IGM temperature. Here we show what SKA1-low could do in terms of detecting the 21cm forest in the redshift range z = 7.5-15.

Ciardi, Benedetta; Mack, Katherine J; Xu, Yidong; Bernardi, Gianni

2015-01-01

53

The Multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The multidimensional Curriculum Model (MdCM) helps teachers to better prepare gifted and able students for our changing world, acquiring much needed skills. It is influenced by general learning theory of constructivism, notions of preparing students for 21st century, Teaching the Future Model, and current comprehensive curriculum models for…

Vidergor, Hava E.

2010-01-01

54

Characterization of 8-cm engineering model thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of 8 cm ion thruster technology which was conducted in support of the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) flight contract (Contract NAS3-21055) is discussed. The work included characterization of thruster performance, stability, and control; a study of the effects of cathode aging; environmental qualification testing; and cyclic lifetesting of especially critical thruster components.

Williamson, W. S.

1984-01-01

55

The Spectral Energy Distributions of Infant Super Star Clusters in Henize 2-10 from 7mm to 6cm  

E-print Network

We present observations from our continuing studies of the earliest stages of massive star cluster evolution. In this paper, radio observations from the Very Large Array at 0.7cm, 1.3cm, 2cm, 3.6cm, and 6cm are used to map the radio spectral energy distributions and model the physical properties of the ultra-young embedded super star clusters in Henize 2-10. The 0.7cm flux densities indicate that the young embedded star clusters that are powering the radio detected ``ultradense HII regions'' (UDHIIs) have masses greater than \\~10^5 Msun. We model the radio spectral energy distributions as both constant density HII regions and HII regions with power-law electron density gradients. These models suggest the UDHIIs have radii ranging between ~2-4pc and average electron densities of ~10^3-10^4 cm^-3 (with peak electron densities reaching values of ~10^5-10^6 cm^-3). The pressures implied by these densities are P/k_B~10^7-10^10 cm^-3 K, several orders of magnitude higher than typical pressures in the Galactic ISM. The inferred HII masses in the UDHIIs are \\~2-8x10^3 Msun; these values are <5% of the embedded stellar masses, and anonamously low when compared to optically visible young clusters. We suggest that these low HII mass fractions may be a result of the extreme youth of these objects.

Kelsey E. Johnson; Henry A. Kobulnicky

2003-08-18

56

www.city.ac.uk/wifi Wireless Network Connection Instructions Mac OS X (10.7/10.8)  

E-print Network

www.city.ac.uk/wifi Wireless Network Connection Instructions ­ Mac OS X (10.7/10.8) For advanced "Turn Airport Off. 2. Click on the icon once again and select "Open Network Preferences..." 3. Select Wi-Fi and under Status turn on Wi-Fi. 4. Select "Network Name:" eduroam and click connect. 5. Under "Mode:" Select

Weyde, Tillman

57

The Intrinsic Size of Sagittarius A* from 0.35 cm to 6 cm  

E-print Network

We present new high-resolution observations of Sagittarius A* at wavelengths of 17.4 to 23.8 cm with the Very Large Array in A configuration with the Pie Town Very Long Baseline Array antenna. We use the measured sizes to calibrate the interstellar scattering law and find that the major axis size of the scattering law is smaller by ~6% than previous estimates. Using the new scattering law, we are able to determine the intrinsic size of Sgr A* at wavelengths from 0.35 cm to 6 cm using existing results from the VLBA. The new law increases the intrinsic size at 0.7 cm by ~20% and <5% at 0.35 cm. The intrinsic size is 13^{+7}_{-3} Schwarzschild radii at 0.35 cm and is proportional to lambda^gamma, where gamma is in the range 1.3 to 1.7.

Geoffrey C. Bower; W. M. Goss; Heino Falcke; Donald C. Backer; Yoram Lithwick

2006-07-31

58

Measurements of Output Factors For Small Photon Fields Up to 10 cm x 10 cm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field output factors (OF) for photon beams from a 6 MV medical accelerator were measured using five different detectors in a scanning water phantom. The measurements were taken for square field sizes of integral widths ranging from 1 cm to 10 cm for two reference source-to-surface distances (SSD) and depths in water. For the diode detectors, square field widths as small as 2.5 mm were also studied. The photon beams were collimated by using either the jaws or the multileaf collimators. Measured OFs are found to depend upon the field size, SSD, depth and also upon the type of beam collimation, size and type of detector used. For field sizes larger than 3 cm x 3 cm, the OF measurements agree to within 1% or less. The largest variation in OF occurs for jawsshaped field of size 1 cm x 1cm, where a difference of more than 18% is observed.

Bacala, Angelina

59

{alpha} decay of {sup 238}Cm and the new isotope {sup 237}Cm  

SciTech Connect

Alpha decays of {sup 237}Cm and {sup 238}Cm have been studied using a gas-jet coupled on-line isotope separator. The new isotope {sup 237}Cm has been identified through the detection of 6656{+-}10 keV {alpha} particles. The {alpha} energy of {sup 238}Cm has been revised more precisely than the previous one. The {alpha} transition to the first excited 2{sup +} state in {sup 234}Pu has also been observed. It was found that the 2{sup +} energy in {sup 234}Pu is much higher than those in heavier Pu isotopes.

Asai, M.; Tsukada, K.; Ichikawa, S.; Nishinaka, I.; Nagame, Y. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sakama, M. [Department of Radiologic Science and Engineering, The University of Tokushima, Tokushima 770-8509 (Japan); Haba, H. [Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Goto, S. [Department of Chemistry, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Kojima, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Oura, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Shibata, M. [Radioisotope Research Center, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2006-06-15

60

Interpreting Sky-Averaged 21-cm Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Within the first ~billion years after the Big Bang, the intergalactic medium (IGM) underwent a remarkable transformation, from a uniform sea of cold neutral hydrogen gas to a fully ionized, metal-enriched plasma. Three milestones during this epoch of reionization -- the emergence of the first stars, black holes (BHs), and full-fledged galaxies -- are expected to manifest themselves as extrema in sky-averaged ("global") measurements of the redshifted 21-cm background. However, interpreting these measurements will be complicated by the presence of strong foregrounds and non-trivialities in the radiative transfer (RT) modeling required to make robust predictions.I have developed numerical models that efficiently solve the frequency-dependent radiative transfer equation, which has led to two advances in studies of the global 21-cm signal. First, frequency-dependent solutions facilitate studies of how the global 21-cm signal may be used to constrain the detailed spectral properties of the first stars, BHs, and galaxies, rather than just the timing of their formation. And second, the speed of these calculations allows one to search vast expanses of a currently unconstrained parameter space, while simultaneously characterizing the degeneracies between parameters of interest. I find principally that (1) physical properties of the IGM, such as its temperature and ionization state, can be constrained robustly from observations of the global 21-cm signal without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves, (2) translating IGM properties to galaxy properties is challenging, in large part due to frequency-dependent effects. For instance, evolution in the characteristic spectrum of accreting BHs can modify the 21-cm absorption signal at levels accessible to first generation instruments, but could easily be confused with evolution in the X-ray luminosity star-formation rate relation. Finally, (3) the independent constraints most likely to aide in the interpretation of global 21-cm signal measurements are detections of Lyman Alpha Emitters at high redshifts and constraints on the midpoint of reionization, both of which are among the primary science objectives of ongoing or near-future experiments.

Mirocha, Jordan

2015-01-01

61

Graphs for Isotopes of 96-Cm (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides a graphic representation of nucleon separation energies and residual interaction parameters for isotopes of the chemical element 96-Cm (Curium, atomic number Z = 96).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

62

Constraining dark matter through 21-cm observations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Beyond reionization epoch cosmic hydrogen is neutral and can be directly observed through its 21-cm line signal. If dark matter (DM) decays or annihilates, the corresponding energy input affects the hydrogen kinetic temperature and ionized fraction, and contributes to the Ly? background. The changes induced by these processes on the 21-cm signal can then be used to constrain the proposed DM candidates, among which we select the three most popular ones: (i) 25-keV decaying sterile neutrinos, (ii) 10-MeV decaying light dark matter (LDM) and (iii) 10-MeV annihilating LDM. Although we find that the DM effects are considerably smaller than found by previous studies (due to a more physical description of the energy transfer from DM to the gas), we conclude that combined observations of the 21-cm background and of its gradient should be able to put constrains at least on LDM candidates. In fact, LDM decays (annihilations) induce differential brightness temperature variations with respect to the non-decaying/annihilating DM case up to ??Tb = 8 (22) mK at about 50 (15) MHz. In principle, this signal could be detected both by current single-dish radio telescopes and future facilities as Low Frequency Array; however, this assumes that ionospheric, interference and foreground issues can be properly taken care of.

Valdés, M.; Ferrara, A.; Mapelli, M.; Ripamonti, E.

2007-05-01

63

Mapmaking for precision 21 cm cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to study the "Cosmic Dawn" and the Epoch of Reionization with 21 cm tomography, we need to statistically separate the cosmological signal from foregrounds known to be orders of magnitude brighter. Over the last few years, we have learned much about the role our telescopes play in creating a putatively foreground-free region called the "EoR window." In this work, we examine how an interferometer's effects can be taken into account in a way that allows for the rigorous estimation of 21 cm power spectra from interferometric maps while mitigating foreground contamination and thus increasing sensitivity. This requires a precise understanding of the statistical relationship between the maps we make and the underlying true sky. While some of these calculations would be computationally infeasible if performed exactly, we explore several well-controlled approximations that make mapmaking and the calculation of map statistics much faster, especially for compact and highly redundant interferometers designed specifically for 21 cm cosmology. We demonstrate the utility of these methods and the parametrized trade-offs between accuracy and speed using one such telescope, the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, as a case study.

Dillon, Joshua S.; Tegmark, Max; Liu, Adrian; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Morales, Miguel F.; Neben, Abraham R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Zheng, Haoxuan

2015-01-01

64

Interaction of integrin ?4 with S1P receptors in S1P- and HGF-induced endothelial barrier enhancement.  

PubMed

We previously reported sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) augment endothelial cell (EC) barrier function and attenuate murine acute lung inury (ALI). While the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood, S1P and HGF both transactivate the S1P receptor, S1PR1 and integrin ?4 (ITGB4) at membrane caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEMs). In the current study, we investigated the roles of S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC signaling and their associations with ITGB4. Our studies confirmed ITGB4 and S1PR2/3 are recruited to CEMs in human lung EC in response to either S1P (1?µM, 5?min) or HGF (25?ng/ml, 5?min). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments identified an S1P/HGF-mediated interaction of ITGB4 with both S1PR2 and S1PR3. We then employed an in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) to confirm a direct ITGB4-S1PR3 association induced by S1P/HGF although a direct association was not detectable between S1PR2 and ITGB4. S1PR1 knockdown (siRNA), however, abrogated S1P/HGF-induced ITGB4-S1PR2 associations while there was no effect on ITGB4-S1PR3 associations. Moreover, PLA confirmed a direct association between S1PR1 and S1PR2 induced by S1P and HGF. Finally, silencing of S1PR2 significantly attenuated S1P/HGF-induced EC barrier enhancement as measured by transendothelial resistance while silencing of S1PR3 significantly augmented S1P/HGF-induced barrier enhancement. These results confirm an important role for S1PR2 and S1PR3 in S1P/HGF-mediated EC barrier responses that are associated with their complex formation with ITGB4. Our findings elucidate novel mechanisms of EC barrier regulation that may ultimately lead to new therapeutic targets for disorders characterized by increased vascular permeability including ALI. PMID:24851274

Ni, Xiuqin; Epshtein, Yulia; Chen, Weiguo; Zhou, Tingting; Xie, Lishi; Garcia, Joe G N; Jacobson, Jeffrey R

2014-06-01

65

Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP): evaluation of the main 243Cm and 245Cm decay characteristics.  

PubMed

The results of new decay data evaluations are presented for (243)Cm (?) decay to nuclear levels in (239)Pu and (245)Cm (?) decay to nuclear levels in (241)Pu. These evaluated data have been obtained within the Decay Data Evaluation Project using information published up to 2011. PMID:22425420

Chechev, Valery P

2012-09-01

66

ICD-10-CM/PCS: Transferring Knowledge from ICD-9-CM  

PubMed Central

The transition to ICD-10-CM/PCS has expanded educational opportunities for educators and trainers who are taking on the responsibility of training coders on the new system. Coding education currently faces multiple challenges in the areas of how to train the new workforce, what might be the most efficient method of providing that training, how much retraining of the current workforce with ICD-9-CM training will be required, and how to meet the national implementation deadline of 2014 in the most efficacious manner. This research sought to identify if there was a difference between a group of participants with no knowledge of ICD-9-CM and those with some knowledge of ICD-9-CM in scores on an ICD-10-CM/PCS quiz. Results indicate a difference, supporting the idea of knowledge transfer between the systems and providing additional insight into coding education. PMID:23861677

Sand, Jaime N.; Elison-Bowers, Patt

2013-01-01

67

CF 3-torsional potentials of 2-aminobenzotrifluoride in the S 0 and S 1 electronic states from fluorescence spectra in a supersonic jet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Both fluorescence excitation and dispersed fluorescence spectra of 2-aminobenzotrifluoride in a supersonic jet show quite extensive vibrational structure due to the CF 3-torsional motion in the S 1 and S 0 electronic states, respectively. This structure has been assigned and results in CF 3-torsional potentials with parameters V3=450 cm -1, V6=83 cm -1 in S 0 and V3=240 cm -1, V6=-67 cm -1 in S 1. There is some evidence which points to interaction between an amino-hydrogen atom and the fluorine atoms: this may be due to hydrogen bonding or steric effects, or both.

Gordon, Robert D.; Michael Hollas, J.; Ribeiro-Claro, Paulo J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, José J. C.

1993-08-01

68

Overcoming the Challenges of 21cm Cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The highly-redshifted 21cm line of neutral hydrogen is one of the most promising and unique probes of cosmology for the next decade and beyond. The past few years have seen a number of dedicated experiments targeting the 21cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) begin operation, including the LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER). For these experiments to yield cosmological results, they require new calibration and analysis algorithms which will need to achieve unprecedented levels of separation between the 21cm signal and contaminating foreground emission. Although much work has been spent developing these algorithms over the past decade, their success or failure will ultimately depend on their ability to overcome the complications associated with real-world systems and their inherent complications. The work in this dissertation is closely tied to the late-stage commissioning and early observations with PAPER. The first two chapters focus on developing calibration algorithms to overcome unique problems arising in the PAPER system. To test these algorithms, I rely on not only simulations, but on commissioning observations, ultimately tying the success of the algorithm to its performance on actual, celestial data. The first algorithm works to correct gain-drifts in the PAPER system caused by the heating and cooling of various components (the amplifiers and above ground co-axial cables, in particular). It is shown that a simple measurement of the ambient temperature can remove ˜ 10% gain fluctuations in the observed brightness of calibrator sources. This result is highly encouraging for the ability of PAPER to remove a potentially dominant systematic in its power spectrum and cataloging measurements without resorting to a complicated system overhaul. The second new algorithm developed in this dissertation solves a major calibration challenge not just for PAPER, but for nearly all of a large class of new wide-field, drift- scanning radio telescopes: primary beam calibration in the presence of a poorly measured sky. Since these telescopes lack the ability to steer their primary beams, while seeing nearly the entire sky at once, a large number of calibrator sources are necessary to probe the entire beam response. However, the catalogs of radio sources at low-frequencies are not reliable enough to achieve the level of primary beam accuraccy needed for 21cm cosmology experiments. I develop, test, and apply a new technique which -- using only the assumption of symmetry around a 180° rotation -- simultaneously solves for the primary beam and the flux density of large number of sources. In this dissertation, I also present the analysis of new observations from PAPER to test theoretical models which predict foreground emission is confined to a "wedge"-like region of cosmological Fourier space, leaving an "EoR window" free from contamination. For the first time in actual observations, these predictions are spectacularly confirmed. In many ways, this result shifts the burden for upcoming PAPER analysis from foreground removal to increased sensitivity. And although increasing sensitivity is no small feat in-and-of-itself, this result is highly encouraging for 21cm studies, as foreground removal was long-viewed as the principal challenge for this field. The final result in this dissertation is the application of the all the lessons learned building PAPER and the MWA to design a new experiment for 21cm studies at z ˜ 1 with the goal of measuring baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). The design of the BAO Broadband and Broad-beam (BAOBAB) Array is described, and cosmological forecasts are presented. The bottom line is highly encouraging, suggesting that z ˜ 1 21cm observations can detect the neutral hydrogen power spectrum with a very modest (16 - 32 element) array, and that still reasonably sized (128 - 256 elements) arrays can produce significant advances in our knowledge of dark energy.

Pober, Jonathan

69

Integrable KdV Hierarchies on T^2=S^1\\times S^1  

E-print Network

Following our previous works on extended higher spin symmetries on the torus we focus in the present contribution to make a setup of the integrable KdV hierarchies on $T^{2} = S^{1} \\times S^{1}$. Actually two particular systems are considered, namely the KdV and the Burgers non linear integrable model associated to currents of conformal weights (2, 2) and (1, 1) respectively. One key steps towards proving the integrability of these systems is to find their Lax pair operators. This is explicitly done and a mapping between the two systems is discussed.

M. B. Sedra

2007-10-07

70

CF 3 torsional potentials in the S 0 and S 1 electronic states of 3-aminobenzotrifluoride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Torsional structure in the supersonic jet spectra of 3-aminobenzotrifluoride has been interpreted. The CF 3 torsional potentials are surprisingly similar to the CH 3 potentials in 4-toluidine: there is a low barrier with a minimum near ? = 25° in S 0, and a higher barrier with an eclipsed conformation in S 1. However, because of the greater mass of the CF 3 group, the spectra are quite different. Potential constants, in cm -1, are: V? 3 = 9 ± 5, V? 6 = -1 10 ± 2, V' 3 = 155 ± 5, and V' 6 = -40 ± 2, for F? = F' = 0.29 ± 0.01 cm -1.

Gordon, Robert D.; Hollas, J. Michael; Ribeiro-Claro, Paulo J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, José J. C.

1991-09-01

71

Injection of current densities over kA/cm2 in organic thin films and investigation of charge-carrier transport mechanisms in current density region between nA/cm2 and kA/cm2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of copper phthalocyanine thin-film devices, with active areas ranging from S = 1,000,000 to 7.9 ?m2, and analyze their charge-carrier transport mechanisms under current densities between nA/cm2 and kA/cm2. We demonstrate injection of 128 kA/cm2 in the smallest device having S = 7.9 ?m2. Furthermore, we find that J-V characteristics are divided into three regions between nA/cm2 and kA/cm2: ohm current, shallow-trap space-charge-limited current (SCLC), and trap-free SCLC. In a shallow-trap SCLC region, we observe a large shift in J-V characteristics depending upon the active areas. From analyses of carrier traps with a thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurement, we see that TSC signal intensities of these films decrease as the active area is reduced. Hence, we conclude that a large shift in J-V characteristics is attributable to the change of carrier trap concentrations in these films.

Matsushima, Toshinori; Adachi, Chihaya

2006-08-01

72

Twisted S1 excited state geometries in 4-dimethylaminobenzonitrile and dimethylaniline: New -d6 origin bands  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The S1?S0 electronic spectra of 4-dimethylaminobenzonitrile-h6 and -d6 (DMABN) and dimethylaniline-h6 and -d6 have been reexamined, and new electronic origins have been observed for the -d6 species, approximately 65 cm-1 lower in energy than previously reported. The spectra of DMABN-h3d3 and several other isotopomers of DMABN are reported for the first time. A prominent low-frequency progression is assigned to dimethylamino torsion, and the S1 states are found to be twisted by about 26° with a small 190 cm-1 barrier to planarity. Other bands are tentatively assigned to inversion and methyl torsional motions.

Saigusa, Hiroyuki; Miyakoshi, Naoki; Mukai, Chisato; Fukagawa, Tomoyoshi; Kohtani, Shigeru; Nakagaki, Ryoichi; Gordon, Robert

2003-09-01

73

Electroabsorption in laminated GaSe x S 1? x semiconductors in the fundamental-absorption edge region  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Electroabsorption spectra at 300 K and 77K and under fields of 2·103V\\/cm and 4·104V\\/cm have been studied in the fundamental-absorption edge region of single-crystal solid solutions GaSe\\u000a x\\u000a S1?x\\u000a obtained by the Bridgman method. The characteristic of GaSe\\u000a x\\u000a S1?x\\u000a electroabsorption spectra at 300 K and 77 K is the presence of a strong negative peak associated with the ground

S. G. Abdullayeva; V. A. Gadjiyev; T. G. Kerimova; E. Yu. Salayev

1977-01-01

74

A 30-cm diameter argon ion source  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm diameter argon ion source was evaluated. Ion source beam currents up to 4a were extracted with ion energies ranging from 0.2 to 1.5 KeV. An ion optics scaling relation was developed for predicting ion beam extraction capability as a function of total extraction voltage, gas type, and screen grid open area. Ignition and emission characteristics of several hollow cathode geometries were assessed for purposes of defining discharge chamber and neutralizer cathodes. Also presented are ion beam profile characteristics which exhibit broad beam capability well suited for ion beam sputtering applications.

Sovey, J. S.

1976-01-01

75

Design study of large area 8 cm x 8 cm wrapthrough cells for space station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of large area silicon solar cells for the projected NASA space station is discussed. It is based on the NASA specification for the cells which calls for an 8 cm by 8 cm cell of wrapthrough type with gridded back contacts. The beginning of life (BOL) power must be 1.039 watts per cell or larger and maximum end of life (EOL) after 10 years in the prescribed orbit under an equivalent 1MeV electron radiation damage fluence of 5 times 10 to the 13th power e/square cm. On orbit efficiency is to be optimized by a low thermal absorptance goal (thermal alpha) of .63.

Garlick, George F. J.; Lillington, David R.

1987-01-01

76

Combustion of stratified hydrogen-air mixtures in the 10.7 m 3 combustion test facility cylinder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents preliminary results from hydrogen concentration gradient combustion experiments in a 10.7 m3 cylinder. These gradients, also referred to as stratified mixtures, were formed from dry mixtures of hydrogen and air at atmospheric temperature. Combustion pressures, burn fractions and flame speeds in concentration gradients were compared with combustion of well-mixed gases containing equivalent amounts of hydrogen. The studied

D. R. Whitehouse; D. R. Greig; G. W. Koroll

1996-01-01

77

Dirichlet Series of Jacquet-Langlands Cusp Forms Over Fields of Cm-Type  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For certain Jacquet-Langlands cusp forms over fields of CM-type it is shown that the value at s = 1 of their Dirichlet series for a certain infinite set of Hecke quasicharacters can be computed as algebraic linear combinations of a finite set of periods of a closed differential form on a real-analytic manifold with singular point.Bibliography: 5 titles.

Kur?anov, P. F.

1980-02-01

78

30-cm electron cyclotron plasma generator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Experimental results on the development of a 30-cm-diam electron cyclotron resonance plasma generator are presented. This plasma source utilizes samarium-cobalt magnets and microwave power at a frequency of 4.9 GHz to produce a uniform plasma with densities of up to 3 x 10 to the 11th/cu cm in a continuous fashion. The plasma generator contains no internal structures, and is thus inherently simple in construction and operation and inherently durable. The generator was operated with two different magnetic geometries. One used the rare-earth magnets arranged in an axial line cusp configuration, which directly showed plasma production taking place near the walls of the generator where the electron temperature was highest but with the plasma density peaking in the central low B-field regions. The second configuration had magnets arranged to form azimuthal line cusps with approximately closed electron drift surfaces; this configuration showed an improved electrical efficiency of about 135 eV/ion.

Goede, Hank

1987-01-01

79

THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Feiden, Gregory A., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2012-11-20

80

Requirements for Cosmological 21-cm Masers  

E-print Network

We perform Monte-Carlo calculations of the radiative transfer of Lyman Alpha (hereafter Lya) photons emitted by a source embedded in a neutral collapsing gas cloud. This represents a young galaxy or quasar during the early stages of the epoch of reionisation (EoR). After computing the Lya spectrum as function of radius and time, we find that the Lya color temperature may be negative in large volumes surrounding the central source. Motivated by this result, we explore the prospects for a population inversion in the hyperfine levels of atomic hydrogen via the Wouthuysen-Field (WF) effect. The reason for this exploration is clear: if 21-cm masers exist during the EoR, they could greatly boost the expected 21-cm flux from this epoch. We find that population inversion is unlikely to occur for several reasons: (1) the required Lya luminosities of the central source exceed ~10e45 erg/s. The radiation pressure exerted by such a large Lya flux likely halts the collapse of the cloud; (2) When quantum corrections to the WF-coupling strength are applied, the required Lya luminosities are (even) larger by orders of magnitude; (3) A relatively low flux of Lya photons that is produced via other channels (x-ray heating, collisional excitation of hydrogen) prevents the Lya color temperature from becoming negative.

Mark Dijkstra; Abraham Loeb

2006-08-08

81

Fuel elements of research reactor CM  

SciTech Connect

In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A. [Rogova St., 5A, P.O.B. 369, Moscow(Russian Federation)

2013-07-01

82

Blocking S1P interaction with S1P{sub 1} receptor by a novel competitive S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of a newly developed S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The efficacy of S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P{sub 1}) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P{sub 1} and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P{sub 1}-selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P{sub 1} antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P{sub 1} is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

Fujii, Yasuyuki, E-mail: y.fujii@po.rd.taisho.co.jp [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan)] [Department of Molecular Function and Pharmacology Laboratories, Taisho Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd., 1-403 Saitama, Saitama 331-9530 (Japan); Igarashi, Yasuyuki [Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Biomembrane and Biofunctional Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Goitsuka, Ryo [Division of Development and Aging, Research Institute for Biological Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)] [Division of Development and Aging, Research Institute for Biological Sciences, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-0022 (Japan)

2012-03-23

83

A New Galactic 6cm Formaldehyde Maser  

E-print Network

We report the detection of a new H2CO maser in the massive star forming region G23.71-0.20 (IRAS 18324-0820), i.e., the fifth region in the Galaxy where H2CO maser emission has been found. The new H2CO maser is located toward a compact HII region, and is coincident in velocity and position with 6.7 GHz methanol masers and with an IR source as revealed by Spitzer/IRAC GLIMPSE data. The coincidence with an IR source and 6.7 GHz methanol masers suggests that the maser is in close proximity to an embedded massive protostar. Thus, the detection of H2CO maser emission toward G23.71-0.20 supports the trend that H2CO 6cm masers trace molecular material very near young massive stellar objects.

E. Araya; P. Hofner; W. M. Goss; S. Kurtz; H. Linz; L. Olmi

2006-04-17

84

NASA 30 Cm Ion Thruster Development Status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster is under development at NASA to provide an ion propulsion option for missions of national interest and it is an element of the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) program established to validate ion propulsion for space flight applications. The thruster has been developed to an engineering model level and it incorporates innovations in design, materials, and fabrication techniques compared to those employed to conventional ion thrusters. The performance of both functional and engineering model thrusters has been assessed including thrust stand measurements, over an input power range of 0.5-2.3 kW. Attributes of the engineering model thruster include an overall mass of 6.4 kg, and an efficiency of 65 percent and thrust of 93 mN at 2.3 kW input power. This paper discusses the design, performance, and lifetime expectations of the functional and engineering model thrusters under development at NASA.

Patterson, Michael J.; Haag, Thomas W.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Kussmaul, Michael T.

1995-01-01

85

47 CFR 25.146 - Licensing and operating rules for the non-geostationary orbit Fixed-Satellite Service in the 10.7...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...operating rules for the non-geostationary orbit Fixed-Satellite Service in the 10.7...operating rules for the non-geostationary orbit Fixed-Satellite Service in the 10.7...the proposed non-geostationary satellite orbit Fixed-Satellite Service (NGSO...

2014-10-01

86

A re-examination of the S0 --> S1 excitation spectrum of dimethylaniline  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new assignment for the S0?S1 transition of N,N-dimethylaniline (DMA) and related derivatives is presented. The low frequency bands and long Franck-Condon envelope observed in DMA-h6 and DMA-d6 are assigned to the coupled methyl torsion mode of the amino group, not to torsion of the amino substituent about the C-N bond. This new assignment is consistent with the change in frequency of the excitation bands upon deuteration of the methyl groups and the strong origin transitions observed in the excitation spectra of other alkyl anilines. The assignment was confirmed by simulations of the excitation spectra of DMA-h6 and DMA-d6, with parameters of the calculated potential energy surface determined to be V3=148.0±0.5 cm-1, V+=-31.6±0.5 cm-1, V-=8.5±0.5 cm-1, and V6=-15±0.5 cm-1. By Franck-Condon analysis, it was determined that the weak origin transition is due to the shifting of the S1 torsion minimum by 40° along the gearing coordinate relative to the corresponding minimum in the ground state.

Weersink, Robert A.; Wallace, Stephen C.; Gordon, Robert D.

1995-12-01

87

Detecting the 21 cm forest in the 21 cm power spectrum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a new technique for constraining the radio-loud population of active galactic nuclei at high redshift by measuring the imprint of 21 cm spectral absorption features (the 21 cm forest) on the 21 cm power spectrum. Using semi-numerical simulations of the intergalactic medium and a semi-empirical source population, we show that the 21 cm forest dominates a distinctive region of k-space, k ? 0.5 Mpc- 1. By simulating foregrounds and noise for current and potential radio arrays, we find that a next-generation instrument with a collecting area of the order of ˜ 0.1 km2 (such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array) may separately constrain the X-ray heating history at large spatial scales and radio-loud active galactic nuclei of the model we study at small ones. We extrapolate our detectability predictions for a single radio-loud active galactic nuclei population to arbitrary source scenarios by analytically relating the 21 cm forest power spectrum to the optical depth power spectrum and an integral over the radio luminosity function.

Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Dillon, Joshua S.; Mesinger, Andrei; Hewitt, Jacqueline

2014-07-01

88

S-1-induced lung injury combined with pneumocystis pneumonia  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary injuries due to S-1 have been reported, and these reports have shown an increase in lung cancer following the increased usage of S-1 in treating lung cancer. We report the first case of lung injury due to S-1 in combination with pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), because the radiological findings and clinical courses were compatible with S-1-induced lung injury combined with PCP. We should consider that S-1 might induce lung injuries which might occur with PCP, especially with a history of drug-induced or radiation-induced lung injuries. PMID:23386491

Yano, Shuichi

2013-01-01

89

Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

1978-01-01

90

The 15 cm diameter ion thruster research  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The startup reliability of a 15 cm diameter mercury bombardment ion thruster which employs a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode on the main and neutralizer cathodes is examined. Startup of the thruster is achieved 100% of the time on the main cathode and 98.7% of the time on the neutralizer cathode over a 3640 cycle test. The thruster was started from a 20 C initial condition and operated for an hour at a 600 mA beam current. An energy efficiency of 75% and a propellant utilization efficiency of 77% was achieved over the complete cycle. The effect of a single cusp magnetic field thruster length on its performance is discussed. Guidelines are formulated for the shaping of magnetic field lines in thrusters. A model describing double ion production in mercury discharges is presented. The production route is shown to occur through the single ionic ground state. Photographs of the interior of an operating-hollow cathode are presented. A cathode spot is shown to be present if the cathode is free of low work-function surfaces. The spot is observed if a low work-function oxide coating is applied to the cathode insert. Results show that low work-function oxide coatings tend to migrate during thruster operation.

Wilbur, P. J.

1974-01-01

91

8.500" [21.59cm] .600" [1.52cm  

E-print Network

] TFEEp Blind holes for PEM studs "Shoebox" Shaped Top 0.090 5052 H32 Aluminum Sheet Stock welded corners] tolerance +/- 0.010" [0.03cm] Tray Feet: End View Material: 5052 H32 Aluminum Sheet Stock thickness = 0

Llope, William J.

92

A sub-cm micromachined electron microscope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new approach for fabricating macroscopic (approximately 10x10x10 mm(exp 3)) structures with micron accuracy has been developed. This approach combines the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies. A (100) silicon wafer is anisotropically etched to create four orthogonal v-grooves and an aperture on each 10x12 mm die. Precision 308 micron optical fibers are sandwiched between the die to align the v-grooves. The fiber is then anodically bonded to the die above and below it. This procedure is repeated to create thick structures and a stack of 5 or 6 die will be used to create a miniature scanning electron microscope (MSEM). Two die in the structure will have a segmented electrode to deflect the beam and correct for astigmatism. The entire structure is UHV compatible. The performance of an SEM improves as its length is reduced and a sub-cm 2 keV MSEM with a field emission source should have approximately 1 nm resolution. A low voltage high resolution MSEM would be useful for the examination of biological specimens and semiconductors with a minimum of damage. The first MSEM will be tested with existing 6 micron thermionic sources. In the future a micromachined field emission source will be used. The stacking technology presented in this paper can produce an array of MSEMs 1 to 30 mm in length with a 1 mm or larger period. A key question being addressed by this research is the optimum size for a low voltage MSEM which will be determined by the required spatial resolution, field of view, and working distance.

Feinerman, A. D.; Crewe, D. A.; Perng, D. C.; Shoaf, S. E.; Crewe, A. V.

1993-01-01

93

Phosphorylation of ?S1-casein is regulated by different genes.  

PubMed

Casein phosphorylation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by kinase enzymes that attach phosphate groups to specific AA in the protein sequence. This modification is one of the key factors responsible for the stabilization of calcium phosphate nanoclusters in casein micelles and for the internal structure of the casein micelles. ?S1-Casein (?s1-CN) is of special interest because it constitutes up to 40% of the total casein fraction in milk, and it has 2 common phosphorylation states, with 8 (?S1-CN-8P) and 9 (?S1-CN-9P) phosphorylated serine residues. Factors affecting this variation in the degree of phosphorylation are not currently known. The objective of this research was to determine the genetic background of ?S1-CN-8P and ?S1-CN-9P. The genetic and phenotypic correlation between ?S1-CN-8P and ?S1-CN-9P was low (0.18 and 0.19, respectively). This low genetic correlation suggests a different genetic background. These differences were further investigated by means of a genome-wide association study, which showed that both ?S1-CN-8P and ?S1-CN-9P were affected by a region on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 6, but only ?S1-CN-8P was affected by a region on BTA11 that contains the gene that encodes for ?-lactoglobulin (?-LG), and only ?S1-CN-9P was affected by a region on BTA14 that contains the diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) gene. Estimated effects of ?-LG protein genotypes showed that only ?S1-CN-8P was associated with the ?-LG A/B polymorphism (g.1772G>A and g.3054C>T); the AA genotype of ?-LG was associated with a lower concentration of ?S1-CN-8P (-0.32% wt/wt) than the BB genotype (+0.41% wt/wt). Estimated effects of DGAT1 K232A genotypes showed that only ?S1-CN-9P was associated with the DGAT1 gene polymorphism; DGAT1 AA genotype was associated with a higher ?S1-CN-9P concentration (+0.53% wt/wt) than the DGAT1 KK genotype (-0.44% wt/wt). The results give insight in phosphorylation of ?S1-CN-8P and ?S1-CN-9P, which seem to be regulated by a different set of genes. PMID:25200775

Bijl, E; van Valenberg, H J F; Huppertz, T; van Hooijdonk, A C M; Bovenhuis, H

2014-11-01

94

Imaging and Timing Performance of 1cm × 1cm Position-sensitive Solid-state Photomultiplier  

PubMed Central

We have designed and built a large-area 1cm × 1cm position-sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM) for use in detector design for medical imaging applications. Our new large-area PS-SSPM concept implements resistive network between the micro-pixels, which are photodiodes operated in Geiger mode, called Geiger Photodiodes (GPDs), to provide continuous position sensitivity. Here we present imaging and timing performance of the large-area PS-SSPM for different temperatures and operating biases to find the optimum operating parameters for the device in imaging applications. A detector module was built by coupling a polished 8×8 LYSO array, with 1×1×20 mm3 elements, to a 1×1 cm2 PS-SSPM. Flood images recorded at room temperature show good crystal separation as all 64 elements were separated from each other. Cooling the device at 10 °C showed significant improvement. The device optimum bias voltage was ~4.5V over breakdown voltage. The coincidence timing resolution was improved significantly by increasing the operating bias, as well as by lowering the temperature to 0 °C. Results show excellent imaging performance and good timing response with a large-area PS-SSPM device.

Schmall, J.; Stapels, C.; Christian, J.; Cherry, S.; Squillante, M. R.; Shah, K.

2014-01-01

95

CH3 internal rotation in the S0 and S1 states of 9-methylanthracene.  

PubMed

Fluorescence excitation spectra and dispersed fluorescence spectra of jet-cooled 9-methylanthracene-h12 and -d12 (9MA-h12 and 9MA-d12) have been observed, and the energy levels of methyl internal rotation (CH3 torsion) in the S0 and S1 states have been analyzed. The molecular symmetry of 9MA is the same as that of toluene (G12). Because of two-fold symmetry in the pi system, the potential curve has six-fold barriers to CH3 rotation. In toluene, the barrier height to CH3 rotation V6 is very small, nearly free rotation. As for 9MA-h12, we could fit the level energies by potential curves with the barrier heights of V6(S0) = 118 cm(-1) and V6(S1) = 33 cm(-1). These barrier heights are remarkably larger than those of toluene and are attributed to hyperconjugation between the pi orbitals and methyl group. The dispersed fluorescence spectrum showed broad emission for the excitation of 0(0)(0) + 386 cm(-1) band, indicating that intramolecular vibrational redistribution efficiently occurs, even in the vibronic level of low excess energy of the isolated 9MA molecule. PMID:19231826

Baba, Masaaki; Mori, Koichi; Saito, Motohisa; Kowaka, Yasuyuki; Noma, Yuki; Kasahara, Shunji; Yamanaka, Takaya; Okuyama, Katsuhiko; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Nagashima, Umpei

2009-03-19

96

Evolution of SINE S1 retroposons in Cruciferae plant species.  

PubMed

The S1 element is a plant short interspersed element (SINE) that was first described and studied in Brassica napus. In this work, we investigated the distribution and the molecular phylogeny of the S1 element within the Cruciferae (= Brassicaceae). S1 elements were found to be widely distributed within the Cruciferae, especially in species of the tribe Brassiceae. The molecular phylogeny of S1 elements in eight Cruciferae species (Brassica oleracea, Brassica rapa, Brassica napus, Brassica nigra, Sinapis, arvensis, Sinapis pubescens, Coincya monensis, and Vella spinosa) was inferred using 14-36 elements per species. Significant neighbor-joining and maximum-parsimony phylogenetic clusters, supported by high bootstrap P values and/or represented in 100% of the most-parsimonious trees, were observed for each species. Most of these clusters probably correspond to recent species-specific bursts of S1 amplification. Since these species diverged recently, S1 amplification in Cruciferae plants is proposed to be a highly dynamic process that could contribute to genome rearrangements and eventually lead to reproductive isolation. S1 sequence analysis also revealed putative gene conversion events that occurred between different S1 elements of a given species. These events suggest that gene conversion is a minor but significant component of the molecular drive governing S1 concerted evolution. PMID:9287426

Lenoir, A; Cournoyer, B; Warwick, S; Picard, G; Deragon, J M

1997-09-01

97

S1P and the birth of platelets  

PubMed Central

Recent work has highlighted the multitude of biological functions of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which include roles in hematopoietic cell trafficking, organization of immune organs, vascular development, and neuroinflammation. Indeed, a functional antagonist of S1P1 receptor, FTY720/Gilenya, has entered the clinic as a novel therapeutic for multiple sclerosis. In this issue of the JEM, Zhang et al. highlight yet another function of this lipid mediator: thrombopoiesis. The S1P1 receptor is required for the growth of proplatelet strings in the bloodstream and the shedding of platelets into the circulation. Notably, the sharp gradient of S1P between blood and the interstitial fluids seems to be essential to ensure the production of platelets, and S1P appears to cooperate with the CXCL12–CXCR4 axis. Pharmacologic modulation of the S1P1 receptor altered circulating platelet numbers acutely, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for controlling thrombocytopenic states. However, the S1P4 receptor may also regulate thrombopoiesis during stress-induced accelerated platelet production. This work reveals a novel physiological action of the S1P/S1P1 duet that could potentially be harnessed for clinical translation. PMID:23166370

Galvani, Sylvain; Rafii, Shahin; Nachman, Ralph

2012-01-01

98

Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel, Plexiglass, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10- 8 to 10-7 strain amplitude.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A detailed evaluation on the method of internal friction measurement by the stress-strain hysteresis loop method from 0.01 to 1 Hz at 10-8-10-7 strain amplitude and 23.9oC is presented. Significant systematic errors in relative phase measurement can result from convex end surfaces of the sample and stress sensor and from end surface irregularities such as nicks and asperities. Preparation of concave end surfaces polished to optical smoothness having a radius of curvature >3.6X104 cm reduces the systematic error in relative phase measurements to <(5.5+ or -2.2)X10-4 radians. -from Authors

Hsi-Ping, Liu; Peselnick, L.

1983-01-01

99

LED-based Fourier-transform spectroscopy of H2 18O in the range 15000-15700 cm-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The spectrum of H2 18O in the range 15000-15700 cm-1 has been recorded for the first time on a Fourier-transform spectrometer using a high-brightness light-emitting diode as a radiation source. The measurements have been conducted at room temperature with a resolution of 0.05 cm-1. A threshold sensitivity in absorption of 2 × 10-7 cm-1 has been achieved due to both the use of a light-emitting diode and optimization of the multipass cell with a base length of 60 cm, which ensured a 19.2-m length of the absorbing layer. A high signal-to-noise ratio ( S/ N = 2000-10000) made it possible to record about 670 water-vapor lines with intensities of 1.0 × 10-26-2.2 × 10-24 cm/mol at 296 K. The energies of 265 vibrational-rotational levels of the H2 18O molecule are determined and attributed to seven vibrational states, namely, (033), (113), (212), (231), (311), (330), and (410).

Mikhailenko, S. N.; Serdyukov, V. I.; Sinitsa, L. N.; Vasilchenko, S. S.

2013-12-01

100

New insight into Cm(III) interaction with kaolinite - Influence of mineral dissolution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cm(III) speciation in natural kaolinite (St. Austell, UK) suspensions under alkaline conditions was studied by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The spectroscopic investigations were performed under argon atmosphere (O2 < 1 ppm) using a constant curium concentration, ionic strength and mineral content of 2 × 10-7 M, 1 mM NaClO4 and 0.25 g/L, respectively, throughout the study. The impact of kaolinite mineral dissolution on the speciation of the trivalent actinide was investigated in oversaturation experiments where excess amounts of aluminum and/or silicon were added to alkaline kaolinite suspensions. Only silicon addition was found to influence the curium ligand-field under the experimental conditions indicating the formation of a curium-silicate complex in the kaolinite environment. In experiments with 10-3 M added silicon but no solid phase for curium attachment only the hydrolysis species Cm(OH)2+ could be detected at pH 10. Thus, the formation of colloidal silicate species for the attachment of curium could be excluded and the observed species in alkaline kaolinite environments could be assigned to a ternary kaolinite/curium/silicate complex forming between adsorbed curium at the mineral surface and dissolved silicates in solution. A similar curium-silicate complex with identical spectroscopic features was also found in investigations with ?-alumina as sorbent phase upon addition of silicon to the mineral suspensions, suggesting that silicon complexation with surface-bound curium is independent of the sorbent material.

Huittinen, N.; Rabung, Th.; Schnurr, A.; Hakanen, M.; Lehto, J.; Geckeis, H.

2012-12-01

101

S-1 in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

S-1 is an oral 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug, which is designed to improve the antitumor activity of 5-FU by inhibiting dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, the key enzyme of 5-FU catabolism. Recently, two important studies on the clinical use of S-1 for pancreatic cancer have been reported from Japan. In the first study (GEST study), S-1 demonstrated non-inferiority to gemcitabine (GEM) in overall survival (OS) for metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic cancer, but combination chemotherapy with GEM and S-1 did not show superiority to GEM in OS. In the second study (JASPAC-01 study), S-1 showed superiority to adjuvant chemotherapy with GEM in OS in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. In addition to GEM, S-1 is now regarded as the key drug in the management of pancreatic cancer in Japan. To date, many studies have investigated the effectiveness of S-1 in various settings, such as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic cancer, second-line chemotherapy after GEM failure, and chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced disease. In this review, we focus on recent clinical trials of S-1-based chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:25386059

Sudo, Kentaro; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Taketo

2014-11-01

102

Chrysanthemum CmNAR2 interacts with CmNRT2 in the control of nitrate uptake.  

PubMed

Nitrate transporters are an important component of plant growth and development. Chrysanthemum morifolium is an important ornamental species, for which a sufficient supply of nitrogenous fertilizer is required to maintain economic yields. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the nitrate transporter genes CmNRT2 and CmNAR2 were isolated. CmNRT2 transcript accumulation was inducible by both nitrate and ammonium, but the latter ion down-regulated the transcript accumulation of CmNAR2. CmNRT2 might be a plasma membrane localized protein, while CmNAR2 was distributed throughout the cell. CmNAR2 was shown to interact with CmNRT2 by in vitro and in vivo assays. Arabidopsis thaliana plants heterologously expressing CmNRT2 showed an increased rate of nitrate influx, while this trait was unaltered in plants expressing CmNAR2. Double transformants (CmNRT2 plus CmNAR2) exhibited an enhanced rate of nitrate influx into the root. Our data indicated that the interaction of CmNAR2 with CmNRT2 contributed to the uptake of nitrate. PMID:25060485

Gu, Chunsun; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Jiang, Jiafu; Guan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shuang; Fang, Weimin; Liao, Yuan; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi

2014-01-01

103

Investigation of spheromak configuration generated by inductive methods in the S-1 device  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the characteristics of the spheromak plasmas obtained during the past five-year operation period of S-1 experiments. The S-1 Spheromak device, which began operation in 1983, generates a compact toroid in which the self-generated toroidal field in the plasma is comparable to the poloidal field. The S-1 experiment is unique in that spheromak plasmas are formed by inductive transfer of magnetic flux from a toroidal-shaped ''flux core,'' and plasma stability is maintained by shaping of the externally applied equilibrium field and using loose-fitting passive conductors. The most important objective for the S-1 experiment is to investigate the confinement feature of the spheromak configuration. With a rather extensive diagnostic system for this size device, the transport characteristics of the S-1 spheromak have been measured for plasmas with 10 /approx lt/ T/sub e/ less than or equal to 130 eV and 2 /approx lt/ n/sub e/ /approx lt/ 15 /times/ 10/sup 13/ cm/sup /minus/3/. The scaling of electron temperature T/sub e/ and density n/sub e/ with plasma current density has been obtained in a wide operation regime. The most important finding is that the peak electron pressure scales as n/sub eo/T/sub eo/ /proportional to/ j/sub o//sup 2/ (j/sub o/ = peak toroidal current density) with T/sub eo/ /proportinal to/ j/sub o//sup 2/ and n/sub eo/ approx. = constant. These scaling results, which are similar to those obtained in the reversed-field pinch device, suggest that ..beta.. = constant. Energy and particle confinement times are determined. 44 refs., 35 figs.

Yamada, M.; Janos, A.C.; Ellis, R.A. Jr.; Hart, G.W.; Levinton, F.M.; Mayo, R.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mimura, M.; Motley, R.W.; Ono, Y.; Paul, S.; Ueda, Y.

1988-08-01

104

Circularly polarized sun at 12. 6 cm wavelength. Interim report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Circular polarization maps of the Sun with 45 sec angular resolution at 12 cm wavelength are presented for six continuous days. The maps have degrees of circular polarization up to pc = 20%, and they show an excellent correlation with photostatic magnetograms. A similar correlation exists at 6 cm and 20 cm, and at all three wavelentghs the brightness temperatures,

K. R. Lang; R. F. Willson

1983-01-01

105

Nozzle R&D for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-diameter Mercury Jet K.T. McDonald  

E-print Network

on mercury delivery to the nozzle. · Distortion of mercury jet by the magnetic field. Final configuration inlet tube. It may be better to have only a very short length at the final diameter of the nozzle. Should the transition from a large-diameter inlet to a small-diameter nozzle be abrupt or gradual? Kirk T

McDonald, Kirk

106

The circularly polarized sun at 12.6 CM wavelength  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Circular polarization maps of the Sun with 45 sec angular resolution at 12 cm wavelength are presented for six continuous days. The maps have degrees of circular polarization up to pc = 20%, and they show an excellent correlation with photo-static magnetograms. A similar correlation exists at 6 cm and 20 cm, and at all three wavelentghs the brightness temperatures, TB, of the circularly polarized emission is TB approx 1,000,000 K. This suggests that the emission at all three wavelengths is due to the same hot plasma radiating in the presence of magnetic fields that project radially upwards from the photosphere into the low solar corona. At 6 cm wavelength highly circularly polarized (pc appprox 50%), core sources with angular sizes 0 approx 10 sec to 30 sec occur near sunspots. These core sources are due to gyroesonant emission at the third harmonic of the gyrofrequency, implying longitudinal magnetic field strengths of Hl approx 580 spots, gauss at altitudes h approx 3 x 10 to the ninth power cm above the sunspots. In regions near sunspots, the circularly polarized emission at 6 cm, 12 cm and 20 cm could all be due to the gyroemission of hot electrons spiralling in magnetic fields of strength Hl approx 280 gauss and Hl approc 170 guass are inferred from the 12 cm and 20 cm data, respectively. An alternative explanations is polarization by bremsstrahlung propagating in magnetic fields of strength Hl approx 100 guass and 50 gauss, respectively.

Lang, K. R.; Willson, R. F.

1983-06-01

107

Circularly polarized sun at 12. 6 cm wavelength. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

Circular polarization maps of the Sun with 45 sec angular resolution at 12 cm wavelength are presented for six continuous days. The maps have degrees of circular polarization up to pc = 20%, and they show an excellent correlation with photostatic magnetograms. A similar correlation exists at 6 cm and 20 cm, and at all three wavelentghs the brightness temperatures, TB, of the circularly polarized emission is TB approx 1,000,000 K. This suggests that the emission at all three wavelengths is due to the same hot plasma radiating in the presence of magnetic fields that project radially upwards from the photosphere into the low solar corona. At 6 cm wavelength highly circularly polarized (pc appprox 50%), core sources with angular sizes 0 approx 10 sec to 30 sec occur near sunspots. These core sources are due to gyroesonant emission at the third harmonic of the gyrofrequency, implying longitudinal magnetic field strengths of Hl approx 580 spots, gauss at altitudes h approx 3 x 10 to the ninth power cm above the sunspots. In regions near sunspots, the circularly polarized emission at 6 cm, 12 cm and 20 cm could all be due to the gyroemission of hot electrons spiralling in magnetic fields of strength Hl approx 280 gauss and Hl approc 170 guass are inferred from the 12 cm and 20 cm data, respectively. An alternative explanations is polarization by bremsstrahlung propagating in magnetic fields of strength Hl approx 100 guass and 50 gauss, respectively.

Lang, K.R.; Willson, R.F.

1983-06-01

108

Cis-trans isomerization in the S1 state of acetylene: Identification of cis-well vibrational levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

A systematic analysis of the S1-trans (A~1Au) state of acetylene, using IR-UV double resonance along with one-photon fluorescence excitation spectra, has allowed assignment of at least part of every single vibrational state or polyad up to a vibrational energy of 4200 cm-1. Four observed vibrational levels remain unassigned, for which no place can be found in the level structure of

Anthony J. Merer; Adam H. Steeves; Joshua H. Baraban; Hans A. Bechtel; Robert W. Field

2011-01-01

109

Cis-trans isomerization in the S1 state of acetylene: Identification of cis-well vibrational levels  

Microsoft Academic Search

A systematic analysis of the S1-trans (A˜1Au) state of acetylene, using IR-UV double resonance along with one-photon fluorescence excitation spectra, has allowed assignment of at least part of every single vibrational state or polyad up to a vibrational energy of 4200 cm–1. Four observed vibrational levels remain unassigned, for which no place can be found in the level structure of

Anthony J. Merer; Adam H. Steeves; Joshua H. Baraban; Hans A. Bechtel; Robert W. Field

2011-01-01

110

Power distribution for an Am\\/Cm bushing melter  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decades of nuclear material production at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has resulted in the generation of large quantities of the isotopes Am²⁴³ and Cm²⁴⁴. Currently, the Am and Cm isotopes are stored as a nitric acid solution in a tank. The Am and Cm isotopes have great commercial value but must be transferred to ORNL for processing. The nitric

C. Gong; B. J. Hardy

1996-01-01

111

Experimental determination of kQ factors for cylindrical ionization chambers in 10?cm × 10?cm and 3?cm × 3?cm photon beams from 4?MV to 25?MV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the ionometric determination of absorbed dose to water, Dw, in megavoltage photon beams from a linear accelerator, beam-quality-dependent correction factors, kQ, are used for the ionization chambers. By using a water calorimeter, these factors can be determined experimentally and with substantially lower standard uncertainties compared to calculated values of the kQ, which are published in various dosimetry protocols. In this investigation, kQ for different types of cylindrical ionization chambers (NE 2561, NE 2571, FC 65?G) were determined experimentally in 10?cm × 10?cm photon beams from 4?MV to 25?MV (corresponding beam quality index TPR20,10 from 0.64 to 0.80). The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factors for a single ionization chamber in 10?cm × 10?cm photon beams can be measured with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.31%. In addition to these measurements in 10?cm × 10?cm fields, kQ factors for the NE 2561 chamber were also determined in smaller 3?cm × 3?cm photon beams between 6?MV and 25?MV. In this case, relative standard uncertainties between 0.35 % and 0.38 % are achieved for the kQ factors. It is found for this ionization chamber, that the ratio of the kQ factors in 3?cm × 3?cm and in 10?cm × 10?cm beams increases with increasing TPR20,10 to reach a value of 1.0095 at TPR20,10 = 0.8 with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.4 %.

Krauss, A.; Kapsch, R. P.

2014-08-01

112

Lessons Learned From CM-2 Modal Testing and Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Combustion Module-2 (CM-2) is a space experiment that launches on Shuttle mission STS-107 in the SPACEHAB Double Research Module. The CM-2 flight hardware is installed into SPACEHAB single and double racks. The CM-2 flight hardware was vibration tested in the launch configuration to characterize the structure's modal response. Cross-orthogonality between test and analysis mode shapes were used to assess model correlation. Lessons learned for pre-test planning and model verification are discussed.

McNelis, Mark E.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Carney, Kelly S.; Otten, Kim D.

2002-01-01

113

Reduced dimension rovibrational variational calculations of the S1 state of C2H2. II. The S1 rovibrational manifold and the effects of isomerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reduced dimension variational calculations have been performed for the rovibrational level structure of the S1 state of acetylene. The state exhibits an unusually complicated level structure, for various reasons. First, the potential energy surface has two accessible conformers, trans and cis. The cis conformer lies about 2700 cm-1 above the trans, and the barrier to cis-trans isomerization lies about 5000 cm-1 above the trans minimum. The trans vibrations ?4 (torsion) and ?6 (asym. bend) interact very strongly by Darling-Dennison and Coriolis resonances, such that their combination levels and overtones form polyads with unexpected structures. Both conformers exhibit very large x36 cross-anharmonicity since the pathway to isomerization is a combination of ?6 and ?3 (sym. bend). Near the isomerization barrier, the vibrational levels show an even-odd K-staggering of their rotational levels as a result of quantum mechanical tunneling through the barrier. The present calculations address all of these complications, and reproduce the observed K-structures of the bending and C-C stretching levels with good qualitative accuracy. It is expected that they will assist with the assignment of the irregular patterns near the isomerization barrier.

Changala, P. Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Stanton, John F.; Merer, Anthony J.; Field, Robert W.

2014-01-01

114

S-1 plus gemcitabine chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and maintenance therapy with S-1 for unresectable pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of the combination of S-1 with gemcitabine followed by oral S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy (intensity modulated radiotherapy, IMRT) and maintenance therapy with S-1 for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Subjects selected in the study were patients who had unresectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer without distant metastases, adequate organ and marrow functions, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1 and no prior anticancer therapy. Initially the subjects received two cycles of chemotherapy, oral administration of S-1 40 mg/m2 twice daily from day 1 to day 14 of a 21-d cycle, with 30-min intravenous infusions of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 on day 1 and day 8. Two weeks after the completion of chemotherapy, S-1 was administered orally with concurrent IMRT. Oral S-1 was administered at a dose of 80 mg/m2 per day twice daily from day 1 to day 14 and from day 22 to day 35. Radiation was concurrently delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/d, 5 times per week, 28 fractions). One month after the completion of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m2 per day twice daily for 14 d, followed by a 14-d rest period. This cycle was repeated as maintenance therapy, until unacceptable toxicity occurred or the disease worsened. Thirty-two patients were involved in this study. The median follow-up was 15.6 mo (range: 8.6-32.3 mo). RESULTS: Thirty-two patients completed the scheduled course of chemotherapy, while 30 patients (93.8%) received chemoradiotherapy with two patients ceasing to continue with radiotherapy. The major toxic effects were nausea and leukopenia. There was no grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, the objective tumor response was partial response in 17 (53.1%) patients, stable disease in 9 (28.1%), and progressive disease in 6 (18.8%). The median overall survival and median progression-free survival were 15.2 mo and 9.3 mo, respectively. The survival rates at 1 year and 2 years were 75% and 34.4%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The combination of S-1 with gemcitabine followed by oral S-1 with IMRT and maintenance therapy with S-1 alone in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer may be considered a well-tolerated, promising treatment regimen. PMID:25320537

Ke, Qing-Hua; Zhou, Shi-Qiong; Yang, Ji-Yuan; Du, Wei; Liang, Gai; Lei, Yong; Luo, Fei

2014-01-01

115

S1P signaling: new therapies and opportunities  

PubMed Central

Development of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) modulators to dampen inflammation and its sequelae is becoming increasingly promising for treating medical conditions characterized by significant immunopathology. As shown by the non-selective S1P receptor modulator FTY720 (fingolimod [Gilenya®]) in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), the ability to use S1P1 modulation to precisely block immune cell traffic—immunomodulation—while maintaining immunosurveillance, has opened therapeutic opportunities in various other immune-derived chronic pathologies, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), lupus, psoriasis, as well as, potentially, in early acute viral respiratory infection. Proof-of-concept studies across validated animal models with S1P receptor modulators highly selective for S1P1, such as BAF-312 (Siponimod), KRP-203, ONO-4641 (Ceralifimod), ponesimod and RPC-1063, and emerging clinical trials for safety and efficacy in humans, particularly in MS, ulcerative colitis (UC) and psoriasis, have set the stage for us to consider additional testing in various other autoimmune diseases.

Gonzalez-Cabrera, Pedro J.; Brown, Steve; Studer, Sean M.

2014-01-01

116

Photofraction of a 5 cm x 2 cm BGO scintillator. [bismuth germanate crystal for use in cosmic gamma ray detector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The photofraction of a 5.1 cm x 2.0 cm bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator was measured over a gamma-ray energy range of 0.2 to 6.1 MeV. Several methods, used to minimize the effect of room scattering on the measurement, are discussed. These include a gamma-gamma coincidence technique, a beta-gamma coincidence technique, and the use of sources calibrated with a standard 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm sodium iodide scintillator.

Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.

1985-01-01

117

Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma sized > 3 and ? 5 cm: Is ablative margin of more than 1 cm justified?  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate whether an ablative margin (AM) > 1.0 cm might reduce chance of recurrence for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors 3.1 to 5.0 cm in size, compared with an AM of 0.5-1.0 cm. METHODS: From October 2005 to December 2012, 936 consecutive patients with HCC who received radiofrequency ablation were screened. Of these, 281 patients, each with a single primary HCC tumor of 3.1 to 5.0 cm in size on its greatest diameter, were included in the study. Based on the AM width, we categorized patients into the 0.5-1.0 cm group and the > 1.0 cm group. Local tumor progression (LTP)-free survival, intrahepatic distant recurrence (IDR)-free survival and overall survival (OS) rates were obtained using the Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year LTP-free survival rates and IDR-free survival rates were significantly higher in the > 1.0 cm group compared with the 0.5-1.0 cm group (97.5%, 86.3%, 73.6%, 49.5% and 26.4% vs 91.3%, 78.4%, 49.5%, 27.8%, and 12.8%; 95.1%, 90.3%, 77.0%, 61.0% and 48.3% vs 95.2%, 85.9%, 62.6%, 47.2% and 28.5%; P < 0.05). The 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year OS rates were 98.6%, 91.5%, 69.2%, 56.0% and 42.2%, respectively, in the 0.5-1.0 cm group and 100%, 98.9%, 90.1%, 68.7% and 57.4%, respectively, in the > 1.0 cm group (P = 0.010). There were no significant differences in complication rates between the two groups. Both univariate and multivariate analyses identified AM as an independent prognostic factor linked to LTP, IDR, and OS. CONCLUSION: For HCC tumors > 3.0 cm and ? 5.0 cm, AM > 1.0 cm could reduce chances of recurrence compared with AM of 0.5-1.0 cm, emphasizing the need for a more defensive strategy using AMs > 1.0 cm for ablating HCC tumors of 3.1 to 5.0 cm. PMID:24259969

Ke, Shan; Ding, Xue-Mei; Qian, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Cao, Bao-Xin; Gao, Kun; Sun, Wen-Bing

2013-01-01

118

Design and Performance of 40 cm Ion Optics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 40 cm ion thruster is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain input power and propellant throughput capabilities of 10 kW and 550 kg. respectively. The technical approach here is a continuation of the "derating" technique used for the NSTAR ion thruster. The 40 cm ion thruster presently utilizes the NSTAR ion optics aperture geometry to take advantage of the large database of lifetime and performance data already available. Dome-shaped grids were chosen for the design of the 40 cm ion optics because this design is naturally suited for large-area ion optics. Ion extraction capabilities and electron backstreaming limits for the 40 cm ion optics were estimated by utilizing NSTAR 30 cm ion optics data. A preliminary service life assessment showed that the propellant throughput goal of 550 kg of xenon may be possible with molybdenum 40 cm ion optics. One 40 cm ion optics' set has been successfully fabricated to date. Additional ion optics' sets are presently being fabricated. Preliminary performance tests were conducted on a laboratory model 40 cm ion thruster.

Soulas, George C.

2001-01-01

119

An early solar system magnetic field recorded in CM chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a paleomagnetic study of seven CM carbonaceous chondrites. CM chondrites are believed to be some of the most chemically primitive materials available in our solar system and may sample the continuum of transitional objects between asteroids and comets formed in the outer solar system. As such, CM chondrites can help us to understand primordial aspects of the history of the early solar system including protoplanetary disk and planetesimal magnetism. The ferromagnetic assemblage of CM chondrites is composed of a mixture of primary metallic iron, pyrrhotite, and magnetite. The remanent properties are usually dominated by secondary pyrrhotite. Paleomagnetic analyses using thermal and alternating field demagnetization identified a stable origin-trending component of magnetization in the seven studied CM chondrites. In each meteorite, this component is homogeneous in direction at least at the cm scale and is therefore post-accretional. We interpret this stable component as a pre-terrestrial chemical remanent magnetization acquired during crystallization of magnetite and pyrrhotite during parent body aqueous alteration in a field of at least a few ? T (2 ± 1.5 ? T). Considering the timescale and intensities of primordial magnetic fields, both internally generated fields from a putative dynamo and external fields, generated in the protoplanetary disk, may have been recorded by CM chondrites. It is presently difficult to discriminate between the two hypotheses. Regardless, CM chondrites likely contain the oldest paleomagnetic record yet identified.

Cournede, C.; Gattacceca, J.; Gounelle, M.; Rochette, P.; Weiss, B. P.; Zanda, B.

2015-01-01

120

Experimental response functions and response matrices for 2.54-cm x 2.54 cm and 7.62 cm x 7.62 cm bismuth germanate scintillation detectors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report experimental response functions at twelve gamma-ray energies over the range of 123.6 keV to 11.67 MeV for a 2.54-cm-diameter x 2.54-cm-long and a 7.62-cm-diameter x 7.62-cm long bismuth germanate scintillation detector. The measurements were made at, or corrected to correspond to, source-to-detector distances of 100 cm. The resolutions of the detectors at a gamma-ray energy of 661.6 keV are 11.6 percent for the small detector and 13.0 percent for the large detector.

Kiziah, Rex R.; Lowell, John R.

1990-10-01

121

S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

AIM: To assess the efficacy and tolerability of S-1-based vs non-S-1-based chemotherapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). METHODS: We extracted reported endpoints, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), time-to-treatment failure (TTF), objective response rate (ORR) and adverse effects, from randomized controlled trials identified in PubMed, the Cochrane library, Science Direct, EMBASE and American Society of Clinical Oncology meetings. Stata software was used to calculate the pooled values. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials involving 2176 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Compared to non-S-1-based regimens, the use of S-1-based regimens were associated with an increase in ORR (RR = 1.300; 95%CI: 1.028-1.645); OS (HR = 0.89; 95%CI: 0.81-0.99; P = 0.025), TTF (HR = 0.83; 95%CI: 0.75-0.92; P = 0.000), and a lower risk of febrile neutropenia (RR = 0.225; P = 0.000) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032). OS, PFS and TTF were prolonged, especially in the Asian population. In subgroup analysis, statistically significant increases in ORR (RR = 1.454; P = 0.029), OS (HR = 0.895; P = 0.041) and TTF (HR = 0.832; P = 0.000) were found when S-1-based chemotherapy was compared to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. The incidence of leukopenia (RR = 0.584; P = 0.002) and stomatitis (RR = 0.230; P = 0.032) was higher in the 5-FU-based arm. S-1-based regimens had no advantage in ORR, OS, PFS, TTF and grade 3 or 4 adverse events over capecitabine-based regimens. CONCLUSION: S-1-based chemotherapy may be a good choice for AGC because of longer survival times, better tolerance and more convenient use. PMID:25206296

Yang, Jian; Zhou, Yan; Min, Ke; Yao, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Ni

2014-01-01

122

Multiplexing and DQPSK Precoding of 10.7Gb\\/s Client Signals to 107 Gb\\/s Using an FPGA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We implemented a real-time DQPSK precoder for 107-Gb\\/s data, together with a highspeed channel alignment scheme and the required rate adaptation from 10.7 Gb\\/s to 13.375 Gb\\/s, on a Xilinx Virtex II Pro X FPGA.

H. Song; A. Adamiecki; P. J. Winzer; C. Woodworth; S. Corteselli; G. Raybon

2008-01-01

123

C.M. Brasier -Refereed Publications Brasier, C.M. (1986). Some genetical aspects of necrotophy with special reference to  

E-print Network

of the British Mycological Society 52, 273-279. Brasier, C.M. (1971). Induction of sexual reproduction in single-142. Biology of Phytophthora Brasier, C.M. (1969). The effect of temperature and light on reproduction in vitro.M. (1972). Observations on the sexual mechanism in Phytophthora palmivora and related species. Transactions

124

4.5cm3.5cm26 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html  

E-print Network

P.7 201279 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html P.45 A. 3 3 #12;201279 , . ` ' . . URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/english/index.html 6 90 90 "" ... ) "" ... 4,000 *1 14cm Ã?3cm 201279 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html : 36113223 333443

Takada, Shoji

125

4.5cm3.5cm26 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html  

E-print Network

P.7 201279 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html P.45 A. 3 3 #12;201279" " URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/english/index.html 6 9090 4.5cmÃ?3.5cm26 1 " (Kofu Yotei , 28 "" "" "" . #12;201279 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html 9 C

Takada, Shoji

126

A novel mGluR5 antagonist, MFZ 10-7, inhibits cocaine-taking and cocaine-seeking behavior in rats.  

PubMed

Pre-clinical studies suggest that negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5), including 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine (MTEP) and fenobam are highly effective in attenuating drug-taking and drug-seeking behaviors. However, both MPEP and MTEP have no translational potential for use in humans because of their off-target effects and short half-lives. Here, we report that 3-fluoro-5-[(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)ethynyl]benzonitrile (MFZ 10-7), a novel mGluR5 NAM, is more potent and selective than MPEP, MTEP and fenobam in both in vitro binding and functional assays. Similar to MTEP, intraperitoneal administration of MFZ 10-7 inhibited intravenous cocaine self-administration, cocaine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior and cocaine-associated cue-induced cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. Although MFZ 10-7 and MTEP lowered the rate of oral sucrose self-administration, they did not alter total sucrose intake. Further, MFZ 10-7 appeared to be more potent than MTEP in inducing downward shifts in the cocaine dose-response curve, but less effective than MTEP in attenuating sucrose-induced reinstatement of sucrose-seeking behavior. MFZ 10-7 and MTEP had no effect on basal locomotor behavior. These findings not only provide additional evidence supporting an important role for mGluR5 in cocaine reward and addiction, but also introduce a new tool for both in vitro and in vivo investigations with which to further characterize this role. PMID:24001208

Keck, Thomas M; Zou, Mu-Fa; Bi, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Hong-Ju; Srivastava, Ratika; Gardner, Eliot L; Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Newman, Amy Hauck

2014-03-01

127

Evaluation of CM5 Charges for Condensed-Phase Modeling.  

PubMed

The recently developed Charge Model 5 (CM5) is tested for its utility in condensed-phase simulations. The CM5 approach, which derives partial atomic charges from Hirshfeld population analyses, provides excellent results for gas-phase dipole moments and is applicable to all elements of the periodic table. Herein, the adequacy of scaled CM5 charges for use in modeling aqueous solutions has been evaluated by computing free energies of hydration (?G hyd) for 42 neutral organic molecules via Monte Carlo statistical mechanics. An optimal scaling factor for the CM5 charges was determined to be 1.27, resulting in a mean unsigned error (MUE) of 1.1 kcal/mol for the free energies of hydration. Testing for an additional 20 molecules gave an MUE of 1.3 kcal/mol. The high precision of the results is confirmed by free energy calculations using both sequential perturbations and complete molecular annihilation. Performance for specific functional groups is discussed; sulfur-containing molecules yield the largest errors. In addition, the scaling factor of 1.27 is shown to be appropriate for CM5 charges derived from a variety of density functional methods and basis sets. Though the average errors from the 1.27*CM5 results are only slightly lower than those using 1.14*CM1A charges, the broader applicability and easier access to CM5 charges via the Gaussian program are additional attractive features. The 1.27*CM5 charge model can be used for an enormous variety of applications in conjunction with many fixed-charge force fields and molecular modeling programs. PMID:25061445

Vilseck, Jonah Z; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

2014-07-01

128

Icy Galilean Satellites: 70 cm Radar Results from Arecibo  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radar scattering properties of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are unlike those of any other object observed with planetary radars. At wavelengths of 3.5 cm and 13 cm most inner Solar System targets have low reflectivities on the order of 0.1, while the icy Galilean satellites are strongly backscattering with specific radar cross sections that can exceed unity (Campbell et al. 1978, Icarus 34, 254-267, Ostro et al. 1992, J. Geophys. Res. 97, 18227-18244). Their polarization ratios are also high, ˜1.5, indicative of multiple scattering, and the echoes follow a diffuse scattering law at all incident angles with no indication of the quasi-specular reflections characteristic of terrestrial planets and the Moon. We present observations that were made in 1988 and 1990 with the Arecibo radar at a much longer wavelength, 70 cm. The total cross sections measured at this wavelength are much lower than those measured at the shorter wavelengths. At 0.62±0.20 and 0.15±0.09, respectively, Ganymede's and Callisto's total normalized cross sections are a factor of 3 lower than their values at the short wavelengths. However, their 70-cm polarization ratios are greater than unity and consistent with those at the shorter wavelengths. Europa was not reliably detected at 70 cm and hence an upper limit on its total cross section is placed at 0.34, which is almost a factor of 10 lower than at the short wavelengths. Although all the 70-cm echoes are fairly weak and carry relatively large uncertainties, it appears unlikely that single reflections from the vacuum-surface interface are contributing significantly to the reflections, and hence the mechanism responsible for the radar scattering properties at 3.5 cm and 13 cm is still active at 70 cm, but apparently not operating as efficiently.

Black, G. J.; Campbell, D. B.; Ostro, S. J.

2001-06-01

129

Ribosomal protein S1 induces a conformational change of tmRNA; more than one protein S1 per molecule of tmRNA  

E-print Network

Ribosomal protein S1 induces a conformational change of tmRNA; more than one protein S1 per-translationally to the nascent peptide, targeting it for proteolysis. Ribosomal protein S1 is required for tmRNA binding of both recombinant and purified proteins S1 from E. coli is biphasic with apparent binding constants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

130

Femtosecond dynamics of the forbidden carotenoid S1 state in light-harvesting complexes of purple bacteria observed after two-photon excitation  

PubMed Central

Time-resolved excited-state absorption intensities after direct two-photon excitation of the carotenoid S1 state are reported for light-harvesting complexes of purple bacteria. Direct excitation of the carotenoid S1 state enables the measurement of subsequent dynamics on a fs time scale without interference from higher excited states, such as the optically allowed S2 state or the recently discovered dark state situated between S1 and S2. The lifetimes of the carotenoid S1 states in the B800-B850 complex and B800-B820 complex of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are 7 ± 0.5 ps and 6 ± 0.5 ps, respectively, and in the light-harvesting complex 2 of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ?1.9 ± 0.5 ps. These results explain the differences in the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer efficiency after S2 excitation. In Rps. acidophila the carotenoid S1 to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer is found to be quite inefficient (?ET1 <28%) whereas in Rb. sphaeroides this energy transfer is very efficient (?ET1 ?80%). The results are rationalized by calculations of the ensemble averaged time constants. We find that the Car S1 ? B800 electronic energy transfer (EET) pathway (?85%) dominates over Car S1 ? B850 EET (?15%) in Rb. sphaeroides, whereas in Rps. acidophila the Car S1 ? B850 EET (?60%) is more efficient than the Car S1 ? B800 EET (?40%). The individual electronic couplings for the Car S1 ? BChl energy transfer are estimated to be approximately 5–26 cm?1. A major contribution to the difference between the energy transfer efficiencies can be explained by different Car S1 energy gaps in the two species. PMID:10984512

Walla, Peter J.; Linden, Patricia A.; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Scholes, Gregory D.; Fleming, Graham R.

2000-01-01

131

Eight-cm mercury ion thruster system technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology status of 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5 cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8 cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

1974-01-01

132

Ion accelerator systems for high power 30 cm thruster operation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two and three-grid accelerator systems for high power ion thruster operation were investigated. Two-grid translation tests show that over compensation of the 30 cm thruster SHAG grid set spacing the 30 cm thruster radial plasma density variation and by incorporating grid compensation only sufficient to maintain grid hole axial alignment, it is shown that beam current gains as large as 50% can be realized. Three-grid translation tests performed with a simulated 30 cm thruster discharge chamber show that substantial beamlet steering can be reliably affected by decelerator grid translation only, at net-to-total voltage ratios as low as 0.05.

Aston, G.

1982-01-01

133

The impending demise of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present evidence to conclude that it is very probable that comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) will disintegrate before reaching perihelion. Figs. 1 and 7 of this work are particularly revealing. The comet is following the path of disintegrating comets and not the path of normal Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that C/2012 S1 (ISON) is going to disintegrate. Note: the comet disintegrated on November 13th, according to this prediction while this paper was being refereed (CBET 3731). We present evidence to conclude that it is very probable that comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) will disintegrate before reaching perihelion. Some Oort Cloud comets exhibit a signature (a slope discontinuity event (SDE)+a magnitude dip after the event) that has predictive power. Figs. 1 and 7 of this work are particularly revealing. The comet is following the path of disintegrating comets and not the path of normal Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that C/2012 S1(ISON) is going to disintegrate. Note: the comet disintegrated on November 13th while this paper was being refereed (CBET 3731).

Ferrín, Ignacio

2014-06-01

134

Breaking a Visual CAPTCHA Anonymous Author(s)1  

E-print Network

Breaking a Visual CAPTCHA Anonymous Author(s)1 Affiliation2 Address3 email4 5 Abstract6 Visual CAPTCHAs have recently become a practical mainstream online7 Turing test method to counter malicious a simple attack against11 a popular open source web blog plugin, PHP CAPTCHA.12 13 1 Introduction14 Web

de Freitas, Nando

135

Particle decay in the early universe: predictions for 21 cm  

E-print Network

The influence of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and decaying dark matter particles on the emission and absorption characteristics of neutral hydrogen in 21 cm at redshifts $z = 10-50$ is considered. In presence of UHECRs 21 cm can be seen in absorption with the brightness temperature $T_b=-(5\\div 10)$ mK in the range $z=10-30$. Decayng particles can stimulate a 21 cm signal in emission with $T_b\\sim 50-60$~mK at $z =50$, and $T_b \\simeq 10$~mK at $z \\sim 20$. Observational possibilities to detect manifestations of UHECRs and/or decaying particles in 21 cm with the future radio telescopes (LOFAR, PAST and SKA), and to distinguish contributions from them are briefly discussed.

Shchekinov, Yu A; Shchekinov, Yu. A.

2006-01-01

136

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-49 Sexual Harassment / Gender Discrimination  

E-print Network

Chancellor's Memorandum CM-49 ­ Sexual Harassment / Gender Discrimination To: Vice Chancellors, including sexual harassment. Any sexual harassment, whether verbal, physical or environmental, is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. Sexual harassment is illegal under federal, state and local laws

137

Management of 1-2 cm renal stones  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The preferred treatment of >1cm stone is shockwave lithotripsy (SWL), while that of stone <2 cm is percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), but treatment of 1-2 cm renal stones is a controversial issue. We searched the literature to present a comprehensive review on this group. Material and Methods: Pubmed search of literature was done using the appropriate key words. We separately discussed the literature in lower polar and non lower polar stone groups. Results: For non lower polar renal stones of 1-2 cm, SWL is preferred approach, while for the lower polar stones; literature favors the use of PCNL. Retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) is emerging as a promising technique for these calculi. Conclusions: Treatment of renal stone disease depends on stone and patient related, as well as on renal anatomical factors. Treatment should be individualized according to site of stone and available expertise. PMID:24082440

Srivastava, Aneesh; Chipde, Saurabh S

2013-01-01

138

Benchmarking and performance analysis of the CM-2. [SIMD computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A suite of benchmarking routines testing communication, basic arithmetic operations, and selected kernel algorithms written in LISP and PARIS was developed for the CM-2. Experiment runs are automated via a software framework that sequences individual tests, allowing for unattended overnight operation. Multiple measurements are made and treated statistically to generate well-characterized results from the noisy values given by cm:time. The results obtained provide a comparison with similar, but less extensive, testing done on a CM-1. Tests were chosen to aid the algorithmist in constructing fast, efficient, and correct code on the CM-2, as well as gain insight into what performance criteria are needed when evaluating parallel processing machines.

Myers, David W.; Adams, George B., II

1988-01-01

139

Ch 6 -MISCELLANEOUS TOPICS H I 21 cm line  

E-print Network

is in the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the Planck curve ­ usually the case at radio wavelengths. For no background source of atoms along a column of cross-sectional area 1 cm2 ) is N HI( ) =1.82x1013 Tb ( ) d atoms cm-2 in the Sun. Many species are found to be depleted with respect to their solar abundances, normalized

Sitko, Michael L.

140

Detecting the redshifted 21cm forest during reionization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 21cm forest -- HI absorption features in the spectra of high-redshift radio sources -- can potentially provide a unique probe of the largely neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) during the epoch of reionization. We present simulations of the 21cm forest due to the large scale structure of the reionization-era IGM, including a prescription for x-ray heating and the percolation of

Katherine J. Mack; J. Stuart B. Wyithe

2011-01-01

141

Video-assisted thoracic surgery left S1+2+3 segmentectomy for lung cancer  

PubMed Central

A 49-year-old female presented with a solitary pulmonary nodule on the chest screening computed tomography (CT) scan. The nodule was 1.3 cm in diameter and located in the apical segment of left upper lobe. The lesion was considered to be cT1aN0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and a 3-port video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) wedge resection was performed. Intraoperative frozen sections revealed a lung adenocarcinoma. Therefore, sequential S1+2+3 segmentectomy of the left upper lobe was performed, also systematic lymph node dissection was carried out. The final pathological stage was pT1aN0M0 (Ia). PMID:25589985

Lu, Weishan; Zhou, Xinming

2014-01-01

142

A TECHNIQUE FOR FOREGROUND SUBTRACTION IN REDSHIFTED 21 cm OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

One of the main challenges for future 21 cm observations is to remove foregrounds which are several orders of magnitude more intense than the H I signal. We propose a new technique for removing foregrounds of the redshifted 21 cm observations. We consider multi-frequency interferometer observations. We assume that the 21 cm signals in different frequency channels are uncorrelated and the foreground signals change slowly as a function of frequency. When we add the visibilities of all channels, the foreground signals increase roughly by a factor of {approx}N because they are highly correlated. However, the 21 cm signals increase by a factor of {approx}{radical}N because the signals in different channels contribute randomly. This enables us to obtain an accurate shape of the foreground angular power spectrum. Then, we obtain the 21 cm power spectrum by subtracting the foreground power spectrum obtained this way. We describe how to obtain the average power spectrum of the 21 cm signal.

Cho, Jungyeon [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lazarian, A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Timbie, Peter T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-04-20

143

Spectroscopic identification of ternary Cm-carbonate surface complexes.  

PubMed

The influence of dissolved CO(2) on the sorption of trivalent curium (Cm) on alumina (gamma-Al(2)O(3)) and kaolinite was investigated by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) using the optical properties of Cm as a local luminescent probe. Measurements were performed at T < 20 K on Cm loaded gamma-Al(2)O(3) and kaolinite wet pastes prepared in the absence and presence of carbonate in order to pictorially illustrate any changes through a direct comparison of spectra from both systems. The red-shift of excitation and emission spectra, as well as the increase of fluorescence lifetimes observed in the samples with carbonate, clearly showed the influence of carbonate and was fully consistent with the formation of Cm(III) surface species involving carbonate complexes. In addition, the biexponential decay behavior of the fluorescence lifetime indicated that at least two different Cm(III)-carbonate species exist at the mineral-water interface. These results provide the first spectroscopic evidence for the formation of ternary Cm(III)-carbonate surface complexes. PMID:20050656

Fernandes, M Marques; Stumpf, T; Baeyens, B; Walther, C; Bradbury, M H

2010-02-01

144

[A case of squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple skin successfully treated with S-1 alone].  

PubMed

Squamous cell carcinoma of the breast is uncommon, but that of the nipple skin is rarer. The effect of chemotherapy in these cases is yet to reach consensus. We report a rare case in which primary squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple skin was successfully treated with S-1 alone. A 64-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a granulomatous tumor mass over the right nipple, which she was aware of for 10 years; the tumor showed a rapid increase in growth before admission. The tumor was approximately 4 cm at the first visit, and was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma by incisional biopsy. We administered preoperative systemic chemotherapy owing to the presence of metastasis in an axillary lymph node. After 2 courses of chemotherapy with oralS -1 at 100mg/day for 28 days followed by a 14-day resting period, the primary tumor and metastatic lymph node showed a remarkable reduction in size. The patient subsequently underwent a radical operation and is currently healthy without any recurrence. PMID:25131884

Murakami, Soichiro; Umeda, Shuyo; Sozaki, Masae; Miyoshi, Kei; Ishikawa, Mikimasa; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Ohuchi, Kiyoko; Nakano, Ryuji

2014-07-01

145

Rotational band contour analysis of the 281-nm origin band of the S1- S0 system of 1,4-benzodioxan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rotational contour of the 281-nm origin band of the S1 ? S0 transition of 1,4-benzodioxan has been photographed and analyzed. It is shown to be type A, which establishes the transition as A ? A (in C2), as expected for an o-disubstituted benzene with identical substituents. The changes in rotational constants from S0 to S1 have been found to be ? A = -0.0033 cm -1, ? B = -0.0001 cm -1, and ? C = -0.00036 cm -1. The change in the inertial defect is small, ruling out a major change upon excitation of the conformation of the partly saturated ring, assumed to be twisted in S0.

Gordon, Robert D.; Hollas, J. Michael

1992-12-01

146

Long-term survival following pancreatectomy and s-1 chemotherapy for pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma with peritoneal dissemination: a case report and literature review.  

PubMed

Current case is the third report of S-1 chemotherapy against acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) of pancreas, and our patient has achieved the longest reported recurrence-free survival, longer than 6 years, despite the presence of disseminated nodules at laparotomy.A 77-year-old man presented with abdominal discomfort. Computed tomography showed a low-density tumor in the pancreas tail and the patient was referred for surgery. A 3-cm sized pancreatic tumor, with localized disseminated nodules, was detected on laparotomy. Distal pancreatectomy with concomitant resection of disseminated nodules was performed, and histopathological examination revealed an ACC. Oral S-1 chemotherapy was administered postsurgery, and the patient showed no sign of recurrence during 73 months of follow-up. This is the first report of long-term survivor of pancreatic ACC with peritoneal dissemination, following pancreatectomy and S-1 chemotherapy.Current case suggests a beneficial effect of S-1 chemotherapy in cases of ACC. PMID:25569665

Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Iwata, Jun; Saisaka, Yuichi; Tokumaru, Teppei; Nakamura, Toshio; Morita, Sojiro

2015-01-01

147

Comparative Study of the Ternary Particle Emission in 243Cm(nth,f) and 244Cm(SF)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we report on the energy distribution and the emission probability of 3H, 4He and 6He particles emitted in the spontaneous ternary fission of 244Cm (Eexc = 0 MeV) and in the neutron induced ternary fission of 243Cm (Eexc = 6.8 MeV). Both measurements were performed using suited ?E-E telescope detectors, at the IRMM (Geel, Belgium) for the spontaneous fission and at the ILL (Grenoble, France) for the neutron induced fission measurements. By combining these results with similar data obtained for the fissioning systems 246Cm and 248Cm, a different impact of the excitation energy on the emission probability of ternary alphas and tritons could be demonstrated, which is ascribed to the influence of the ?-cluster preformation probability on the ternary alpha emission.

Vermote, S.; Wagemans, C.; Serot, O.; Heyse, J.; Soldner, T.; Geltenbort, P.

2008-11-01

148

Ultraviolet Absorption Spectra and the Quasi-planarity of Pyridine and its d5 Isotopomer in its S1(?,?*) Excited State  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ultraviolet absorption spectra of pyridine-d0 and --d5 vapor have been recorded and analyzed in the 32,000 to 38,000 cm-1 region. The electronic band origins are at 34,767 (d0) and 34,945 cm-1 (d5) for the two isotopomers. For both molecules series of transitions for ?18, the out-of-plane ring-bending vibration, in the excited electronic state can be observed, and a one-dimensional potential energy function of the form V = ax^4 -- bx^2 can be determined, where x is the out-of-plane vibrational coordinate. In the S0 electronic ground state pyridine is rigid and planar with ?18 at 403 cm-1. In the S1(?,?*) excited state ?18 drops to 59.5 cm-1 and the molecule becomes floppy with a tiny barrier to planarity of 3 cm-1 resulting in a quasi-planar structure.

Boopalachandran, Praveen; McCann, Kathleen; Laane, Jaan

2007-10-01

149

Large endoscopic mucosal resection for colorectal tumors exceeding 4 cm  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and the outcome of endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for large colorectal tumors exceeding 4 cm (LCRT) undergoing piecemeal resection. METHODS: From January 2005 to April 2008, 146 digestive tumors larger than 2 cm were removed with the EMR technique in our department. Of these, 34 tumors were larger than 4 cm and piecemeal resection was carried out on 26 colorectal tumors. The mean age of the patients was 71 years. The mean follow-up duration was 12 mo. RESULTS: LCRTs were located in the rectum, left colon, transverse colon and right colon in 58%, 15%, 4% and 23% of cases, respectively. All were sessile tumors larger than 4 cm with a mean size of 4.9 cm (4-10 cm). According to the Paris classification, 34% of the tumors were type?Is, 58% type IIa, 4% type IIb and 4% type IIc. Pathological examination showed tubulous adenoma in 31%, tubulo-villous adenoma in 27%, villous adenoma in 42%, high-grade dysplasia in 38%, in situ carcinoma in 19% of the cases and mucosal carcinoma (m2) in 8% of the cases. The two cases (7.7%) of procedural bleeding that occurred were managed endoscopically and one small perforation was treated with clips. During follow-up, recurrence of the tumor occurred in three patients (12%), three of whom received endoscopic treatment. CONCLUSION: EMR for tumors larger than 4 cm is a safe and effective procedure that could compete with endoscopic submucosal dissection, despite providing incomplete histological assessment. PMID:20128027

Soune, Philippe Ah; Ménard, Charles; Salah, Ezzedine; Desjeux, Ariadne; Grimaud, Jean-Charles; Barthet, Marc

2010-01-01

150

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, a strongback lifts the S1 truss from the Guppy cargo carrier that protected it during flight and transfer. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss se gment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The tr uss is slated for flight in 2001

1999-01-01

151

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Operations and Checkout Building, a strongback is lowered toward the S1 truss below it in order to lift the truss from the Guppy cargo carrier that protected it during flight and transfer. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the International Space Station is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When full y outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001

1999-01-01

152

Balance of S1P1 and S1P2 signaling regulates peripheral microvascular permeability in rat cremaster muscle vasculature.  

PubMed

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates various molecular and cellular events in cultured endothelial cells, such as cytoskeletal restructuring, cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and intercellular junction interactions. We utilized the venular leakage model of the cremaster muscle vascular bed in Sprague-Dawley rats to investigate the role of S1P signaling in regulation of microvascular permeability. S1P signaling is mediated by the S1P family of G protein-coupled receptors (S1P(1-5) receptors). S1P(1) and S1P(2) receptors, which transduce stimulatory and inhibitory signaling, respectively, are expressed in the endothelium of the cremaster muscle vasculature. S1P administration alone via the carotid artery was unable to protect against histamine-induced venular leakage of the cremaster muscle vascular bed in Sprague-Dawley rats. However, activation of S1P(1)-mediated signaling by SEW2871 and FTY720, two agonists of S1P(1), significantly inhibited histamine-induced microvascular leakage. Treatment with VPC 23019 to antagonize S1P(1)-regulated signaling greatly potentiated histamine-induced venular leakage. After inhibition of S1P(2) signaling by JTE-013, a specific antagonist of S1P(2), S1P was able to protect microvascular permeability in vivo. Moreover, endothelial tight junctions and barrier function were regulated by S1P(1)- and S1P(2)-mediated signaling in a concerted manner in cultured endothelial cells. These data suggest that the balance between S1P(1) and S1P(2) signaling regulates the homeostasis of microvascular permeability in the peripheral circulation and, thus, may affect total peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:19011048

Lee, Jen-Fu; Gordon, Sharon; Estrada, Rosendo; Wang, Lichun; Siow, Deanna L; Wattenberg, Binks W; Lominadze, David; Lee, Menq-Jer

2009-01-01

153

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

Takeshita, Harunori [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)] [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Kitano, Masayasu, E-mail: mkitano6@hyo-med.ac.jp [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)] [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi [Department of Pharmacy, Hyogo University of Health Sciences, 1-3-6 Minatojima Kobe, Hyogo 650-8530 (Japan)] [Department of Pharmacy, Hyogo University of Health Sciences, 1-3-6 Minatojima Kobe, Hyogo 650-8530 (Japan); Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)] [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Miyazawa, Keiji [Discovery Research III, Research and Development, Kissei Pharmaceutical Company, 4365-1 Hodakakashiwara, Azumino, Nagano 399-8304 (Japan)] [Discovery Research III, Research and Development, Kissei Pharmaceutical Company, 4365-1 Hodakakashiwara, Azumino, Nagano 399-8304 (Japan); Hla, Timothy [Center for Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 69, NY 10065 (United States)] [Center for Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 69, NY 10065 (United States); Sano, Hajime [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)] [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)

2012-03-09

154

Characterization of the S=1 molecular magnetic chains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A numerical quantum transfer-matrix approach for the S=1 macroscopic chains with the single-site anisotropy and alternating bonds is worked out and a fit of the susceptibility data for the quasi-one-dimensional molecular magnets [Ni(dmen)(?-N3)2]n and [Ni(aep)(?-N3)2]n is performed in the region above the observed low-temperature minima.

Esposito, Filippo; Kamieniarz, Grzegorz

1998-04-01

155

Gutzwiller approach for elementary excitations in S = 1 antiferromagnetic chains  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a previous paper (Liu et al 2012 Phys. Rev. B 85 195144), a variational Monte Carlo method (based on Gutzwiller projected states) was generalized to S = 1 systems. This method provided very good trial ground states for the gapped phases of an S = 1 bilinear-biquadratic (BLBQ) Heisenberg chain. In this paper, we extend the approach to study the low-lying elementary excitations in S = 1 chains. We calculate the one-magnon and two-magnon excitation spectra of the BLBQ Heisenberg chain and the results agree very well with recent data in the literature. In our approach, the difference of the excitation spectrum between the Haldane phase and the dimer phase (such as the even/odd size effect) can be understood from their different topologies of the corresponding mean field theory. We especially study the Takhtajan-Babujian critical point. Despite the fact that the ‘elementary excitations’ are spin-1 magnons, which are different from the spin-1/2 spinons in Bethe solution, we show that the excitation spectrum, critical exponent (\\eta =0.74) and central charge (c = 1.45) calculated from our theory agree well with the Bethe ansatz solution and conformal field theory predictions.

Liu, Zheng-Xin; Zhou, Yi; Ng, Tai-Kai

2014-08-01

156

Fiber Bragg gratings for in-line dispersion compensation in cost-effective 10-7 Gbit\\/s long-haul transmission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the promising new developments towards cost-effective long-haul transmission are chirped multi-channel Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG). In this paper we discuss the feasibility of long-haul WDM optical transmission using only FBGs for in-line dispersion compensation. We show successful transmission of 32x10.7-Gbit\\/s NRZ modulated channels over 3,800-km using low group delay ripple slope-matched FBGs.

D. van den Borne; V. Veljanovski; E. Gottwald; G. D. Khoe; H. de Waardt

2006-01-01

157

VLA observations of Uranus at 1. 3-20 cm  

SciTech Connect

Observations of Uranus, obtained with resolution 0.5-1.2 arcsec at wavelengths 1.3, 2, 6, and 20 cm using the A and B configurations of the VLA in June-July 1982, October 1983, and February 1984, are reported. The disk-averaged brightness temperatures (DABTs) are determined by model fitting, and the results are presented in extensive graphs and contour maps and characterized in detail. Findings discussed include: (1) an overall spectrum which is relatively flat above 6 cm, (2) 1.3-6-cm brightness which is concentrated nearer to the pole than to the subsolar point, and (3) small changes in DABT from 1982 to 1983/1984 (consistent with an explanation based on a pole-equator temperature gradient). 16 references.

De Pater, I.; Gulkis, S.

1988-08-01

158

Structural silicone performance testing on 2 cm polished granite  

SciTech Connect

Polished granite panels, 91 cm (36 in.) x 152 cm (60 in.) x 2 cm (3/4 in.) were structurally attached with silicone adhesives to anodized aluminum frames and pressure tested to destruction after 21 days of cure and after six winters of exposed aging in Cold Spring, Minnesota. Silicone adhesives were tested for physical properties using an ASTM C1135 method both initially and after aging. Polished red granite samples were tested to a modified ASTM C880 dry and wet initially and after aging. Adhesive deflection was studied and reported along with ultimate loads required for destruction of the silicone attached granite panel. The structural silicone adhesives were found to be unaffected by the freeze-thaw cycling experienced by the panels. Ultimate performance of the aged composite panels were essentially unchanged from the initial performance. Flexural strength of the granite was found to have decreased over the test period.

Carbary, L.D. [Dow Corning Corp., Midland, MI (United States); Fulton, J.R. [Walters and Wolf Glass Co., Fremont, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

159

Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. The cycle life test results are presented along with results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

Wintucky, E. G.

1976-01-01

160

Cross section for {sup 246}Cm subbarrier fission  

SciTech Connect

The cross section for {sup 246}Cm fission induced by neutrons of energy in the range 0.1 eV-20 keV was measured by the neutron lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS-100) of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The parameters of the resonance area and of the fission width were evaluated for several low-lying s-wave neutron resonances. The parameters of the intermediate structure in the cross section for the subbarrier fusion of {sup 246}Cm nuclei were found. The results obtained in this way were compared with available experimental data and with recommended evaluated data.

Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Samylin, B. F.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S., E-mail: shorin@ippe.r [Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15

161

Evidence for live Cm-247 in the early solar system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Variations of the U-238/U-235 ratio in the Allende meteorite, ranging from -35% to +19% are interpreted as evidence of live Cm-247 in the early solar system. The amounts of these and other r-products in the solar system indicate values of (9000 + or - 3000) million years for the age of the Galaxy and approximately 8 million years for the time between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of meteoritic grains. Three possible explanations are presented for the different values of the latter time period which are indicated by the decay of products of Cm-247, Al-27, Pu-244, and I-129.

Tatsumoto, M.; Shimamura, T.

1980-01-01

162

Cross section for the subbarrier fission of {sup 244}Cm  

SciTech Connect

The cross section for {sup 244}Cm fission induced by neutrons of energy in the range between 0.07 eV and 20 keV was measured by using the lead slowing-down spectrometer (LSDS-100) of the Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow). The parameters of the resonance areas were determined for the lowest eight s-wave neutron resonances, and the respective fission widths were evaluated. Also, the parameters of the intermediate structure in the cross section for the subbarrier fission of {sup 244}Cm nuclei were evaluated. The results were compared with available data and recommendations based on evaluations.

Alekseev, A. A.; Bergman, A. A.; Berlev, A. I.; Koptelov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Samylin, B. F.; Svirin, M. I.; Trufanov, A. M.; Fursov, B. I.; Shorin, V. S., E-mail: shorin@ippe.r [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (Russian Federation)

2010-09-15

163

WSRC Am/Cm Stabilization Program - Cylindrical Induction Melter Studies  

SciTech Connect

1.1.1 Kilogram quantities of Americium and Curium isotopes (Am/Cm) have been produced at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina. These highly radioactive isotopes have both government and commercial value and are currently stored as a nitric acid solution at the Savannah River Site. The material represents the largest source term in the F canyon at SRS. It is proposed that the Am/Cm material be vitrified to stabilize the material for long term, recoverable storage. This paper reviews the progress made during the process development phase of this program using the Cylindrical Induction Melter.

Henderson, W.A.

1999-02-17

164

Evidence for live 247Cm in the early solar system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Variations of the 238U/235U ratio in the Allende meteorite, ranging from -35% to + 19%, are interpreted as evidence of live 247Cm in the early Solar System. The amounts of these and other r-products in the Solar System indicate values of (9,000??3,000) Myr for the age of the Galaxy and ??? 8 Myr for the time between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of meteoritic grains. Three possible explanations are presented for the different values of the latter time period which are indicated by the decay products of 247Cm, 26Al, 244Pu and 129I. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

Tatsumoto, M.; Shimamura, T.

1980-01-01

165

4000 cm D2 MAGNET D3 MAGNET  

E-print Network

FOR INSERTING BEAM PIPE 1300 cm A B C D E F H G X Z Y KLYSTRON ELECTRON GUN ACCELERATING TUBE VACUUM PUMP C1 200 400 600 800 4 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 (MeV) 0 100 200 300 400 7.8 8 8.2 (MeV) #12;#12;-1500 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500 -1500 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500 Z(cm) 0 2000 4000 6000 -1500 -1000 -500 0 500 1000 1500

Tokyo, University of

166

HI 21cm probes of reionization, and beyond  

E-print Network

I review the potential for observing cosmic reionization using the HI 21cm line of neutral hydrogren. Studies include observations of the evolution of large scale structure of the IGM (density, excitation temperature, and neutral fraction), through HI 21cm emission, as well as observations of small to intermediate scale structure through absorption toward the first discrete radio sources. I summarize predictions for the HI signals, then consider capabilities of facilities being built, or planned, to detect these signals. I also discuss the significant observational challenges.

C. L. Carilli

2005-09-02

167

21 cm radiation: A new probe of fundamental physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New low frequency radio telescopes currently being built open up the possibility of observing the 21 cm radiation from redshifts 200 > z > 30, also known as the dark ages, see Furlanetto, Oh, & Briggs(2006) for a review. At these high redshifts, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is absorbed by neutral hydrogen at its 21 cm hyperfine transition. This redshifted 21 cm signal thus carries information about the state of the early Universe and can be used to test fundamental physics. The 21 cm radiation probes a volume of the early Universe on kpc scales in contrast with CMB which probes a surface (of some finite thickness) on Mpc scales. Thus there is many orders of more information available, in principle, from the 21 cm observations of dark ages. We have studied the constraints these observations can put on the variation of fundamental constants (Khatri & Wandelt(2007)). Since the 21 cm signal depends on atomic physics it is very sensitive to the variations in the fine structure constant and can place constraints comparable to or better than the other astrophysical experiments (??/?= < 10-5) as shown in Figure 1. Making such observations will require radio telescopes of collecting area 10 - 106 km2 compared to ~ 1 km2 of current telescopes, for example LOFAR. We should also expect similar sensitivity to the electron to proton mass ratio. One of the challenges in observing this 21 cm cosmological signal is the presence of the synchrotron foregrounds which is many orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal but the two can be separated because of their different statistical nature (Zaldarriaga, Furlanetto, & Hernquist(2004)). Terrestrial EM interference from radio/TV etc. and Earth's ionosphere poses problems for telescopes on ground which may be solved by going to the Moon and there are proposals for doing so, one of which is the Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI). In conclusion 21 cm cosmology promises a large wealth of data and provides the only way to observe the redshift range between recombination and reionization.

Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

2010-11-01

168

Sorption of Cm(III) and Gd(III) onto gibbsite, alpha-Al(OH)(3): A batch and TRLFS study.  

PubMed

Gd(III) and Cm(III) sorption onto a pure aluminum hydroxide, gibbsite (alpha-Al(OH)(3)), is studied by batch experiments and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The experiments are conducted under argon atmosphere to exclude the influence of atmospheric CO(2) on solution and surface speciation. Batch experiments are done in two different electrolytes 0.1 M NaClO(4) and 0.1/0.01 M NaCl at a constant gibbsite concentration of 2.2 g/L. Gadolinium concentrations are varied from 6.4x10(-9) to 6.4x10(-5) M. pH-dependent sorption is found to be congruent at Gd(III) concentrations up to 6.4x10(-7) M and a shift of the pH edge to higher pH values is observed for higher metal ion concentrations. Type of background electrolyte anion and ionic strength do not affect the metal ion sorption. The spectroscopic investigations are performed with Cm(III) and gibbsite concentrations of 2x10(-7) M and 0.5 g/L, respectively. From the strongly red-shifted emission spectra two different inner-sphere surface complexes can be identified. A third species appearing at pH 6-11 is assigned to a coprecipitated or incorporated Cm(III) species. This incorporated species is most likely formed as a consequence of the applied experimental procedure. By continuously increasing the pH from 4 we move from high to low gibbsite solubility domains. As a result, aluminum hydroxide precipitates from oversaturated solutions, either covering already adsorbed curium or forming a Al/Cm(OH)(3) coprecipitate. Fluorescence lifetimes for the surface-bound Cm(III) complexes and the incorporated species are at 140-150 and 180-200 micros, respectively. Emission bands of the Cm(III) gibbsite surface complexes appear at comparable wavelengths as reported for Cm(III) species bound to aluminum oxides, e.g., gamma-Al(2)O(3); however, lifetimes are longer. This could presumably arise from either shorter binding distances of the Cm to Al-O sites or a coordination to more surface sites. PMID:19162273

Huittinen, N; Rabung, Th; Lützenkirchen, J; Mitchell, S C; Bickmore, B R; Lehto, J; Geckeis, H

2009-04-01

169

Limited (L4-S1, L5-S1) Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy for Reducing Spasticity in Cerebral Palsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  ?Selective posterior rhizotomy is effective for relieving spasticity associated with cerebral palsy. In current techniques\\u000a dorsal roots from L1\\/L2 to S1\\/S2 are selectively divided. With transoperative electromyography (EMG) significant sensory loss\\u000a has been prevented, but postoperative hypotonia following excessive reduction of the fusimotor drive is still of concern for\\u000a surgeons and therapists. To decrease the volume of deafferentiated rootlets we

J. A. Lazareff; M. A. Garcia-Mendez; R. De Rosa; Charles Olmstead

1999-01-01

170

Cosmological constraints from 21cm surveys after reionization  

SciTech Connect

21cm emission from residual neutral hydrogen after the epoch of reionization can be used to trace the cosmological power spectrum of density fluctuations. Using a Fisher matrix formulation, we provide a detailed forecast of the constraints on cosmological parameters that are achievable with this probe. We consider two designs: a scaled-up version of the MWA observatory as well as a Fast Fourier Transform Telescope. We find that 21cm observations dedicated to post-reionization redshifts may yield significantly better constraints than next generation Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. We find the constraints on ?{sub ?}, ?{sub m}h{sup 2}, and ?{sub ?}h{sup 2} to be the strongest, each improved by at least an order of magnitude over the Planck CMB satellite alone for both designs. Our results do not depend as strongly on uncertainties in the astrophysics associated with the ionization of hydrogen as similar 21cm surveys during the epoch of reionization. However, we find that modulation of the 21cm power spectrum from the ionizing background could potentially degrade constraints on the spectral index of the primordial power spectrum and its running by more than an order of magnitude. Our results also depend strongly on the maximum wavenumber of the power spectrum which can be used due to non-linearities.

Visbal, Eli [Jefferson Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Loeb, Abraham [Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wyithe, Stuart, E-mail: evisbal@fas.harvard.edu, E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: swyithe@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria (Australia)

2009-10-01

171

The 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the signature of a cosmic string wake in 21cm redshift surveys. Since 21cm surveys probe higher redshifts than optical large-scale structure surveys, the signatures of cosmic strings are more manifest in 21cm maps than they are in optical galaxy surveys. We find that, provided the tension of the cosmic string exceeds a critical value (which depends on both the redshift when the string wake is created and the redshift of observation), a cosmic string wake will generate an emission signal with a brightness temperature which approaches a limiting value which at a redshift of z+1 = 30 is close to 400 mK in the limit of large string tension. The signal will have a specific signature in position space: the excess 21cm radiation will be confined to a wedge-shaped region whose tip corresponds to the position of the string, whose planar dimensions are set by the planar dimensions of the string wake, and whose thickness (in redshift direction) depends on the string tension. For wakes created at z{sub i}+1 = 10{sup 3}, then at a redshift of z+1 = 30 the critical value of the string tension ? is G? = 6 × 10{sup ?7}, and it decreases linearly with redshift (for wakes created at the time of equal matter and radiation, the critical value is a factor of two lower at the same redshift). For smaller tensions, cosmic strings lead to an observable absorption signal with the same wedge geometry.

Brandenberger, Robert H.; Danos, Rebecca J.; Hernández, Oscar F.; Holder, Gilbert P., E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: rjdanos@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: oscarh@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: holder@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

2010-12-01

172

The 21cm Signature of a Cosmic String Loop  

E-print Network

Cosmic string loops lead to nonlinear baryon overdensities at early times, even before the time which in the standard LCDM model corresponds to the time of reionization. These overdense structures lead to signals in 21cm redshift surveys at large redshifts. In this paper, we calculate the amplitude and shape of the string loop-induced 21cm brightness temperature. We find that a string loop leads to a roughly elliptical region in redshift space with extra 21cm emission. The excess brightness temperature for strings with a tension close to the current upper bound can be as high as 1 degree K for string loops generated at early cosmological times (times comparable to the time of equal matter and radiation) and observed at a redshift of z + 1 = 30. The angular extent of these predicted "bright spots" is of the order 0.1 degree for a value of the string tension equal to the current upper bound. These signals should be detectable in upcoming high redshift 21cm surveys.

Pagano, Michael

2012-01-01

173

The 21 cm Signature of Cosmic String Wakes  

E-print Network

We discuss the signature of a cosmic string wake in 21cm redshift surveys. Since 21cm surveys probe higher redshifts than optical large-scale structure surveys, the signatures of cosmic strings are more manifest in 21cm maps than they are in optical galaxy surveys. We find that, provided the tension of the cosmic string exceeds a critical value (which depends on both the redshift when the string wake is created and the redshift of observation), a cosmic string wake will generate an emission signal with a brightness temperature which approaches a limiting value which at a redshift of $z + 1 = 30$ is close to 400 mK in the limit of large string tension. The signal will have a specific signature in position space: the excess 21cm radiation will be confined to a wedge-shaped region whose tip corresponds to the position of the string, whose planar dimensions are set by the planar dimensions of the string wake, and whose thickness (in redshift direction) depends on the string tension. For wakes created at $z_i + 1 ...

Brandenberger, Robert H; Hernandez, Oscar F; Holder, Gilbert P

2010-01-01

174

The 21 cm signature of a cosmic string loop  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic string loops lead to nonlinear baryon overdensities at early times, even before the time which in the standard LCDM model corresponds to the time of reionization. These overdense structures lead to signals in 21 cm redshift surveys at large redshifts. In this paper, we calculate the amplitude and shape of the string loop-induced 21 cm brightness temperature. We find that a string loop leads to a roughly elliptical region in redshift space with extra 21 cm emission. The excess brightness temperature for strings with a tension close to the current upper bound can be as high as 1deg K for string loops generated at early cosmological times (times comparable to the time of equal matter and radiation) and observed at a redshift of z+1 = 30. The angular extent of these predicted 'bright spots' is x{sup '}. These signals should be detectable in upcoming high redshift 21 cm surveys. We also discuss the application of our results to global monopoles and primordial black holes.

Pagano, Michael; Brandenberger, Robert, E-mail: paganom@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada)

2012-05-01

175

Selection between foreground models for global 21-cm experiments  

E-print Network

The precise form of the foregrounds for sky-averaged measurements of the 21-cm line during and before the epoch of reionization is unknown. We suggest that the level of complexity in the foreground models used to fit global 21-cm data should be driven by the data, under a Bayesian model selection methodology. A first test of this approach is carried out by applying nested sampling to simplified models of global 21-cm data to compute the Bayesian evidence for the models. If the foregrounds are assumed to be polynomials of order n in log-log space, we can infer the necessity to use n=4 rather than n=3 with <2h of integration with limited frequency coverage, for reasonable values of the n=4 coefficient. Using a higher-order polynomial does not necessarily prevent a significant detection of the 21-cm signal. Even for n=8, we can obtain very strong evidence distinguishing a reasonable model for the signal from a null model with 128h of integration. More subtle features of the signal may, however, be lost if the...

Harker, Geraint

2015-01-01

176

BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #19 [cm: Connective tissues  

E-print Network

ME411/511 BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #19 [cm: Connective tissues] General Objectives: Connective tissues are a group of tissues which bind structures together and provide a framework Mechanics of connective tissues and systems Central Framework: Connective tissues provide the mechanical

Sniadecki, Nathan J.

177

BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #19 [cm: Connective tissues  

E-print Network

ME498/599 BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #19 [cm: Connective tissues] General Objectives: Connective tissues are a group of tissues which bind structures together and provide a framework Mechanics of connective tissues and systems Central Framework: Connective tissues provide the mechanical

Sniadecki, Nathan J.

178

Search for Cm-248 in the early solar system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Possible evidence for the presence of Cm-248 in the early solar system was reported from fission gas studies (Rao and Gopalan, 1973) and recently from studies of very high nuclear track densities (not less than 5 x 10 exp 8/sq cm) in the merrillite of the H4 chondrite Forest Vale (F.V.) (Pellas et al., 1987). We report here an analysis of the isotopic abundances of xenon in F.V. phosphates and results of track studies in phosphate/pyroxene contacts. The fission xenon isotopic signature clearly identifies Pu-244 as the extinct progenitor. We calculate an upper limit Cm-248/Pu-244 to be less than 0.0015 at the beginning of Xe retention in F.V. phosphates. This corresponds to an upper limit of the ratio Cm-248/U-235 of not greater than 5 x 10 exp -5 further constraining the evidence for any late addition of freshly synthesized actinide elements just prior to solar system formation. The fission track density observed after annealing the phosphates at 290C (1 hr, which essentially erases spallation recoil tracks) is also in agreement with the Pu-244 abundance inferred from fission Xe. The spallation recoil tracks produced during the 76 Ma cosmic-ray exposure account for the very high track density in merrillites.

Lavielle, B.; Marti, K.; Pellas, P.; Perron, C.

1992-01-01

179

EXPERIMENTALLY DETERMINED PLASMA PARAMETERS IN A 30 CM ION ENGINE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single planar Langmuir probes and fiber optic probes are used to concurrently measure the plasma properties and neutral density variation in a 30cm diameter ion engine discharge chamber, from the immediate vicinity of the keeper to the near grid plasma region. The fiber optic probe consists of a collimated optical fiber recessed into a double bore ceramic tube fitted with

George Tynan; Russ Dorner

180

Retrofit and acceptance test of 30-cm ion thrusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Six 30 cm mercury thrusters were modified to the J-series design and evaluated using standardized test procedures. The thruster performance meets the design objectives (lifetime objective requires verification), and documentation (drawings, etc.) for the design is completed and upgraded. The retrofit modifications are described and the test data for the modifications are presented and discussed.

Poeschel, R. L.

1981-01-01

181

Electronic and magnetic properties of Am and Cm  

SciTech Connect

A review of the present status of the analyses of the optical spectra of Am and Cm in various oxidation states is given. From these analyses, the magnetic properties of the ground states of these ions can be determined. These predicted values are compared with the various magnetic measurements available.

Edelstein, N.

1985-02-01

182

Heterogeneous distribution of solar and cosmogenic noble gases in CM chondrites and implications for the formation of CM parent bodies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Distribution of solar, cosmogenic, and primordial noble gases in thin slices of Murchison, Murray, and Nogoya CM carbonaceous chondrites was determined by the laser microprobe analysis so as to put some constraints on the parent-body processes in the CM chondrite formation. The main lithological units of the three meteorite slices were located by electron microscope observations and classified into clastic matrix and clasts of primary accretionary rocks (PARs) based on the classification scheme of texture of CM chondrites. All sample slices contain both clastic matrix and PARs. Clastic matrix shows a comminuted texture formed by fragmentation and mechanical mixing of rocks due to impacts, whereas PARs preserve the original textures prior to the mechanical disruption. Solar-type noble gases are detected in all sample slices. They are located preferentially in clastic matrix. The distribution of solar gases is similar to that in ordinary chondrites where these gases reside in clastic dark portions of these meteorites. The heterogeneous distribution of solar gases in CM chondrites suggests that these gases were acquired not in a nebular accretion process but in parent body processes. Solar energetic particles (SEP) are predominant in CM chondrites. The low abundance of low energy solar wind (SW) component relative to SEP suggests preferential loss of SW from minerals comprising the clastic matrix, due to aqueous alteration in the parent bodies. Cosmogenic noble gases are also enriched in some portions in clastic matrix, indicating that some parts of clastic matrix were exposed to solar and galactic cosmic rays prior to the final consolidation of the CM parent bodies. Primordial noble gases are rich in fine-grained rims around chondrules in all three meteorites. However, average concentrations of heavy primordial gases in the rims differ among meteorites and correlate inversely to the degree of aqueous alteration that the meteorites have experienced. This appears to have been caused by aqueous alteration reactions between fluids and carbonaceous carrier phases of noble gases.

Nakamura, Tomoki; Nagao, Keisuke; Metzler, Knut; Takaoka, Nobuo

1999-01-01

183

Solid-state fluoroscopic imager for high-resolution angiography: Physical characteristics of an 8 cm×8 cm experimental prototype  

PubMed Central

In this paper, the performance of an 8 cm×8 cm three-side buttable charge-coupled device (CCD)-based imager specially designed for high-resolution fluoroscopy and operating in fluoroscopic (30 frames/second) mode is presented in terms of the presampling modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The 8 cm×8 cm CCD imager is coupled to a 450 ?m thick CsI:Tl scintillator by nondemagnifying (straight, 1:1) fiberoptics. The CCD imager has a fundamental pixel pitch of 39 ?m and incorporates an optically opaque interline (data) channel. The CCD imager was operated at 156 ?m pixel pitch by binning 4×4 adjacent pixels prior to readout. The fluoroscopic image lag was measured and accounted for in the DQE estimate to provide lag-corrected DQE. The measured limiting spatial resolution at 10% presampling MTF with the imager operated at 156 ?m pixel pitch (Nyquist sampling limit: 3.21 cy/mm) was 3.6 cy/mm. In the pulsed fluoroscopic mode, the first-frame image lag was less than 0.9%. The lag-corrected DQE(0) of ~0.62 was achieved even at a low fluoroscopic exposure rate of 1 ?R/frame. Grid phantom measurements indicate no appreciable distortion. Results from DQE and image lag measurements at fluoroscopic exposure rates combined with the high spatial resolution observed from the MTF suggest that this type of imager or its variants may be a potential candidate for high-resolution neuro-interventional imaging, cardiovascular imaging, pediatric angiography, and small animal imaging. Since the CCD is three-side buttable, four such CCD modules can be joined to form a 2×2 matrix providing a field of view of 16 cm×16 cm. PMID:15259649

Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; Suryanarayanan, Sankararaman; Onishi, Steven K.

2008-01-01

184

Measurement of the M1 amplitude and hyperfine mixing between the 6S1/2-7S1/2 caesium states  

E-print Network

transition 6S1/2-7S1/2 du Cs, par une méthode utilisant des effets d'interférence induits par effet Stark1/2-7S1/2 transition in Cs, by a method using Stark-induced interference effects, free from back

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

185

Surface ion transfer growth of ternary CdS1-xSex quantum dots and their electron transport modulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a surface ion transfer method to synthesise ternary alloy CdS1-xSex (0 <= x <= 1) quantum dots (QDs) in situ on TiO2 nanoparticles. By tuning the content of selenium in such quantum dots, the optical absorption spectra can be controllably widened to cover the most of the visible light range. The electron transport of such QDs can be modulated by changing the interfacial electronic energy between CdS1-xSex QDs and TiO2 nanoparticles. The QDs with optimized selenium content (x = 0.72) give a balance between a broad optical absorption and a suitable energy band alignment. The homogenous alloy CdS1-xSex QDs achieve a maximum light-harvesting efficiency over 90%, and generate a photocurrent density larger than 10 mA cm-2, which is 2.6- and 1.4-times that of binary CdS and CdSe QDs sensitized photovoltaic devices.We report a surface ion transfer method to synthesise ternary alloy CdS1-xSex (0 <= x <= 1) quantum dots (QDs) in situ on TiO2 nanoparticles. By tuning the content of selenium in such quantum dots, the optical absorption spectra can be controllably widened to cover the most of the visible light range. The electron transport of such QDs can be modulated by changing the interfacial electronic energy between CdS1-xSex QDs and TiO2 nanoparticles. The QDs with optimized selenium content (x = 0.72) give a balance between a broad optical absorption and a suitable energy band alignment. The homogenous alloy CdS1-xSex QDs achieve a maximum light-harvesting efficiency over 90%, and generate a photocurrent density larger than 10 mA cm-2, which is 2.6- and 1.4-times that of binary CdS and CdSe QDs sensitized photovoltaic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31703f

Chen, Zhenhua; Peng, Wenqin; Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Jing; Yanagida, Masatoshi; Han, Liyuan

2012-11-01

186

The 12 micron band of ethane: A spectral catalog from 765 cm(-1) to 900 cm(-1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high resolution laboratory absorption spectrum of the 12 micro band of ethane gas is studied. The data were obtained using the McMath Solar Telescope 1 meter Fourier Transform interferometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory and tunable diode laser spectrometers at the University of Tennessee and NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Over 200 individual vibration rotation transitions were analyzed taking into account many higher order effects including torsional splitting. Line positions were reproduced to better than 0.001/cm. Both ground and upper state molecular constants were determined in the analysis. The experimental details, the analysis procedures and the results are addressed. A list of ethane transitions occurring near (14)CO2 laser lines needed for heterodyne searches for C2H6 in extraterrestrial sources is also included. A spectral catalog of the ethane nu sub g fundamental from 765/cm to 900/cm is provided. A high dispersion (1/cm 12 in.) plot of both the Kitt Peak interferometric data and a simulated spectrum with Doppler limited resolution, a table of over 8500 calculated transitions listed quantum number assignments, frequencies and intensities are provided.

Atakan, A. K.; Blass, W. E.; Brault, J. W.; Daunt, S. J.; Halsey, G. W.; Jennings, D. E.; Reuter, D. C.; Susskind, J.

1983-01-01

187

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Escort vehicles prepare to leave the Shuttle Landing Facility with the S1 truss (at right) on its trek to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, seen in the background. The aircraft is uniquely built with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads and a 'fold-away' nose that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight

1999-01-01

188

Measurement of the WW production cross section in pp collisions at square root[s]=1.96 TeV.  

PubMed

We present a measurement of the W boson pair-production cross section in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. The data, collected with the Run II D0 detector at Fermilab, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 224-252 pb(-1) depending on the final state (ee, emu, or mumu). We observe 25 candidates with a background expectation of 8.1+/-0.6(stat)+/-0.6(syst)+/-0.5(lum) events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2.3x10(-7), equivalent to 5.2 standard deviations. The measurement yields a cross section of 13.8(+4.3)(-3.8)(stat)+1.2-0.9(syst)+/-0.9(lum) pb, in agreement with predictions from the standard model. PMID:15904132

Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveria Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P

2005-04-22

189

Lensing of 21-cm fluctuations by primordial gravitational waves.  

PubMed

Weak-gravitational-lensing distortions to the intensity pattern of 21-cm radiation from the dark ages can be decomposed geometrically into curl and curl-free components. Lensing by primordial gravitational waves induces a curl component, while the contribution from lensing by density fluctuations is strongly suppressed. Angular fluctuations in the 21-cm background extend to very small angular scales, and measurements at different frequencies probe different shells in redshift space. There is thus a huge trove of information with which to reconstruct the curl component of the lensing field, allowing tensor-to-scalar ratios conceivably as small as r~10(-9)-far smaller than those currently accessible-to be probed. PMID:23003237

Book, Laura; Kamionkowski, Marc; Schmidt, Fabian

2012-05-25

190

Boltzmann analysis of CM waveforms using virtual instrument software.  

PubMed

We describe a modification to our technique for the rapid analysis of low-frequency cochlear microphonic (CM) waveforms in the basal turn of the guinea pig cochlea (Patuzzi and Moleirinho, 1998). The transfer curve relating instantaneous sound pressure in the ear canal to instantaneous receptor current through the outer hair cells (OHCs) is determined from the distorted microphonic waveform generated in the extracellular fluid near the hair cells, assuming a first-order Boltzmann activation curve. Previously, the analysis was done in real time using custom-built electronic circuitry. Here, the same task is performed numerically using virtual instrument software (National Instruments LabVIEW 4.1) running on a personal computer. The assumed theoretical function describing the CM waveform is Vcm = Voff + Vsat/[1 + exp[(Eo+Z.Po.sin(2pi f + phi(tot)))/kT

Patuzzi, R B; O'Beirne, G A

1999-07-01

191

Studying 21cm power spectrum with one-point statistics  

E-print Network

The redshifted 21cm line signal from neutral hydrogens is a promising tool to probe the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization (EoR). Ongoing and future low-frequency radio experiments are expected to detect its fluctuations, especially through the power spectrum. In this paper, we give a physical interpretation of the time evolution of the power spectrum of the 21cm brightness temperature fluctuations, which can be decomposed into dark matter density, spin temperature and neutral fraction of hydrogen fluctuations. From the one-point statistics of the fluctuations, such as variance and skewness, we find that the peaks and dips in the time evolution are deeply related to X-ray heating of the intergalactic gas, which controls the spin temperature. We suggest the skewness of the brightness temperature distribution is a key observable to identify the onset of X-ray heating.

Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

2014-01-01

192

Performance of the NASA 30 cm Ion Thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster is under development at NASA to provide an ion propulsion option for missions of national interest, and is being proposed for use on the USAF/TRW Space Surveillance, Tracking and Autonomous Repositioning (SSTAR) platform to validate ion propulsion. The thruster incorporates innovations in design, materials, and fabrication techniques compared to those employed in conventional ion thrusters. Specific development efforts include thruster design optimizations, component life testing and validation, vibration testing, and performance characterizations. Under this test program, the ion thruster will be brought to engineering model development status. This paper discusses the performance and power throttling test data for the NASA 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster over an input power envelope of 0.7 to 4.9 kW, and corresponding thruster lifetime expectations.

Patterson, Michael J.; Haag, Thomas W.; Hovan, Scot A.

1993-01-01

193

Instrumental Simulations of the 21cm Epoch of Reionization Signal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Epoch of Reionization (EoR) represents an unexplored phase in early cosmic history when the light from the first galaxies and stars ionized the majority of the hydrogen in the universe. A powerful way of probing EoR fluctuations is by mapping the red-shifted 21cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen, and current telescope arrays such as the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and their recently funded successor, the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA) aim to do this. Because the detection of EoR requires the difficult isolation of a signal ?105 times fainter than galactic foregrounds, as well as unprecedented levels of sensitivity, it is important to develop realistic end-to-end simulations that accurately capture instrumental effects. Here we present simulation efforts within the HERA collaboration, demonstrating capabilities that will be necessary for a confirmed detection of the cosmological 21cm signal.

Cheng, Carina; Parsons, Aaron; Liu, Adrian; Zheng, Haoxuan; HERA Collaboration

2015-01-01

194

21 cm cosmology in the 21st century.  

PubMed

Imaging the Universe during the first hundreds of millions of years remains one of the exciting challenges facing modern cosmology. Observations of the redshifted 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen offer the potential of opening a new window into this epoch. This will transform our understanding of the formation of the first stars and galaxies and of the thermal history of the Universe. A new generation of radio telescopes is being constructed for this purpose with the first results starting to trickle in. In this review, we detail the physics that governs the 21 cm signal and describe what might be learnt from upcoming observations. We also generalize our discussion to intensity mapping of other atomic and molecular lines. PMID:22828208

Pritchard, Jonathan R; Loeb, Abraham

2012-08-01

195

Identifying Ionized Regions in Noisy Redshifted 21 cm Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which ~20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z ~ 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as ~150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam

2013-04-01

196

IDENTIFYING IONIZED REGIONS IN NOISY REDSHIFTED 21 cm DATA SETS  

SciTech Connect

One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which {approx}20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z {approx} 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as {approx}150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam, E-mail: mattma@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

2013-04-10

197

Semi-Lagrangian shallow water modeling on the CM-5  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the parallel implementation of a semi-Lagrangian shallow-water model on the massively parallel Connection Machine CM-5. The four important issues we address in this article are (i) two alternative formulations of the elliptic problem and their relative efficiencies, (ii) the performance of two successive orders of a generalized conjugate residual elliptic solver, (iii) the time spent in unstructured communication -- an unavoidable feature of semi-Lagrangian schemes, and (iv) the scalability of the algorithm.

Nadiga, B.T.; Margolin, L.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smolarkiewicz, P.K. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-09-01

198

Redshifted Neutral Hydrogen 21cm Absorption toward Red Quasars  

E-print Network

We have searched for redshifted neutral hydrogen 21cm absorption toward sources from the Stickel et al. `red quasar' sub-sample. Five of these red quasars have been searched for redshifted HI 21cm absorption to optical depth levels of a few percent, and four show strong absorption. This 80% success rate for the red quasars compares to the much lower success rate of only 11% for detecting HI 21cm absorption associated with optically selected Mg II absorption line systems. The large neutral hydrogen column densities seen toward the red quasars provide circumstantial evidence supporting the dust reddening hypothesis, as opposed to an intrinsically red spectrum for the AGN emission mechanism. The data on the red quasar sub-sample support the models of Fall and Pei for dust obscuration by damped Ly alpha absorption line systems and suggest that: (i) there may be a significant, but not dominant, population of quasars missing from optically selected samples due to dust obscuration, perhaps as high as 20% at the POSS limit for an optical sample with a redshift distribution similar to the 1 Jy, flat spectrum quasar sample, and (ii) optically selected samples may miss about half the high column density quasar absorption line systems. The redshifted HI 21cm absorption line detections are toward the sources: 0108+388 at z = 0.6685, 0500+019 at z = 0.5846, and 1504+377 at z = 0.6733. No absorption is seen toward 2149+056 at z = 0.740 at a level below that seen for the three detections. In some systems the absorbing gas is in the vicinity of the AGN, either circumnuclear material or material in the general ISM of the AGN's host galaxy, and in other systems the absorption is by gas associated with galaxies cosmologically distributed along the line of sight to the quasar.

C. L. Carilli; K. M. Menten; M. J. Reid; M. P. Rupen; M. S. Yun

1997-09-03

199

An autoguider system for the 40 CM Schmidt telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An autoguider system was constructed for the 40 cm Schmidt telescope at the Ouda Station. The sensor of the guider, a type ITT FW 130 image dissector, is attached to the guiding telescope. A microprocessor is introduced for processing the sensor output and for correcting the guiding error of the telescope. This enables the broadening of the objective prism spectra by a simple software. The microprocessor is used also for other auxiliary functions for the telescope control.

Ohtani, H.; Ichikawa, T.; Sasaki, T.; Saito, K.; Tsujimura, T.

1983-03-01

200

Bright Source Subtraction Requirements for Redshifted 21 cm Measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The H I 21 cm transition line is expected to be an important probe into the cosmic dark ages and epoch of reionization. Foreground source removal is one of the principal challenges for the detection of this signal. This paper investigates the extragalactic point source contamination and how accurately bright sources (gsim1 Jy) must be removed in order to detect 21 cm emission with upcoming radio telescopes such as the Murchison Widefield Array. We consider the residual contamination in 21 cm maps and power spectra due to position errors in the sky model for bright sources, as well as frequency-independent calibration errors. We find that a source position accuracy of 0.1 arcsec will suffice for detection of the H I power spectrum. For calibration errors, 0.05% accuracy in antenna gain amplitude is required in order to detect the cosmic signal. Both sources of subtraction error produce residuals that are localized to small angular scales, k bottom >~ 0.05 Mpc-1, in the two-dimensional power spectrum.

Datta, A.; Bowman, J. D.; Carilli, C. L.

2010-11-01

201

BRIGHT SOURCE SUBTRACTION REQUIREMENTS FOR REDSHIFTED 21 cm MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The H I 21 cm transition line is expected to be an important probe into the cosmic dark ages and epoch of reionization. Foreground source removal is one of the principal challenges for the detection of this signal. This paper investigates the extragalactic point source contamination and how accurately bright sources ({approx}>1 Jy) must be removed in order to detect 21 cm emission with upcoming radio telescopes such as the Murchison Widefield Array. We consider the residual contamination in 21 cm maps and power spectra due to position errors in the sky model for bright sources, as well as frequency-independent calibration errors. We find that a source position accuracy of 0.1 arcsec will suffice for detection of the H I power spectrum. For calibration errors, 0.05% accuracy in antenna gain amplitude is required in order to detect the cosmic signal. Both sources of subtraction error produce residuals that are localized to small angular scales, k{sub perpendicular} {approx}> 0.05 Mpc{sup -1}, in the two-dimensional power spectrum.

Datta, A. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Bowman, J. D. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Carilli, C. L., E-mail: adatta@nrao.ed [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

2010-11-20

202

Lobectomy vs. segmentectomy for NSCLC (T<2 cm)  

PubMed Central

The extent of surgical resection for peripheral clinical T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ?2 cm continues to be a matter of debate. Eighteen years ago, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) established lobectomy as the standard of care for peripheral clinical T1N0M0 NSCLC. However, numerous publications since then have reported similar outcomes for patients treated with segmentectomy or lobectomy for peripheral clinical T1N0M0 NSCLC 2 cm or smaller in size. The majority of these publications are retrospective studies. Two ongoing RCTs aim to resolve this debate, one in Japan and the other in the United States. This manuscript is a comprehensive review of the literature that compares lobectomy to segmentectomy for peripheral clinical T1N0M0 NSCLC 2 cm or smaller in size. Until data from the ongoing RCTs become available, this literature review provides the best evidence to guide the thoracic surgeon in the management of these patients. PMID:24790839

Swanson, Scott J.

2014-01-01

203

10.7 Gb/s uncompensated transmission over a 470 km hybrid fiber link with in-line SOAs using MLSE and duobinary signals.  

PubMed

We experimentally demonstrate uncompensated 8-channel wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and single channel transmission at 10.7 Gb/s over a 470 km hybrid fiber link with in-line semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). Two different forms of the duobinary modulation format are investigated and compared. Maximum Likelihood Sequence Estimation (MLSE) receiver technology is found to significantly mitigate nonlinear effects from the SOAs and to enable the long transmission, especially for optical duobinary signals derived from differential phase shift keying (DPSK) signals directly detected after narrowband optical filter demodulation. The MLSE also helps to compensate for a non-optimal Fabry-Perot optical filter demodulator. PMID:18825215

Downie, John D; Hurley, Jason; Mauro, Yihong

2008-09-29

204

New observation and combined analysis of the Cs20g (-), 0u (+), and 1g states at the asymptotes 6S1/2 + 6P1/2 and 6S1/2 + 6P3/2.  

PubMed

We report on new observations of the photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold cesium molecules using a highly sensitive detection technique and a combined analysis with all observed electronic states. The technique is achieved by directly modulating the frequency of the trapping lasers of a magneto-optical trap. New observations of the Cs2 0g (-), 0u (+), and 1g states at the asymptotes 6S1/2 + 6P1/2 and 6S1/2 + 6P3/2 are reported. The spectral range is extended to the red detuning of 112 cm(-1) below the 6S1/2 + 6P3/2 dissociation limit. Dozens of vibrational levels of the ultracold Cs2 0g (-), 0u (+), and 1g states are observed for the first time. The available experimental binding energies of these states are analyzed simultaneously in a framework of the generalized LeRoy-Bernstein theory and the almost degenerate perturbation theory by Marinescu and Dalgarno [Phys. Rev. A: At., Mol., Opt. Phys. 52, 311 (1995)]. The unique atomic-related parameter c3 governing the dispersion forces of all the molecular states is estimated as (10.29 ± 0.05) a.u. PMID:25554154

Ma, Jie; Liu, Wenliang; Yang, Jinxin; Wu, Jizhou; Sun, Weiguo; Ivanov, Valery S; Skublov, Alexei S; Sovkov, Vladimir B; Dai, Xingcan; Jia, Suotang

2014-12-28

205

Confinement and power balance in the S-1 spheromak  

SciTech Connect

The confinement and scaling features of the S-1 spheromak have been investigated using magnetic, spectroscopic, and Thomson scattering data in conjunction with numerical modeling. Results from the multipoint Thomson scattering diagnostic shows that the central beta remains constant (/beta//sub to/ /approximately/ 5%) as the plasma current density increases from 0.68--2.1 MA/m/sup 2/. The density is observed to increase slowly over this range, while the central electron temperature increases much more rapidly. Analysis of the global plasma parameters shows a decrease in the volume average beta and energy confinement as the total current is increased. The power balance has been modeled numerically with a 0-D non-equilibrium time-dependent coronal model and is consistent with the experimental observations. 20 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Levinton, F.M.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Mayo, R.M.; Janos, A.C.; Ono, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Yamada, M.

1989-07-01

206

Effect of anisotropy in the S=1 underscreened Kondo lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the effect of crystal field anisotropy in the underscreened S=1 Kondo lattice model. Starting from the two orbital Anderson lattice model and including a local anisotropy term, we show, through Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, that local anisotropy is equivalent to an anisotropic Kondo interaction (J??J?). The competition and coexistence between ferromagnetism and Kondo effect in this effective model is studied within a generalized mean-field approximation. Several regimes are obtained, depending on the parameters, exhibiting or not coexistence of magnetic order and Kondo effect. Particularly, we show that a re-entrant Kondo phase at low temperature can be obtained. We are also able to describe phases where the Kondo temperature is smaller than the Curie temperature (TK

Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simões, Acirete S.; Lacroix, Claudine; Iglesias, José Roberto; Coqblin, Bernard

2014-12-01

207

Relaxation mechanism of ?-carotene from S2 (1Bu(+)) state to S1 (2Ag(-)) state: femtosecond time-resolved near-IR absorption and stimulated resonance Raman studies in 900-1550 nm region.  

PubMed

Carotenoids have two major low-lying excited states, the second lowest (S2 (1Bu(+))) and the lowest (S1 (2Ag(-))) excited singlet states, both of which are suggested to be involved in the energy transfer processes in light-harvesting complexes. Studying vibrational dynamics of S2 carotenoids requires ultrafast time-resolved near-IR Raman spectroscopy, although it has much less sensitivity than visible Raman spectroscopy. In this study, the relaxation mechanism of ?-carotene from the S2 state to the S1 state is investigated by femtosecond time-resolved multiplex near-IR absorption and stimulated Raman spectroscopy. The energy gap between the S2 and S1 states is estimated to be 6780 cm(-1) from near-IR transient absorption spectra. The near-IR stimulated Raman spectrum of S2 ?-carotene show three bands at 1580, 1240, and 1050 cm(-1). When excess energy of 4000 cm(-1) is added, the S1 C?C stretch band shows a large upshift with a time constant of 0.2 ps. The fast upshift is explained by a model that excess energy generated by internal conversion from the S2 state to the S1 state is selectively accepted by one of the vibronic levels of the S1 state and is redistributed among all the vibrational modes. PMID:24844607

Takaya, Tomohisa; Iwata, Koichi

2014-06-12

208

Berberine reduces fibronectin expression by suppressing the S1P-S1P2 receptor pathway in experimental diabetic nephropathy models.  

PubMed

The accumulation of glomerular extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the critical pathological characteristics of diabetic renal fibrosis. Fibronectin (FN) is an important constituent of ECM. Our previous studies indicate that the activation of the sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1)-sphingosine 1- phosphate (S1P) signaling pathway plays a key regulatory role in FN production in glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) under diabetic condition. Among the five S1P receptors, the activation of S1P2 receptor is the most abundant. Berberine (BBR) treatment also effectively inhibits SphK1 activity and S1P production in the kidneys of diabetic models, thus improving renal injury. Based on these data, we further explored whether BBR could prevent FN production in GMCs under diabetic condition via the S1P2 receptor. Here, we showed that BBR significantly down-regulated the expression of S1P2 receptor in diabetic rat kidneys and GMCs exposed to high glucose (HG) and simultaneously inhibited S1P2 receptor-mediated FN overproduction. Further, BBR also obviously suppressed the activation of NF-?B induced by HG, which was accompanied by reduced S1P2 receptor and FN expression. Taken together, our findings suggest that BBR reduces FN expression by acting on the S1P2 receptor in the mesangium under diabetic condition. The role of BBR in S1P2 receptor expression regulation could closely associate with its inhibitory effect on NF-?B activation. PMID:22937115

Huang, Kaipeng; Liu, Weihua; Lan, Tian; Xie, Xi; Peng, Jing; Huang, Juan; Wang, Shaogui; Shen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Peiqing; Huang, Heqing

2012-01-01

209

Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Promotes Extravillous Trophoblast Cell Invasion by Activating MEK/ERK/MMP-2 Signaling Pathways via S1P/S1PR1 Axis Activation  

PubMed Central

Successful placentation depends on the proper invasion of extravillous trophoblast (EVT) cells into maternal tissues. Previous reports demonstrated that S1P receptors are expressed in the EVT cells and S1P could regulate migration and function of trophoblast cells via S1P receptors. However, little is known about roles of S1P in the invasion of EVT cells. Our study was performed to investigate S1P effect on the invasion of EVT cells. We used the extravillous trophoblast cell line HTR8/SVneo cells to evaluate the effect. In vitro invasion assay was employed to determine the invasion of HTR8/SVneo cells induced by S1P. MMP-2 enzyme activity and relative level in the supernatants of HTR8/SVneo was assessed by gelatin zymography and western blot. Based on the above, siRNA and specific inhibitors were used for the intervention and study of potential signal pathways, and Real-time qPCR and western blot were used to test the mRNA and protein level of potential signal targets. We found that S1P could promote HTR8/SVneo cell invasion and upregulates activity and level of MMP-2. The promotion requires activation of MEK-ERK and is dependent on the axis of S1P/S1PR1. Our investigation of S1P may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of EVT invasion. PMID:25188412

Yang, Weiwei; Li, Qinghua; Pan, Zhifang

2014-01-01

210

A polysaccharides MDG-1 augments survival in the ischemic heart by inducing S1P release and S1P1 expression.  

PubMed

Ophiopogon japonicus is a traditional Chinese medicine used to treat cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have confirmed the anti-ischemic properties of a water-soluble ?-D-fructan (MDG-1) from O. japonicus. The sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling pathway is involved in its cytoprotective effects. Herein, we explore the role of the S1P signaling pathway in the anti-ischemic effect of MDG-1 and assess one possible mechanism by which it induces S1P release and sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P(1)) expression in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) and cardiomyocytes. Our evidence demonstrates that MDG-1 promotes sphingosine kinase (SPHK) activity in HMEC-1 cells. An analytical method for measuring the mass of S1P using ESI/MS/MS was developed and we found that MDG-1 increases intracellular S1P levels. Meanwhile, MDG-1 is protective during hypoxia and ischemia through mechanisms that require S1P(1) receptor activation, which was confirmed both in oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and coronary artery ligation models by using transfection of cloned human S1P(1) receptor and RNA interference. These data indicate that the increase of intracellular S1P generation, particularly by activation of the SPHK enzyme, coupled with the autocrine and paracrine stimulation of cell surface S1P receptors, is a potential mechanism in the anti-ischemic and cell protective effect of MDG-1. PMID:22197795

Wang, Shuo; Lin, Xiao; Wang, Ling-Yi; Ruan, Ke-Feng; Feng, Yi; Li, Xiao-Yan

2012-04-01

211

The S1/S2 exciton interaction in 2-pyridone.6-methyl-2-pyridone: Davydov splitting, vibronic coupling, and vibronic quenching  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The excitonic splitting between the S1 and S2 electronic states of the doubly hydrogen-bonded dimer 2-pyridone.6-methyl-2-pyridone (2PY.6M2PY) is studied in a supersonic jet, applying two-color resonant two-photon ionization (2C-R2PI), UV-UV depletion, and dispersed fluorescence spectroscopies. In contrast to the C2h symmetric (2-pyridone)2 homodimer, in which the S1 ? S0 transition is symmetry-forbidden but the S2 ? S0 transition is allowed, the symmetry-breaking by the additional methyl group in 2PY.6M2PY leads to the appearance of both the S1 and S2 origins, which are separated by ?exp = 154 cm-1. When combined with the separation of the S1 ? S0 excitations of 6M2PY and 2PY, which is ? = 102 cm-1, one obtains an S1/S2 exciton coupling matrix element of VAB, el = 57 cm-1 in a Frenkel-Davydov exciton model. The vibronic couplings in the S1/S2 ? S0 spectrum of 2PY.6M2PY are treated by the Fulton-Gouterman single-mode model. We consider independent couplings to the intramolecular 6a' vibration and to the intermolecular ?' stretch, and obtain a semi-quantitative fit to the observed spectrum. The dimensionless excitonic couplings are C(6a') = 0.15 and C(?') = 0.05, which places this dimer in the weak-coupling limit. However, the S1/S2 state exciton splittings ?calc calculated by the configuration interaction singles method (CIS), time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF), and approximate second-order coupled-cluster method (CC2) are between 1100 and 1450 cm-1, or seven to nine times larger than observed. These huge errors result from the neglect of the coupling to the optically active intra- and intermolecular vibrations of the dimer, which lead to vibronic quenching of the purely electronic excitonic splitting. For 2PY.6M2PY the electronic splitting is quenched by a factor of ˜30 (i.e., the vibronic quenching factor is ?exp = 0.035), which brings the calculated splittings into close agreement with the experimentally observed value. The 2C-R2PI and fluorescence spectra of the tautomeric species 2-hydroxypyridine.6-methyl-2-pyridone (2HP.6M2PY) are also observed and assigned.

Heid, Cornelia G.; Ottiger, Philipp; Leist, Roman; Leutwyler, Samuel

2011-10-01

212

Jet-cooled fluorescence spectra and carbonyl wagging potential energy functions of tetrahydrofuran-3-one and tetrahydrothiophen-3-one in their S 1(n,??) excited states  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra of states of tetrahydrofuran-3-one and tetrahydrothiophen-3-one have been recorded and analyzed. The carbonyl inversion bands, which arise from double-minimum potential energy functions in the excited states, were fit with functions of the form V = ax4 - bx2 or V = cx2 + dexp(- fx2). The furanone was found to have an inversion barrier in the S 1(n,??) state of 1152 cm -1 (13.8 kJ mol -1) while the thiophenone has a barrier of 659 cm -1 (7.9 kJ mol -1). The two molecules have their potential energy minima for the S 1(n,??) state at carbonyl wagging angles of 26 and 20°, respectively. The results here, together with previous data for several other cyclic ketones, demonstrate that the inversion barrier increases with the ring angle strain at the ketone carbon atom.

Laane, Jaan; Sagear, Paul A.; Lee, S. N.

1997-06-01

213

Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Carrier-dependent Regulation of Endothelial Barrier  

PubMed Central

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a blood-borne lysosphingolipid that acts to promote endothelial cell (EC) barrier function. In plasma, S1P is associated with both high density lipoproteins (HDL) and albumin, but it is not known whether the carriers impart different effects on S1P signaling. Here we establish that HDL-S1P sustains EC barrier longer than albumin-S1P. We showed that the sustained barrier effects of HDL-S1P are dependent on signaling by the S1P receptor, S1P1, and involve persistent activation of Akt and endothelial NOS (eNOS), as well as activity of the downstream NO target, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Total S1P1 protein levels were found to be higher in response to HDL-S1P treatment as compared with albumin-S1P, and this effect was not associated with increased S1P1 mRNA or dependent on de novo protein synthesis. Several pieces of evidence indicate that long term EC barrier enhancement activity of HDL-S1P is due to specific effects on S1P1 trafficking. First, the rate of S1P1 degradation, which is proteasome-mediated, was slower in HDL-S1P-treated cells as compared with cells treated with albumin-S1P. Second, the long term barrier-promoting effects of HDL-S1P were abrogated by treatment with the recycling blocker, monensin. Finally, cell surface levels of S1P1 and levels of S1P1 in caveolin-enriched microdomains were higher after treatment with HDL-S1P as compared with albumin-S1P. Together, the findings reveal S1P carrier-specific effects on S1P1 and point to HDL as the physiological mediator of sustained S1P1-PI3K-Akt-eNOS-sGC-dependent EC barrier function. PMID:23135269

Wilkerson, Brent A.; Grass, G. Daniel; Wing, Shane B.; Argraves, W. Scott; Argraves, Kelley M.

2012-01-01

214

A Global Map of Titan's 13 cm Wavelength Radar Reflectivity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have used radar spectra of Titan obtained with the Arecibo Observatory's radar system to produce global maps of Titan's diffuse radar reflectivity at a wavelength of 13 cm in both circular polarizations. The data were obtained during oppositions of the Saturn system from 2000 through 2008 with sub-radar locations between latitudes 26S and 7S and well distributed in longitude [1,2]. The inversion method of Hudson and Ostro (1990) [3] was applied to reconstruct the global radar reflectivity at a resolution of roughly 10 degrees at equatorial latitudes. Titan's 13 cm radar spectrum is a combination of a specular component resulting from single surface reflections and a diffuse component resulting from multiple surface or volume scattering. The maps are constructed using only the diffuse component, which is assumed to dominate the full spectrum in the same circular (SC) polarization sense as transmitted, and at high incidence angles in the opposite circular sense (OC). The specular component, which appears in the OC polarization at low incidence angles around the sub-radar location, is not easily treated in this inversion method. The resulting reflectivity maps are compared to 2.2 cm wavelength radar reflectivity (cf. [4]) and radiometry (cf. [5]) maps from the Cassini RADAR instrument, smoothed to a similar resolution, in order to look for variations in surface structure as revealed by contrasts between these data sets. We acknowledge support from the NASA CDAP Program. Arecibo Observatory is part of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, operated by Cornell University under cooperative agreement with the NSF. [1] Black et al., 2010 Icarus, In press. [2] Campbell et al., 2003 Science 302, 431. [3] Hudson & Ostro, 1990, JGR 95, 10947. [4] Wye et al., 2007, Icarus 188, 367. [5] Janssen et al., 2009, Icarus 200, 222.

Black, Gregory J.

2010-10-01

215

Dynamin 2–dependent endocytosis is required for sustained S1PR1 signaling  

PubMed Central

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1PR1) is critical for lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs. Lymphocytes encounter low S1P concentrations near exit sites before transmigration, yet S1PR1 signaling is rapidly terminated after exposure to S1P. How lymphocytes maintain S1PR1 signaling in a low S1P environment near egress sites is unknown. Here we identify dynamin 2, an essential component of endocytosis, as a novel regulator of T cell egress. Mice with T cell–specific dynamin 2 deficiency had profound lymphopenia and impaired egress from lymphoid organs. Dynamin 2 deficiency caused impaired egress through regulation of S1PR1 signaling, and transgenic S1PR1 overexpression rescued egress in dynamin 2 knockout mice. In low S1P concentrations, dynamin 2 was essential for S1PR1 internalization, which enabled continuous S1PR1 signaling and promoted egress from both thymus and lymph nodes. In contrast, dynamin 2–deficient cells were only capable of a pulse of S1PR1 signaling, which was insufficient for egress. Our results suggest a possible mechanism by which T lymphocytes positioned at exit portals sense low S1P concentrations, promoting their egress into circulatory fluids. PMID:24638168

Ferguson, Shawn M.; Pereira, João P.; De Camilli, Pietro

2014-01-01

216

Thermoacoustic imaging of fresh prostates up to 6-cm diameter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thermoacoustic (TA) imaging provides a novel contrast mechanism that may enable visualization of cancerous lesions which are not robustly detected by current imaging modalities. Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most notorious example. Imaging entire prostate glands requires 6 cm depth penetration. We therefore excite TA signal using submicrosecond VHF pulses (100 MHz). We will present reconstructions of fresh prostates imaged in a well-controlled benchtop TA imaging system. Chilled glycine solution is used as acoustic couplant. The urethra is routinely visualized as signal dropout; surgical staples formed from 100-micron wide wire bent to 3 mm length generate strong positive signal.

Patch, S. K.; Hanson, E.; Thomas, M.; Kelly, H.; Jacobsohn, K.; See, W. A.

2013-03-01

217

Performance mapping of a 30 cm engineering model thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm thruster representative of the engineering model design has been tested over a wide range of operating parameters to document performance characteristics such as electrical and propellant efficiencies, double ion and beam divergence thrust loss, component equilibrium temperatures, operational stability, etc. Data obtained show that optimum power throttling, in terms of maximum thruster efficiency, is not highly sensitive to parameter selection. Consequently, considerations of stability, discharge chamber erosion, thrust losses, etc. can be made the determining factors for parameter selection in power throttling operations. Options in parameter selection based on these considerations are discussed.

Poeschel, R. L.; Vahrenkamp, R. P.

1975-01-01

218

30 cm Engineering Model thruster design and qualification tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of a 30-cm mercury electron bombardment Engineering Model ion thruster has successfully brought the thruster from the status of a laboratory experimental device to a point approaching flight readiness. This paper describes the development progress of the Engineering Model (EM) thruster in four areas: (1) design features and fabrication approaches, (2) performance verification and thruster to thruster variations, (3) structural integrity, and (4) interface definition. The design of major subassemblies, including the cathode-isolator-vaporizer (CIV), main isolator-vaporizer (MIV), neutralizer isolator-vaporizer (NIV), ion optical system, and discharge chamber/outer housing is discussed along with experimental results.

Schnelker, D. E.; Collett, C. R.

1975-01-01

219

The 100 cm solar telescope primary mirror study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The manufacturing impact of primary mirror configuration on the performance of a 100 cm aperture solar telescope was studied. Three primary mirror configurations were considered: solid, standard lightweight, and mushroom. All of these are of low expansion material. Specifically, the study consisted of evaluating the mirrors with regard to: manufacturing metrology, manufacturing risk factors and ultimate quality assessment. As a result of this evaluation, a performance comparison of the configurations was made, and a recommendation of mirror configuration is the final output. These evaluations, comparisons and recommendations are discussed in detail. Other investigations were completed and are documented in the appendices.

1975-01-01

220

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-290 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-290 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 290).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

221

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-302 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-302 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 302).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

222

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-296 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-296 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 296).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

223

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-292 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-292 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 292).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

224

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-306 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-306 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 306).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

225

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-310 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-310 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 310).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

226

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-324 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-324 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 324).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

227

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-287 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-287 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 287).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

228

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-323 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-323 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 323).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

229

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-325 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-325 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 325).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

230

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-312 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-312 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 312).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

231

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-311 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-311 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 311).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

232

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-289 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-289 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 289).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

233

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-315 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-315 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 315).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

234

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-304 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-304 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 304).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

235

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-286 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-286 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 286).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

236

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-308 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-308 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 308).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

237

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-314 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-314 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 314).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

238

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-320 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-320 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 320).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

239

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-294 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-294 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 294).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

240

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-305 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-305 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 305).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

241

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-313 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-313 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 313).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

242

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-300 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-300 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 300).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

243

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-298 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-298 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 298).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

244

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-307 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-307 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 307).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

245

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-288 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-288 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 288).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

246

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-299 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-299 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 299).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

247

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-291 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-291 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 291).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

248

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-301 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-301 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 301).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

249

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-322 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-322 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 322).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

250

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-316 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-316 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 316).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

251

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-318 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-318 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 318).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

252

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-293 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-293 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 293).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

253

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-295 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-295 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 295).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

254

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-326 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-326 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 326).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

255

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-317 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-317 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 317).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

256

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-321 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-321 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 321).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

257

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-309 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-309 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 309).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

258

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-319 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-319 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 319).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

259

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-297 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-297 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 297).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

260

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-303 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-303 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 303).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

261

Design of a 9 T 5 cm bore dipole  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design is presented for an accelerator dipole magnet intended for a collider application with central field of 9T and a coil bore diameter of 5 cm. Emphasis is on identifying a superconducting cable and a coil design that requires little development and which will result in a reasonable operating ''margin.'' Conventional NbTi superconducting cable is used, operating at 2 K to increase the critical current density. The cable and strand proposed are similar to designs now being manufactured for the SSC and the Tevatron. 4 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Taylor, C.E.; Caspi, S.

1988-07-01

262

Radiated and conducted EMI from a 30-cm ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to properly assess the interaction of a spacecraft with the EMI environment produced by an ion thruster, the EMI environment was characterized. Therefore, radiated and conducted emissions were measured from a 30-cm mercury ion thruster. The ion thruster beam current varied from zero to 2.0 amperes and the emissions were measured from 5 KHz to 200 MHz. Several different types of antennas were used to obtain the measurements. The various measurements that were made included: magnetic field due to neutralizer/beam current loop; radiated electric fields of thruster and plume; and conducted emissions on arc discharge, neutralizer keeper and magnetic baffle lines.

Whittlesey, A. C.; Peer, W.

1981-01-01

263

Long lifetime hollow cathodes for 30-cm mercury ion thrusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation of hollow cathodes for 30-cm Hg bombardment thrusters was carried out. Both main and neutralizer cathode configurations were tested with both rolled foil inserts coated with low work function material and impregnated porous tungsten inserts. Temperature measurements of an impregnated insert at various positions in the cathode were made. These, along with the cathode thermal profile are presented. A theory for rolled foil and impregnated insert operation and lifetime in hollow cathodes is developed. Several endurance tests, as long as 18000 hours at emission currents of up to 12 amps were attained with no degradation in performance.

Mirtich, M. J.; Kerslake, W. R.

1976-01-01

264

Pulsar distances estimated from the 21-cm absorption line  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The radial velocities of the 21-cm absorption lines in the spectra of the pulsars B1937+21, J0332+5434, J0738-4042, J0835-4510, J1559-4438, J1645-0317, J1752-2806, J1825-0935, and J2157+4017 have been measured. Distance estimates have been obtained for six of these objects. The observations were conducted on the 34-m radio telescope of the Kashima Space TechnologyCenter (Japan) and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in India. The data are in a good agreement with the results of other studies.

Rudnitskii, A. G.; Safutdinov, E. R.; Popov, M. V.; Oreshko, V. V.; Potapov, V. A.; Gupta, Y.; Sekido, M.; Takefuji, K.

2014-12-01

265

Electric prototype power processor for a 30cm ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electrical prototype power processor unit was designed, fabricated and tested with a 30 cm mercury ion engine for primary space propulsion. The power processor unit used the thyristor series resonant inverter as the basic power stage for the high power beam and discharge supplies. A transistorized series resonant inverter processed the remaining power for the low power outputs. The power processor included a digital interface unit to process all input commands and internal telemetry signals so that electric propulsion systems could be operated with a central computer system. The electrical prototype unit included design improvement in the power components such as thyristors, transistors, filters and resonant capacitors, and power transformers and inductors in order to reduce component weight, to minimize losses, and to control the component temperature rise. A design analysis for the electrical prototype is also presented on the component weight, losses, part count and reliability estimate. The electrical prototype was tested in a thermal vacuum environment. Integration tests were performed with a 30 cm ion engine and demonstrated operational compatibility. Electromagnetic interference data was also recorded on the design to provide information for spacecraft integration.

Biess, J. J.; Inouye, L. Y.; Schoenfeld, A. D.

1977-01-01

266

Presolar grains in the CM2 chondrite Sutter's Mill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AbstractThe Sutter's Mill (SM) carbonaceous chondrite is a regolith breccia, composed predominantly of <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 clasts with varying degrees of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. An investigation of presolar grains in four Sutter's Mill sections, SM43, SM51, SM2-4, and SM18, was carried out using NanoSIMS ion mapping technique. A total of 37 C-anomalous grains and one O-anomalous grain have been identified, indicating an abundance of 63 ppm for presolar C-anomalous grains and 2 ppm for presolar oxides. Thirty-one silicon carbide (SiC), five carbonaceous grains, and one Al-oxide (Al2O3) were confirmed based on their elemental compositions determined by C-N-Si and O-Si-Mg-Al isotopic measurements. The overall abundance of SiC grains in Sutter's Mill (55 ppm) is consistent with those in other <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. The absence of presolar silicates in Sutter's Mill suggests that they were destroyed by aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid. Furthermore, SM2-4 shows heterogeneous distributions of presolar SiC grains (12-54 ppm) in different matrix areas, indicating that the fine-grained matrix clasts come from different sources, with various thermal histories, in the solar nebula.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhao, Xuchao; Lin, Yangting; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Zhang, Jianchao; Hao, Jialong; Zolensky, Michael; Jenniskens, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1980257"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measuring the Cosmological 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Monopole with an Interferometer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A measurement of the cosmological 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal remains a promising but as-of-yet unattained ambition of radio astronomy. A positive detection would provide direct observations of key unexplored epochs of our cosmic history, including the cosmic dark ages and reionization. In this paper, we concentrate on measurements of the spatial monopole of the 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> brightness temperature as a function of redshift (the "global signal"). Most global experiments to date have been single-element experiments. In this paper, we show how an interferometer can be designed to be sensitive to the monopole mode of the sky, thus providing an alternate approach to accessing the global signature. We provide simple rules of thumb for designing a global signal interferometer and use numerical simulations to show that a modest array of tightly packed antenna elements with moderately sized primary beams (full-width-half-max of $\\sim$40$^\\circ$) can compete with typical single-element experiments in their ability to constrain phenomenologi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Presley, Morgan; Parsons, Aaron</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050207466&hterms=Plasma+Physics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3D%2522Plasma%2BPhysics%2522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of an 8-<span class="hlt">cm</span> Diameter Ion Source System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Results of tests characterizing an 8-<span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter ion source are presented. The tests were conducted in three separate vacuum test facilities at the University of Alabama-Huntsville, Colorado State University, and L3 Communications' ETI division. Standard ion optics tests describing electron backstreaming and total-voltage-limited impingement current behavior as a function of beam current were used as guidelines for selecting operating conditions where more detailed ion beam measurements were performed. The ion beam was profiled using an in-vacuum actuating probe system to determine the total ion current density and the ion charge state distribution variation across the face of the ion source. Both current density and ExB probes were utilized. The ion current density data were used to obtain integrated beam current, beam flatness parameters, and general beam profile shapes. The ExB probe data were used to determine the ratio of doubly to singly charged ion current. The ion beam profile tests were performed at over six different operating points that spanned the expected operating range of the DAWN thrusters being developed at L3. The characterization tests described herein reveal that the 8-<span class="hlt">cm</span> ion source is suitable for use in (a) validating plasma diagnostic equipment, (b) xenon ion sputtering and etching studies of spacecraft materials, (c) plasma physics research, and (d) the study of ion thruster optics at varying conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Zhongmin; Hawk, C. W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Buttweiler, Mark S.; Williams, John D.; Buchholtz, Brett</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010mss..confETE06O"> <span id="translatedtitle">New Measurements of H2 16O Line Intensities around 8800 <span class="hlt">CM</span>-1 and 1300 <span class="hlt">CM</span>-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A precise knowledge of spectroscopic parameters for atmospheric molecules is necessary for the control and the modelling of the Earth's atmosphere. The water vapor take a special key as it participate to the global radiative balance of the atmosphere. Our laboratory is engaged since many years in the study of H216O vapor and its isotopologues [1, 2, 3]. An important work has been already made in the spectral region of 4000 to 6600 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 [3] and it continues now in the following spectral window : 6600-9000 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. We have focused on the lines around 8800 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1, as the latest version of HITRAN database still relies on the work of Mandin et al. performed in 1988 [4, 5]. We have recorded several spectra of water vapor with our step-by-step Fourier Transform Spectrometer built in our laboratory [6, 7]. We present here our intensity measurements compared to recent literature data [8] and HITRAN2008 database. Also we have performed a study around 1300 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. The precise knowledge of water vapor for this spectral range is very useful for inversion of IASI spectra. We show some comparisons between our new intensity measurements and LISA database, HITRAN2004, and recent literature data [9]. References: [1] M. Carleer, A. Jenouvrier, A.-C. Vandaele, M.-F. Mérienne, R. Colin, N. F. Zobov, O. L. Polyansky, J. Tennyson and V. A. Savin, J. Chem Phys 111 (1999) 2444-2450. [2] M.-F. Mérienne, A. Jenouvrier, C. Hermans, A.-C. Vandaele, M. Carleer, C. Clerbaux, P.-F. Coheur, R. Colin, S. Fally, M. Bachc J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Trans. 82 (2003) 99-117. [3] A. Jenouvrier, L. Daumont, L. RÉgalia-Jarlot, Vl. G. Tyuterev, M. Carleer, A. C. Vandaele, S. Mikhailenko and S. Fally, JQSRT, 105 (2007) 326-355. [4] J.-Y. Mandin, J.-P. Chevillard, J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, Can. J. Phys, 66 (1988) 997-1011. [5] J.-Y. Mandin, J.-P. Chevillard, J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, J. Mol. Spectrosc, 132 (1988) 352-360. [6] J-J. Plateaux, A. Barbe and A. Delahaigue, Spectrochim. Acta, 51A (1995) 1169-1153 [7] L. Régalia, Thesis, Reims, 1996 (France). [8] R. N. Tolchenov, J. Tennyson, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 231 (2005) 23-27. [9] L.H. Coudert, G.Wagner, M.Birk, U.I. Baranov, M.J. Lafferty, J-M. Flaud, J. Mol. Spect, 251 (2008) 357-339</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oudot, C.; Regalia, L.; Le Wang; Daumont, L.; Thomas, X.; von der Heyden, P.; Decatoire, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014IJMPA..2945003O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Confinement on R3 × <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: Continuum and lattice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There has been substantial progress in understanding confinement in a class of four-dimensional SU(N) gauge theories using semiclassical methods. These models have one or more compact directions, and much of the analysis is based on the physics of finite temperature gauge theories. The topology R3 × <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> has been most often studied using a small compactification circumference L such that the running coupling g2(L) is small. The gauge action is modified by a double-trace Polyakov loop deformation term, or by the addition of periodic adjoint fermions. The additional terms act to preserve Z(N) symmetry and thus confinement. An area law for Wilson loops is induced by a monopole condensate. In the continuum, the string tension can be computed analytically from topological effects. Lattice models display similar behavior, but the theoretical analysis of topological effects is based on Abelian lattice duality rather than on semiclassical arguments. In both cases, the key step is reducing the low-energy symmetry group from SU(N) to the maximal Abelian subgroup U(1)N-1 while maintaining Z(N) symmetry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ogilvie, Michael C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1410.1860v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Confinement on $R^{3}\\times <span class="hlt">S</span>^{<span class="hlt">1</span>}$: continuum and lattice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There has been substantial progress in understanding confinement in a class of four-dimensional SU(N) gauge theories using semiclassical methods. These models have one or more compact directions, and much of the analysis is based on the physics of finite-temperature gauge theories. The topology $R^{3}\\times <span class="hlt">S</span>^{<span class="hlt">1</span>}$ has been most often studied, using a small compactification circumference $L$ such that the running coupling $g^{2}\\left(L\\right)$ is small. The gauge action is modified by a double-trace Polyakov loop deformation term, or by the addition of periodic adjoint fermions. The additional terms act to preserve $Z(N)$ symmetry and thus confinement. An area law for Wilson loops is induced by a monopole condensate. In the continuum, the string tension can be computed analytically from topological effects. Lattice models display similar behavior, but the theoretical analysis of topological effects is based on Abelian lattice duality rather than on semiclassical arguments. In both cases the key step is reducing the low-energy symmetry group from $SU(N)$ to the maximal Abelian subgroup $U(1)^{N-1}$ while maintaining $Z(N)$ symmetry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Michael C. Ogilvie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-07</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750007664&hterms=Triple&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DTriple%2Bx"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studies of internal sputtering in a 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Initial studies have been made of the sputtering and deposition phenomena in a 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> thruster. Sputtering rates, of the cathode baffle, one of the main sources of sputtered material in a thruster, have been measured by weight loss as a function of several thruster parameters. Sputtering rates were found to increase with both cathode flow rate and beam current when constant discharge voltage of 37 volts and power loses of 185 ev/ion were maintained. Sputtering rates were reduced 24% as discharge voltage was decreased from 37 to 33 volts while keeping discharge power constant. Qualitative agreement was found between sputtering rates obtained by the weight loss and those implied by spectroscopically observed line intensities of the excited iron sputtered atoms. After the completion of the sputtering tests, deposition and sputtering sites inside the thruster were identified.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mantenieks, M. A.; Rawlin, V. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009PhRvD..80f3535G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Forecasted 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> constraints on compensated isocurvature perturbations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A “compensated” isocurvature perturbation consists of an overdensity (or underdensity) in the cold dark matter which is completely cancelled out by a corresponding underdensity (or overdensity) in the baryons. Such a configuration may be generated by a curvaton model of inflation if the cold dark matter is created before curvaton decay and the baryon number is created by the curvaton decay (or vice versa). Compensated isocurvature perturbations, at the level producible by the curvaton model, have no observable effect on cosmic microwave background anisotropies or on galaxy surveys. They can be detected through their effect on the distribution of neutral hydrogen between redshifts 30-300 using 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption observations. However, to obtain a good signal to noise ratio, very large observing arrays are needed. We estimate that a fast Fourier transform telescope would need a total collecting area of about 20 square kilometers to detect a curvaton generated compensated isocurvature perturbation at more than 5 sigma significance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gordon, Christopher; Pritchard, Jonathan R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21300962"> <span id="translatedtitle">Gravitational-wave detection using redshifted 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> observations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A gravitational-wave traversing the line of sight to a distant source produces a frequency shift which contributes to redshift space distortion. As a consequence, gravitational waves are imprinted as density fluctuations in redshift space. The gravitational-wave contribution to the redshift space power spectrum has a different {mu} dependence as compared to the dominant contribution from peculiar velocities. This, in principle, allows the two signals to be separated. The prospect of a detection is most favorable at the highest observable redshift z. Observations of redshifted 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> radiation from neutral hydrogen hold the possibility of probing very high redshifts. We consider the possibility of detecting primordial gravitational waves using the redshift space neutral hydrogen power spectrum. However, we find that the gravitational-wave signal, though present, will not be detectable on superhorizon scales because of cosmic variance and on subhorizon scales where the signal is highly suppressed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bharadwaj, Somnath [Department of Physics and Meteorology, I.I.T., Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Centre for Theoretical Studies, I.I.T., Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Guha Sarkar, Tapomoy [Centre for Theoretical Studies, I.I.T., Kharagpur, 721302 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750015607&hterms=Alan+Schoenfeld&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DAlan%2BSchoenfeld"> <span id="translatedtitle">Power processor for a 30<span class="hlt">cm</span> ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thermal vacuum power processor for the NASA Lewis 30<span class="hlt">cm</span> Mercury Ion Engine was designed, fabricated and tested to determine compliance with electrical specifications. The power processor breadboard used the silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) series resonant inverter as the basic power stage to process all the power to an ion engine. The power processor includes a digital interface unit to process all input commands and internal telemetry signals so that operation is compatible with a central computer system. The breadboard was tested in a thermal vacuum environment. Integration tests were performed with the ion engine and demonstrate operational compatibility and reliable operation without any component failures. Electromagnetic interference data were also recorded on the design to provide information on the interaction with total spacecraft.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biess, J. J.; Inouye, L. Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0612769v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitude-resolved imaging of Jupiter at lambda = 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a technique for creating a longitude-resolved image of Jupiter's thermal radio emission. The technique has been applied to VLA data taken on 25 January 1996 at a wavelength of 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. A comparison with infrared data shows a good correlation between radio hot spots and the 5 micron hot spots seen on IRTF images. The brightest spot on the radio image is most likely the hot spot through which the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere. We derived the ammonia abundance (= volume mixing ratio) in the hot spot, which is ~ 3 x 10^{-5}, about half that seen in longitude-averaged images of the NEB, or less than 1/3 of the longitude-averaged ammonia abundance in the EZ. This low ammonia abundance probably extends down to at least the 4 bar level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. Sault; C. Engel; Imke de Pater</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7066626"> <span id="translatedtitle">Very Large Array observations of Uranus at 2. 0 <span class="hlt">cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Radio observations of Uranus obtained at 2.0 <span class="hlt">cm</span> with the B configuration of the VLA during April 1985 are reported. The calibration and data-reduction procedures are described in detail, and the results are presented in tables, maps, and graphs and compared with IRIS 44-micron observations (Hanel et al., 1986). Features discussed include highest brightness centered on the pole rather than on the subearth point, a decrease in brightness temperature (by up to 9 K) at latitudes between -20 and -50 deg (well correlated with the IRIS data), and disk-center position (corrected for the observed radio asymmetry) in good agreement with that found on the basis of the outer contours of the image. 15 references.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Berge, G.L.; Muhleman, D.O.; Linfield, R.P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AAS...22531801L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improving Cosmic Microwave Background Constraints with 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> Cosmology</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">As measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) become increasingly precise, it becomes necessary to search for qualitatively new ways to reduce uncertainties and degeneracies in cosmological constraints. One such source of uncertainty and degeneracy is reionization, which produces free electrons in the intergalactic medium that dampen CMB anisotropies through scattering. Currently, this is accounted for by the optical depth parameter, which must be fit for in the CMB data as a nuisance parameter, resulting in increases in the final uncertainties of other cosmological parameters. In this talk, we show how direct observations of reionization using the redshifted 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> line allow the CMB optical depth to be predicted and removed as a nuisance parameter from CMB studies. We discuss how this is relatively robust to the astrophysical uncertainties of reionization, and forecast the ability of arrays such as the recently funded Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) to improve CMB constraints.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Adrian; Pritchard, Jonathan R.; Mortonson, Michael; Parsons, Aaron; HERA Collaboration</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19770030138&hterms=bode+plot&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dbode%2Bplot"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compensated control loops for a 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The vaporizer dynamic control characteristics of a 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter mercury ion thruster were determined by operating the thruster in an open loop steady state mode and then introducing a small sinusoidal signal on the main, cathode, or neutralizer vaporizer current and observing the response of the beam current, discharge voltage, and neutralizer keeper voltage, respectively. This was done over a range of frequencies and operating conditions. From these data, Bode plots for gain and phase were made and mathematical models were obtained. The Bode plots and mathematical models were analyzed for stability and appropriate compensation networks determined. The compensated control loops were incorporated into a power processor and operated with a thruster. The time responses of the compensated loops to changes in set points and recovery from arc conditions are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robson, R. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020062709&hterms=ion+current+density+centerline+thruster+causes+effect+screen+aperture+size+ion-optics&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dion%2Bcurrent%2Bdensity%2Bcenterline%2Bthruster%2Bcauses%2Beffect%2Bscreen%2Baperture%2Bsize%2Bion-optics"> <span id="translatedtitle">Translation Optics for 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Ion Engine Thrust Vector Control</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Data were obtained from a 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> xenon ion thruster in which the accelerator grid was translated in the radial plane. The thruster was operated at three different throttle power levels, and the accelerator grid was incrementally translated in the X, Y, and azimuthal directions. Plume data was obtained downstream from the thruster using a Faraday probe mounted to a positioning system. Successive probe sweeps revealed variations in the plume direction. Thruster perveance, electron backstreaming limit, accelerator current, and plume deflection angle were taken at each power level, and for each accelerator grid position. Results showed that the thruster plume could easily be deflected up to six degrees without a prohibitive increase in accelerator impingement current. Results were similar in both X and Y direction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haag, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' 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src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JAHH...13...43B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wilhelm Tempel and his 10.8-<span class="hlt">cm</span> Steinheil Telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The German astronomer Ernst Wilhelm Leberecht Tempel (1821-1889) owed most of his successes to a 10.8-<span class="hlt">cm</span> Steinheil refractor, which he bought in 1858. A lithographer, without an academic foundation, but with a strong passion for astronomy, Tempel had sharp eyesight and a talent for drawing, and he discovered with his telescope many celestial objects, including asteroids, comets (most notably, 9 P/Tempel 1) and the Merope Nebula in the Pleiades. Tempel carried his telescope with him throughout his moves in France and Italy. The telescope is now conserved in Florence, at the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, where Tempel was astronomer from 1875 until the end of his life. Using unpublished material from the Arcetri Historical Archive, as well as documents from other archives and published material, we trace the history of the telescope and its use during and after Tempel's life, and describe its recent rediscovery and status.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bianchi, Simone; Gasperini, Antonella; Galli, Daniele; Palla, Francesco; Brenni, Paolo; Giatti, Anna</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740005390&hterms=battery+cathode+texture&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dbattery%2Bcathode%2Btexture"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hollow cathode restartable 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of substituting high perveance dished grids for low perveance flat ones on performance variables and plasma properties within a 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> modified SERT II thruster are discussed. Results suggest good performance may be achieved as an ion thruster is throttled if the screen grid transparency is decreased with propellant flow rate. Thruster startup tests, which employ a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode between the keeper and the cathode to initiate the discharge, are described. High startup reliability at cathode tip temperatures of about 500 C without excessive component wear over 2000 startup cycles is demonstrated. Testing of a single cusp magnetic field concept of discharge plasma containment is discussed. A theory which explains the observed behavior of the device is presented and proposed thruster modifications and future testing plans are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilbur, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3623934"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sphingosine 1-Phosphate induces filopodia formation through <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2R activation of ERM proteins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Previously we demonstrated that the sphingolipids ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) regulate phosphorylation of the ERM family of cytoskeletal proteins [1]. Herein, we show that exogenously applied or endogenously generated <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P (in a sphingosine kinase-dependent manner) result in significant increases in phosphorylation of ERM proteins as well as filopodia formation. Utilizing phosphomimetic and non-phosphorylatable ezrin mutants, we show that the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-induced cytoskeletal protrusions are dependent on ERM phosphorylation. Employing various pharmacological <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor agonists and antagonists, along with small interfering RNA techniques and genetic knockout approaches, we identify the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P Receptor 2 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2R) as the specific and necessary receptor to induce phosphorylation of ERM proteins and subsequent filopodia formation. Taken together, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism by which <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P regulates cellular architecture that requires <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2R and subsequent phosphorylation of ERM proteins. PMID:23106337</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gandy, K. Alexa Orr; Canals, Daniel; Adada, Mohamad; Wada, Masayuki; Roddy, Patrick; Snider, Ashley J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23622430"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of the surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) due to the 1574 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mode of benzenethiol using low-power (<20 mW) CW diode lasers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) from a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of benzenethiol on a silver-coated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been measured for the 1574 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) SERS mode. A value of 9.6 ± 1.7×10(-14) W was determined for the resonant component of the SECARS signal using 17.8 mW of 784.9 nm pump laser power and 7.1 mW of 895.5 nm Stokes laser power; the pump and Stokes lasers were polarized parallel to each other but perpendicular to the grooves of the diffraction grating in the spectrometer. The measured value of resonant component of the SECARS signal is in agreement with the calculated value of 9.3×10(-14) W using the measured value of 8.7 ± 0.5 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) for the SERS linewidth ? (full width at half-maximum) and the value of 5.7 ± 1.4×<span class="hlt">10(-7</span>) for the product of the Raman cross section ?SERS and the surface concentration Ns of the benzenethiol SAM. The xxxx component of the resonant part of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility |3 ?xxxx((3)R)| for the 1574 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) SERS mode has been determined to be 4.3 ± 1.1×10(-5) <span class="hlt">cm</span>·g(-1)·s(2). The SERS enhancement factor for the 1574 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) mode was determined to be 3.6 ± 0.9×<span class="hlt">10(7</span>) using the value of 1.8×10(15) molecules/<span class="hlt">cm</span>(2) for Ns. PMID:23622430</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aggarwal, Roshan L; Farrar, Lewis W; Greeneltch, Nathan G; Van Duyne, Richard P; Polla, Dennis L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://calpolynews.calpoly.edu/cpreport/13_reports/oct-9-print.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 1 of 7 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2013 3:21 PM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 2 of 7 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2013 3:21 PM #12;Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 3 of 7 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2013 3</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sze, Lawrence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19547300"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental study of SBS mitigation and transmission improvement from cross-phase modulation in <span class="hlt">10.7</span> Gb/s unrepeatered systems.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We experimentally study the effects of cross-phase modulation and stimulated Brillouin scattering limitations in long unrepeatered transmission systems at <span class="hlt">10.7</span> Gb/s. We find significant SBS suppression in wavelength-division multiplexed systems and investigate system performance for different numbers of channels and channel spacing. We find greater than 4 orders of magnitude improvement in bit error rate (BER) with a WDM system in comparison to single channel transmission due to SBS impairment mitigation. Unrepeatered transmission over 323 km with a simple system configuration using low-attenuation fiber, NRZ modulation, and only EDFA amplification is demonstrated with more than 5 dB system margin over the forward error correction (FEC) threshold. PMID:19547300</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Downie, John D; Hurley, Jason</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19434196"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">10.7</span> Gb/s electronic predistortion transmitter using commercial FPGAs and D/A converters implementing real-time DSP for chromatic dispersion and SPM compensation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present an experimental demonstration of simultaneous chromatic dispersion and self-phase modulation compensation at <span class="hlt">10.7</span> Gb/s using real-time electronic digital signal processing. This was achieved using a pre-distorting transmitter based on commercially available field programmable gate arrays and 21.4 GS/s, 6-bit resolution digital-to-analog converters. The digital signal processing employed look-up tables stored in RAM. This resulted in the achievement of a BER of 10(-6) at an OSNR of 16 dB after transmission over a 450 km link of uncompensated standard single mode fiber with + 4 dBm launch power. PMID:19434196</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Waegemans, Robert; Herbst, Stefan; Holbein, Ludwig; Watts, Philip; Bayvel, Polina; Fürst, Cornelius; Killey, Robert I</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22327632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photochemistry and photophysics of the endoperoxide of mesodiphenylhelianthrene: a contribution to the localization of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(?*?*) state of aromatic endoperoxides.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The endoperoxide of mesodiphenylhelianthrene MDHPO has been studied in detail with respect to fluorescence and photo-induced rearrangement. MDHPO proved to be non-fluorescent, although its absorption spectrum is dominated at the low energy side by a strong ??* band with a maximum at 429.5 nm. Irradiation of that band effects rearrangement to the corresponding diepoxide MDHDO, a reaction typical for <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)(?*?*) excited endoperoxides (EPOs). The absorption spectrum of the product MDHDO is blue shifted by only 3.5 nm. MDHDO has the same extended planar aromatic system like its precursor MDHPO, but MDHDO fluoresces strongly. These results set the excitation energy of the <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)(?*?*) state of MDHPO to ?23?000 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1), which is considered to be a generally realistic value of the <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)(?*?*) state energy of aromatic EPOs. The main reaction of <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)(?*?*) excited MDHPO is, however, chemical deactivation to ground state MDHPO via an oxygen biradical. The sequence of O-O bond opening and closing is the general way of repopulation of the S(0) state of aromatic EPOs from <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)(?*?*) excited states. PMID:22327632</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmidt, Reinhard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/86/86/49/PDF/art_3A10.1051_2Fdst_2F2010033.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ORIGINAL ARTICLE Extreme frequencies of the <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein "null" variant</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">; crude protein, casein and pH. The mean casein micelle size was larger in milks containing <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-caseinORIGINAL ARTICLE Extreme frequencies of the <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein "null" variant in milk from Norwegian dairy June 2010 / Published online: 2 August 2010 # INRA, EDP Sciences, 2010 Abstract Caprine <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.inria.fr/docs/00/89/37/33/PDF/hal-00893733.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Mendelian polymorphism underlying quantitative variations of goat ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Mendelian polymorphism underlying quantitative variations of goat ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein F. GROSCLAUDE- les, designated a,,-Cn'-, ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CnF and ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-Cno, were identified at the goat a!-Cn locus superiority in casein content of milks from goats possessing the allele</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boyer, Edmond</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010snhs.conf..126R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for <span class="hlt">S</span> = -<span class="hlt">1</span>, -2 Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ?N spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the ?+p(3<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, T = 3/2)- and ?N(1S0,T = l/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010IJMPE..19.2418R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for <span class="hlt">S</span> = -<span class="hlt">1</span>, -2 Systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ?N spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the ?+p(3<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>,T = 3/2)- and ?N(1S0,T = 1/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.sci.utah.edu/publications/muralidhara11/Muralidhara_PLoSOne2011-appendix.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Muralidhara, Gross, Gutell & Alter (2011) PLoS One | Supplementary Appendix <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> | A-1 Supplementary Figures <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>S17</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Figures <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>­S17 Figure <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Significant 16S eigenpositions and their correlations with the NCBI Taxonomy;A-2 | alterlab.org/rRNA/ Muralidhara, Gross, Gutell & Alter (2011) Figure S2. Significant 23S Taxonomy Browser [19] (Figure S3). (b) Raster display of the 25 most significant 23S eigenpositions</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Utah, University of</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140003129&hterms=history&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dhistory"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Are Space Exposure Histories Telling Us about <span class="hlt">CM</span> Carbonaceous Chondrites?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chondrites are chemically primitive and carbonaceous (C) chondrites are potentially the most primitive among them because they mostly escaped thermal metamor-phism that affected the other chondrite groups and ratios of their major, non-volatile and most of the volatile elements are similar to those of the Sun. Therefore, C chondrites are ex-pected to retain a good record of the origin and early history of the solar system. Carbonaceous chondrites are chemically differentiated from other chondrites by their high Mg/Si ratios and refractory elements, and have experienced various degrees of aqueous alteration. They are subdivided into eight subgroups (CI, <span class="hlt">CM</span>, CO, CV, CK, CR, CB and CH) based on major element and oxygen isotopic ratios. Their elemental ratios spread over a wide range though those of ordinary and enstatite chondrites are relatively uniform. It is critical to know how many sepa-rate bodies are represented by the C chondrites. In this study, <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites, the most abundant carbona-ceous chondrites, are examined. They are water-rich, chon-drule- and CAI-bearing meteorites and most of them are brec-cias. High-temperature components such as chondrules, iso-lated olivine and CAIs in CMs are frequently altered and some of them are replaced by clay minerals and surrounded by sul-fides whose Fe was derived from mafic silicates. On the basis of degrees of aqueous alteration, CMs have been classified into subtypes from 1 to 2, although Rubin et al. [1] assigned subtype 1 to subtype 2 and subtype 2 to subtype 2.6 using various petrologic properties. The classification is based on petrographic and mineralogic properties. For example, though tochilinite (2[(Fe, Mg, Cu, Ni[])<span class="hlt">S</span>] <span class="hlt">1</span>.57-1.85 [(Mg, Fe, Ni, Al, Ca)(HH)2]) clumps are produced during aqueous alteration, they disappear and sulfide appears with increasing degrees of aqueous alteration. Cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age measurements of <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites reveal an unusual feature. Though CRE ages of other chondrite groups range from several Myr to tens of Myr, CMs exposure ages are not longer than 7 Myr with one-third of the <span class="hlt">CM</span> having less than 1 Myr CRE age. For those <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites that have CRE ages <1 Myr, there are two discern-able CRE peaks. Because a CRE age reflects how long a me-teorite is present as a separate body in space, the peaks pre-sumably represent collisional events on the parent body (ies) [2]. In this study we defined 4 distinct CRE age groups of CMs and systematically characterized the petrography in each of the 4 CRE age groups to determine whether the groups have significant petrographic differences, with such differences probably reflecting different parent body (asteroid) geological processing, or multiple original bodies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takenouchi, A.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M.; Velbel, M. A.; Ross, K.; Zolensky, P.; Le, L.; Imae, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070023371&hterms=ion+current+density+centerline+thruster+causes&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dion%2Bcurrent%2Bdensity%2Bcenterline%2Bthruster%2Bcauses"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimentally Determined Plasma Parameters in a 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Ion Engine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Single planar Langmuir probes and fiber optic probes are used to concurrently measure the plasma properties and neutral density variation in a 30<span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter ion engine discharge chamber, from the immediate vicinity of the keeper to the near grid plasma region. The fiber optic probe consists of a collimated optical fiber recessed into a double bore ceramic tube fitted with a stainless steel light-limiting window. The optical fiber probe is used to measure the emission intensity of excited neutral xenon for a small volume of plasma, at various radial and axial locations. The single Langmuir probes, are used to generate current-voltage characteristics at a total of 140 spatial locations inside the discharge chamber. Assuming a maxwellian distribution for the electron population, the Langmuir probe traces provide spatially resolved measurements of plasma potential, electron temperature, and plasma density. Data reduction for the NSTAR TH8 and TH15 throttle points indicates an electron temperature range of 1 to 7.9 eV and an electron density range of 4e10 to le13 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(sup -3), throughout the discharge chamber, consistent with the results in the literature. Plasma potential estimates, computed from the first derivative of the probe characteristic, indicate potential from 0.5V to 11V above the discharge voltage along the thruster centerline. These values are believed to be excessively high due to the sampling of the primary electron population along the thruster centerline. Relative neutral density profiles are also obtained with a fiber optic probe sampling photon flux from the 823.1 nm excited to ground state transition. Plasma parameter measurements and neutral density profiles will be presented as a function of probe location and engine discharge conditions. A discussion of the measured electron energy distribution function will also be presented, with regards to variation from pure maxwellian. It has been found that there is a distinct primary population found along the thruster centerline, which causes estimates of electron temperature, electron density, and plasma potential, to err on the high side, due this energetic population. Computation of the energy distribution fimction of the plasma clearly indicates the presence of primaries, whose presence become less obvious with radial distance from the main discharge plume.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sengupta, Anita; Goebel, Dan; Fitzgerald, Dennis; Owens, Al; Tynan, George; Dorner, Russ</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015A%26A...574A..56G"> <span id="translatedtitle">A 1.3 <span class="hlt">cm</span> line survey toward IRC +10216</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Context. IRC +10216 is the prototypical carbon star exhibiting an extended molecular circumstellar envelope. Its spectral properties are therefore the template for an entire class of objects. Aims: The main goal is to systematically study the ? ~ 1.3 <span class="hlt">cm</span> spectral line characteristics of IRC +10216. Methods: We carried out a spectral line survey with the Effelsberg-100 m telescope toward IRC +10216. It covers the frequency range between 17.8 GHz and 26.3 GHz (K-band). Results: In the circumstellar shell of IRC +10216, we find 78 spectral lines, among which 12 remain unidentified. The identified lines are assigned to 18 different molecules and radicals. A total of 23 lines from species known to exist in this envelope are detected for the first time outside the solar system and there are additional 20 lines first detected in IRC +10216. The potential orgin of "U" lines is also discussed. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), we then determine rotational temperatures and column densities of 17 detected molecules. Molecular abundances relative to H2 are also estimated. A non-LTE analysis of NH3 shows that the bulk of its emission arises from the inner envelope with a kinetic temperature of 70 ± 20 K. Evidence for NH3 emitting gas with higher kinetic temperature is also obtained, and potential abundance differences between various 13C-bearing isotopologues of HC5N are evaluated. Overall, the isotopic 12C/13C ratio is estimated to be 49 ± 9. Finally, a comparison of detected molecules in the ? ~ 1.3 <span class="hlt">cm</span> range with the dark cloud TMC-1 indicates that silicate-bearing molecules are more predominant in IRC +10216. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgSpectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/574/A56</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gong, Y.; Henkel, C.; Spezzano, S.; Thorwirth, S.; Menten, K. M.; Wyrowski, F.; Mao, R. Q.; Klein, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16833992"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large amplitude out-of-plane vibrations of 1,3-benzodioxole in the S0 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> states: an analysis of fluorescence and excitation spectra by ab initio calculations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the analytical expressions of the two-dimensional potential energy surfaces (PES) spanned by the puckering and flapping vibrations in the S0 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> states of 1,3-benzodioxole (BDO). Both PES are obtained from S0 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> energies computed on a grid of 2500 molecular geometries at the CASPT2 level. Both the S0 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> PES are anharmonic, and the planar geometry corresponds to a barrier that separates two minima at nonplanar geometries along the puckering/flapping deformations. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the mixed puckering/flapping modes are calculated by the Meyer flexible model. Improved vibronic levels, in better agreement with the observed spectra, are obtained by suitably optimized CASPT2 surfaces. To assign the lower-energy (0-500 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1)) portion of emission and absorption spectra, we evaluate the band intensities by estimating the Franck-Condon factors between the puckering/flapping eigenvectors of the S0 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> states. From these calculations, we obtain a satisfactory assignment of the ground state IR spectra and of the fluorescence excitation spectrum. Both assignments are supported by the analysis of the vibrational structures of several single vibronic level (SVL) fluorescence spectra. The successful interpretation of these spectra shows that the S0 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> PES that we derive for BDO are substantially correct. The barrier heights in the two states are similar: 125.7 and 190.4 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) in S0 and in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, respectively. In S0, the barrier is associated essentially with the puckering motion. In <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, it involves to a considerable extent also the flapping coordinate, whose vibrational frequency is much lower in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> than in S0. This fact introduces a substantial Duschinsky effect in the S0-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> transitions of BDO. PMID:16833992</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Emanuele, Emanuela; Orlandi, Giorgio</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850004629&hterms=Pnh&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3DPnh"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ion thruster system (8-<span class="hlt">cm</span>) cyclic endurance test</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the qualification test of an Engineering-Model 5-mN-thrust 8-<span class="hlt">cm</span>-diameter mercury ion thruster which is representative of the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) thrusters. Two of these thrusters are scheduled for future flight test. The cyclic endurance test described herein was a ground-based test performed in a vacuum facility with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled cryo-surface and a frozen mercury target. The Power Electronics Unit, Beam Shield, Gimal, and Propellant Tank that were used with the thruster in the endurance test are also similar to those of the IAPS. The IAPS thruster that will undergo the longest beam-on-time during the actual space test will be subjected to 7,055 hours of beam-on-time and 2,557 cycles during the flight test. The endurance test was successfully concluded when the mercury in the IAPS Propellant Tank was consumed. At that time, 8,471 hours of beam-on-time and 599 cycles had been accumulated. Subsequent post-test-evaluation operations were performed (without breaking vacuum) which extended the test values to 652 cycles and 9,489 hours of beam-on-time. The Power Electronic Unit (PEU) and thruster were in the same vacuum chamber throughout the test. The PEU accumulated 10,268 hr of test time with high voltage applied to the operating thruster or dummy load.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dulgeroff, C. R.; Beattie, J. R.; Poeschel, R. L.; Hyman, J., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040129576&hterms=ion+current+density+centerline+thruster+causes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dion%2Bcurrent%2Bdensity%2Bcenterline%2Bthruster%2Bcauses"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance and Vibration of 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Pyrolytic Ion Thruster Optics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Carbon has a sputter erosion rate about an order of magnitude less than that of molybdenum, over the voltages typically used in ion thruster applications. To explore its design potential, 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> pyrolytic carbon ion thruster optics have been fabricated geometrically similar to the molybdenum ion optics used on NSTAR. They were then installed on an NSTAR Engineering Model thruster, and experimentally evaluated over much of the original operating envelope. Ion beam currents ranged from 0.51 to 1.76 Angstroms, at total voltages up to 1280 V. The perveance, electron back-streaming limit, and screen-grid transparency were plotted for these operating points, and compared with previous data obtained with molybdenum. While thruster performance with pyrolytic carbon was quite similar to that with molybdenum, behavior variations can reasonably be explained by slight geometric differences. Following all performance measurements, the pyrolytic carbon ion optics assembly was subjected to an abbreviated vibration test. The thruster endured 9.2 g(sub rms) of random vibration along the thrust axis, similar to DS 1 acceptance levels. Despite significant grid clashing, there was no observable damage to the ion optics assembly.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haag, Thomas; Soulas, George C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA....13411Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Towards the 1-<span class="hlt">cm</span> goal: characterizing Jason orbit error</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Jason-1, launched on December 7, 2001, is continuing the time series of centimeter level ocean topography observations as the follow-on to the highly successful TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P) mission. The precision orbit determination (POD) is a critical component to meeting the ocean topography goals of the mission. Fortunately, Jason-1 POD can rely on four independent tracking data types available including near continuous tracking data from the dual frequency codeless BlackJack GPS receiver. Orbit solutions computed using individual and various combinations of GPS, SLR and DORIS data types have been determined from over 180 days of Jason-1 tracking data. Analysis of current solution performance indicates the 1-<span class="hlt">cm</span> radial orbit accuracy goal is close to being met. For example, the GPS dynamic solutions which overlap by 6-hours, show radial orbit differences of 7 mm, and show SLR high elevation fits of 14 mm. The reduced-dynamic solutions show even better performance. Sources of orbit error include the mis-modeling of gravity, tides, non-conservative forces, and the tracking measurement. Analysis of orbit differences, tracking and altimeter data residuals, and recovered accelerations are used to identify and characterize error remaining in the Jason orbit.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zelensky, N. P.; Luthcke, S. B.; Lemoine, F. G.; Rowlands, D. D.; Beckley, D. B.; Williams, T. A.; Chinn, D. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987EM%26P...37...59T"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-resolution lunar radar map at 70-<span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">New radar observations of the moon in 1981-1984 were made using the 430 MHz (70 <span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength) radar at the Arecibo observatory, Puerto Rico. The new observations have produced a high resolution lunar radar map with radar cell-sizes near 2-5 km. This new resolution is a three-fold improvement over the previous mapping done in the late 1960's. Since the Arecibo radar antenna beam is only ten arc-minutes (about one-third of the width of the lunar disk), this new map is a mosaic of some eighteen observations. A radar-metric control between the various pieces of the mosaic was obtained via a 'beam-swing', limb-to-limb calibration. When the limb-to-limb calibration was combined with the mosaic, there were significant radar scattering differences across the maria. Eastern Mare Tranquillitatis and western Oceanus Procellarum have weaker echoes than other maria, while the central portion of Mare Serenitatis and northern Mare Imbrium have stronger echoes. There is a radar scattering difference across the southern terra as areas nearer Mare Orientale have stronger echoes than areas further from Mare Orientale.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, T. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1977558"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sensitivity for 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> Bispectrum from Epoch of Reionization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> line brightness temperature brings rich information about Epoch of Reionizaton (EoR) and high-$z$ universe (Cosmic Dawn and Dark Age). While the power spectrum is a useful tool to investigate the EoR signal statistically, higher-order statistics such as bispectrum are also valuable because the EoR signal is expected to be highly non-Gaussian. In this paper, we develop a formalism to calculate the bispectrum contributed from the thermal noise taking array configularion of telescopes into account, by extending a formalism for the power spectrum \\cite{2006ApJ...653..815M}. We apply our formalism to the ongoing and future telescopes such as expanded Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We find that expanded MWA does not have enough sensitivity to detect the bispectrum signal. On the other hand, LOFAR has better sensitivity and will be able to detect the peaks of the bispectrum as a function of redshift at large scales with comoving wavenumber $k \\...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshiura, Shintaro; Takahashi, Keitaro; Momose, Rieko; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Imai, Hiroshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AN....334.1115R"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Monitoring Telescope of the Universitätssternwarte Bochum</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The new 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Bochum Monitoring Telescope (BMT) has started routine operation at the Universitätssternwarte Bochum (USB), located near Cerro Armazones in Chile. It has a 41' {×} 27' field of view (FoV) and is equipped with B and V broad band filters and three narrow band filters at 670, 680, and 690 nm. This makes the BMT ideally suited to perform photometric reverberation mapping of the H? emission line of active galactic nuclei, where the line is redshifted into the narrow bands, and to monitor bright stars which would be saturated with large telescopes. As a complement to our Robotic Bochum Twin Telescope (RoBoTT) with 2.7° FoV and 14 filters, the BMT is an efficient instrument to accurately study the variability of individual sources, provided that its smaller FoV covers a sufficient number of suitable comparison stars. Here we describe the telescope and its fully robotic operation, and present science verification data demonstrating the performance of the BMT.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ramolla, M.; Drass, H.; Lemke, R.; Westhues, C.; Pozo Nuñez, F.; Barr Dominguez, A.; Haas, M.; Chini, R.; Murphy, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014acm..conf..397O"> <span id="translatedtitle">TRAPPIST monitoring of comets C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of a dense photometric monitoring of comets C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (Ison) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) using narrow-band cometary filters and the 60-<span class="hlt">cm</span> TRAPPIST robotic telescope [1]. We were able to isolate the emission of the OH, NH, CN, C_2, and C_3 radicals for both comets as well as the dust continuum in four bands. By applying a Haser model [2] and fitting the observed profiles, we derive gas production rates. From the continuum bands, we computed the dust Af? parameters [3]. We were able to follow the evolution of the gas and dust activity of these comets for weeks, looking for changes with the heliocentric distance, study the coma morphology, and analyze their composition and dust coma properties. Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) was observed about three times a week from October 12 (r=1.43 au) to November 23, 2013. It was then at a heliocentric distance of 0.33 au, only five days before perihelion, when it disintegrated. This dense monitoring allowed us to detect fast changes of the cometary activity. We observed a slowly rising activity in October and early November, and two major outbursts around November 13 and November 19 [4], the gas and dust production rates being multiplied by at least a factor of five during each outburst and then slowly decreasing in the following days. These outbursts were correlated with changes in gas-production-rate ratios. The coma morphology study revealed strong jets in both gas and dust filters. Since the comet was very active in November, we were even able to detect OH jets in our images. Comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) was observed before perihelion from September 9 (r=1.94 au) to November 16 (r=1.12 au), 2013 when the comet was too far North. We recovered the comet post-perihelion on February 13 (r=1.24 au), 2014 and planned to observe it until May (r=2.5 au) with narrow-band filters. We compare the evolution of gas and dust activity as well as the evolution of gas production rates ratios on both sides of perihelion. The morphological study of both gas and dust coma we already performed on pre-perihelion images revealed structures in gas and dust filters. We compare the gas and dust features in all filters and study their evolution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Opitom, C.; Jehin, E.; Manfroid, J.; Hutsemékers, D.; Gillon, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0507282v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">The subpulse modulation properties of pulsars at 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of a systematic, unbiased search for subpulse modulation of 187 pulsars performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) in the Netherlands at an observing wavelength of 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. Using new observations and archival WSRT data we have expanded the list of pulsars which show the drifting subpulse phenomenon by 42, indicating that at least one in three pulsars exhibits this phenomenon. The real fraction of pulsars which show the drifting phenomenon is likely to be larger than some 55%. The majority of the analysed pulsars show subpulse modulation (170), of which the majority were not previously known to show subpulse modulation and 30 show clear systematic drifting. The large number of new drifters we have found allows us, for the first time, to do meaningful statistics on the drifting phenomenon. We find that the drifting phenomenon is correlated with the pulsar age such that drifting is more likely to occur in older pulsars. Pulsars which drift more coherently seem to be older and have a lower modulation index. There is no significant correlation found between P3 and other pulsar parameters (such as the pulsar age), as has been reported in the past. There is no significant preference of drift direction and the drift direction is not found to be correlated with pulsar parameters. None of the four complexity parameters predicted by different emission models (Jenet & Gil 2003) are shown to be inconsistent with the set of modulation indices of our sample of pulsars. Therefore none of the models can be ruled out based on our observations. We also present results on some interesting new individual sources like a pulsar which shows similar subpulse modulation in both the main- and interpulse and six pulsars with opposite drift senses in different components.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Weltevrede; R. T. Edwards; B. W. Stappers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-07-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AAS...22013103H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mcmc Signal Extraction For 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> Global Signal Experiments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements of the highly redshifted 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> line promise to provide a great deal of information about the dark ages of the Universe, the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization. It is generally accepted that strong astrophysical foregrounds are a major obstacle to overcome before this promise is realised, largely because of the way they are filtered through a complicated instrumental response. A great deal of work has therefore been devoted to studying foreground removal for observations with the low-frequency radio arrays which are starting to collect data. The case of so-called 'global signal' experiments has received less attention, however. I will compare the foreground fitting problem in these two types of experiments, and describe a foreground fitting methodology which has been developed for a proposed global signal experiment, the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE), which will make use of the pristine radio-frequency environment over the far side of the Moon. The method, a fully Bayesian technique based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code will, however, be applicable more generally to other space- and ground-based experiments, including the prototype DARE antenna being deployed in Western Australia. For ground-based experiments, we must also contend with effects from the Earth's ionosphere and low-level radio-frequency interference. I will show early results from applying our algorithm to data from the prototype and the EDGES experiment. GH is a member of the LUNAR consortium, which is funded by the NASA Lunar Science Institute (via Cooperative Agreement NNA09DB30A) to investigate concepts for astrophysical observatories on the Moon.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harker, Geraint</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.432.3074C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Accurate measurement of the H I column density from H I 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption-emission spectroscopy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a detailed study of an estimator of the H I column density, based on a combination of H I 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption and H I 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> emission spectroscopy. This `isothermal' estimate is given by NHI, ISO = 1.823 × 1018 ? [?tot × TB / [ 1 - e-?tot]dV, where ?tot is the total H I 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> optical depth along the sightline and TB is the measured brightness temperature. We have used a Monte Carlo simulation to quantify the accuracy of the isothermal estimate by comparing the derived NHI, ISO with the true H I column density NHI. The simulation was carried out for a wide range of sightlines, including gas in different temperature phases and random locations along the path. We find that the results are statistically insensitive to the assumed gas temperature distribution and the positions of different phases along the line of sight. The median value of the ratio of the true H I column density to the isothermal estimate, NHI/NHI, ISO, is within a factor of 2 of unity while the 68.2 per cent confidence intervals are within a factor of ?3 of unity, out to high H I column densities, ?5 × 1023 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-2 per 1 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> channel, and high total optical depths, ?1000. The isothermal estimator thus provides a significantly better measure of the H I column density than other methods, within a factor of a few of the true value even at the highest columns, and should allow us to directly probe the existence of high H I column density gas in the Milky Way.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Kanekar, Nissim; Roy, Nirupam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.P24A..02L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pre-perihelion characterization of Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) is a dynamically new comet on a sungrazing orbit. As such, C/ISON represents a unique opportunity to study both the cosmic-ray-irradiated surface, produced during the comet's long residence in the Oort cloud, and much deeper layers in the nucleus, exposed when the comet passes within 2 solar radii of the Sun at perihelion. During the first phase of our investigation, we collected broadband images of C/ISON on April 10, 2012 at a heliocentric distance of 4.15 AU, using the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS. We used the F606W and F438W filters in three HST orbits covering a total span of ~19 hrs. The comet shows a well delineated coma in the sunward direction extending about 2" from the nucleus, and a dust tail at least 25" long. The coma has an average red color of 5%/0.1 micron within 1.6" from the nucleus, becoming redder towards the tail. Both the color and the size of the coma in the sunward direction are consistent with outflow of micron sized dust. Broadband photometry yielded Af? of 1376 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 589 nm, and 1281 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 433 nm, measured with a 1.6" radius aperture. The total brightness of the comet within a 0.12" radius aperture remained unchanged within 0.03 mag for the entire duration of the observations. A well defined sunward jet is visible after removing the 1/? brightness distribution. The jet is centered at position angle 290 deg (E of Celestial N), with a cone angle of 45 deg, a projected length of 1.6", and a slight curvature towards the north near the end. No temporal change in the morphology is observed, suggesting the jet is circumpolar. Under this assumption, the jet's apparent position constrains the rotational pole to lie within 30 deg of (RA, Dec) = (330, 0), and an obliquity of 50-80 deg. Preliminary analysis using a coma-nucleus separation technique suggests a nuclear radius less than 2 km. The survival of such a small nucleus during its perihelion at 2.7 solar radii is certainly questionable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, J.; Kelley, M. S.; Farnham, T. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Knight, M. M.; Weaver, H. A.; Mutchler, M.; Lamy, P. L.; Toth, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4540702L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Early pre-perihelion characterization of Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) is a dynamically new comet on a sungrazing orbit. As such, C/ISON represents a unique opportunity to study both the cosmic-ray-irradiated surface, produced during the comet's long residence in the Oort cloud, and much deeper layers in the nucleus, exposed when the comet passes 1.7 solar radii from the Sun's surface at perihelion. During the first phase of our investigation, we collected broadband images of C/ISON on April 10, 2012 at a heliocentric distance of 4.15 AU, using the Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/UVIS. We used the F606W and F438W filters in three HST orbits covering a total span of ~19 hrs. The comet shows a well delineated coma in the sunward direction extending about 2" from the nucleus, and a dust tail at least 25" long. The coma has an average red color of 5%/0.1 micron within 1.6" from the nucleus, becoming redder towards the tail. Both the color and the size of the coma in the sunward direction are consistent with outflow of micron sized dust. Broadband photometry yielded Af? of 1376 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 589 nm, and 1281 <span class="hlt">cm</span> at 433 nm, measured with a 1.6" radius aperture. The total brightness of the comet within a 0.12" radius aperture remained unchanged within 0.03 mag for the entire duration of the observations. A well defined sunward jet is visible after removing the 1/? brightness distribution. The jet is centered at position angle 290 deg (E of Celestial N), with a cone angle of 45 deg, a projected length of 1.6", and a slight curvature towards the north near the end. No temporal change in the morphology is observed, suggesting the jet is circumpolar. Under this assumption, the jet’s apparent position constrains the rotational pole to lie within 30 deg of (RA, Dec) = (330, 0), and an obliquity of 50-80 deg. Preliminary analysis using a coma-nucleus separation technique suggests a nuclear radius less than 2 km. The survival of such a small nucleus during its sungrazing perihelion is certainly questionable.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, M. S.; Farnham, T. L.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Knight, M. M.; Weaver, H. A.; Mutchler, M. J.; Lamy, P.; Toth, I.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012A%26A...544A..21G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for cold gas in strong Mg II absorbers at 0.5 < z < 1.5: nature and evolution of 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorbers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report four new detections of 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption from a systematic search of 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption in a sample of 17 strong (rest equivalent width, Wr(Mg ii?2796) ? 1 Å) intervening Mg ii absorbers at 0.5 < zabs < 1.5. We also present 20-<span class="hlt">cm</span> milliarcsecond scale maps of 40 quasars having 42 intervening strong Mg ii absorbers for which we have searched for 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption. These maps are used to understand the dependence of 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> detection rate on the radio morphology of the background quasar and address the issues related to the covering factor of absorbing gas. Combining 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption measurements for 50 strong Mg ii systems from our surveys with the measurements from literature, we obtain a sample of 85 strong Mg ii absorbers at 0.5 < zabs < 1 and 1.1 < zabs < 1.5. We present detailed analysis of this 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption sample, taking into account the effect of the varying 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> optical depth sensitivity and covering factor associated with the different quasar sight lines. We find that the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> detection rate is higher towards the quasars with flat or inverted spectral index at <span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelengths. About 70% of 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> detections are towards the quasars with linear size, LS < 100 pc. The 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption lines having velocity widths, ?V > 100 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> are mainly seen towards the quasars with extended radio morphology at arcsecond scales. However, we do not find any correlation between the integrated 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> optical depth, ??dv, or the width of 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption line, ?V, with the LS measured from the milliarcsecond scale images. All this can be understood if the absorbing gas is patchy with a typical correlation length of ~30-100 pc. We confirm our previous finding that the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> detection rate for a given optical depth threshold can be increased by up to a factor 2 by imposing the following additional constraints: Mg ii doublet ratio < 1.1, W(Mg ii)/W(Fe ii) < 1.47 and W(Mg i)/W(Mg ii) > 0.27. This suggests that the probability of detecting 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption is higher in the systems with high N(H i). We show that within the measurement uncertainty, the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> detection rate in strong Mg ii systems is constant over 0.5 < zabs < 1.5, i.e., over ~30% of the total age of universe. We show that the detection rate can be underestimated by up to a factor 2 if 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> optical depths are not corrected for the partial coverage estimated using milliarcsecond scale maps. Since stellar feedback processes are expected to diminish the filling factor of cold neutral medium over 0.5 < z < 1, this lack of evolution in the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> detection rate in strong Mg ii absorbers is intriguing. Large blind surveys of 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption lines with the upcoming Square Kilometre Array pathfinders will provide a complete view of the evolution of cold gas in galaxies and shed light on the nature ofMg ii systems and DLAs, and their relationship with stellar feedback processes. Table 4 and appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gupta, N.; Srianand, R.; Petitjean, P.; Bergeron, J.; Noterdaeme, P.; Muzahid, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.443.1044M"> <span id="translatedtitle">2MTF III. H I 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> observations of 1194 spiral galaxies with the Green Bank Telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present H I 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> observations of 1194 galaxies out to a redshift of 10 000 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> selected as inclined spirals (i ? 60°) from the 2MASS redshift survey. These observations were carried out at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This observing programme is part of the 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) survey. This project will combine H I widths from these GBT observations with those from further dedicated observing at the Parkes Telescope, from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey at Arecibo, and S/N > 10 and spectral resolution vres < 10 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> published widths from a variety of telescopes. We will use these H I widths along with 2MASS photometry to estimate Tully-Fisher distances to nearby spirals and investigate the peculiar velocity field of the local Universe. In this paper, we report on detections of neutral hydrogen in emission in 727 galaxies, and measure good signal to noise and symmetric H I global profiles suitable for use in the Tully-Fisher relation in 484.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Masters, Karen L.; Crook, Aidan; Hong, Tao; Jarrett, T. H.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Macri, Lucas; Springob, Christopher M.; Staveley-Smith, Lister</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4320342"> <span id="translatedtitle">Helicobacter pylori vacA <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>a and <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b alleles from clinical isolates from different regions of Chile show a distinct geographic distribution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">AIM: To establish the most common vacA alleles in Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) strains isolated from Chilean patients and its relationship with gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcers. METHODS: Two hundred and forty five H pylori clinical isolates were obtained from 79 biopsies from Chilean infected patients suffering from gastrointestinal diseases. An average of 2-3 strains per patient was isolated and the vacA genotype was analyzed by PCR and 3% agarose electrophoresis. Some genotypes were checked by DNA sequencing. RESULTS: The most prevalent vacA genotype in Chilean patients was <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 (76%), followed by <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>a m1 (21%). In contrast, the s2 m2 genotype was scarcely represented (3%). The <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 genotype was found most frequently linked to gastropathies (P<0.05) rather than ulcers. Ulcers were found more commonly in male and older patients. Curiously, patients living in cities located North and far South of Santiago, the capital and largest Chilean city, carried almost exclusively strains with the <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 genotype. In contrast, patients from Santiago and cities located South of Santiago carried strains with either one or both <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>a m1 and <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 genotypes. Regarding the s2 m2 genotype, comparison with GenBank sequences revealed that Chilean s2 sequence was identical to those of Australian, American, and Colombian strains but quite different from those of Alaska and India. CONCLUSION: Differences in geographic distribution of the s and m vacA alleles in Chile and a relationship of <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 genotype with gastritis were found. Sequence data in part support a hispanic origin for the vacA genotype. Asymmetric distribution of genotypes <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>b m1 and s2 m2 recedes H Pylori strain distribution in Spain and Portugal. PMID:16419167</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Díaz, MI; Valdivia, A; Martínez, P; Palacios, JL; Harris, P; Novales, J; Garrido, E; Valderrama, D; Shilling, C; Kirberg, A; Hebel, E; Fierro, J; Bravo, R; Siegel, F; Leon, G; Klapp, G; Venegas, A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/120987"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling the behavior of <span class="hlt">Cm</span> and Am during separation by complexing extraction chromatography</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Certain heavy rare earths (REE), <span class="hlt">Cm</span>, and Am are separated by complexing extraction chromatography using solutions of DTPA and DTPA-citric acid as eluents. The separation coefficients of REE from <span class="hlt">Cm</span> and Am are calculated. Tracers are proposed for the <span class="hlt">Cm</span> and Am separations. These are Tm for <span class="hlt">Cm</span> elution using 0.025 M DTPA and Ho for <span class="hlt">Cm</span> elution using 0.025 M DTPA with 0.025 citric acid. The tracer for Am in both instances is Tb.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chuveleva, E.A.; Kharitonov, O.V.; Firsova, L.A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25351259"> <span id="translatedtitle">Activation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 receptor, a possible mechanism of inhibition of adipogenic differentiation by sphingosine 1?phosphate.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sphingosine 1?phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) belongs to a significant group of signaling sphingolipids and exerts most of its activity as a ligand of G?protein?coupled receptors. In our previous study, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P demonstrated a novel biological activity with the anti?adipogenesis of 3T3?L1 preadipocytes. In the present study, we identified a possible mechanism of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P?mediated anti?adipogenic effects, particularly in target pathways of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptors, including <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2. The mRNA levels of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 receptors were increased by MDI media treatment, whereas <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P treatment highly induced <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 but not <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor protein in adipocytes. Triglyceride accumulation assay using an agonist and antagonist of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptors revealed that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 receptor was only involved in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P?mediated anti?adipogenic effects. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 signals completely retrieved <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P?mediated downregulation of the transcriptional levels of peroxisome proliferator?activated receptor ?, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein ? and adiponectin, which are markers of adipogenic differentiation. This study demonstrated that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 receptor signals may regulate the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P?mediated anti?adipogenic differentiation and also identifies the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 receptor as a possible mechanism of anti?adipogenic differentiation. PMID:25351259</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Moon, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Park, Sang-Youel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1135825"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of three types of human alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein mRNA transcripts.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Here we report the molecular cloning and sequencing of three types of human alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein transcripts and present evidence indicating that exon skipping is responsible for deleted mRNA transcripts. The largest transcript comprised 981 bp encoding a signal peptide of 15 amino acids followed by the mature alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein sequence of 170 amino acids. Human alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein has been reported to exist naturally as a multimer in complex with kappa-casein in mature human milk, thereby being unique among alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-caseins [Rasmussen, Due and Petersen (1995) Comp. Biochem. Physiol., in the press]. The present demonstration of three cysteines in the mature protein provides a molecular explanation of the interactions in this complex. Tissue-specific expression of human alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein was indicated by Northern-blot analysis. In addition, two cryptic exons were localized in the bovine alpha <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein gene. Images Figure 3 PMID:7619062</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnsen, L B; Rasmussen, L K; Petersen, T E; Berglund, L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://mcb.asm.org/cgi/reprint/25/10/4237.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 Receptor Negatively Regulates Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Induced Motility and Proliferation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P), a bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, is the ligand for five specific G protein- coupled receptors, named <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P5. In this study, we found that cross-communication between platelet- derived growth factor receptor and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 serves as a negative damper of PDGF functions. Deletion of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 receptor dramatically increased migration of mouse embryonic fibroblasts toward <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P, serum, and PDGF</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sravan K. Goparaju; Puneet S. Jolly; Kenneth R. Watterson; Meryem Bektas; Sergio Alvarez; Sukumar Sarkar; Lin Mel; Isao Ishii; Jerold Chun; Sheldon Milstien; Sarah Spiegel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013DPS....4540705S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Narrowband Observations of Comets ISON (2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) and 2P/Encke: Extremes of the New and the Old</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on narrowband filter observations of Comets ISON (2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) and 2P/Encke obtained from Lowell Observatory. Observations of dynamically new Comet ISON include the first successful gas measurements of the apparition on March 5 (r = 4.57 AU) with a CN production rate of 1.3x1024 molecules/s, implying a water production rate of 1-10x1026 molecules/s for a normal range of CN-to-OH abundance ratios. Two months later the measured CN and inferred water values were about 70% higher. During the same interval the apparent dust production more than doubled, with Af? increasing from 120 <span class="hlt">cm</span> to 270 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. Further observations, both photometry and imaging, are scheduled for early September and early October, and the results from these will be presented. In contrast to ISON, Comet Encke is highly evolved both thermally and physically, having made hundreds of close passages by the Sun. As a result, only a small fraction of its surface remains active and almost no micron-sized dust particles are released during outgassing. This fall's apparition will be the ninth for which we will have obtained gas production rates. The existing data imply a strong secular decrease in water production but a much smaller decrease for the minor species. These and new observations will be presented and we will examine whether or not these trends continue and the possible meaning. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy and Planetary Atmospheres Programs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schleicher, David G.; Knight, M. M.; Bair, A. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19757852"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solvation effects on isomeric preferences of curium(iii) complexes with multidentate phosphonopropionic acid ligands: <span class="hlt">Cm</span>H(2)PPA(2+) and <span class="hlt">Cm</span>HPPA(+) complexes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have carried out both time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopic and computational studies on the complexes of curium(III) with multidentate Phosphonopropionic (PPA) acid ligands. A number of complexes of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>(III) with these ligands, such as <span class="hlt">Cm</span>H(2)PPA(2+), <span class="hlt">Cm</span>HPPA(+), <span class="hlt">Cm</span>[H(2)PPA](2)(+), and <span class="hlt">Cm</span>[HPPA](2)(-) have been studied. Our computational studies focused on all possible isomers in the gas phase and aqueous solution so that the relative binding strengths of carboxylic versus phosphoric groups can be assessed in these multidentate systems. The solvation effects play an important role in the determination of the preferred configurations and binding propensities of carboxylate versus phosphate sites of the ligands. Our computations assess the relative strengths of single and multidentate complexes in solutions for these systems. The computed free energies of solvation explain the experimentally observed fluorescence spectra and the lifetimes of these complexes in that as more water molecules are displaced from the first hydration sphere by the ligands that bind to <span class="hlt">Cm</span>(III), the fluorescence lifetime increases. We have found that the most stable complex for <span class="hlt">Cm</span>H(2)PPA(2+) in the aqueous phase exhibits a monodentate complex where the curium(III) is bound to the deprotonated phosphate oxygen atom. Our computations support the observed longer fluorescence lifetime of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>H(2)PPA(2+) (112 mus) compared to the free <span class="hlt">Cm</span>(III) aquo ion (65 mus), suggesting a greater degree of H(2)O displacement from the hydration sphere. For the <span class="hlt">Cm</span>-HPPA(+) complex, we find a tridentate form as the most stable structure which supports the observed fluorescence lifetime for the <span class="hlt">Cm</span>HPPA(+) complex (172 mus), confirming the removal of up to six water molecules from the inner hydration sphere. The relative stabilities of the complexes are found to vary substantially between the gas phase and solution, indicating a major role of solvation in the relative stabilities of these complexes. PMID:19757852</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cao, Zhiji; Balasubramanian, K; Calvert, Michael G; Nitsche, Heino</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24326191"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expression, purification and improved antigenicity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> antigen for serodiagnosis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The phosphate-specific transport substrate binding protein-1 (Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) is a potential antigen used for the serological diagnosis of tuberculosis. For a highly specific diagnostic result, it is important that the recombinant Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> be highly pure and correctly folded. In this study, the Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> was expressed as fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase (Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST) and Escherichia coli trigger factor (Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF) and their immunodiagnostic potentials were evaluated. The insoluble Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST was denatured and refolded to the native conformation by a step-gradient dilution, followed by purification with affinity chromatography on immobilized glutathione whereas the soluble Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF was directly purified by Ni-NTA affinity and size-exclusion chromatographies. The levels of antibody responses to Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF and Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the sera of 22 tuberculosis patients with smear-positive and culture-positive tuberculosis as well as 20 healthy individuals; the antigenicities of the samples were evaluated in terms of sensitivity and specificity. To determine the diagnostic accuracy, receiver operation characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and then the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were calculated; the AUC values for Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF and Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST were 0.971 and 0.877 with 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 0.927-1.000 and 0.768-0.986, respectively. The specificity of Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF was reduced from 89.5% to 84.2%, but in case of Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST it dropped drastically from 78.9% to 26.3% when the sensitivity was raised from 86.4% up to 95.5%. These results indicate that Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF is capable of producing more accurate and consistent serodiagnostic results than Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST, possibly due to its conformation being closer to the native state. PMID:24326191</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hwang, Won-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Ryoo, Sung Weon; Yoo, Ki-Yeol; Tae, Gun-Sik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22207486"> <span id="translatedtitle">Blocking peptides against HBV: Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein selected from a phage display library</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. {yields} P7 could block Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> attachment. -- Abstract: The Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native Pre<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xiao, Gengfu, E-mail: xiaogf@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> 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class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997APS..APR.E1506B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of the Two-Photon Helium 1s^2 ^1<span class="hlt">S</span> - <span class="hlt">1</span>s2<span class="hlt">s</span> ^<span class="hlt">1</span>S Transition at 120.3 nm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the first observation, to our knowledge, of the two-photon 1s^2 ^1<span class="hlt">S</span> - <span class="hlt">1</span>s2<span class="hlt">s</span> ^<span class="hlt">1</span>S transition in helium. Laser radiation at 120.3 nm is employed to excite helium atoms ejected from a supersonic nozzle. Subsequent ionization from the metastable 1s2<span class="hlt">s</span> ^<span class="hlt">1</span>S level by the 266 nm pulsed output of a tripled Nd:YAG laser permits detection of the resulting ions via time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The vacuum ultraviolet light at 120.3 nm is generated by first quadrupling the 842 nm pulse-dye- amplified output of a cw diode laser in two successive BBO crystals to give radiation at 210 nm. The 210 nm photons are then combined with the leftover 842 nm beam in a phase-matched mixture of argon and krypton to produce the 120.3 nm radiation via a 2?_1- ?2 four-wave mixing scheme. Pulses at 120.3 nm with an energy of 40 to 50 nJ and duration of less than 5 ns have been obtained and give rise to large resonance ionization signals. An accurate determination of the 1s^2 ^1<span class="hlt">S</span> - <span class="hlt">1</span>s2<span class="hlt">s</span> ^<span class="hlt">1</span>S interval may serve as a sensitive check of quantum electrodynamics (QED) calculations in the 2-electron, 3-body regime.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bergeson, S. D.; Wen, Jesse; Balakrishnan, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lucatorto, T. B.; Marangos, J.; McIlrath, T. J.; O`Brian, T. R.; Rolston, S. L.; Vansteenkiste, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.harvard.edu/malan/publications/sigcse07-s1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Scratch for Budding Computer Scientists Computer Science <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>: Great Ideas in Computer Science</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 Scratch for Budding Computer Scientists Computer Science <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>: Great Ideas in Computer Science generated numbers sorted themselves!'" "[My] brother is a senior programmer at Apple so occasionally he for Budding Computer Scientists Computer Science <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>: Great Ideas in Computer Science Harvard Summer School</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Malan, David J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/handle/1808/15342"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for the decay B? D(+)(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) (2536)X</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have searched for the decay B? D(+)(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)(2536)X and measured an upper limit for the inclusive branching fraction of B(B? D(+)(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)X)<0.96% at the 90% confidence level. This limit is small compared with the total expected B? D(*)D(*)KX rate...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991CPL...182..649G"> <span id="translatedtitle">CF 3 torsional potentials and bending—torsion interaction in the S 0 and <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> electronic states of 4-aminobenzotrifluoride</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Torsional structure in supersonic-jet fluorescence spectra of 4-aminobenzotrifluoride has been interpreted. The sixfold CF 3 torsional barriers are ? 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> -1 in S 0 and 33±4 <span class="hlt">cm</span> -1 in <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>, similar to those in 4-substituted toluenes, with the same equilibrium conformation, probably staggered, in both states. However, because of the larger mass of the CF 3 rotor, there are significant differences between the spectra. Activity of C?CF 3 bending modes is explained by a novel mechanism involving cross-sequence and combination bands which combine bending and torsional intervals of appropriate symmetry, and provides evidence for significant interaction between C?CF 3 bending and torsional motions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gordon, Robert D.; Michael Hollas, J.; Ribeiro-Claro, Paulo J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, José J. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.geobacter.org/press/2005-10-03-associatedpress.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eyewitness News -UMass scientist gets DOE grant to study microbes http://www.eyewitnessnewstv.com/global/story.asp?s=3931658&Clie... 1 of 1 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2005 1:27 PM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eyewitness News - UMass scientist gets DOE grant to study microbes http://www.eyewitnessnewstv.com/global/story.asp?s=3931658&Clie... 1 of 1 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2005 1:27 PM microbes AMHERST. The government is giving Lovley nearly 22 (m) million dollars to continue studying the microbes he's been working</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lovley, Derek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://viterbi.usc.edu/assets/114/70955.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">9/28/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:30 PMHoles Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe -CBS News Page 1 of 4http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/09/26/national/main6903300.shtml</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">9/28/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:30 PMHoles Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe - CBS News Page 1 of 4http on the well kill 153 days after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. C Holes Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe Engineering Experts Question Thoroughness of Oil Giant's Internal Investigation on Massive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valero-Cuevas, Francisco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23598093"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bk and Cf chromatographic separation and ²??Bk/²??<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and ²??Cf/²??<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios determination by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron flux. In this context a <span class="hlt">Cm</span> sample enriched in (248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> (?97%) was irradiated in a thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). The precise and accurate determination of Cf isotope ratios and of (249)Bk/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and (249)Cf/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios in the (248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> irradiated sample is crucial for the calculation of actinide neutron capture cross-sections. This work describes an analytical procedure for the separation and the isotope ratio measurement of Bk and Cf in the irradiated sample. The Bk and Cf separation is based on a lanthanides separation protocol previously developed by the laboratory. Well-defined retention times for Bk and Cf were obtained by coupling the Ionic Chromatography (IC) with an ICP-QMS. All conditions of element separation by IC and the different steps of the analytical protocol in order to obtain the isotopic and elemental ratios are presented. Relative uncertainties of Cf isotopic ratios range from 0.3% to 0.5% and the uncertainty of the (249)Bk/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and (249)Cf/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios are respectively 6.1% and 3.2%. This level of uncertainty for both isotopic and elemental ratios is in perfect agreement with the requirement for transmutation studies. PMID:23598093</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gourgiotis, A; Isnard, H; Nonell, A; Aubert, M; Stadelmann, G; Dupont, E; AlMahamid, I; Tiang, G; Rao, L; Lukens, W; Cassette, P; Panebianco, S; Letourneau, A; Chartier, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15783803"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B0s--> mu(+) mu(-) in pp Collisions at sqrt[<span class="hlt">s</span>] = <span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV with the D0 detector.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-) using a data set with integrated luminosity of 240 pb(-1) of pp collisions at sqrt[<span class="hlt">s</span>] = <span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We find the upper limit on the branching fraction to be B(B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-)) < or= 5.0 x <span class="hlt">10(-7</span>) at the 95% C.L. assuming no contributions from the decay B(0)(d)--> mu(+) mu(-) in the signal region. This limit is the most stringent upper bound on the branching fraction B(0)(s)--> mu(+) mu(-) to date. PMID:15783803</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystricky, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Coss, J; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Déliot, F; Delsart, P A; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Freeman, W; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kado, M M; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, K H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4288201"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structural basis for the interaction of protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> with the Escherichia coli ribosome</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In Gram-negative bacteria, the multi-domain protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is essential for translation initiation, as it recruits the mRNA and facilitates its localization in the decoding centre. In sharp contrast to its functional importance, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is still lacking from the high-resolution structures available for Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus ribosomes and thus the molecular mechanism governing the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>–ribosome interaction has still remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> domain D1 when bound to the ribosome at atomic resolution by using a combination of NMR, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Together with biochemical assays, the structure reveals that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is anchored to the ribosome primarily via a stabilizing ?-stacking interaction within the short but conserved N-terminal segment that is flexibly connected to domain D1. This interaction is further stabilized by salt bridges involving the zinc binding pocket of protein S2. Overall, this work provides one hitherto enigmatic piece in the ?ribosome puzzle?, namely the detailed molecular insight into the topology of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>–ribosome interface. Moreover, our data suggest novel mechanisms that have the potential to modulate protein synthesis in response to environmental cues by changing the affinity of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> for the ribosome. PMID:25510494</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byrgazov, Konstantin; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Arenz, Stefan; Coudevylle, Nicolas; Temmel, Hannes; Wilson, Daniel N.; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Moll, Isabella</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21566439"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Examination of continuity of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> adjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer patients after gastrectomy].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Next to ACTS-GC (Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> for Gastric Cancer), adjuvant chemotherapy with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> is the standard treatment for stage II or III gastric cancer patients.In this study, we retrospectively examined the continuity and adverse reaction of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> adjuvant chemotherapy in 30 gastric cancer patients who visited our hospital from 2007 to 2008, and compared them with those of patients treated with ACTS-GC. Whereas the persistent rate of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> adjuvant chemotherapy for one year in ACTS-GC was 65.8%, it was 86.7% in our hospital.The RP (Relative performance) value in cases who completed <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> adjuvant therapy for one year in ACTS-GC and for one year in our hospital was 81.2% and 88.5%, respectively. Grade 3/4 adverse events in our hospital were leukopenia (3.3%), neutropenia (16.7%), and anorexia(6.7%). In conclusion, our hospital has shown a far greater continuity with <span class="hlt">S</span>- <span class="hlt">1</span> adjuvant chemotherapy than with ACTS-GC, a result suggesting that <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> adjuvant chemotherapy is feasible in clinical practice. PMID:21566439</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kawabata, Ryohei; Imamura, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Tomono; Anami, Setsuko; Yasui, Yukako; Fujino, Misako; Fujii, Chika; Sumida, Rumi; Furukawa, Hiroshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25510494"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structural basis for the interaction of protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> with the Escherichia coli ribosome.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In Gram-negative bacteria, the multi-domain protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is essential for translation initiation, as it recruits the mRNA and facilitates its localization in the decoding centre. In sharp contrast to its functional importance, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is still lacking from the high-resolution structures available for Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus ribosomes and thus the molecular mechanism governing the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-ribosome interaction has still remained elusive. Here, we present the structure of the N-terminal <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> domain D1 when bound to the ribosome at atomic resolution by using a combination of NMR, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Together with biochemical assays, the structure reveals that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is anchored to the ribosome primarily via a stabilizing ?-stacking interaction within the short but conserved N-terminal segment that is flexibly connected to domain D1. This interaction is further stabilized by salt bridges involving the zinc binding pocket of protein S2. Overall, this work provides one hitherto enigmatic piece in the 'ribosome puzzle', namely the detailed molecular insight into the topology of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-ribosome interface. Moreover, our data suggest novel mechanisms that have the potential to modulate protein synthesis in response to environmental cues by changing the affinity of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> for the ribosome. PMID:25510494</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byrgazov, Konstantin; Grishkovskaya, Irina; Arenz, Stefan; Coudevylle, Nicolas; Temmel, Hannes; Wilson, Daniel N; Djinovic-Carugo, Kristina; Moll, Isabella</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21308174"> <span id="translatedtitle">B{sub <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>}(5830) and B{sub s2}*(5840)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper we investigate the strong decays of the two newly observed bottom-strange mesons B{sub <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>}(5830) and B{sub s2}{sup *}(5840) in the framework of the quark pair creation model. The two-body strong decay widths of B{sub <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>}(5830){sup 0}{yields}B*{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sub s2}*(5840){sup 0}{yields}B{sup +}K{sup -}, B*{sup +}K{sup -} are calculated by considering B{sub <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>}(5830) to be a mixture between |{sup 1}P{sub 1}> and |{sup 3}P{sub 1}> states, and B{sub s2}*(5840) to be a |{sup 3}P{sub 2}> state. The double pion decay of B{sub <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>}(5830) and B{sub s2}{sup *}(5840) is supposed to occur via the intermediate state {sigma} and f{sub 0}(980). Although the double pion decay widths of B{sub <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>}(5830) and B{sub s2}*(5840) are smaller than the two-body strong decay widths of B{sub <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>}(5830) and B{sub s2}*(5840), one suggests future experiments to search the double pion decays of B{sub <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>}(5830) and B{sub s2}*(5840) due to their sizable decay widths.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Luo Zhigang; Chen Xiaolin [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu Xiang [Centro de Fisica Computacional, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, P-3004-516, Coimbra (Portugal); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MNRAS.436.2366R"> <span id="translatedtitle">The temperature of the diffuse H I in the Milky Way - II. Gaussian decomposition of the H I-21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss physical conditions in Galactic neutral hydrogen based on deep, high-velocity resolution interferometric H I-21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption spectroscopy towards 33 compact extragalactic radio sources. The H I-21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> optical depth spectra have root-mean-square noise values ?10-3 per 1 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> velocity channel, i.e. sufficiently sensitive to detect H I-21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption by the warm neutral medium (WNM). Comparing these spectra with H I-21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> emission spectra from the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn (LAB) survey, we show that some of the absorption detected on most sightlines must arise in gas with temperatures higher than that in the stable cold neutral medium (CNM). A multi-Gaussian decomposition of 30 of the H I-21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption spectra yielded very few components with linewidths in the temperature range of stable WNM, with no such WNM components detected for 16 of the 30 sightlines. We find that some of the detected H I-21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption along 13 of these sightlines must arise in gas with spin temperatures larger than the CNM range. For these sightlines, we use very conservative estimates of the CNM spin temperature and the non-thermal broadening to derive strict upper limits to the gas column densities in the CNM and WNM phases. Comparing these upper limits to the total H I column density, we find that typically at least 28 per cent of the gas must have temperatures in the thermally unstable range (200-5000 K). Our observations hence robustly indicate that a significant fraction of the gas in the Galactic interstellar medium has temperatures outside the ranges expected for thermally stable gas in two-phase models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Roy, Nirupam; Kanekar, Nissim; Chengalur, Jayaram N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22612978"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CSN3 (?(<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-?-casein) composite genotype on milk production traits and milk coagulation properties in Mediterranean water buffalo.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this study was to estimate effects of CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CSN3 (?(<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-?-casein) composite genotypes on milk production traits and milk coagulation properties (MCP) in Mediterranean water buffalo. Genotypes at CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and CSN3 and coagulation properties [rennet clotting time (RCT), curd firming time (K??), and curd firmness (A??)] were assessed by reversed-phase HPLC and computerized renneting meter analysis, respectively, using single test-day milk samples of 536 animals. Alternative protein variants of ?(<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-CN and ?-CN were detected by HPLC, and identification of the corresponding genetic variants was carried out by DNA analysis. Two genetic variants were detected at CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (A and B variants) and 2 at CSN3 (X1 and X2 variants). Statistical inference was based on a linear model including the CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-CSN3 composite genotype effect (7 genotypes), the effects of herd-test-day (8 levels), and a combined days in milk (DIM)-parity class. Composite genotype AB-X2X2 was associated with decreased test-day milk yield [-0.21 standard deviation (SD) units of the trait] relative to genotype BB-X2X2. Genotypes did not affect milk protein content, but genotype AB-X1X1 was associated with increased fat content compared with genotype BB-X2X2 (+0.28 SD units of the trait) and AB-X1X1 (+0.43 SD units of the trait). For RCT, the largest difference (+1.91 min; i.e., 0.61 SD units of the trait) was observed between genotype AA-X1X2 and AB-X1X1. Direction of genotype effects on K(20) was consistent with that for RCT. The maximum variation in K?? due to genotype effects (between AA-X1X2 and AB-X1X1 genotypes) was almost 0.9 SD units of the trait. Magnitude of genotype effects was smaller for A?? than for RCT and K??, with a maximum difference of 0.5 SD units of the trait between genotype AA-X1X2 and AA-X1X1. The B allele at CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> was associated with increased RCT and K?? and with weaker curds compared with allele A. Allele X2 at CSN3 exerted opposite effects on MCP relative to CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> B. Because of linkage disequilibrium, allele B at CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and allele X2 at CSN3 tend to be associated and this likely makes their effects cancel each other. This study indicates a role for casein genes in variation of MCP of buffalo milk. Further studies are necessary to estimate the effects of casein genetic variants on variation of cheese yield. PMID:22612978</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bonfatti, V; Giantin, M; Gervaso, M; Coletta, A; Dacasto, M; Carnier, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ast.leeds.ac.uk/~jah/CTASoI.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Statement of Interest for UK Participation in the Cherenkov Telescope Array , Biller <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Statement of Interest for UK Participation in the Cherenkov Telescope Array Bell A1,2 , Biller <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> of the speed of light [2]. The path forward for European VHE astronomy is very clear: the Cherenkov Telescope</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pittard, Julian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/76689"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paired chiral spin liquid with a Fermi surface in <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> model on the triangular lattice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motivated by recent experiments on Ba[subscript 3]NiSb[subscript 2]O[subscript 9], we investigate possible quantum spin liquid ground states for spin <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> Heisenberg models on the triangular lattice. We use variational Monte ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bieri, Samuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1275876"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electron cryomicroscopy of acto-myosin-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> during steady-state ATP hydrolysis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The structure of the complex of actin and myosin subfragment-1 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) during steady-state ATP hydrolysis has been examined by electron microscopy. This complex is normally dissociated by ATP in vitro but was stabilized here by low ionic strength. Optimal conditions for attachment were established by light-scattering experiments that showed that approximately 70% of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> could be bound in the presence of ATP. Micrographs of the unstained complex in vitreous water suggest that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> attaches to actin in a variety of configurations in ATP; this contrasts with the single attached configuration seen in the presence of ADP. The data are therefore compatible with the idea that a change in attached configuration of the myosin cross-bridge is the origin of muscle force. In control experiments where ATP was allowed to hydrolyze completely the binding of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> seemed cooperative. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8061205</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walker, M; White, H; Belknap, B; Trinick, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://repository.tamu.edu/handle/1969.1/152485"> <span id="translatedtitle">Annexin A2 is Required for Endothelial Cell Junctional Response to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Endothelial cell (EC) junctions are critical for angiogenesis, the sprouting and growth of new blood vessels from existing vessels. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) is a proangiogenic factor that potently stimulates sprouting, fortifies EC junctions...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith, Rebecca</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18766007"> <span id="translatedtitle">A patient with stage IV type 4 advanced gastric cancer who had a complete pathological response to short-term treatment with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> alone.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An 81-year-old woman presented with dysphagia. Stage IV (cT3, cN3, cH0, <span class="hlt">cM</span>1) type 4 advanced gastric cancer was diagnosed. The left adrenal gland and the paragastric, mediastinal, and abdominal para-aortic lymph nodes were enlarged. Ascites was present. The patient started to receive <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> (100 mg/day), given orally for 4 weeks followed by 2 weeks of rest. During the first course of treatment, grade 2 anorexia, grade 2 vomiting, and grade 2 diarrhea developed. Treatment with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> was therefore discontinued on day 27. The tumor had shrunk and was severely deformed. There was marked narrowing of the pyloric antrum. Abdominal computed tomography revealed that ascites and enlargement of the left adrenal gland and paragastric lymph nodes had resolved. To ensure adequate oral intake and improve the patient's quality of life, a total gastrectomy with a limited (D1) lymph node dissection was performed. The primary gastric tumor, resected lymph nodes, and a peritoneal-lavage specimen were all negative for tumor. Histologically, the tumor had a complete pathological response to <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>. Two years after surgery, the patient is alive, with no evidence of metastasis or recurrence. PMID:18766007</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ishido, Kenji; Koizumi, Wasaburo; Tanabe, Satoshi; Higuchi, Katsuhiko; Sasaki, Tohru; Katada, Chikatoshi; Azuma, Mizutomo; Saigenji, Katsunori; Futawatari, Nobue; Saegusa, Makoto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006JCrGr.293...52C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth and optoelectronic characteristic of n-Si/p-CuIn(<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>-xSe x) 2 thin-film solar cell by solution growth technique</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The p-CuIn(<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>-xSe x) 2 (CISS) thin films have been grown on n-Si substrate by solution growth technique. The deposition parameters, such as pH (10.5), deposition time (60 min), deposition temperature (50 °C), and concentration of bath solution (0.1 M) were optimized. Elemental analysis of the p-CuIn(<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>-xSe x) 2 thin film was confirmed by energy-dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX). The SEM study of absorber layer shows the uniform morphology of film as well as the continuous smooth deposition onto the n-Si substrates, whose grain size is 130 nm. CuIn(<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>-xSe x) 2 ( x=0.5) reveals (1 1 2) orientation peak and exhibits the chalcopyrite structure with lattice constant a=5.28 Å and c=11.45 Å. The J- V characteristics were measured in dark and light. The device parameters have been calculated for solar cell fabrication, V=411.09 mV, and J=14.55 mA. FF=46.55% and ?=4.64% under an illumination of 60 mW/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2. The J- V characteristics of the device under dark condition were also studied and the ideality factor was calculated, which is equal to 2.2 for n-Si/p-CuIn(S 0.5Se 0.5) 2 heterojunction thin film.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chavhan, S.; Sharma, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" 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showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.uni-ulm.de/fileadmin/website_uni_ulm/nawi.inst.220/publikationen/0954-3899_37_5_055107.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isotope shift measurements in the 2<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 transition of Be</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isotope shift measurements in the 2<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 2p3/2 transition of Be + and extraction of the nuclear.1088/0954-3899/37/5/055107 Isotope shift measurements in the 2<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 2p3/2 transition of Be+ and extraction of the nuclear charge Published 1 April 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysG/37/055107 Abstract We have performed isotope shift</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pfeifer, Holger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.sjsu.edu/faculty/pollett/papers/mm03.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle">In classical logic it is known that the theory <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> 2 can be axiomatized over</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">worlds model <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> 2 forces BASIC+#5; b+ 1 -P IND. The plus in #5; b+ 1 is used to denote #5; b 1 -formulasIn classical logic it is known that the theory <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> 2 can be axiomatized over the base theory BASIC using either #5; b 1 -P IND or #6; b 1 -P IND [1]. Here #5; b 1 formula correspond to coNP predicates</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pollett, Chris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3501353"> <span id="translatedtitle">A novel role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr1 in mouse thrombopoiesis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Millions of platelets are produced each hour by bone marrow (BM) megakaryocytes (MKs). MKs extend transendothelial proplatelet (PP) extensions into BM sinusoids and shed new platelets into the blood. The mechanisms that control platelet generation remain incompletely understood. Using conditional mutants and intravital multiphoton microscopy, we show here that the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) serves as a critical directional cue guiding the elongation of megakaryocytic PP extensions from the interstitium into BM sinusoids and triggering the subsequent shedding of PPs into the blood. Correspondingly, mice lacking the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr1 develop severe thrombocytopenia caused by both formation of aberrant extravascular PPs and defective intravascular PP shedding. In contrast, activation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr1 signaling leads to the prompt release of new platelets into the circulating blood. Collectively, our findings uncover a novel function of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P–<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>pr1 axis as master regulator of efficient thrombopoiesis and might raise new therapeutic options for patients with thrombocytopenia. PMID:23148237</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Lin; Orban, Martin; Lorenz, Michael; Barocke, Verena; Braun, Daniel; Urtz, Nicole; Schulz, Christian; von Brühl, Marie-Luise; Tirniceriu, Anca; Gaertner, Florian; Proia, Richard L.; Graf, Thomas; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Montanez, Eloi; Prinz, Marco; Müller, Alexandra; von Baumgarten, Louisa; Billich, Andreas; Sixt, Michael; Fässler, Reinhard; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Junt, Tobias</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987NIMPA.257...15A"> <span id="translatedtitle">The preparation of 248<span class="hlt">Cm</span>F 3 deposits on self-supported carbon foils</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Another target preparative technique was recently added to the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory's (IRML) capabilities for custom target fabrication. In support of super-heavy-ion physics experiments, methods and equipment were developed for the preparation of 248<span class="hlt">Cm</span>F 3 deposits on carbon foils. The starting material was obtained as either a chloride or nitrate solution, converted to the flouride, and evaporated on carbon foil substrates. Deposits ranging from 40 to 570 ?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2 were prepared as a 12-mm-diam spot on 45- to 60-?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2 self-supported carbon foils. The deposits were then overcoated with approximately 10 ?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2 of carbon to minimize contamination problems during target handling. The high cost of 248<span class="hlt">Cm</span> ($100/?g) and its limited availability were the key constraints in the development of preparative technology beyond the inherent radioactivity of 248<span class="hlt">Cm</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aaron, W. S.; Petek, M.; Zevenbergen, L. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47012417"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Results of the Remote Sensing of Sea-Surface Salinity at 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> Wavelength</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The complex dielectric constant of sea water is a function of salinity at 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength, and sea-water salinity can be determined by a measurement of radiometric temperature at 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> along with a measurement of thermodynamic temperature. Three aircraft and two helicopter experiments using two different 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> radiometers were conducted under different salinity and temperature conditions. Ground-truth measurements were used</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gary Thomann; A. K. Baird; B. C. Clark; K. Keil; J. Rose</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19820043390&hterms=hydrogen+peroxide&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dhydrogen%2Bperoxide"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intensity of the hydrogen peroxide v6/b/ band around 1266 <span class="hlt">cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Laboratory spectra of the V6(b) band of H2O2 at 1266/<span class="hlt">cm</span> have been obtained at a resolution of 0.06/<span class="hlt">cm</span> and at temperatures ranging from 278 to 294 K. A total band intensity of 375 + or - 17 per sq <span class="hlt">cm</span> per amagat is determined from the spectra. Special techniques to handle the H2O2 samples in a way that minimizes abundance determination errors are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valero, F. P. J.; Goorvitch, D.; Boese, R. W.; Bonomo, F. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/114495"> <span id="translatedtitle">Beyond the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-5: A case study in performance analysis for the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-5, T3D, and high performance RISC workstations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a comprehensive performance evaluation of our molecular dynamics code SPaSM on the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-5 in order to devise optimization strategies for the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-5, T3D, and RISC workstations. In this analysis, we focus on the effective use of the SPARC microprocessor by performing measurements of instruction set utilization, cache effects, memory access patterns, and pipeline stall cycles. We then show that we can account for more than 99% of observed execution time of our program. Optimization strategies are devised and we show that our highly optimized ANSI C program running only on the SPARC microprocessor of the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-5 is only twice as slow as our Gordon-Bell prize winning code that utilized the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-5 vector units. On the <span class="hlt">CM</span>-5E, we show that this optimized code run faster than the vector unit version. We then apply these techniques to the Cray T3D and measure resulting speedups. Finally, we show that simple optimization strategies are effective on a wide variety of high performance RISC workstations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beazley, D.M. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Lomdahl, P.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-03-22</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://geosci.uchicago.edu/~grossman/BWSG12.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous. Investigation of the magnesium isotopic compositions of chondrules can place stringent constraints on the timing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grossman, Lawrence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/~bdstephe/217_W14/MacOSXPython323InstallationGuide.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">INSTALLING PYTHON 3.2.3 ON MAC OS X (10.6, <span class="hlt">10.7</span>, and 10.8) 1. Visit python.org/download/ and download the Mac installer. It will be called</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">INSTALLING PYTHON 3.2.3 ON MAC OS X (10.6, <span class="hlt">10.7</span>, and 10.8) 1. Visit python.org/download/ and download the Mac installer. It will be called Python 3.2.3 Mac OS X 64-bit/32-bit x86-64/i386 Installer. 2 saved it to) and double-click to mount it. It will be named python-3.2.3-macosx10.6.dmg. The disk image</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stephenson, Ben</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40060090"> <span id="translatedtitle">HgCdTe Growth on 6 <span class="hlt">cm</span> × 6 <span class="hlt">cm</span> CdZnTe Substrates for Large-Format Dual-Band Infrared Focal-Plane Arrays</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper describes molecular-beam epitaxy growth of mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) dual-band\\u000a device structures on large-area (6 <span class="hlt">cm</span> × 6 <span class="hlt">cm</span>) CdZnTe substrates. Wafer-level composition and defect mapping techniques were\\u000a used to investigate the limiting mechanisms in improving the cutoff wavelength (?\\u000a c) uniformity and reducing the defect density. Structural quality of epitaxial layers was monitored using etch pit density\\u000a (EPD)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. Reddy; J. M. Peterson; D. D. Lofgreen; T. Vang; E. A. Patten; W. A. Radford; S. M. Johnson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3158008"> <span id="translatedtitle">The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 maintains germinal center B cell homeostasis and promotes niche confinement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2)-deficient mice develop diffuse large B cell lymphoma. However, the role of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 in normal germinal center (GC) physiology is unknown. Here we show that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2-deficient GC B cells outgrow their wild-type counterparts in chronically-established GCs. We find that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2-, G12–G13- and p115RhoGEF-mediated antagonism of Akt regulates cell viability and is required for growth control in chronically proliferating GCs. We also find that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 inhibits GC B cell responses to follicular chemoattractants and helps confine cells to the GC. Moreover, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 overexpression promotes centering of activated B cells within the follicle. We suggest that by inhibiting Akt activation and migration, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 helps restrict GC B cell survival and localization to an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-low niche at the follicle center. PMID:21642988</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Green, Jesse A.; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Cho, Bryan; Willison, L. David; Palmer, Daniel; Allen, Christopher D.C.; Schmidt, Timothy H.; Xu, Ying; Proia, Richard L.; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Cyster, Jason G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvB..89x5432S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic phases in the <span class="hlt">S</span> =<span class="hlt">1</span> Shastry-Sutherland model with uniaxial anisotropy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We explore the field-induced magnetic phases of an <span class="hlt">S</span> =<span class="hlt">1</span> XXZ model with single-ion anisotropy and large Ising-like anisotropy on a Shastry-Sutherland lattice over a wide range of Hamiltonian parameters and applied magnetic field. The multitude of ground-state phases are characterized in detail in terms of their thermodynamic properties, and the underlying classical (Ising limit) spin arrangements for the plateau phases are identified by calculating the static structure factors. The enlarged local Hilbert space of the <span class="hlt">S</span> =<span class="hlt">1</span> spins results in several ground state phases that are not realized for <span class="hlt">S</span> =<span class="hlt">1</span>/2 spins. These include the quantum paramagnetic state that is ubiquitous to <span class="hlt">S</span> =<span class="hlt">1</span> spins with single-ion anisotropy, two different spin supersolid phases (with distinct longitudinal ordering), and a magnetization plateau that arises as a direct descendant of the 1/3 plateau due to quantum fluctuations that are not possible for <span class="hlt">S</span> =<span class="hlt">1</span>/2 spins. We predict the same mechanism will lead to plateaus at smaller fractions of 1/3 for higher spins. The full momentum dependence of the longitudinal and transverse components of the static structure factor is calculated in the spin supersolid phase to demonstrate the simultaneous existence of diagonal and off-diagonal long-range order as well as the different longitudinal orderings.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Su, Lei; Wierschem, Keola; Sengupta, Pinaki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23891752"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> pocket of glutamate carboxypeptidase II: a new binding site for amyloid-? degradation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We recently reported that glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) has a new physiological function degrading amyloid-? (A?), distinct from its own hydrolysis activity in N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate (NAAG); however, its underlying mechanism remains undiscovered. Using site-directed mutagenesis and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> pocket-specific chemical inhibitor (compound 2), which was developed for the present study based on in sillico computational modeling, we discovered that the A? degradation occurs through <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> pocket but not through <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>' pocket responsible for NAAG hydrolysis. Treatment with compound 2 prevented GCPII from A? degradation without any impairment in NAAG hydrolysis. Likewise, 2-PMPA (specific GCPII inhibitor developed targeting <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>' pocket) completely blocked the NAAG hydrolysis without any effect on A? degradation. Pre-incubation with NAAG and A? did not affect A? degradation and NAAG hydrolysis, respectively. These data suggest that GCPII has two distinctive binding sites for two different substrates and that A? degradation occurs through binding to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> pocket of GCPII. PMID:23891752</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee, Suk Kyung; Kim, Hyunyoung; Cheong, You-Hoon; Kim, Min-Ju; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Youn, Hyung-Seop; Park, Sang Ick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1345529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Angular 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Power Spectrum of a Scaling Distribution of Cosmic String Wakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cosmic string wakes lead to a large signal in 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> redshift maps at redshifts larger than that corresponding to reionization. Here, we compute the angular power spectrum of 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> radiation as predicted by a scaling distribution of cosmic strings whose wakes have undergone shock heating.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hernandez, Oscar F; Brandenberger, Robert; Fong, Jose</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22277806"> <span id="translatedtitle">Angular 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> power spectrum of a scaling distribution of cosmic string wakes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cosmic string wakes lead to a large signal in 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> redshift maps at redshifts larger than that corresponding to reionization. Here, we compute the angular power spectrum of 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> radiation as predicted by a scaling distribution of cosmic strings whose wakes have undergone shock heating.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hernández, Oscar F.; Wang, Yi; Brandenberger, Robert; Fong, José, E-mail: oscarh@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: wangyi@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: jose.fong@ens-lyon.fr [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.kitp.ucsb.edu/sites/default/files/kitp/research/nature06620.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A minimum column density of 1 g <span class="hlt">cm</span>22 for massive</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">LETTERS A minimum column density of 1 g <span class="hlt">cm</span>22 for massive star formation Mark R. Krumholz1--have not yet been determined. Here we show that only clouds with column densities of at least 1 g <span class="hlt">cm</span>22 can- lar initial mass function that it implies, naturally explain the char- acteristic column densities</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ahlers, Guenter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39912225"> <span id="translatedtitle">The centre-to-limb variation of the moon's brightness at 2 and 6<span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A map of the Moon at 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength is presented. The angular (? 1'arc) and temperature resolution (? is possible (1.4 ?? ? 2.5). The existence of a temperature gradient in the lunar surface layers is used to derive the depth of penetration of electromagnetic waves (Le), which isLe ? 8 m for 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength. The parameters derived</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. Hirth; M. Butz; L. Velden; E. Fuerst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020084975&hterms=Higher+English+2001+Past+Paper&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3DHigher%2BEnglish%2B2001%2BPast%2BPaper"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance Evaluation of 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Ion Optics for the NEXT Ion Engine</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of performance tests with two 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics sets are presented and compared to those of 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics with similar aperture geometries. The 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics utilized both NSTAR and TAG (Thick-Accelerator-Grid) aperture geometries. All 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics tests were conducted on a NEXT (NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster) laboratory model ion engine. Ion optics performance tests were conducted over a beam current range of 1.20 to 3.52 A and an engine input power range of 1.1 to 6.9 kW. Measured ion optics' performance parameters included near-field radial beam current density profiles, impingement-limited total voltages, electron backstreaming limits, screen grid ion transparencies, beam divergence angles, and start-up transients. Impingement-limited total voltages for 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics with the NSTAR aperture geometry were 60 to 90 V lower than those with the TAG aperture geometry. This difference was speculated to be due to an incomplete burn-in of the TAG ion optics. Electron backstreaming limits for the 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics with the TAG aperture geometry were 8 to 19 V higher than those with the NSTAR aperture geometry due to the thicker accelerator grid of the TAG geometry. Because the NEXT ion engine provided beam flatness parameters that were 40 to 63 percent higher than those of the NSTAR ion engine, the 40 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics outperformed the 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ion optics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Patterson, Michael J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5253828"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907: a structurally novel anticonvulsant in mice, rats and baboons</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 (3-(4-hydroxypiperidyl)-6-(2'-chlorophenyl)-pyridazine) is a chemically original compound which possesses the pharmacological properties of a potent, p.o. active anticonvulsant. The anticonvulsant activity of <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 was examined in mice, rats and photosensitive Papio-papio baboons and compared to that of phenobarbital, diphenylhydantoin, carbamazepine, sodium valproate and ethosuximide. In mice, <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 antagonized electroconvulsive shock and chemically induced seizures with an overall potency comparable to that of carbamazepine and a therapeutic ratio (ED50 rotorod/ED50 electroshock) superior to that of ethosuximide, sodium valproate, phenobarbital and carbamazepine. In the rat <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 suppressed completed kindled amygdaloid seizures and was approximately as active as phenobarbital. In naturally photosensitive Senegalese Papio-papio baboons <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 antagonized myoclonus and cortical paroxysmal discharges. In this model <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 was approximately one-fourth as potent as phenobarbital, twice as potent as carbamazepine and 6 times more potent than sodium valproate. In mice <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907, at anticonvulsant doses, increased the affinity of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam for its central receptor site. Based on these results it is postulated that <span class="hlt">CM</span> 40907 is a potent and relatively nonsedative anticonvulsant and may be of therapeutic benefit in epileptic disorders.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chambon, J.P.; Brochard, J.; Hallot, A.; Heaulme, M.; Brodin, R.; Roncucci, R.; Biziere, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0707.1841v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Review of H2CO 6<span class="hlt">cm</span> Masers in the Galaxy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a review of the field of formaldehyde (H2CO) 6<span class="hlt">cm</span> masers in the Galaxy. Previous to our ongoing work, H2CO 6<span class="hlt">cm</span> masers had been detected in the Galaxy only toward three regions: NGC7538 IRS1, Sgr B2, and G29.96-0.02. Current efforts by our group using the Very Large Array, Arecibo, and the Green Bank Telescope have resulted in the detection of four new H2CO 6<span class="hlt">cm</span> maser regions. We discuss the characteristics of the known H2CO masers and the association of H2CO 6<span class="hlt">cm</span> masers with very young regions of massive star formation. We also review the current ideas on the pumping mechanism for H2CO 6<span class="hlt">cm</span> masers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. Araya; P. Hofner; W. M. Goss</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-07-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23238921"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isolation, characterization, and expression analysis of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>MLO2 in muskmelon.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The full-length cDNA sequence of the MLO gene was cloned via SMART-RACE-PCR from muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), and was designated as <span class="hlt">Cm</span>MLO2 (GenBank Accession No. FJ713542). The gene is 1,710 bp long and encodes a 570-amino acid peptide with a seven-transmembrane domain topology, and is a typical transmembrane protein. Localization analysis in onion epidermal cells showed that <span class="hlt">Cm</span>MLO2-GFP is localized in the plasma membrane. The expression of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>MLO2 gene was analyzed in melon leaf infected with powdery mildew using a quantitative RT-PCR and it was found that <span class="hlt">Cm</span>MLO2 was mainly expressed in melon leaves in a no-tissue-specific pattern. Moreover, <span class="hlt">Cm</span>MLO2 may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of powdery mildew. PMID:23238921</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheng, Hong; Kong, Weiping; Hou, Dong; Lv, Junfeng; Tao, Xinglin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1034824"> <span id="translatedtitle">TESTING AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF NASA 5 <span class="hlt">CM</span> BY 5 <span class="hlt">CM</span> BI-SUPPORTED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELLS OPERATED IN BOTH FUEL CELL AND STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> by 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> bi-supported Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells (SOEC) were produced by NASA for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and tested under the INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis program. The results from the experimental demonstration of cell operation for both hydrogen production and operation as fuel cells is presented. An overview of the cell technology, test apparatus and performance analysis is also provided. The INL High Temperature Steam Electrolysis laboratory has developed significant test infrastructure in support of single cell and stack performance analyses. An overview of the single cell test apparatus is presented. The test data presented in this paper is representative of a first batch of NASA's prototypic 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> by 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> SOEC single cells. Clearly a significant relationship between the operational current density and cell degradation rate is evident. While the performance of these cells was lower than anticipated, in-house testing at NASA Glenn has yielded significantly higher performance and lower degradation rates with subsequent production batches of cells. Current post-test microstructure analyses of the cells tested at INL will be published in a future paper. Modification to cell compositions and cell reduction techniques will be altered in the next series of cells to be delivered to INL with the aim to decrease the cell degradation rate while allowing for higher operational current densities to be sustained. Results from the testing of new batches of single cells will be presented in a future paper.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. C. O'Brien; J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; X. Zhang; S. C. Farmer; T. L. Cable; J. A. Setlock</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1976288"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two Wave Functions and dS/CFT on <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> x S^2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We evaluate the tunneling and Hartle-Hawking wave functions on <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> x S^2 boundaries in Einstein gravity with a positive cosmological constant. In the large overall volume limit the classical predictions of both wave functions include an ensemble of Schwarzschild-de Sitter black holes. We show that the Hartle-Hawking tree level measure on the classical ensemble converges in the small <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> limit. A divergence in this regime can be identified in the tunneling state. However we trace this to the contribution of an unphysical branch of saddle points associated with negative mass black holes. Using a representation in which all saddle points have an interior Euclidean anti-de Sitter region we also generalise the holographic formulation of the semiclassical Hartle-Hawking wave function to <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> x S^2 boundaries.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Conti, Gabriele</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JChPh.129a4303Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy-dependent dynamics of large-?E collisions: Highly vibrationally excited azulene (E=20 390 and 38 580 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1) with CO2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the energy dependence of strong collisions of CO2 with highly vibrationally excited azulene for two initial energies, E =20390 and 38580<span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. These studies show that both the distribution of transferred energy and the energy transfer rates are sensitive to the azulene energy. Highly excited azulene was prepared in separate studies by absorption of pulsed excitation at ?=532 or 266nm, followed by rapid radiationless decay from <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> or S4 to vibrationally excited levels of the ground electronic state. The appearance of scattered CO2 (0000) molecules with Erot>1000<span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 was monitored by high-resolution transient IR absorption at ? =4.3?m. The average rotational and translational energies of the scattered CO2 molecules double when the azulene energy is increased by a factor of 2. The rate of energy transfer in strong collisions increases by nearly a factor of 4 when the azulene energy is doubled. The energy transfer probability distribution function for ?E >3000<span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 at each initial energy is an exponential decay with curvature that correlates with the energy dependence of the state density, in excellent agreement with predictions from GRETCHEN, a model based on Fermi's golden rule to describe collisional quenching of highly excited molecules.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuan, Liwei; Du, Juan; Mullin, Amy S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16697189"> <span id="translatedtitle">Discovery of 3-arylpropionic acids as potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1) with high selectivity against all other known <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor subtypes.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A series of 3-arylpropionic acids were synthesized as <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor agonists. Structure-activity relationship studies on the pendant phenyl ring revealed several structural features offering selectivity of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 binding against <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2-5. These highly selective <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 agonists induced peripheral blood lymphocyte lowering in mice and one of them was found to be efficacious in a rat skin transplantation model, supporting that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 agonism is primarily responsible for the immunosuppressive efficacy observed in preclinical animal models. PMID:16697189</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yan, Lin; Huo, Pei; Doherty, George; Toth, Lesile; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Quackenbush, Elizabeth; Wickham, Alexandra; Mandala, Suzanne M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16904708"> <span id="translatedtitle">The acrylamide (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> differentially affects Kv7 (KCNQ) potassium channels.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The family of Kv7 (KCNQ) potassium channels consists of five members. Kv7.2 and 3 are the primary molecular correlates of the M-current, but also Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 display M-current characteristics. M-channel modulators include blockers (e.g., linopirdine) for cognition enhancement and openers (e.g., retigabine) for treatment of epilepsy and neuropathic pain. We investigated the effect of a Bristol-Myers Squibb compound (S)-N-[1-(3-morpholin-4-yl-phenyl)-ethyl]-3-phenyl-acrylamide [(<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span>] on cloned human Kv7.1-5 potassium channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Using two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings we found that (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> blocks Kv7.1 and Kv7.1/KCNE1 currents. In contrast, (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> produced a hyperpolarizing shift of the activation curve for Kv7.2, Kv7.2/Kv7.3, Kv7.4 and Kv7.5. Further, the compound enhanced the maximal current amplitude at all potentials for Kv7.4 and Kv7.5 whereas the combined activation/block of Kv7.2 and Kv7.2/3 was strongly voltage-dependent. The tryptophan residue 242 in S5, known to be crucial for the effect of retigabine, was also shown to be critical for the enhancing effect of (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> and BMS204352. Furthermore, no additive effect on Kv7.4 current amplitude was observed when both retigabine and (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> or BMS204352 were applied simultaneously. In conclusion, (<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span> differentially affects the Kv7 channel subtypes and is dependent on a single tryptophan for the current enhancing effect in Kv7.4. PMID:16904708</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Schmitt, Nicole; Calloe, Kirstine; Dalby Brown, William; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4002783"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pharmacokinetic evaluation of novel oral fluorouracil antitumor drug <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> in Chinese cancer patients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> is an oral anticancer fluoropyrimidine formulation consisting of tegafur, 5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine and potassium oxonate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of a newly developed generic formulation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> in Chinese cancer patients in comparison with the branded reference formulation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>. Methods: A single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, two-way self-crossover study was conducted in 30 Chinese cancer patients. The subjects alternatively received the two formulations (40 mg/m2, po) with a 7-d interval. Plasma concentrations of FT, CDHP, Oxo, and 5-Fu were determined using LC-MS/MS. Pharmacokinetic parameters, including Cmax, Tmax, t1/2, AUC0–t, and AUC0–? were determined using non-compartmental models with DAS2.0 software. Bioequivalence of the two formulations were to be evaluated according to 90% CIs for the log-transformed ratios of AUC and Cmax of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>. Adverse events were evaluated through monitoring the symptom, physical and laboratory examinations, ECGs and subject interviews. Results: The mean values of Cmax, AUC0–t, and AUC0–? of FT, 5-Fu, CDHP, and Oxo for the two formulations had no significant differences. The 90% CIs for natural log-transformed ratios of Cmax, AUC0–t, and AUC0–? were within the predetermined bioequivalence acceptance limits. A total of 11 mild adverse events, including fatigue, nausea and vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea and myelosuppression, were observed, and no serious and special adverse events were found. Conclusion: The newly developed generic formulation and reference formulation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> have similar pharmacokinetics with one dose (40 mg/m2) in Chinese cancer patients. Both the formulations of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> are well tolerated. PMID:23396375</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhuang, Zhi-xiang; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Ji; Zhu, Min-gao; Wang, Hui; Pu, Wang-yang; Bian, Hua-hui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Hong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014CliPD..10.4647T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eastern Mediterranean Sea circulation inferred from the conditions of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> sapropel deposition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Holocene Eastern Mediterranean Sea sediments contain an organic-rich sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> layer that was formed in oxygen-depleted waters. The spatial distribution of this layer revealed that during <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> deposition deep waters were permanently anoxic below 1800 m in water depth. To provide further insight into past Eastern Mediterranean Sea circulation, a multi-proxy approach was applied to a core retrieved close to the 1800 m boundary (at 1780 m). We measured the bulk sediment elemental composition, the stable isotopic composition of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber, and the abundance of benthic foraminifera since the last deglaciation. The result indicates that authigenic U and Mo accumulation began around 13-12 cal ka BP, in concert with surface water freshening estimated from the G. ruber ?18O record. The onset of bottom/pore water oxygen depletion occurred prior to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> deposition inferred from barium enrichment. In the middle of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> deposition period, between 9 and 8 cal ka BP, reduced authigenic V, Fe and As contents and Br / Cl ratio indicated short-term bottom water re-oxygenation. A sharp Mn peak and maximal abundance for benthic foraminifera marked a total recovery for circulation at approximately 7 cal ka BP. Based on our results and existing data, we suggest that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> formation withinthe upper 1780 m of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea was preconditioned by reduced ventilation, resulting from excess fresh water inputs due to insolation changes under deglacial conditions, that initiated between 15 and 12 ka. Short-term re-oxygenation in the Levantine Basin is estimated to have affected bottom water below and above the anoxic boundary. We tentatively propose that complete ventilation recovery at the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> termination was attained earlier within the upper 1780 m than at deeper water depths. Our results provided new constraints for eastern Mediterranean Sea thermohaline circulation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tachikawa, K.; Vidal, L.; Cornuault, M.; Garcia, M.; Pothin, A.; Sonzogni, C.; Bard, E.; Menot, G.; Revel, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993JMoSp.162..426R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vibration Wavenumbers of 2-Aminobenzotrifluoride in the Ground and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Electronic States from Its Infrared, Raman, and Supersonic Jet <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-S0 Fluorescence Spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Raman and infrared spectra of 2-aminobenzotrifluoride, in the liquid phase, and single vibronic level fluorescence (SVLF) spectra, in a supersonic jet, have been recorded and assigned to give an almost complete set of fundamental vibration wavenumbers in S0. In the SVLF spectrum, the assignment of the I 02 band, where ? I is the NH 2-inversion vibration, is not so straightforward as for 3- and 4-aminobenzotrifluoride, and the most likely assignment is discussed. The fluorescence excitation spectrum gives some lower vibrational wavenumbers in the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> electronic state and shows a long progression in the CF 3 torsional mode.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ribeiroclaro, P. J. A.; Teixeiradias, J. J. C.; Gordon, R. D.; Hollas, J. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991JMoSp.150...46R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vibration wavenumbers of 3-aminobenzotrifluoride in the ground and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> electronic states from its infrared, Raman, and supersonic jet <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>- S0 fluorescence spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Raman and infrared spectra of 3-aminobenzotrifluoride, in the liquid phase, and single vibronic level fluorescence spectra, in a supersonic jet, have been obtained and interpreted to give a fairly complete set of vibrational assignments in S0. These include the observation of the I 20 band in fluorescence, where ?1 is the NH 2-inversion vibration, in agreement with a previous interpretation of the gas phase far infrared spectrum. A strong Fermi resonance between one quantum of the a'C?CF 3 bending vibration and two quanta of the a?C?CF 3 bending vibration has been identified in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ribeiro-Claro, Paulo J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, JoséJ. C.; Gordon, Robert D.; Hollas, J. Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.scs.illinois.edu/silverman/docs/SilvermanPub49Supp.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">J. Org. Chem. Supporting Information page <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Synthesis and Application of a 5-Aldehyde Phosphoramidite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">for compounds 3­7 5-O-Allyl-3-O-benzylthymidine (3): 1 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 8.89 (br <span class="hlt">s</span>, <span class="hlt">1</span>H), 7.63 (br q, 1H, J = 1.0 Hz); 13 C NMR (125 MHz, CDCl3) 163.8, 150.3, 137.5, 135.8, 133.9, 128.5, 127.6, 117.5, 110 H NMR (400 MHz, CDCl3) 8.62 (br <span class="hlt">s</span>, <span class="hlt">1</span>H), 7.41-7.29 (m, 6H), 6.25 (m, 1H), 4.54 (ABq, 2H, J = 11.6 Hz</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Silverman, Scott K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21386401"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monte Carlo study of mixed-spin <span class="hlt">S</span> = (<span class="hlt">1</span>/2, 1) Ising ferrimagnets.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate Ising ferrimagnets on square and simple cubic lattices with exchange couplings between spins of values <span class="hlt">S</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>/2 and 1 on neighbouring sites and an additional single-site anisotropy term on the <span class="hlt">S</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span> sites. Mainly on the basis of a careful and comprehensive Monte Carlo study, we conclude that there is no tricritical point in the two-dimensional case, in contradiction to mean-field predictions and recent series results. However, evidence for a tricritical point is found in the three-dimensional case. In addition, a line of compensation points is found for the simple cubic, but not for the square lattice. PMID:21386401</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Selke, W; Oitmaa, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003PhRvL..91y2001S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of an Exotic <span class="hlt">S</span>=+<span class="hlt">1</span> Baryon in Exclusive Photoproduction from the Deuteron</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In an exclusive measurement of the reaction ?d?K+K-pn, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness <span class="hlt">S</span>=+<span class="hlt">1</span> is seen in the K+n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1.542±0.005 GeV/c2 with a measured width of 0.021 GeV/c2 FWHM, which is largely determined by experimental mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is (5.2±0.6)?. The mass and width of the observed peak are consistent with recent reports of a narrow <span class="hlt">S</span>=+<span class="hlt">1</span> baryon by other experimental groups.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stepanyan, S.; Hicks, K.; Carman, D. S.; Pasyuk, E.; Schumacher, R. A.; Smith, E. S.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Todor, L.; Adams, G.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Audit, G.; Avakian, H.; Bagdasaryan, H.; Ball, J. P.; Barrow, S. P.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bellis, M.; Berman, B. L.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carnahan, B.; Chen, S.; Ciciani, L.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L.; de Vita, R.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dhuga, K. S.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Dzyubak, O. P.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Eugenio, P.; Fatemi, R.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Forest, T. A.; Funsten, H.; Garçon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Gordon, C. I.; Gothe, R.; Griffioen, K.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hakobyan, R. S.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Heimberg, P.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Juengst, H. G.; Kellie, J. D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuang, Y.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Lawrence, D.; Li, J.; Lima, A.; Livingston, K.; Lukashin, K.; Manak, J. J.; McAleer, S.; McNabb, J. W.; Mecking, B. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Melone, J. J.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Mikhailov, K.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morand, L.; Morrow, S.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L. Y.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niczyporuk, B. B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Brien, J.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Opper, A. K.; Osipenko, M.; Park, K.; Peterson, G.; Philips, S. A.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Pozdniakov, S.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Santoro, J.; Sapunenko, V.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A. V.; Smith, L. C.; Sober, D. I.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Stavinsky, A.; Stoler, P.; Suleiman, R.; Taiuti, M.; Taylor, S.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Tur, C.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A. V.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, C. S.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Yun, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14754107"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of an exotic <span class="hlt">S</span> = +<span class="hlt">1</span> baryon in exclusive photoproduction from the deuteron.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In an exclusive measurement of the reaction gammad-->K(+)K(-)pn, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness <span class="hlt">S</span>=+<span class="hlt">1</span> is seen in the K(+)n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1.542+/-0.005 GeV/c(2) with a measured width of 0.021 GeV/c(2) FWHM, which is largely determined by experimental mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is (5.2+/-0.6)sigma. The mass and width of the observed peak are consistent with recent reports of a narrow <span class="hlt">S</span>=+<span class="hlt">1</span> baryon by other experimental groups. PMID:14754107</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stepanyan, S; Hicks, K; Carman, D S; Pasyuk, E; Schumacher, R A; Smith, E S; Tedeschi, D J; Todor, L; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S P; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carnahan, B; Chen, S; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; De Vita, R; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuang, Y; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Lawrence, D; Li, J; Lima, A; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Murphy, L Y; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Brien, J; O'Rielly, G V; Opper, A K; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J; Sapunenko, V; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Strakovsky, I I; Stavinsky, A; Stoler, P; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-12-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp//issp_wms/DATA/OPTION/release20140502.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">-H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2Cat-(b) <span class="hlt">S</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>/2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">/ NIMS ) NIMS -H3(Cat- EDT-TTF)2Cat- EDT-TTF (b) <span class="hlt">S</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>/2 2(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 1 2 Cat-EDT-TTF 1(a) Cat-EDT-TTF <span class="hlt">S</span> =<span class="hlt">1</span>/2 3 20 K-253.15 3K -270.15 50mK-273.10 - (BEDT-TTF)2Cu2(CN)3 EtMe3Sb[Pd(dmit)2]2 Cat-EDT-TTF 2 1(c) -H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 -H3(Cat</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Katsumoto, Shingo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70035673"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fe-Ni metal and sulfide minerals in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites: An indicator for thermal history</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites were subjected to aqueous alteration and, in some cases, to secondary metamorphic heating. The effects of these processes vary widely, and have mainly been documented in silicate phases. Herein, we report the characteristic features of Fe-Ni metal and sulfide phases in 13 <span class="hlt">CM</span> and 2 <span class="hlt">CM</span>-related chondrites to explore the thermal history of these chondrites. The texture and compositional distribution of the metal in <span class="hlt">CM</span> are different from those in unequilibrated ordinary and CO chondrites, but most have similarities to those in highly primitive chondrites, such as CH, CR, and Acfer 094. We classified the <span class="hlt">CM</span> samples into three categories based on metal composition and sulfide texture. Fe-Ni metal in category A is kamacite to martensite. Category B is characterized by pyrrhotite grains always containing blebs or lamellae of pentlandite. Opaque mineral assemblages of category C are typically kamacite, Ni-Co-rich metal, and pyrrhotite. These categories are closely related to the degree of secondary heating and are not related to degree of the aqueous alteration. The characteristic features of the opaque minerals can be explained by secondary heating processes after aqueous alteration. Category A <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites are unheated, whereas those in category B experienced small degrees of secondary heating. CMs in category C were subjected to the most severe secondary heating process. Thus, opaque minerals can provide constraints on the thermal history for <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2011.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kimura, M.; Grossman, J.N.; Weisberg, M.K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20695671"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fission-product formation in the thermal-neutron-induced fission of odd <span class="hlt">Cm</span> isotopes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermal-neutron-induced fission of {sup 243}<span class="hlt">Cm</span> was studied at the Lohengrin mass separator. The light-mass peak of the fission-yield curve was investigated, and yields of masses from A=72 to A=120 were obtained. Independent-product yields were determined for nuclear charges Z=28-37. The yield of masses in the superasymmetric region was found to be identical to other fission reactions studied at Lohengrin. The multimodal approach to fission and the macroscopic-microscopic method for the calculation of charge-distribution parameters in isobaric chains were used to analyze experimental results from the fission of {sup 243}<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and {sup 245}<span class="hlt">Cm</span>. A systematics on fission modes was derived from the analysis and extended to the {sup 247}<span class="hlt">Cm</span> case. The weight of the {sup 132}Sn mode was found to decrease in {sup 243}<span class="hlt">Cm</span>, relative to the {sup 245}<span class="hlt">Cm</span> nucleus. A prediction of the {sup 78}Ni yield in the fission of <span class="hlt">Cm</span> isotopes was made. The feasibility of the study of {sup 78}Ni at Lohengrin has been demonstrated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tsekhanovich, I.; Varapai, N.; Rubchenya, V.; Rochman, D.; Simpson, G.S.; Sokolov, V.; Fioni, G.; Al Mahamid, Ilham [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38042 Grenoble (France); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Siege, 75752 Paris Cedex 15 (France); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/786675"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact of MST on the Rheology of the Neutralized Am/<span class="hlt">Cm</span> Slurry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The americium (Am) and curium (<span class="hlt">Cm</span>) solution, currently stored in F-Canyon Tank 17.1 will be neutralized and diluted prior to addition to High Level Waste (HLW) sludge batch 3 to eliminate the cost and uncertainty of processing and vitrifying this solution. One of the processing alternatives involves the addition of monosodium titanate (MST) to adsorb any soluble Am, <span class="hlt">Cm</span> or Pu present in the slurry. This paper discusses the impact of the MST on the rheology of the neutralized Am/<span class="hlt">Cm</span> slurry.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lambert, D.P.; Peters, T.B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-08-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20722725"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mass and Isotopic Yields in Super-Asymmetric Fission of 245<span class="hlt">Cm</span>(nth,f)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mass, isotopic yields for thermal-neutron induced fission of 245<span class="hlt">Cm</span> at the Lohengrin fission-product mass separator are described. Using an ionization chamber coupled to the mass separator, we have measured the mass and isotopic yields from fragment mass A=67 up to A=77 over three yield decades. This considerably extends the data set previously known for the light peak. The results of mass and isotopic yields are compared with those of other compound nuclei to highlight the shell effect at mass 70 for the 246<span class="hlt">Cm</span>* compound-nucleus system. Finally, the neutron evaporation in the super-asymmetric fission of 245<span class="hlt">Cm</span> is investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rochman, D. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tsekhanovich, I.; Simpson, G. [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Goennenwein, F. [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Storrer, F. [CEA Saclay (France); Sokolov, V. [PNPI Gatchina (Russian Federation); Serot, O. [CEA Cadarache (France)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-05-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.141x4310M"> <span id="translatedtitle">New observation and combined analysis of the Cs 2 0g - , 0u + , and 1g states at the asymptotes 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P1/2 and 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P3/2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on new observations of the photoassociation spectroscopy of ultracold cesium molecules using a highly sensitive detection technique and a combined analysis with all observed electronic states. The technique is achieved by directly modulating the frequency of the trapping lasers of a magneto-optical trap. New observations of the Cs2 0g - , 0u + , and 1g states at the asymptotes 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P1/2 and 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P3/2 are reported. The spectral range is extended to the red detuning of 112 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 below the 6<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 + 6P3/2 dissociation limit. Dozens of vibrational levels of the ultracold Cs2 0g - , 0u + , and 1g states are observed for the first time. The available experimental binding energies of these states are analyzed simultaneously in a framework of the generalized LeRoy-Bernstein theory and the almost degenerate perturbation theory by Marinescu and Dalgarno [Phys. Rev. A: At., Mol., Opt. Phys. 52, 311 (1995)]. The unique atomic-related parameter c3 governing the dispersion forces of all the molecular states is estimated as (10.29 ± 0.05) a.u.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ma, Jie; Liu, Wenliang; Yang, Jinxin; Wu, Jizhou; Sun, Weiguo; Ivanov, Valery S.; Skublov, Alexei S.; Sovkov, Vladimir B.; Dai, Xingcan; Jia, Suotang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://mat.ufrgs.br/~alopes/prevkupka.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">On generic G-prevalent properties of Cr diffeomorphisms of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">On generic G-prevalent properties of Cr diffeomorphisms of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and a quantitative K-S theorem Artur) structure usually consider in the classical setting of prevalence. In this way we will be able to define the meaning of G-prevalent set. In this setting we will show a kind of quantitative Kupka-Smale Theorem</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lopes, Artur Oscar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~mike/ml4as/01/l01-2x2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">09<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Introduction to Machine Learning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">09<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Introduction to Machine Learning March 12, 2008 Acknowledgement: Material derived from slides for the book Machine Learning, Tom Mitchell, McGraw-Hill, 1997 http to describe the motivation, scope and some application areas of machine learning. Following it you should</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bain, Mike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~mike/ml4as/04/l00-2x2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">09<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Machine Learning for Numeric</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">09<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Machine Learning for Numeric Prediction April 1, 2009 Acknowledgement: Material derived from slides for the book Machine Learning, Tom M. Mitchell, Mc by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Aims This lecture will enable you to describe and reproduce machine learning</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bain, Mike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17533388"> <span id="translatedtitle">A phase I trial of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> with concurrent radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigated the maximum tolerated dose of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> based on the frequency of its dose-limiting toxicities (DLT) with concurrent radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> was administered orally at escalating doses from 50 to 80 mg m(-2) b.i.d. on the day of irradiation during radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was delivered through four fields as a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks, and no prophylactic nodal irradiation was given. Twenty-one patients (50 three; 60 five; 70 six; 80 mg m(-2) seven patients) were enrolled in this trial. At a dose of 70 mg m(-2) <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, two of six patients demonstrated DLT involving grade 3 nausea and vomiting and grade 3 haemorrhagic gastritis, whereas no patients at doses other than 70 mg m(-2) demonstrated any sign of DLT. Among the 21 enrolled patients, four (19.0%) showed a partial response. The median progression-free survival time and median survival time for the patients overall were 8.9 and 11.0 months, respectively. The recommended dose of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy with concurrent radiotherapy is 80 mg m(-2) day(-1). A multi-institutional phase II trial of this regimen in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer is now underway. PMID:17533388</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ikeda, M; Okusaka, T; Ito, Y; Ueno, H; Morizane, C; Furuse, J; Ishii, H; Kawashima, M; Kagami, Y; Ikeda, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/74200"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diffractive dijet production in p?p collisions at ?<span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96?TeV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in p?p collisions at ?<span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96??TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p?p collider. A data sample from 310??pb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/71543"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observation of Exclusive ?? Production in pp? Collisions at ?<span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96??TeV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have observed exclusive ?? production in proton-antiproton collisions at ?<span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96??TeV, using data from 1.11±0.07??fb[superscript -1] integrated luminosity taken by the Run II Collider Detector at Fermilab. We selected ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://homepages.see.leeds.ac.uk/~earlgb/Publications/Velina%20et%20al%20Dy-carbonates%20J%20Nanopart%20Res%202013%20Sup%20Info.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">SUPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. FTIR stretching () and bending () vibrational bands for ADC,</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SUPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. FTIR stretching () and bending () vibrational bands for ADC, Dy2 profile. Tick marks below the pattern represent the positions of allowed reflections for DyCO3(OH) (upper tick marks) and Dy2O2CO3 (lower tick marks). The difference curve is plotted at the bottom</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benning, Liane G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2786557"> <span id="translatedtitle">Genome Sequence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Serotype c Strain D11<span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> ?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a major etiological agent of periodontitis. Here we report the complete genome sequence of serotype c strain D11<span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, which was recovered from the subgingival plaque of a patient diagnosed with generalized aggressive periodontitis. PMID:19820097</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Casey; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Si, Yan; Bumgarner, Roger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014DPS....4620914S"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-Dispersion Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) with the Subaru Telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) on UT 2013 November 15 with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 0.601 and 0.898 AU, respectively. We selected the slit size of 0”.5 x 9”.0 on the sky to achieve the spectral resolution of R = 72,000 from 550 to 830 nm. The total exposure time of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) was 1200 seconds. We detected many emission lines caused from radicals (e.g., CN, C2, NH2), ions (H2O+), atoms ([OI] and Na I) and also many unidentified lines in the spectra. We report the (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia estimated from the high-dispersion spectra of H2O+ and NH2, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the isotopic ratios of C2 (the carbon isotopic ratio from Swan band) and CN (the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from red band), (4) the sodium-to-continuum ratio of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Nagashima, Masayoshi; Hitomi, Kobayashi; Decock, Alice; Jehin, Emmanuel; Boice, Daniel C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sites.bio.indiana.edu/~pikaardlab/PDFs%20and%20protocol%20files%20/invitrotx.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">In Vitro Transcription and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease protection analysis of transcripts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">remove supernatant (pellets may not be visible) and discard in radioactive waste container. -add 1ml cold and wash pellets with 1 ml 70% EtOH. Mix by inversion, spin again 5 min. #12;-pour off supernatant and dry pellets. -resuspend thoroughly the RNA/ probe pellet in 30ul formamide hybridization buffer: formamide <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pikaard, Craig</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22H+system%22&pg=2&id=ED093053"> <span id="translatedtitle">Administration and Leadership. The Individualized System. H.<span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span> Studies.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In September 1972, all Ontario secondary schools were directed to implement the individualized or credit system by making changes in administration and organization congruent with the revised diploma regulations outlined in the Ministry of Education Circular H.<span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span> (1972/73). This study examines the changes that are occurring and the issues of…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryan, Doris W.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22H+system%22&pg=2&id=ED105601"> <span id="translatedtitle">Courses and Patterns of Student Choice. The Individualized System. H.<span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span> Studies.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With Circular H.<span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span> 1972/73, the Ministry of Education directed Ontario's secondary schools to provide an increased range of course offerings and to allow students as much freedom as possible to choose their own courses. To identify the effects of the individualized "credit system" established by this controversial circular, a number of studies…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leithwood, Kenneth A.; And Others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22H+system%22&pg=2&id=ED105603"> <span id="translatedtitle">Student Participation in Decision-Making. The Individualized System. H.<span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span> Studies.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With Circular H.<span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span> 1972/73, the Ministry of Education directed Ontario's secondary schools to provide an increased range of course offerings and to allow students as much freedom as possible to choose their own courses. To identify the effects of the individualized "credit system" established by this controversial circular, a number of studies…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alexander, William E.; Farrell, Joseph P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.mathematik.uni-bielefeld.de/sfb343/preprints/pr99099.ps.gz"> <span id="translatedtitle">A category of pseudo-tangles with classifying 1 <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> and applications ?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> , which has a pictorial description by pseudo-tangles. This leads to an elementary has a pictorial interpretation, i.e. there is a pictorially described category G which is equivalent. It is denoted by FP;D and has again a pictorial descrip- tion. FP is a subcategory of FP;D , and #25; 0 BFP</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bielefeld, University of</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cs.nott.ac.uk/~nza/G53KRR09/answers-defaults.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exercises on defaults Consider the following knowledge base: <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Cats don't attack people</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Exercises on defaults Consider the following knowledge base: <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Cats don't attack people S2 Wild cats are cats S3 Wild cats when threatened attack people S4 a is a cat S5 b is a wild cat implications, which are true without exceptions. Use unary predicates C for cat, W for wild cat, A for attack</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alechina, Natasha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nd.edu/~sevens/luev.ps"> <span id="translatedtitle">Poisson harmonic forms, Kostant harmonic forms, and the <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> equivariant cohomology of K/T</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Poisson harmonic forms, Kostant harmonic forms, and the <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> ­equivariant cohomology of K/T Sam Abstract We characterize the harmonic forms on a flag manifold K/T defined by Kostant in 1963 in terms of a Poisson structure. Namely, they are ``Poisson harmonic'' with respect to the so­called Bruhat Poisson</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evens, Sam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.seas.ucla.edu/~pilon/Publications/JDST2010.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care Dmitry Yudovsky, M.<span class="hlt">S</span>.,<span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1099 Hyperspectral Imaging in Diabetic Foot Wound Care Dmitry Yudovsky, M.<span class="hlt">S</span>.,<span class="hlt">1</span> Aksone Nouvong, D.P.M.,2 and Laurent Pilon, Ph.D.3 Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology Volume 4, Issue 5, September 2010 © Diabetes Technology Society Introduction Diabetes mellitus affected 194 million people worldwide</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pilon, Laurent</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25573299"> <span id="translatedtitle">SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P inhibitor PF-429242 impairs the onset of HCV infection.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Worldwide, approximately 170 million individuals are afflicted with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To prevent the development of inherent diseases such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, tremendous efforts have been made, leading to the development of promising new treatments. However, their efficiency is still dependent on the viral genotype. Additionally, these treatments that target the virus directly can trigger the emergence of resistant variants. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a long-term (72h) inhibition of SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P, a master lipogenic pathway regulator through activation of SREBP, resulted in impaired HCV genome replication and infectious virion secretion. In the present study, we sought to investigate the antiviral effect of the SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P small molecule inhibitor PF-429242 at the early steps of the HCV lifecycle. Our results indicate a very potent antiviral effect of the inhibitor early in the viral lifecycle and that the overall action of the compound relies on two different contributions. The first one is SREBP/SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P dependent and involves LDLR and NPC1L1 proteins, while the second one is SREBP independent. Overall, our study confirms that SKI-1/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is a relevant target to impair HCV infection and that PF-429242 could be a promising candidate in the field of HCV infection treatment. PMID:25573299</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Blanchet, Matthieu; Sureau, Camille; Guévin, Carl; Seidah, Nabil G; Labonté, Patrick</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...06..181M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adjoint QCD on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with twisted fermionic boundary conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate QCD with adjoint Dirac fermions on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with generic boundary conditions for fermions along <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>. By means of perturbation theory, semiclassical methods and a chiral effective model, we elucidate a rich phase structure in the space spanned by the <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> compactification scale L, twisted fermionic boundary condition ? and the fermion mass m. We found various phases with or without chiral and center symmetry breaking, separated by first- and second-order phase transitions, which in specific limits ( ? = 0, ? = ?, L ? 0 and m ? ?) reproduce known results in the literature. In the center- symmetric phase at small L, we show that Ünsal's bion-induced confinement mechanism is at work but is substantially weakened at ? = 0 by a linear potential between monopoles. Through an analytic and numerical study of the PNJL model, we show that the order parameters for center and chiral symmetries (i.e., Polyakov loop and chiral condensate) are strongly intertwined at ? = 0. Due to this correlation, a deconfined phase can intervene between a weak-coupling center-symmetric phase at small L and a strong-coupling one at large L. Whether this happens or not depends on the ratio of the dynamical fermion mass to the energy scale of the Yang-Mills theory. Implication of this possibility for resurgence in gauge theories is briefly discussed. In an appendix, we study the index of the adjoint Dirac operator on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with twisted boundary conditions, which is important for semiclassical analysis of monopoles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Misumi, Tatsuhiro; Kanazawa, Takuya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2442634"> <span id="translatedtitle">S?3 switch sequences function in place of endogenous <span class="hlt">S</span>?<span class="hlt">1</span> to mediate antibody class switching</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) replaces the initially expressed IgH C? exons with a set of downstream IgH constant region (CH) exons. Individual sets of CH exons are flanked upstream by long (1–10-kb) repetitive switch (S) regions, with CSR involving a deletional recombination event between the donor S? region and a downstream S region. Targeting CSR to specific S regions might be mediated by S region–specific factors. To test the role of endogenous S region sequences in targeting specific CSR events, we generated mutant B cells in which the endogenous 10-kb <span class="hlt">S</span>?<span class="hlt">1</span> region was replaced with wild-type (WT) or synthetic 2-kb S?3 sequences or a synthetic 2-kb <span class="hlt">S</span>?<span class="hlt">1</span> sequence. We found that both the inserted endogenous and synthetic S?3 sequences functioned similarly to a size-matched synthetic <span class="hlt">S</span>?<span class="hlt">1</span> sequence to mediate substantial CSR to IgG1 in mutant B cells activated under conditions that stimulate IgG1 switching in WT B cells. We conclude that S?3 can function similarly to <span class="hlt">S</span>?<span class="hlt">1</span> in mediating endogenous CSR to IgG1. The approach that we have developed will facilitate assays for IgH isotype–specific functions of other endogenous S regions. PMID:18541713</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zarrin, Ali A.; Goff, Peter H.; Senger, Kate; Alt, Frederick W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3684237"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of FAK in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-Regulated Endothelial Permeability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The vascular endothelium serves as a semi-selective barrier between the circulating contents of the blood and the tissues through which they flow. Disruption of this barrier results in significant organ dysfunction during devastating inflammatory syndromes such as sepsis and acute lung injury (ALI). Sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) is an endogenous lipid regulator of endothelial permeability that produces potent barrier enhancement via actin and junctional protein rearrangement and resultant cytoskeletal changes. A key effector protein in this <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P response is focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a highly conserved cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase involved in the engagement of integrins and assembly of focal adhesions (FA) through the catalysis of multiple downstream signals. After stimulation by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P, endothelial FAK undergoes specific tyrosine phosphorylation that results in activation of the kinase and dynamic interactions with other effector molecules to improve the endothelial barrier. FAK participates in peripheral actin cytoskeletal rearrangement as well as cell-matrix (FA) and cell-cell (adherens junction) junctional complex strengthening that combine to decrease vascular permeability. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the role of FAK in mediating enhanced endothelial barrier function by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P. PMID:21925517</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Belvitch, Patrick; Dudek, Steven M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8673739"> <span id="translatedtitle">Northern analysis of highly folded goat alpha <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> casein mRNA.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Northern blotting using glyoxal to denature a highly folded mRNA, such as goat alpha <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-Casein E, can lead to the detection of multiple incompletely denatured forms. Formaldehyde appears to be the most suitable agent for Northern blotting due to its effective denaturing capacity and lower toxicity than methylmercuric hydroxide. PMID:8673739</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jansà Pérez, M; Leroux, C; Sànchez Bonastre, A; Martin, P</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/16535287"> <span id="translatedtitle">Northern analysis of highly folded goat ? <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Casein mRNA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Northern blotting using glyoxal to denature a highly folded mRNA, such as goat ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-Casein E, can lead to the detection of multiple incompletely denatured forms. Formaldehyde appears to be the most suitable agent for Northern blotting due to its effective denaturing capacity and lower toxicity than methylmercuric hydroxide.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Marta JansàPérez; Christine Leroux; Armand Sànchez Bonastre; Patrice Martin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.astrochem.org/docs/Tanetal2005a.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cavity ring-down spectroscopy and theoretical calculations of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>,,1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">was prepared with a pulsed discharge slit nozzle and detected by cavity ring-down spectroscopy. A numberCavity ring-down spectroscopy and theoretical calculations of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>,,1 B3u...]S0,,1 Ag of the trapped species with the solid lattice. This shortcoming was overcome by the application of cavity ring</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.upmc.fr/docs/00/63/94/31/PDF/Nature2011-02-02478B_SupplInfo.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. List of IOPW-PVOL contributors and their instruments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">tracking and photometry measurements were performed using the LAIA software (refs. 11, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>). Further details,version1-6Nov2012 #12;4 Figure S2. Multi-spectral images of the GWS and Photometry. We obtained images</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/13/7859/2013/acp-13-7859-2013-supplement.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Auxiliary Material Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Description of five emission categories of NEI.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 Auxiliary Material Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Description of five emission categories of NEI. Emission Category. Year Meteorology Resolution Layer 1997-2004 Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) 80 km 26 2004-2006 Eta Data Assimilation System (EDAS) 40 km 26 2007-2011 North America Mesoscale (NAM) 12 km 26 #12;3 Figure</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meskhidze, Nicholas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://my.ece.ucsb.edu/York/Yorklab/Publications/BioBib/74%20-%20IMS%201996%20FMCW%20Radar.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>MPL:E TECHNIQUES TO CO~RIRECI'FOR VCO NONLINEARITIES</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">WlE4D-5 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>MPL:E TECHNIQUES TO CO~RIRECI'FOR VCO NONLINEARITIES IN SHORT RANGE: FMCW RADARS Jorn 93106 ABSTRACT Standard hardware techniqiies for the linearization of the frequency sweep in FMCW radars-based linearization technique is introduced for short-range FMCW radars, and compared with a simple hardware line</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">York, Robert A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://sabatinilab.wi.mit.edu/Sabatini%20papers/Rictor_Supp_Data-CB-2004.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>Supplemental Data Rictor, a Novel Binding Partner of mTOR, Defines</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Covance; myc mono- reTOF) MS using a BRUKER UltraFlex TOF/TOF instrument (Bruker clonal antibody from prepared samples,[<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>], and the rictor and raptor antibodies were developed with the using the UltraFlex</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sabatini, David M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1403.2711v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Higgs branch localization of $\\mathcal{N}=1$ theories on $S^3 \\times <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>$</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We apply the method of Higgs branch localization to the $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supersymmetric partition function on $S^3\\times <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>.$ As a result, we show that it can be written as the product of an elliptic vortex and anti-vortex partition function summed over a finite number of Higgs vacua.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wolfger Peelaers</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-06-04/pdf/2012-13306.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 32975 - AHRQ Workgroups on ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span>/PCS Conversion of Quality Indicators (QIs)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality AHRQ Workgroups on ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span>/PCS Conversion of Quality Indicators (QIs) AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of request for...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/dc0091.photos.025364p/"> <span id="translatedtitle">5. Historic American Buildings Survey Exterior photocopy from <span class="hlt">C.M</span>. Pepper, ...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p class="result-summary">5. Historic American Buildings Survey Exterior photocopy from <span class="hlt">C.M</span>. Pepper, Everyday Life in Washington (1900, p. 371) - Robert P. Dodge House, 1534 Twenty-eighth Street Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21135933"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effect of temperature on the complexation of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>(III) with nitrate in aqueous solutions.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The complexation of curium(III) with nitrate was studied at different temperatures (10-85 °C) by luminescence spectroscopy. The stability constants of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>NO(3)(2+) were calculated from the luminescence emission spectra. The specific ion interaction approach (SIT) was used to obtain the stability constants of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>NO(3)(2+) at infinite dilution and variable temperatures. The complexation is weak and little effect of temperature on the complexation was observed over the temperature range 10-85 °C. Data on the luminescence lifetime indicate that each nitrate ligand replaces two water molecules from the inner coordination sphere of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>(3+), forming a bidentate inner-sphere complex with <span class="hlt">Cm</span>(3+) in aqueous solutions. PMID:21135933</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/77255"> <span id="translatedtitle">Initial exploration of 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> cosmology with imaging and power spectra from the Murchison Widefield Array</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency radio array under construction in Western Australia with a primary goal of measuring the power spectrum of the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal from neutral hydrogen during the Epoch ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Williams, Christopher Leigh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5790943"> <span id="translatedtitle">Juan de Fuca plate: Aseismic subduction at 1. 8 <span class="hlt">cm</span>/yr</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Volcanic activity in the Cascades in historic times suggests that the Juan de Fuca plate is underthrusting aseismically at about 1.8 <span class="hlt">cm</span>/yr. This rate of underthrusting is identical to the rate computed from sediment studies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Acharya, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/1501.01970.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signatures of residual HI inside cosmic HII regions during reionization</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the impact of sinks of ionizing radiation on the reionization-era 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal, focusing on 1-point statistics. We consider sinks in both the intergalactic medium and inside galaxies. At a fixed filling factor of HII regions, sinks will have two main effects on the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> morphology: (i) as inhomogeneous absorbers of ionizing photons they result in smaller and more widespread cosmic HII patches; and (ii) as reservoirs of neutral gas they contribute a non-zero 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal in otherwise ionized regions. Both effects damp the contrast between neutral and ionized patches during reionization, making detection of the epoch of reionization with 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> interferometry more challenging. Here we systematically investigate these effects using the latest semi-numerical simulations. We find that sinks dramatically suppress the peak in the redshift evolution of the variance, corresponding to the midpoint of reionization. As previously predicted, skewness changes sign at midpoint, but the fluctuations in the res...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Watkinson, C A; Pritchard, J R; Sobacchi, E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/750858"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interlock recovery during the drying, calcination and vitrification phase of Am/<span class="hlt">Cm</span> processing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document summarizes the results of five CIM5 [5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter] runs designed to demonstrate power interlock recovery methods during the drying, calcination and vitrification phases of the Am/<span class="hlt">Cm</span> melter cycle.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Snyder, T.K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-19/pdf/2011-21167.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 51985 - ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Coordination and Maintenance Committee Meeting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Coding Guidelines. ICD-10 MS-DRGs. ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Procedure Topics Electromagnetic Tip Tracked Sensor devices used in lung bronchoscopy and lung biopsy procedures. Extracorporeal Heart and Lung Assist System, including Membrane Oxygenation, CO 2...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-08-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0812.2085v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Index theorem for topological excitations on R^3 * <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> and Chern-Simons theory</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/eprints/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We derive an index theorem for the Dirac operator in the background of various topological excitations on an R^3 \\times <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> geometry. The index theorem provides more refined data than the APS index for an instanton on R^4 and reproduces it in decompactification limit. In the R^3 limit, it reduces to the Callias index theorem. The index is expressed in terms of topological charge and the eta-invariant associated with the boundary Dirac operator. Neither topological charge nor eta-invariant is typically an integer, however, the non-integer parts cancel to give an integer-valued index. Our derivation is based on axial current non-conservation--an exact operator identity valid on any four-manifold--and on the existence of a center symmetric, or approximately center symmetric, boundary holonomy (Wilson line). We expect the index theorem to usefully apply to many physical systems of interest, such as low temperature (large <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>, confined) phases of gauge theories, center stabilized Yang-Mills theories with vector-like or chiral matter (at <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> of any size), and supersymmetric gauge theories with supersymmetry-preserving boundary conditions (also at any <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>). In QCD-like and chiral gauge theories, the index theorem should shed light into the nature of topological excitations responsible for chiral symmetry breaking and the generation of mass gap in the gauge sector. We also show that imposing chirally-twisted boundary condition in gauge theories with fermions induces a Chern-Simons term in the infrared. This suggests that some QCD-like gauge theories should possess components with a topological Chern-Simons phase in the small <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> regime.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Erich Poppitz; Mithat Unsal</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-12-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2702866"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metathesis Cascade Strategies (ROM-RCM-<span class="hlt">CM</span>): A DOS approach to Skeletally Diverse Sultams</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of a ring-opening metathesis/ring-closing metathesis/cross metathesis (ROM-RCM-<span class="hlt">CM</span>) cascade strategy to the synthesis of a diverse collection of bi- and tricyclic sultams is reported. In this study, functionalized sultam scaffolds derived from intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reactions undergo metathesis cascades to yield a collection tricyclic sultams. Additional appendage based diversity was achieved by utilizing a variety of <span class="hlt">CM</span> partners. PMID:20161277</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeon, Kyu Ok; Rayabarapu, Dinesh; Rolfe, Alan; Volp, Kelly; Omar, Iman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20161277"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metathesis Cascade Strategies (ROM-RCM-<span class="hlt">CM</span>): A DOS approach to Skeletally Diverse Sultams.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The development of a ring-opening metathesis/ring-closing metathesis/cross metathesis (ROM-RCM-<span class="hlt">CM</span>) cascade strategy to the synthesis of a diverse collection of bi- and tricyclic sultams is reported. In this study, functionalized sultam scaffolds derived from intramolecular Diels-Alder (IMDA) reactions undergo metathesis cascades to yield a collection tricyclic sultams. Additional appendage based diversity was achieved by utilizing a variety of <span class="hlt">CM</span> partners. PMID:20161277</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeon, Kyu Ok; Rayabarapu, Dinesh; Rolfe, Alan; Volp, Kelly; Omar, Iman; Hanson, Paul R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.438.2664S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The imprint of warm dark matter on the cosmological 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate the effects of warm dark matter (WDM) on the cosmic 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal. If dark matter exists as WDM instead of cold dark matter (CDM), its non-negligible velocities can inhibit the formation of low-mass haloes that normally form first in CDM models, therefore delaying star formation. The absence of early sources delays the build-up of UV and X-ray backgrounds that affect the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> radiation signal produced by neutral hydrogen. With use of the 21CMFAST code, we demonstrate that the pre-reionization 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal can be changed significantly in WDM models with a free-streaming length equivalent to that of a thermal relic with mass mX of up to ˜10-20 keV. In such a WDM cosmology, the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal traces the growth of more massive haloes, resulting in a delay of the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> absorption signature and followed by accelerated X-ray heating. CDM models where astrophysical sources have a suppressed photon-production efficiency can delay the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal as well, although its subsequent evolution is not as rapid as compared to WDM. This motivates using the gradient of the global 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal to differentiate between some CDM and WDM models. Finally, we show that the degeneracy between the astrophysics and mX can be broken with the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> power spectrum, as WDM models should have a bias-induced excess of power on large scales. This boost in power should be detectable with current interferometers for models with mX ? 3 keV, while next-generation instruments will easily be able to measure this difference for all relevant WDM models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sitwell, Michael; Mesinger, Andrei; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Sigurdson, Kris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.univ-reims.fr/rubrique-cachee/laboratoires-labelises/groupe-de-spectrometrie-moleculaire-et-atmospherique-umr-cnrs-6089/axes-de-recherche/gallery_files/site/1/1697/3184/4472/8117/8468.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fourier transform measurements of water vapor line parameters in the 4200–6600 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ?1 region</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">New high-resolution water vapor absorption spectra were obtained at room temperature in the 4200–6600<span class="hlt">cm</span>?1 spectral region by combining Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) with single and multiple reflection cells. With absorption paths from 0.3 to 1800 m in pure and air diluted water vapor, accurate measurements of about 10400 lines in an intensity range from 10?29 to 10?19<span class="hlt">cm</span>\\/molecule have been performed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alain Jenouvrier; Ludovic Daumont; Laurence Régalia-Jarlot; Vladimir G. Tyuterev; Michel Carleer; Ann Carine Vandaele; Semen Mikhailenko; Sophie Fally</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/492018"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rapid growth of large-scale (40-55 <span class="hlt">cm</span>) KDP crystals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">KDP (KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}) single crystals up to 47 <span class="hlt">cm</span> in size have been grown by the rapid growth technique on the point seed in glass recrystallizers of 1000 L in volume at growth rates of 10 to 25 mm/day in both the [001] and [100] directions. Measurements of the optical quality of 41 x 41 <span class="hlt">cm</span> single crystal plates are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zaitseva, N.P.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Dehaven, M.R.; Vital, R.L.; Carman, L.M.; Spears, H.R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-02-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39665241"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distinguishing natural from synthetic amethyst: the presence and shape of the 3595?<span class="hlt">cm</span> ?1 peak</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The infrared absorption spectrum of amethyst in the region of stretching vibrations of X–OH groups reveals several bands that have been used for the separation of natural from synthetic amethyst. The intensity and shape of these bands have been measured as a function of crystallographic orientation. Using a resolution of 0.5?<span class="hlt">cm</span>?1 the 3595?<span class="hlt">cm</span>?1 band is present in all infrared spectra</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Karampelas; E. Fritsch; T. Zorba; K. M. Paraskevopoulos; S. Sklavounos</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24343034"> <span id="translatedtitle">Validity of ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Codes for the Identification of Complications Related to Central Venous Catheterization.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two complications of central venous catheterization (CVC), iatrogenic pneumothorax and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), have dedicated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>) codes. Despite increasing use of ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes for research and pay-for-performance purposes, their validity for detecting complications of CVC has not been established. Complications of CVCs placed between July 2010 and December 2011 were identified by ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes in discharge records from a single hospital and compared with those revealed by medical record abstraction. The ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> code for iatrogenic pneumothorax had a sensitivity of 66.7%, specificity of 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 100%, and negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.5%. The ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes for CLABSI had a sensitivity of 33.3%, specificity of 99.0%, PPV of 28.6%, and NPV of 99.2%. The low sensitivity and variable PPV of ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> codes for detection of complications of CVC raise concerns about their use for research or pay-for-performance purposes. PMID:24343034</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tukey, Melissa H; Borzecki, Ann M; Wiener, Renda Soylemez</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20090033058&hterms=help&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dhelp"> <span id="translatedtitle">How Configuration Management (<span class="hlt">CM</span>) Can Help Project Teams To Innovate and Communicate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Traditionally, <span class="hlt">CM</span> is relegated to a support role in project management activities. <span class="hlt">CM</span> s traditional functions of identification, change control, status accounting, and audits/verification are still necessary and play a vital role. However, this presentation proposes <span class="hlt">CM</span> s role in a new and innovative manner that will significantly improve communication throughout the organization and, in turn, augment the project s success. <span class="hlt">CM</span> s new role is elevated to the project management level, above the engineering or sub-project level in the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), where it can more effectively accommodate changes, reduce corrective actions, and ensure that requirements are clear, concise, and valid, and that results conform to the requirements. By elevating <span class="hlt">CM</span> s role in project management and orchestrating new measures, a new communication will emerge that will improve information integrity, structured baselines, interchangeability/traceability, metrics, conformance to standards, and standardize the best practices in the organization. Overall project performance (schedule, quality, and cost) can be no better than the ability to communicate requirements which, in turn, is no better than the <span class="hlt">CM</span> process to communicate project decisions and the correct requirements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cioletti, Louis</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JMoSp.281...18M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Absolute absorption cross sections for two selected lines of formaldehyde around 6625 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Absolute absorption cross sections of formaldehyde, CH2O, have been measured at total pressures of 14.5 and 66 mbar Helium by cw-CRDS for two selected lines at around 6625 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. Absolute CH2O concentrations have been determined in situ by measuring the pseudo-first order decays of OH radicals using high repetition rate laser induced fluorescence (LIF). OH radicals have been generated by laser photolysis of H2O2 in the presence of CH2O and from the well-known rate constant of the reaction of CH2O with OH radicals, the absolute CH2O concentration has been determined. Concentrations between 1.5 and 4 × 1014 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-3 have been used. The line strengths for the lines at 6624.779 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 and 6625.248 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 have been found to be (9.1 ± 1.8) × 10-24 <span class="hlt">cm</span> and (5.3 ± 1.0) × 10-24 <span class="hlt">cm</span>, respectively. The broadening coefficients in Helium have also been determined for both lines. Converting the line strengths to absorption cross sections it is found that these values are a factor of 2 smaller than the only known determination of these absorption cross sections in the literature (Staak et al., J. Molec. Spectroscopy 229 (2005) 115-121).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Morajkar, Pranay; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009RAA.....9..653H"> <span id="translatedtitle">RESEARCH PAPER: Foreground removal of 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> fluctuation with multifrequency fitting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 21 centimeter (21 <span class="hlt">cm</span>) line emission from neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshifts is strongly contaminated by foreground sources such as the diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission and free-free emission from the Galaxy, as well as emission from extragalactic radio sources, thus making its observation very complicated. However, the 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal can be recovered through its structure in frequency space, as the power spectrum of the foreground contamination is expected to be smooth over a wide band in frequency space while the 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> fluctuations vary significantly. We use a simple polynomial fitting to reconstruct the 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal around four frequencies 50, 100, 150 and 200MHz with an especially small channel width of 20 kHz. Our calculations show that this multifrequency fitting approach can effectively recover the 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal in the frequency range 100 ~ 200 MHz. However, this method doesn't work well around 50 MHz because of the low intensity of the 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal at this frequency. We also show that the fluctuation of detector noise can be suppressed to a very low level by taking long integration times, which means that we can reach a sensitivity of approx10 mK at 150 MHz with 40 antennas in 120 hours of observations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">He, Li-Ping</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2872963"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Novel Substituted Piperazine, <span class="hlt">CM</span>156, Attenuates the Stimulant and Toxic Effects of Cocaine in Mice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cocaine is a highly abused drug without effective pharmacotherapies to treat it. It interacts with sigma (?) receptors, providing logical targets for the development of medications to counteract its actions. Cocaine causes toxic and stimulant effects that can be categorized as acute effects such as convulsions and locomotor hyperactivity and subchronic effects including sensitization and place conditioning. In the present study, 3-(4-(4-cyclohexylpiperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]thiazole-2(3H)-thione (<span class="hlt">CM</span>156), a novel compound, was developed and tested for interactions with ? receptors using radioligand binding studies. It was also evaluated against cocaine-induced effects in behavioral studies. The results showed that <span class="hlt">CM</span>156 has nanomolar affinities for each of the ? receptor subtypes in the brain and much weaker affinities for non-? binding sites. Pretreatment of male Swiss-Webster mice with <span class="hlt">CM</span>156, before administering either a convulsive or locomotor stimulant dose of cocaine, led to a significant attenuation of these acute effects. <span class="hlt">CM</span>156 also significantly reduced the expression of behavioral sensitization and place conditioning evoked by subchronic exposure to cocaine. The protective effects of <span class="hlt">CM</span>156 are consistent with ? receptor-mediated actions. Together with previously reported findings, the data from <span class="hlt">CM</span>156 and related ? compounds indicate that ? receptors can be targeted to alleviate deleterious actions of cocaine. PMID:20100904</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Yan-Tong; Kaushal, Nidhi; Shaikh, Jamaluddin; Wilson, Lisa L.; Mésangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17155383"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for neutral, long-lived particles decaying into two muons in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[<span class="hlt">s</span>]=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a search for a neutral particle, pair produced in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[<span class="hlt">s</span>]=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV, which decays into two muons and lives long enough to travel at least 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> before decaying. The analysis uses approximately 380 pb(-1) of data recorded with the D0 detector. The background is estimated to be about one event. No candidates are observed, and limits are set on the pair-production cross section times branching fraction into dimuons + X for such particles. For a mass of 10 GeV and lifetime of 4x10(-11) s, we exclude values greater than 0.14 pb (95% C.L.). These results are used to limit the interpretation of NuTeV's excess of dimuon events. PMID:17155383</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; Cruz-Burelo, E De La; Martins, C De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Bihan, A-C Le; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeCoA.151..192S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sorption of <span class="hlt">Cm</span>(III) and Eu(III) onto clay minerals under saline conditions: Batch adsorption, laser-fluorescence spectroscopy and modeling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present work reports experimental data for trivalent metal cation (<span class="hlt">Cm</span>/Eu) sorption onto illite (Illite du Puy) and montmorillonite (Na-SWy-2) in NaCl solutions up to 4.37 molal (m) in the absence of carbonate. Batch sorption experiments were carried out for a given ionic strength at fixed metal concentration (mEu = 2 × <span class="hlt">10-7</span> m, labeled with 152Eu for ?-counting) and at a constant solid to liquid ratio (S:L = 2 g/L) for 3 < pHm < 12 (pHm = -log mH+). The amount of clay sorbed Eu approaches almost 100% (with log KD > 5) for pHm > 8, irrespective of the NaCl concentration. Variations in Eu uptake are minor at elevated NaCl concentrations. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) studies on <span class="hlt">Cm</span> sorption covering a wide range of NaCl concentrations reveal nearly identical fluorescence emission spectra after peak deconvolution, i.e. no significant variation of <span class="hlt">Cm</span> surface speciation with salinity. Beyond the three surface complexes already found in previous studies an additional inner-sphere surface species with a fluorescence peak maximum at higher wavelength (? ? 610 nm) could be resolved. This new surface species appears in the high pH range and is assumed to correspond to a clay/curium/silicate complex as already postulated in the literature for kaolinite. The 2 site protolysis non-electrostatic surface complexation and cation exchange sorption model (2SPNE SC/CE) was applied to describe Eu sorption data by involving the Pitzer and SIT (specific ion interaction) formalism in the calculation of the activities of dissolved aqueous species. Good agreement of model and experiment is achieved for sorption data at pHm < 6 without the need of adjusting surface complexation constants. For pHm > 6 in case of illite and pHm > 8 in case of montmorillonite calculated sorption data systematically fall below experimental data with increasing ionic strength. Under those conditions sorption is almost quantitative and deviations must be discussed considering uncertainties of measured Eu concentrations in the range of analytical detection limits.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schnurr, Andreas; Marsac, Rémi; Rabung, Thomas; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Geckeis, Horst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991JMoSp.149...34R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Vibration wavenumbers of 4-aminobenzotrifluoride in the ground and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> electronic states from its supersonic jet <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>- S0 fluorescence, infrared, and Raman spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Single vibronic level fluorescence (SVLF) spectra, in a supersonic jet, and infrared and Raman spectra of 4-aminobenzotrifluoride have been recorded and assigned to give, apart from some a2 vibrations, a complete set of fundamental vibration wavenumbers in the S0 electronic state. A supersonic jet fluorescence excitation spectrum has given some of the lower vibration wavenumbers in the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> electronic state. Observation of the I20, NH 2-inversion band in the SVLF spectrum agrees with the interpretation of the far infrared spectrum. Several CF 3 torsional levels in S0 are populated, even in the supersonic jet, and one result of this is to allow the observation of vibrations which are of b1 symmetry in the C2 v point group and which would be forbidden in the rigid molecule.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ribeiro-Claro, Paulo J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, JoséJ. C.; Gordon, Robert D.; Hollas, J. Michael</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013mss..confETK09K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotationally Resolved High-Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of the <span class="hlt">S</span>_{<span class="hlt">1</span>} ? S_{0} Transition of Naphthalene and Cl-NAPHTHALENE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rotationally resolved high-resolution fluorescence excitation spectra and the Zeeman effects of 0-0 band of <span class="hlt">S</span>_{<span class="hlt">1</span>} ? S_{0} electronic transition have been observed for naphthalene, 1-Cl naphthalene (1-ClN), and 2-Cl naphthalene (2-ClN). Sub-Doppler excitation spectra were measured by crossing a single-mode UV laser beam perpendicular to a collimated molecular beam. The typical linewidth was 25 MHz and the absolute wavenumber was calibrated with accuracy 0.0002 <span class="hlt">cm</span>^{-1} by measurement of the Doppler-free saturation spectrum of iodine molecule and fringe pattern of the stabilized etalon. For naphthalene and 2-ClN, the rotationally resolved spectra were obtained, and these molecular constants were determined in high accuracy. The obtained molecular constants of 2-ClN are good agreement with the ones reported by Plusquellic et. al. For 1-ClN, the rotational lines were not completely resolved because the fluorescence lifetime is shorter than the one of 2-ClN. Additionally, we have observed the change of the spectra with magnetic field. The Zeeman broadening was mainly observed for the levels of low K_{a} and increasing in proportion to J for given K for both of naphthalene and 2-ClN. The order of magnitude and the J, K-dependence of the observed Zeeman broadening were similar to the other vibronic bands of naphthalene. D. L. Joo, R. Takahashi, J. O'Reilly, H. Katô, and M. Baba, J. Mol. Spectrosc., {215}, 155 (2002). D. F. Plusquellic, S. R. Davis, and F. Jahanmir, J. Chem. Phys., {115}, 225 (2001). H. Kato, S. Kasahara, and M. Baba, Bull. Chem. Soc. Jpn., {80}, 456 (2007).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kasahara, Shunji; Yamamoto, Ryo; Tada, Kohei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997JChPh.106.3876S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Laser induced fluorescence spectra and carbonyl wagging potential energy functions for the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(n,?*) excited states of tetrahydrofuran-3-one and tetrahydrothiophen-3-one: Correlation between inversion barrier and angle strain for cyclic ketones</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(n,?*) states of tetrahydrofuran-3-one, CH2OCH2CH2C¯=O, and tetrahydrothiophen-3-one, CH2SCH2CH2C¯=O, have been recorded and analyzed. The carbonyl inversion bands, which arise from double-minimum potential energy functions in the excited states, were fit with functions of the form V=ax4-bx2 or V=cx2+d exp(-fx2). The furanone was found to have an inversion barrier in the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(n,?*) state of 1152 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 (13.8 kJ/mol) while the thiophenone has a barrier of 659 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 (7.9 kJ/mol). The two molecules have their potential energy minima for the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(n,?*) state at carbonyl wagging angles of 26° and 20°, respectively. The results here, together with previous data for several other cyclic ketones, demonstrate that the inversion barrier increases with the ring angle strain at the ketone carbon atom.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sagear, Paul A.; Lee, S. N.; Laane, Jaan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2517077"> <span id="translatedtitle">No Evidence from FTIR Difference Spectroscopy that Aspartate-342 of the D1 Polypeptide Ligates a Mn ion that Undergoes Oxidation during the S0 to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> to S2, or S2 to S3 Transitions in Photosystem II†</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the recent X-ray crystallographic structural models of photosystem II, Asp342 of the D1 polypeptide is assigned as a ligand of the oxygen-evolving Mn4 cluster. To determine if D1-Asp342 ligates a Mn ion that undergoes oxidation during one or more of the S0 ? <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ? S2, and S2 ? S3 transitions, the FTIR difference spectra of the individual S state transitions in D1-D342N mutant PSII particles from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were compared with those in wild-type PSII particles. Remarkably, the data show that the mid-frequency (1800 – 1200 <span class="hlt">cm</span>?1) FTIR difference spectra of wild-type and D1-D342N PSII particles are essentially identical. Importantly, the mutation alters none of the carboxylate vibrational modes that are present in the wild-type spectra. The absence of significant mutation-induced spectral alterations in D1-D342N PSII particles shows that the oxidation of the Mn4 cluster does not alter the frequencies of the carboxylate stretching modes of D1-Asp342 during the S0 ? <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ? S2, or S2 ? S3 transitions. One explanation of these data is that D1-Asp342 ligates a Mn ion that does not increase its charge or oxidation state during any of these S state transitions. However, because the same conclusion was reached previously for D1-Asp170, and because the recent X-ray crystallographic structural models assign D1-Asp170 and D1-Asp342 as ligating different Mn ions, this explanation requires that (1) the extra positive charge that develops on the Mn4 cluster during the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ? S2 transition be localized on the Mn ion that is ligated by the ?-COO? group of D1-Ala344 and (2) any increase in positive charge that develops on the Mn4 cluster during the S0 ? <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and S2 ? S3 transitions be localized on the one Mn ion that is not ligated by D1-Asp170, D1-Asp342, or D1-Ala344. In separate experiments that were conducted with L-[1-13 C]alanine, we found no evidence that D1-Asp342 ligates the same Mn ion that is ligated by the ?-COO? group of D1-Ala344. PMID:17319696</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Strickler, Melodie A.; Walker, Lee M.; Hillier, Warwick; Britt, R. David; Debus, Richard J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.445.3674Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Distinctive 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> structures of the first stars, galaxies and quasars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Observations of the redshifted 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> line with forthcoming radio telescopes promise to transform our understanding of the cosmic reionization. To unravel the underlying physical process, we investigate the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> structures of three different ionizing sources - Population (Pop) III stars, the first galaxies and the first quasars - by using radiative transfer simulations that include both ionization of neutral hydrogen and resonant scattering of Ly? photons. We find that Pop III stars and quasars produce a smooth transition from an ionized and hot state to a neutral and cold state, because of their hard spectral energy distribution with abundant ionizing photons, in contrast to the sharp transition in galaxies. Furthermore, Ly? scattering plays a dominant role in producing the 21-<span class="hlt">cm</span> signal because it determines the relation between hydrogen spin temperature and gas kinetic temperature. This effect, also called Wouthuysen-Field coupling, depends strongly on the ionizing source. It is strongest around galaxies, where the sp