These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Relative phase analyses of 10.7 cm solar radio flux with sunspot numbers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three nonlinear approaches, including the cross-recurrence plot, line of synchronization and cross-wavelet transform, have been proposed to analyze the phase asynchrony between 10.7 cm solar radio flux and sunspot numbers during the period of 1947 February to 2012 June. It is found that, (1) the amplitude variation of the two indicators become more asynchronous around the minimum and maximum of a solar cycle than at the ascending and descending phases of the cycle; (2) the phase relationship between them is not only time-dependent but also frequency-dependent, which may be related to the processes of accumulation and dissipation of solar magnetic energy from the lower to the upper atmosphere. Our findings indicate that bright regions and large sunspot groups are more likely to shed light on solar energy radiation than active regions and small sunspot groups.

Deng, L. H.; Li, B.; Zheng, Y. F.; Cheng, X. M.

2013-10-01

2

DECREASING SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS EXPLAIN UNIQUE 10.7 cm RADIO FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Infrared spectral observations of sunspots from 1998 to 2011 have shown that on average sunspots changed, the magnetic fields weakened, and the temperatures rose. The data also show that sunspots or dark pores can only form at the solar surface if the magnetic field strength exceeds about 1500 G. Sunspots appear at the solar surface with a variety of field strengths, and during the period from 1998 to 2002 a histogram of the sunspot magnetic fields shows a normal distribution with a mean of 2436 {+-} 26 G and a width of 323 {+-} 20 G. During this observing period the mean of the magnetic field distribution decreased by 46 {+-} 6 G per year, and we assume that as the 1500 G threshold was approached, magnetic fields appeared at the solar surface which could not form dark sunspots or pores. With this assumption we propose a quantity called the sunspot formation fraction and give an analytical form derived from the magnetic field distribution. We show that this fraction can quantitatively explain the changing relationship between sunspot number and solar radio flux measured at 10.7 cm wavelengths.

Livingston, W.; Penn, M. J. [National Solar Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85718 (United States); Svalgaard, L. [HEPL, Via Ortega, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

2012-09-20

3

The 10.7-cm microwave observations of AR 5395 and related terrestrial effects  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 10.7 cm flux patrols in Canada recorded 4 Great Bursts (peaks greater than 500 sfu) during the disk passage of AR 5395 in March 1989. The Great Bursts of 16 and 17 March were simple events of great amplitude and with half-life durations of only several minutes. Earlier Great Bursts, originating on 6 March towards the NE limb and on 10 March closer to the central meridian, belong to an entirely different category of event. Each started with a very strong impulsive event lasting just minutes. After an initial recovery, however, the emission climbed back to level as greater or greater than the initial impulsive burst. The events of 6 and 10 March stayed above the Great Burst threshold for at least 100 minutes. The second component of long duration in these cases is associated with Type 4 continuum emission and thus very likely with CMEs. Major geomagnetic disturbances did not occur as a result of the massive complex event of 6 March or the two simple but strong events of 16 and 17 March. But some 55 hours after the peak in the long-enduring burst of 10 March, a storm began which qualifies as the fourth strongest geomagnetic storm in Canada since 1932. The vertical component of the earth's field measured during the storm by a fluxgate magnetometer at a station in Manitoba is presented. Within a minute of the sudden commencement of this storm, a series of breakdowns began in the transmission system of Hydro-Quebec which resulted in a total loss of power, on a bitterly cold winter's day, for at least 10 hours. The loss of power provoked an enormous outcry from the public resulting in the power utilities being more receptive to the need to monitor solar as well as geomagnetic activity.

Gaizauskas, V.; Hughes, T. J.; Tapping, K. F.

4

The Cosmic Ray and the 10.7 cm flux variations during solar cycles 19-23  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cosmic ray flux (CRF) and 10.7 cm flux (F10.7) are studied for solar cycles 19-23. The cross-correlations show longer time-dependence at odd than at even cycles. A shift of the maximum at the histograms of CRF^1/F10.7^1 (the ratios of normalized values), does not depend on the polarity of the cycle. The behavior of CRF^1 vs F10.7^1 differs for odd and even cycles and also for different cycle phases. We fitted an inverted CRF^1 profile to the F10.7^1 profile with a linear function. The F10.7^1/CRF^{inv} histogram differs for odd and even cycles. The results for sunspot number (SSN) are similar to F10.7 but differ for the F10.7^1/CRF^{inv} histograms. Summarizing, besides the differences between odd and even cycles, there occur variations at different phases of the cycles and also variations independent of the polarity of the cycle, the latter perhaps arising outside the heliosphere.

Mendoza-Torres, J. E.; Luo, X.; Salazar, H.

2014-10-01

5

The Cosmic Ray and the 10.7 cm flux variations during solar cycles 19-23  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The cosmic ray flux (CRF) and 10.7 cm flux (F10.7) are studied for solar cycles 19-23. The cross-correlations show longer time-dependence at odd than at even cycles. A shift of the maximum at the histograms of CRF{^1}/F10.7{^1} (the ratios of normalized values), does not depend on the polarity of the cycle. The behavior of CRF{^1} vs F10.7{^1} differs for odd and even cycles and also for different cycle phases. We fitted an inverted CRF{^1} profile to the F10.7{^1} profile with a linear function. The F10.7{^1}/CRF{^{inv}} histogram differs for odd and even cycles. The results for sunspot number (SSN) are similar to F10.7 but differ for the F10.7{^1}/CRF{^{inv}} histograms. Summarizing, besides the differences between odd and even cycles, there occur variations at different phases of the cycles and also variations independent of the polarity of the cycle, the latter perhaps arising outside the heliosphere. %Z Akhmedov, S. B., Gelfreikh, G. B., Bogod, V. M., & Korzhavin, A. N., 1982, Solar Physics, 79, 41 Aschwanden, M. J. 2005, Physics of the Solar Corona. An Introduction with Problems and Solutions (2nd ed. Springer-Verlag, Berlin) Bachmann, K. T., & White, O. R. 1994, Solar Physics, 150, 347 Cliver, F.W., & Ling, A.G. 2001, ApJL, 551, L189 Florinski, V. 2011, Adv. Space Res., 48, 308 Gupta M., Mishra, V.K., & Mishra, A.P. 2006, Indian J. Radio Sp. Phys. 35, 167 Heber, B., Fichtner, H., & Scherer, K. 2006, Space Science Reviews, 125, 81 Kravtsova, M.V., & Sdobnov, V. E. 2011, Proc. 32nd ICRC, Beijing, China, 11, 228 Livingston, W., Penn, M.J., & Svalgaard, L. 2012, ApJL, 757, L8 Luo, X., Zhang, M., Rassoul, H. K., & Pogorelov, N. V. 2011, ApJ, 730, 13 Potgieter, M.S. 2008, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 70, 207 Scherer, K., et al. 2006, Space Sci. Rev., 127, 327 Singh, M., Singh, Y. P., Badruddin, 2008, Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, 70, 169 SIDC-team, Monthly Report on the International Sunspot Number, online catalogue 1951-2006, http://www.sidc.be/sunspot-data/. Usoskin, I.G., Kovaltsov, G.A., Kananen, H., Mursala, K., & Tanskanen, P. 1997, Proc. 25th ICRC, Durban, South Africa, 2, 201 Usoskin, I.G., Mursula, K., Kananen, H., & Kovaltsov, G.A. 2001, Adv.Space Res., 27, 571 Usoskin, I.G., Alanko-Yuotari, K., Kovaltsov, G.A., & Mursala, K. 2005, J. Geophys. Res. 110, A12108 Yeghikyan, A., & Fahr, H. 2004, A&A, 415, 763

Mendoza-Torres, J. E.; Luo, X.; Salazar, H.

2014-10-01

6

Pathologies, Microbes et Evolution (UE optionnelle de S1) 38 h CM + 10 h TD  

E-print Network

Pathologies, Microbes et Evolution (UE optionnelle de S1) 38 h CM + 10 h TD Responsable: Thierry peste, l'anthrax et la tuberculose ou du paradigme de la clonalité - Helicobacter pylori et les grandes

Wirth, Thierry

7

Barycentric Corrections at 1 cm s-1 for Precise Doppler Velocities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The goal of this paper is to establish the requirements of a barycentric correction with an rms of ?1 cm s-1, which is an order of magnitude better than necessary for the Doppler detection of true Earth analogs (˜9 cm s-1). We describe the theory and implementation of accounting for the effects on precise Doppler measurements of motion of the telescope through space, primarily from rotational and orbital motion of the Earth, and the motion of the solar system with respect to target star (i.e., the "barycentric correction"). We describe the minimal algorithm necessary to accomplish this and how it differs from a naïve subtraction of velocities (i.e., a Galilean transformation). We demonstrate the validity of code we have developed from the California Planet Survey code via comparison with the pulsar timing package, TEMPO2. We estimate the magnitude of various terms and effects, including relativistic effects, and the errors associated with incomplete knowledge of telescope position, timing, and stellar position and motion. We note that chromatic aberration will create uncertainties in the time of observation, which will complicate efforts to detect true Earth analogs. Our code is available for public use and validation.

Wright, J. T.; Eastman, J. D.

2014-11-01

8

Design of a 10**36 CM-2 S-1 Super-B Factory  

SciTech Connect

Parameters have been studied for a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon 4S that would deliver a luminosity of 1 to 4 x 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s. This collider, called a Super-B Factory, would use a combination of linear collider and storage ring techniques. In this scheme an electron beam and a positron beam are stored in low-emittance damping rings similar to those designed for a Linear Collider (LC) or the next generation light source. A LC style interaction region is included in the ring to produce sub-millimeter vertical beta functions at the collision point. A large crossing angle (+/- 24 mrad) is used at the collision point to allow beam separation. A crab-waist scheme is used to reduce the hourglass effect and restore peak luminosity. Beam currents of 1.8 A at 4 x 7 GeV in 1251 bunches can produce a luminosity of 10{sup 36}/cm{sup 2}/s with upgrade possibilities. Such a collider would produce an integrated luminosity of about 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year (10{sup 7} sec) at the {gamma}(4S) resonance. Further possibilities include having longitudinally polarized e- at the IR and operating at the J/Psi and Psi beam energies.

Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Demma, T.; Drago, A.; Guiducci, S.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Bertsche, Kirk J.; Novokhatski, A.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; Marchiori, G.; /Pisa U.; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2011-10-24

9

High Carrier Mobility up to 1.4 cm2.V-1.s-1 in Non-Peripheral Octahexyl Phthalocyanine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carrier transport properties of a non-peripherally alkyl-substituted phthalocyanine, 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine (C6PcH2) have been investigated. The material is a low-molecular-weight organic semiconductor with high solubility for typical organic solvents and liquid crystallinity. The carrier mobility was measured in the crystal phase and the hexagonal disordered columnar (Colhd) mesophase by the time-of-flight technique. A strong negative temperature dependence was observed for the hole mobility in the crystal phase, and a maximum drift mobility of 1.4 cm2.V-1.s-1 was achieved at -15 °C. A maximum mobility of 0.5 cm2.V-1.s-1 was obtained for the electrons that had a smaller dependence.

Miyake, Yasuo; Shiraiwa, Youyu; Okada, Keizo; Monobe, Hirosato; Hori, Tetsuro; Yamasaki, Naoyuki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Cook, Michael J.; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori; Shimizu, Yo

2011-02-01

10

A laser frequency comb that enables radial velocity measurements with a precision of 1 cm s(-1).  

PubMed

Searches for extrasolar planets using the periodic Doppler shift of stellar spectral lines have recently achieved a precision of 60 cm s(-1) (ref. 1), which is sufficient to find a 5-Earth-mass planet in a Mercury-like orbit around a Sun-like star. To find a 1-Earth-mass planet in an Earth-like orbit, a precision of approximately 5 cm s(-1) is necessary. The combination of a laser frequency comb with a Fabry-Pérot filtering cavity has been suggested as a promising approach to achieve such Doppler shift resolution via improved spectrograph wavelength calibration, with recent encouraging results. Here we report the fabrication of such a filtered laser comb with up to 40-GHz (approximately 1-A) line spacing, generated from a 1-GHz repetition-rate source, without compromising long-term stability, reproducibility or spectral resolution. This wide-line-spacing comb, or 'astro-comb', is well matched to the resolving power of high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs. The astro-comb should allow a precision as high as 1 cm s(-1) in astronomical radial velocity measurements. PMID:18385734

Li, Chih-Hao; Benedick, Andrew J; Fendel, Peter; Glenday, Alexander G; Kärtner, Franz X; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

2008-04-01

11

Differences in the temporal variations of solar UV flux, 10.7-cm solar radio flux, sunspot number, and Ca-K plage data caused by solar rotation and active region evolution  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Attention is given to two types of temporal variations in the solar UV spectral irradiance caused by solar rotation and active region evolution. It is noted that the first type of dissimilar temporal behavior occurs when concentrations of solar active regions evolve at solar longitudes nearly 180 deg apart. Both the UV observations and modeled UV fluxes based on Ca-K plage data then exhibit pronounced 13-day periodicity, whereas the 10.7-cm solar radio flux and sunspot number exhibit quite dissimilar temporal variations. This type of dissimilarity is related to the modeled UV flux and has a dependence on the solar central meridian distance that is narrower than that for the 10.7-cm radio flux or for sunspot numbers. A second case of marked dissimilarity is seen when major new solar active regions arise and dominate the full-disk fluxes for several rotations. It is found that the strongest peaks in 10.7 cm and sunspot numbers tend to occur on their first rotation, for example, during major dips in the total solar irradiance, whereas the Ca-K plages and UV enhancements peak on the next rotation and then decay more slowly on subsequent rotations.

Donnelly, R. F.; Heath, D. F.; Lean, J. L.; Rottman, G. J.

1983-01-01

12

A laser-lock concept to reach cm s-1-precision in Doppler experiments with Fabry-Pérot wavelength calibrators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

State-of-the-art Doppler experiments require wavelength calibration with precision at the cm s-1 level. A low-finesse Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) can provide a wavelength comb with a very large bandwidth as required for astronomical experiments, but unavoidable spectral drifts are difficult to control. Instead of actively controlling the FPI cavity, we propose to passively stabilize the interferometer and track the time-dependent cavity length drift externally using the 87Rb D2 atomic line. A dual-finesse cavity allows drift tracking during observation. In the low-finesse spectral range, the cavity provides a comb transmission spectrum tailored to the astronomical spectrograph. The drift of the cavity length is monitored in the high-finesse range relative to an external standard: a single narrow transmission peak is locked to an external cavity diode laser and compared to an atomic frequency from a Doppler-free transition. Following standard locking schemes, tracking at sub-mm s-1 precision can be achieved. This is several orders of magnitude better than currently planned high-precision Doppler experiments, and it allows freedom for relaxed designs including the use of a single-finesse interferometer under certain conditions. All components for the proposed setup are readily available, rendering this approach particularly interesting for upcoming Doppler experiments. We also show that the large number of interference modes used in an astronomical FPI allows us to unambiguously identify the interference mode of each FPI transmission peak defining its absolute wavelength solution. The accuracy reached in each resonance with the laser concept is then defined by the cavity length that is determined from the one locked peak and by the group velocity dispersion. The latter can vary by several 100 m s-1 over the relevant frequency range and severely limits the accuracy of individual peak locations, although their interference modes are known. A potential way to determine the absolute peak positions is to externally measure the frequency of each individual peak with a laser frequency comb (LFC). Thus, the concept of laser-locked FPIs may be useful for applying the absolute accuracy of an LFC to astronomical spectrographs without the need for an LFC at the observatory.

Reiners, A.; Banyal, R. K.; Ulbrich, R. G.

2014-09-01

13

Epitaxial SrTiO3 films with electron mobilities exceeding 30,000 cm2 V(-1) s(-1).  

PubMed

The study of quantum phenomena in semiconductors requires epitaxial structures with exceptionally high charge-carrier mobilities. Furthermore, low-temperature mobilities are highly sensitive probes of the quality of epitaxial layers, because they are limited by impurity and defect scattering. Unlike many other complex oxides, electron-doped SrTiO(3) single crystals show high (approximately 10(4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) electron mobilities at low temperatures. High-mobility, epitaxial heterostructures with SrTiO(3) have recently attracted attention for thermoelectric applications, field-induced superconductivity and two-dimensional (2D) interface conductivity. Epitaxial SrTiO(3) thin films are often deposited by energetic techniques, such as pulsed laser deposition. Electron mobilities in such films are lower than those of single crystals. In semiconductor physics, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is widely established as the deposition method that produces the highest mobility structures. It is a low-energetic, high-purity technique that allows for low defect densities and precise control over doping concentrations and location. Here, we demonstrate controlled doping of epitaxial SrTiO(3) layers grown by MBE. Electron mobilities in these films exceed those of single crystals. At low temperatures, the films show Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. These high-mobility SrTiO(3) films allow for the study of the intrinsic physics of SrTiO(3) and can serve as building blocks for high-mobility oxide heterostructures. PMID:20364139

Son, Junwoo; Moetakef, Pouya; Jalan, Bharat; Bierwagen, Oliver; Wright, Nicholas J; Engel-Herbert, Roman; Stemmer, Susanne

2010-06-01

14

Nozzle R&D for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-diameter Mercury Jet K.T. McDonald  

E-print Network

and the Influence of Nozzle Design, Chem. Eng. J. 7, 1 (1974), http://puhep1.princeton). However, advice on nozzle design is not very definitive. It seems good precede the nozzle by a largerNozzle R&D for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-diameter Mercury Jet K.T. McDonald Princeton U. MERIT Collider

McDonald, Kirk

15

In-situ determination of astro-comb calibrator lines to better than 10 cm s(-1).  

PubMed

Improved wavelength calibrators for high-resolution astrophysical spectrographs will be essential for precision radial velocity (RV) detection of Earth-like exoplanets and direct observation of cosmological deceleration. The astro-comb is a combination of an octave-spanning femtosecond laser frequency comb and a Fabry-Pérot cavity used to achieve calibrator line spacings that can be resolved by an astrophysical spectrograph. Systematic spectral shifts associated with the cavity can be 0.1-1 MHz, corresponding to RV errors of 10-100 cm/s, due to the dispersive properties of the cavity mirrors over broad spectral widths. Although these systematic shifts are very stable, their correction is crucial to high accuracy astrophysical spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate an in-situ technique to determine the systematic shifts of astro-comb lines due to finite Fabry-Pérot cavity dispersion. The technique is practical for implementation at a telescope-based spectrograph to enable wavelength calibration accuracy better than 10 cm/s. PMID:20588453

Li, Chih-Hao; Glenday, Alexander G; Benedick, Andrew J; Chang, Guoqing; Chen, Li-Jin; Cramer, Claire; Fendel, Peter; Furesz, Gabor; Kärtner, Franz X; Korzennik, Sylvain; Phillips, David F; Sasselov, Dimitar; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Walsworth, Ronald L

2010-06-01

16

Nozzle R&D for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-diameter Mercury Jet K.T. McDonald  

E-print Network

Title 1 Design Review 7-8 Feb 05 Cavitation is highly likely because of the low pressure at the nozzleNozzle R&D for a 20-m/s, 1-cm-diameter Mercury Jet K.T. McDonald Princeton U. Neutrino Factory. McDonald Muon Collaboration Meeting, Berkeley, Feb. 16, 2005 1 #12;The Best Nozzle is No Nozzle

McDonald, Kirk

17

Epitaxial growth of large area single-crystalline few-layer MoS2 with high space charge mobility of 192 cm2 V-1 s-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report on the vapor-solid growth of single crystalline few-layer MoS2 films on (0001)-oriented sapphire with excellent structural and electrical properties over centimeter length scale. High-resolution X-ray diffraction scans indicated that the films had good out-of-plane ordering and epitaxial registry. A carrier density of ˜2 × 1011 cm-2 and a room temperature mobility of 192 cm2/Vs were extracted from space-charge limited transport regime in the films. The electron mobility was found to exhibit in-plane anisotropy with a ratio of ˜1.8. Theoretical estimates of the temperature-dependent electron mobility including optical phonon, acoustic deformation potential, and remote ionized impurity scattering were found to satisfactorily match the measured data. The synthesis approach reported here demonstrates the feasibility of device quality few-layer MoS2 films with excellent uniformity and high quality.

Ma, Lu; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Lee, Edwin W.; Lee, Choong Hee; Yu, Mingzhe; Arehart, Aaron; Rajan, Siddharth; Wu, Yiying

2014-08-01

18

Mg dopant in Cu2SnSe3: An n-type former and a promoter of electrical mobility up to 387 cm2 V-1 s-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mg-doped Cu2SnSe3 bulk materials with the (Cu2-xMgx)SnSe3 (Mg-x-CTSe) formula at x=0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 were prepared at 550 °C for 2 h with soluble sintering aids of Sb2S3 and Te. Defect chemistry was studied by measuring structural and electrical properties of Mg-doped Cu2SnSe3 as a function of dopant concentration. Mg-x-CTSe pellets show p-type at x=0, 0.05 and 0.1 and n-type at x=0.15 and 0.2. The low hole concentration of 3.2×1017 cm-3 and high mobility of 387 cm2 V-1 s-1 were obtained for (Cu2-xMgx)SnSe3 bulks at x=0.1 (5% Mg) as compared to 2.2×1018 cm-3 and 91 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the undoped one. The explanation based upon the Mg-to-Cu antisite donor defect for the changes in electrical property was declared. A high Mg content for Mg-x-CTSe at x?0.1 can lead to the formation of second phases. The study in bulk Mg-x-CTSe has been based upon defect states and is consistent and supported by the data of structural and electrical properties.

Kuo, Dong-Hau; Wubet, Walelign

2014-10-01

19

44 CFR 10.7 - Planning.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

44 Emergency Management and Assistance...2010-10-01 false Planning. 10.7 Section 10.7 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT...Procedures § 10.7 Planning. (a)...

2010-10-01

20

46 CFR 111.10-7 - Dead ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...111.10-7 Section 111.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-7 Dead ship. (a) The...

2011-10-01

21

46 CFR 111.10-7 - Dead ship.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...111.10-7 Section 111.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-7 Dead ship. (a) The...

2010-10-01

22

CM Draconis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most current theory predicts that M-dwarfs later than about spectral type dM3 are fully convective. Since the most efficient known dynamo mechanism for amplifying stellar magnetic fields (the shell dynamo) occurs near the interface of a convective and a radiative zone, a drop-off in magnetic activity is expected as this interface disappears (at ~dm3). IUE fluxes for cool main-sequence stars with known rotation periods,Prot, show a decrease in both chromospheric (Ca II and/or Mg II) and transition region (mostly C IV) fluxes with increasing Rossby number (= Prot/tau c, where tau is the convective turnover time), and with increasing age. Two classical M-dwarf flare stars, AU Mic and YZ CMi, for which both Mg II and C IV fluxes are available from IUE observations, scale with the Rossby number in the same manner as earlier main sequence stars. According to current understanding of stellar structure, AU Mic (dMO.5e) has a radiative core, while YZ CMi (dM4e) may or may not. The chromospheric Mg II flux from a third M-dwarf, CM Dra (dM4+dM4), also scales in the normal manner. However, both components of the spectroscopic binary system, CM Dra (masses 0.24 and 0.21 M(sun)), are fully convective by current stellar structure models, and furthermore, the system is old (Population II). We propose to observe the high excitation C IV 1550 line in CM Dra with a deep (15 hr) low resolution SWP spectrum. If the C IV line flux scales with Rossby number in the same way as for earlier stars, then we can conclude either that dynamo activity occurs with equal efficiency even in a totally convective star, or else that the present stellar structure theory of low mass stars needs to be revised. In either case, our result will have important implications for our understanding of stellar structure.

Linksy, Jeffrey L.

23

46 CFR 113.10-7 - Connection boxes.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...113.10-7 Section 113.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING COMMUNICATION AND ALARM SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT Fire and Smoke Detecting and Alarm Systems §...

2010-10-01

24

RESEARCH PAPER: Forecast daily indices of solar activity, F10.7, using support vector regression method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 10.7 cm solar radio flux (F10.7), the value of the solar radio emission flux density at a wavelength of 10.7 cm, is a useful index of solar activity as a proxy for solar extreme ultraviolet radiation. It is meaningful and important to predict F10.7 values accurately for both long-term (months-years) and short-term (days) forecasting, which are often used as inputs in space weather models. This study applies a novel neural network technique, support vector regression (SVR), to forecasting daily values of F10.7. The aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of SVR in short-term F10.7 forecasting. The approach, based on SVR, reduces the dimension of feature space in the training process by using a kernel-based learning algorithm. Thus, the complexity of the calculation becomes lower and a small amount of training data will be sufficient. The time series of F10.7 from 2002 to 2006 are employed as the data sets. The performance of the approach is estimated by calculating the norm mean square error and mean absolute percentage error. It is shown that our approach can perform well by using fewer training data points than the traditional neural network.

Huang, Cong; Liu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jing-Song

2009-06-01

25

Mountain Lion Sighting DATE: 10/7/12  

E-print Network

WARNING Mountain Lion Sighting DATE: 10/7/12 TIME: 8:00 PM LOCATION: ALONG FENCE LINE NEAR. PRECAUTIONS: Although mountain lions are secretive and human attacks are rare they still occur. Mountain lions. If you encounter a mountain lion you should: 1. To avoid an attack, always keep children and pets close

Sze, Lawrence

26

Linearized pipe flow to Reynolds number 10 7  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A Fourier-Chebyshev Petrov-Galerkin spectral method is described for high-accuracy computation of linearized dynamics for flow in an infinite circular pipe. Our code is unusual in being based on solenoidal velocity variables and in being written in MATLAB. Systematic studies are presented of the dependence of eigenvalues, transient growth factors, and other quantities on the axial and azimuthal wave numbers and the Reynolds number R for R ranging from 10 2 to the idealized (physically unrealizable) value 10 7. Implications for transition to turbulence are considered in the light of recent theoretical results of S.J. Chapman.

Meseguer, Á.; Trefethen, L. N.

2003-03-01

27

21-cm Intensity Mapping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the 21 cm line, observed all-sky and across the redshift range from 0 to 5, the large scale structure of the Universe can be mapped in three dimensions. This can be accomplished by studying specific intensity with resolution ~ 10 Mpc, rather than via the usual galaxy redshift survey. The data set can be analyzed to determine Baryon Acoustic

Jeffrey B. Peterson; Roy Aleksan; Réza Ansari; Kevin Bandura; Dick Bond; John Bunton; Kermit Carlson; Tzu-Ching Chang; Fritz DeJongh; Matt Dobbs; Scott Dodelson; Hassane Darhmaoui; Nick Gnedin; Mark Halpern; Craig Hogan; Jean-Marc Le Goff; Tiehui Ted Liu; Ahmed Legrouri; Avi Loeb; Khalid Loudiyi; Christophe Magneville; John Marriner; David P. McGinnis; Bruce McWilliams; Marc Moniez; Nathalie Palanque-Delabruille; Ralph J. Pasquinelli; Ue-Li Pen; Jim Rich; Vic Scarpine; Hee-Jong Seo; Kris Sigurdson; Uros Seljak; Albert Stebbins; Jason H. Steffen; Chris Stoughton; Peter T. Timbie; Alberto Vallinotto; Christophe Teche; Christophe Yeche

2009-01-01

28

The exoplanet hunter HARPS: unequalled accuracy and perspectives toward 1 cm s-1 precision  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present results from the first two years of operations of the HARPS spectrograph installed on the ESO 3.6m telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile. This instrument, primarily built to detect extrasolar planetary systems, was designed to achieve the highest radial velocity precision ever, thanks to high mechanical and environmental stability, stable illumination, accurate wavelength calibration and tracking of instrumental

Christophe Lovis; Francesco Pepe; François Bouchy; Gaspare Lo Curto; Michel Mayor; Luca Pasquini; Didier Queloz; Gero Rupprecht; Stéphane Udry; Shay Zucker

2006-01-01

29

APPLICATION CM CARES PROJECT REQUEST  

E-print Network

2015. Mission Statement The Department of Construction Management CM CARES PROGRAM is a service-learning Program through CM-related community service projects that allow students to apply classroom skillsAPPLICATION CM CARES PROJECT REQUEST Application must be submitted by Friday, August 29, 2014

Stephens, Graeme L.

30

UCSD POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION 516-10.7 PAGE 1 ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY  

E-print Network

UCSD POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL SECTION 516-10.7 PAGE 1 ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY Effective: 7/8/10 Issuing Office: Environment, Health & Safety Supersedes: 5/1/98 516-10.7 ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION--WASTE DISPOSAL I. REFERENCES A. California Health and Safety Code B. California Code of Regulations C. UCSD

Aluwihare, Lihini

31

Record Retention Policy Page 1 of 3 10.7 Record Retention Policy  

E-print Network

Record Retention Policy Page 1 of 3 10.7 Record Retention Policy Policy Number & Name: 10.7 Record Retention Policy Approval Authority: Administrative Council Responsible Executive: Vice President and Summary of Policy This Policy sets forth the standards and procedures for the systematic review, retention

Yang, Eui-Hyeok

32

CM-458/U Signal Comparator  

SciTech Connect

The development history, the physical and functional characteristics, and the production activity of the CM-458/U Signal Comparator is described. The CM-458/U Signal Comparator is a test device used to verify proper delivery by the aircraft control equipment of the unique signal used in the prearming of modern nuclear weapons. CM-458/U monitors voltage levels, pulse widths and signal sequence to verify correctness.

Merritt, W. G.; Kestly, J. D.

1980-06-01

33

Installation of Secondo on Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) Thomas Behr  

E-print Network

Installation of Secondo on Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion) Thomas Behr 2011-12-16 This document describes how you can install the Secondo extensible DBMS on Mac OSX 10.7 (Lion). As a first step, you have://dna.fernuni-hagen.de/secondo/files/sdk/SDK MAC OSX LION.zip Run Finder and navigate to the directory containing the downloaded file. Unpack

Güting, Ralf Hartmut

34

15 cm×15 cm high efficiency multicrystalline silicon solar cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large-area multicrystalline silicon solar cell with 15 cm×15 cm cell area using a substrate made by a casting method has been developed to obtain high efficiency at low cost. The bifacial silicon nitride solar cell (BSNSC) fabrication process has been applied to this large-area solar cell. By optimizing the surface structure to reduce the reflective losses, the p-n junction

K. Fukui; H. Yamashita; M. Takayama; K. Okada; K. Masuri; K. Shirasawa; H. Watanabe

1991-01-01

35

Formation of ultracold LiRb molecules by photoassociation near the Li(2s?2S1/2) + Rb(5p?2P1/2) asymptote  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the production of ultracold 7Li85Rb molecules by photoassociation (PA) below the Li (2s?2S1/2) + Rb(5p?2P1/2) asymptote. We perform PA spectroscopy in a dual-species 7Li-85Rb magneto-optical trap (MOT) and detect the PA resonances using trap loss spectroscopy. We observe several strong PA resonances corresponding to the last few bound states, assign the lines and derive the long-range C6 dispersion coefficients for the Li (2s?2S1/2) + Rb(5p?2P1/2) asymptote. We also report an excited-state molecule formation rate (P_{\\textit{LiRb}}) of {\\sim}10^{7}\\ \\text{s}^{-1} and a PA rate coefficient (K_{PA}) of {\\sim}4\\times10^{-11}\\ \\text{cm}^3/\\text{s} , which are both among the highest observed for heteronuclear bi-alkali molecules. These suggest that PA is a promising route for the creation of ultracold ground-state LiRb molecules.

Dutta, Sourav; Elliott, Daniel S.; Chen, Yong P.

2013-12-01

36

18 -NUCLEAR REACTIONS N = # of collisions cm-3  

E-print Network

released per collision The energy released per unit mass per unit time for a particular reaction and Astrophysics (ARAA), vol. 21, p. 165 (1983). #12;5 #12;6 #12;7 = available energy generated reaction x1 18 - NUCLEAR REACTIONS Define: N = # of collisions cm-3 s-1 W = probability of barrier

Sitko, Michael L.

37

Magnetic study of CM chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of the paleomagnetism of carbonaceous chondrites can lead to an estimate of the magnetic fields present in the early solar system. CM chondrites contain abundant magnetite formed during aqueous alteration on their parent body, and have not been heated after that, making them interesting targets for paleomagnetism. We performed a detailed and comparative magnetic study (paleomagnetism and rock magnetism) of three CM chondrites: Paris, Cold Bokkeveled and Murchison. These three meteorites cover a wide range of aqueous alteration, with increasing alteration from Paris [1] to Murchison to Cold Bokkeveld [2]. Paris is a unique CM chondrite significantly less aqueously altered than other CM chondrites. Our magnetic data show that in contrast with other CM, Paris meteorite contains abundant FeNi metal (of nebular origin) together with magnetite and pyrrhotite (of asteroidal origin). Paleomagnetic results of Paris show that unfortunately the meteorite has been exposed to a strong artificial magnetic field (magnet), precluding the study of the natural magnetization (of possible nebular origin) carried by FeNi. However, a high-coercivity magnetization carried by pyrrhotite is still preserved in the meteorite. It is homogeneous in direction and intensity at the scale of the meteorite. We interpret this high-coercivity magnetization as a pre-terrestrial chemical remanent magnetization acquired on the parent body in a field of a few µT. Our preliminary results on Murchison also evidenced an stable and homogeneous magnetization in the meteorite. Therefore a long-lasting stable magnetizing field seems necessary to account for the paleomagnetism of both meteorites. Because crystallization of pyrrhotite and magnetite occurred several Myr after the formation of the parent body [3] (i.e. after possible existence of strong solar and nebular magnetic field), the magnetizing field was most probably created on the parent body. In view of its intensity, the most plausible origin for the magnetizing field is an internally generated dynamo field. This would imply that the parent body of CM chondrites was partially differentiated with a convecting metallic core. Such process has recently been proposed for the parent body of CV chondrites [4, 5]. [1] Zanda et al., 2010. Meteoritics Planetary Sci., 45, 222-222. [2] Rubin et al., 2007. Geo. et Cosmo. Acta, 71, 2361-2382 [3] Krot et al., 2005. UCRL-BOOK-217207 [4] Carporzen et al., 2011. Proc. National Acad. Sci., 108, 6386-6389. [5] Elkins-Tanton et al., 2011. Earth Planet . Sci. Lett., 305, 1-10.

Cournède, C.; Gattacceca, J.; Zanda, B.; Rochette, P.

2012-04-01

38

J M Wolfe 10/7/09 PART I: General Information  

E-print Network

J M Wolfe 10/7/09 page 1 PART I: General Information PREPARED: August, 2009 Name: Jeremy Michael Assistant Professor, Psychology MIT 1986 1987 Assistant Professor, Brain and Cognitive Sciences MIT 1987 1991 Associate Professor, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT 1988 1991 Class of 1922, Associate

39

7-1 of 7-10 7 Mindlin theory, moment excitation and orthotropic plates  

E-print Network

7-1 of 7-10 7 Mindlin theory, moment excitation and orthotropic plates Similar to the transition theory for plates in order to extend the range of validity. The two transitions essentially involve force p(x,z) = F0(x,z) such that ^p(kx,kz ) = F0 . For an infinite plate it is convenient to make

Berlin,Technische Universität

40

Selection Effects at 21cm  

E-print Network

Surveys in the 21cm line of neutral hydrogen are testing the completeness of the catalogs of nearby galaxies. The remarkable observational fact is that the potential wells that confine gas to sufficient density that it can remain neutral in the face of ionizing radiation also provide sites for star formation, so that there are no known cases of neutral intergalactic clouds without associated star light.

F. H. Briggs

1998-11-04

41

CYP2S1: A short review  

SciTech Connect

A new member of the cytochrome P450 superfamily, CYP2S1, has recently been identified in human and mouse. In this paper, we review the data currently available for CYP2S1. The human CYP2S1 gene is located in chromosome 19q13.2 within a cluster including CYP2 family members CYP2A6, CYP2A13, CYP2B6, and CYP2F1. These genes also show the highest homology to the human CYP2S1. The gene has recently been found to harbor genetic polymorphism. CYP2S1 is inducible by dioxin, the induction being mediated by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR) and Aryl Hydrocarbon Nuclear Translocator (ARNT) in a manner typical for CYP1 family members. In line with this, CYP2S1 has been shown to be inducible by coal tar, an abundant source of PAHs, and it was recently reported to metabolize naphthalene. This points to the involvement of CYP2S1 in the metabolism of toxic and carcinogenic compounds, similar to other dioxin-inducible CYPs. CYP2S1 is expressed in epithelial cells of a wide variety of extrahepatic tissues. The highest expression levels have been observed in the epithelial tissues frequently exposed to xenobiotics, e.g., the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and urinary tracts, and in the skin. The observed ubiquitous tissue distribution, as well as the expression of CYP2S1 throughout embryogenesis suggest that CYP2S1 is likely to metabolize important endogenous substrates; thus far, retinoic acid has been identified. In conclusion, CYP2S1 exhibits many features of interest for human health and thus warrants further investigation.

Saarikoski, Sirkku T. [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FI-00250 (Finland) and Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research, National Public Health Institute, FI-00250 (Finland)]. E-mail: sirkku.saarikoski@ktl.fi; Rivera, Steven P. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hankinson, Oliver [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti [Department of Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, FI-00250 (Finland)

2005-09-01

42

Hadronic transitions ?(2S)-->?(1S)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using a 73.6 pb-1 data sample of ?(2S) events collected with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the hadronic transitions between the ?(2S) and the ?(1S). The dipion transition ?(2S)-->?(1S)?+?- was studied using two different analysis techniques. Selecting events in which ?(1S)-->e+e-,?+?- (``exclusive'' analysis), and using the ?(1S) leptonic branching fractions world averages from the PDG review, we obtained B(?(2S)-->?(1S)?+?-)=0.189+/-0.004+/-0.010, while using a method allowing ?(1S)-->anything (``inclusive'' analysis) we obtained B(?(2S)-->?(1S)?+?-)=0.196+/-0.002+/-0.010. The appropriate weighted average of the two measurements gives B(?(2S)-->?(1S)?+?-)=0.192+/-0.002+/-0.010. Combining the exclusive and inclusive results we derive the ?(1S) leptonic branching fractions Bee=0.0229+/-0.0008+/-0.0011 and B??=0.0249+/-0.0008+/-0.0013. We also studied ?(2S)-->?(1S)?0?0 and obtained B(?(2S)-->?(1S)?0?0)=0.092+/-0.006+/-0.008. Parameters of the ?? system (dipion invariant mass spectra, angular distributions) were analyzed and found to be consistent with current theoretical models. Lastly, we searched for the ? and single ?0 transitions and obtained the 90% confidence level upper limits B(?(2S)-->?(1S)?)<0.0028 and B(?(2S)-->?(1S)?0)<0.0011.

P. Alexander, J.; Baker, R.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B. E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D. G.; Crowcroft, D. S.; Dickson, M.; von Dombrowski, S.; Drell, P. S.; Ecklund, K. M.; Ehrlich, R.; Foland, A. D.; Gaidarev, P.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hopman, P. I.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kim, P. C.; Kreinick, D. L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Mistry, N. B.; Ng, C. R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Valant-Spaight, B.; Ward, C.; Athanas, M.; Avery, P.; Jones, C. D.; Lohner, M.; Patton, S.; Prescott, C.; Yelton, J.; Zheng, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Briere, R. A.; Ershov, A.; Gao, Y. S.; Kim, D. Y.-J.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Browder, T. E.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G. E.; Gollin, G. D.; Hans, R. M.; Johnson, E.; Karliner, I.; Marsh, M. A.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J. J.; Edwards, K. W.; Bellerive, A.; Janicek, R.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Sadoff, A. J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Darling, C.; Davis, R.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Zhou, L.; Anderson, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, S. J.; O'neill, J. J.; Poling, R.; Riehle, T.; Smith, A.; Alam, M. S.; Athar, S. B.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A. H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F.; Anastassov, A.; Duboscq, J. E.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K. K.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Spencer, M. B.; Sung, M.; Undrus, A.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Nemati, B.; Richichi, S. J.; Ross, W. R.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Hinson, J. W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D. H.; Shibata, E. I.; Shipsey, I. P.; Yurko, M.; Glenn, S.; Johnson, S. D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Jessop, C. P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M. L.; Savinov, V.; Ugolini, D.; Wang, R.; Zhou, X.; Coan, T. E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Shelkov, V.; Staeck, J.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J.; Artuso, M.; Azfar, F.; Efimov, A.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G. C.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Xing, X.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S. E.; Jain, V.; McLean, K. W.; Marka, S.; Godang, R.; Kinoshita, K.; Lai, I. C.; Pomianowski, P.; Schrenk, S.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L. P.; Zhou, G. J.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J. S.; O'grady, C.; Schmidtler, M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A. J.; Würthwein, F.; Bliss, D. W.; Masek, G.; Paar, H. P.; Prell, S.; Sharma, V.; Asner, D. M.; Gronberg, J.; Hill, T. S.; Lange, D. J.; Morrison, R. J.; Nelson, H. N.; Nelson, T. K.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Balest, R.; Behrens, B. H.; Ford, W. T.; Gritsan, A.; Park, H.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.

1998-09-01

43

SYMPLECTIC S1 , SUBGROUP SEPARABILITY, AND  

E-print Network

94, Ta95]), that gave some initial evidence to an affirmative answer to this question. We can state class of maps N S1 determined by H1 (N) = [N, S1 ] contains a representative that is a fiber bundle], we suggested an approach to Conjecture 1 based on the study of twisted Alexander polynomials N, of N

Friedl, Stefan

44

A fully differential BiCMOS OTA for a 10.7MHz bandpass filter  

E-print Network

Filters 1. Component simulation of LC ladders. . . . . . . . 2. Operational simulation of LC ladders 3. General comments on ladder filters from tuning point of view, B. Cascade Filters 77 78 80 84 85 CHAPTER Page 1. Dynamic range considerations... . . a. Pole-zero matching 2. Design approach for the cascade filter 3. A fourth-order 10. 7MHz bandpass filter IV AUTOMATIC TUNING A. Survey of Previous Schemes 1. PLL based frequency tuning scheme 2. Bandwidth tuning based on peak detection 3...

Ali, Muhammad Imtiaz

2012-06-07

45

The thermal neutron sensitivities of SEI and Toshiba FDP10-7 radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters  

Microsoft Academic Search

The thermal neutron sensitivities of SEI and Toshiba FD-P10-7 radiophotoluminescent silver activated metaphosphate glass dosimeters have been measured and studied theoretically. The graphite thermal neutron column attached to the AEEW reactor NESTOR was utilised as a source of thermal neutrons with minimal fast neutron and gamma-ray contamination. Both the neutron removal and gamma correction measurement techniques were applied and these

S. Croft

1990-01-01

46

Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.  

PubMed

Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Rodrigo Pauli, José; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

2014-01-01

47

77 FR 8877 - ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Control and Prevention ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee...following meeting. Name: ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance (C&M) Committee...process. Purpose: The ICD-9-CM Coordination and Maintenance Committee is a...

2012-02-15

48

Supporting Information S1. Experimental Section  

E-print Network

fibers are used not only as the flexible soft substrate onto which a ZnO thin film is grown at high1 Supporting Information S1. Experimental Section Growth of ZnO NW film on carbon fibers. Carbon around 1000 carbon fibers. The FNG is fabricated by etching the ZnO NW film at one end of the carbon

Wang, Zhong L.

49

The Mid-term Forecast Method of Solar Radiation Index {F}_{10.7}  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the low earth orbit satellite's orbit computation, the solar radiation index F_{10.7} is an important parameter, which is usually used to describe the solar activity's effect on the thermosphere density and the orbit perturbation. So the accuracy of index F_{10.7} will affect the precision of orbit prediction. In this paper, based on the characteristics of the solar 27-day short-term activity, we bring up a forecast method of F_{10.7} which can use the historical indices of the past 135 days to predict the solar radiation indices in the next 54 days. That is to say, the method is able to forecast the variations of solar radiation for about two rotation-cycles in the future. In this paper, we compare this method with those widely-used methods. The detail results are as follows: (1) This paper's method is observably better than the traditional triangle function method; (2) In the short-term forecast (7 days) , this paper's method is little better than the method developed by Space Weather Prediction Center in America, since the root mean square could be reduced by about 19% when using this paper's method; (3) In the mid-termforecast (2 7 days), the accuracy of this paper's method is almost equal to the 54-order self-regression method which is used widely in our country. However, fewer parameters and observation data are needed in this paper's method, leading to the more convenient application in orbit computation. Moreover, on the 54th day the correlation coefficient between the prediction and actual index is still greater than 0.92, implying that the method can keep stable in mid-term forecast. All in all, the advantage of this paper's method is that it could use fewer historical indices to predict the mid-term solar radiation independent of extra solar real-time observation, and it is very helpful to the orbit short- and mid-term predictions in some space flight missions.

Wang, H. B.; Xiong, J. N.; Zhao, C. Y.

2014-07-01

50

43 CFR 10.7 - Disposition of unclaimed human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, or objects of cultural...  

...2014-10-01 false Disposition of unclaimed human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects...PROTECTION AND REPATRIATION REGULATIONS Human Remains, Funerary Objects, Sacred Objects...Lands § 10.7 Disposition of unclaimed human remains, funerary objects, sacred...

2014-10-01

51

UNIVERSAL INDEX THEOREM ON Mob(S1)\\\\Diff+(S1)  

Microsoft Academic Search

By conformal welding, there is a pair of univalent functions (f,g) associated to every point of the complex Kahler manifold Mob(S1)\\\\Diff+(S1). For every integer n ? 1, we generalize the definition of Faber polynomials to define some canonical bases of holomorphic 1 n and n differentials associated to the pair (f,g). Using these bases, we generalize the definition of Grunsky

LEE-PENG TEO

52

Progressive aqueous alteration of CM carbonaceous chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CM chondrites are aqueously altered rocks that contain ˜9 wt% H 2O + (i.e., indigenous water) bound in phyllosilicates; also present are clumps of serpentine-tochilinite intergrowths (previously called "poorly characterized phases" or PCP), pentlandite and Ni-bearing pyrrhotite. We studied 11 CM chondrites that span the known range from least altered to most altered. We used various petrologic properties (many previously identified) that provide information regarding the degree of aqueous alteration. There are no known unaltered or slightly altered CM chondrites (e.g., rocks containing numerous chondrules with primary igneous glass). Some CM properties result from processes associated with early and intermediate stages of the alteration sequence (i.e., hydration of matrix, alteration of chondrule glass, and production of large PCP clumps). Other petrologic properties reflect processes active throughout the alteration sequence; these include oxidation of metallic Fe-Ni, alteration of chondrule phenocrysts, changes in PCP composition (reflecting an increase in the phyllosilicate/sulfide ratio), and changes in carbonate mineralogy (reflecting the development of dolomite and complex carbonates at the expense of Ca carbonate). On the basis of these parameters, we propose a numerical alteration sequence for CM chondrites. Because there are no known CM samples that display only incipient alteration, the least altered sample was arbitrarily assigned to subtype 2.6. The most altered CM chondrites, currently classified CM1, are assigned to subtype 2.0. These highly altered rocks have essentially no mafic silicates; they contain chondrule pseudomorphs composed mainly of phyllosilicate. However, their bulk compositions are CM-like, and they are closer in texture to other C2 chondrites than to CI1 chondrites (which lack chondrule pseudomorphs). Using several diagnostic criteria, we assigned petrologic subtypes (±0.1) to every CM chondrite in our study: QUE 97990, CM2.6; Murchison, CM2.5; Kivesvaara, CM2.5; Murray, CM2.4/2.5; Y 791198, CM2.4; QUE 99355, CM2.3; Nogoya, CM2.2; Cold Bokkeveld, CM2.2; QUE 93005, CM2.1; LAP 02277, CM2.0; MET 01070, CM2.0. The proposed CM numerical alteration sequence improves upon the existing scheme of Browning et al. (1996) in that it does not require a complicated algorithm applied to electron-microprobe data to determine the average matrix phyllosilicate composition. The new sequence is more comprehensive and employs petrologic subtypes that are easier to use and remember than mineralogic alteration index values. New neutron-activation analyses of QUE 97990, QUE 93005, MET 01070, Murchison and Crescent, together with literature data, confirm the compositional uniformity of the CM group; different degrees of alteration among CM chondrites do not lead to resolvable bulk compositional differences. This suggests that the textural differences among individual CM chondrites reflect progressive alteration of similar hypothetical CM3.0 starting materials in different regions of the same parent body, with minimal aqueous transport of materials over appreciable (e.g., meters) distances.

Rubin, Alan E.; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Huber, Heinz; Wasson, John T.

2007-05-01

53

Will Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) Survive Perihelion?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 2013 November 28 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) will pass by the Sun with a perihelion distance of 2.7 solar radii. Understanding the possible outcomes for the comet's response to such a close passage by the Sun is important for planning observational campaigns and for inferring ISON's physical properties. We present new numerical simulations and interpret them in context with the historical track record of comet disruptions and of sungrazing comet behavior. Historical data suggest that sizes below ~200 m are susceptible to destruction by sublimation driven mass loss, while we find that for ISON's perihelion distance, densities lower than 0.1 g cm-3 are required to tidally disrupt a retrograde or non-spinning body. Such low densities are substantially below the range of the best-determined comet nucleus densities, though dynamically new comets such as ISON have few measurements of physical properties. Disruption may occur for prograde rotation at densities up to 0.7 g cm-3, with the chances of disruption increasing for lower density, faster prograde rotation, and increasing elongation of the nucleus. Given current constraints on ISON's nucleus properties and the typically determined values for these properties among all comets, we find tidal disruption to be unlikely unless other factors (e.g., spin-up via torquing) affect ISON substantially. Whether or not disruption occurs, the largest remnant must be big enough to survive subsequent mass loss due to sublimation in order for ISON to remain a viable comet well after perihelion.

Knight, Matthew M.; Walsh, Kevin J.

2013-10-01

54

PMMA Cementoplasty in Symptomatic Metastatic Lesions of the S1 Vertebral Body  

SciTech Connect

We describe a lateral transiliac direct puncture approach to the S1 vertebral body for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cementoplasty of painful metastatic lesions. This approach was performed using a 15-cm-long trocar needle with 3-mm outer diameter, introduced under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic control. A lateral projection was used to center the needle just in front of the spinal canal and subjacent to the superior plate of the S1 vertebral body. Needle progression was controlled using anteroposterior and lateral fluoroscopic projections alternately with a needle course parallel to an axial plane, avoiding conflict with the S1 foramen. After needle tip placement in the center of the S1 vertebral body, diluted PMMA with a setting time of 8 min was delivered. Ipsilateral lesions of the lateral sacral compartment were filled with the same needle by stepwise withdrawal and continuous PMMA injection.

Dehdashti, Amir R.; Martin, Jean-Baptiste; Jean, Beatrix; Ruefenacht, Daniel A. [Neuroradiology-HUG, University Hospital of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

2000-03-15

55

Policy S-1.04 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA  

E-print Network

Policy S-1.04 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA COLLEGE OF NURSING S:\\EVERYONE\\CON-Policies\\S- Student\\S-1(GEN, or download files from the Internet. #12;Policy S-1.04 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA COLLEGE OF NURSING S:\\EVERYONE)\\S1.04 - Student Computer Policy.doc Page 1 of 3 TITLE: STUDENT COMPUTER POLICY POLICY: The College

Mazzotti, Frank

56

CM2002/Y:06 Theme Session Y  

E-print Network

CM2002/Y:06 Theme Session Y: The effects of fishing on the genetic composition of living marine for such phenomena of `evolutionary suicide' is overlooked in models that do not incorporate life history evolution suicide 1 #12;Ernande, Dieckmann & Heino CM2002/Y:06 1. Introduction Fishing creates selective pressures

Dieckmann, Ulf

57

HI 21cm Absorption toward Red Quasars  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have searched for redshifted absorption in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen toward `red quasars', which are extragalactic radio sources with a steep spectral drop between optical and infrared wavelengths. The success rate for detecting HI 21cm absorption toward a representative sample of such sources is 80%. This compares to the much lower success rate of 11% for

C. L. Carilli; K. M. Menten; C. P. Moore

1999-01-01

58

Nançay ``blind'' 21 CM line survey of the Canes Venatici group region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A radio spectroscopic driftscan survey in the 21 cm line with the Nançay decimetric radio telescope of 0.08 steradians of sky in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici covering a heliocentric velocity range of -350 < V_hel < 2350 km s(-1) produced 53 spectral features, which was further reduced to a sample of 33 reliably detected galaxies by extensive follow-up observations. With a typical noise level of rms = 10 mJy after Hanning smoothing, the survey is - depending on where the detections are located with regard to the centre of the beam - sensitive to M_HI = 1-2x10(8) {h}(-2) {M_sun} at 23 {h}(-1) Mpc and to M_HI = 4-8x10(7) {h}(-2) {M_sun} throughout the CVn groups. The survey region had been previously examined on deep optical plates by \\cite[Binggeli et al. (1990)]{bin90} and contains loose groups with many gas-rich galaxies as well as voids. No galaxies that had not been previously identified in these deep optical surveys were uncovered in our H{sigma c i} survey, neither in the groups nor the voids. The implication is that no substantial quantity of neutral hydrogen contained in gas-rich galaxies has been missed in these well-studied groups. All late-type members of our sample are listed in the \\cite[Fisher & Tully (1981b)]{fis81b} optically selected sample of nearby late-type galaxies; the only system not contained in Fisher and Tully's Catalog is the S0 galaxy NGC 4203. Within the well-sampled CVn group volume with distances corrected for flow motions, the H {sigma c i} mass function is best fitted with the \\cite[Zwaan et al. (1997)]{zwa97} H{sigma c i} mass function (alpha =-1.2) scaled by a factor of f=4.5 in account of the locally overdense region.

Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; van Driel, W.; Briggs, F.; Binggeli, B.; Mostefaoui, T. I.

1999-03-01

59

Correlated alteration effects in CM carbonaceous chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three parameters are proposed to determine the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites. The mineralogic alteration index monitors the relative progress of coupled substitutions in the progressive alteration of cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine and increases with increasing alteration. To calculate values of this index, an algorithm has been developed to estimate the average matrix phyllosilicate composition in individual CM chondrites. The second parameter is the volume percent of isolated matrix silicates, which decreases with progressive alteration due to mineral hydration. Finally, the volume percent of chondrule alteration monitors the extent of chondrule phyllosilicate production and increases as alteration proceeds. These parameters define the first CM alteration scale that relies on multiple indicators of progressive alteration. The following relative order of increasing alteration is established by this model: Murchison ? Bells < Pollen ? Murray < Mighei < Nogoya < Cold Bokkeveld. The relative degree of aqueous processing Cochabamba and Boriskino experienced is less precisely constrained, although both fall near the middle of this sequence. A comparison between the mineralogic alteration index and literature values for the whole-rock chemistry of CM chondrites reveals several correlations. A positive, nearly linear correlation between bulk H content and progressive CM alteration suggests an approximately constant production rate of new phyllosilicates relative to the mineralogical transition from cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine. The abundance of trapped planetary 36Ar decreases systematically in progressively altered CM chondrites, suggesting the wholesale destruction of primary noble gas carrier phase (s) by aqueous reactions. Because low temperature fluid-rock reactions are generally associated with large isotopic mass fractionation factors, we also compared our model predictions with ?18O values for bulk CM samples. Although some of these data are poorly resolved, the order of increasing ?18O values approximates the order of increasing alteration predicted by our model parameters. Multiple correlations between diverse alteration parameters strongly suggest that (a) different CM chondrites experienced similar kinds of processes and conditions, and (b) CM materials experienced in situ alteration on the CM parent body or bodies.

Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael E.

1996-07-01

60

8-cm mercury ion thruster system technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology status of 8-cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5-cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8-cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

1974-01-01

61

Chilled Mirror Dew Point Hygrometer (CM) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The CM systems have been developed for the ARM Program to act as a moisture standard traceable to National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). There are three CM systems that are each fully portable, self-contained, and require only 110 V AC power. The systems include a CM sensor, air sampling and filtration system, a secondary reference (Rotronic HP043 temperature and relative humidity sensor) to detect system malfunctions, a data acquisition system, and data storage for more than one month of 1-minute data. The CM sensor directly measures dew point temperature at 1 m, air temperature at 2 m, and relative humidity at 2 m. These measurements are intended to represent self-standing data streams that can be used independently or in combinations.

Ritsche, MT

2005-01-01

62

Winter snow depth (cm) Pardosamass(mg)  

E-print Network

Date SpidercatchSquarerootofPardosabodymass(mg) R-valuePardosamass(mg) Winter snow depth (cm and the surrounding terrain, we dug deep trenches around the perimeter. A small-scale trench experiment validated

Weis, Arthur

63

Conducting Retrospective Ontological Clinical Trials in ICD-9-CM in the Age of ICD-10-CM  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To quantify the impact of International Classification of Disease 10th Revision Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) transition in cancer clinical trials by comparing coding accuracy and data discontinuity in backward ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM mapping via two tools, and to develop a standard ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM bridging methodology for retrospective analyses. BACKGROUND While the transition to ICD-10-CM has been delayed until October 2015, its impact on cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses has been inadequately explored. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three high impact journals with broad national and international readerships were reviewed for cancer-related studies utilizing ICD-9-CM diagnoses codes in study design, methods, or results. Forward ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM mapping was performing using a translational methodology with the Motif web portal ICD-9-CM conversion tool. Backward mapping from ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM was performed using both Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) general equivalence mappings (GEMs) files and the Motif web portal tool. Generated ICD-9-CM codes were compared with the original ICD-9-CM codes to assess data accuracy and discontinuity. RESULTS While both methods yielded additional ICD-9-CM codes, the CMS GEMs method provided incomplete coverage with 16 of the original ICD-9-CM codes missing, whereas the Motif web portal method provided complete coverage. Of these 16 codes, 12 ICD-9-CM codes were present in 2010 Illinois Medicaid data, and accounted for 0.52% of patient encounters and 0.35% of total Medicaid reimbursements. Extraneous ICD-9-CM codes from both methods (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services general equivalent mapping [CMS GEMs, n = 161; Motif web portal, n = 246]) in excess of original ICD-9-CM codes accounted for 2.1% and 2.3% of total patient encounters and 3.4% and 4.1% of total Medicaid reimbursements from the 2010 Illinois Medicare database. DISCUSSION Longitudinal data analyses post-ICD-10-CM transition will require backward ICD-10-CM to ICD-9-CM coding, and data comparison for accuracy. Researchers must be aware that all methods for backward coding are not comparable in yielding original ICD-9-CM codes. CONCLUSIONS The mandated delay is an opportunity for organizations to better understand areas of financial risk with regards to data management via backward coding. Our methodology is relevant for all healthcare-related coding data, and can be replicated by organizations as a strategy to mitigate financial risk.

Venepalli, Neeta K; Shergill, Ardaman; Dorestani, Parvaneh; Boyd, Andrew D

2014-01-01

64

A Comperative Study of Gauge Fixing Procedures on the Connection Machines CM2 and CM5  

E-print Network

Gauge fixing is a frequent task encountered in practical lattice gauge theory calculations. We review the performance characteristics of some standard gauging procedures for non-abelian gauge theories, implemented on the parallel machines CM2 and CM5.

H. Suman; K. Schilling

1993-06-22

65

Correlated Alteration Effects in CM Carbonaceous Chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Three parameters are proposed to determine the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites. The mineralogic alteration index monitors the relative progress of coupled substitutions in the progressive alteration of cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine, and increases with increasing alteration. To calculate values of this index, an algorithm has been developed to estimate the average matrix phyllosilicate composition in individual CM chondrites. The second parameter is the volume percent of isolated matrix silicates, which decreases with progressive alteration due to mineral hydration. Finally, the volume percent of chondrule alteration monitors the extent of chondrule phyllosilicate production, and increases as alteration proceeds. These parameters define the first CM alteration scale that-relies on multiple indicators of progressive alteration. The following relative order of increasing alteration is established by this model: Murchison less than or equal to Bells less than Pollen less than or equal to Murray less than Mighei less than Nogoya less than Cold Bokkeveld. Bulk delta18O values generally increase with progressive alteration, providing additional support for this sequence. The relative degree of aqueous processing Cochabamba and Boriskino experienced is less precisely constrained, although both fall near the middle of this sequence. A comparison between the mineralogic alteration index and literature values of the whole-rock chemistry of CM chondrites reveals several correlations. For example, a positive, nearly linear correlation between bulk H content and progressive CM alteration suggests an approximately constant production rate of new phyllosilicates relative to the mineralogical transition from cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine. Furthermore, the abundance of trapped planetary Ar-36 decreases systematically in progressively altered CM chondrites, suggesting the wholesale destruction of primary noble gas carrier phase(s) by aqueous reactions. Multiple correlations between diverse alteration parameters indicate that different CM chondrites probably experienced the same kinds of processes and conditions during in situ parent body alteration.

Zolensky, Michael E.; Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.

1996-01-01

66

VizieR Online Data Catalog: 6cm and 3cm sources in SMC (Wong+, 2012)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present two new catalogues of radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). These catalogues contain sources found at 4800MHz (?=6cm) and 8640MHz (?=3cm). Some 457 sources have been detected at 3cm with 601 sources at 6cm created from new high-sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC from Crawford et al. (2011SerAJ.183...95C). (2 data files).

Wong, G. F.; Crawford, E. J.; Filipovic, M. D.; de Horta, A. Y.; Tothill, N. F. H.; Collier, J. D.; Draskovic, D.; Galvin, T. J.; Payne, J. L.

2012-11-01

67

21-cm line observations of galaxies from Kazarian's lists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 21-cm neutral hydrogen line has been measured for the first time in 39 non-Seyfert type galaxies from Kazarian list, with the Nancay radiotelescope. The line profiles, widths at 20% and 50% of the peak intensity, radial velocities as well as total fluxes are presented. The values of radial velocity are in fairly good agreement with those obtained from optical spectra. The width values at 20% of the peak vary in wide range from 113 km s^{-1} (KAZ 579) to 608 km s^{-1} for KAZ 566. Nine of our objects remained undetected, whether their HI-flux was too faint, the integration time too short, or the frequency sighted wrong. However, for part of them, there were positive hint of detection. Comments on individual objects are given. Tables 1 and 3 are only available in electronic form at CDS. Table 2 is also available in electronic form at CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

Tamazian, V. S.; Theureau, G.; Coudreau-Durand, N.

1997-12-01

68

Probing Lepton Asymmetry with 21 cm Fluctuations  

E-print Network

We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry xi_nu = mu_nu/T_nu in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on xi_nu in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

Kohri, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

2014-01-01

69

21 CM searches for DIM galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We review very strong selection effects which operate against the detection of dim (i.e. low surface brightness) galaxies. The Parkes multibeam instrument offers a wonderful opportunity to turn up new populations of such galaxies. However, to explore the newly accessible parameter space, it will be necessary to survey both a very deep patch (105 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 1018 cm-2) and a deep patch (104 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 3 × 1018 cm-2) in carefully selected areas, and we outline the case to do this.

Disney, Mike; Banks, Gareth

1997-04-01

70

S1P/S1P1 signaling stimulates cell migration and invasion in Wilms tumor  

PubMed Central

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is an important regulator of cellular functions via interaction with its receptors S1P1–5. To date, nothing is known about the S1P receptor expression and the effects of S1P signaling in Wilms tumor. In this study, we found ubiquitous expression of S1P receptors in Wilms tumor specimens and cell lines. We demonstrated that S1P1 acted as a promigratory modulator by employing S1P1 antagonist VPC44116, S1P1 siRNA and adenoviral transduction in Wilms tumor cells. Further, we clarified that S1P1-mediated migration occurred via Gi coupling and activation of PI3K and Rac1. In addition, S1P stimulated WiT49 cell invasion through S1P1/Gi signaling pathway. We consider that targeting S1P1 may be a point of therapeutic intervention in Wilms tumor. PMID:19131156

Li, Mei-Hong; Sanchez, Teresa; Yamase, Harold; Hla, Timothy; Oo, Myat Lin; Pappalardo, Anna; Lynch, Kevin R.; Lin, Chen-Yong; Ferrer, Fernando

2010-01-01

71

Lymphopenia induced by a novel selective S1P(1) antagonist structurally unrelated to S1P.  

PubMed

Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) regulates lymphocyte trafficking via type-1 S1P receptor (S1P(1)) and participates in many pathological conditions. We developed a novel type S1P(1)-selective antagonist, TASP0251078, which is structurally unrelated to S1P. This competitive antagonist inhibited binding of S1P to S1P(1) resulting in reduced signaling downstream of S1P(1), including GTP?S-binding and cAMP formation. TASP0251078 also inhibited S1P-induced cellular responses such as chemotaxis and receptor-internalization. Furthermore, when administered in vivo, TASP0251078 induced lymphopenia in blood, which is different from previously reported effects of other S1P(1)-antagonists. In a mouse contact hypersensitivity model, TASP0251078 effectively suppressed ear swelling, leukocyte infiltration, and hyperplasia. These findings provide the chemical evidence that S1P(1) antagonism is responsible for lymphocyte sequestration from the blood, and suggest that the effect of S1P(1) agonists on lymphocyte sequestration results from their functional antagonism. PMID:22265714

Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Hara, Toshifumi; Sakurai, Takanobu; Takahashi, Syuya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Fukasawa, Yoshiki; Shiozawa, Fumiyasu; Tsukahara, Narutoshi; Hirayama, Takehiro; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

2012-04-01

72

Characterization of 8-cm engineering model thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Development of 8 cm ion thruster technology which was conducted in support of the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) flight contract (Contract NAS3-21055) is discussed. The work included characterization of thruster performance, stability, and control; a study of the effects of cathode aging; environmental qualification testing; and cyclic lifetesting of especially critical thruster components.

Williamson, W. S.

1984-01-01

73

Combustion of stratified hydrogen-air mixtures in the 10.7 m 3 combustion test facility cylinder  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents preliminary results from hydrogen concentration gradient combustion experiments in a 10.7 m3 cylinder. These gradients, also referred to as stratified mixtures, were formed from dry mixtures of hydrogen and air at atmospheric temperature. Combustion pressures, burn fractions and flame speeds in concentration gradients were compared with combustion of well-mixed gases containing equivalent amounts of hydrogen. The studied

D. R. Whitehouse; D. R. Greig; G. W. Koroll

1996-01-01

74

Universal Index Theorem on $Mob(S^1)\\Diff_+(S^1)$  

E-print Network

By conformal welding, there is a pair of univalent functions $(f,g)$ associated to every point of the complex K\\"ahler manifold $\\Mob(S^1)\\bk\\Diff_+(S^1)$. For every integer $n\\geq 1$, we generalize the definition of Faber polynomials to define some canonical bases of holomorphic $1-n$ and $n$ differentials associated to the pair $(f,g)$. Using these bases, we generalize the definition of Grunsky matrices to define matrices whose columns are the coefficients of the differentials with respect to standard bases of differentials on the unit disc and the exterior unit disc. We derive some identities among these matrices which are reminiscent of the Grunsky equality. By using these identities, we showed that we can define the Fredholm determinants of the period matrices of holomorphic $n$ differentials $N_n$, which are the Gram matrices of the canonical bases of holomorphic $n$-differentials with respect to the inner product given by the hyperbolic metric. Finally we proved that $\\det N_n =(\\det N_1)^{6n^2-6n+1}$ and $\\pa\\bar{\\pa}\\log\\det N_n$ is $-(6n^2-6n+1)/(6\\pi i)$ of the Weil-Petersson symplectic form.

Lee-Peng Teo

2006-11-24

75

Measurements of Output Factors For Small Photon Fields Up to 10 cm x 10 cm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field output factors (OF) for photon beams from a 6 MV medical accelerator were measured using five different detectors in a scanning water phantom. The measurements were taken for square field sizes of integral widths ranging from 1 cm to 10 cm for two reference source-to-surface distances (SSD) and depths in water. For the diode detectors, square field widths as small as 2.5 mm were also studied. The photon beams were collimated by using either the jaws or the multileaf collimators. Measured OFs are found to depend upon the field size, SSD, depth and also upon the type of beam collimation, size and type of detector used. For field sizes larger than 3 cm x 3 cm, the OF measurements agree to within 1% or less. The largest variation in OF occurs for jawsshaped field of size 1 cm x 1cm, where a difference of more than 18% is observed.

Bacala, Angelina

76

In Situ Investigation of Preirradiated Olivines in CM Chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most CM chondrites are breccias that contain fragments of primary rock representing densely packed agglomerates of chondrules, CAIs, etc., all of which are mantled by thick layers of fine-grained mineral dust [1]. These dust mantles seem to be the result of dust sampling by the various components during their isolated existence in the solar nebula prior to the formation of the CM parent body [1]. Metzler et al. [1] concluded that these rock fragments are well-preserved remnants of the freshly accreted CM parent body(ies). There is an opposing hypothesis that favors an origin of the dust mantles in an active regolith on the CM parent body [e.g., 2]. A list of arguments against the latter view is given by Metzler et al. [1], including a hint at the absence of solar-wind-implanted gases in dust mantles and in fragments of primary rock. In analogy to brecciated ordinary chondrites and lunar breccias, the most probable residence of the solar gases in CM chondrites is their clastic matrix. The same holds for track-rich olivines that were observed in CM chondrites. The occurrence of these grains in the clastic matrix and their absence in the primary rock would give an additional argument for the idea of a dust mantle origin in the solar nebula rather than in a planetary regolith. To answer this important question, mosaics of backscattered electron images of several large polished thin sections of Murchison and Cold Bokkeveld were prepared. The thin sections (1.5-5 cm^2 each) were etched in a WN solution [3] for about 4 hr to reveal the heavy ion tracks in olivines. Results: The background GCR track density produced during meteoroid transit is on the order of 10^4 tracks/cm^2, as was previously observed by [4]. Following the definition given by Goswami and Lal [4], olivines with track densities >10^5 tracks/cm^2 were classified as preirradiated grains and were found in both meteorites in a very small quantity. In both meteorites, 39 preirradiated isolated olivine grains were found in the clastic matrix, whereas the investigated fragments of primary rock do not contain preirradiated olivines. In Murchison about 1.8% (15 out of 850 investigated grains) of the isolated olivines in the clastic matrix show high track densities in the range between 1.9 x 10^6 and >5 x 10^7, comparable to the results of Goswami and co-workers [4,5]. Both Fe-poor and Fe-rich olivines with grain sizes between 40 and 710 micrometers were found to be preirradiated. Track gradients were found in 33% of these olivines, which is very similar to the values obtained by Goswami and Lal [4] and identical to those obtained by MacDougall and Phinney [6]. About 0.4% (2 out of 530) of the investigated olivine-bearing chondrules and chondrule fragments are preirradiated. In the case of Cold Bokkeveld, 3.7% (24 out of 650) of the isolated olivines show high track densities. Thirteen of these 24 grains were found to be concentrated in a distinct inclusion (1 x 4 mm) that is characterized by its elongated appearence and clastic fabric. The track densities of its preirradiated olivines show a very narrow range, indicating a common irradiation history of these grains. The petrography of this inclusion is currently under investigation. Conclusions: Track-rich (preirradiated) olivines in CM chondrites occur exclusively in the clastic matrix of these meteorites, comparable to observations in brecciated ordinary chondrites. Fragments of primary rock in CM chondrites do not contain solar-wind-implanted gases [1] or preirradiated grains. This confirms the view that the dust mantles around various components of these rocks are the products of dust accretion in the solar nebula rather than of regolith processes on the parent body surface. References: [1] Metzler K. et al. (1992) GCA, 56, 2873. [2] Kerridge J. (1992) personal communication. [3] Krishnaswami S. et al. (1971) Science, 174, 287. [4] Goswami J. N. and Lal D.(1979) Icarus, 40, 510. [5] Goswami J. N. and MacDougall J. D. (1983) Proc. LPSC 13th, in JGR, 88, A755. [6] MacDougall J. D. and Phinney D. (1977) Proc. LS

Metzler, K.

1993-07-01

77

[Antigenicity tests of a new antineoplastic agent S-1].  

PubMed

The antigenicity was tested of a new antineoplastic agent S-1 (a combination of tegafur (FT), CDHP and potassium oxonate (Oxo)) in mice and guinea pigs. 1. Male BALB/c or C3H/He mice were sensitized with S-1, CDHP, Oxo, and conjugates of CDHP (or Oxo) and human serum albumin (HSA). S-1 was administered by oral gavage, and the other compounds were administered intraperitoneally with adjuvant (alum). In the heterologous passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) test, using Sprague-Dawley rats as recipients, no IgE antibodies against S-1, CDHP, or Oxo were detected to any serum obtained from the sensitized mice, and no eliciting antigenicities were seen for CDHP or Oxo. 2. Male Hartley guinea pigs were sensitized with S-1, CDHP, Oxo, and conjugates of CDHP (or Oxo) and HSA. S-1 was administered by oral gavage, and the other compounds were administered subcutaneously with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). The homologous PCA test, active systemic anaphylaxis test, and passive hemagglutination test showed no production of antibodies against S-1, CDHP, or Oxo in any sensitized guinea pig, and no eliciting antigenicities for CDHP or Oxo. 3. Female Hartley guinea pigs were sensitized with S-1 subcutaneously with FCA. The active cutaneous anaphylaxis test revealed that S-1 did not induce cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity. 4. These results indicated that S-1, Oxo, and CDHP were not antigenic in mice and guinea pigs. PMID:9021667

Maeda, Y; Morinaga, H; Izumi, K; Ikebuchi, K; Kouchi, Y

1996-11-01

78

Magnetic susceptibility of curium pnictides. [/sup 248/CmP, /sup 248/CmSb  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic susceptibility of microgram quantities of /sup 248/CmP and /sup 248/CmSb has been determined with the use of a SQUID micromagnetic susceptometer over the temperature range 4.2 to 340 K and in the applied magnetic field range of 0.45 to 1600 G. The fcc (NaCl-type) samples yield magnetic transitions at 73K and 162 K for the phosphide and antimonide, respectively. Together with published magnetic data for CmN and CmAs, these results indicate spatially extended exchange interactions between the relatively localized 5f electrons of the metallic actinide atoms.

Nave, S.E.; Huray, P.G.; Peterson, J.R.; Damien, D.A.; Haire, R.G.

1981-09-01

79

The cm-wave continuum in PNe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Excess 20-30GHz emission, above that expected from synchrotron or free-free templates and sub-millimetre dust emission, has been reported in HII regions, planetary nebulae (PNe), dark clouds and in the ISM at large. The excess may perhaps be due to electric dipole radiation from spinning very small grains, or `spinning dust'. The cm-wave excess confronts the free-free paradigm in PNe. It implies that the level of free-free emission, in the optically thin regime above 10GHz, was overestimated by up to 100%, resulting in spurious diagnostics of physical conditions. The evidence for the cm-wave excess in PNe stems from a CBI/SIMBA survey of ~20 objects, highlighting a systematic 250~GHz deficit from the level of 30GHz emission. We have selected the best candidates for an exhaustive continuum study with ATCA. Here we propose to acquire W-band flux densities in 4 selected PNe.

Casassus, Simon; Burton, Michael; Roche, Patrick; Dickinson, Clive; Nyman, Lars-Ake; Indermuehle, Balthasar

2008-04-01

80

Polyhedral serpentine grains in CM chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron tomography, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to investigate the structure and composition of polyhedral serpentine grains that occur in the matrices and fine-grained rims of the Murchison, Mighei, and Cold Bokkeveld CM chondrites. The structure of these grains is similar to terrestrial polygonal serpentine, but the data show that some have spherical or subspherical, rather than cylindrical morphologies. We therefore propose that the term polyhedral rather than polygonal be used to describe this material. EDS shows that the polyhedral grains are rich in Mg with up to 8 atom% Fe. EELS indicates that 70% of the Fe occurs as Fe3+. Alteration of cronstedtite on the meteorite parent body under relatively oxidizing conditions is one probable pathway by which the polyhedral material formed. The polyhedral grains are the end-member serpentine in a mineralogic alteration sequence for the CM chondrites.

Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dódony, István; Friedrich, Heiner; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Buseck, Peter R.

2006-05-01

81

CM Magazine: Canadian Review of Materials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Published by the Manitoba Library Association, the Canadian Review of Materials is the Web version of _CM Magazine_, a bi-weekly review of Canadian materials for young people. _CM Magazine_ contains book, media, and web reviews, as well as news, features, and stories of interest to teachers, librarians, parents, and kids. Though Web issues began appearing in June 1995, the site offers an archive of reviews, feature stories, interviews, and articles from the print version some back to 1971. The archives are indexed by date, author, title, age group, and media type. The site contains pictures, sound clips and video clips. You can search for authors, book titles, and reviewers. In concert with McNally Robinson Booksellers the site offers ordering services for any book reviewed in the magazine.

1995-01-01

82

On absolute CM-periods, II  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a CM-fieldK, Shimura defined the period symbolpK by factorizing periods of abelian varieties with complex multiplication. We define the absolute period symbolgK using division values of the multiple gamma function and conjecture that pK coincides with gK up to the multiplication by algebraic numbers. Taking the action of Gal(Q Q) into account, we present a refined version of this

Hiroyuki Yoshida

1998-01-01

83

Construction of 21cm Cosmic Radio Antenna  

Microsoft Academic Search

We made a pyramidal horn antenna system for 21cm cosmic radio wave. The antenna system has a rectangular waveguide with TE10 mode and a copper probe to detect the electromagnetic wave in waveguide. The parameters of the probe are obtained by experiments using two waveguides. Pyramidal horn antenna is designed to get a gain of 20dB. The size of the

Jong Ae Park; Jong-Man Yang; Seog Tae Han; Yong Sun Park

1993-01-01

84

Polyhedral Serpentine Grains in CM Chondrites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

CM chondrites are primitive rocks that experienced aqueous alteration in the early solar system. Their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained the effects of alteration, and the minerals within them hold clues to the aqueous reactions. Sheet silicates are an important product of alteration, and those of the serpentine group are abundant in the CM2 chondrites. Here we expand on our previous efforts to characterize the structure and chemistry of serpentines in CM chondrites and report results on a polyhedral form that is structurally similar to polygonal serpentine. Polygonal serpentine consists of tetrahedral (T) sheets joined to M(2+)-centered octahedral (O) sheets (where (M2+) is primarily Mg(2+) and Fe(2+)), which give rise to a 1:1 (TO) layered structure with a 0.7-nm layer periodicity. The structure is similar to chrysotile in that it consists of concentric lizardite layers wrapped around the fiber axis. However, unlike the rolled-up chrysotile, the tetrahedral sheets of the lizardite layers are periodically inverted and kinked, producing sectors. The relative angles between sectors result in 15- and 30-sided polygons in terrestrial samples.

Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Buseck, Peter R.

2005-01-01

85

ICD-10 to ICD-9-CM Based on FY2014 ICD-9-CM codes  

Cancer.gov

ICD-10 to ICD-9-CM Based on FY2014 ICD-9-CM codes REPORTABLE NEOPLASMS Category and subcategory codes are shaded in grey and marked with an ^ Cells shaded in pink and marked with an *indicate the preferred code when a single code maps to multiple codes

86

ICD-10 to ICD-10-CM Based on FY2014 ICD-10-CM codes  

Cancer.gov

ICD-10 to ICD-10-CM Based on FY2014 ICD-10-CM codes REPORTABLE NEOPLASMS Category and subcategory codes are shaded in grey and marked with an ^ Cells shaded in pink and marked with an *indicate the preferred code when a single code maps to multiple codes

87

ICD-10-CM to ICD-10 Based on FY2014 ICD-10-CM codes  

Cancer.gov

ICD-10-CM to ICD-10 Based on FY2014 ICD-10-CM codes REPORTABLE NEOPLASMS Category and subcategory codes are shaded in grey and marked with an ^ Cells shaded in pink and marked with an *indicate the preferred code when a single code maps to multiple codes

88

S1P and the birth of platelets  

PubMed Central

Recent work has highlighted the multitude of biological functions of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), which include roles in hematopoietic cell trafficking, organization of immune organs, vascular development, and neuroinflammation. Indeed, a functional antagonist of S1P1 receptor, FTY720/Gilenya, has entered the clinic as a novel therapeutic for multiple sclerosis. In this issue of the JEM, Zhang et al. highlight yet another function of this lipid mediator: thrombopoiesis. The S1P1 receptor is required for the growth of proplatelet strings in the bloodstream and the shedding of platelets into the circulation. Notably, the sharp gradient of S1P between blood and the interstitial fluids seems to be essential to ensure the production of platelets, and S1P appears to cooperate with the CXCL12–CXCR4 axis. Pharmacologic modulation of the S1P1 receptor altered circulating platelet numbers acutely, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for controlling thrombocytopenic states. However, the S1P4 receptor may also regulate thrombopoiesis during stress-induced accelerated platelet production. This work reveals a novel physiological action of the S1P/S1P1 duet that could potentially be harnessed for clinical translation. PMID:23166370

Galvani, Sylvain; Rafii, Shahin; Nachman, Ralph

2012-01-01

89

THE METALLICITY OF THE CM DRACONIS SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii ({approx}< 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 {+-} 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Feiden, Gregory A., E-mail: rct151@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2012-11-20

90

Fuel elements of research reactor CM  

SciTech Connect

In 1961 the CM research reactor was commissioned at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Dimitrovgrad, Russia), it was intended to carry on investigations and the production of transuranium nuclides. The reactor is of a tank type. Original fuel assembly contained plate fuels that were spaced with vanes and corrugated bands. Nickel was used as a cladding material, fuel meat was produced from UO{sub 2} + electrolytic nickel composition. Fuel plates have been replaced by self-spacing cross-shaped dispersion fuels clad in stainless steel. In 2005 the reactor was updated. The purpose of this updating was to increase the quantity of irradiation channels in the reactor core and to improve the neutron balance. The updating was implemented at the expense of 20 % reduction in the quantity of fuel elements in the core which released a space for extra channels and decreased the mass of structural materials in the core. The updated reactor is loaded with modified standard fuel elements with 20 % higher uranium masses. At the same time stainless steel in fuel assembly shrouds was substituted by zirconium alloy. Today in progress are investigations and work to promote the second stage of reactor updating that involve developments of cross-shaped fuel elements having low neutron absorption matrix materials. This article gives an historical account of the design and main technical changes that occurred for the CM reactor since its commissioning.

Kozlov, A.V.; Morozov, A.V.; Vatulin, A.V.; Ershov, S.A. [Rogova St., 5A, P.O.B. 369, Moscow(Russian Federation)

2013-07-01

91

Ejs CM Lagrangian Pendulum Spring Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lagrangian Pendulum Spring model asks students to solve the Lagrangian for a spring-pendulum and then develop a computational model of it. The model framework is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double-clicking the ejs_CM_Lagrangian_pendulum_spring.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. In order to run correctly, the student must add the correct physics to the EJS differential equation solver and parameter definitions. If EJS is installed on your computer, you can right-click within the simulation window and select Open Ejs Model from the pop-up menu. Information about Ejs (Easy Java Simulations) is available at: http://www.um.es/fem/Ejs/. The CM Lagrangian Pendulum Spring model is one of several Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) models used to incorporate computational physics in Classical Mechanics. Ejs, a part of the Open Source Physics Project, is designed to make it easier to access, modify and generate computer models. Additional models can be found by searching ComPADRE for Ejs.

Cox, Anne

2008-06-04

92

Requirements for Cosmological 21-cm Masers  

E-print Network

We perform Monte-Carlo calculations of the radiative transfer of Lyman Alpha (hereafter Lya) photons emitted by a source embedded in a neutral collapsing gas cloud. This represents a young galaxy or quasar during the early stages of the epoch of reionisation (EoR). After computing the Lya spectrum as function of radius and time, we find that the Lya color temperature may be negative in large volumes surrounding the central source. Motivated by this result, we explore the prospects for a population inversion in the hyperfine levels of atomic hydrogen via the Wouthuysen-Field (WF) effect. The reason for this exploration is clear: if 21-cm masers exist during the EoR, they could greatly boost the expected 21-cm flux from this epoch. We find that population inversion is unlikely to occur for several reasons: (1) the required Lya luminosities of the central source exceed ~10e45 erg/s. The radiation pressure exerted by such a large Lya flux likely halts the collapse of the cloud; (2) When quantum corrections to the WF-coupling strength are applied, the required Lya luminosities are (even) larger by orders of magnitude; (3) A relatively low flux of Lya photons that is produced via other channels (x-ray heating, collisional excitation of hydrogen) prevents the Lya color temperature from becoming negative.

Mark Dijkstra; Abraham Loeb

2006-08-08

93

The Metallicity of the CM Draconis System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The CM Draconis system comprises two eclipsing mid-M dwarfs of nearly equal mass in a 1.27 day orbit. This well-studied eclipsing binary has often been used for benchmark tests of stellar models, since its components are among the lowest mass stars with well-measured masses and radii (lsim 1% relative precision). However, as with many other low-mass stars, non-magnetic models have been unable to match the observed radii and effective temperatures for CM Dra at the 5%-10% level. To date, the uncertain metallicity of the system has complicated comparison of theoretical isochrones with observations. In this Letter, we use data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility to measure the metallicity of the system during primary and secondary eclipses, as well as out of eclipse, based on an empirical metallicity calibration in the H and K near-infrared (NIR) bands. We derive an [Fe/H] = -0.30 ± 0.12 that is consistent across all orbital phases. The determination of [Fe/H] for this system constrains a key dimension of parameter space when attempting to reconcile model isochrone predictions and observations.

Terrien, Ryan C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Feiden, Gregory A.; Bender, Chad F.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.

2012-11-01

94

SUPPLEMENTAL FIGURE LEGENDS SUPPLEMENTAL FIG S1. Lrat-/-  

E-print Network

SUPPLEMENTAL FIGURE LEGENDS SUPPLEMENTAL FIG S1. Lrat-/- mice at P10 in the VAD diet group show group. The asterisk indicates a difference from all other groups at PSUPPLEMENTAL FIG S2.110.086157 Copyright 2010 by The Society for the Study of Reproduction. #12;Supplemental Figure S1 BOR

Palczewski, Krzysztof

95

S-1 in the treatment of pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

S-1 is an oral 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) prodrug, which is designed to improve the antitumor activity of 5-FU by inhibiting dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, the key enzyme of 5-FU catabolism. Recently, two important studies on the clinical use of S-1 for pancreatic cancer have been reported from Japan. In the first study (GEST study), S-1 demonstrated non-inferiority to gemcitabine (GEM) in overall survival (OS) for metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic cancer, but combination chemotherapy with GEM and S-1 did not show superiority to GEM in OS. In the second study (JASPAC-01 study), S-1 showed superiority to adjuvant chemotherapy with GEM in OS in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. In addition to GEM, S-1 is now regarded as the key drug in the management of pancreatic cancer in Japan. To date, many studies have investigated the effectiveness of S-1 in various settings, such as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic or locally advanced pancreatic cancer, second-line chemotherapy after GEM failure, and chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced disease. In this review, we focus on recent clinical trials of S-1-based chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic cancer. PMID:25386059

Sudo, Kentaro; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Taketo

2014-01-01

96

Screening and identification of a Bacillus thuringiensis strain S1/4 with large and efficient insecticidal activities.  

PubMed

The bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis was recognized for its entomopathogenic activities related to Cry and Cyt proteins forming the ?-endotoxins and some extracellular activities like the vegetative insecticidal proteins (VIP) and Cry1I. These activities may act specifically against diverse organisms and some of them typically characterize each strain. Here, we screened a set of 212 B. thuringiensis strains to search the higher insecticidal activities. These strains had bipyramidal and cubic crystal morphologies and 30% of them showed PCR amplification of vip3 internal region, from which five isolates (S1/4, S17, S122, S123, and S144) showed plasmid profile variability. These five strains contained the cry1I, cry1Aa and/or cry1Ac, cry1Ab and cry2 genes, and S1/4 harbored in addition the cry1C, vip1, and vip2 genes. They produced from 25 to 46 µg ?-endotoxin per 10(7) spores. Their ?-endotoxins displayed distinct lethal concentrations 50% against either Spodoptera littoralis or Ephestia kuehniella larvae with the lowest one for S1/4, which was also active against Tuta absoluta. Fortunately, the analysis of the culture supernatants revealed that S1/4 had the higher toxicity towards these lepidopteron but it did not show any toxicity against the Tribolium castaneum coleopteran larvae; additionally, S1/4 displayed an antibacterial activity. S1/4 is a good candidate for agricultural pest control, as it is more efficient than the reference strain HD1. PMID:22915162

Sellami, Sameh; Zghal, Taheni; Cherif, Maroua; Zalila-Kolsi, Imen; Jaoua, Samir; Jamoussi, Kaïs

2013-06-01

97

21-cm Intensity Mapping with FAST  

E-print Network

This paper describes a program to map large-scale cosmic structures on the largest possible scales by using FAST\\cite{Nan:2011} to make a 21-cm (red-shifted) Intensity Map of the sky for the range $0.5 z scans with a transverse set of beams. This approach would be competitive to galaxy surveys and could be completed before SKA could begin a more detailed and precise effort. The science would be to measure the large-scale structure on the size of the baryon acoustic oscillations and larger scale and the results would be competitive to its contemporary observations and signficant. The survey would be uniquely sensitive to the potential very large-scale features from GUT-scale Inflation and complementary to the CMB observations.

Smoot, George F

2014-01-01

98

NASA 30 Cm Ion Thruster Development Status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster is under development at NASA to provide an ion propulsion option for missions of national interest and it is an element of the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) program established to validate ion propulsion for space flight applications. The thruster has been developed to an engineering model level and it incorporates innovations in design, materials, and fabrication techniques compared to those employed to conventional ion thrusters. The performance of both functional and engineering model thrusters has been assessed including thrust stand measurements, over an input power range of 0.5-2.3 kW. Attributes of the engineering model thruster include an overall mass of 6.4 kg, and an efficiency of 65 percent and thrust of 93 mN at 2.3 kW input power. This paper discusses the design, performance, and lifetime expectations of the functional and engineering model thrusters under development at NASA.

Patterson, Michael J.; Haag, Thomas W.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Kussmaul, Michael T.

1995-01-01

99

NASA 30 cm ion thruster development status  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster is under development at NASA to provide an ion propulsion option for missions of national interest and it is an element of the NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) program established to validate ion propulsion for space flight applications. The thruster has been developed to an engineering model level and it incorporates innovations in design, materials, and fabrication techniques compared to those employed to conventional ion thrusters. The performance of both functional and engineering model thrusters has been assessed including thrust stand measurements, over an input power range of 0.5-2.3 kW. Attributes of the engineering model thruster include an overall mass of 6.4 kg, and an efficiency of 65 percent and thrust of 93 mN at 2.3 kW input power. This paper discusses the design, performance, and lifetime expectations of the functional and engineering model thrusters under development at NASA.

Patterson, Michael J.; Haag, Thomas W.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Kussmaul, Michael T.

1995-01-01

100

Supplementary Figure S1 Supplementary Figure S1. Seeding and analyzing ECM microarrays (a) Process flow for  

E-print Network

Supplementary Figure S1 Supplementary Figure S1. Seeding and analyzing ECM microarrays (a) Process flow for ECM microarray experiments: slides are prepared by spotting ECM; cells are seeded onto slides Supplementary Figure S4. ECM combinations can have anti-adhesive effects when compared to single molecules (a

Bhatia, Sangeeta

101

Structure and internal rotation in the S0 and S1 states of o-toluidine studied by high resolution UV spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rotationally resolved spectrum of the o-toluidine S1 ' S0 origin was measured using laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. From the resulting spectrum torsional barriers to internal rotation of the methyl group were derived, which resulted in S0 state values of V3 = 699 ? 11 cm ? 1 and V6 =6 4? 11 cm ? 1 with an effective rotational

Ivo Kalkman; Chau Vu; Michael Schmitt; W. Leo Meerts

2009-01-01

102

Aqueous alteration of kamacite in CM chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of aqueous alteration of kamacite in CM chondrites provides insight on the conditions, products, and relative timing of aqueous alteration. We studied unaltered, partially altered, and fully altered kamacite grains from Murray, Murchison, Cold Bokkeveld, and Nogoya using optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. From textual evidence and chemical analysis, we established three separate microchemical environments. 1) In a microchemical environment with a high S activity, kamacite alters to form tochilinite, P-bearing sulfides, eskolaite, and schreibersite. Mass balance calculations show that 81% of the Fe in kamacite is removed from the alteration region, making it available for the formation of other minerals or Fe-rich aureoles. The release of Fe can alter the mesostasis of type-I chondrules forming cronstedtite. 2) In a microchemical environment with a high Si activity and a low S activity, kamacite alters to form cronstedtite with small accessory sulfide inclusions. 3) A microchemical environment with limited S and Si activity results in kamacite alteration forming magnetite. The resulting magnetite retains associated Ni that can distinguish it from precipitated magnetite. In addition, the accessory phases of pentlandite and apatite can be formed if S or Ca are present. Finally, we note that small tochilinite grains in the matrix lack typical Ni, P, and Co levels, suggesting that they did not form from kamacite but possibly by sulfidization of magnetite.

Palmer, Eric E.; Lauretta, Dante S.

2011-10-01

103

Engineering model 8-cm thruster subsystem  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An Engineering Model (EM) 8 cm Ion Thruster Propulsion Subsystem was developed for operation at a thrust level 5 mN (1.1 mlb) at a specific impulse 1 sub sp = 2667 sec with a total system input power P sub in = 165 W. The system dry mass is 15 kg with a mercury-propellant-reservoir capacity of 8.75 kg permitting uninterrupted operation for about 12,500 hr. The subsystem can be started from a dormant condition in a time less than or equal to 15 min. The thruster has a design lifetime of 20,000 hr with 10,000 startup cycles. A gimbal unit is included to provide a thrust vector deflection capability of + or - 10 degrees in any direction from the zero position. The EM subsystem development program included thruster optimization, power-supply circuit optimization and flight packaging, subsystem integration, and subsystem acceptance testing including a cyclic test of the total propulsion package.

Herron, B. G.; Hyman, J.; Hopper, D. J.; Williamson, W. S.; Dulgeroff, C. R.; Collett, C. R.

1978-01-01

104

Gravitational Lensing of Cosmological 21cm Emission  

E-print Network

We investigate the feasibility of measuring weak gravitational lensing using 21cm intensity mapping with special emphasis on the performance of the planned Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We find that the current design for SKA-Mid should be able to measure the evolution of the lensing power spectrum at z~2-3 using this technique. This will be a probe of the expansion history of the universe and gravity at a unique range in redshift. The signal-to-noise is found to be highly dependent on evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction in the universe with a higher HI density resulting in stronger signal. With realistic models for this, SKA Phase 1 should be capable of measuring the lensing power spectrum and its evolution. The signal-to-noise's dependence on the area and diameter of the telescope array is quantified. We further demonstrate the applications of this technique by applying it to two specific coupled dark energy models that would be difficult to observationally distinguish without information from this r...

Pourtsidou, A

2014-01-01

105

S-1-based combination therapy vs S-1 monotherapy in advanced gastric cancer: A meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

AIM: To assess the efficacy and safety of combination therapy based on S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine, vs S-1 monotherapy in advanced gastric cancer (AGC). METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library for eligible studies published before March 2013. Our analysis identified four randomized controlled trials involving 790 participants with AGC. The outcome measures were overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate (ORR) and grade 3-4 adverse events. RESULTS: Meta-analysis showed that S-1-based combination therapy significantly improved OS (HR = 0.77, 95%CI: 0.66-0.91, P = 0.002), PFS (HR = 0.58, 95%CI: 0.46-0.72, P = 0.000) and ORR (OR = 2.23, 95%CI: 1.54-3.21, P = 0.000). Sensitivity analysis further confirmed this association. Lower incidence of grade 3-4 leucopenia (OR = 4.06, 95%CI: 2.11-7.81), neutropenia (OR = 3.94, 95%CI: 2.1-7.81) and diarrhea (OR = 2.41, 95%CI: 1.31-4.44) was observed in patients with S-1 monotherapy. CONCLUSION: S-1-based combination therapy is superior to S-1 monotherapy in terms of OS, PFS and ORR. S-1 monotherapy is associated with less toxicity. PMID:24415887

Liu, Guo-Fang; Tang, Dong; Li, Ping; Wang, Su; Xu, Ya-Xiang; Long, Ai-Hua; Zhou, Nian-Lan; Zhang, Li-Li; Chen, Jie; Xiang, Xiao-Xing

2014-01-01

106

INFO4990 Research Methods, s1 2008 Presentation -marking sheet  

E-print Network

INFO4990 Research Methods, s1 2008 Presentation - marking sheet Criteria Marks Covers all required literature review -Research method -Research method -Plan, with tasks and timetable -Results parts Presentation of research proposal: OR Presentation of research results: -Motivation and context

Koprinska, Irena

107

Anomalous conformer dependent S 1 lifetime of L-phenylalanine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fluorescence lifetimes were measured for six conformers of L-phenylalanine cooled in a supersonic jet. It was found that the S 1 state lifetimes differ by a factor of three among the conformers. Especially, the most stable conformer (intramolecular hydrogen-bonded form) in S 0 had the shortest lifetime. Time-dependent DFT calculation suggested an importance of the mixing of the n? ? character to S 1(?? ?) in this conformer dependent dynamics.

Hashimoto, Takayo; Takasu, Yuichi; Yamada, Yuji; Ebata, Takayuki

2006-04-01

108

Proteolytic specificity of elastase on bovine ? s1-casein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proteases from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or neutrophils) and macrophages, the main somatic cells found in milk of healthy cows, may contribute to hydrolysis of caseins at neutral or acid pH in high somatic cell count milks. The objective of this study was to determine the cleavage specificity of elastase, one of the principal PMN proteinases, on ?s1-casein. ?s1-Casein (5 mg

T. Considine; Á. Healy; A. L. Kelly; P. L. H. McSweeney

2000-01-01

109

A sub-cm micromachined electron microscope  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new approach for fabricating macroscopic (approximately 10x10x10 mm(exp 3)) structures with micron accuracy has been developed. This approach combines the precision of semiconductor processing and fiber optic technologies. A (100) silicon wafer is anisotropically etched to create four orthogonal v-grooves and an aperture on each 10x12 mm die. Precision 308 micron optical fibers are sandwiched between the die to align the v-grooves. The fiber is then anodically bonded to the die above and below it. This procedure is repeated to create thick structures and a stack of 5 or 6 die will be used to create a miniature scanning electron microscope (MSEM). Two die in the structure will have a segmented electrode to deflect the beam and correct for astigmatism. The entire structure is UHV compatible. The performance of an SEM improves as its length is reduced and a sub-cm 2 keV MSEM with a field emission source should have approximately 1 nm resolution. A low voltage high resolution MSEM would be useful for the examination of biological specimens and semiconductors with a minimum of damage. The first MSEM will be tested with existing 6 micron thermionic sources. In the future a micromachined field emission source will be used. The stacking technology presented in this paper can produce an array of MSEMs 1 to 30 mm in length with a 1 mm or larger period. A key question being addressed by this research is the optimum size for a low voltage MSEM which will be determined by the required spatial resolution, field of view, and working distance.

Feinerman, A. D.; Crewe, D. A.; Perng, D. C.; Shoaf, S. E.; Crewe, A. V.

1993-01-01

110

Macronized Vowels on a Mac (OS X 10.6 & 10.7) In order to type macrons using an Apple Macintosh you must make some  

E-print Network

1 Macronized Vowels on a Mac (OS X 10.6 & 10.7) In order to type macrons using an Apple Macintosh. Choose System Preferences from the Apple Menu. 2. From the System Preferences Window click on Language

Keegan, Te Taka

111

Electronic coupling matrix element for electronic excitation energy transfer: S1+S1-->S2+S0 excited state annihilation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the singlet-singlet annihilation process S1+S1?S2+S0, an expression is derived for the electronic coupling matrix element involved in electronic excitation energy transfer (EET) between two equivalent chromophores. Allowance is made for vibronic coupling to occur between the S1 and S2 states of the chromophores, for each of which the S1?S0 and S2?S0 excitations are, respectively, electric-dipole forbidden and allowed. Attention is also given to aspects of the theory for singlet-singlet (?D?D*)(nAnA)?(?D?D)(nA?A*) EET with vibronic coupling. The theory for S1+S1?S2+S0 is illustrated via the results of some model calculations for two C=S chromophores. For each chromophore, the calculations treat explicitly the valence-shell p? atomic orbitals and a sulphur lone-pair atomic orbital. The results of the calculations highlight the nature of the primary contributors to the vibronic coupling component of the electronic EET matrix element, namely Coulombic-type terms. The theory also shows that a Coulombic term is the primary contributor to the vibronic coupling component for singlet-singlet (?D?D*)(nAnA)?(?D?D)(nA?A*) EET.

Harcourt, Richard D.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.; Scholes, Gregory D.; Steer, Ronald P.

1998-07-01

112

Plasma distribution of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) observed using the radio scintillation method  

E-print Network

We report the electron density in a plasma tail of Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) derived from interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations during November 1--28, 2013. Comet ISON showed a well-developed plasma tail (longer than 2.98 x 10^{7} km) before its perihelion passage on November 28. We identified a radio source whose line-of-sight approached the ISON's plasma tail in the above period and obtained its IPS data using the Solar Wind Imaging Facility at 327 MHz. We used the Heliospheric Imager onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relation Observatory to distinguish between the cometary tail and solar eruption origins of their enhanced scintillation. From our examinations, we confirmed three IPS enhancements of a radio source 1148-00 on November 13, 16, and 17, which could be attributed to the disturbance in the cometary tail. They showed no appreciable change of fluctuation power spectra during the occultation by the plasma tail of Comet ISON. We estimated the electron density in the ISON's plasma tail and found 84 ...

Iju, Tomoya; Tokumaru, Munetoshi; Fujiki, Ken'ichi

2014-01-01

113

S-1 plus gemcitabine chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and maintenance therapy with S-1 for unresectable pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of the combination of S-1 with gemcitabine followed by oral S-1 with concurrent radiotherapy (intensity modulated radiotherapy, IMRT) and maintenance therapy with S-1 for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Subjects selected in the study were patients who had unresectable and locally advanced pancreatic cancer without distant metastases, adequate organ and marrow functions, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1 and no prior anticancer therapy. Initially the subjects received two cycles of chemotherapy, oral administration of S-1 40 mg/m2 twice daily from day 1 to day 14 of a 21-d cycle, with 30-min intravenous infusions of gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 on day 1 and day 8. Two weeks after the completion of chemotherapy, S-1 was administered orally with concurrent IMRT. Oral S-1 was administered at a dose of 80 mg/m2 per day twice daily from day 1 to day 14 and from day 22 to day 35. Radiation was concurrently delivered at a dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/d, 5 times per week, 28 fractions). One month after the completion of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m2 per day twice daily for 14 d, followed by a 14-d rest period. This cycle was repeated as maintenance therapy, until unacceptable toxicity occurred or the disease worsened. Thirty-two patients were involved in this study. The median follow-up was 15.6 mo (range: 8.6-32.3 mo). RESULTS: Thirty-two patients completed the scheduled course of chemotherapy, while 30 patients (93.8%) received chemoradiotherapy with two patients ceasing to continue with radiotherapy. The major toxic effects were nausea and leukopenia. There was no grade 4 toxicity or treatment-related death. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, the objective tumor response was partial response in 17 (53.1%) patients, stable disease in 9 (28.1%), and progressive disease in 6 (18.8%). The median overall survival and median progression-free survival were 15.2 mo and 9.3 mo, respectively. The survival rates at 1 year and 2 years were 75% and 34.4%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The combination of S-1 with gemcitabine followed by oral S-1 with IMRT and maintenance therapy with S-1 alone in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer may be considered a well-tolerated, promising treatment regimen. PMID:25320537

Ke, Qing-Hua; Zhou, Shi-Qiong; Yang, Ji-Yuan; Du, Wei; Liang, Gai; Lei, Yong; Luo, Fei

2014-01-01

114

Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel, Plexiglass, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10- 8 to 10-7 strain amplitude.  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A detailed evaluation on the method of internal friction measurement by the stress-strain hysteresis loop method from 0.01 to 1 Hz at 10-8-10-7 strain amplitude and 23.9oC is presented. Significant systematic errors in relative phase measurement can result from convex end surfaces of the sample and stress sensor and from end surface irregularities such as nicks and asperities. Preparation of concave end surfaces polished to optical smoothness having a radius of curvature >3.6X104 cm reduces the systematic error in relative phase measurements to <(5.5+ or -2.2)X10-4 radians. -from Authors

Hsi-Ping, Liu; Peselnick, L.

1983-01-01

115

Two-mode multiplexing at 2 × 10.7 Gbps over a 7-cell hollow-core photonic bandgap fiber.  

PubMed

Current technologies are fast approaching the capacity limit of single mode fibers (SMFs). Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers (HC-PBGFs) are expected to provide attractive long-term solutions in terms of ultra-low fiber nonlinearities associated with the possibility of mode scaling, thus enabling mode division multiplexing (MDM). In this work, we demonstrate MDM over a HC-PBGF for the first time. Two 10.7 Gbps channels are simultaneously transmitted over two modes of a 30-m long 7-cell HC-PBGF. Bit error ratio (BER) performances below the FEC threshold limit (3.3 × 10(-3)) are shown for both data channels when the two modes are transmitted simultaneously. No power penalty and up to 3 dB power penalty at a BER of 10(-9) are measured for single mode transmission using the fundamental and the LP(11) mode, respectively. The performance of this exploratory demonstration is expected to improve significantly if advanced mode launching and detection methods are used. PMID:22714232

Xu, Jing; Peucheret, Christophe; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian; Leick, Lasse

2012-05-21

116

Measurement of the WW Production Cross Section in pp¯ Collisions at ?(s)=1.96 TeV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a measurement of the W boson pair-production cross section in pp¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ?(s)=1.96 TeV. The data, collected with the Run II D0 detector at Fermilab, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 224 252 pb-1 depending on the final state (ee, e?, or ??). We observe 25 candidates with a background expectation of 8.1±0.6(stat)±0.6(syst)±0.5(lum) events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2.3×10-7, equivalent to 5.2 standard deviations. The measurement yields a cross section of 13.8+4.3-3.8(stat)+1.2-0.9(syst)±0.9(lum) pb, in agreement with predictions from the standard model.

Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beauceron, S.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Butler, J. M.; Bystricky, J.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveria Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Feligioni, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golling, T.; Gómez, B.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Harder, K.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kau, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, K. H.; Klima, B.; Klute, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lueking, L.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martens, M.; Mattingly, S. E.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitrevski, J.; Mokhov, N.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, N.; Oshima, N.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.

2005-04-01

117

Rectocutaneous fistula and nonunion after TranS1 axial lumbar interbody fusion L5-S1 fixation: case report.  

PubMed

The authors report a case of rectal injury, rectocutaneous fistula, and pseudarthrosis after a TranS1 axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF) L5-S1 fixation. The TranS1 AxiaLIF procedure is a percutaneous minimally invasive approach to transsacral fusion of the L4-S1 vertebral levels. It is gaining popularity due to the ease of access to the sacrum through the presacral space, which is relatively free from intraabdominal and neurovascular structures. This 35-year-old man had undergone the procedure for the treatment of degenerative disc disease. The patient subsequently presented with fever, syncope, and foul-smelling gas and bloody drainage from the surgical site. A CT fistulagram and flexible sigmoidoscopy showed evidence of rectocutaneous fistula, which was managed with intravenous antibiotic therapy and bowel rest with total parenteral nutrition. Subsequent studies performed 6 months postoperatively revealed evidence of pseudarthrosis. The patient's rectocutaneous fistula symptoms gradually subsided, but his preoperative back pain recurred prompting a revision of his L5-S1 spinal fusion. PMID:23790047

Siegel, Geoffrey; Patel, Nilesh; Ramakrishnan, Rakesh

2013-08-01

118

Reduced dimension rovibrational variational calculations of the S1 state of C2H2. II. The S1 rovibrational manifold and the effects of isomerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Reduced dimension variational calculations have been performed for the rovibrational level structure of the S1 state of acetylene. The state exhibits an unusually complicated level structure, for various reasons. First, the potential energy surface has two accessible conformers, trans and cis. The cis conformer lies about 2700 cm-1 above the trans, and the barrier to cis-trans isomerization lies about 5000 cm-1 above the trans minimum. The trans vibrations ?4 (torsion) and ?6 (asym. bend) interact very strongly by Darling-Dennison and Coriolis resonances, such that their combination levels and overtones form polyads with unexpected structures. Both conformers exhibit very large x36 cross-anharmonicity since the pathway to isomerization is a combination of ?6 and ?3 (sym. bend). Near the isomerization barrier, the vibrational levels show an even-odd K-staggering of their rotational levels as a result of quantum mechanical tunneling through the barrier. The present calculations address all of these complications, and reproduce the observed K-structures of the bending and C-C stretching levels with good qualitative accuracy. It is expected that they will assist with the assignment of the irregular patterns near the isomerization barrier.

Changala, P. Bryan; Baraban, Joshua H.; Stanton, John F.; Merer, Anthony J.; Field, Robert W.

2014-01-01

119

000700S 10/2011 000700S 1 of 12  

E-print Network

000700S 10/2011 000700S 1 of 12 DIVISION 00 ­ BIDDING AND CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS SECTION 000700 ­ Includes but is not limited to all labor, materials, tools, and equipment required and reasonably inferred by Contract to complete all construction. 7. Contractor ­ Person or entity identified in Lump Sum Contract

Ohta, Shigemi

120

S1Supplemental Data Will Travel for Food: Spatial Discounting  

E-print Network

to access 72.5% 6.6%, t 3.42, p 0.04; tamarins: 85.6% 4.0%, tthe food rewards at different distancesS1Supplemental Data Will Travel for Food: Spatial Discounting in Two New World Monkeys Jeffrey R prefer the close reward that they can easily distin- guish. Research on the anatomy of tamarin

Stevens, Jeffrey

121

The impending demise of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present evidence to conclude that it is very probable that comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) will disintegrate before reaching perihelion. Figs. 1 and 7 of this work are particularly revealing. The comet is following the path of disintegrating comets and not the path of normal Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that C/2012 S1 (ISON) is going to disintegrate. Note: the comet disintegrated on November 13th, according to this prediction while this paper was being refereed (CBET 3731). We present evidence to conclude that it is very probable that comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) will disintegrate before reaching perihelion. Some Oort Cloud comets exhibit a signature (a slope discontinuity event (SDE)+a magnitude dip after the event) that has predictive power. Figs. 1 and 7 of this work are particularly revealing. The comet is following the path of disintegrating comets and not the path of normal Oort Cloud comets, suggesting that C/2012 S1(ISON) is going to disintegrate. Note: the comet disintegrated on November 13th while this paper was being refereed (CBET 3731).

Ferrín, Ignacio

2014-06-01

122

Search for the Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Decay B0s??+?- in pp¯ Collisions at ?(s)=1.96 TeV with the D0 Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a search for the flavor-changing neutral current decay B0s??+?- using a data set with integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at ?(s)=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We find the upper limit on the branching fraction to be B(B0s??+?-)?5.0×10-7 at the 95% C.L. assuming no contributions from the decay B0d??+?- in the signal region. This limit is the most stringent upper bound on the branching fraction B0s??+?- to date.

Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beauceron, S.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Butler, J. M.; Bystricky, J.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Feligioni, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golling, T.; Gómez, B.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Harder, K.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kau, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, K. H.; Klima, B.; Klute, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lueking, L.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martens, M.; Mattingly, S. E.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mitrevski, J.; Mokhov, N.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulders, M.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, N.; Oshima, N.; Otero Y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.

2005-02-01

123

A search for 21 cm H I absorption in AT20G compact radio galaxies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present results from a search for 21 cm associated H I absorption in a sample of 29 radio sources selected from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz survey. Observations were conducted using the Australia Telescope Compact Array Broadband Backend, with which we can simultaneously look for 21 cm absorption in a redshift range of 0.04 ?z? 0.08, with a velocity resolution of 7 km s-1. In preparation for future large-scale H I absorption surveys we test a spectral-line finding method based on Bayesian inference. We use this to assign significance to our detections and to determine the best-fitting number of spectral-line components. We find that the automated spectral-line search is limited by residuals in the continuum, both from the band-pass calibration and spectral-ripple subtraction, at spectral-line widths of ?vFWHM? 103 km s-1. Using this technique we detect two new absorbers and a third, previously known, yielding a 10 per cent detection rate. Of the detections, the spectral-line profiles are consistent with the theory that we are seeing different orientations of the absorbing gas, in both the host galaxy and circumnuclear disc, with respect to our line of sight to the source. In order to spatially resolve the spectral-line components in the two new detections, and so verify this conclusion, we require further high-resolution 21 cm observations (˜0.01 arcsec) using very long baseline interferometry.

Allison, J. R.; Curran, S. J.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Geréb, K.; Mahony, E. K.; Reeves, S.; Sadler, E. M.; Tanna, A.; Whiting, M. T.; Zwaan, M. A.

2012-07-01

124

Collisional facilitation of aqueous alteration of CM and CV carbonaceous chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CM chondrites exhibit a strong correlation between the degree of alteration and the extent of particle alignment (i.e., the strength of the petrofabric). It seems likely that the S1 shock stage of essentially every CM and the high matrix abundance (˜70 vol.%) of these samples ensured that the shock waves that produced CM petrofabrics (by collapsing matrix pores and squeezing chondrules into pore spaces) were significantly attenuated and were too weak to damage olivine crystal lattices. Random collisions on the CM body produced petrofabrics and created fractures in the target rocks. Subsequent impact-mobilization of water caused hydrated phases to form preferentially in the more-fractured regions (those with the strongest petrofabrics); the less-deformed, less-fractured CM regions experienced lower degrees of aqueous alteration. Many CV3 chondrites also have petrofabrics: roughly half are from the oxidized Bali-like subgroup (CV3OxB), roughly half are from the reduced subgroup (CV3R) and none is from the oxidized Allende-like subgroup (CV3OxA) (which is less altered than CV3OxB). Nearly all CVs with petrofabrics are S3-S4 and nearly all CVs that lack petrofabrics are S1. Oxidized CVs have much higher porosities (typically 20-28%) than reduced CVs (0.6-8%), facilitating more-extensive aqueous alteration. The CV3R chondrites formed from low-porosity material that inhibited oxidation during alteration. The oxidized CV subgroups formed from higher-porosity materials. The CV3OxB samples were shocked, became extensively fractured and developed petrofabrics; the CV3OxA samples were not shocked and never developed petrofabrics. When water was mobilized, both sets of porous CV chondrites became oxidized; the more-fractured CV3OxB subgroup was more severely altered.

Rubin, Alan E.

2012-08-01

125

Limits on variations in fundamental constants from 21-cm and ultraviolet quasar absorption lines  

E-print Network

Quasar absorption spectra at 21-cm and UV rest-wavelengths are used to estimate the time variation of x=alpha^2 g_p mu, where alpha is the fine structure constant, g_p the proton g factor, and m_e/m_p=mu the electron/proton mass ratio. Over a redshift range 0.24 ~_total_weighted=(1.17+-1.01) x 10^-5. A linear fit gives d/dt{x}/x=(-1.43+-1.27) x 10^-15 yr^-1. Two previous results on varying alpha yield the strong limits Delta mu/mu=(2.31+-1.03) x 10^-5 and Delta mu/mu=(1.29+-1.01) x 10^-5. Our sample, 8x larger than any previous, provides the first direct estimate of the intrinsic 21-cm and UV velocity differences ~6 km s^-1.

P. Tzanavaris; J. K. Webb; M. T. Murphy; V. V. Flambaum; S. J. Curran

2004-12-29

126

[Induction chemotherapy with S-1/oxaliplatin prevented colostomy in a patient with advanced rectal cancer].  

PubMed

A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with bloody stools and constipation. She was diagnosed with advanced lower rectal cancer with multiple liver and pulmonary metastases. Because the rectal cancer was located 2 cm from the anal verge, we suggested she undergo an abdominoperineal resection(Miles operation), but she refused to undergo a colostomy. Then, 6 courses of chemotherapy with S-1/oxaliplatin(SOX)were administered, and the local tumor, liver metastases, and pulmonary metastases were all significantly decreased in size(reduction rate 60%). After chemotherapy, she chose to undergo low anterior resection(LAR), D2. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and she currently has stable disease with adjuvant SOX chemotherapy. Induction SOX chemotherapy was considered to be useful for maintaining the quality of life(QOL) in a patient with advanced rectal cancer. PMID:24743292

Shimao, Kazuya; Yano, Masao; Sasaki, Kenji; Goto, Tetsuhiro

2014-03-01

127

Multiplexing and DQPSK Precoding of 10.7Gb\\/s Client Signals to 107 Gb\\/s Using an FPGA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We implemented a real-time DQPSK precoder for 107-Gb\\/s data, together with a highspeed channel alignment scheme and the required rate adaptation from 10.7 Gb\\/s to 13.375 Gb\\/s, on a Xilinx Virtex II Pro X FPGA.

H. Song; A. Adamiecki; P. J. Winzer; C. Woodworth; S. Corteselli; G. Raybon

2008-01-01

128

25 CFR 10.7 - Where do I find help or receive technical assistance in complying with the policies and standards?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Where do I find help or receive technical assistance in complying with the policies...DETENTION FACILITIES AND PROGRAMS § 10.7 Where do I find help or receive technical assistance in complying with the...

2010-04-01

129

[A case of squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple skin successfully treated with S-1 alone].  

PubMed

Squamous cell carcinoma of the breast is uncommon, but that of the nipple skin is rarer. The effect of chemotherapy in these cases is yet to reach consensus. We report a rare case in which primary squamous cell carcinoma of the nipple skin was successfully treated with S-1 alone. A 64-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of a granulomatous tumor mass over the right nipple, which she was aware of for 10 years; the tumor showed a rapid increase in growth before admission. The tumor was approximately 4 cm at the first visit, and was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma by incisional biopsy. We administered preoperative systemic chemotherapy owing to the presence of metastasis in an axillary lymph node. After 2 courses of chemotherapy with oralS -1 at 100mg/day for 28 days followed by a 14-day resting period, the primary tumor and metastatic lymph node showed a remarkable reduction in size. The patient subsequently underwent a radical operation and is currently healthy without any recurrence. PMID:25131884

Murakami, Soichiro; Umeda, Shuyo; Sozaki, Masae; Miyoshi, Kei; Ishikawa, Mikimasa; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Ohuchi, Kiyoko; Nakano, Ryuji

2014-07-01

130

Static Test Firing of Saturn V S-1C Stage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Smoke and flames belch from the huge S-1C test stand as the first stage booster of the Apollo/Saturn V space vehicle is static fired at the NASA Mississippi Test Facility (MTF), currently called Stennis Space Center. The huge 138 foot-long rocket had five engines that develop 7.5 million pounds of thrust and launched the 363 foot-long Saturn V up to a height of 40 miles at a speed of 6,000 miles per hour. The first stage was built by the Boeing Company at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, Louisiana, under the management of Marshall Space Flight Center.

1967-01-01

131

Experimental determination of kQ factors for cylindrical ionization chambers in 10?cm × 10?cm and 3?cm × 3?cm photon beams from 4?MV to 25?MV  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the ionometric determination of absorbed dose to water, Dw, in megavoltage photon beams from a linear accelerator, beam-quality-dependent correction factors, kQ, are used for the ionization chambers. By using a water calorimeter, these factors can be determined experimentally and with substantially lower standard uncertainties compared to calculated values of the kQ, which are published in various dosimetry protocols. In this investigation, kQ for different types of cylindrical ionization chambers (NE 2561, NE 2571, FC 65?G) were determined experimentally in 10?cm × 10?cm photon beams from 4?MV to 25?MV (corresponding beam quality index TPR20,10 from 0.64 to 0.80). The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factors for a single ionization chamber in 10?cm × 10?cm photon beams can be measured with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.31%. In addition to these measurements in 10?cm × 10?cm fields, kQ factors for the NE 2561 chamber were also determined in smaller 3?cm × 3?cm photon beams between 6?MV and 25?MV. In this case, relative standard uncertainties between 0.35 % and 0.38 % are achieved for the kQ factors. It is found for this ionization chamber, that the ratio of the kQ factors in 3?cm × 3?cm and in 10?cm × 10?cm beams increases with increasing TPR20,10 to reach a value of 1.0095 at TPR20,10 = 0.8 with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.4 %.

Krauss, A.; Kapsch, R. P.

2014-08-01

132

Energy Levels of the Nitrate Radical Below 2000 CM-1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Highly sophisticated quantum chemistry techniques have been employed to build a three-state diabatic Hamiltonian for the nitrate radical (NO_3). Eigenvalues of this Hamiltonian (which includes effects beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation) are consistent with the known ``vibrational'' levels of NO_3 up to ca. 2100 cm-1 above the zero-point level; with a small empirical adjustment of the diabatic coupling strength, calculated levels are within 20 cm-1 of the measured level positions for those that have been observed experimentally. Of the eleven states with e' symmetry calculated below 2000 cm-1, nine of these have been observed either in the gas phase by Hirota and collaborators as well as Neumark and Johnston, or in frozen argon by Jacox. However, the Hamiltonian produces two levels that have not been seen experimentally: one calculated to lie at 1075 cm-1 (which is the third e' state, above ?_4 and 2?_4) and another at 1640 cm-1 which is best assigned as one of the two e' sublevels of 4?_4. A significant result is that the state predicted at 1075 cm-1 is not far enough above the predicted 2?_4 level (777 cm-1 v. ca. 760 cm-1 from experiment) to be plausibly assigned as 3?_4 (which is at 1155 cm-1: experimental position: 1173 cm-1), nor is its nodal structure consistent with such an idea. Rather, it is quite unambiguously the ?_3 level. Given the fidelity of the results generated by this model Hamiltonian as compared to experiment, it can safely be concluded that the prominent infrared band seen at 1492 cm-1 (corresponding to a calculated level at 1500 cm-1) is not ?_3, but rather a multiquantum state best viewed as a sublevel of the ?_3 + ?_4 combination.

Stanton, J. F.; Simmons, C. S.

2012-06-01

133

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, rolls to a stop at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the I SS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communicatio ns systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an elec tric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building

1999-01-01

134

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility, NASA's Super Guppy opens to reveal its cargo, the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the f irst starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super G uppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building

1999-01-01

135

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the newly arrived S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station (ISS), is offloaded from NASA's Super Guppy aircraft. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated fo r flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to b e moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is being transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building.

1999-01-01

136

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers attach cranes to the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, to lift the truss to a payload transporter for its transfer to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufa ctured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully out fitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails al low pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight

1999-01-01

137

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the S1 truss, a segment of the International Space Station, is moved away from the Super Guppy that brought it to KSC from Marshall Space Flight Center. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Hunti ngton Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S 1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 poun ds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircraft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is being transferred to the Operations and Checkout Building.

1999-01-01

138

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Super Guppy airplane, with the International Space Station's (ISS) S1 truss aboard, arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility from Marshall Space Flight Center. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif ., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment al so will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is s lated for flight in 2001. The Super Guppy, with its 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads, is well prepared to transport the truss and other ISS segments. Loading the Guppy is easy because of the unique 'fold-away' nose of the aircr aft that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtu res to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight. The truss is to be moved to the Operations and Checkout Building

1999-01-01

139

STS-112 S1 Truss Payload arrives at KSC  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Escort vehicles prepare to leave the Shuttle Landing Facility with the S1 truss (at right) on its trek to the Operations and Checkout Building. Manufactured by the Boeing Co. in Huntington Beach, Calif., this component of the ISS is the first starboard (right-side) truss segment, whose main job is providing structural support for the orbiting research facility's radiator panels that cool the Space Station's complex power system. The S1 truss segment also will house communications systems, external experiment positions and other subsystems. Primarily constructed of aluminum, the truss segment is 45 feet long, 15 feet wide and 6 feet tall. When fully outfitted, it will weigh 31,137 pounds. The truss is slated for flight in 2001. The truss arrived at KSC aboard NASA's Super Guppy, seen in the background. The aircraft is uniquely built with a 25-foot diameter fuselage designed to handle oversized loads and a 'fold-away' nose that opens 110 degrees for cargo loading. A system of rails in the cargo compartment, used with either Guppy pallets or fixtures designed for specific cargo, makes cargo loading simple and efficient. Rollers mounted in the rails allow pallets or fixtures to be moved by an electric winch mounted beneath the cargo floor. Automatic hydraulic lock pins in each rail secure the pallet for flight

1999-01-01

140

LCLS-S1 optical transition radiation monitor.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a high- resolution optical transition radiation (OTR) imaging monitor for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) injection linac at SLAC. The imaging station,OTR-S1, will be located at the S1 spectrometer with a beam energy of 135 MeV. The system will be used to acquire 2-D transverse beam distributions of the accelerated photocathode-gun-generated electron beam. We anticipate an average beam current of 0.2 to 1 nC and nominal beam spot size of 130 mum (sigmax), 100 mum (sigmay). The imaging system was designed for a field of view x/y: 10 times 7.5 mm. The spatial resolution of {approx}12 microns was verified over the central 5times4 mm region in the visible. A 12-bit digital camera acquires the image and a Mac-based digital frame-capturing system was employed for the initial lab-based performance testing of the device. We report on system development, testing methods, and data analysis.

Berg, W. J.; Yang, B.; X.; Erwin, L. L.; Shoaf, S. E.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2008-01-01

141

6cm and 11cm polarisation maps of SNR G65.2+5.7 (Xiao+, 2009)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The {lambda}11cm and {lambda}6cm continuum and polarization observations of SNR G65.2+5.7 were completed with the Effelsberg 100-m and the Urumqi 25-m telescopes, respectively, to investigate the integrated spectrum, the spectral index distribution, and the magnetic field properties. Archival {lambda}21cm data of the Effelsberg 100-m telescope were also used. (2 data files).

L. Xiao; W. Reich; E. Furst; J. L. Han

2009-01-01

142

High Redshift HI 21cm Absorption toward Red Quasars  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have searched for redshifted absorption in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen toward `red quasars', which are extragalactic radio sources with a steep spectral drop between optical and infrared wavelengths. The success rate for detecting HI 21cm absorption toward a representative sample of such sources is 80%. This compares to the much lower success rate of 11% for

C. L. Carilli; Karl M. Menten; C. P. Moore

1998-01-01

143

HI lambda 21 CM observations of low ionization absorption systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A description is presented of two radio frequency studies with results which are related to the nature of the narrow-line low-ionization QSO absorption systems. One of the studies involved a search for lambda 21 cm absorption in redshifted systems selected for Mg II absorption. It was found that 21 cm absorption is rare, occurring in 2 out of 18 systems.

F. H. Briggs

1983-01-01

144

Photofraction of a 5 cm x 2 cm BGO scintillator. [bismuth germanate crystal for use in cosmic gamma ray detector  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The photofraction of a 5.1 cm x 2.0 cm bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator was measured over a gamma-ray energy range of 0.2 to 6.1 MeV. Several methods, used to minimize the effect of room scattering on the measurement, are discussed. These include a gamma-gamma coincidence technique, a beta-gamma coincidence technique, and the use of sources calibrated with a standard 7.6 cm x 7.6 cm sodium iodide scintillator.

Dunphy, P. P.; Forrest, D. J.

1985-01-01

145

Static compression of Ca(OH)2 at room temperature - Observations of amorphization and equation of state measurements to 10.7 GPa  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

X-ray diffraction measurements are reported for Ca(OH)2 portlandite as it is compressed to 37.6 GPa in the diamond cell at room temperature. Between 10.7 and 15.4 GPa crystalline Ca(OH)2 transforms to a glass, and on decompression the glass recrystallizes between 3.6 and 5.1 GPa. Below pressures of 10.7 GPa the elastic compression of crystalline Ca(OH)2 was measured. A finite strain analysis of these data shows that the isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are 37.8 + or - 1.8 GPa and 5.2 + or - 0.7 at zero pressure. The change in the unit cell dimensions indicates that the linear incompressibilities of Ca(OH)2 differ by a factor of three.

Meade, Charles; Jeanloz, Raymond

1990-01-01

146

Determination of the threshold value of F10.7 in the dependence of foF2 on solar activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By introducing the two-segmented linear regression model instead of the well known quadratic fit, we were able to describe the solar activity dependence of the F2 critical frequency. Saturation features were observed and the corresponding F10.7 values at which this phenomenon occurs were obtained for different hours. The seasonal average values were found to be around 154 sfu, 138 sfu, 177 sfu and 150 sfu for March equinox, June solstice, September equinox and December solstice respectively. These affirmed that saturation phenomenon is more pronounced at the equinoxes than solstices. On the average, the threshold value of F10.7 was obtained to be 154.5 sfu for this station in the African sector of the equatorial region.

Adeniyi, J. O.; Ikubanni, S. O.

2013-05-01

147

Photometric investigations of UV Cet type flare stars with 3×10-7sec time resolution on a 6-m telescope  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1982 - 1985, electrophotometrical observations of eight flare stars of the UV Cet type have been carried out with the 3×10-7sec time resolution at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory. Using the apparatus and program complex MANIA during 35 hours of patrol observations, the authors have registered about 120 stellar flares, mainly at V577 Mon, Wolf 424

G. M. Beskin; R. E. Gershberg; S. I. Neizvestnyj; V. L. Plakhotnichenko; L. A. Pustil'Nik; V. F. Shvartsman

1990-01-01

148

Photometrical investigations of the UV Cet type flare stars with the 3×10-7sec time resolution at the 6-metre telescope  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1982 - 85 electrophotometrical observations of 8 flare stars of the UV Cet type have been carried out with the 3×10-7sec time resolution at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory. Using the apparatus and program complex MANIA during 35 hours of patrol observations, the authors have registered about 120 stellar flares, mainly at V577 Mon, Wolf 424

G. M. Beskin; R. E. Gershberg; S. I. Neizvestnyj; V. L. Plakhotnichenko; L. A. Pustil'Nik; V. F. Shvartsman

1988-01-01

149

4.5cm3.5cm26 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html  

E-print Network

P.7 201279 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html P.45 A. 3 3 #12;201279 , . ` ' . . URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/english/index.html 6 90 90 "" ... ) "" ... 4,000 *1 14cm Ã?3cm 201279 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html : 36113223 333443

Takada, Shoji

150

4.5cm3.5cm26 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html  

E-print Network

P.7 201279 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html P.45 A. 3 3 #12;201279" " URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/english/index.html 6 9090 4.5cmÃ?3.5cm26 1 " (Kofu Yotei , 28 "" "" "" . #12;201279 URL www.immi-moj.go.jp/index.html 9 C

Takada, Shoji

151

A 244Cm irradiator for protracted exposure of cultured Mammalian cells with alpha particles.  

PubMed

A 244Cm alpha-particle irradiator was designed and constructed for radiobiological studies where protracted exposure at a low dose rate of cultured mammalian cells is required. It allows irradiation of a cell monolayer attached to the Mylar bottom of a specially designed Petri dish of 56 mm diameter (approximately 25 cm(2) area). The irradiator is based on a 20-mm-diameter stainless steel chamber containing a 148 kBq 244Cm source. The chamber, flushed with helium gas at a pressure kept slightly above the external pressure, is inserted into a cell incubator where temperature and CO2 concentration are controlled. Spectrometric and dosimetric characterization of the irradiator was carried out by means of an ion-implanted-silicon charged-particle detector, CR39 detectors, and Monte Carlo simulations with the TRIM code. Average LET of particles incident on the cells at the center of the Petri dish was evaluated to be 120 keV microm(-1) at 59 mm from the source, and the average dose rate was 5.69 x 10 Gy s(-1), with +12% and -8% variations at the center and the edge, respectively. The irradiator has been successfully tested and used for several experiments involving 16-d exposure of human fibroblasts monolayers. PMID:16340609

Esposito, G; Belli, M; Simone, G; Sorrentino, E; Tabocchini, M A

2006-01-01

152

Eight-cm mercury ion thruster system technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The technology status of 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion thrusters is presented. Much of the technology resulting from the 5 cm diameter thruster has been adapted and improved upon to increase the reliability, durability, and efficiency of the 8 cm thruster. Technology discussed includes: dependence of neutralizer tip erosion upon neutralizer flow rate; impregnated and rolled-foil insert cathode performance and life testing; neutralizer position studies; thruster ion beam profile measurements; high voltage pulse ignition; high utilization ion machined accelerator grids; deposition internal and external to the thruster; thruster vectoring systems; thruster cycling life testing and thruster system weights for typical mission applications.

1974-01-01

153

LIFTING OF S1 -VALUED MAPS IN SUMS OF SOBOLEV SPACES  

E-print Network

LIFTING OF S1 -VALUED MAPS IN SUMS OF SOBOLEV SPACES PETRU MIRONESCU Abstract. We describe, in terms of lifting, the closure of smooth S1 -valued maps in the space Ws,p ((-1, 1)N ; S1 ). (Here, 0 the problem of lifting of S1 -valued maps in Sobolev spaces: (Ls,p) Given an arbitrary u Ws,p (Q; S1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

154

Mutiple Precursors of Secondary Mineralogical Assemblages in CM Chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Petrographic survey of Poorly Characterized Phases (PCPs) of Paris (CM2) underline that Type-I PCPs are linked to the alteration of Fe-Ni metal beads whereas Type-II PCPs were formed by pseudomorphism of anhydrous silicates.

Marrocchi, Y.; Pignatelli, I.; Gounelle, M.

2014-09-01

155

Determining the Relative Extent of Alteration in CM Chondrites.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The aqueous alteration of CM chondrites provides a record of the processes attending the earliest stages of parent body evolution. However, resolving the alteration pathways of chondritic evolution requires a means for distinguishing the relative extent o...

L. B. Browning, H. Y. Mcsween, M. Zolensky

1993-01-01

156

Benchmarking and performance analysis of the CM-2. [SIMD computer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A suite of benchmarking routines testing communication, basic arithmetic operations, and selected kernel algorithms written in LISP and PARIS was developed for the CM-2. Experiment runs are automated via a software framework that sequences individual tests, allowing for unattended overnight operation. Multiple measurements are made and treated statistically to generate well-characterized results from the noisy values given by cm:time. The results obtained provide a comparison with similar, but less extensive, testing done on a CM-1. Tests were chosen to aid the algorithmist in constructing fast, efficient, and correct code on the CM-2, as well as gain insight into what performance criteria are needed when evaluating parallel processing machines.

Myers, David W.; Adams, George B., II

1988-01-01

157

CM Process Improvement and the International Space Station Program (ISSP)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the Configuration Management (CM) process improvements planned and undertaken for the International Space Station Program (ISSP). It reviews the 2004 findings and recommendations and the progress towards their implementation.

Stephenson, Ginny

2007-01-01

158

S-1 combined with docetaxel following doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide as neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer: phase II trial  

PubMed Central

Background This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of S-1 combined with docetaxel (SD) following doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide (AC) as neoadjuvant therapy in patients with HER2-negative, stage II-III breast cancer. Methods Patients received AC every 3 weeks for four cycles followed by S-1 (30 mg/m2 orally b.i.d. on days 1–14) and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 i.v. on day 1) every 3 weeks for four cycles. The primary endpoint was the pathological complete response (pCR) rate in breast and axillary lymph nodes. Results The study included 49 patients with a median age of 43 years. The median breast tumor size was 4.0 cm by palpation. All patients were positive for involvement of axillary lymph node and five patients also had supraclavicular lymph node metastasis, which was confirmed by histological examination. In total, 85.4% of patients (41/49) completed eight cycles of therapy and 95.9% of patients (47/49) received curative surgery. The pCR rate was 22.5% (n = 11). The clinical response rate was 67.4%. During SD chemotherapy, the most frequent grade 3–4 toxicity was neutropenia (8.5% by cycle). There was a single treatment-related mortality from severe neutropenia. Grade 3 S-1 specific toxicities such as epigastric pain (12.2% by person), stomatitis (4.1% by person), and diarrhea (2.0% by person) were also observed. In particular, gastrointestinal discomfort led to dose reduction of S-1 in 45.8% of patients. Conclusions Given all axillary lymph node positive diseases, neoadjuvant S-1 combined with docetaxel following AC showed a favorable anti-tumor activity but gastrointestinal discomfort should be carefully considered for future studies. Trial registration NCT00994968 PMID:24314307

2013-01-01

159

Final report on EURAMET.AUV.A-S1  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The supplementary Regional Comparison EURAMET.AUV.A-S1 has been carried out under the auspices of EURAMET's Technical Committee for Acoustics, Ultrasound and Vibration, and the Consultative Committee for Acoustics, Ultrasound and Vibration (CCAUV) of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM). The participating NMIs are the Centro Nacional de Metrología (CENAM, Mexico), the Danish Fundamental Metrology (DFM, Denmark) and the Directorate of Measures and Precious Metals (DMDM, Serbia). The role of the Pilot laboratory was jointly undertaken by the DFM and CENAM. The time schedule was organized in a single star configuration. Two LS1P microphones and two LS2aP were circulated among participants. This report includes the measurement results from the participants, and the analysis leading to a proposal for the reference values for the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCAUV, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

Barrera-Figueroa, Salvador; Nielsen, Lars

2013-01-01

160

Confinement on R3 × S1: Continuum and lattice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There has been substantial progress in understanding confinement in a class of four-dimensional SU(N) gauge theories using semiclassical methods. These models have one or more compact directions, and much of the analysis is based on the physics of finite temperature gauge theories. The topology R3 × S1 has been most often studied using a small compactification circumference L such that the running coupling g2(L) is small. The gauge action is modified by a double-trace Polyakov loop deformation term, or by the addition of periodic adjoint fermions. The additional terms act to preserve Z(N) symmetry and thus confinement. An area law for Wilson loops is induced by a monopole condensate. In the continuum, the string tension can be computed analytically from topological effects. Lattice models display similar behavior, but the theoretical analysis of topological effects is based on Abelian lattice duality rather than on semiclassical arguments. In both cases, the key step is reducing the low-energy symmetry group from SU(N) to the maximal Abelian subgroup U(1)N-1 while maintaining Z(N) symmetry.

Ogilvie, Michael C.

2014-10-01

161

Confinement on $R^{3}\\times S^{1}$: continuum and lattice  

E-print Network

There has been substantial progress in understanding confinement in a class of four-dimensional SU(N) gauge theories using semiclassical methods. These models have one or more compact directions, and much of the analysis is based on the physics of finite-temperature gauge theories. The topology $R^{3}\\times S^{1}$ has been most often studied, using a small compactification circumference $L$ such that the running coupling $g^{2}\\left(L\\right)$ is small. The gauge action is modified by a double-trace Polyakov loop deformation term, or by the addition of periodic adjoint fermions. The additional terms act to preserve $Z(N)$ symmetry and thus confinement. An area law for Wilson loops is induced by a monopole condensate. In the continuum, the string tension can be computed analytically from topological effects. Lattice models display similar behavior, but the theoretical analysis of topological effects is based on Abelian lattice duality rather than on semiclassical arguments. In both cases the key step is reducin...

Ogilvie, Michael C

2014-01-01

162

Three remarkable 6-cm flares on YZ Canis Minoris.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The dM3.5e flare star, YZ CMi, was observed at 6, 20, and 21-cm on 1982 October 26 as part of a continuing effort to monitor flare stars for both quiescent and flaring emission. The six-hour observing run was notable for three flares which occurred at 6-cm. No comparable activity was seen at the longer wavelengths.

Gibson, D. M.

163

Redshifted Neutral Hydrogen 21cm Absorption toward Red Quasars  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have searched for redshifted neutral hydrogen 21cm absorption toward\\u000asources from the Stickel et al. `red quasar' sub-sample. Five of these red\\u000aquasars have been searched for redshifted HI 21cm absorption to optical depth\\u000alevels of a few percent, and four show strong absorption. This 80% success rate\\u000afor the red quasars compares to the much lower success rate

C. L. Carilli; Karl M. Menten; Mark J. Reid; M. P. Rupen; Min Su Yun

1997-01-01

164

High Redshift HI 21cm Absorption toward Red Quasars  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have searched for redshifted absorption in the 21 cm line of neutral\\u000ahydrogen toward `red quasars', which are extragalactic radio sources with a\\u000asteep spectral drop between optical and infrared wavelengths. The success rate\\u000afor detecting HI 21cm absorption toward a representative sample of such sources\\u000ais 80%. This compares to the much lower success rate of 11% for

C. L. Carilli; Karl M. Menten; C. P. Moore

1998-01-01

165

Observing Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) With Spitzer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this talk we discuss the design, implementation, and reduction of observations of Comet ISON from space using the Spitzer Space Telescope on 13.00 - 13.96 Jun UT and from the ground at Lowell Observatory on Jun 11.16 UT and from APO on 14.13 Jun UT. The comet was at distance rh = 3.34 AU from the Sun, distance ?Spitzer = 3.29 AU and 17.4o phase from SST, and distance ?Earth = 4.25 AU and 6.8 - 7.3o phase at the time of observation. Preliminary analyses show ISON's Spitzer coma morphology was relatively compact and simple, with a linear anti-solar dust tail > 3x105 km in length and a 1/p profile gas coma extending > 105 km from the nucleus. Afp values in an 18,200 km radius aperture of 840, 890, and 840 ± 80 cm were found at VRI, and 650 ± 100 cm were found at 3.6 micron. Together, the ground-based and Spitzer photometry imply near-neutral dust scattering from the visual through the infrared. An excess at 4.5 µm due to emission from a neutral gas coma is clearly found both morphologically and photometrically. The gas coma total flux and spatial profile and ISON’s discovery distance imply a coma dominated by the stronger CO_2 line emission at 4.67 ?m, but we cannot rule out a preponderance of CO emission at 4.26 ?m. No variability in our Spitzer photometry at the 0.03 mag level over 24 hrs was seen. We present our imagery, spectrophotometry, and lightcurves, and discuss the physical implications of these measurements of the comet made well outside the ice line.

Lisse, Carey M.; Vervack, R. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Bauer, J. M.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Kelley, M. S.; Knight, M. M.; Hines, D. C.; Li, J.; Reach, W. T.; Sitko, M. L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Meech, K. J.; Rayner, J. T.

2013-10-01

166

Dynamin 2-dependent endocytosis is required for sustained S1PR1 signaling  

PubMed Central

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor 1 (S1PR1) is critical for lymphocyte egress from lymphoid organs. Lymphocytes encounter low S1P concentrations near exit sites before transmigration, yet S1PR1 signaling is rapidly terminated after exposure to S1P. How lymphocytes maintain S1PR1 signaling in a low S1P environment near egress sites is unknown. Here we identify dynamin 2, an essential component of endocytosis, as a novel regulator of T cell egress. Mice with T cell–specific dynamin 2 deficiency had profound lymphopenia and impaired egress from lymphoid organs. Dynamin 2 deficiency caused impaired egress through regulation of S1PR1 signaling, and transgenic S1PR1 overexpression rescued egress in dynamin 2 knockout mice. In low S1P concentrations, dynamin 2 was essential for S1PR1 internalization, which enabled continuous S1PR1 signaling and promoted egress from both thymus and lymph nodes. In contrast, dynamin 2–deficient cells were only capable of a pulse of S1PR1 signaling, which was insufficient for egress. Our results suggest a possible mechanism by which T lymphocytes positioned at exit portals sense low S1P concentrations, promoting their egress into circulatory fluids. PMID:24638168

Ferguson, Shawn M.; Pereira, Joao P.; De Camilli, Pietro

2014-01-01

167

The turbomachine blading design using S2-S1 approach  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The boundary conditions corresponding to the design problem when the blades being simulated by the bound vorticity distribution are presented. The 3D flow is analyzed by the two steps S2 - S1 approach. In the first step, the number of blades is supposed to be infinite, the vortex distribution is transformed into an axisymmetric one, so that the flow field can be analyzed in a meridional plane. The thickness distribution of the blade producing the flow channel striction is taken into account by the modification of metric tensor in the continuity equation. Using the meridional stream function to define the flow field, the mass conservation is satisfied automatically. The governing equation is deduced from the relation between the azimuthal component of the vorticity and the meridional velocity. The value of the azimuthal component of the vorticity is provided by the hub to shroud equilibrium condition. This step leads to the determination of the axisymmetric stream sheets as well as the approximate camber surface of the blade. In the second step, the finite number of blades is taken into account, the inverse problem corresponding to the blade to blade flow confined in each stream sheet is analyzed. The momentum equation implies that the free vortex of the absolute velocity must be tangential to the stream sheet. The governing equation for the blade to blade flow stream function is deduced from this condition. At the beginning, the upper and the lower surfaces of the blades are created from the camber surface obtained from the first step with the assigned thickness distribution. The bound vorticity distribution and the penetrating flux conservation applied on the presumed blade surface constitute the boundary conditions of the inverse problem. The detection of this flux leads to the rectification of the geometry of the blades.

Luu, T. S.; Bencherif, L.; Viney, B.; Duc, J. M. Nguyen

1991-01-01

168

Nijmegen Baryon-Baryon Interactions for S = -1, -2 Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present and discuss the most recent version of the extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions. The ESC-model describes the nucleon-nucleon (NN), hyperon-nucleon (YN), and hyperon-hyperon (YY), in terms of meson-exchanges using (broken) SUF(3)-symmetry. In this approach to baryon-baryon (BB) the dynamics is derived from (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), (ii) two-meson-exchanges (TME), and (iii) meson-pair-exchanges (MPE), (iv) gluon-exchanges, and (v) quark-core effects. In the OBE-sector, a special feature is the importance of the axial-vector meson potentials, and the inclusion of a zero in the scalar- and axial- meson form-factors. Novelties are the inclusion of (a) odderon-exchange, and (b) special pronounced effects of the appearance of forbidden six-quark configurations. With these ingredients, a rather flexible dynamical framework is constructed. Namely, it appeared feasible to keep the parameters of the model in reasonable accordance with the predictions of the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model (QPC). This is the case for the meson- and meson-pair-baryon coupling constants and the F/(F + D)-ratio's as well. The NN, YN, and YY results for this model are rather promising. In particular, we improved the ?N spin-orbit interaction greatly by the inclusion of (a) the Brown, Downs, and Iddings anti-symmetric spin-orbit potentials, and (b) new corrections to the MPE-potentials. Also, the special quark-core effects provide ample repulsion in the ?+p(3S1, T = 3/2)- and ?N(1S0,T = l/2)-channels. The new version of the ESC-model reported here will be referred to as ESC07 henceforth.

Rijken, Th. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

2010-10-01

169

Fabrication and performance evaluation of 3-cell SOFC stack based on planar 10 cm × 10 cm anode-supported cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study reports the development of planar-type solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks based on an internal gas manifold and a cross-flow type design. A single-columned, 3-cell, SOFC stack is assembled using 10cm×10cm anode-supported unit cells, metallic interconnects and glass-based compression-seal gaskets. The power-generating characteristics of the unit cell and stack are characterized as a function of temperature. The practical

H. Y. Jung; S.-H. Choi; H. Kim; J.-W. Son; J. Kim; H.-W. Lee; J.-H. Lee

2006-01-01

170

Rotationally resolved studies of S0 and the exciton coupled S1/S2 origin regions of diphenylmethane and the d12 isotopologue  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rotationally resolved microwave and ultraviolet spectra of jet-cooled diphenylmethane (DPM) and DPM-d12 have been obtained in S0, S1, and S2 electronic states using Fourier-transform microwave and UV laser/molecular beam spectrometers. The S0 and S1 states of both isotopologues have been well fit to asymmetric rotor Hamiltonians that include only Watson distortion parameters. The transition dipole moment (TDM) orientations of DPM and DPM-d12 are perpendicular to the C2 symmetry axes with 66(2)%:34(2)% a:c hybrid-type character, establishing the lower exciton S1 origin as a completely delocalized, antisymmetric combination of the zero-order locally excited states of the toluene-like chromophores. In contrast, the rotational structures of the S2 origin bands at S1+123 cm-1 and S1+116 cm-1, respectively, display b-type Q-branch transitions and lack the central a-type Q-branch features that characterize the S1 origins, indicating TDM orientations parallel to the C2(b) symmetry axes as anticipated for the upper exciton levels. However, rotational fits were not possible in line with expectations from previous work [N. R. Pillsbury, J. A. Stearns, C. W. Müller, T. S. Zwier, and D. F. Plusquellic, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 114301 (2008)] where the S2 origins were found to be largely perturbed through vibronic interactions with the S1 symmetric, antisymmetric torsional, and butterfly levels in close proximity. Predictions from a dipole-dipole coupling model and ab initio theories are shown to be in fair agreement with the observed TDM orientations and exciton splitting. The need to include out-of-ring-plane dipole coupling terms indicates that in-plane models are not sufficient to fully account for the excitonic interactions in this bichromophore.

Stearns, Jaime A.; Pillsbury, Nathan R.; Douglass, Kevin O.; Müller, Christian W.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Plusquellic, David F.

2008-12-01

171

Ligand-binding pocket shape differences between S1P1 and S1P3 determine efficiency of chemical probe identification by uHTS  

PubMed Central

We have studied the Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor system to better understand why certain molecular targets within a closely related family are much more tractable when identifying compelling chemical leads. Five medically important G protein-coupled receptors for S1P regulate heart rate, coronary artery caliber, endothelial barrier integrity, and lymphocyte trafficking. Selective S1P receptor agonist probes would be of great utility to study receptor subtype-specific function. Through systematic screening of the same libraries, we identified novel selective agonists chemotypes for each of the S1P1 and S1P3 receptors. uHTS for S1P1 was more effective than for S1P3, with many selective, low nanomolar hits of proven mechanism emerging for. Receptor structure modeling and ligand docking reveal differences between the receptor binding pockets, which are the basis for sub-type selectivity. Novel selective agonists interact primarily in the hydrophobic pocket of the receptor in the absence of head-group interactions. Chemistry-space and shape-based analysis of the screening libraries in combination with the binding models explain the observed differential hit rates and enhanced efficiency for lead discovery for S1P1 vs. S1P3 in this closely related receptor family. PMID:18590333

Schurer, Stephan C.; Brown, Steven J.; Cabrera, Pedro Gonzales; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Chapman, Jacqueline; Jo, Euijung; Chase, Peter; Spicer, Tim; Hodder, Peter; Rosen, Hugh

2008-01-01

172

Influence of primordial magnetic fields on 21 cm emission  

E-print Network

Magnetic fields in the early universe can significantly alter the thermal evolution and the ionization history during the dark ages. This is reflected in the 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen, which is coupled to the gas temperature through collisions at high redshifts, and through the Wouthuysen-Field effect at low redshifts. We present a semi-analytic model for star formation and the build-up of a Lyman alpha background in the presence of magnetic fields, and calculate the evolution of the mean 21 cm brightness temperature and its frequency gradient as a function of redshift. We further discuss the evolution of linear fluctuations in temperature and ionization in the presence of magnetic fields and calculate the effect on the 21 cm power spectrum. At high redshifts, the signal is increased compared to the non-magnetic case due to the additional heat input into the IGM from ambipolar diffusion and the decay of MHD turbulence. At lower redshifts, the formation of luminous objects and the build-up of a Lyman alpha background can be delayed by a redshift interval of 10 due to the strong increase of the filtering mass scale in the presence of magnetic fields. This tends to decrease the 21 cm signal compared to the zero-field case. In summary, we find that 21 cm observations may become a promising tool to constrain primordial magnetic fields.

Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Robi Banerjee; Ralf S. Klessen

2008-08-11

173

Determining the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aqueous alteration of CM chondrites provides a record of the processes attending the earliest stages of parent body evolution. However, resolving the alteration pathways of chondritic evolution requires a means for distinguishing the relative extent of alteration that individual samples have experienced. Three new indices for gauging the relative degree of alteration in CM chondrites based on modal and compositional analyses of 7 CM falls were proposed. The proposed alteration parameters are consistent with the basic tenets of several previous models and correlate with additional indices to produce an integrated method for determining the relative extent of alteration. The model predicts the following order of progressive alteration: Murchison (MC) is less than or equal to Bells (BL) is less than Murray (MY) is less than Cochabamba (CC) is less than Mighei (MI) is less than Nogoya (NG) is less than or equal to Cold Bokkeveld (CB). The broad range of CM phyllosilicate compositions observed within individual meteorites is fundamental to the characterization of the aqueous alteration process. Chemical analyses of CM phyllosilicates suggest that these phases became systematically enriched in Mg and depleted in Fe with increasing alteration.

Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael

1993-03-01

174

Determining the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The aqueous alteration of CM chondrites provides a record of the processes attending the earliest stages of parent body evolution. However, resolving the alteration pathways of chondritic evolution requires a means for distinguishing the relative extent of alteration that individual samples have experienced. Three new indices for gauging the relative degree of alteration in CM chondrites based on modal and compositional analyses of 7 CM falls were proposed. The proposed alteration parameters are consistent with the basic tenets of several previous models and correlate with additional indices to produce an integrated method for determining the relative extent of alteration. The model predicts the following order of progressive alteration: Murchison (MC) is less than or equal to Bells (BL) is less than Murray (MY) is less than Cochabamba (CC) is less than Mighei (MI) is less than Nogoya (NG) is less than or equal to Cold Bokkeveld (CB). The broad range of CM phyllosilicate compositions observed within individual meteorites is fundamental to the characterization of the aqueous alteration process. Chemical analyses of CM phyllosilicates suggest that these phases became systematically enriched in Mg and depleted in Fe with increasing alteration.

Browning, Lauren B.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael

1993-01-01

175

SpS1-Gas in protoplanetary disks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

High resolution infrared spectroscopy is the key technique to look at the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. As molecular hydrogen is an inefficient emitter, CO gas is the single most important molecular probe of the disk. The energy gaps of the vibrationally excited levels (?E > 3000 K) and the critical density required to keep the molecules in the excited state (nc ~ 1010cm-3) match well to the physical condition of the inner regions of protoplanetary disks. In order to resolve the vibrational lines of different rotational states, a spectral resolving power of ?/?? > 10000 is necessary; or even higher (> 30000 -100000), if we would like to fully resolve the gas kinematics. Scoville et al. (1980) provided the fundamentals of the excitation mechanisms, which is essential for the interpretation of the vibrational transitions of CO, and pioneered the study of the circumstellar environment with infrared CO lines in the observation of BN (Scoville et al. (1983)). The bandhead emission of CO at 2.3 ?m from young stars was unambiguously attributed to the circumstellar disks by Carr (1989) and Najita et al. (1996), because the gas kinematics matches well to what is expected from Keplerian rotation. Since then, the gas kinematics have been extensively used to shed light on peculiar disk structures, such as the inner truncation (Brittain et al. 2003), the outer truncation (Najita et al. 2008), and the gap (van der Plas et al. 2008; though this is an oxygen forbidden line).

Goto, Miwa

2010-11-01

176

The cm-wave continuum in compact PNe  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Excess 20-30GHz emission, above that expected from synchrotron or free-free templates and sub-millimetre dust emission, has been reported in HII regions, planetary nebulae (PNe), dark clouds and in the ISM at large. The excess has been modelled in terms of dipole radiation from spinning very small grains, or `spinning dust'. The cm-wave excess confronts the free-free paradigm in PNe. A CBI/SIMBA survey of 22 objects highlighted a systematic 250~GHz deficit from the level of optically thin free-free extrapolated from 30GHz. Although we find a correlation between the fractional cm-wave excess and the ratio IRAS100um/5GHz, the low-frequency data rule out existing spinning dust models. We have selected the best candidates for an exhaustive continuum study. ATCA can provide adequately sampled spectral energy distributions with which to test various interpretations of the cm-wave excess in PNe.

Casassus, Simon; Burton, Michael; Roche, Patrick; Nyman, Lars-Ake; Dickinson, Clive; Rodriguez, Luis Felipe

2007-10-01

177

Formation and alteration of CAIs in Cold Bokkeveld (CM2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The mode of formation of calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) in Cold Bokkeveld (CM2) was investigated, using an X-ray mapping technique, a TEM equipped with an X-ray detector, and an ion microprobe to locate and examine 345 CM2 CAIs in situ. The results of these studies indicate that CAIs in Cold Bokkeveld underwent extensive aqueous alteration that took place within the parent body regolith. Two episodes of deformation were experienced by CM2 CAIs: an earlier nebula phase, which predates the formation of their dust mantles, and a later phase which occurred in an asteroidal regolith. The normal isotopic composition displayed by most spinel-bearing inclusions in Cold Bokkeveld suggests that they did not form by simultaneous melting and evaporation of primitive dust. Two or more events seem to be required. The first event produced the refractory compositions, while the second caused melting of this precursor material.

Greenwood, Richard C.; Lee, Martin R.; Hutchison, Robert; Barber, David J.

1994-04-01

178

CM-2 Environmental / Modal Testing of Spacehab Racks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Combined environmental/modal vibration testing has been implemented at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Dynamics Laboratory. The benefits of combined vibration testing are that it facilitates test article modal characterization and vibration qualification testing. The Combustion Module-2 (CM-2) is a space experiment that launches on Shuttle mission STS 107 in the SPACEHAB Research Double Module. The CM-2 flight hardware is integrated into a SPACEHAB single and double rack. CM-2 rack level combined vibration testing was recently completed on a shaker table to characterize the structure's modal response and verify the random vibration response. Control accelerometers and limit force gauges, located between the fixture and rack interface, were used to verify the input excitation. Results of the testing were used to verify the loads and environments for flight on the Shuttle.

McNelis, Mark E.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Farkas, Michael A.

2001-01-01

179

CM-2 Environmental/Modal Testing of SPACEHAB Racks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Combined environmental/modal vibration testing has been implemented at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Structural Dynamics Laboratory. The benefits of combined vibration testing are that it facilitates test article modal characterization and vibration qualification testing. The Combustion Module-2 (CM-2) is a space experiment that will launch on shuttle mission STS-107 in the SPACEHAB Research Double Module. The CM-2 flight hardware is integrated into a SPACEHAB single and double rack. CM-2 rack-level combined vibration testing was recently completed on a shaker table to characterize the structure's modal response and verify the random vibration response. Control accelerometers and limit force gauges, located between the fixture and rack interface, were used to verify the input excitation. Results of the testing were used to verify the loads and environments for flight on the shuttles.

McNelis, Mark E.; Goodnight, Thomas W.

2001-01-01

180

Development of Activity in Comet C/2012 S1 ISON  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 ISON obtained immediately after discovery (22 Sep. 2012; r = 6.28 AU) until moving into solar conjunction in mid-June 2013 using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, and the VYSOS-5 and VYSOS-20 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawai'i. An additional pre-discovery data point from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 28 Jan. 2012 (r = 8.4 AU). The images showed similar tail morphology throughout this period, largely because of projection effects. Additional observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 9 March (r = 4.52 AU) and 16 June 2013 (r = 3.35 AU) were used to search for CO J(3-2), CO J(2-1), HCN J(4-3), and HCN J(3-2) rotation lines. No gas was detected, with preliminary upper limits for CO during 14-15 June (r = 3.3 AU) of Q < 6.4 x 10^27 molec/s based on the observations of the CO J(2-1) line. Using these production rates, the Q(H2O) published by Schleicher (2013; IAUC 9254), and the preliminary radius from the HST measurements (J.-Y. Li et al., 2013; STScI-2013-14) we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO or CO2; at these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. Without more sensitive limits on CO, we cannot yet constrain which of these volatiles is controlling the activity. It is clear from the photometric light curve that the fractional active area of the nucleus increased linearly by about a factor of 2 from Jan. 2012 until mid Jan. 2013 (r ~ 5 AU) at which point the activity decreased by 30% by early May 2013. We will discuss these models and data obtained from Mauna Kea after the comet comes out of solar conjunction in late August 2013. Our team has a comprehensive plan of observation to look at the evolution of activity as the comet goes through perihelion (on 28 November, 2013), with investigations to look at volatile production, and characterization of the dust. We will summarize early results from the University of Hawaii Mauna Kea observing campaign.

Meech, K. J.; Yang, B.; Keane, J.; Ansdell, M.; Riesen, T.; Kleyna, J.; Hsieh, H.; Mottola, S.; Kuhrt, E.; Chiang, H.; Reipurth, B.; Michaud, P.; Rector, T.

2013-12-01

181

Development of Activity in Comet C/2012 S1 ISON  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 ISON obtained immediately after discovery (22 Sep. 2012; r = 6.28 AU) until moving into solar conjunction in mid-June 2013 using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, and the VYSOS-5 and VYSOS-20 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawai’i. An additional pre-discovery data point from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 28 Jan. 2012 (r = 8.4 AU). The images showed similar tail morphology throughout this period, largely because of projection effects. Additional observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 9 March (r = 4.52 AU) and 16 June 2013 (r = 3.35 AU) were used to search for CO J(3-2), CO J(2-1), HCN J(4-3), and HCN J(3-2) rotation lines. No gas was detected, with preliminary upper limits for CO during 14-15 June (r = 3.3 AU) of Q < 6.4 x 10^27 molec/s based on the observations of the CO J(2-1) line. Using these production rates, the Q(H2O) published by Schleicher (2013; IAUC 9254), and the preliminary radius from the HST measurements (J.-Y. Li et al., 2013; STScI-2013-14) we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO or CO2; at these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. Without more sensitive limits on CO, we cannot yet constrain which of these volatiles is controlling the activity. It is clear from the photometric light curve that the fractional active area of the nucleus increased linearly by about a factor of 2 from Jan. 2012 until mid Jan. 2013 (r ~ 5 AU) at which point the activity decreased by 30% by early May 2013. This suggests that a limited supply of volatile material was driving the current activity.

Meech, Karen J.; Yang, B.; Keane, J. V.; Ansdell, M.; Riesen, T. E.; Kleyna, J.; Hsieh, H.; Mottola, S.; Kuehrt, E.; Chiang, H.; Reipurth, B.; Milani, G.; Bryssinck, E.; Michaud, P.; Rector, T.

2013-10-01

182

S(1)<--S(0) transition of 2,3-benzofluorene at low temperatures in the gas phase.  

PubMed

The S(1)((1)A('))<--S(0)((1)A(')) absorption spectrum of jet-cooled 2,3-benzofluorene (Bzf) has been measured by cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The potential energy surfaces of the S(n=0,1,2) states of Bzf have been investigated with calculations based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). At the B3LYP/TZ level of theory, TD-DFT does not deliver a realistic difference between the excited S(1) and S(2) potential energy surfaces, a problem which can be avoided by introducing a reference geometry where this difference coincides with the observation. In this geometry, an expression for the Herzberg-Teller corrected intensities of the vibronic bands is proposed, allowing a straightforward assignment of the observed a(') modes below 900 cm(-1), including realistic calculated intensities. For vibronic bands at higher energies, the agreement between calculated and observed modes is deteriorated by substantial Dushinsky rotations and nonparabolicities of the potential energy surface S(1). PMID:19044762

Staicu, A; Rouillé, G; Henning, Th; Huisken, F; Pouladsaz, D; Scholz, R

2008-08-21

183

Evidence for live 247Cm in the early solar system  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Variations of the 238U/235U ratio in the Allende meteorite, ranging from -35% to + 19%, are interpreted as evidence of live 247Cm in the early Solar System. The amounts of these and other r-products in the Solar System indicate values of (9,000??3,000) Myr for the age of the Galaxy and ??? 8 Myr for the time between the end of nucleosynthesis and the formation of meteoritic grains. Three possible explanations are presented for the different values of the latter time period which are indicated by the decay products of 247Cm, 26Al, 244Pu and 129I. ?? 1980 Nature Publishing Group.

Tatsumoto, M.; Shimamura, T.

1980-01-01

184

Inert gas test of two 12-cm magnetostatic thrusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Comparative performance tests were conducted with 12 cm line and ring magnetic cusp thrusters. Shell anode and magnetoelectrostatic containment boundary anode configurations were evaluated with each magnet array. The best performance was achieved with the 12-cm ring cusp-shell anode configuration. Argon operation of this configuration produced 65-81 percent mass utilization efficiency at 170-208 watts/single-charged-equivalent (SCE) ampere beam. Xenon test results showed 75-95 percent utilization at 162-188 watts/SCE ampere beam.

Ramsey, W. D.

1982-01-01

185

Cycle life testing of 8-cm mercury ion thruster cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two main cathodes have successfully completed 2800 and 1980 cycles and three neutralizers, 3928, 3050, and 2850 cycles in ongoing cycle life tests of flight-type cathode-isolator-vaporizer and neutralizer-isolator-vaporizer assemblies for the 4.45 mN 8-cm Hg ion thruster system. Each cycle included one hour of cathode operation. Starting and operating conditions simulated those expected in a typical auxiliary propulsion mission duty cycle. The cycle life test results are presented along with results of an insert comparison test which led to the selection of a rolled foil insert type for the 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster cathodes.

Wintucky, E. G.

1976-01-01

186

Increased capabilities of the 30-cm diameter Hg ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Some space flight missions require advanced ion thrusters which operate at conditions much different than those for which the baseline 30-cm Hg thruster was developed. Results of initial tests of a 30-cm Hg thruster with two and three grid ion accelerating systems, operated at higher values of both thrust and power and over a greater range of specific impulse than the baseline conditions are presented. Thruster lifetime at increased input power was evaluated both by extended tests and real time spectroscopic measurements.

Rawlin, V. K.; Hawkins, C. E.

1979-01-01

187

5200 cycle of an 8-cm diameter Hg ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An accelerated cycle test was conducted in which an 8-cm Engineering Model Thruster (EMT) prototype successfully completed 5200 on-off cycles and a total of more than 1300 hours of thruster operation at a 4.5 mN thrust level. Cathode tip heater powers required for starting and keeper voltages remained well within acceptable limits. The discharge chamber utilization and electrical efficiency were nearly constant over the duration of the test. It is concluded that on-off cyclic operation by itself does not appreciably degrade starting capability or performance of the 8-cm EMT.

Mantenieks, M. A.; Wintucky, E. G.

1978-01-01

188

HI 21cm probes of reionization, and beyond  

E-print Network

I review the potential for observing cosmic reionization using the HI 21cm line of neutral hydrogren. Studies include observations of the evolution of large scale structure of the IGM (density, excitation temperature, and neutral fraction), through HI 21cm emission, as well as observations of small to intermediate scale structure through absorption toward the first discrete radio sources. I summarize predictions for the HI signals, then consider capabilities of facilities being built, or planned, to detect these signals. I also discuss the significant observational challenges.

C. L. Carilli

2005-09-02

189

21-cm absorption from galaxies at z ~ 0.3  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the detection of 21-cm absorption from foreground galaxies towards quasars, specifically zgal = 0.3120 towards SDSS J084957.97+510829.0 (zqso = 0.584; Pair-I) and zgal = 0.3714 towards SDSS J144304.53+021419.3 (zqso = 1.82; Pair-II). In both the cases, the integrated 21-cm optical depth is consistent with the absorbing gas being a damped Lyman-? (DLA) system. In the case of Pair-I, strong Na i and Ca ii absorption lines are also detected at zgal in the QSO spectrum. We identify an early-type galaxy at an impact parameter of b ~ 14 kpc whose photometric redshift is consistent with that of the detected metal and 21-cm absorption lines. This would be the first example of an early-type galaxy associated with an intervening 21-cm absorber. The gas detected in 21-cm and metal absorption lines on the outskirts of this luminous red galaxy could be associated with the reservoir of cold H i gas with a low level of star formation activity in the outer regions of the galaxy as reported in the literature for z ~ 0.1 early-type galaxies. In the case of Pair-II, the absorption is associated with a low surface brightness galaxy that, unlike most other known quasar-galaxy pairs (QGPs), i.e. QSO sight lines passing through disks or halos of foreground galaxies, is identified only via narrow optical emission lines detected on top of the QSO spectra. Using SDSS spectra we infer that the emission lines originate within ~5 kpc of the QSO sight line, and the gas has metallicity [12+O/H] ~ 8.4 and star formation rate ~0.7-0.8 M? yr-1. The measured 21-cm optical depth can be reconciled with the N(H i) we derive from the measured extinction (AV = 0.6) if either the H i gas is warm or the extinction per hydrogen atom in this galaxy is much higher than the mean value of the Small Magellanic Cloud. Finally, using a sample of 9 QGPs with 21-cm absorption detection from our observations and literature, we report a weak anti-correlation (Spearman rank, rs = -0.3) between the 21-cm optical depth and galaxy impact parameter. Milliarcsecond scale images and spectra are required to understand the implications of this.

Gupta, N.; Srianand, R.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Muzahid, S.

2013-10-01

190

Search for cold gas in z > 2 damped Ly? systems: 21-cm and H2 absorption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a systematic Green Bank Telescope and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope survey for 21-cm absorption in a sample of 10 damped Lyman ? systems (DLAs) at 2 ?zabs? 3.4. Analysis of L-band very long baseline array images of the background QSOs are also presented. We detect 21-cm absorption in only one DLA (at zabs= 3.1745 towards J1337+3152). Thus the detection rate of 21-cm absorption is ˜10 per cent when no limit on the integrated optical depth (??(v)dv) is imposed and ˜13 per cent for a 3? limit of 0.4 km s-1. Combining our data with the data from the literature (a sample of 28 DLAs) and assuming the measured core fraction at milliarcsecond scale to represent the gas covering factor, we find that the H I gas in DLAs at z? 2 is predominantly constituted by a warm neutral medium. The detection rate of 21-cm absorption seems to be higher for systems with higher N(H I) or metallicity. However, no clear correlation is found between the integrated 21-cm optical depth (or the spin temperature, TS) and either N(H I), metallicity or velocity spread of the low-ionization species. There are 13 DLAs in our sample for which high-resolution optical spectra covering the expected wavelength range of H2 absorption are available. We report the detection of H2 molecules in the zabs= 3.3871 21-cm absorber towards J0203+1134 (PKS 0201+113). In eight cases, neither H2 (with molecular fraction f(H2) ? 10-6) nor 21-cm absorption (with TS/fc? 700 K) is detected. The lack of 21-cm and H2 absorption in these systems can be explained if most of the H I in these DLAs originates from low-density high-temperature gas. In one case we have a DLA with 21-cm absorption not showing H2 absorption. In two cases, both species are detected but do not originate from the same velocity component. In the remaining two cases 21-cm absorption is not detected despite the presence of H2 with evidence for the presence of cold gas. All this is consistent with the idea that the H2 components seen in DLAs are compact (with sizes of ?15 pc) and contain only a small fraction (i.e. typically ?10 per cent) of the total N(H I) measured in the DLAs. This implies that the molecular fractions f(H2) reported from the H2 surveys should be considered as conservative lower limits for the H2 components.

Srianand, R.; Gupta, N.; Petitjean, P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Ledoux, C.; Salter, C. J.; Saikia, D. J.

2012-03-01

191

LIF excitation spectra for S 0 ? S 1 transition of anthranilic acid: Detailed studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation spectra of jet-cooled molecules of anthranilic acid were investigated. In order to distinguish bands belonging to the monomer from those belonging to the dimer species three different spectra were recorded under conditions which differed in the value of partial pressure of vapours of anthranilic acid. Narrow bandwidth of rotational profiles in the acquired spectra made it possible to resolve new interesting spectral features and to analyse the rather small anharmonicity in progressions of several low-frequency vibrations. Eleven fundamental bands up to ca. 1400 cm -1 and five overtones of out-of-plane vibrations were assigned. Simulation based on approximate relations of the experimental band intensities of overtones and combination bands with respect to fundamental bands was carried out. This simulation was found a simple and practical tool in analysis of the spectra and an aid to verify the proposed assignment. Harmonic and anharmonic frequencies of vibrational modes were calculated using the HF/6-31G?? and CIS/6-31G?? methods for the S 0 and S 1 state, respectively. Modelling of band intensities using displacement parameters derived from the results of the ab initio calculations was performed. This modelling significantly underestimates the displacement parameters. The Dushinsky matrix derived from the results of the ab initio calculations was used to check the validity of the models and to find modes which undergo large frequency changes and mode mixing upon electronic excitation.

Kolek, Przemys?aw; Le?niewski, Sebastian; Pirowska, Katarzyna; Najbar, Jan

2008-06-01

192

Retrofit and acceptance test of 30-cm ion thrusters  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Six 30 cm mercury thrusters were modified to the J-series design and evaluated using standardized test procedures. The thruster performance meets the design objectives (lifetime objective requires verification), and documentation (drawings, etc.) for the design is completed and upgraded. The retrofit modifications are described and the test data for the modifications are presented and discussed.

Poeschel, R. L.

1981-01-01

193

Influence of Primordial Magnetic Fields on 21 cm Emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic fields in the early universe can significantly alter the thermal evolution and the ionization history during the dark ages. This is reflected in the 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen, which is coupled to the gas temperature through collisions at high redshifts, and through the Wouthuysen-Field effect at low redshifts. We present a semianalytic model for star formation and

Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Robi Banerjee; Ralf S. Klessen

2009-01-01

194

A 160 cm Synchro and Variable Energy Ordinary Cyclotron  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 160-cm cyclotron which can be used as a variable energy ordinary ; cyclotron as well as a synchro-cyclotron by changing the dee-system and the ; oscillator system is described. As an ordinary cyclotron it can produce protons ; of any desired energy between 7.5 and 15 Mev, deuterons between 15 and 21 Mev, ; and alpha particles between 30

Seishi Kikuchi; Itaru Nonaka; Hiroshi Ikeda; Hiroo Kumagai; Yoshio Saji; Junpei Sanada; Shigeki Suwa; Akira Isoya; Izuo Hayashi; Kazuhisa Matsuda; Hisashi Yamaguchi; Takashi Mikumo; K. Nishimura; Takashi Karasawa; Shinsaku Kobayashi; Ken Kikuchi; Satoru Ito; Arata Suzuki; Seiichiro Takeuchi; Hirotsugu Ogawa

1960-01-01

195

Electronic and magnetic properties of Am and Cm  

SciTech Connect

A review of the present status of the analyses of the optical spectra of Am and Cm in various oxidation states is given. From these analyses, the magnetic properties of the ground states of these ions can be determined. These predicted values are compared with the various magnetic measurements available.

Edelstein, N.

1985-02-01

196

H I 21 cm opacity fluctuations power spectra towards Cassiopeia A  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The angular power spectrum of HI 21 cm opacity fluctuations is a useful statistic for quantifying the observed opacity fluctuations as well as for comparing these with theoretical models. We present here the HI 21cm opacity fluctuation power spectrum towards the supernova remnant Cas A from interferometric data with spacial resolution of 5arcsec and spectral resolution of 0.4 km s-1. The power spectrum has been estimated using a simple but robust visibility-based technique. We find that the power spectrum is well fitted by a power law P?(U) = U? with a power-law index of ? ~ -2.86 +/- 0.10 (3? error) over the scales of 0.07-2.3 pc for the gas in the Perseus spiral arm and 0.002-0.07 pc (480-15730 au) for that in the local arm. This estimated power-law index is consistent with earlier observational results based on both HI emission over larger scales and absorption studies over a similar range of scales. We do not detect any statistically significant change in the power-law index with the velocity width of the frequency channels. This constrains the power-law index of the velocity structure function to be ? = 0.2 +/- 0.6 (3? error).

Roy, Nirupam; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Dutta, Prasun; Bharadwaj, Somnath

2010-05-01

197

Photoluminescence and Raman study of Cu 2ZnSn(Se xS 1 ? x ) 4 monograins for photovoltaic applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

The quaternary semiconductors Cu2ZnSnSe4 and Cu2ZnSnS4 have attracted a lot of attention as possible absorber materials for solar cells due to their direct bandgap and high absorption coefficient (>104cm?1). In this study we investigate the optical properties of Cu2ZnSn(SexS1?x)4 monograin powders that were synthesized from binary compounds in the liquid phase of potassium iodide (KI) flux materials in evacuated quartz

M. Grossberg; J. Krustok; J. Raudoja; K. Timmo; M. Altosaar; T. Raadik

2011-01-01

198

Search for Neutral, Long-Lived Particles Decaying into Two Muons in pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a search for a neutral particle, pair produced in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV, which decays into two muons and lives long enough to travel at least 5 cm before decaying. The analysis uses ≈380pb-1 of data recorded with the D0 detector. The background is estimated to be about one event. No candidates are observed, and limits are set

V. M. Abazov; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B. S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; M. Agelou; S. H. Ahn; M. Ahsan; G. D. Alexeev; G. Alkhazov; A. Alton; G. Alverson; G. A. Alves; M. Anastasoaie; T. Andeen; S. Anderson; B. Andrieu; M. S. Anzelc; Y. Arnoud; M. Arov; A. Askew; B. Åsman; A. C. S. Assis Jesus; O. Atramentov; C. Autermann; C. Avila; C. Ay; F. Badaud; A. Baden; L. Bagby; B. Baldin; D. V. Bandurin; P. Banerjee; S. Banerjee; E. Barberis; P. Bargassa; P. Baringer; C. Barnes; J. Barreto; J. F. Bartlett; U. Bassler; D. Bauer; A. Bean; M. Begalli; M. Begel; C. Belanger-Champagne; L. Bellantoni; A. Bellavance; J. A. Benitez; S. B. Beri; G. Bernardi; R. Bernhard; L. Berntzon; I. Bertram; M. Besançon; R. Beuselinck; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; M. Binder; C. Biscarat; K. M. Black; I. Blackler; G. Blazey; F. Blekman; S. Blessing; D. Bloch; K. Bloom; U. Blumenschein; A. Boehnlein; O. Boeriu; T. A. Bolton; G. Borissov; K. Bos; T. Bose; A. Brandt; R. Brock; G. Brooijmans; A. Bross; D. Brown; N. J. Buchanan; D. Buchholz; M. Buehler; V. Buescher; S. Burdin; S. Burke; T. H. Burnett; E. Busato; C. P. Buszello; J. M. Butler; P. Calfayan; S. Calvet; J. Cammin; S. Caron; W. Carvalho; B. C. K. Casey; N. M. Cason; H. Castilla-Valdez; D. Chakraborty; K. M. Chan; A. Chandra; F. Charles; E. Cheu; F. Chevallier; D. K. Cho; S. Choi; B. Choudhary; L. Christofek; D. Claes; B. Clément; C. Clément; Y. Coadou; M. Cooke; W. E. Cooper; D. Coppage; M. Corcoran; M.-C. Cousinou; B. Cox; S. Crépé-Renaudin; D. Cutts; M. Cwiok; H. da Motta; A. Das; M. Das; B. Davies; G. Davies; G. A. Davis; K. de; P. de Jong; S. J. de Jong; E. De La Cruz-Burelo; C. De Oliveira Martins; J. D. Degenhardt; F. Déliot; M. Demarteau; R. Demina; P. Demine; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; S. Desai; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; M. Doidge; A. Dominguez; H. Dong; L. V. Dudko; L. Duflot; S. R. Dugad; D. Duggan; A. Duperrin; J. Dyer; A. Dyshkant; M. Eads; D. Edmunds; T. Edwards; J. Ellison; J. Elmsheuser; V. D. Elvira; S. Eno; P. Ermolov; H. Evans; A. Evdokimov; V. N. Evdokimov; S. N. Fatakia; L. Feligioni; A. V. Ferapontov; T. Ferbel; F. Fiedler; F. Filthaut; W. Fisher; H. E. Fisk; I. Fleck; M. Ford; M. Fortner; H. Fox; S. Fu; S. Fuess; T. Gadfort; C. F. Galea; E. Gallas; E. Galyaev; C. Garcia; A. Garcia-Bellido; J. Gardner; V. Gavrilov; A. Gay; P. Gay; D. Gelé; R. Gelhaus; C. E. Gerber; Y. Gershtein; D. Gillberg; G. Ginther; N. Gollub; B. Gómez; A. Goussiou; P. D. Grannis; H. Greenlee; Z. D. Greenwood; E. M. Gregores; G. Grenier; Ph. Gris; J.-F. Grivaz; S. Grünendahl; M. W. Grünewald; F. Guo; J. Guo; G. Gutierrez; P. Gutierrez; A. Haas; N. J. Hadley; P. Haefner; S. Hagopian; J. Haley; I. Hall; R. E. Hall; L. Han; K. Hanagaki; K. Harder; A. Harel; R. Harrington; J. M. Hauptman; R. Hauser; J. Hays; T. Hebbeker; D. Hedin; J. G. Hegeman; J. M. Heinmiller; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; C. Hensel; K. Herner; G. Hesketh; M. D. Hildreth; R. Hirosky; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; H. Hoeth; M. Hohlfeld; S. J. Hong; R. Hooper; P. Houben; Y. Hu; Z. Hubacek; V. Hynek; I. Iashvili; R. Illingworth; A. S. Ito; S. Jabeen; M. Jaffré; S. Jain; K. Jakobs; C. Jarvis; A. Jenkins; R. Jesik; K. Johns; C. Johnson; M. Johnson; A. Jonckheere; P. Jonsson; A. Juste; D. Käfer; S. Kahn; E. Kajfasz; A. M. Kalinin; J. M. Kalk; J. R. Kalk; S. Kappler; D. Karmanov; J. Kasper; P. Kasper; I. Katsanos; D. Kau; R. Kaur; R. Kehoe; S. Kermiche; N. Khalatyan; A. Khanov; A. Kharchilava; Y. M. Kharzheev; D. Khatidze; H. Kim; T. J. Kim; M. H. Kirby; B. Klima; J. M. Kohli; J.-P. Konrath; M. Kopal; V. M. Korablev; J. Kotcher; B. Kothari; A. Koubarovsky; A. V. Kozelov; J. Kozminski; D. Krop; A. Kryemadhi; T. Kuhl; A. Kumar; S. Kunori; A. Kupco; T. Kurca; J. Kvita; S. Lammers; G. Landsberg; J. Lazoflores; A.-C. Le Bihan; P. Lebrun; W. M. Lee; A. Leflat; F. Lehner; V. Lesne; J. Leveque; P. Lewis; J. Li; Q. Z. Li; J. G. R. Lima; D. Lincoln; J. Linnemann; V. V. Lipaev; R. Lipton; Z. Liu; L. Lobo; A. Lobodenko; M. Lokajicek; A. Lounis; P. Love; H. J. Lubatti; M. Lynker; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; R. J. Madaras; P. Mättig; C. Magass; A. Magerkurth; A.-M. Magnan; N. Makovec; P. K. Mal; H. B. Malbouisson; S. Malik; V. L. Malyshev; H. S. Mao; Y. Maravin; M. Martens; R. McCarthy; D. Meder; A. Melnitchouk; A. Mendes; L. Mendoza; M. Merkin; K. W. Merritt; A. Meyer; J. Meyer; M. Michaut; H. Miettinen; T. Millet; J. Mitrevski; J. Molina; N. K. Mondal; J. Monk; R. W. Moore; T. Moulik; G. S. Muanza; M. Mulders; M. Mulhearn; L. Mundim; Y. D. Mutaf; E. Nagy; M. Naimuddin; M. Narain; N. A. Naumann; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; P. Neustroev; C. Noeding; A. Nomerotski; S. F. Novaes; T. Nunnemann; V. O'Dell; D. C. O'Neil; G. Obrant; V. Oguri; N. Oliveira; N. Oshima; R. Otec; G. J. Otero Y Garzón; M. Owen; P. Padley; N. Parashar; S.-J. Park; S. K. Park; J. Parsons; R. Partridge; N. Parua; A. Patwa; G. Pawloski; P. M. Perea

2006-01-01

199

Properties of CM-SAF's cloud products -a statistical analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clouds have a major impact on the earth radiation budget and contribute significantly to the state of the climate system. Additionally, the space-based retrieval of other atmospheric pa-rameters is highly influenced by clouds. Therefor it is essential to assess the strengths and limitations of the satellite-derived cloud properties as accurately as possible. This study deals with those cloud products, that are operationally generated by the EUMETSAT's Satellite Ap-plication Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM-SAF). CM-SAF uses space-based observations from geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites and polar orbiting NOAA and MetOp satellites to provide satellite-derived geophysical parameter data sets suitable for climate monitoring. CM-SAF's product suite includes cloud parameters, radiation fluxes, sur-face albedo, and atmospheric water vapor, temperature and humidity profiles on a regional and partially on a global scale and thereby focuses on geophysical parameters describing the elements of the energy and water cycle. Since 2005 a threshold technique is used within the CM-SAF to derive various cloud products from satellite data, some are further estimated with an iterative look-up table approach. The properties of CM-SAF's cloud products which are cloud top variables (in here: Cloud Top Height (CTH)), Liquid Water Path (LWP), Cloud Type (CTY), Cloud Optical Thickness (COT) and Cloud Fraction (CFC) are explored and analyzed statistically. The individual products are related to each other via for example two-dimensional frequency distributions in order to verify their consistency. From these statistics average properties for certain classified types are derived, such as LWP-distributions for five different CM-SAF cloud types. Each cloud type can be characterized by an average LWP dis-tribution. Also temporal variations for the cloud properties are studied. The Cloud Top Height product for example shows strong seasonal variations, depending on latitude. Locating the maximal CTH near the equator makes it possible to easily monitor the meridional traveling of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone during the the seasons.

Kniffka, Anke; Lockhoff, Maarit; Hollmann, Rainer; Weber, Ralf

200

The 12 micron band of ethane: A spectral catalog from 765 cm(-1) to 900 cm(-1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The high resolution laboratory absorption spectrum of the 12 micro band of ethane gas is studied. The data were obtained using the McMath Solar Telescope 1 meter Fourier Transform interferometer at Kitt Peak National Observatory and tunable diode laser spectrometers at the University of Tennessee and NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Over 200 individual vibration rotation transitions were analyzed taking into account many higher order effects including torsional splitting. Line positions were reproduced to better than 0.001/cm. Both ground and upper state molecular constants were determined in the analysis. The experimental details, the analysis procedures and the results are addressed. A list of ethane transitions occurring near (14)CO2 laser lines needed for heterodyne searches for C2H6 in extraterrestrial sources is also included. A spectral catalog of the ethane nu sub g fundamental from 765/cm to 900/cm is provided. A high dispersion (1/cm 12 in.) plot of both the Kitt Peak interferometric data and a simulated spectrum with Doppler limited resolution, a table of over 8500 calculated transitions listed quantum number assignments, frequencies and intensities are provided.

Atakan, A. K.; Blass, W. E.; Brault, J. W.; Daunt, S. J.; Halsey, G. W.; Jennings, D. E.; Reuter, D. C.; Susskind, J.

1983-01-01

201

The redox state of iron in the matrix of CI, CM and metamorphosed CM chondrites by XANES spectroscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbonaceous chondrites record the action of water at some point of their petrological history. These meteorites are usually connected to low albedo asteroid, which present visible/near-IR absorption explained by iron related absorption within phyllosilicates and oxides. In order to obtain quantitative insight into the mineralogy of iron-bearing phases, we have measured X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy at the iron K-edge of matrix from carbonaceous chondrites. This method enables to constrain the redox state and environment of iron in these meteorites. For this study, we selected seven CM chondrites and the CI Orgueil, expected to span a range of aqueous alteration degrees. Our analysis of the pre-edge features show that the redox state of Orgueil (CI) is dominated by octahedral Fe and that the Fe3+/(Fe3++Fe2+) atomic ratio is above 80%. Full-inversion of the spectra suggests that the iron budget is dominated by iron oxides, with additional contributions from phyllosilicate. In the case of the CM, the iron speciation appears different that in the case of Orgueil. Cronstedtite is identified from the inversion of the spectra, and suggested by the presence of significant amount of tetrahedral Fe3+. Within the CM chondrites, a trend of aqueous alteration appears presents, and which is roughly correlated to the scheme defined by Rubin et al. (2007). This trend is characterized by an increase in the amount of iron oxides. Two shock metamorphosed CM are present in our dataset (PCA 91008, WIS 91600). If WIS 91600 does not appear distinguishable, from the CM trend, in the case of PCA 91008, shock metamorphism did impact the pre-edge intensity and an increased amount of anhydrous silicates is found. Although the matrix was dehydrated, significant amount of Fe3+ is still present, providing a memory of the aqueous alteration.

Beck, P.; De Andrade, V.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Veronesi, G.; Cotte, M.; Quirico, E.; Schmitt, B.

2012-12-01

202

Refractory-element-rich inclusions in CM meteorites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Refractory-element-rich inclusions of a variety of types occur in CM meteorites. Based on detailed study of Murchison and more limited investigations of Murray, Nogoya, Cold Bokkeveld and Mighei, the most common of these inclusions are small spinel-hibonite bodies rimmed with diopside. Bulk chemical compositions are estimated to be approximately 67% Al2O3, 21% MgO, 5.5% CaO, 5.5% TiO2, and 1% SiO2. Although this chemical composition does not agree closely with current theoretically predicted compositions of early condensate assemblages, the inclusions have many features which suggest that they are indeed early condensates. These include texture, mineralogical composition, sequence of minerals and magnesium isotopic composition of hibonite. The CM refractory inclusions exhibit several differences from those observed in Allende and other CV meteorites. These probably record variations in time, place or physical conditions of origin for the two cases.

Macdougall, J. D.

1979-01-01

203

Precision measurement of cosmic magnification from 21 cm emitting galaxies  

SciTech Connect

We show how precision lensing measurements can be obtained through the lensing magnification effect in high redshift 21cm emission from galaxies. Normally, cosmic magnification measurements have been seriously complicated by galaxy clustering. With precise redshifts obtained from 21cm emission line wavelength, one can correlate galaxies at different source planes, or exclude close pairs to eliminate such contaminations. We provide forecasts for future surveys, specifically the SKA and CLAR. SKA can achieve percent precision on the dark matter power spectrum and the galaxy dark matter cross correlation power spectrum, while CLAR can measure an accurate cross correlation power spectrum. The neutral hydrogen fraction was most likely significantly higher at high redshifts, which improves the number of observed galaxies significantly, such that also CLAR can measure the dark matter lensing power spectrum. SKA can also allow precise measurement of lensing bispectrum.

Zhang, Pengjie; /Fermilab; Pen, Ue-Li; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.

2005-04-01

204

Performance of the NASA 30 cm Ion Thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster is under development at NASA to provide an ion propulsion option for missions of national interest, and is being proposed for use on the USAF/TRW Space Surveillance, Tracking and Autonomous Repositioning (SSTAR) platform to validate ion propulsion. The thruster incorporates innovations in design, materials, and fabrication techniques compared to those employed in conventional ion thrusters. Specific development efforts include thruster design optimizations, component life testing and validation, vibration testing, and performance characterizations. Under this test program, the ion thruster will be brought to engineering model development status. This paper discusses the performance and power throttling test data for the NASA 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster over an input power envelope of 0.7 to 4.9 kW, and corresponding thruster lifetime expectations.

Patterson, Michael J.; Haag, Thomas W.; Hovan, Scot A.

1993-01-01

205

LIF excitation spectra for S 0 ? S 1 transition of deuterated anthranilic acid COOD, ND 2 in supersonic-jet expansion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation spectrum for the S 0 ? S 1 transition of anthranilic acid molecules deuterated in the substituent groups (COOD, ND 2) was investigated. Analysis of the LIF spectrum allowed for the assignment of the six most prominent fundamental in-plane modes of frequencies up to ca. 850 cm. The experimental results show good correlation with the frequency changes upon deuteration computed with CIS (CI-Singles) and TD-DFT for the S 1 state. Deuteration induced red-shifts of the identified fundamental bands are used for examination of the alternative assignments proposed in earlier studies. Potential energy distributions (PED) and overlaps of the in-plane normal modes with frequencies below 850 cm indicate that the correspondence of the respective vibrations of the deuterated and non-deuterated molecule is very good. A blue-shift of the 00 transition due to the isotopic substitution, is equal to 47 cm. This relatively large value is caused primarily by a significant decrease of the N-H stretching frequency associated with the increase of strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bond upon the electronic excitation. The deuteration shift of the 00 band was interpreted in terms of the differences of the zero point energy (ZPE) between the S 0 and S 1 electronic states, computed with DFT and TD-DFT methods, respectively.

Kolek, Przemys?aw; Le?niewski, Sebastian; Andrzejak, Marcin; Góra, Maciej; Cias, Pawel; We?rzynowicz, Adam; Najbar, Jan

2010-12-01

206

Control logic for a 30 cm diameter ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The various missions to be performed by the 30-cm diameter mercury bombardment thruster engine are discussed. The operating constraints imposed by the thermal environment, allowable time to reach steady state operation, and the number of start-ups required are examined. The variety of requirements is further analyzed for the impact on the basic control logic for the engine. The control logic is divided into the start-up, run, and shutdown modes of operation. The start-up mode is reported.

Bechtel, R. T.

1975-01-01

207

Not All Refractory Spherules in CM2S are Chondrules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Refractory spherules in CM2 meteorites are small, <300 micrometers in diameter, inclusions composed predominantly of spinel, with accessory hibonite and perovskite (Macdougall 1981). On the basis of their chondrule-like morphology, and the inward-radiating habit of hibonite in some inclusions, it has been suggested that refractory spherules formed from liquid droplets (Macdougall 1981; MacPherson et al. 1983). Since many spherules are

R. C. Greenwood

1992-01-01

208

Influence of primordial magnetic fields on 21 cm emission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic fields in the early universe can significantly alter the thermal\\u000aevolution and the ionization history during the dark ages. This is reflected in\\u000athe 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen, which is coupled to the gas temperature\\u000athrough collisions at high redshifts, and through the Wouthuysen-Field effect\\u000aat low redshifts. We present a semi-analytic model for star formation and

Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Robi Banerjee; Ralf S. Klessen

2008-01-01

209

Identifying Ionized Regions in Noisy Redshifted 21 cm Data Sets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which ~20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z ~ 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as ~150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam

2013-04-01

210

IDENTIFYING IONIZED REGIONS IN NOISY REDSHIFTED 21 cm DATA SETS  

SciTech Connect

One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which {approx}20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z {approx} 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as {approx}150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam, E-mail: mattma@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

2013-04-10

211

20-cm ECR plasma generator for xenon ion propulsion  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the development status of a 20-cm diameter microwave discharge ion thruster which generates 25?30 mN of thrust with an electric power of 1 kW. By optimizing the discharge chamber length, magnetic field and propellant flow injection, ion currents of up to 530 mA at a net microwave power of 100 W had been obtained at a frequency

Kazutaka Nishiyama; Hitoshi Kuninaka

2006-01-01

212

The Paris CM chondrite: Secondary minerals and asteroidal processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a petrographic and mineralogical survey of Paris, a new CM chondrite considered to be the least-altered CM identified so far (Hewins et al.). Compared to other CMs, Paris exhibits (1) a higher concentration of Fe-Ni metal beads, with nickel contents in the range 4.1-8.1 wt%; (2) the systematic presence of thin lamellae and tiny blebs of pentlandite in pyrrhotite grains; and (3) ubiquitous tochilinite/cronstedtite associations with higher FeO/SiO2 and S/SiO2 ratios. In addition, Paris shows the highest concentration of trapped 36Ar reported so far for a CM chondrite (Hewins et al.). In combination with the findings of previous studies, our data confirm the reliability of (1) the alteration sequence based on the chemical composition of tochilinite/cronstedtite associations to quantify the fluid alteration processes and (2) the use of Cr content variability in type II ferroan chondrule olivine as a proxy of thermal metamorphism. In contrast, the scales based on (1) the Fe3+ content of serpentine in the matrix to estimate the degree of aqueous alteration and (2) the chemical composition of Fe-Ni metal beads for quantifying the intensity of the thermal metamorphism are not supported by the characteristics of Paris. It also appears that the amount of trapped 36Ar is a sensitive indicator of the secondary alteration modifications experienced by chondrites, for both aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. Considering Paris, our data suggest that this chondrite should be classified as type 2.7 as it suffered limited but significant fluid alteration and only mild thermal metamorphism. These results point out that two separated scales should be used to quantify the degree of the respective role of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism in establishing the characteristics of CM chondrites.

Marrocchi, Yves; Gounelle, Matthieu; Blanchard, Ingrid; Caste, Florent; Kearsley, Anton T.

2014-07-01

213

Redshifted Neutral Hydrogen 21cm Absorption toward Red Quasars  

E-print Network

We have searched for redshifted neutral hydrogen 21cm absorption toward sources from the Stickel et al. `red quasar' sub-sample. Five of these red quasars have been searched for redshifted HI 21cm absorption to optical depth levels of a few percent, and four show strong absorption. This 80% success rate for the red quasars compares to the much lower success rate of only 11% for detecting HI 21cm absorption associated with optically selected Mg II absorption line systems. The large neutral hydrogen column densities seen toward the red quasars provide circumstantial evidence supporting the dust reddening hypothesis, as opposed to an intrinsically red spectrum for the AGN emission mechanism. The data on the red quasar sub-sample support the models of Fall and Pei for dust obscuration by damped Ly alpha absorption line systems and suggest that: (i) there may be a significant, but not dominant, population of quasars missing from optically selected samples due to dust obscuration, perhaps as high as 20% at the POSS limit for an optical sample with a redshift distribution similar to the 1 Jy, flat spectrum quasar sample, and (ii) optically selected samples may miss about half the high column density quasar absorption line systems. The redshifted HI 21cm absorption line detections are toward the sources: 0108+388 at z = 0.6685, 0500+019 at z = 0.5846, and 1504+377 at z = 0.6733. No absorption is seen toward 2149+056 at z = 0.740 at a level below that seen for the three detections. In some systems the absorbing gas is in the vicinity of the AGN, either circumnuclear material or material in the general ISM of the AGN's host galaxy, and in other systems the absorption is by gas associated with galaxies cosmologically distributed along the line of sight to the quasar.

C. L. Carilli; K. M. Menten; M. J. Reid; M. P. Rupen; M. S. Yun

1997-09-03

214

Testing general relativity with 21-cm intensity mapping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate the prospects for constraining alternative theories of gravity with a typical near-term, low-budget 21-cm intensity mapping experiment. We derive the 21-cm brightness temperature perturbation consistently in linear theory, including all line-of-sight and relativistic effects. We uncover new terms that are a small correction on large scales, analogous to those recently found in the context of galaxy surveys. We then perform a Fisher matrix analysis of the B0 parametrization of f(R) gravity, where B0 is proportional to the square of the Compton wavelength of the scalaron. We find that our 21-cm survey, in combination with CMB information from Planck, will be able to place a 95% upper limit of 7×10-5 on B0 in flat models with a ?CDM expansion history, improving on current cosmological constraints by several orders of magnitude. We argue that this constraint is limited by our ability to model the mildly nonlinear regime of structure formation in modified gravity. We also perform a model-independent principal component analysis on the free functions introduced into the field equations by modified gravity, ? and ?. We find that 20-30 modes of the free functions will be “well-constrained” by our combination of observables, the lower and upper limits dependent on the criteria used to define the “goodness” of the constraint. These constraints are found to be robust to uncertainties in the time dependence of the bias. Our analysis reveals that our observables are sensitive primarily to temporal variations in ? and scale variations in ?. We argue that the inclusion of 21-cm intensity maps will significantly improve constraints on any cosmological deviations from general relativity in large-scale structure in a very cost-effective manner.

Hall, Alex; Bonvin, Camille; Challinor, Anthony

2013-03-01

215

S1P lyase in skeletal muscle regeneration and satellite cell activation: exposing the hidden lyase.  

PubMed

Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid whose actions are essential for many physiological processes including angiogenesis, lymphocyte trafficking and development. In addition, S1P serves as a muscle trophic factor that enables efficient muscle regeneration. This is due in part to S1P's ability to activate quiescent muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) that are needed for muscle repair. However, the molecular mechanism by which S1P activates SCs has not been well understood. Further, strategies for harnessing S1P signaling to recruit SCs for therapeutic benefit have been lacking. S1P is irreversibly catabolized by S1P lyase (SPL), a highly conserved enzyme that catalyzes the cleavage of S1P at carbon bond C(2-3), resulting in formation of hexadecenal and ethanolamine-phosphate. SPL enhances apoptosis through substrate- and product-dependent events, thereby regulating cellular responses to chemotherapy, radiation and ischemia. SPL is undetectable in resting murine skeletal muscle. However, we recently found that SPL is dynamically upregulated in skeletal muscle after injury. SPL upregulation occurred in the context of a tightly orchestrated genetic program that resulted in a transient S1P signal in response to muscle injury. S1P activated quiescent SCs via a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1P2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-dependent pathway, thereby facilitating skeletal muscle regeneration. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), exhibited skeletal muscle SPL upregulation and S1P deficiency. Pharmacological SPL inhibition raised skeletal muscle S1P levels, enhanced SC recruitment and improved mdx skeletal muscle regeneration. These findings reveal how S1P can activate SCs and indicate that SPL suppression may provide a therapeutic strategy for myopathies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Advances in Lysophospholipid Research. PMID:22750505

Saba, Julie D; de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S

2013-01-01

216

Influence of primordial magnetic fields on 21 cm emission  

E-print Network

Magnetic fields in the early universe can significantly alter the thermal evolution and the ionization history during the dark ages. This is reflected in the 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen, which is coupled to the gas temperature through collisions at high redshifts, and through the Wouthuysen-Field effect at low redshifts. We present a semi-analytic model for star formation and the build-up of a Lyman alpha background in the presence of magnetic fields, and calculate the evolution of the mean 21 cm brightness temperature and its frequency gradient as a function of redshift. We further discuss the evolution of linear fluctuations in temperature and ionization in the presence of magnetic fields and calculate the effect on the 21 cm power spectrum. At high redshifts, the signal is increased compared to the non-magnetic case due to the additional heat input into the IGM from ambipolar diffusion and the decay of MHD turbulence. At lower redshifts, the formation of luminous objects and the build-up of a Lyman alpha...

Schleicher, Dominik R G; Klessen, Ralf S

2008-01-01

217

High Redshift HI 21 cm Absorption toward Red Quasars  

E-print Network

We have searched for redshifted absorption in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen toward `red quasars', which are extragalactic radio sources with a steep spectral drop between optical and infrared wavelengths. The success rate for detecting HI 21cm absorption toward a representative sample of such sources is 80%. This compares to the much lower success rate of 11% for detecting HI 21cm absorption associated with optically selected Mg II absorption line systems. The large neutral hydrogen column densities seen toward red quasars supports the hypothesis that these sources are reddened by dust, as opposed to having an intrinsically red spectrum due to the AGN emission mechanism. The lower limits to the spin temperatures for the neutral hydrogen are between 50 K and 1000 K, assuming a Galactic dust-to-gas ratio. We consider the question of biases in optically selected samples of quasars due to dust obscuration. The data on the red quasar sub-sample support the models of Fall and Pei for dust obscuration by damped...

Carilli, C L; Moore, C P; Menten, Karl M.

1998-01-01

218

High Redshift HI 21cm Absorption toward Red Quasars  

E-print Network

We have searched for redshifted absorption in the 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen toward `red quasars', which are extragalactic radio sources with a steep spectral drop between optical and infrared wavelengths. The success rate for detecting HI 21cm absorption toward a representative sample of such sources is 80%. This compares to the much lower success rate of 11% for detecting HI 21cm absorption associated with optically selected Mg II absorption line systems. The large neutral hydrogen column densities seen toward red quasars supports the hypothesis that these sources are reddened by dust, as opposed to having an intrinsically red spectrum due to the AGN emission mechanism. The lower limits to the spin temperatures for the neutral hydrogen are between 50 K and 1000 K, assuming a Galactic dust-to-gas ratio. We consider the question of biases in optically selected samples of quasars due to dust obscuration. The data on the red quasar sub-sample support the models of Fall and Pei for dust obscuration by damped Ly alpha absorption line systems, and suggest that: (i) there may be a significant, but not dominant, population of quasars missing from optically selected samples due to dust obscuration, perhaps as high as 20% at the POSS limit for an optical sample with a redshift distribution similar to the 1 Jy, flat spectrum quasar sample, and (ii) optically selected samples may miss about half the high column density quasar absorption line systems.

C. L. Carilli; Karl M. Menten; C. P. Moore

1998-12-09

219

Laser Guiding at > 10^18 W\\/cm^2 in cm - scale Gas Jets using the Ignitor Heater Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laser wakefield accelerators in the self guided regime and in pre formed channels are studied at LBNL's l'OASIS facility (10TW, 2×10^19W\\/cm^2) with the goal of a compact 0.1-1GeV accelerator module. A self modulated, self guided drive beam produced nC electron beams up to 50MeV with large energy spread. Simulations indicate plasma channeled accelerators can substantially increase particle energy and reduce

Cameron Geddes; Eric Esarey; Jerome Faure; Wim Leemans; Csaba Toth; Jeroen Vantilborg

2003-01-01

220

Randomised phase II study of S-1/cisplatin plus TSU-68 vs S-1/cisplatin in patients with advanced gastric cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: This study aimed to determine whether combination S-1 plus cisplatin (CDDP) therapy, the most widely used therapy for Japanese patients with advanced gastric cancer, and the novel oral antiangiogenic agent TSU-68 could contribute to gastric cancer treatment. Methods: Ninety-three patients with chemotherapy-naïve unresectable or recurrent advanced gastric cancers were randomised into two groups: TSU-68 plus S-1/CDDP (group A) and S-1/CDDP (group B) groups. Both patient groups received identical S-1 and CDDP dosages. TSU-68 was orally administered for 35 consecutive days. Group B patients received S-1 orally twice daily for three consecutive weeks, followed by intravenous CDDP on day 8. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Median PFS periods were 208 and 213 days in groups A and B, respectively (P=0.427). Median survival periods for groups A and B were 497.0 and 463.5 days, respectively (P=0.219). No statistically significant differences were noted for PFS, survival or the adverse event (AE) incidence rate. All AEs were expected according to previous reports for TSU-68, TS-1, and CDDP. Conclusion: Combination therapy involving TSU-68, S-1, and CDDP was safe and well tolerated in patients with chemotherapy-naïve unresectable or recurrent advanced gastric cancers. However, factors related to therapeutic efficacy should be investigated further. PMID:24045669

Koizumi, W; Yamaguchi, K; Hosaka, H; Takinishi, Y; Nakayama, N; Hara, T; Muro, K; Baba, H; Sasaki, Y; Nishina, T; Fuse, N; Esaki, T; Takagi, M; Gotoh, M; Sasaki, T

2013-01-01

221

Embolisation of Small (< 3 cm) Brain Arteriovenous Malformations  

PubMed Central

Summary The role of embolisation in the treatment of small (< 3cm) brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) has not been elucidated. We reviewed our experience using embolisation in the treatment of small AVMs and correlated a proposed grading system based on the angioarchitecture to the percentage obliteration achieved by embolisation. Eighty-one small AVMs in 80 patients were embolised from 1984 to 1999. The age range was from 3 to 72 years. The AVMs were given a score from 0 to 6 based on the angioarchitecture. The assigned scores were as follows: nidus (fistula = 0, < 1 cm = 1,1-3 cm = 2), type of feeding arteries (cortical = 0, perforator or choroidal = 1), number of feeding arteries (single = 0, multiple -2) and number of draining veins (single = 0\\ multiple - 1). Angiographic results based on percentage obliteration were grouped into three categories: complete, 66-99%, and 0-65%. The goal of embolisation was cure in 27 AVMs, pre-surgical in 23, pre-radiosurgery in 26, and elimination of an aneurysm in five. Embolisation achieved complete obliteration in 22 (27%) of the 81 AVMs. In the AVMs where the goal was cure, 19 (70%) of 27 were completely obliterated. In the AVMs with angioarchitecture scores of 0-2, 12 (86%) of 14 were cured, with scores of 3-4, 8 (34%) of 24 were cured and with scores of 5-6, 2 (4%) of 44 were cured. Embolisation resulted in transient morbidity of 5.0%, permanent morbidity of 2.5%, and mortality of 1.2%. There were no complications in AVMs with scores of 0-2. Embolisation is an effective treatment of small AVMs when the angioarchitecture is favourable (scores 0-2). This includes pure fistulas and AVMs with a single, pial, feeding artery. PMID:20663327

Willinsky, R.; Goyal, M.; terBrugge, K.; Montanera, W.; Wallace*, M.G; Tymianski*, M.

2001-01-01

222

[A case of locally advanced gastric cancer in which the patient underwent curative gastrectomy after treatment with systemic chemotherapy with bi-weekly s-1/docetaxel].  

PubMed

Here, we report the case of a patient with advanced gastric cancer complicated by pyloric stenosis and direct invasion into the pancreas who underwent curative resection after bi-weekly S-1/docetaxel(DS)therapy after gastrojejunostomy. A 73-year-old man consulted a general practitioner because of indigestibility, and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy indicated gastric cancer. He was referred to our hospital. Gastric cancer, whole stomach tumor(LMU), 150×80 mm, Type 3, T4a(SE), N2, M0, stage III B was diagnosed, and surgery was performed. The tumor was seen to directly invade the pancreas and the middle colic artery intraoperatively, so only a gastrojejunostomy was performed. After the operation, the patient was treated with DS therapy for 13 courses, and the response was defined as non-complete response(CR)and non-progressive disease (PD). During the second laparotomy, a curative operation was performed via distal gastrectomy because frozen-section diagnosis revealed that no cancer cells were present at the oral margin. Postoperatively, the tumor was diagnosed as LM, 10× 7 mm, 10×2.5 mm, pType 4, pT2(MP), pN0, pM0, CY0, stage I B. The patient is now receiving S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy and is still alive 2 years and 4 months after the first operation. PMID:24231709

Wada, Tomoko; Kunisaki, Chikara; Hasegawa, Shinichi; Kaida, Shuhei; Tamura, Shuzo; Ono, Hidetaka; Oshima, Takashi; Fujii, Shoichi; Kosaka, Takashi; Makino, Hirochika; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Endo, Itaru

2013-11-01

223

Radiated and conducted EMI from a 30-cm ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to properly assess the interaction of a spacecraft with the EMI environment produced by an ion thruster, the EMI environment was characterized. Therefore, radiated and conducted emissions were measured from a 30-cm mercury ion thruster. The ion thruster beam current varied from zero to 2.0 amperes and the emissions were measured from 5 KHz to 200 MHz. Several different types of antennas were used to obtain the measurements. The various measurements that were made included: magnetic field due to neutralizer/beam current loop; radiated electric fields of thruster and plume; and conducted emissions on arc discharge, neutralizer keeper and magnetic baffle lines.

Whittlesey, A. C.; Peer, W.

1981-01-01

224

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-223 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-223 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 223).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

225

The 100 cm solar telescope primary mirror study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The manufacturing impact of primary mirror configuration on the performance of a 100 cm aperture solar telescope was studied. Three primary mirror configurations were considered: solid, standard lightweight, and mushroom. All of these are of low expansion material. Specifically, the study consisted of evaluating the mirrors with regard to: manufacturing metrology, manufacturing risk factors and ultimate quality assessment. As a result of this evaluation, a performance comparison of the configurations was made, and a recommendation of mirror configuration is the final output. These evaluations, comparisons and recommendations are discussed in detail. Other investigations were completed and are documented in the appendices.

1975-01-01

226

Human Being Imaging with cm-Wave UWB Radar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Possibilities of high-resolution human body imaging and concealed weapon detection using centimeter-wave microwave frequencies are investigated. Dependencies of the cross-range resolution of different imaging techniques on operational bandwidth, center frequency, imaging aperture size, and imaging topology have been studied. It has been demonstrated that the cross-range resolution of 2 cm can be achieved using frequencies below 10 GHz. These findings have been verified experimentally by producing high-resolution images of a foil-covered doll and some weapons.

Yarovoy, A.; Zhuge, X.; Savelyev, T.; Matuzas, J.; Levitas, B.

227

Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cm-227 (Curium)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cm-227 (Curium, atomic number Z = 96, mass number A = 227).

Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

228

The use of 8 cm midlines in community IV therapy.  

PubMed

There is limited published literature on the use of 8 cm centimetre midlines for vascular access. This clinical audit was undertaken to provide a local evidence base for the insertion of midlines in patients receiving non-vesicant intravenous antibiotic therapy in the community setting over the medium term. The findings show their use has clear advantages for patients and clinicians. Although conducted in the community setting, the audit could be replicated in any community or hospital environment where medium-term intravenous therapy of non-vesicant fluids is administered. PMID:25345478

Owen, Kate

2014-10-22

229

Performance of 30-cm ion thrusters with dished accelerator grids  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Thirteen sets of dished accelerator grids were treated on five different 30 cm diameter bombardment thrusters to evaluate the effects of grid geometry variations on thruster discharge chamber performance. The dished grid parameters varied were: grid-to-grid spacing, screen and accelerator grid hole diameter, screen and accelerator open area fraction, compensation for beam divergence losses, and accelerator grid thickness. The effects on discharge chamber performance of main magnetic field changes, magnetic baffle current, cathode pole piece length and cathode position were also investigated.

Rawlin, V. K.

1973-01-01

230

Performance mapping of a 30 cm engineering model thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 30 cm thruster representative of the engineering model design has been tested over a wide range of operating parameters to document performance characteristics such as electrical and propellant efficiencies, double ion and beam divergence thrust loss, component equilibrium temperatures, operational stability, etc. Data obtained show that optimum power throttling, in terms of maximum thruster efficiency, is not highly sensitive to parameter selection. Consequently, considerations of stability, discharge chamber erosion, thrust losses, etc. can be made the determining factors for parameter selection in power throttling operations. Options in parameter selection based on these considerations are discussed.

Poeschel, R. L.; Vahrenkamp, R. P.

1975-01-01

231

Volatiles on solar system objects: Carbon dioxide on Iapetus and aqueous alteration in CM chondrites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volatiles are critical in understanding the history of the solar system. We conducted two case studies intended to further this understanding. First, we analyzed the presence of CO2 on Iapetus. Second, we evaluated aqueous alteration in CM chondrites. We studied the distribution, stability and production of CO2 on Saturn's moon Iapetus. We determined that CO2 is concentrated exclusively on Iapetus' dark material with an effective thickness of 31 nm. The total CO2 on Iapetus' surface is 2.3x108 kg. However, CO2 should not be present because it has a limited residence time on the surface of Iapetus. Our thermal calculations and modeling show that CO2 in the form of frost will not remain on Iapetus' surface beyond a few hundred years. Thus, it must be complexed with dark material. However, photodissociation will destroy the observed inventory in ˜1/2 an Earth year. The lack of thermal and radiolytic stability requires an active source. We conducted experiments showing UV radiation generates CO2 under Iapetus-like conditions. We created a simulated regolith by mixing crushed water ice with isotopically labeled carbon. We then irradiated it with UV light at low temperature and pressure, producing 1.1x1015 parts m-2 s-1. Extrapolating to Iapetus, photolysis could generate 8.4x107 kg y-1, which makes photolytic production a good candidate for the source of the CO2 detected on Iapetus. We also studied the aqueous alteration of metal-bearing assemblages in CM chondrites. We examined Murchison, Cold Bokkeveld, Nogoya, and Murray using microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Alteration on CM meteorites occurred within at least three microchemical environments: S-rich water, Si-rich water and water without substantial reactive components. Kamacite alters into tochilinite, cronstedtite, or magnetite. Sulfur associated alteration can form accessory minerals: P-rich sulfides, eskolaite and schreibersite. Additionally, we determined that there were two alteration events for some CM chondrites. The first formed a hydrated matrix prior to accretion, indicated by unaltered kamacite surrounded by a hydrated matrix. The second occurred after parent body formation. This event is indicated by large regions with consistent alteration features, surrounded by other regions of less altered material.

Palmer, Eric Edward

2009-12-01

232

[Immunosuppressive effect of S1P1 receptor agonist FTY720].  

PubMed

FTY720 is a synthetic compound derived from the metabolites of Isaria sinclairii. Its unique chemical structure and mechanism appear to be distinctive from other known immunosuppressors. In the present study, the effect of FTY720 on immunosuppression and toxicity to heart was evaluated by detection of lymphocytes count, heart rate in rats, the survival time of the allografts of skin slice in mice and binding to S1P1 and S1P3 receptors by confocal. The results showed that FTY720 could induce lymphopenia, reduce the heart rates in rats and prolong the survival time of the allografts of skin slice in mice. The assay results on confocal showed that FTY720 can bind with S1P1 and S1P3 on surface of CHO-S1P1 and CHO-S1P3 cells. FTY720 could be developed for wide application for organ transplantation and self-immunity diseases. PMID:22799042

Zhou, Wan-Qi; Zhang, Hai-Jing; Jin, Jing; Li, Yan; Li, Chao; Chen, Xiao-Guang

2012-04-01

233

The XXX spin s quantum chain and the alternating $s^{1}$, $s^{2}$ chain with boundaries  

E-print Network

The integrable XXX spin s quantum chain and the alternating $s^{1}$, $s^{2}$ ($s^{1}-s^{2}={1\\over 2}$) chain with boundaries are considered. The scattering of their excitations with the boundaries via the Bethe ansatz method is studied, and the exact boundary S matrices are computed in the limit $s, s^{1, 2} \\to \\infty$. Moreover, the connection of these models with the SU(2) Principal Chiral, WZW and the RSOS models is discussed.

Anastasia Doikou

2002-01-02

234

Monoclonal Antibodies against Der s 1, a Major Allergen of Dermatophagoides siboney  

Microsoft Academic Search

Six stable clones secreting murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against Der s 1 were obtained. The binding of Mabs showed cross-reactivity with Dermatophagoides farinae, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In a Western blot assay, antibodies reacted with a 24-kD protein considered to represent the major allergen Der s 1. The repertoire of antigenic sites on Der s 1 was

Minerva Sewer; Keiko Uyema; Mayrel Labrada; Maritza González; Marcos Coca

2000-01-01

235

Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 1 of 7 10/7/2013 3:21 PM  

E-print Network

Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 1 of 7 10/7/2013 3:21 PM #12;Cal Poly Report Employee Newsletter October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA October 2, 2013 file:///V:/UA/Marketing and Communications/Web_Sites_Private/calpol... 3 of 7 10/7/2013 3

Sze, Lawrence

236

Power processor for a 20CM ion thruster  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A power processor breadboard for the JPL 20CM Ion Engine was designed, fabricated, and tested to determine compliance with the electrical specification. The power processor breadboard used the silicon-controlled rectifier (SCR) series resonant inverter as the basic power stage to process all the power to the ion engine. The breadboard power processor was integrated with the JPL 20CM ion engine and complete testing was performed. The integration tests were performed without any silicon-controlled rectifier failure. This demonstrated the ruggedness of the series resonant inverter in protecting the switching elements during arcing in the ion engine. A method of fault clearing the ion engine and returning back to normal operation without elaborate sequencing and timing control logic was evolved. In this method, the main vaporizer was turned off and the discharge current limit was reduced when an overload existed on the screen/accelerator supply. After the high voltage returned to normal, both the main vaporizer and the discharge were returned to normal.

Biess, J. J.; Schoenfeld, A. D.; Cohen, E.

1973-01-01

237

Presolar grains in the CM2 chondrite Sutter's Mill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sutter's Mill (SM) carbonaceous chondrite is a regolith breccia, composed predominantly of CM2 clasts with varying degrees of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. An investigation of presolar grains in four Sutter's Mill sections, SM43, SM51, SM2-4, and SM18, was carried out using NanoSIMS ion mapping technique. A total of 37 C-anomalous grains and one O-anomalous grain have been identified, indicating an abundance of 63 ppm for presolar C-anomalous grains and 2 ppm for presolar oxides. Thirty-one silicon carbide (SiC), five carbonaceous grains, and one Al-oxide (Al2O3) were confirmed based on their elemental compositions determined by C-N-Si and O-Si-Mg-Al isotopic measurements. The overall abundance of SiC grains in Sutter's Mill (55 ppm) is consistent with those in other CM chondrites. The absence of presolar silicates in Sutter's Mill suggests that they were destroyed by aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid. Furthermore, SM2-4 shows heterogeneous distributions of presolar SiC grains (12-54 ppm) in different matrix areas, indicating that the fine-grained matrix clasts come from different sources, with various thermal histories, in the solar nebula.

Zhao, Xuchao; Lin, Yangting; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Zhang, Jianchao; Hao, Jialong; Zolensky, Michael; Jenniskens, Peter

2014-06-01

238

Probing Patchy Reionization through ?-21 cm Correlation Statistics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the cross-correlation between free electrons and neutral hydrogen during the epoch of reionization (EoR). The free electrons are traced by the optical depth to reionization ?, while the neutral hydrogen can be observed through 21 cm photon emission. As expected, this correlation is sensitive to the detailed physics of reionization. Foremost, if reionization occurs through the merger of relatively large halos hosting an ionizing source, the free electrons and neutral hydrogen are anticorrelated for most of the reionization history. A positive contribution to the correlation can occur when the halos that can form an ionizing source are small. A measurement of this sign change in the cross-correlation could help disentangle the bias and the ionization history. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of the cross-correlation using the estimator for inhomogeneous reionization \\hat{\\tau }_{\\ell m} proposed by Dvorkin and Smith. We find that with upcoming radio interferometers and cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, the cross-correlation is measurable going up to multipoles l ~ 1000. We also derive parameter constraints and conclude that, despite the foregrounds, the cross-correlation provides a complementary measurement of the EoR parameters to the 21 cm and CMB polarization autocorrelations expected to be observed in the coming decade.

Meerburg, P. Daniel; Dvorkin, Cora; Spergel, David N.

2013-12-01

239

Characterization of an 8-cm Diameter Ion Source System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of tests characterizing an 8-cm diameter ion source are presented. The tests were conducted in three separate vacuum test facilities at the University of Alabama-Huntsville, Colorado State University, and L3 Communications' ETI division. Standard ion optics tests describing electron backstreaming and total-voltage-limited impingement current behavior as a function of beam current were used as guidelines for selecting operating conditions where more detailed ion beam measurements were performed. The ion beam was profiled using an in-vacuum actuating probe system to determine the total ion current density and the ion charge state distribution variation across the face of the ion source. Both current density and ExB probes were utilized. The ion current density data were used to obtain integrated beam current, beam flatness parameters, and general beam profile shapes. The ExB probe data were used to determine the ratio of doubly to singly charged ion current. The ion beam profile tests were performed at over six different operating points that spanned the expected operating range of the DAWN thrusters being developed at L3. The characterization tests described herein reveal that the 8-cm ion source is suitable for use in (a) validating plasma diagnostic equipment, (b) xenon ion sputtering and etching studies of spacecraft materials, (c) plasma physics research, and (d) the study of ion thruster optics at varying conditions.

Li, Zhongmin; Hawk, C. W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Buttweiler, Mark S.; Williams, John D.; Buchholtz, Brett

2005-01-01

240

Tank testing of a 2500-cm2 solar panel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 50 cm by 50 cm solar array panel test patch was investigated for spacecraft charging and arcing effects. Bombardment with monochromatic electron was carried out. Some objectives of the test were: (1) to estimate at what voltage of electron bombardment arcing would be probable; (2) to find whether the arc's energy would be tolerable or damagingly large; (3) to try and separate thermal and photoeffects; and, (4) to see whether materials used were such as to minimize arcing. Some conclusions were: In sunlight the tracking data relay satellite's solar panel which has ceria glass on the front and conductive paint on the backside is probably a good design for reducing charge-up. In a geomagnetic substorm simulated in testing there will be arcing at the interconnects during eclipse and transitions into and out of eclipse in testing especially in view of the very cold temperatures that will be reached by this lightweight array. Ceria-doped glass is preferred to fused silica glass for reducing charge build up. The Kapton bare patch should still be conductively painted. The differential voltages on the panel determine when arcing first begins, and the electron beam voltages vary depending upon whether the metallic structure is directly grounded or semifloating.

Bever, R. S.; Staskus, J.

1981-01-01

241

Presolar grains in the CM2 chondrite Sutter's Mill  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AbstractThe Sutter's Mill (SM) carbonaceous chondrite is a regolith breccia, composed predominantly of <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 clasts with varying degrees of aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. An investigation of presolar grains in four Sutter's Mill sections, SM43, SM51, SM2-4, and SM18, was carried out using NanoSIMS ion mapping technique. A total of 37 C-anomalous grains and one O-anomalous grain have been identified, indicating an abundance of 63 ppm for presolar C-anomalous grains and 2 ppm for presolar oxides. Thirty-one silicon carbide (SiC), five carbonaceous grains, and one Al-oxide (Al2O3) were confirmed based on their elemental compositions determined by C-N-Si and O-Si-Mg-Al isotopic measurements. The overall abundance of SiC grains in Sutter's Mill (55 ppm) is consistent with those in other <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. The absence of presolar silicates in Sutter's Mill suggests that they were destroyed by aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid. Furthermore, SM2-4 shows heterogeneous distributions of presolar SiC grains (12-54 ppm) in different matrix areas, indicating that the fine-grained matrix clasts come from different sources, with various thermal histories, in the solar nebula.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhao, Xuchao; Lin, Yangting; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Zhang, Jianchao; Hao, Jialong; Zolensky, Michael; Jenniskens, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3443394"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flow-regulated endothelial <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor-1 signaling sustains vascular development</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">SUMMARY During angiogenesis, nascent vascular sprouts fuse to form vascular networks enabling efficient circulation. Mechanisms that stabilize the vascular plexus are not well understood. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) is a blood-borne lipid mediator implicated in the regulation of vascular and immune systems. Here we describe a mechanism by which the G protein-coupled <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor-1 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1) stabilizes the primary vascular network. A gradient of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 expression from the mature regions of the vascular network to the growing vascular front was observed. In the absence of endothelial <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1, adherens junctions are destabilized, barrier function is breached, and flow is perturbed resulting in abnormal vascular hypersprouting. Interestingly, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 responds to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P as well as laminar shear stress to transduce flow-mediated signaling in endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that blood flow and circulating <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P activate endothelial <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 to stabilize blood vessels in development and homeostasis. PMID:22975328</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jung, Bongnam; Obinata, Hideru; Galvani, Sylvain; Mendelson, Karen; Ding, Bisen; Skoura, Athanasia; Kinzel, Bernd; Brinkmann, Volker; Rafii, Shahin; Evans, Todd; Hla, Timothy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhRvD..57.3847B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for the decay B-->D+<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(2536)X</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have searched for the decay B-->D+<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(2536)X and measured an upper limit for the inclusive branching fraction of B(B-->D+<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>X)<0.96% at the 90% confidence level. This limit is small compared with the total expected B-->D¯(*)D(*)KX rate. Assuming factorization, the D+<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> decay constant is constrained to be fD+<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span><114 MeV at the 90% confidence level, at least 2.5 times smaller than that of D+s.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Hinson, J. W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D. H.; Shibata, E. I.; Shipsey, I. P.; Yurko, M.; Glenn, S.; Johnson, S. D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E. H.; Jessop, C. P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M. L.; Savinov, V.; Ugolini, D.; Wang, R.; Zhou, X.; Coan, T. E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Shelkov, V.; Staeck, J.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J.; Artuso, M.; Azfar, F.; Efimov, A.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G. C.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Xing, X.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S. E.; Jain, V.; McLean, K. W.; Marka, S.; Godang, R.; Kinoshita, K.; Lai, I. C.; Pomianowski, P.; Schrenk, S.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L. P.; Zhou, G. J.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J. S.; O'grady, C.; Schmidtler, M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A. J.; Würthwein, F.; Bliss, D. W.; Masek, G.; Paar, H. P.; Prell, S.; Sharma, V.; Asner, D. M.; Gronberg, J.; Hill, T. S.; Lange, D. J.; Morrison, R. J.; Nelson, H. N.; Nelson, T. K.; Richman, J. D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Witherell, M. S.; Balest, R.; Behrens, B. H.; Ford, W. T.; Gritsan, A.; Park, H.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; Alexander, J. P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B. E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D. G.; Cho, H. A.; Crowcroft, D. S.; Dickson, M.; von Dombrowski, S.; Drell, P. S.; Ecklund, K. M.; Ehrlich, R.; Foland, A. D.; Gaidarev, P.; Gibbons, L.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hopman, P. I.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kim, P. C.; Kreinick, D. L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Mistry, N. B.; Ng, C. R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Patterson, J. R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Valant-Spaight, B.; Ward, C.; Athanas, M.; Avery, P.; Jones, C. D.; Lohner, M.; Prescott, C.; Yelton, J.; Zheng, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Briere, R. A.; Ershov, A.; Gao, Y. S.; Kim, D. Y.-J.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Browder, T. E.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G. E.; Gollin, G. D.; Hans, R. M.; Johnson, E.; Karliner, I.; Marsh, M. A.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J. J.; Edwards, K. W.; Bellerive, A.; Janicek, R.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Sadoff, A. J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Darling, C.; Davis, R.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Zhou, L.; Anderson, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, S. J.; O'neill, J. J.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Riehle, T.; Smith, A.; Alam, M. S.; Athar, S. B.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A. H.; Severini, H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F.; Anastassov, A.; Duboscq, J. E.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K. K.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Spencer, M. B.; Sung, M.; Undrus, A.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Nemati, B.; Richichi, S. J.; Ross, W. R.; Skubic, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.imaging.sbes.vt.edu/BIDLib/Diverse/ChenChoykeWang_SignalDeconvContrEnh.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Figure 1. Software flowchart of the CAM-<span class="hlt">CM</span> algorithm. CAM-<span class="hlt">CM</span>: A Signal Deconvolution Tool for In Vivo Dynamic Con-</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 Figure 1. Software flowchart of the CAM-<span class="hlt">CM</span> algorithm. CAM-<span class="hlt">CM</span>: A Signal Deconvolution Tool-mixed tissue heterogeneity. CAM-<span class="hlt">CM</span> (Convex Analysis of Mixtures - Compartment Modeling) signal deconvolution parameters. CAM-<span class="hlt">CM</span> can dissect complex tissues into regions with differential tracer kinetics at pixel</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Ge</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010mss..confETE06O"> <span id="translatedtitle">New Measurements of H2 16O Line Intensities around 8800 <span class="hlt">CM</span>-1 and 1300 <span class="hlt">CM</span>-1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A precise knowledge of spectroscopic parameters for atmospheric molecules is necessary for the control and the modelling of the Earth's atmosphere. The water vapor take a special key as it participate to the global radiative balance of the atmosphere. Our laboratory is engaged since many years in the study of H216O vapor and its isotopologues [1, 2, 3]. An important work has been already made in the spectral region of 4000 to 6600 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 [3] and it continues now in the following spectral window : 6600-9000 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. We have focused on the lines around 8800 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1, as the latest version of HITRAN database still relies on the work of Mandin et al. performed in 1988 [4, 5]. We have recorded several spectra of water vapor with our step-by-step Fourier Transform Spectrometer built in our laboratory [6, 7]. We present here our intensity measurements compared to recent literature data [8] and HITRAN2008 database. Also we have performed a study around 1300 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1. The precise knowledge of water vapor for this spectral range is very useful for inversion of IASI spectra. We show some comparisons between our new intensity measurements and LISA database, HITRAN2004, and recent literature data [9]. References: [1] M. Carleer, A. Jenouvrier, A.-C. Vandaele, M.-F. Mérienne, R. Colin, N. F. Zobov, O. L. Polyansky, J. Tennyson and V. A. Savin, J. Chem Phys 111 (1999) 2444-2450. [2] M.-F. Mérienne, A. Jenouvrier, C. Hermans, A.-C. Vandaele, M. Carleer, C. Clerbaux, P.-F. Coheur, R. Colin, S. Fally, M. Bachc J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Trans. 82 (2003) 99-117. [3] A. Jenouvrier, L. Daumont, L. RÉgalia-Jarlot, Vl. G. Tyuterev, M. Carleer, A. C. Vandaele, S. Mikhailenko and S. Fally, JQSRT, 105 (2007) 326-355. [4] J.-Y. Mandin, J.-P. Chevillard, J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, Can. J. Phys, 66 (1988) 997-1011. [5] J.-Y. Mandin, J.-P. Chevillard, J.-M. Flaud, C. Camy-Peyret, J. Mol. Spectrosc, 132 (1988) 352-360. [6] J-J. Plateaux, A. Barbe and A. Delahaigue, Spectrochim. Acta, 51A (1995) 1169-1153 [7] L. Régalia, Thesis, Reims, 1996 (France). [8] R. N. Tolchenov, J. Tennyson, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 231 (2005) 23-27. [9] L.H. Coudert, G.Wagner, M.Birk, U.I. Baranov, M.J. Lafferty, J-M. Flaud, J. Mol. Spect, 251 (2008) 357-339</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oudot, C.; Regalia, L.; Le Wang; Daumont, L.; Thomas, X.; von der Heyden, P.; Decatoire, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvD..87d3002L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Global 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal experiments: A designer's guide</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The global (i.e., spatially averaged) spectrum of the redshifted 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> line has generated much experimental interest lately, thanks to its potential to be a direct probe of the epoch of reionization and the dark ages, during which the first luminous objects formed. Since the cosmological signal in question has a purely spectral signature, most experiments that have been built, designed, or proposed have essentially no angular sensitivity. This can be problematic because with only spectral information, the expected global 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> signal can be difficult to distinguish from foreground contaminants such as galactic synchrotron radiation, since both are spectrally smooth and the latter is many orders of magnitude brighter. In this paper, we establish a systematic mathematical framework for global signal data analysis. The framework removes foregrounds in an optimal manner, complementing spectra with angular information. We use our formalism to explore various experimental design trade-offs, and find that (1) with spectral-only methods, it is mathematically impossible to mitigate errors that arise from uncertainties in one’s foreground model; (2) foreground contamination can be significantly reduced for experiments with fine angular resolution; (3) most of the statistical significance in a positive detection during the dark ages comes from a characteristic high-redshift trough in the 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> brightness temperature; (4) measurement errors decrease more rapidly with integration time for instruments with fine angular resolution; and (5) better foreground models can help reduce errors, but once a modeling accuracy of a few percent is reached, significant improvements in accuracy will be required to further improve the measurements. We show that if observations and data analysis algorithms are optimized based on these findings, an instrument with a 5° wide beam can achieve highly significant detections (greater than 5?) of even extended (high ?z) reionization scenarios after integrating for 500 h. This is in strong contrast to instruments without angular resolution, which cannot detect gradual reionization. Ionization histories that are more abrupt can be detected with our fiducial instrument at the level of tens to hundreds of ?. The expected errors are similarly low during the dark ages, and can yield a 25? detection of the expected cosmological signal after only 100 h of integration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Adrian; Pritchard, Jonathan R.; Tegmark, Max; Loeb, Abraham</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24326191"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expression, purification and improved antigenicity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> antigen for serodiagnosis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The phosphate-specific transport substrate binding protein-1 (Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) is a potential antigen used for the serological diagnosis of tuberculosis. For a highly specific diagnostic result, it is important that the recombinant Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> be highly pure and correctly folded. In this study, the Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> was expressed as fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase (Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST) and Escherichia coli trigger factor (Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF) and their immunodiagnostic potentials were evaluated. The insoluble Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST was denatured and refolded to the native conformation by a step-gradient dilution, followed by purification with affinity chromatography on immobilized glutathione whereas the soluble Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF was directly purified by Ni-NTA affinity and size-exclusion chromatographies. The levels of antibody responses to Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF and Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the sera of 22 tuberculosis patients with smear-positive and culture-positive tuberculosis as well as 20 healthy individuals; the antigenicities of the samples were evaluated in terms of sensitivity and specificity. To determine the diagnostic accuracy, receiver operation characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and then the areas under the ROC curves (AUC) were calculated; the AUC values for Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF and Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST were 0.971 and 0.877 with 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 0.927-1.000 and 0.768-0.986, respectively. The specificity of Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF was reduced from 89.5% to 84.2%, but in case of Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST it dropped drastically from 78.9% to 26.3% when the sensitivity was raised from 86.4% up to 95.5%. These results indicate that Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-TF is capable of producing more accurate and consistent serodiagnostic results than Pst<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-GST, possibly due to its conformation being closer to the native state. PMID:24326191</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hwang, Won-Hyun; Lee, Won-Kyu; Ryoo, Sung Weon; Yoo, Ki-Yeol; Tae, Gun-Sik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/971101"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing Primordial Magnetic Fields with the 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> Fluctuations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Primordial magnetic fields possibly generated in the very early universe are one of the candidates for the origin of magnetic fields observed in many galaxies and galaxy clusters. After recombination, the dissipation process of the primordial magnetic fields increases the baryon temperature. The Lorentz force acts on the residual ions and electrons to generate density fluctuations. These effects are imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) brightness temperature fluctuations produced by the neutral hydrogen 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> line. We calculate the angular power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations for the model with the primordial magnetic fields of a several nano Gauss strength and a power-law spectrum. It is found that the overall amplitude and the shape of the brightness temperature fluctuations depend on the strength and the spectral index of the primordial magnetic fields. Therefore, it is expected that the observations of the CMB brightness temperature fluctuations give us a strong constraint on...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tashiro, H; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0607169v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing Primordial Magnetic Fields with the 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> Fluctuations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Primordial magnetic fields possibly generated in the very early universe are one of the candidates for the origin of magnetic fields observed in many galaxies and galaxy clusters. After recombination, the dissipation process of the primordial magnetic fields increases the baryon temperature. The Lorentz force acts on the residual ions and electrons to generate density fluctuations. These effects are imprinted on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) brightness temperature fluctuations produced by the neutral hydrogen 21<span class="hlt">cm</span> line. We calculate the angular power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations for the model with the primordial magnetic fields of a several nano Gauss strength and a power-law spectrum. It is found that the overall amplitude and the shape of the brightness temperature fluctuations depend on the strength and the spectral index of the primordial magnetic fields. Therefore, it is expected that the observations of the CMB brightness temperature fluctuations give us a strong constraint on the primordial magnetic fields.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hiroyuki Tashiro; Naoshi Sugiyama</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790040556&hterms=bokkeveld&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dbokkeveld"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rb-Sr studies of CI and <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rb-Sr whole rock analyses have been performed on 2 CI and 3 <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites. Four of these stones (Ivuna, Orgueil, Cold Bokkeveld and Erakot) were previously studied in this laboratory and were shown to be discordant from a 4.6 Gyr isochron. The fifth, Murchison, was not previously studied. The new data support the discordance of the first four stones, and indicate that Murchison is also discordant. Studies of Sr isotope ratios in unspiked Orgueil show that the discordance is not due to inhomogeneities in the Sr-84/Sr-86 ratio caused by incomplete mixing of nucleosynthesis products. In order to gauge the effects of weathering, two leaching experiments were performed on fresh, interior samples of Murchison; one for a period of 1.5 hr and the other for 117 hr. The results indicate that the relative solubility of nonradiogenic Sr is approximately twice that of Rb and radiogenic Sr is more soluble than the nonradiogenic Sr.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Wetherill, G. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750007661&hterms=zeeman&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dzeeman%252C%2BE%2BC"> <span id="translatedtitle">Direct thrust measurement of a 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A direct thrust measurement of a 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter ion thruster was accomplished by means of a laser interferometer thrust stand. The thruster was supported in a pendulum manner by three 3.65-m long wires. Electrical power was provided by means of 18 mercury filled pots. A movable 23-button planar probe rake was used to determine thrust loss due to ion beam divergence. Values of thrust, thrust loss due to ion beam divergence, and thrust loss due to multiple ionization were measured for ion beam currents ranging from 0.5 A to 2.5 A. Measured thrust values indicate an accuracy of approximately 1% and are in good agreement with thrust values calculated by indirect measurements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Banks, B.; Rawlin, V.; Weigand, A. J.; Walker, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0612769v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Longitude-resolved imaging of Jupiter at lambda = 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a technique for creating a longitude-resolved image of Jupiter's thermal radio emission. The technique has been applied to VLA data taken on 25 January 1996 at a wavelength of 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. A comparison with infrared data shows a good correlation between radio hot spots and the 5 micron hot spots seen on IRTF images. The brightest spot on the radio image is most likely the hot spot through which the Galileo probe entered Jupiter's atmosphere. We derived the ammonia abundance (= volume mixing ratio) in the hot spot, which is ~ 3 x 10^{-5}, about half that seen in longitude-averaged images of the NEB, or less than 1/3 of the longitude-averaged ammonia abundance in the EZ. This low ammonia abundance probably extends down to at least the 4 bar level.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. J. Sault; C. Engel; Imke de Pater</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740005390&hterms=langmuir+probe+based+ion+sensor&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlangmuir%2Bprobe%2Bbased%2Bion%2Bsensor"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hollow cathode restartable 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of substituting high perveance dished grids for low perveance flat ones on performance variables and plasma properties within a 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> modified SERT II thruster are discussed. Results suggest good performance may be achieved as an ion thruster is throttled if the screen grid transparency is decreased with propellant flow rate. Thruster startup tests, which employ a pulsed high voltage tickler electrode between the keeper and the cathode to initiate the discharge, are described. High startup reliability at cathode tip temperatures of about 500 C without excessive component wear over 2000 startup cycles is demonstrated. Testing of a single cusp magnetic field concept of discharge plasma containment is discussed. A theory which explains the observed behavior of the device is presented and proposed thruster modifications and future testing plans are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilbur, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790050761&hterms=Hg&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DHg"> <span id="translatedtitle">Increased capabilities of the 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter Hg ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 30-<span class="hlt">cm</span>-diam mercury ion thruster, using two or three grid ion accelerating systems, is operated at increased values of beam current. Comparisons with the SEP (Solar Electric Propulsion) and EPSEP (Extended Performance SEP) baseline thrusters are made with respect to performance and lifetime. It is found that when a third, or decelerator, grid is added to the conventional two-grid optics of a SEP-like thruster, the ion beam focusing properties are improved, as expected from theoretical considerations. The total thruster efficiency as a function of specific impulse, is increased for values of specific impulse in the range 1200-2800 sec. Lifetime test results predict a thruster lifetime, under space conditions, not less than that of the baseline SEP thruster.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rawlin, V. K.; Hawkins, C. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3639062"> <span id="translatedtitle">11 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Haughton D left cervical aortic arch aneurysm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A 56?year old Caucasian man presented with sudden loss of consciousness while driving and was found to have an 11?<span class="hlt">cm</span> Haughton D type left cervical aortic arch aneurysm with normal brachiocephalic branching and normal descending thoracic laterality but with considerable tortuosity and redundancy of aortic arch. The aneurysm arose between the left common carotid artery and the left subclavian artery. It compressed and stretched the left common carotid artery, compressed the pulmonary trunk and the left pulmonary artery, stretched the vagus, left recurrent laryngeal and left phrenic nerves and caused extreme deviation of trachea, severely compromising the tracheal lumen. Patient underwent successful interposition graft replacement of distal aortic arch under total circulatory arrest and selective unihemispherical cerebral perfusion. PMID:23618036</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19750015607&hterms=Alan+Schoenfeld&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DAlan%2BSchoenfeld"> <span id="translatedtitle">Power processor for a 30<span class="hlt">cm</span> ion thruster</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thermal vacuum power processor for the NASA Lewis 30<span class="hlt">cm</span> Mercury Ion Engine was designed, fabricated and tested to determine compliance with electrical specifications. The power processor breadboard used the silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) series resonant inverter as the basic power stage to process all the power to an ion engine. The power processor includes a digital interface unit to process all input commands and internal telemetry signals so that operation is compatible with a central computer system. The breadboard was tested in a thermal vacuum environment. Integration tests were performed with the ion engine and demonstrate operational compatibility and reliable operation without any component failures. Electromagnetic interference data were also recorded on the design to provide information on the interaction with total spacecraft.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Biess, J. J.; Inouye, L. Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18352691"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cosmic (Super)String Constraints from 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> Radiation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We calculate the contribution of cosmic strings arising from a phase transition in the early Universe, or cosmic superstrings arising from brane inflation, to the cosmic 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> power spectrum at redshifts z > or =30. Future experiments can exploit this effect to constrain the cosmic string tension G mu and probe virtually the entire brane inflation model space allowed by current observations. Although current experiments with a collecting area of approximately 1 km2 will not provide any useful constraints, future experiments with a collecting area of 10(4)-10(6) km2 covering the cleanest 10% of the sky can, in principle, constrain cosmic strings with tension G mu > or = 10(-10)-10(-12) (superstring/phase transition mass scale >10(13) GeV). PMID:18352691</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740048203&hterms=Atlas+Maps&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DAtlas%2B%2528Maps%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atlas of lunar radar maps at 70-<span class="hlt">cm</span> wavelength</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The intensity distribution of lunar radar echoes has been mapped for two-thirds of the earth-visible lunar surface at a wavelength of 70 <span class="hlt">cm</span>. The depolarizing effects of the lunar surface were observed by simultaneously receiving the radar echoes in opposite polarizations. These echoes were mapped with areal resolutions of 25-100 sq km. Mapping with this resolution confirmed that the young craters have enhanced returns. A few craters were found to have enhanced echoes only from their rims. Backscattering differences were also observed between various areas within a mare, between different highland areas, and between maria and adjacent highlands. These scattering differences were interpreted with a simple model, which assumed that the surface backscattered with varying amounts of quasi-specular and diffuse power. Only an increase in the diffuse power was needed to give the numerical values of the enhancements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thompson, T. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1974-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992Metic..27R.228G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Not All Refractory Spherules in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2S are Chondrules</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Refractory spherules in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 meteorites are small, <300 micrometers in diameter, inclusions composed predominantly of spinel, with accessory hibonite and perovskite (Macdougall 1981). On the basis of their chondrule-like morphology, and the inward-radiating habit of hibonite in some inclusions, it has been suggested that refractory spherules formed from liquid droplets (Macdougall 1981; MacPherson et al. 1983). Since many spherules are composed purely of spinel, Macdougall (1981) estimated that their 1-atm melting temperature might have been as high as 2135 degrees C. Melt temperatures in excess of 1550 degrees C were estimated by MacPherson et al. (1983) for the spinel-hibonite spherule BB1. Refractory spherules are a minor component of the Ca-Al rich inclusions (CAIs) found in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2s. Of 345 CAIs located in the <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 Cold Bokkeveld only 4 are refractory spherules (study in collaboration with M. Lee, University of Essex). Textural evidence from Cold Bokkeveld demonstrates that CAIs in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2s are highly fragmented and must have been derived by disruption of larger objects (Greenwood et al. 1991). That this is also the case for refractory spherules is clearly demonstrated by MSP1, an anhedral, spinel-bearing inclusion (300 mmicrometer longest dimension) located in situ in Murchison (<span class="hlt">CM</span>2). It comprises a rounded core (110 micrometers in diameter) of Fe-free spinel (V2O3 0.5wt%) surrounded by a rim of pyroxene (15-25 micrometers thick), in turn enclosed by a zone of olivine (Fo 99.7) and Mg-rich phyllosilicate. The spinel core contains 15% void space (estimated). The pyroxene rim is zoned outwards from fassaite to diopside. Blocky crystals of olivine <20 micrometers in diameter form a discontinuous rim to pyroxene and occur as isolated grains enclosed by Mg-phyllosilicate. The inclusion has an irregular outline and a sharp contact with surrounding matrix, indicating that it is a fragment of a larger, now disrupted CAI. In CV3 meteorites refractory spinel-rich spherules, similar to the Murchison example, occur within a number of different inclusion-types. Nodules, 5-300 micrometers in diameter, composed of spinel, melilite, perovskite, and pyroxene are common constituents of amoeboid olivine aggregates (Hashimoto and Grossman 1987). Melilite is also present in some Murchison spherules (MacPherson et al. 1983), and prior to aqueous alteration may have been an important constituent in many of these objects. Spherical clumps of spinel crystals, termed "framboids" by El Goresy et al. (1979) are common constituents of type B2 coarse-grained CAIs (Wark and Lovering 1982). One B2 CAI in Vigarano contains a 160-micrometer-diameter framboid with a 10-20-micrometer-thick rim of spinel enclosing a touching framework of rounded grains (5-15 micrometers in diameter). Melilite, present in the bulk inclusion, forms an outer rind to the framboid 5-10 micrometers thick and may be contiguous with crystals (angstrom k(sub)16.5) interstitial to spinel within the framboid. Individually rimmed spinel nodules, up to 300 micrometers in diameter, are also an important component of "fluffy" type A inclusions (MacPherson and Grossman 1984). The structure of the Murchison inclusion MSP1 indicates that at least some <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 refractory spherules were components of larger inclusions. In CV3s, experimental evidence suggests that spinel spherules represent residual solid material that acquired a rounded form during partial melting (Wark and Lovering 1982). The comparison made between chondrules and spherules may therefore be misleading and results in erroneously high estimates of the temperatures experienced by these objects. El Goresy A., Nagel K., and Ramdohr P. (1979) Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci. Conf. 10th, 833-850. Greenwood R.C., Hutchison R., and Cressey G. (1991) Meteoritics (abstract) 26, 340. Hashimoto A. and Grossman L. (1987) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 51, 1685-1704. Macdougall J.D. (1981) Geophys. Res. Lett. 8, 966-969. MacPherson G.J. and Grossman, L. (1984) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 48, 29-46. MacPherson G.J., Bar-Matthews M., Tanak</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Greenwood, R. C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/535862"> <span id="translatedtitle">Estimating 13.8-GHz path-integrated attenuation from <span class="hlt">10.7</span>-GHz brightness temperatures for the TRMM combined PR-TMI precipitation algorithm</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study presents research in support of the design and implementation of a combined radar-radiometer algorithm to be used for precipitation retrieval during the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The combined algorithm approach is expected to overcome various difficulties that arise with a radar-only approach, particularly related to estimates of path-integrated attenuation (PIA)along the TRMM radar beam. A technique is described for estimating PIA at the 13.8-GHz frequency of the TRMM precipitation radar (PR) from <span class="hlt">10.7</span>-GHz brightness temperature T{sub B} measurements obtained from the TRMM microwave imager. Through the use of variational or probabilistic techniques, the independent PIA calculations provide a means to adjust for errors that accumulate in estimates of range-dependent rain rates at progressively increasing range positions from radar reflectivity vectors. The accepted radar approach for obtaining PIA from ocean-viewing radar reflectivity measurements is called the surface reference technique, a scheme based on the difference in ocean surface cross sections between cloud-free and raining radar pixels. This technique has encountered problems, which are discussed and analyzed with the aid of coordinated aircraft radar (Airborne Rain Mapping Radar) and radiometer (Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer) measurements obtained during the west Pacific Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment in 1993. 97 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smith, E.A.; Farrar, M.R.; Xiang, X. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)] [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Turk, F.J. [Naval Research Lab., Monterey, CA (United States)] [Naval Research Lab., Monterey, CA (United States); Mugnai, A. [Instituto di Fisica dell`Atmosfera-CNR, Frascati (Italy)] [Instituto di Fisica dell`Atmosfera-CNR, Frascati (Italy)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_13 div --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988IzKry..79...71B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photometrical investigations of the UV Cet type flare stars with the 3×<span class="hlt">10-7</span>sec time resolution at the 6-metre telescope.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1982 - 85 electrophotometrical observations of 8 flare stars of the UV Cet type have been carried out with the 3×<span class="hlt">10-7</span>sec time resolution at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory. Using the apparatus and program complex MANIA during 35 hours of patrol observations, the authors have registered about 120 stellar flares, mainly at V577 Mon, Wolf 424 = FL Vir, CN Leo and UV Cet. The methods of observations and statistical treatment of data are given. The main results are: (1) no fine structure within the time scale 10-6 - 10-1s is found; (2) the shortest times of statistically significant brightness variations are 0.3 - 0.8 s and inherent in a phase of a fast flaring up; these values fit the prediction of the gasodynamical model of flares; (3) the life time of significant details at maxima and descending branches of flare light curves reliably exceed 0.5 s; (4) the flares with a total duration of several seconds are registered, their fading phases seem to be determined by a relaxation time of matter heated in a flare; (5) the energetics of the faintest flares registered in the observations is compatible with the energetics of the solar subflares; (6) the upper limit of a total power of stellar microflares is less than the time averaged power of flares which are individually registered and therefore there is no reason to suggest that microflares play the main role in stellar corona heating.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beskin, G. M.; Gershberg, R. E.; Neizvestnyj, S. I.; Plakhotnichenko, V. L.; Pustil'Nik, L. A.; Shvartsman, V. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7133501"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diminished croton oil-induced acute inflammation in mast cell deficient (W/W/sup v/ and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/sup d/) mice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mast cells (MC) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute inflammatory reactions. The authors tested the response of WBB6F/sub 1/-W/W/sup v/ and WCB6F/sub 1/-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/sup d/ mice, and their normal (+/+) littermates to croton oil (C.O.), an agent which induces an acute inflammatory response in the mouse. Mice received C.O. (200 ..mu..g) topically to the left (L) ear and vehicle alone to the right (R) (control) ear. Ear weight ratios (L/R, an indicator of swelling), /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2-deoxyuridine (/sup 125/I-IUDR)-labeled leukocyte infiltration ratios and histology (1/sup +/m) Epon sections) were examined 6-18 hr after challenge. The authors found: 1) a significant diminution in the ear weight and /sup 125/I-IUDR ratios in W/W/sup v/ and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/sup d/ mice as compared to congenic +/+ mice, 2) histologic evidence of diminished neutrophil infiltration in reactions to C.O. in W/W/sup v/ and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/sup d/ mice, and 3) evidence of MC activation in C.O. reactions in +/+ mice. Topical C.O. had little or no effect on peripheral blood leukocyte counts. The C.O. response of W/W/sup v/ mice whose tissue MC were restored by transplantation of congenic +/+ bone marrow resembled that of +/+ mice. These data are consistent with a role of mast cells in augmenting the acute inflammatory response to epicutaneous croton oil in the mouse.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wershil, B.K.; Mekori, Y.A.; Murakami, T.; Galli, S.J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-03-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://cdsweb.cern.ch/record/1664609"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pan-STARRS 1 observations of the unusual active Centaur P/2011 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>(Gibbs)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">P/2011 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (Gibbs) is an outer solar system comet or active Centaur with a similar orbit to that of the famous 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. P/2011 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (Gibbs) has been observed by the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) sky survey from 2010 to 2012. The resulting data allow us to perform multi-color studies of the nucleus and coma of the comet. Analysis of PS1 images reveals that P/2011 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (Gibbs) has a small nucleus $rate of $\\sim100$ kg <span class="hlt">s</span>$^{-<span class="hlt">1</span>}$. The mass-loss rate per unit surface area of P/2011 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (Gibbs) is as high as that of 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, making it one of the most active Centaurs. The mass-loss rate also varies with time from $\\sim 40$ kg <span class="hlt">s</span>$^{-<span class="hlt">1</span>}$ to 150 kg <span class="hlt">s</span>$^{-<span class="hlt">1</span>}$. Due to its rather circular orbit, we propose that P/2011 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (Gibbs) has 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1-like outbursts that control the outgass...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, H W; Lacerda, P; Ip, W H; Holman, M; Protopapas, P; Chen, W P; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Flewelling, H; Huber, M E; Jedicke, R; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Price, P A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41141830"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proteolytic specificity of cathepsin G on bovine ? <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>- and ?-caseins</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland which results in an increase in numbers of somatic cells, particularly polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN), which contain very active proteinases. The objective of this study was to determine the cleavage specificity of cathepsin G, one of the principal PMN proteinases, on ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>- and ?-casein. ?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>- or ?-casein (5 mg ml?1) were dissolved in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Considine; S. Geary; A. L. Kelly; P. L. H. McSweeney</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3335345"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 links germinal center confinement and growth regulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary Germinal centers (GCs) are sites of rapid B-cell proliferation and somatic mutation. These ovoid structures develop within the center of follicles and grow to a stereotypic size. The cell migration and interaction dynamics underlying GC B-cell selection events are currently under intense scrutiny. In recent work, we identified a role for a migration inhibitory receptor, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2, in promoting GC B-cell confinement to GCs. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 also dampens Akt activation and deficiency in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 or components of its signaling pathway result in a loss of growth control in chronically stimulated mucosal GCs. Here we detail present understanding of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P biology as it pertains to GC B cells and place this information in the context of a current model of GC function. PMID:22500830</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Green, Jesse A.; Cyster, Jason G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22783904"> <span id="translatedtitle">Large-area (over 50 <span class="hlt">cm</span> × 50 <span class="hlt">cm</span>) freestanding films of colloidal InP/ZnS quantum dots.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We propose and demonstrate the fabrication of flexible, freestanding films of InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) using fatty acid ligands across very large areas (greater than 50 <span class="hlt">cm</span> × 50 <span class="hlt">cm</span>), which have been developed for remote phosphor applications in solid-state lighting. Embedded in a poly(methyl methacrylate) matrix, although the formation of stand-alone films using other QDs commonly capped with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and oleic acid is not efficient, employing myristic acid as ligand in the synthesis of these QDs, which imparts a strongly hydrophobic character to the thin film, enables film formation and ease of removal even on surprisingly large areas, thereby avoiding the need for ligand exchange. When pumped by a blue LED, these Cd-free QD films allow for high color rendering, warm white light generation with a color rendering index of 89.30 and a correlated color temperature of 2298 K. In the composite film, the temperature-dependent emission kinetics and energy transfer dynamics among different-sized InP/ZnS QDs are investigated and a model is proposed. High levels of energy transfer efficiency (up to 80%) and strong donor lifetime modification (from 18 to 4 ns) are achieved. The suppression of the nonradiative channels is observed when the hybrid film is cooled to cryogenic temperatures. The lifetime changes of the donor and acceptor InP/ZnS QDs in the film as a result of the energy transfer are explained well by our theoretical model based on the exciton-exciton interactions among the dots and are in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The understanding of these excitonic interactions is essential to facilitate improvements in the fabrication of photometrically high quality nanophosphors. The ability to make such large-area, flexible, freestanding Cd-free QD films pave the way for environmentally friendly phosphor applications including flexible, surface-emitting light engines. PMID:22783904</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mutlugun, Evren; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Eroglu, Cuneyt; Coskun, Yasemin; Erdem, Talha; Sharma, Vijay K; Unal, Emre; Panda, Subhendu K; Hickey, Stephen G; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander; Demir, Hilmi Volkan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010058591&hterms=audit&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Daudit"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CM</span> and DM in an ISO R and D Environment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">ISO 9000 - a common buzz word in industry is making inroads to government agencies. The National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) achieved ISO 9001 certification at each of its nine (9) Centers and Headquarters in 1998-1999. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) was recommended for certification in September 1999. Since then, each of the Centers has been going through the semi-annual surveillance audits. Growing out of the manufacturing industry, successful application of the international quality standard to a research and development (R&D) environment has had its challenges. This paper will address how GRC applied Configuration Management (<span class="hlt">CM</span>) and Data (or Document) Management (DM) to meet challenges to achieve ISO certification. One of the first challenges was to fit the ISO 9001-1994 elements to the GRC environment. Some of the elements fit well-Management Responsibility (4.1), Internal Audits (4.17), Document and Data Control (4.5). Other elements were not suited or applied easily to the R&D environment-Servicing (4.19), Statistical Techniques (4.20). Since GRC "builds" only one or two items at a time, these elements were considered not applicable to the environment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Crowley, Sandra L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760007106&hterms=langmuir+probe+based+ion+sensor&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dlangmuir%2Bprobe%2Bbased%2Bion%2Bsensor"> <span id="translatedtitle">The 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> mercury ion thruster research 1975</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Doubly charged ion current measurements in the beam of a SERT II thruster are shown to introduce corrections which bring its calculated thrust into close agreement with that measured during flight testing. A theoretical model of doubly charged ion production and loss in mercury electron bombardment thrusters is discussed and is shown to yield doubly-to-singly charged ion density ratios that agree with experimental measurements obtained on a 15 <span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter thruster over a range of operating conditions. Single cusp magnetic field thruster operation is discussed and measured ion beam profiles, performance data, doubly charged ion densities, and discharge plasma characteristics are presented for a range of operating conditions and thruster geometries. Variations in the characteristics of this thruster are compared to those observed in the divergent field thruster and the cusped field thruster is shown to yield flatter ion beam profiles at about the same discharge power and propellant utilization operating point. An ion optics test program is described and the measured effects of grid system dimensions on ion beamlet half angle and diameter are examined. The effectiveness of hollow cathode startup using a thermionically emitting filament within the cathode is examined over a range of mercury flow rates and compared to results obtained with a high voltage tickler startup technique. Results of cathode plasma property measurement tests conducted within the cathode are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wilbur, P. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1975-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850004629&hterms=operation+overlord&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3D%2528operation%2Boverlord%2529"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ion thruster system (8-<span class="hlt">cm</span>) cyclic endurance test</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This report describes the qualification test of an Engineering-Model 5-mN-thrust 8-<span class="hlt">cm</span>-diameter mercury ion thruster which is representative of the Ion Auxiliary Propulsion System (IAPS) thrusters. Two of these thrusters are scheduled for future flight test. The cyclic endurance test described herein was a ground-based test performed in a vacuum facility with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled cryo-surface and a frozen mercury target. The Power Electronics Unit, Beam Shield, Gimal, and Propellant Tank that were used with the thruster in the endurance test are also similar to those of the IAPS. The IAPS thruster that will undergo the longest beam-on-time during the actual space test will be subjected to 7,055 hours of beam-on-time and 2,557 cycles during the flight test. The endurance test was successfully concluded when the mercury in the IAPS Propellant Tank was consumed. At that time, 8,471 hours of beam-on-time and 599 cycles had been accumulated. Subsequent post-test-evaluation operations were performed (without breaking vacuum) which extended the test values to 652 cycles and 9,489 hours of beam-on-time. The Power Electronic Unit (PEU) and thruster were in the same vacuum chamber throughout the test. The PEU accumulated 10,268 hr of test time with high voltage applied to the operating thruster or dummy load.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dulgeroff, C. R.; Beattie, J. R.; Poeschel, R. L.; Hyman, J., Jr.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140003129&hterms=History&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DHistory"> <span id="translatedtitle">What Are Space Exposure Histories Telling Us about <span class="hlt">CM</span> Carbonaceous Chondrites?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chondrites are chemically primitive and carbonaceous (C) chondrites are potentially the most primitive among them because they mostly escaped thermal metamor-phism that affected the other chondrite groups and ratios of their major, non-volatile and most of the volatile elements are similar to those of the Sun. Therefore, C chondrites are ex-pected to retain a good record of the origin and early history of the solar system. Carbonaceous chondrites are chemically differentiated from other chondrites by their high Mg/Si ratios and refractory elements, and have experienced various degrees of aqueous alteration. They are subdivided into eight subgroups (CI, <span class="hlt">CM</span>, CO, CV, CK, CR, CB and CH) based on major element and oxygen isotopic ratios. Their elemental ratios spread over a wide range though those of ordinary and enstatite chondrites are relatively uniform. It is critical to know how many sepa-rate bodies are represented by the C chondrites. In this study, <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites, the most abundant carbona-ceous chondrites, are examined. They are water-rich, chon-drule- and CAI-bearing meteorites and most of them are brec-cias. High-temperature components such as chondrules, iso-lated olivine and CAIs in CMs are frequently altered and some of them are replaced by clay minerals and surrounded by sul-fides whose Fe was derived from mafic silicates. On the basis of degrees of aqueous alteration, CMs have been classified into subtypes from 1 to 2, although Rubin et al. [1] assigned subtype 1 to subtype 2 and subtype 2 to subtype 2.6 using various petrologic properties. The classification is based on petrographic and mineralogic properties. For example, though tochilinite (2[(Fe, Mg, Cu, Ni[])<span class="hlt">S</span>] <span class="hlt">1</span>.57-1.85 [(Mg, Fe, Ni, Al, Ca)(HH)2]) clumps are produced during aqueous alteration, they disappear and sulfide appears with increasing degrees of aqueous alteration. Cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age measurements of <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites reveal an unusual feature. Though CRE ages of other chondrite groups range from several Myr to tens of Myr, CMs exposure ages are not longer than 7 Myr with one-third of the <span class="hlt">CM</span> having less than 1 Myr CRE age. For those <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites that have CRE ages <1 Myr, there are two discern-able CRE peaks. Because a CRE age reflects how long a me-teorite is present as a separate body in space, the peaks pre-sumably represent collisional events on the parent body (ies) [2]. In this study we defined 4 distinct CRE age groups of CMs and systematically characterized the petrography in each of the 4 CRE age groups to determine whether the groups have significant petrographic differences, with such differences probably reflecting different parent body (asteroid) geological processing, or multiple original bodies.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takenouchi, A.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M.; Velbel, M. A.; Ross, K.; Zolensky, P.; Le, L.; Imae, N.; Yamaguchi, A.; Mikouchi, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0701441v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spitzer/IRAC and JHKs Observations of h & chi Persei: Constraints on Protoplanetary Disk and Massive Cluster Evolution at ~ <span class="hlt">10^{7</span>} yr</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe IRAC 3.6-8 mu_m observations and ground-based near-IR JHKs photometry from Mimir and 2MASS of the massive double cluster h & chi Persei complete to J=15.5 (M ~ 1.3 Msun. Within 25' of the cluster centers we detect \\~11,000 sources with J < 15.5, ~7,000 sources with [4.5] < 15, and ~ 5000 sources with [8] < 14.5. In both clusters, the surface density profiles derived from the 2MASS data decline with distance from the cluster centers as expected for a bound cluster. Within 15' of the cluster centers, ~ 50% of the stars lie on a reddened ~ 13 Myr isochrone; at 15'-25' from the cluster centers, ~ 40% lie on this isochrone. Thus, the optical/2MASS color-magnitude diagrams indicate that h & chi Per are accompanied by a halo population with roughly the same age and distance as the two dense clusters. The double cluster lacks any clear IR excess sources for J < 13.5 (~ 2.7 Msun). Therefore, disks around high-mass stars disperse prior to ~ <span class="hlt">10^{7</span>} yr. At least 2-3% of the fainter cluster stars have strong IR excess at both [5.8] and [8]. About 4-8% of sources slightly more massive than the Sun (~ 1.4 Msun) have IR excesses at [8]. Combined with the lack of detectable excesses for brighter stars, this result suggests that disks around lower-mass stars have longer lifetimes. The IR excess population also appears to be larger at longer IRAC bands ([5.8], [8]) than at shorter IRAC/2MASS bands ($K_{s}$, [4.5]), a result consistent with an inside-out clearing of disks.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thayne Currie; Zoltan Balog; S. J. Kenyon; G. Rieke; L. Prato; E. T. Young; J. Muzerolle; D. P. Clemens; M. Buie; D. Sarcia; A. Grabau; E. V. Tollestrup; B. Taylor; E. Dunham; G. Mace</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990BCrAO..79...67B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photometric investigations of UV Cet type flare stars with 3×<span class="hlt">10-7</span>sec time resolution on a 6-m telescope.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In 1982 - 1985, electrophotometrical observations of eight flare stars of the UV Cet type have been carried out with the 3×<span class="hlt">10-7</span>sec time resolution at the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory. Using the apparatus and program complex MANIA during 35 hours of patrol observations, the authors have registered about 120 stellar flares, mainly at V577 Mon, Wolf 424 = FL Vir, CN Leo and UV Cet. The methods of observations and statistical treatment of data are given. The main results are as follows: 1) no fine structure within the time scale 10-6 - 10-1sec is found in flares; 2) the shortest times of statistically significant brightness variations are 0.3 - 0.8 sec, inherent in a phase of a fast flaring-up; these values fit the prediction of the gasdynamical model of flares; 3) the lifetime of significant details at maxima and descending branches of flare light curves reliably exceed 0.5 sec; 4) the flares with a total duration of several seconds are registered, their fading phases seem to be determined by a relaxation time of matter heated in a flare; 5) the energetics of the faintest flares registered in the observations is compatible with the energetics of the solar subflares; 6) the upper limit of the total power of stellar microflares is less than the time-averaged power of flares which are individually registered, and therefore there is no reason to suggest that microflares play the main role in stellar corona heating.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Beskin, G. M.; Gershberg, R. E.; Neizvestnyj, S. I.; Plakhotnichenko, V. L.; Pustil'Nik, L. A.; Shvartsman, V. F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22969964"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combination therapy using oral <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and targeted agents against human tumor xenografts in nude mice.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, combination therapies using the oral fluoropyrimidine tegafur-gimeracil-oteracil (<span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>) with several targeted agents or antibodies, were evaluated. First, the effects of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (erlotinib hydrochloride, sorafenib tosilate and sunitinib malate) against human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), breast cancer and colorectal cancer were evaluated in vivo. The effects of the combination of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and targeted antibodies (bevacizumab and cetuximab) against human colorectal cancers was also evaluated in vivo. <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erlotinib, showed a significant inhibition of growth in human NSCLC (Lu-99 and PC-9 cell lines). The antitumor activity of the combination of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and erlotinib against Lu-99 and PC-9 cancer cell lines was significantly superior to either monotherapy (P<0.05). Combination therapy using the multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, sorafenib or sunitinib, with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> against breast cancer (MX-1 cell line) and NSCLC (NCI-H460 cell line) was significantly superior to either monotherapy (P<0.01). The combination of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody bevacizumab or the anti-EGFR antibody, cetuximab, with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> against human colorectal cancer [Col-1, KM20C (bevacizumab) and DLD-1 (cetuximab) cell lines] and a 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-resistant cell line (KM12C/5-FU) was significantly superior to either monotherapy (p<0.01). In particular, the growth of the Col-1 cells was completely inhibited by the combination of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and bevacizumab. No toxic mortalities and no significant difference in the body weight changes of the animals treated with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> combined with the targeted agents or with the mono-therapies were observed; therefore, the treatments appeared to be well-tolerated. Our preclinical findings indicate that the combination therapies of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and targeted agents are promising treatment options. PMID:22969964</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nukatsuka, Mamoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Fumio; Tsujimoto, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Kazuki; Tsukioka, Sayaka; Uchida, Junji; Kiniwa, Mamoru; Kobunai, Takashi; Takechi, Teiji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012E%26PSL.327...75L"> <span id="translatedtitle">A heterogeneous solar nebula as sampled by <span class="hlt">CM</span> hibonite grains</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnesium isotopic compositions of 43 hibonite-bearing inclusions extracted from <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 meteorites Murchion and Paris were measured with a Cameca 1280 HR2 ion microprobe. The results are broadly consistent with the literature data: most Spinel-HIBonite spherules (SHIBs) bear evidence for in situ decay of 26Al at the canonical level, whereas PLAty-hibonite Crystals (PLACs) either lack resolvable 26Mg excesses or are characterized by apparent 26Mg deficits by up to ~ 5‰ relative to the terrestrial composition. With higher precisions achieved in this study, the 26Al/27Al scatter ranging from ~ 6 × 10- 6 to ~ 6 × 10- 5 previously seen in lower precision SHIB data can be clearly resolved. A statistical treatment to all the data reveals three distinctive peaks at 26Al/27Al = 4.9 × 10- 5, 3.5 × 10- 5 and 6.5 × 10- 6, and two minor (barely resolved) components at 26Al/27Al = 6 × 10- 5 and 2.5 × 10- 5. Possible explanations for the observed 26Al/27Al scatter in SHIBs include (1) isotopic disturbance, (2) protracted SHIB formation, (3) early formation before complete homogenization of 26Al in the solar nebula, and (4) initial Mg isotopic heterogeneity during SHIB formation. We argue that the early formation of SHIBs was the most plausible scenario. The PLACs could have formed in a reservoir characterized by 26Al/27Al similar to the average galactic background value, or in an 26Al-free environment. In either case, it is almost certain that the Mg isotope distribution in the PLAC-forming region was heterogeneous. Combining the hydrodynamic timescales of isotope mixing in the solar nebula, one could infer that the duration for PLAC and SHIB formation should only be around tens of thousands of years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Ming-Chang; Chaussidon, Marc; Göpel, Christa; Lee, Typhoon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3995487"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of Inpatient Clinical Documentation Readiness for ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research study examined the gaps in documentation that occur when coding in ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span>. More than 4,000 diagnoses from all chapters were coded from 656 electronic documents obtained from a large integrated healthcare facility at the time the study was conducted (2012). After the documents were coded, areas for documentation improvement were identified for chapters that resulted in deficiencies in documentation, and a quick reference guide was developed. The overall absent documentation percentage was 15.4 percent. The 10 chapters with the highest percentage of absent documentation were chapter 7 (Diseases of Eye and Adnexa), with 67.65 percent (p < .001); chapter 8 (Diseases of Ear and Mastoid Process), with 63.64 percent (p < .001); chapter 13 (Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue), with 46.05 percent (p < .001); chapter 14 (Diseases of the Genitourinary System), with 40.29 percent (p < .001); chapter 10 (Diseases of Respiratory System), with 35.52 percent (p < .001); chapter 1 (Infectious and Parasitic Diseases), with 32.88 percent (p < .001); chapter 12 (Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue), with 32.35 percent (p < .001); chapter 2 (Neoplasms), with 25.45 percent (p < .001); chapter 4 (Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases), with 14.58 percent (p < .001); and chapter 17 (Congenital Malformations, Deformations, and Chromosomal Abnormalities), with 12.50 percent. We addressed the deficient areas in the quick reference guide developed for clinicians and technology vendors. Having complete and accurate documentation would benefit both the clinician and the patient in providing the highest quality of care. PMID:24808815</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DeAlmeida, Dilhari R.; Watzlaf, Valerie J.; Anania-Firouzan, Patti; Salguero, Otto; Rubinstein, Elaine; Abdelhak, Mervat; Parmanto, Bambang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/11322"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of the Am/<span class="hlt">Cm</span> Batch Vitrification Process</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A batch vitrification process, which utilizes an oxalate precipitate and frit (or cullet), is being developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to immobilize an Am-<span class="hlt">Cm</span> solution. Prior to being accepted as the baseline flowsheet, numerous laboratory-scale tests were conducted to demonstrate its feasibility and to characterize the general melt behavior of the oxalate/frit system. The effects of frit particle size and oxalate precipitation temperature were the initial focus of these studies. Two technical issues were identified during these initial tests that warranted further study: a volume or bed expansion was observed at approximately 1140 degrees C and ''excessive'' bubble formation between 1220 - 1250 degrees C. Although high temperature bubble formation does not pose a serious process concern (i.e., longer residence times and/or higher process temperatures minimize bubble retention), the volume expansion is undesirable during processing. The volume expansion may limit the amount of glass that can be produced in a single batch. That is, the batch height may have to be controlled so that the material is contained within the Pt-Rh vessel at all times. Both the volume expansion and high temperature bubble formation have been linked to the thermal reduction of CeO{sub 2}. As part of the oxalate feed, Ce is reduced (3 plus state). Upon thermal decomposition of the oxalate under oxidizing conditions, Ce will oxidize (3 plus (r) 4 plus state) which provides the opportunity for thermal reduction at higher temperatures liberating O2. Tests using a ''Ce-free'' oxalate have been performed in which no indication of either the volume expansion or high temperature bubble formation were observed. Complementary studies focused on redox and off-gas related issues provided a fundamental understanding of the melting behavior of the oxalate/frit system and lead to the successful development of the batch vitrification process.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peeler, D.K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-09-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/astro-ph/0703677v2"> <span id="translatedtitle">Detecting ionized bubbles in redshifted 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> maps</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The reionization of the Universe, it is believed, occurred by the growth of ionized regions (bubbles) in the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM). We study the possibility of detecting these bubbles in radio-interferometric observations of redshifted neutral hydrogen (HI) 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> radiation. The signal 1 mJy will be buried in noise and foregrounds, the latter being at least a few orders of magnitude stronger than the signal. We develop a visibility based formalism that uses a filter to optimally combine the entire signal from a bubble while minimizing the noise and foreground contributions. This formalism makes definite predictions on the ability to detect an ionized bubble or conclusively rule out its presence in a radio- interferometric observation. We make predictions for the currently functioning GMRT and a forthcoming instrument, the MWA at a frequency of 150 MHz (corresponding to a redshift of 8.5). For both instruments, we show that a 3 sigma detection will be possible for a bubble of comoving radius R_b > 40 Mpc (assuming it to be spherical) in 100 hrs of observation and R_b 22 Mpc in 1000 hrs of observation, provided the bubble is at the center of the field of view. In both these cases the filter effectively removes the expected foreground contribution so that it is below the signal, and the system noise is the deciding criteria. We find that there is a fundamental limitation on the smallest bubble that can be detected arising from the statistical fluctuations in the HI distribution. Assuming that the HI traces the dark matter we find that it will not be possible to detect bubbles with R_b < 8 Mpc using the GMRT and R_b < 16 Mpc using the MWA, however large be the integration time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanan K. Datta; Somnath Bharadwaj; T. Roy Choudhury</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21452721"> <span id="translatedtitle">ENHANCED DETECTABILITY OF PRE-REIONIZATION 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> STRUCTURE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Before the universe was reionized, it was likely that the spin temperature of intergalactic hydrogen was decoupled from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by UV radiation from the first stars through the Wouthuysen-Field effect. If the intergalactic medium (IGM) had not yet been heated above the CMB temperature by that time, then the gas would appear in absorption relative to the CMB. Large, rare sources of X-rays could inject sufficient heat into the neutral IGM, so that {delta}T{sub b} >0 at comoving distances of tens to hundreds of Mpc, resulting in large 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> fluctuations with {delta}T{sub b} {approx_equal} 250 mK on arcminute to degree angular scales, an order of magnitude larger in amplitude than that caused by ionized bubbles during reionization, {delta}T{sub b} {approx_equal} 25 mK. This signal could therefore be easier to detect and probe higher redshifts than that due to patchy reionization. For the case in which the first objects to heat the IGM are QSOs hosting 10{sup 7} M {sub sun} black holes with an abundance exceeding {approx}1 Gpc{sup -3} at z {approx} 15, observations with either the Arecibo Observatory or the Five Hundred Meter Aperture Spherical Telescope could detect and image their fluctuations at greater than 5{sigma} significance in about a month of dedicated survey time. Additionally, existing facilities such as MWA and LOFAR could detect the statistical fluctuations arising from a population of 10{sup 5} M {sub sun} black holes with an abundance of {approx}10{sup 4} Gpc{sup -3} at z {approx_equal} 10-12.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Pen, Ue-Li; Chang, Tzu-Ching, E-mail: malvarez@cita.utoronto.c [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24808815"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evaluation of inpatient clinical documentation readiness for ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research study examined the gaps in documentation that occur when coding in ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span>. More than 4,000 diagnoses from all chapters were coded from 656 electronic documents obtained from a large integrated healthcare facility at the time the study was conducted (2012). After the documents were coded, areas for documentation improvement were identified for chapters that resulted in deficiencies in documentation, and a quick reference guide was developed. The overall absent documentation percentage was 15.4 percent. The 10 chapters with the highest percentage of absent documentation were chapter 7 (Diseases of Eye and Adnexa), with 67.65 percent (p < .001); chapter 8 (Diseases of Ear and Mastoid Process), with 63.64 percent (p < .001); chapter 13 (Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective Tissue), with 46.05 percent (p < .001); chapter 14 (Diseases of the Genitourinary System), with 40.29 percent (p < .001); chapter 10 (Diseases of Respiratory System), with 35.52 percent (p < .001); chapter 1 (Infectious and Parasitic Diseases), with 32.88 percent (p < .001); chapter 12 (Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue), with 32.35 percent (p < .001); chapter 2 (Neoplasms), with 25.45 percent (p < .001); chapter 4 (Endocrine, Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases), with 14.58 percent (p < .001); and chapter 17 (Congenital Malformations, Deformations, and Chromosomal Abnormalities), with 12.50 percent. We addressed the deficient areas in the quick reference guide developed for clinicians and technology vendors. Having complete and accurate documentation would benefit both the clinician and the patient in providing the highest quality of care. PMID:24808815</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">DeAlmeida, Dilhari R; Watzlaf, Valerie J; Anania-Firouzan, Patti; Salguero, Otto; Rubinstein, Elaine; Abdelhak, Mervat; Parmanto, Bambang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12736550"> <span id="translatedtitle">The $<span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>$ fixed points in Quot-schemes and mirror principle computations</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We describe the $<span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>$-action on the Quot-scheme $\\\\Quot({\\\\cal E}^n)$ associated to the trivial bundle ${\\\\cal E}^n=CP^1\\\\times{\\\\smallBbb C}^n$. In particlular, the topology of the $<span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>$-fixed-point components in $\\\\Quot({\\\\cal E}^n)$ and the $<span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span>$-weights of the normal bundle of these components are worked out. Mirror Principle, as developed by three of the current authors in the series of work [L-L-Y1, I, II, III,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bong H. Lian; Chien-Hao Liu; Kefeng Liu; Shing-Tung Yau</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_14 div --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-02-20/pdf/2013-03794.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 11889 - Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Coordination and Maintenance Committee; Correction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Coordination and Maintenance Committee; Correction...Notice of Meeting of the ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Coordination and Maintenance Committee. The first...following meeting: Name: ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span> Coordination and Maintenance Committee...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/923103"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison between <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> and R/1 tests and damage density vs. fluence (rho(phi)) results for unconditioned and sub-nanosecond laser-conditioned KD2PO4 crystals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> and R/1 test results on unconditioned and 355 nm (3{omega}), 500 ps laser conditioned DKDP. We find up to {approx}2.5X improvement in fluence in the <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> performance after 3{omega}, 500 ps conditioning to 5 J/<span class="hlt">cm</span>{sup 2}. For the first time, we observe a shift to higher fluences in the R/1 results for DKDP at 3{omega}, 7 ns due to 500 ps laser conditioning. The <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> results are compared to {rho}({phi}) results previously measured on the same DKDP crystal [1]. A consistent behavior in fluence was found between the <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> and {rho}({phi}) results for unconditioned and 500 ps conditioned DKDP. We were successful at using Poisson statistics to derive a connection between the <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> and {rho}({phi}) results that could be tested with our data sets by trying to predict the shape of the {rho}({phi}) curve. The value for the power dependence on fluence of {rho}({phi}) derived from the <span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span> data was {approx}11 {+-} 50%. The results presented and discussed here imply a strong correlation between the damage probability (<span class="hlt">S</span>/<span class="hlt">1</span>) test and {rho}({phi}). We find a consistent description of the two test types in terms of a power law {rho}({phi}) and that this basic shape held for all cases, i.e. the shape was invariant between unconditioned and conditioned results.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adams, J J; Jarboe, J; Feit, M; Hackel, R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-10-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title26-vol13/pdf/CFR-2011-title26-vol13-sec1-6050S-1.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">26 CFR 1.6050<span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> - Information reporting for qualified tuition and related expenses.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Information reporting for qualified tuition and related...CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Information Returns § 1.6050<span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> Information reporting for qualified tuition and...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24958630"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clipping of predetermined fragments from the human genome by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease-PNA combinations.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By combining <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease with two strands of pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acid (pcPNA), the whole human genome was selectively cut at targeted sites, and desired fragments were clipped from the genome. PMID:24958630</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Xia; Muneoka, Satoshi; Shigi, Narumi; Sumaoka, Jun; Komiyama, Makoto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/76689"> <span id="translatedtitle">Paired chiral spin liquid with a Fermi surface in <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> model on the triangular lattice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Motivated by recent experiments on Ba[subscript 3]NiSb[subscript 2]O[subscript 9], we investigate possible quantum spin liquid ground states for spin <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span> Heisenberg models on the triangular lattice. We use variational Monte ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bieri, Samuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.iovs.org/cgi/reprint/42/12/2762.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Novel Mutation in the M1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Gene Responsible for Gelatinous Droplike Corneal Dystrophy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">PURPOSE. To identify the genetic defect in the M1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> gene causing gelatinous droplike corneal dystrophy (GDLD) in an Estonian family. METHODS. DNA was extracted from members of a GDLD-af- fected family and control persons. Polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing was used to detect mutations in the M1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> gene. Sequencing results were confirmed with re- striction analysis. RESULTS. Sequencing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gunnar Tasa; Jaak Kals; Kai Muru; Erkki Juronen; Andres Piirsoo; Siiri Veromann; Silvi Janes; Aavo-Valdur Mikelsaar; Aavo Lang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24239768"> <span id="translatedtitle">Second generation <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P pathway modulators: research strategies and clinical developments.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder affecting the central nervous system (CNS) through demyelination and neurodegeneration. Until recently, major therapeutic treatments have relied on agents requiring injection delivery. In September 2010, fingolimod/FTY720 (Gilenya, Novartis) was approved as the first oral treatment for relapsing forms of MS. Fingolimod causes down-modulation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptors on lymphocytes which prevents the invasion of autoaggressive T cells into the CNS. In astrocytes, down-modulation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 by the drug reduces astrogliosis, a hallmark of MS, thereby allowing restoration of productive astrocyte communication with other neural cells and the blood brain barrier. Animal data further suggest that the drug directly supports the recovery of nerve conduction and remyelination. In human MS, such mechanisms may explain the significant decrease in the number of inflammatory markers on brain magnetic resonance imaging in recent clinical trials, and the reduction of brain atrophy by the drug. Fingolimod binds to 4 of the 5 known <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor subtypes, and significant efforts were made over the past 5 years to develop next generation <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor modulators and determine the minimal receptor selectivity needed for maximal therapeutic efficacy in MS patients. Other approaches considered were competitive antagonists of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor, inhibitors of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P lyase to prevent <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P degradation, and anti-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P antibodies. Below we discuss the current status of the field, and the functional properties of the most advanced compounds. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled New Frontiers in Sphingolipid Biology. PMID:24239768</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bigaud, Marc; Guerini, Danilo; Billich, Andreas; Bassilana, Frederic; Brinkmann, Volker</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8760884"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular cloning of a RNA binding protein, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> proteins A-D constitute a nuclear protein family that are liberated rapidly in a set from chromatin by mild digestion with a DNA or RNA hydrolyzing enzyme. With an anti-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-protein B antiserum that reacted with B2, C1 and D1, a cDNA clone, p<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1, was obtained, which encoded a protein of 852 amino acids. The <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1 protein, encoded within the cells by a mRNA of 3480 nt, was a novel protein and could be distinguished from the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> proteins B, C and D by their amino acid sequences. The <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>-1 protein synthesized by in vitro translation bound to RNA homopolymers, with a preference for G and U polyribonucleotides and little for poly(A). The protein contained two tandem RNP motifs and several intriguing sequences, such as a novel repeat of five octamers with a consensus sequence DP-S(Q/G)YYY and a potentially perfect amphipathic alpha-helix of five turns with basic and acidic amino acids positioned in an ordered way. The two RNP motif sequences were similar, although homologies were low, to the RNP motif sequences of yeast NSR1 protein, animal nucleolins, Drosophila hnRNP Al and tobacco chloroplast RNP precursor protein, suggesting a functional uniqueness of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1 protein in RNA metabolism and also the evolution of its RNP motif structure before plants and animals diverged. These results indicate that the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-1 protein encoded by the cDNA is a new class of RNA binding protein. PMID:8760884</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Inoue, A; Takahashi, K P; Kimura, M; Watanabe, T; Morisawa, S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.uni-ulm.de/fileadmin/website_uni_ulm/nawi.inst.220/publikationen/0954-3899_37_5_055107.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Isotope shift measurements in the 2<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 transition of Be</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Isotope shift measurements in the 2<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 2p3/2 transition of Be + and extraction of the nuclear.1088/0954-3899/37/5/055107 Isotope shift measurements in the 2<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>/2 2p3/2 transition of Be+ and extraction of the nuclear charge Published 1 April 2010 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysG/37/055107 Abstract We have performed isotope shift</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pfeifer, Holger</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=107157"> <span id="translatedtitle">Specific Binding of Escherichia coli Ribosomal Protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> to boxA Transcriptional Antiterminator RNA</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that ribosomal protein <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> specifically binds the boxA transcriptional antiterminator RNAs of bacteriophage ? and the Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA operons. Although <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> competes with the NusB-S10 antitermination complex for binding to boxA, it does not affect antitermination by the ? N protein in vitro, and its role, if any, in rRNA synthesis is still unknown. PMID:9555913</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mogridge, Jeremy; Greenblatt, Jack</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://stoltz.caltech.edu/publications/87-S-2009.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supporting Information -<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-Q. Sun, H. Nelson, T. Ly, B. M. Stoltz, R. R. Julian</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supporting Information -<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>- Q. Sun, H. Nelson, T. Ly, B. M. Stoltz, R. R. Julian Supporting Data.............................................S7 #12;Supporting Information -S2- Q. Sun, H. Nelson, T. Ly, B. M. Stoltz, R. R. Julian Figure <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Information -S3- Q. Sun, H. Nelson, T. Ly, B. M. Stoltz, R. R. Julian Figure S2 Figure S2a: CID of [RPPGFSPFR</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stoltz, Brian M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3177188"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> ribosomal protein and the interplay between translation and mRNA decay</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is an ‘atypical’ ribosomal protein weakly associated with the 30S subunit that has been implicated in translation, transcription and control of RNA stability. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is thought to participate in translation initiation complex formation by assisting 30S positioning in the translation initiation region, but little is known about its role in other RNA transactions. In this work, we have analysed in vivo the effects of different intracellular <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> concentrations, from depletion to overexpression, on translation, decay and intracellular distribution of leadered and leaderless messenger RNAs (mRNAs). We show that the cspE mRNA, like the rpsO transcript, may be cleaved by RNase E at multiple sites, whereas the leaderless cspE transcript may also be degraded via an alternative pathway by an unknown endonuclease. Upon <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> overexpression, RNase E-dependent decay of both cspE and rpsO mRNAs is suppressed and these transcripts are stabilized, whereas cleavage of leaderless cspE mRNA by the unidentified endonuclease is not affected. Overall, our data suggest that ribosome-unbound <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> may inhibit translation and that part of the Escherichia coli ribosomes may actually lack <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. PMID:21685451</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Delvillani, Francesco; Papiani, Giulia; Dehò, Gianni; Briani, Federica</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25428387"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyaluroan-regulated lymphatic permeability through <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptors is crucial for cancer metastasis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Disruption of cancer lymphatic vessel barrier function occurs has been reported to involve in cancer lymphatic metastasis. Hyaluronan (HA), a major glycosaminoglycan component of the extracellular matrix, is associated with cancer metastasis. We investigated the effect of high/low molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA/LMW-HA) on regulation of barrier function and tight junctions in cancer lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC) monolayer. Results showed that LMW-HA increased the permeability of cancer LEC monolayers and induced disruption of Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1)-mediated intercellular tight junction and actin stress fiber formation. HMW-HA treatment decreased permeability in cancer LEC monolayers and cortical actin ring formation. As reported, sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) receptors are involved in vascular integrity. After silencing of lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1), upregulation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptors (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P3) induced by HMW-HA/LMW-HA were inhibited, respectively. With <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P3 silenced, the disruption of ZO-1 as well as stress fiber formation and the ROCK1/RhoA signaling pathway induced by LMW-HA was not observed in cancer LEC. These results suggested that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptors may play an important role in HMW-HA-/LMW-HA-mediated regulation of cancer lymphatic vessel integrity, which might be the initial step of cancer lymphatic metastasis and a useful intervention of cancer progression. PMID:25428387</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Mengsi; He, Pingqing; Liu, Yiwen; He, Yiqing; Du, Yan; Wu, Man; Zhang, Guoliang; Yang, Cuixia; Gao, Feng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2015-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20140010584&hterms=SEM&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3DSEM"> <span id="translatedtitle">Impact-Induced Chondrule Deformation and Aqueous Alteration of <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 Murchison</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Deformed chondrules in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 Murchison have been found to define a prominent foliation [1,2] and lineation [3] in 3D using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). It has been hypothesized that chondrules in foliated chondrites deform by "squeezing" into surrounding pore space [4,5], a process that also likely removes primary porosity [6]. However, shock stage classification based on olivine extinction in Murchison is consistently low (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-S2) [4-5,7] implying that significant intracrystalline plastic deformation of olivine has not occurred. One objective of our study is therefore to determine the microstructural mechanisms and phases that are accommodating the impact stress and resulting in relative displacements within the chondrules. Another question regarding impact deformation in Murchison is whether it facilitated aqueous alteration as has been proposed for the CMs which generally show a positive correlation between degree of alteration and petrofabric strength [7,2]. As pointed out by [2], <span class="hlt">CM</span> Murchison represents a unique counterpoint to this correlation: it has a strong petrofabric but a relatively low degree of aqueous alteration. However, Murchison may not represent an inconsistency to the proposed causal relationship between impact and alteration, if it can be established that the incipient aqueous alteration post-dated chondrule deformation. Methods: Two thin sections from Murchison sample USNM 5487 were cut approximately perpendicular to the foliation and parallel to lineation determined by XCT [1,3] and one section was additionally polished for EBSD. Using a combination of optical petrography, SEM, EDS, and EBSD several chondrules were characterized in detail to: determine phases, find microstructures indicative of strain, document the geometric relationships between grain-scale microstructures and the foliation and lineation direction, and look for textural relationships of alteration minerals (tochilinite and Mg-Fe serpentine) that indicate timing of their formation relative to deformation event(s). Preliminary Results: Deformed chondrules are dominated by forsterite and clinoenstatite with lesser amounts of Fe-Mg serpentine, sulfides, and low calcium pyroxene. Olivine grains are commonly fractured but generally show sharp optical extinction. The pyroxene, in contrast, is not only fractured but also often displays undulose extinction. In addition, the clinoenstatite is frequently twinned but it is unclear whether the twins are the result of mechanical deformation or inversion from protoenstatite [8]. EBSD work is currently ongoing to determine if areas of higher crystallographic strain can be imaged and mapped, and to determine the pyroxene twin orientations. In regards to alteration, we have found evidence for post-deformation formation of tochilinite and Mg-Fe serpentine indicating that aqueous alteration has indeed post-dated the deformation of the chondrules.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hanna, R. D.; Zolensky, M.; Ketcham, R. A.; Behr, W. M.; Martinez, J. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23622430"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurement of the surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) due to the 1574 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) mode of benzenethiol using low-power (<20 mW) CW diode lasers.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The surface-enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SECARS) from a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of benzenethiol on a silver-coated surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been measured for the 1574 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) SERS mode. A value of 9.6 ± 1.7×10(-14) W was determined for the resonant component of the SECARS signal using 17.8 mW of 784.9 nm pump laser power and 7.1 mW of 895.5 nm Stokes laser power; the pump and Stokes lasers were polarized parallel to each other but perpendicular to the grooves of the diffraction grating in the spectrometer. The measured value of resonant component of the SECARS signal is in agreement with the calculated value of 9.3×10(-14) W using the measured value of 8.7 ± 0.5 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) for the SERS linewidth ? (full width at half-maximum) and the value of 5.7 ± 1.4×<span class="hlt">10(-7</span>) for the product of the Raman cross section ?SERS and the surface concentration Ns of the benzenethiol SAM. The xxxx component of the resonant part of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility |3 ?xxxx((3)R)| for the 1574 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) SERS mode has been determined to be 4.3 ± 1.1×10(-5) <span class="hlt">cm</span>·g(-1)·s(2). The SERS enhancement factor for the 1574 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) mode was determined to be 3.6 ± 0.9×<span class="hlt">10(7</span>) using the value of 1.8×10(15) molecules/<span class="hlt">cm</span>(2) for Ns. PMID:23622430</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aggarwal, Roshan L; Farrar, Lewis W; Greeneltch, Nathan G; Van Duyne, Richard P; Polla, Dennis L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/961951"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for Excess Dimuon Production in the Radial Region (1.6 < r < 10) <span class="hlt">cm</span> at the D0 Experiment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a study of dimuon events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}<span class="hlt">s</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV, using 0.9 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the D0 experiment during 2008. Using information from the inner-layer silicon tracking detector, we observe 712 {+-} 462 {+-} 942 events in which one or both muons are produced in the range 1.6 < r {approx}< 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>, which is expressed as a fraction (0.40 {+-} 0.26 {+-} 0.53)% of the total dimuon sample. We therefore see no significant excess of muons produced a few centimeters away from the interaction point.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Williams, Mark; Collaboration, for the D0</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MNRAS.443.1044M"> <span id="translatedtitle">2MTF III. H I 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> observations of 1194 spiral galaxies with the Green Bank Telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present H I 21 <span class="hlt">cm</span> observations of 1194 galaxies out to a redshift of 10 000 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> selected as inclined spirals (i ? 60°) from the 2MASS redshift survey. These observations were carried out at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This observing programme is part of the 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) survey. This project will combine H I widths from these GBT observations with those from further dedicated observing at the Parkes Telescope, from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array survey at Arecibo, and S/N > 10 and spectral resolution vres < 10 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> published widths from a variety of telescopes. We will use these H I widths along with 2MASS photometry to estimate Tully-Fisher distances to nearby spirals and investigate the peculiar velocity field of the local Universe. In this paper, we report on detections of neutral hydrogen in emission in 727 galaxies, and measure good signal to noise and symmetric H I global profiles suitable for use in the Tully-Fisher relation in 484.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Masters, Karen L.; Crook, Aidan; Hong, Tao; Jarrett, T. H.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Macri, Lucas; Springob, Christopher M.; Staveley-Smith, Lister</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://viterbi.usc.edu/assets/114/70955.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">9/28/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:30 PMHoles Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe -CBS News Page 1 of 4http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2010/09/26/national/main6903300.shtml</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">9/28/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:30 PMHoles Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe - CBS News Page 1 of 4http on the well kill 153 days after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. C Holes Exposed in BP's Oil Spill Probe Engineering Experts Question Thoroughness of Oil Giant's Internal Investigation on Massive</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Valero-Cuevas, Francisco</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.geobacter.org/press/2005-10-03-associatedpress.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Eyewitness News -UMass scientist gets DOE grant to study microbes http://www.eyewitnessnewstv.com/global/story.asp?s=3931658&Clie... 1 of 1 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2005 1:27 PM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Eyewitness News - UMass scientist gets DOE grant to study microbes http://www.eyewitnessnewstv.com/global/story.asp?s=3931658&Clie... 1 of 1 <span class="hlt">10/7</span>/2005 1:27 PM microbes AMHERST. The government is giving Lovley nearly 22 (m) million dollars to continue studying the microbes he's been working</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lovley, Derek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://psychweb.syr.edu/_pdfs_PSY/NRCRankings.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">10/4/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:45 AMNRC Rankings Overview: Psychology -Faculty -The Chronicle of Higher Education Page 1 of 13http://chronicle.com/article/NRC-Rankings-Overview-/124708/#top</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">and Environmental Health | Philosophy | Physics | Physiology | Plant Sciences | Political Science | Psychology10/4/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:45 AMNRC Rankings Overview: Psychology - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education Page 'NRC Rankings Overview: Psychology - Faculty' has been sent to kbcarey@syr.edu, pvanable</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kovalev, Leonid</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_15 div --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://microbiology.ucdavis.edu/kowalczykowski/PDF_files/University%20of%20Oregon%20Institute%20of%20Molecular%20Biology%20Celebrates%2050%20Years.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">1/13/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:48 AMUniversity of Oregon's Institute of Molecular Biology Celebrates 50 Years Page 1 of 3http://www.asbmb.org/asbmbtoday/asbmbtoday_article_print.aspx?id=5014</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1/13/<span class="hlt">10</span> <span class="hlt">7</span>:48 AMUniversity of Oregon's Institute of Molecular Biology Celebrates 50 Years Page 1 of 3http://www.asbmb.org/asbmbtoday/asbmbtoday_article_print.aspx?id=5014 University of Oregon's Institute of Molecular Biology Celebrates 50 Years BY CHRIS TACHIBANA In 1959, the University of Oregon</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19165507"> <span id="translatedtitle">Arthrodesis to L5 versus <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> in long instrumentation and fusion for degenerative lumbar scoliosis.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">There is a debate regarding the distal fusion level for degenerative lumbar scoliosis. Whether a healthy L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> motion segment should be included or not in the fusion remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal indication for the fusion to the sacrum, and to compare the results of distal fusion to L5 versus the sacrum in the long instrumented fusion for degenerative lumbar scoliosis. A total of 45 patients who had undergone long instrumentation and fusion for degenerative lumbar scoliosis were evaluated with a minimum 2 year follow-up. Twenty-four patients (mean age 63.6) underwent fusion to L5 and 21 patients (mean age 65.6) underwent fusion to the sacrum. Supplemental interbody fusion was performed in 12 patients in the L5 group and eleven patients in the sacrum group. The number of levels fused was 6.08 segments (range 4-8) in the L5 group and 6.09 (range 4-9) in the sacrum group. Intraoperative blood loss (2,754 ml versus 2,938 ml) and operative time (220 min versus 229 min) were similar in both groups. The Cobb angle changed from 24.7 degrees before surgery to 6.8 degrees after surgery in the L5 group, and from 22.8 degrees to 7.7 degrees in the sacrum group without statistical difference. Correction of lumbar lordosis was statistically better in the sacrum group (P = 0.03). Less correction of lumbar lordosis in the L5 group seemed to be associated with subsequent advanced L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> disc degeneration. The change of coronal and sagittal imbalance was not different in both groups. Subsequent advanced L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> disc degeneration occurred in 58% of the patients in the L5 group. Symptomatic adjacent segment disease at L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> developed in five patients. Interestingly, the development of adjacent segment disease was not related to the preoperative grade of disc degeneration, which proved minimal degeneration in the five patients. In the L5 group, there were nine patients of complications at L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> segment, including adjacent segment disease at L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and loosening of L5 screws. Seven of the nine patients showed preoperative sagittal imbalance and/or lumbar hypolordosis, which might be risk factors of complications at L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. For the patients with sagittal imbalance and lumbar hypolordosis, L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> should be included in the fusion even if L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> disc was minimal degeneration. PMID:19165507</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cho, Kyu-Jung; Suk, Se-Il; Park, Seung-Rim; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Choi, Sung-Wook; Yoon, Young-Hyun; Won, Man-Hee</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23494676"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ultrasound and electrical nerve stimulation-guided <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nerve root block.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A selective lumbosacral nerve root block is generally is performed under X-ray fluoroscopy, which has the disadvantage of radiation exposure and the need for fluoroscopy equipment. In this study, we assessed the effectiveness of ultrasound and nerve stimulation-guided <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nerve root block on 37 patients with <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> radicular syndrome. With the patient in a prone position, an ultrasound scan was performed by placing the probe parallel to the body axis. The needle was pointed slightly medial from the lateral side of the probe and advanced toward a hyperechoic area in the sacral foramina with ultrasound guidance. Contrast medium was then injected and its dispersion confirmed by fluoroscopy. The acquired contrast images were classified into intraneural, perineural, and paraneural patterns. The significance of differences in the effect of the block among the contrast image patterns was analyzed. After nerve block, decreased sensation at the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> innervated region and pain relief was achieved in all patients. No significant difference was noted in the effect of the block between perineural and paraneural patterns. In conclusion, this technique provided reliable <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nerve root block in patients with <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> radicular syndrome and minimized radiation exposure. PMID:23494676</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sato, Masaki; Mikawa, Yasuhito; Matuda, Akiko</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007APS..MAR.K1096S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ab initio calculation of vibrational frequencies of clusters in As x <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-x glass and Raman spectra</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have used the density functional theory (DFT) to calculate the vibrational frequencies from first principles by making clusters of atoms on a high speed computer. We have made the clusters, AsS4, As2S3, As3S2, As4S, AsS7, As2S6,As3S5,As4S4,As5S3,As6S2, As7S, L-As4S3, CS-As4S,CS-AsS4,ES-As2S6(L=linear zig-zag, CS=corner sharing, ES=edge sharing) and optimized the bond lengths and angles for the minimum energy. The number of computed values of the vibrational frequencies are consistent with 3N-3, where N is the number of atoms in a cluster. All of the computed values are tabulated and compared with those found in the Raman spectra of Asx<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-x (x=0.35-0.45) glasses. The experimentally found modes at 183, 221, 355, 371 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 are consistent with those calculated for chain mode-As4S3, As3S2, As2S6, AsS7. In the net work glass the frequencies found are, 195, 206, 227, 351, 369, 371, 388 <span class="hlt">cm</span>-1 which are consistent with those calculated for, As7S, As5S3, As7S, As6S2, As5S3, AsS7 and As4S. We have previously interpreted the Raman spectra of GeSI galass by this method ,V.R. Devi, et al, J. Non Cryst. Solids 351,489-494(2005).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shrivastava, Keshav; Radhika Devi, V.; Abu Kassim, Hasan; Jalil, Ithnin Abdul; Yusof, Norhasliza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.bnl.gov/bnlweb/PDF/03SER/UnitsMeasureAndConv_300.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">centimeters (<span class="hlt">cm</span>) 0.39 inches (in.) in. 2.54 <span class="hlt">cm</span> meters (m) 3.28 feet (ft) ft 0.305 m</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">centimeters (<span class="hlt">cm</span>) 0.39 inches (in.) in. 2.54 <span class="hlt">cm</span> meters (m) 3.28 feet (ft) ft 0.305 m kilometers (km) gal 3.785 L cubic meters (m3 ) 35.32 cubic feet (ft3 ) ft3 0.03 m3 hectares (ha) 2.47 acres acres 0 (<span class="hlt">cm</span>) 0.39 inches (in.) in. 2.54 <span class="hlt">cm</span> meters (m) 3.28 feet (ft) ft 0.305 m kilometers (km) 0.62 miles (mi</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Homes, Christopher C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24090699"> <span id="translatedtitle">Visualizing <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-directed cellular egress by intravital imaging.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) is a bioactive lipid that provides cellular signals through plasma membrane G protein-coupled receptors. The <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor signaling system has a fundamental and widespread function in licensing the exit and release of hematopoietically derived cells from various tissues into the circulation. Although the outlines of the mechanism have been established through genetic and pharmacologic perturbations, the temporal and spatial dynamics of the cellular events involved have been unclear. Recently, two-photon intravital imaging has been applied to living tissues to visualize the cellular movements and interactions that occur during egress processes. Here we discuss how some of these recent findings provide a clearer picture regarding <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor signaling in modulating cell egress into the circulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled New Frontiers in Sphingolipid Biology. PMID:24090699</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Giannouli, Christina C; Chandris, Panagiotis; Proia, Richard L</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4221972"> <span id="translatedtitle">Miniopen Oblique Lateral L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Interbody Fusion: A Report of 2 Cases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) has been widely used for minimally invasive anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF), but an approach to L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is difficult because of the iliac crest. In the current study, we present 2 cases using minimally invasive oblique lateral interbody fusion (OLIF) of L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. The patients showed foraminal stenosis between L5 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and severe low back and leg pain. The patients were placed in a lateral decubitus position and underwent OLIF surgery (using a cage and bone graft from the iliac crest) without posterior decompression. Posterior screws were used in the patients. Pain scores significantly improved after surgery. There was no spinal nerve, major vessel, peritoneal, or urinary injury. OLIF surgery was minimally invasive and produced good surgical results without complications.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanno, Keijiro; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Abe, Koki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.activetectonics.coas.oregonstate.edu/sumatra/draft_science/patton_etal_2011_S1_radiocarbon.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Core Geophysics and Age Control Methods Core Geophysics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">-wave velocity, gamma ray density, resistivity, and loop magnetic susceptibility (MS) at 0.5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> spaced intervals at 0.5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> spacing. The cores were imaged with the Oregon State University Aquilion 64 slice X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) system with a nominal voxel size of 0.5 mm. Age Control Methods Age control</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goldfinger, Chris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JPCA..11315328L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crossed-Beam Dynamics, Low-Temperature Kinetics, and Theoretical Studies of the Reaction <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>D) + C2H4</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The reaction between sulfur atoms in the first electronically excited state, <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>D), and ethene (C2H4) has been investigated in a complementary fashion in (a) crossed-beam dynamic experiments with mass spectrometric detection and time-of-flight (TOF) analysis at two collision energies (37.0 and 45.0 kJ mol-1), (b) low temperature kinetics experiments ranging from 298 K down to 23 K, and (c) electronic structure calculations of stationary points and product energetics on the C2H4S singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces. The rate coefficients for total loss of <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>D) are found to be very large (ca. 4 × 10-10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>3 molecule-1 <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>) down to very low temperatures indicating that the overall reaction is barrierless. From laboratory angular and TOF distributions at different product masses, three competing reaction channels leading to H + CH2CHS (thiovinoxy), H2 + CH2CS (thioketene), and CH3 + HCS (thioformyl) have been unambiguously identified and their dynamics characterized. Product branching ratios have also been estimated. Interpretation of the experimental results on the reaction kinetics and dynamics is assisted by high-level theoretical calculations on the C2H4S singlet potential energy surface. RRKM (Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus) estimates of the product branching ratios using the newly developed singlet potential energy surface have also been performed and compared with the experimental determinations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leonori, Francesca; Petrucci, Raffaele; Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio; Rosi, Marzio; Skouteris, Dimitris; Berteloite, Coralie; Le Picard, Sébastien D.; Canosa, André; Sims, Ian R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4002783"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pharmacokinetic evaluation of novel oral fluorouracil antitumor drug <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> in Chinese cancer patients</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aim: <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> is an oral anticancer fluoropyrimidine formulation consisting of tegafur, 5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine and potassium oxonate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of a newly developed generic formulation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> in Chinese cancer patients in comparison with the branded reference formulation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>. Methods: A single-dose, randomized-sequence, open-label, two-way self-crossover study was conducted in 30 Chinese cancer patients. The subjects alternatively received the two formulations (40 mg/m2, po) with a 7-d interval. Plasma concentrations of FT, CDHP, Oxo, and 5-Fu were determined using LC-MS/MS. Pharmacokinetic parameters, including Cmax, Tmax, t1/2, AUC0–t, and AUC0–? were determined using non-compartmental models with DAS2.0 software. Bioequivalence of the two formulations were to be evaluated according to 90% CIs for the log-transformed ratios of AUC and Cmax of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>. Adverse events were evaluated through monitoring the symptom, physical and laboratory examinations, ECGs and subject interviews. Results: The mean values of Cmax, AUC0–t, and AUC0–? of FT, 5-Fu, CDHP, and Oxo for the two formulations had no significant differences. The 90% CIs for natural log-transformed ratios of Cmax, AUC0–t, and AUC0–? were within the predetermined bioequivalence acceptance limits. A total of 11 mild adverse events, including fatigue, nausea and vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea and myelosuppression, were observed, and no serious and special adverse events were found. Conclusion: The newly developed generic formulation and reference formulation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> have similar pharmacokinetics with one dose (40 mg/m2) in Chinese cancer patients. Both the formulations of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> are well tolerated. PMID:23396375</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhuang, Zhi-xiang; Zhu, Hong; Wang, Ji; Zhu, Min-gao; Wang, Hui; Pu, Wang-yang; Bian, Hua-hui; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Hong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23324941"> <span id="translatedtitle">Do L5 and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nerve root compressions produce radicular pain in a dermatomal pattern?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">STRUCTURED ABSTRACT: Study Design. Observational case series.Objective. To compare the pattern of distribution of radicular pain with published dermatome charts.Summary of Background Data. Dermatomal charts vary, and previous studies have demonstrated significant individual subject variation.Methods. Patients with radiologically and surgically proven nerve root compression caused by prolapsed intervertebral disc completed computerised diagrams of the distribution of pain and pins and needles. 98 patients had L5 compressions and 83 had <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> compressions.Results. The distribution of pain and pins and needles did not correspond well with dermatomal patterns. Of those patients with L5 NRC, only 22 (22.4%) recorded any hits on the L5 dermatome on the front, and only 60 (61.2%) on the back with only 13 (13.3%) on both. Only 1 (1.0%) patient placed >50% of their hits within the L5 dermatome. Of those patients with <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> NRC, only 3 (3.6%) recorded any hits on the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> dermatome on the front, and only 64 (77.1%) on the back with only 15 (18.1%) on both. No patients placed >50% of their hits within the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> dermatome. Regarding pins and needles, 27 (29.7%) of L5 patients recorded hits on the front alone, 27 (29.7%) on the back alone and 14 (15.4%) on both. 19 (20.9%) recorded >50% of hits within the L5 dermatome. 3 (3.6%) <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> patients recorded hits on the front alone, 44 (53.0%) on the back alone and 18 (21.7%) on both. 12 (14.5%) recorded >50% of hits within the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> dermatome.Conclusion. Patient report is an unreliable method of identifying the anatomical source of pain or paraesthesia caused by nerve root compression. PMID:23324941</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Taylor, Cs; Coxon, A; Watson, P; Greenough, Cg</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19392822"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization and genetic analysis of bovine alpha <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein I variant.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The aim of this study was to identify the molecular genetic origin underlying the I variant of alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein and to develop a DNA-based test for this polymorphism as a tool for genetic analyses independent of milk sample testing. All coding exons and flanking regions of the alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein gene were sequenced in DNA samples from cattle of known alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein genotypes (BI, CI, II, CC), determined by isoelectric focusing of milk samples. A nucleotide substitution (A>T) in exon 11 (g.19836A>T) leads to the exchange of Glu with Asp at amino acid position 84 of the mature protein (p.Glu84Asp) and perfectly co-segregated with the presence of the alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein I variant in the milk of the analysed animals. Genotyping of a total of 680 DNA samples from 31 Bos taurus and Bos indicus cattle breeds and from Bos grunniens, Bison bison and Bison bonasus by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed the occurrence of Asp at position 84 at low frequencies in Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds and established its origin from the alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein C variant (p.Glu192Gly). Ten different intragenic haplotypes in the gene region from intron 8 to intron 12 were observed by sequencing, of which two occurred in Bison bison and one in Bison bonasus only. Using available casein gene complex information, an association of Asp at position 84 to beta-casein A(2) and kappa-casein B was shown in the Bos indicus breed Banyo Gudali. Taken together, we can postulate that the alpha(<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein variant I is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in exon 11 of the gene and that it originated within Bos indicus and spread to Bos taurus subsequently. PMID:19392822</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lühken, G; Caroli, A; Ibeagha-Awemu, E M; Erhardt, G</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002GeCoA..66.1171S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced regeneration of phosphorus during formation of the most recent eastern Mediterranean sapropel (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Phosphorus regeneration and burial fluxes during and after formation of the most recent sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> were determined for two deep-basin, low-sedimentation sites in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Organic C/P ratios and burial fluxes indicate enhanced regeneration of P relative to C during deposition of sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. This is largely due to the enhanced release of P from organic matter during sulfate reduction. Release of P from Fe-bound P also increased, but this was only a relatively minor source of dissolved P. Pore-water HPO 42- concentrations remained too low for carbonate fluorapatite formation. An increased burial of biogenic Ca-P (i.e., fish debris) was observed for one site. Estimated benthic fluxes of P during sapropel formation were elevated relative to the present day (˜900 to 2800 vs. ˜70 to 120 ?mol m -2 yr -1). The present-day sedimentary P cycle in the deep-basin sediments is characterized by two major zones of reaction: (1) the zone near the sediment-water interface where substantial release of HPO 42- from organic matter takes place, and (2) the oxidation front at the top of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> where upward-diffusing HPO 42- from below the sapropel is sorbed to Fe-oxides. The efficiency of aerobic organisms in retaining P is reflected in the low organic C/P ratios in the oxidized part of the sapropel. Burial efficiencies for reactive P were significantly lower during <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> times compared with the present day (˜7 to 15% vs. 64 to 77%). Budget calculations for the eastern Mediterranean Sea demonstrate that the weakening of the antiestuarine circulation and the enhanced regeneration of P both contributed to a significant increase in deep-water HPO 42- concentrations during sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> times. Provided that sufficient vertical mixing occurred, enhanced regeneration of P at the seafloor may have played a key role in maintaining increased productivity during sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> formation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Slomp, Caroline P.; Thomson, John; de Lange, Gert J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3158008"> <span id="translatedtitle">The sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 maintains germinal center B cell homeostasis and promotes niche confinement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-2 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2)-deficient mice develop diffuse large B cell lymphoma. However, the role of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 in normal germinal center (GC) physiology is unknown. Here we show that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2-deficient GC B cells outgrow their wild-type counterparts in chronically-established GCs. We find that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2-, G12–G13- and p115RhoGEF-mediated antagonism of Akt regulates cell viability and is required for growth control in chronically proliferating GCs. We also find that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 inhibits GC B cell responses to follicular chemoattractants and helps confine cells to the GC. Moreover, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 overexpression promotes centering of activated B cells within the follicle. We suggest that by inhibiting Akt activation and migration, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P2 helps restrict GC B cell survival and localization to an <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-low niche at the follicle center. PMID:21642988</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Green, Jesse A.; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Cho, Bryan; Willison, L. David; Palmer, Daniel; Allen, Christopher D.C.; Schmidt, Timothy H.; Xu, Ying; Proia, Richard L.; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Cyster, Jason G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780017765&hterms=wacc&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dwacc"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tables of spectral transmission of the atmosphere in the 2660-2750 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) and 810-980 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) ranges</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermal sounding data from satellites are presented together with a description of transmission function calculations. Tables contain experimental values for transmission of the entire thickness of the atmosphere for two regions of the spectrum: at 2660 to 2750 <span class="hlt">cm</span>/1 and at 810 to 980 <span class="hlt">cm</span>/1. The spectrum was recorded on an infrared spectrophotometer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40691919"> <span id="translatedtitle">Goat's alpha-<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> casein genotype influences its milk fatty acid composition and delta-9 desaturation ratios</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A large number of studies about impacts of alpha-<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (?<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) casein (CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) gene polymorphism on goat milk composition, including its milk fat concentration, secretion in mammary cells and transcriptome analysis, have been reported. Despite this knowledge, very little data is available on the fatty acid (FA) composition of goat milk according to the CSN1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> genotype. The study reported here compares</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Chilliard; J. Rouel; C. Leroux</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2682440"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pulmonary Endothelial Cell Barrier Enhancement by FTY720 Does Not Require the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 Receptor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Novel therapeutic strategies are needed to reverse the loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity that occurs during inflammatory disease states such as acute lung injury. We previously demonstrated potent EC barrier augmentation in vivo and in vitro by the platelet-derived phospholipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) via ligation of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor. The <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P analogue, FTY720, similarly exerts barrier-protective vascular effects via presumed <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor ligation. We examined the role of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 receptor in sphingolipid-mediated human lung EC barrier enhancement. Both <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P and FTY induced sustained, dose-dependent barrier enhancement, reflected by increases in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER), which was abolished by pertussis toxin indicating Gi-coupled receptor activation. FTY-mediated increases in TER exhibited significantly delayed onset and intensity relative to the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P response. Reduction of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1R expression (via siRNA) attenuated <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-induced TER elevations whereas the TER response to FTY was unaffected. Both <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P and FTY rapidly (within 5 minutes) induced <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1R accumulation in membrane lipid rafts, but only <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P stimulated <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1R phosphorylation on threonine residues. Inhibition of PI3 kinase activity attenuated <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-mediated TER increases but failed to alter FTY-induced TER elevation. Finally, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P, but not FTY, induced significant myosin light chain phosphorylation and dramatic actin cytoskeletal rearrangement whereas reduced expression of the cytoskeletal effectors, Rac1 and cortactin (via siRNA), attenuated <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-, but not FTY-induced TER elevations. These results mechanistically characterize pulmonary vascular barrier regulation by FTY720, suggesting a novel barrier-enhancing pathway for modulating vascular permeability. PMID:17475445</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dudek, SM; Camp, SM; Chiang, ET; Singleton, PA; Usatyuk, PV; Zhao, Y; Natarajan; Garcia, JGN</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/4403576"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cost optimization in the (<span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, S) lost sales inventory model with multiple demand classes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">For the (<span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>,S) lost sales inventory model with several demand classes that have dierent lost sale penalty cost, three accurate and ecient heuristic algorithms are presented that, at a given base stock level, aim to find optimal values for the critical levels, i.e., values that minimize inventory holding and penalty cost.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. A. Kranenburg; Houtum van GJJAN</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://plbrgen.cals.cornell.edu/sites/plbrgen.cals.cornell.edu/files/shared/documents/forage/(2012)%20Carbon%20Sequestration%20and%20Gaseous%20Emissions%20in%20Perennial%20Grass%20Bioenergy%20Cropping%20Systems%20in%20the%20NE%20US.%20Poster%2051-18.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Chamber sampling The Objective 1 site (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, Ithaca NY) represents</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">& Environmental Engineering ­ Soil & Water Group), and Hilary Mayton, Ryan Crawford, Julie Hansen, Don Viands of species (switchgrass vs. reed canarygrass), N loadings, and soil moisture status/variability on yield, CChamber sampling The Objective 1 site (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, Ithaca NY) represents many marginal soils</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pawlowski, Wojtek</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.chemistry.mtu.edu/pages/undergrad/pharma/whatis.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Pharmaceutical Chemistry B.<span class="hlt">S</span>. <span class="hlt">1</span>. General description and characteristics of the program.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pharmaceutical Chemistry B.<span class="hlt">S</span>. <span class="hlt">1</span>. General description and characteristics of the program. Pharmaceutical Chemistry is the study of the molecular and mechanistic aspects of pharmaceuticals. The discipline, and targeting. The development of new pharmaceuticals is critically dependent on a molecular-level understanding</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_16 div --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JHEP...06..181M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adjoint QCD on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with twisted fermionic boundary conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigate QCD with adjoint Dirac fermions on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with generic boundary conditions for fermions along <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span>. By means of perturbation theory, semiclassical methods and a chiral effective model, we elucidate a rich phase structure in the space spanned by the <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> compactification scale L, twisted fermionic boundary condition ? and the fermion mass m. We found various phases with or without chiral and center symmetry breaking, separated by first- and second-order phase transitions, which in specific limits ( ? = 0, ? = ?, L ? 0 and m ? ?) reproduce known results in the literature. In the center- symmetric phase at small L, we show that Ünsal's bion-induced confinement mechanism is at work but is substantially weakened at ? = 0 by a linear potential between monopoles. Through an analytic and numerical study of the PNJL model, we show that the order parameters for center and chiral symmetries (i.e., Polyakov loop and chiral condensate) are strongly intertwined at ? = 0. Due to this correlation, a deconfined phase can intervene between a weak-coupling center-symmetric phase at small L and a strong-coupling one at large L. Whether this happens or not depends on the ratio of the dynamical fermion mass to the energy scale of the Yang-Mills theory. Implication of this possibility for resurgence in gauge theories is briefly discussed. In an appendix, we study the index of the adjoint Dirac operator on ?3 × <span class="hlt">S</span> <span class="hlt">1</span> with twisted boundary conditions, which is important for semiclassical analysis of monopoles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Misumi, Tatsuhiro; Kanazawa, Takuya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1349..875B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of the Vibrational Spectra of the Mixed Crystal Zn<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-xSex</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A simple transferable potential model has been employed to study the vibrational mode behavior of the mixed system Zn<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-xSex as a function of concentration and pressure. Further, the existence of a localized resonance mode has also been confirmed, in agreement with experimental data from Raman scattering.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Basak, Tista; Rao, Mala N.; Chaplot, S. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nwcouncil.org/media/29617/2008_11.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Northwest Power and Conservation Council'<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Columbia River Basin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Northwest Power and Conservation Council'<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> 2 3 4 5 6 7 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife .................................................................................................5 A. The Northwest Power and Conservation Council and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife.................................................................................9 A. Vision for the Columbia River Basin</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.civenv.unimelb.edu.au/~jwalker/papers/modsim07-4.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture over Australia from Draper, C. <span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span>,2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture over Australia from AMSR-E Draper, C. <span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span>,2 , J.P. Walker1 , P, The Netherlands. Email: c.draper@bom.gov.au Keywords: AMSR-E, remote sensing, soil moisture, Australia, numerical weather prediction. EXTENDED ABSTRACT Soil moisture can significantly influence atmospheric evolution</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Walker, Jeff</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://w3.antd.nist.gov/pubs/Xiao-SPIE-QKD-4mMbps-6244_25.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantum key distribution system operating at sifted-key rate over 4 Mbit/<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Quantum key distribution system operating at sifted-key rate over 4 Mbit/<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Xiao Tang2 , Lijun Ma., Gaithersburg, MD 20899 ABSTRACT A complete fiber-based polarization encoding quantum key distribution (QKD the system more practical for integration into existing optical local area networks. Keywords: Quantum key</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014DPS....4620914S"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-Dispersion Spectroscopic Observations of Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) with the Subaru Telescope</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) was one of the Oort cloud comets and dynamically new. This comet was broken at its perihelion passage on UT 2013 November 28.1 (at Rh ~ 17 solar radius). We observed the comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) on UT 2013 November 15 with the High Dispersion Spectrograph (HDS) mounted on the Subaru Telescope atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Its heliocentric and geocentric distances were 0.601 and 0.898 AU, respectively. We selected the slit size of 0”.5 x 9”.0 on the sky to achieve the spectral resolution of R = 72,000 from 550 to 830 nm. The total exposure time of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) was 1200 seconds. We detected many emission lines caused from radicals (e.g., CN, C2, NH2), ions (H2O+), atoms ([OI] and Na I) and also many unidentified lines in the spectra. We report the (1) the ortho-to-para abundance ratios (OPRs) of water and ammonia estimated from the high-dispersion spectra of H2O+ and NH2, (2) the green-to-red line ratio of forbidden oxygen emissions, (3) the isotopic ratios of C2 (the carbon isotopic ratio from Swan band) and CN (the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios from red band), (4) the sodium-to-continuum ratio of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shinnaka, Yoshiharu; Kawakita, Hideyo; Nagashima, Masayoshi; Hitomi, Kobayashi; Decock, Alice; Jehin, Emmanuel; Boice, Daniel C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ffn.ub.es/ritort/PAPERS/BOSCAMRIT.NAR14Supp.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supporting Information <span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span> Materials and molecular synthesis of the DNA hairpin</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Supporting Information <span class="hlt">S</span>.<span class="hlt">1</span> Materials and molecular synthesis of the DNA hairpin N6-methyladenine free -DNA (New England Biolabs) is digested with BamHI (New England Biolabs) and phosphorylated at its 5-ends (T4 polynucleotide kinase, New England Bio- labs). The fragment of the dsDNA between</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ritort, Felix</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www1.ncdc.noaa.gov/pub/data/cmb/bams-sotc/climate-assessment-2005.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>JUNE 2006NOAA/NESDIS/NCDC & AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | STATE OF THE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>JUNE 2006NOAA/NESDIS/NCDC & AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | STATE OF THE CLIMATE IN 2005 K Universitet, Göteborg, Sweden 2. PETER AMBENJE, Kenya Meteorological Department, Nairobi, Kenya 3. ANTHONY ARGUEZ, NOAA/NESDIS National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina 4. MOLLY O. BARINGER, NOAA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://chem.ch.huji.ac.il/~yehuda/publications/1992_1996/J%20Chem%20Phys%20103%2037_47%201995.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">S0<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> transition of trans--methyl styrene: Vibronic structure and dynamics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">S0<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> transition of trans- -methyl styrene: Vibronic structure and dynamics Y. Haas, S. Kendler, E; accepted 28 March 1995 The fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of trans- -methyl styrene have been of styrene and of trans- -methyl styrene BMS is reported. The BMS molecule is calculated to be essentially</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Haas, Yehuda</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=https://www.msu.edu/~idworkin/publications/Dworkin%20et%20al%202003%20Current%20Biology%20supp.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>Supplemental Data Evidence That Egfr Contributes to Cryptic Genetic</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>Supplemental Data Evidence That Egfr Contributes to Cryptic Genetic Variation for Photoreceptor of population ([P], NC inbreeding program was sufficient to generate isogenicity at Egfr or CA), sex (S), cross as Y below, were assessed for each scored as missing data. EgfrE1 strain separately using the least</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dworkin, Ian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://archive.gersteinlab.org/papers/e-print/NRGncannote/preprint.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">When it was realized in the late 1960<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> how much of the</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">When it was realized in the late 1960<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> how much of the genome does not code for proteins, non of repeated words and phrases. *Program in Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Yale University, New 94305, USA. || Department of Computer Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gerstein, Mark</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3684237"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of FAK in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-Regulated Endothelial Permeability</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The vascular endothelium serves as a semi-selective barrier between the circulating contents of the blood and the tissues through which they flow. Disruption of this barrier results in significant organ dysfunction during devastating inflammatory syndromes such as sepsis and acute lung injury (ALI). Sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) is an endogenous lipid regulator of endothelial permeability that produces potent barrier enhancement via actin and junctional protein rearrangement and resultant cytoskeletal changes. A key effector protein in this <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P response is focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a highly conserved cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase involved in the engagement of integrins and assembly of focal adhesions (FA) through the catalysis of multiple downstream signals. After stimulation by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P, endothelial FAK undergoes specific tyrosine phosphorylation that results in activation of the kinase and dynamic interactions with other effector molecules to improve the endothelial barrier. FAK participates in peripheral actin cytoskeletal rearrangement as well as cell-matrix (FA) and cell-cell (adherens junction) junctional complex strengthening that combine to decrease vascular permeability. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the role of FAK in mediating enhanced endothelial barrier function by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P. PMID:21925517</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Belvitch, Patrick; Dudek, Steven M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/74200"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diffractive dijet production in p?p collisions at ?<span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96?TeV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in p?p collisions at ?<span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96??TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p?p collider. A data sample from 310??pb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3915806"> <span id="translatedtitle">A phase II study of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> in relapsed small cell lung cancer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> is a new oral fluoropyrimidine derivative designed to enhance anticancer activity and reduce gastrointestinal toxicity. This phase II trial aimed to evaluate <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> in patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer (SCLC). SCLC patients who had experienced treatment failure with ?1 prior chemotherapies were eligible. Patients were required to have an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of 0–2 and adequate organ function. Treatment consisted of oral <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> at 40 mg/m2 twice/day for 28 days every 6 weeks. Twenty-six patients were enrolled, 85% of whom were males. The median age was 68 years (range, 33–79) and 81% of the patients had a performance status of 0–1, and 46% of the patients had relapse-sensitive SCLC. An objective response was obtained in only 1 patient (3.8%), and the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 1.1 months. The median overall survival was 5.3 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 23%. The most common grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia (7.7%), leukopenia (7.7%), anemia (7.7%), hyponatremia (7.7%), rash (7.7%), infection (7.7%) and diarrhoea (3.8%). None of the patients developed febrile neutropenia and no deaths were attributed to treatment. In conclusion, <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> has minimal single-agent activity in relapsed SCLC. PMID:24649158</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">KUDO, KEITA; OHYANAGI, FUMIYOSI; HORIIKE, ATSUSHI; MIYAUCHI, EISAKU; TAHANAKA, HISASHI; YANAGITANI, NORIKO; SAITO, RYOUTA; KABURAKI, KYOUHEI; SAKATANI, TOSHIO; HORAI, TAKESHI; NISHIO, MAKOTO</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~mike/ml4as/01/l01-2x2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">09<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Introduction to Machine Learning</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">09<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Introduction to Machine Learning March 12, 2008 Acknowledgement: Material derived from slides for the book Machine Learning, Tom Mitchell, McGraw-Hill, 1997 http to describe the motivation, scope and some application areas of machine learning. Following it you should</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bain, Mike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.cse.unsw.edu.au/~mike/ml4as/04/l00-2x2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">09<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Machine Learning for Numeric</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">09<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>: COMP9417 Machine Learning and Data Mining Machine Learning for Numeric Prediction April 1, 2009 Acknowledgement: Material derived from slides for the book Machine Learning, Tom M. Mitchell, Mc by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Aims This lecture will enable you to describe and reproduce machine learning</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bain, Mike</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20798919"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of a periplasmic <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-like nuclease coded by the Mesorhizobium loti symbiosis island</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">DNA sequences encoding hypothetical proteins homologous to <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease from Aspergillus oryzae are found in many organisms including fungi, plants, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotic parasites. One of these is the M1 nuclease of Mesorhizobium loti which we demonstrate herein to be an enzymatically active, soluble, and stable <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> homolog that lacks the extensive mannosyl-glycosylation found in eukaryotic <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> nuclease homologs. We have expressed the cloned M1 protein in M. loti and purified recombinant native M1 to near homogeneity and have also isolated a homogeneous M1 carboxy-terminal hexahistidine tag fusion protein. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal Edman degradation sequencing confirmed the protein identity. The enzymatic properties of the purified M1 nuclease are similar to those of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. At acidic pH M1 is 25 times more active on single-stranded DNA than on double-stranded DNA and 3 times more active on single-stranded DNA than on single-stranded RNA. At neutral pH the RNase activity of M1 exceeds the DNase activity. M1 nicks supercoiled RF-I plasmid DNA and rapidly cuts the phosphodiester bond across from the nick in the resultant relaxed RF-II plasmid DNA. Therefore, M1 represents an active bacterial <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> homolog in spite of great sequence divergence. The biochemical characterization of M1 nuclease supports our sequence alignment that reveals the minimal 21 amino acid residues that are necessarily conserved for the structure and functions of this enzyme family. The ability of M1 to degrade RNA at neutral pH implies previously unappreciated roles of these nucleases in biological systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pimkin, Maxim [Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Miller, C. Glenn [Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Blakesley, Lauryn [Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Oleykowski, Catherine A. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Kodali, Nagendra S. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Yeung, Anthony T. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)]. E-mail: AT_Yeung@fccc.edu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-04-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23598093"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bk and Cf chromatographic separation and ²??Bk/²??<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and ²??Cf/²??<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios determination by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron flux. In this context a <span class="hlt">Cm</span> sample enriched in (248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> (?97%) was irradiated in a thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). The precise and accurate determination of Cf isotope ratios and of (249)Bk/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and (249)Cf/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios in the (248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> irradiated sample is crucial for the calculation of actinide neutron capture cross-sections. This work describes an analytical procedure for the separation and the isotope ratio measurement of Bk and Cf in the irradiated sample. The Bk and Cf separation is based on a lanthanides separation protocol previously developed by the laboratory. Well-defined retention times for Bk and Cf were obtained by coupling the Ionic Chromatography (IC) with an ICP-QMS. All conditions of element separation by IC and the different steps of the analytical protocol in order to obtain the isotopic and elemental ratios are presented. Relative uncertainties of Cf isotopic ratios range from 0.3% to 0.5% and the uncertainty of the (249)Bk/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> and (249)Cf/(248)<span class="hlt">Cm</span> elemental ratios are respectively 6.1% and 3.2%. This level of uncertainty for both isotopic and elemental ratios is in perfect agreement with the requirement for transmutation studies. PMID:23598093</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gourgiotis, A; Isnard, H; Nonell, A; Aubert, M; Stadelmann, G; Dupont, E; AlMahamid, I; Tiang, G; Rao, L; Lukens, W; Cassette, P; Panebianco, S; Letourneau, A; Chartier, F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ceas.uc.edu/content/dam/ceas/documents/currentstudents/curriculum/2013/cm13t.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (<span class="hlt">CM</span>) CLASS OF 2013 Name: Last, First, ID Min Hrs 149 QH + 27 SH</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">) Win/Spr 2011 ARTN 372 Electrical Syst 3 ARTN 573 Mech Systems 4 10U ARTN 373 Water Supp&Waste 4 <span class="hlt">CM</span> 401 TECH ELEC 3 TECH ELEC 3 12FS BLAW 2080 Legal Env Bus(SE) 3 <span class="hlt">CM</span> 5010 Const Mgt Cap Proj 3 13SS <span class="hlt">CM</span> 4037</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Papautsky, Ian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52958476"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-nebular origin of dark mantles around chondrules and inclusions in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our examination of nine <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites that span the aqueous alteration sequence leads us to conclude that compact dark fine mantles surrounding chondrules and inclusions in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites are not discrete fine-grained rims acquired in the solar nebula as modeled by Metzler et al. [Accretionary dust mantles in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites: evidence for solar nebula processes. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta56, 1992, 2873</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Josep M. Trigo-Rodriguez; Alan E. Rubin; John T. Wasson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_17 div --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/docs/00/00/20/76/PDF/RmnBono.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Intrinsic susceptibility and bond defects in the novel 2D frustrated antiferromagnet Ba2Sn2ZnCr7pGa<span class="hlt">10-7</span>pO22</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Intrinsic susceptibility and bond defects in the novel 2D frustrated antiferromagnet Ba2Sn2ZnCr7pGa properties of the highly frustrated antiferro- magnet Ba2Sn2ZnCr7pGa<span class="hlt">10-7</span>pO22, respectively probed with NMR, are evidenced and discussed. We compare our results to SrCr9pGa12-9pO19. Both bond defects and spin vacancies do</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Paris-Sud XI, Université de</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1983JaJAP..22..269M"> <span id="translatedtitle">8.5 percent efficient screen-printed CdS/CdTe solar cell produced on a 5-<span class="hlt">cm</span> x 10-<span class="hlt">cm</span> glass substrate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The preparation conditions of CdS sintered film for 5-<span class="hlt">cm</span> x 10-<span class="hlt">cm</span> screen-printed CsS/CdTe solar cells were investigated. Increasing the belt speed of the belt furnace increased the residual amount of Cl ions in the CdS sintered film and lowered the efficiency of the cell. The optimum belt speed was 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span>/min, corresponding to a sintering time of 90 min. The thickness of the CdS film was changed by changing the screen thickness. Increasing the thickness of the CdS film lowered its surface resistivity and improved the fill factor of a cell. A solar cell of 8.5 percent intrinsic efficiency was obtained from CdS film printed by an 80 mesh screen and sintered at 690 C at a belt speed of 2 <span class="hlt">cm</span>/min.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsumoto, H.; Nakano, A.; Komatsu, Y.; Uda, H.; Kuribayashi, K.; Ikegami, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1983-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007M%26PS...42.1711R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Petrography of refractory inclusions in <span class="hlt">CM</span>2.6 QUE 97990 and the origin of melilite-free spinel inclusions in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 97990 (<span class="hlt">CM</span>2.6) is among the least-altered <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites known. It contains 1.8 vol% refractory inclusions; 40 were studied from a single thin section. Inclusion varieties include simple, banded and nodular structures as well as simple and complex distended objects. The inclusions range in mean size from 30 to 530 ?m and average 130 ± 90 ?m. Many inclusions contain 25 ± 15 vol% phyllosilicate (predominantly Mg-Fe serpentine); several contain small grains of perovskite. In addition to phyllosilicate, the most abundant inclusions in QUE 97990 consist mainly of spinel-pyroxene (35%), followed by spinel (20%), spinel-pyroxene-olivine (18%), pyroxene (12%), pyroxene-olivine (8%) and hibonite ± spinel (8%). Four pyroxene phases occur: diopside, Al-rich diopside (with ?8.0 wt% Al2O3), Al-Ti diopside (i.e., fassaite), and (in two inclusions) enstatite. No inclusions contain melilite. Aqueous alteration of refractory inclusions transforms some phases (particularly melilite) into phyllosilicate; some inclusions broke apart during alteration. Melilite-free, phyllosilicate-bearing, spinel inclusions probably formed from pristine, phyllosilicate-free inclusions containing both melilite and spinel. Sixty-five percent of the refractory inclusions in QUE 97990 appear to be largely intact; the major exception is the group of spinel inclusions, all of which are fragments. Whereas QUE 97990 contains about 50 largely intact refractory inclusions/<span class="hlt">cm</span>2, estimates from literature data imply that more-altered <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites have lower modal abundances (and lower number densities) of refractory inclusions: Mighei (<span class="hlt">CM</span> ˜ 2.3) contains roughly 0.3-0.6 vol% inclusions (˜10 largely intact inclusions/<span class="hlt">cm</span>2); Cold Bokkeveld (<span class="hlt">CM</span>2.2) contains ˜0.01 vol% inclusions (on the order of 6 largely intact inclusions/<span class="hlt">cm</span>2).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rubin, Alan E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26266473"> <span id="translatedtitle">Defect levels of proton-irradiated silicon with doses ranging from 1 × 10 12 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ?2 to 1 × 10 13 <span class="hlt">cm</span> ?2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Schottky diodes of n-type silicon have been irradiated by 800 keV and 1 MeV protons at doses ranging from 1 × 1012 <span class="hlt">cm</span>?2 to 1 × 1013 <span class="hlt">cm</span>?2. Thermally Stimulated Capacitance (TSCAP), capacitance-voltage (C?V) and Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) have been applied for sample analysis. By TSCAP measurements a strong compensation effect has been observed for irradiation doses up</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. F. Barbot; E. Ntsoenzok; C. Blanchard; J. Vernois; D. B. Isabelle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.me.vt.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/1-Fall-13-HT.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heat Transfer -1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span> and outer diameter 10.6 <span class="hlt">cm</span> subjected to an external</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span> and outer diameter 10.6 <span class="hlt">cm</span> subjected to an external constant uniform heat flux of 100,000 W/m2 . The composite material of the pipe has/mK in the axial direction. Both ends of the pipe are insulated from any heat loss. The pipe is cooled by water</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Virginia Tech</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870050791&hterms=tensile+strength&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dtensile%2Bstrength"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure and tensile strength of La<span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>.4)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tensile strength of La<span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>.4) has been estimated by diametral stress testing at room temperature, 800 and 1300 K. Brittle, tensile-type failures were obtained at all temperatures when the crosshead speed was 0.0021 mm/s; however, a 1300 K test at 0.00085 mm/s produced plastic flow. The microstructure of La<span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>.4) consisted of two phases with beta-La2S3 comprising about 15 vol percent of the structure and gamma-La2S3 the remainder. Because of the limited amount of material available for testing, no correlation between microstructure and mechanical strength could be drawn.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Smoak, Richard H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1684798"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sequences homologous to the human D1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> locus present on human chromosome 3.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have investigated the segregation, in somatic cell hybrids, of the human D1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> locus, previously assigned to 1p36 by in situ hybridization. We have shown that the clone which defines this locus, lambda Ch4A-H3, originates from human chromosome 3, but contains a 1.7-kilobase (kb) PstI-HindIII repetitive element that is also present on chromosome 1, probably distal to PGD. The clone recognizes restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the single-copy sequence on chromosome 3 and one for the enzyme StuI in the repeated sequence on chromosome 1. These experiments thus expose a level of complexity in the D1<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> locus not revealed by earlier in situ hybridization studies. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:3010709</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carritt, B; Welch, H M; Parry-Jones, N J</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/gr-qc/9406017v2"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> \\times S^2 as a bag membrane and its Einstein-Weyl geometry</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the hybrid skyrmion in which an Anti-de Sitter bag is imbedded into the skyrmion configuration a <span class="hlt">S</span>^{<span class="hlt">1</span>}\\times S^{2} membrane is lying on the compactified spatial infinity of the bag [H. Rosu, Nuovo Cimento B 108, 313 (1993)]. The connection between the quark degrees of freedom and the mesonic ones is made through the membrane, in a way that should still be clarified from the standpoint of general relativity and topology. The <span class="hlt">S</span>^<span class="hlt">1</span> \\times S^2 membrane as a 3-dimensional manifold is at the same time a Weyl-Einstein space. We make here an excursion through the mathematical body of knowledge in the differential geometry and topology of these spaces which is expected to be useful for hadronic membranes</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. C. Rosu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-06-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JLTP..158..653K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hyperfine Induced Magnetic Ordering in a <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>/2 Quantum Magnets on Kagomé Lattice</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Susceptibility and specific heat measurements have been carried out down to 23 mK on polycrystalline [Cu3(titmb)2(OCOCH3)6]?H2O {titmb = 1,3,5-tris(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)-2,4,6 trimethylbenzene} with <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>/2 antiferromagnet on Kagomé lattice. The results show an unexpected ferromagnetic long range ordering at 56 mK. The entropy change from 10 K to 23 mK is much larger than the entropy corresponding to electron spin <span class="hlt">S</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>/2 of Cu2+. The large excess entropy reduction strongly suggests a novel magnetic ordering of the coupled Cu electron and nuclear spin ( I=3/2) system. We propose that a frustrated ground state changes to the complex ferromagnetic ground state with help of the enhanced indirect nuclear spin interaction through the hyperfine interaction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Karaki, Y.; Kou, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Kubota, M.; Ishimoto, H.; Honda, Z.; Yamada, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3819947"> <span id="translatedtitle">Regarding the Charmed-Strange Member of the 23<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Meson State</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By employing the mass relations derived from the mass matrix and Regge trajectory, we investigate the masses of charmed and charmed-strange members of the 23<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> meson. The masses are compared with the values predicted by other theoretical approaches and experimental data. The results may be useful for the discovery of the unobserved meson and the determination of the quantum number of the newly discovered states. PMID:24250272</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Feng, Xue-Chao; Chen, Jing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18392449"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular analysis of the bovine coronavirus <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> gene by direct sequencing of diarrheic fecal specimens.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) causes severe diarrhea in newborn calves, is associated with winter dysentery in adult cattle and respiratory infections in calves and feedlot cattle. The BCoV S protein plays a fundamental role in viral attachment and entry into the host cell, and is cleaved into two subunits termed <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (amino terminal) and S2 (carboxy terminal). The present study describes a strategy for the sequencing of the BCoV <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> gene directly from fecal diarrheic specimens that were previously identified as BCoV positive by RT-PCR assay for N gene detection. A consensus sequence of 2681 nucleotides was obtained through direct sequencing of seven overlapping PCR fragments of the S gene. The samples did not undergo cell culture passage prior to PCR amplification and sequencing. The structural analysis was based on the genomic differences between Brazilian strains and other known BCoV from different geographical regions. The phylogenetic analysis of the entire <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> gene showed that the BCoV Brazilian strains were more distant from the Mebus strain (97.8% identity for nucleotides and 96.8% identity for amino acids) and more similar to the BCoV-ENT strain (98.7% for nucleotides and 98.7% for amino acids). Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the hypervariable region of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> subunit, these strains clustered with the American (BCoV-ENT, 182NS) and Canadian (BCQ20, BCQ2070, BCQ9, BCQ571, BCQ1523) calf diarrhea and the Canadian winter dysentery (BCQ7373, BCQ2590) strains, but clustered on a separate branch of the Korean and respiratory BCoV strains. The BCoV strains of the present study were not clustered in the same branch of previously published Brazilian strains (AY606193, AY606194). These data agree with the genealogical construction and suggest that at least two different BCoV strains are circulating in Brazil. PMID:18392449</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Takiuchi, E; Alfieri, A F; Alfieri, A A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7241660"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reovirus inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis: role of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> gene.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Type 3 reovirus inhibits L cell DNA synthesis, whereas type 1 reovirus exerts little or no effect on L cell DNA synthesis. By using recombinant viruses containing both type 1 and type 3 double-standard RNA segments, we determined that one double-stranded RNA segment, the reovirus type 3 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> double-stranded RNA segment which encodes the viral hemagglutinin, segregates with and is responsible for the capacity of reovirus type 3 to inhibit L cell DNA synthesis. PMID:7241660</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sharpe, A H; Fields, B N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1447..817B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Inelastic neutron scattering measurements and lattice dynamics of Zn<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-xSex</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Inelastic neutron scattering measurements to determine the phonon density of states along with lattice dynamical studies based on a supercell and a simple transferable potential model have been done to confirm the two mode behavior exhibited by Zn<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-xSex. In addition, the contribution of bond-length distribution to the existence of anomalous modes found in the frequency range of the ZnS-like TO and LO modes has been emphasized.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Basak, Tista; Rao, Mala N.; Rajarajan, A. K.; Chaplot, S. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23174565"> <span id="translatedtitle">Immobilised lipase-catalysed resolution of ( R,<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span>-phenylethanol in recirculated packed bed reactor</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Six commercial immobilised lipases were screened for the resolution of (R,<span class="hlt">S</span>)-<span class="hlt">1</span>-phenylethanol in organic solvent. Among them, lipases from Pseudomonas cepacia (ChiroCLEC-PC) and Candida antarctica lipase B (Chirazyme L2, c.-f., C3, lyo) were used in the kinetic study of the resolution in batch stirred tank reactor (BSTR). Lauric acid was used as acyl donor in the acyl transfer reaction. This enzymatic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lee Suan Chua; Mohamad Roji Sarmidi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/36537473"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in <span class="hlt">S</span>-(<span class="hlt">1</span>,2-Dichlorovinyl)- l -cysteine-Induced Apoptosis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The nephrotoxicity of trichloroethylene and dichloroacetylene has previously been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction induced by the metabolite <span class="hlt">S</span>-(<span class="hlt">1</span>,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC). In this study, we examined whether key biochemical steps associated with mitochondria occur in DCVC-induced apoptosis in cultured porcine proximal tubular LLC-PK1 cells. DCVC caused a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (mt??) beginning at 4 h and a release of cytochrome</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yan Chen; Jiyang Cai; M. W. Anders; James L. Stevens; Dean P. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55703292"> <span id="translatedtitle">Upsilon production in pp¯ collisions at &surd;<span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.8 TeV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on measurements of the Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(2S), and Upsilon(3S) differential, (d2sigma\\/dPtdy)y=0, and integrated cross sections in pp¯ collisions at &surd;<span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.8 TeV using a sample of 16.6+\\/-0.6 pb-1 collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The three resonances were reconstructed through the decay Upsilon-->mu+mu-. Comparison is made to a leading order QCD prediction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Abe; M. G. Albrow; S. R. Amendolia; D. Amidei; J. Antos; C. Anway-Wiese; G. Apollinari; H. Areti; M. Atac; P. Auchincloss; F. Azfar; P. Azzi; N. Bacchetta; W. Badgett; M. W. Bailey; J. Bao; P. de Barbaro; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Bartalini; G. Bauer; T. Baumann; F. Bedeschi; S. Behrends; S. Belforte; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; J. Benlloch; J. Bensinger; D. Benton; A. Beretvas; J. P. Berge; S. Bertolucci; A. Bhatti; K. Biery; M. Binkley; F. Bird; D. Bisello; R. E. Blair; C. Blocker; A. Bodek; W. Bokhari; V. Bolognesi; D. Bortoletto; C. Boswell; T. Boulos; G. Brandenburg; C. Bromberg; E. Buckley-Geer; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; A. Byon-Wagner; K. L. Byrum; J. Cammerata; C. Campagnari; M. Campbell; A. Caner; W. Carithers; D. Carlsmith; A. Castro; Y. Cen; F. Cervelli; H. Y. Chao; J. Chapman; M.-T. Cheng; G. Chiarelli; T. Chikamatsu; C. N. Chiou; L. Christofek; S. Cihangir; A. G. Clark; M. Cobal; M. Contreras; J. Conway; J. Cooper; M. Cordelli; C. Couyoumtzelis; D. Crane; J. D. Cunningham; T. Daniels; F. Dejongh; S. Delchamps; S. dell'agnello; M. dell'orso; L. Demortier; B. Denby; M. Deninno; P. F. Derwent; T. Devlin; M. Dickson; J. R. Dittmann; S. Donati; R. B. Drucker; A. Dunn; K. Einsweiler; J. E. Elias; R. Ely; E. Engels; S. Eno; D. Errede; S. Errede; Q. Fan; B. Farhat; I. Fiori; B. Flaugher; G. W. Foster; M. Franklin; M. Frautschi; J. Freeman; J. Friedman; H. Frisch; A. Fry; T. A. Fuess; Y. Fukui; S. Funaki; G. Gagliardi; S. Galeotti; M. Gallinaro; A. F. Garfinkel; S. Geer; D. W. Gerdes; P. Giannetti; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; L. Gladney; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; J. Gonzalez; A. Gordon; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; H. Grassmann; A. Grewal; L. Groer; C. Grosso-Pilcher; C. Haber; S. R. Hahn; R. Handler; R. M. Hans; K. Hara; B. Harral; R. M. Harris; S. A. Hauger; J. Hauser; C. Hawk; J. Heinrich; D. Cronin-Hennessy; R. Hollebeek; L. Holloway; A. Hölscher; S. Hong; G. Houk; P. Hu; B. T. Huffman; R. Hughes; P. Hurst; J. Huston; J. Huth; J. Hylen; M. Incagli; J. Incandela; H. Iso; H. Jensen; C. P. Jessop; U. Joshi; R. W. Kadel; E. Kajfasz; T. Kamon; T. Kaneko; D. A. Kardelis; H. Kasha; Y. Kato; L. Keeble; R. D. Kennedy; R. Kephart; P. Kesten; D. Kestenbaum; R. M. Keup; H. Keutelian; F. Keyvan; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; L. Kirsch; P. Koehn; K. Kondo; J. Konigsberg; S. Kopp; K. Kordas; W. Koska; E. Kovacs; W. Kowald; M. Krasberg; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; S. E. Kuhlmann; E. Kuns; A. T. Laasanen; N. Labanca; S. Lammel; J. I. Lamoureux; T. Lecompte; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; P. Limon; M. Lindgren; T. M. Liss; N. Lockyer; C. Loomis; O. Long; M. Loreti; E. H. Low; J. Lu; D. Lucchesi; C. B. Luchini; P. Lukens; J. Lys; P. Maas; K. Maeshima; A. Maghakian; P. Maksimovic; M. Mangano; J. Mansour; M. Mariotti; J. P. Marriner; A. Martin; J. A. Matthews; R. Mattingly; P. McIntyre; P. Melese; A. Menzione; E. Meschi; G. Michail; S. Mikamo; M. Miller; R. Miller; T. Mimashi; S. Miscetti; M. Mishina; H. Mitsushio; S. Miyashita; Y. Morita; S. Moulding; J. Mueller; A. Mukherjee; T. Muller; P. Musgrave; L. F. Nakae; I. Nakano; C. Nelson; D. Neuberger; C. Newman-Holmes; L. Nodulman; S. Ogawa; S. H. Oh; K. E. Ohl; R. Oishi; T. Okusawa; C. Pagliarone; R. Paoletti; V. Papadimitriou; S. P. Pappas; J. Patrick; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; L. Pescara; M. D. Peters; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; M. Pillai; R. Plunkett; L. Pondrom; N. Produit; J. Proudfoot; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; K. Ragan; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; M. Roach-Bellino; W. J. Robertson; T. Rodrigo; J. Romano; L. Rosenson; W. K. Sakumoto; D. Saltzberg; A. Sansoni; V. Scarpine; A. Schindler; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; M. P. Schmidt; O. Schneider; G. F. Sciacca; A. Scribano; S. Segler; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; G. Sganos; A. Sgolacchia; M. Shapiro; N. M. Shaw; Q. Shen; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; J. Siegrist; A. Sill; P. Sinervo; P. Singh; J. Skarha; K. Sliwa; D. A. Smith; F. D. Snider; L. Song; T. Song; J. Spalding; L. Spiegel; P. Sphicas; L. Stanco; J. Steele; A. Stefanini; K. Strahl; J. Strait; D. Stuart; G. Sullivan; K. Sumorok; R. L. Swartz; T. Takahashi; K. Takikawa; F. Tartarelli; W. Taylor; P. K. Teng; Y. Teramoto; S. Tether; D. Theriot; J. Thomas; T. L. Thomas; R. Thun; M. Timko; P. Tipton; A. Titov; S. Tkaczyk; K. Tollefson; A. Tollestrup; J. Tonnison; J. F. de Troconiz; J. Tseng; M. Turcotte; N. Turini; N. Uemura; F. Ukegawa; G. Unal; S. C. van den Brink; S. Vejcik; R. Vidal; M. Vondracek; D. Vucinic; R. G. Wagner; R. L. Wagner; N. Wainer; R. C. Walker; C. Wang; G. Wang; J. Wang; M. J. Wang; Q. F. Wang; A. Warburton; G. Watts; T. Watts; R. Webb; C. Wei; C. Wendt; H. Wenzel; W. C. Wester; T. Westhusing; A. B. Wicklund; E. Wicklund; R. Wilkinson; H. H. Williams; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; J. Wolinski; D. Y. Wu; X. Wu; J. Wyss; A. Yagil; W. Yao; K. Yasuoka; Y. Ye; G. P. Yeh; P. Yeh; M. Yin; J. Yoh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12584722"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for Second Generation Leptoquarks in pp¯ Collisions at <span class="hlt">s</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>.8 TeV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of a search for second generation leptoquarks S2 using 19.3 pb-1 of data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in pp¯ collisions at <span class="hlt">s</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>.8 TeV during the 1992-93 collider run. We have searched for S2S2¯ pairs assuming that each leptoquark decays to a muon + quark with a branching ratio beta. We</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. Abe; M. G. Albrow; S. R. Amendolia; D. Amidei; J. Antos; C. Anway-Wiese; G. Apollinari; H. Areti; M. Atac; P. Auchincloss; F. Azfar; P. Azzi; N. Bacchetta; W. Badgett; M. W. Bailey; J. Bao; P. de Barbaro; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Bartalini; G. Bauer; T. Baumann; F. Bedeschi; S. Behrends; S. Belforte; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; J. Benlloch; J. Bensinger; D. Benton; A. Beretvas; J. P. Berge; S. Bertolucci; A. Bhatti; K. Biery; M. Binkley; F. Bird; D. Bisello; R. E. Blair; C. Blocker; A. Bodek; W. Bokhari; V. Bolognesi; D. Bortoletto; C. Boswell; T. Boulos; G. Brandenburg; C. Bromberg; E. Buckley-Geer; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; A. Byon-Wagner; K. L. Byrum; J. Cammerata; C. Campagnari; M. Campbell; A. Caner; W. Carithers; D. Carlsmith; A. Castro; Y. Cen; F. Cervelli; H. Y. Chao; J. Chapman; M.-T. Cheng; G. Chiarelli; T. Chikamatsu; C. N. Chiou; L. Christofek; S. Cihangir; A. G. Clark; M. Cobal; M. Contreras; J. Conway; J. Cooper; M. Cordelli; C. Couyoumtzelis; D. Crane; J. D. Cunningham; T. Daniels; F. Dejongh; S. Delchamps; S. dell'Agnello; M. dell'Orso; L. Demortier; B. Denby; M. Deninno; P. F. Derwent; T. Devlin; M. Dickson; J. R. Dittmann; S. Donati; R. B. Drucker; A. Dunn; K. Einsweiler; J. E. Elias; R. Ely; E. Engels Jr.; S. Eno; D. Errede; S. Errede; Q. Fan; B. Farhat; I. Fiori; B. Flaugher; G. W. Foster; M. Franklin; M. Frautschi; J. Freeman; J. Friedman; H. Frisch; A. Fry; T. A. Fuess; Y. Fukui; S. Funaki; G. Gagliardi; S. Galeotti; M. Gallinaro; A. F. Garfinkel; S. Geer; D. W. Gerdes; P. Giannetti; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; L. Gladney; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; J. Gonzalez; A. Gordon; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; H. Grassmann; A. Grewal; L. Groer; C. Grosso-Pilcher; C. Haber; S. R. Hahn; R. Handler; R. M. Hans; K. Hara; B. Harral; R. M. Harris; S. A. Hauger; J. Hauser; C. Hawk; J. Heinrich; D. Cronin-Hennessy; R. Hollebeek; L. Holloway; A. Hölscher; S. Hong; G. Houk; P. Hu; B. T. Huffman; R. Hughes; P. Hurst; J. Huston; J. Huth; J. Hylen; M. Incagli; J. Incandela; H. Iso; H. Jensen; C. P. Jessop; U. Joshi; R. W. Kadel; E. Kajfasz; T. Kamon; T. Kaneko; D. A. Kardelis; H. Kasha; Y. Kato; L. Keeble; R. D. Kennedy; R. Kephart; P. Kesten; D. Kestenbaum; R. M. Keup; H. Keutelian; F. Keyvan; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; L. Kirsch; P. Koehn; K. Kondo; J. Konigsberg; S. Kopp; K. Kordas; W. Koska; E. Kovacs; W. Kowald; M. Krasberg; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; S. E. Kuhlmann; E. Kuns; A. T. Laasanen; N. Labanca; S. Lammel; J. I. Lamoureux; T. Lecompte; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; P. Limon; M. Lindgren; T. M. Liss; N. Lockyer; C. Loomis; O. Long; M. Loreti; E. H. Low; J. Lu; D. Lucchesi; C. B. Luchini; P. Lukens; J. Lys; P. Maas; K. Maeshima; A. Maghakian; P. Maksimovic; M. Mangano; J. Mansour; M. Mariotti; J. P. Marriner; A. Martin; J. A. Matthews; R. Mattingly; P. McIntyre; P. Melese; A. Menzione; E. Meschi; G. Michail; S. Mikamo; M. Miller; R. Miller; T. Mimashi; S. Miscetti; M. Mishina; H. Mitsushio; S. Miyashita; Y. Morita; S. Moulding; J. Mueller; A. Mukherjee; T. Muller; P. Musgrave; L. F. Nakae; I. Nakano; C. Nelson; D. Neuberger; C. Newman-Holmes; L. Nodulman; S. Ogawa; S. H. Oh; K. E. Ohl; R. Oishi; T. Okusawa; C. Pagliarone; R. Paoletti; V. Papadimitriou; J. Patrick; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; L. Pescara; M. D. Peters; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; M. Pillai; R. Plunkett; L. Pondrom; N. Produit; J. Proudfoot; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; K. Ragan; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; M. Roach-Bellino; W. J. Robertson; T. Rodrigo; J. Romano; L. Rosenson; W. K. Sakumoto; D. Saltzberg; A. Sansoni; V. Scarpine; A. Schindler; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; M. P. Schmidt; O. Schneider; G. F. Sciacca; A. Scribano; S. Segler; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; G. Sganos; A. Sgolacchia; M. Shapiro; N. M. Shaw; Q. Shen; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; J. Siegrist; A. Sill; P. Sinervo; P. Singh; J. Skarha; K. Sliwa; D. A. Smith; F. D. Snider; L. Song; T. Song; J. Spalding; L. Spiegel; P. Sphicas; A. Spies; L. Stanco; J. Steele; A. Stefanini; K. Strahl; J. Strait; D. Stuart; G. Sullivan; K. Sumorok; R. L. Swartz Jr.; T. Takahashi; K. Takikawa; F. Tartarelli; W. Taylor; P. K. Teng; Y. Teramoto; S. Tether; D. Theriot; J. Thomas; T. L. Thomas; R. Thun; M. Timko; P. Tipton; A. Titov; S. Tkaczyk; K. Tollefson; A. Tollestrup; J. Tonnison; J. F. de Troconiz; J. Tseng; M. Turcotte; N. Turini; N. Uemura; F. Ukegawa; G. Unal; S. C. van den Brink; S. Vejcik III; R. Vidal; M. Vondracek; D. Vucinic; R. G. Wagner; R. L. Wagner; N. Wainer; R. C. Walker; C. Wang; C. H. Wang; G. Wang; J. Wang; M. J. Wang; Q. F. Wang; A. Warburton; G. Watts; T. Watts; R. Webb; C. Wei; C. Wendt; H. Wenzel; W. C. Wester III; T. Westhusing; A. B. Wicklund; E. Wicklund; R. Wilkinson; H. H. Williams; P. Wilson; B. L. Winer; J. Wolinski; D. Y. Wu; X. Wu; J. Wyss; A. Yagil; W. Yao; K. Yasuoka; Y. Ye</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://arxiv.org/pdf/0905.2201v1"> <span id="translatedtitle">Photon + Jet production at sqrt{<span class="hlt">s</span>}=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Prompt photon production results by the CDF and D\\OCollaborations in the Tevatron Run II at a center of mass energy of $\\sqrt{<span class="hlt">s</span>}$=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV are presented. Cross sections for central isolated photons, photon+jet production and photons produced in association with a heavy flavor quark are reported. The measurements are compared to Next-to-Leading order perturbative QCD predictions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Deluca</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-05-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49358136"> <span id="translatedtitle">J ? production in p p collisions at <span class="hlt">s</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>.8 TeV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied J? production in pp collisions at <span class="hlt">s</span> = <span class="hlt">1</span>.8 TeV with the DØ detector at Fermilab using ?+?? data. We have measured the inclusive J? production cross section as a function of J? transverse momentum, pT. For the kinematic range pT > 8 GeV\\/c and |?| < 0.6 we obtain ?(pp ? J? + X) · Br(J?</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Abachi; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B. S. Acharya; I. Adam; D. L. Adams; M. Adams; S. Ahn; H. Aihara; J. Alitti; G. Álvarez; G. A. Alves; E. Amidi; N. Amos; E. W. Anderson; S. H. Aronson; R. Astur; R. E. Avery; A. Baden; V. Balamurali; J. Balderston; B. Baldin; J. Bantly; J. F. Bartlett; K. Bazizi; J. Bendich; S. B. Beri; I. Bertram; V. A. Bezzubov; P. C. Bhat; V. Bhatnagar; M. Bhattacharjee; A. Bischoff; N. Biswas; G. Blazey; S. Blessing; P. Bloom; A. Boehnlein; N. I. Bojko; F. Borcherding; J. Borders; C. Boswell; A. Brandt; R. Brock; A. Bross; D. Buchholz; V. S. Burtovoi; J. M. Butler; W. Carvalho; D. Casey; H. Castilla-Valdez; D. Chakraborty; S.-M. Chang; S. V. Chekulaev; L.-P. Chen; W. Chen; S. Chopra; B. C. Choudhary; J. H. Christenson; M. Chung; D. Claes; A. R. Clark; W. G. Cobau; J. Cochran; W. E. Cooper; C. Cretsinger; D. Cullen-Vidal; M. A. C. Cummings; D. Cutts; O. I. Dahl; K. De; M. Demarteau; R. Demina; K. Denisenko; N. Denisenko; D. Denisov; S. P. Denisov; H. T. Diehl; M. Diesburg; G. Di Loreto; R. Dixon; P. Draper; J. Drinkard; Y. Ducros; S. R. Dugad; S. Durston-Johnson; D. Edmunds; J. Ellison; V. D. Elvira; R. Engelmann; S. Eno; G. Eppley; P. Ermolov; O. V. Eroshin; V. N. Evdokimov; S. Fahey; T. Fahland; M. Fatyga; J. Featherly; S. Feher; D. Fein; T. Ferbel; G. Finocchiaro; H. E. Fisk; Y. Fisyak; E. Flattum; G. E. Forden; M. Fortner; K. C. Frame; P. Franzini; S. Fuess; E. Gallas; A. N. Galyaev; T. L. Geld; R. J. Genik; K. Genser; C. E. Gerber; B. Gibbard; V. Glebov; S. Glenn; J. F. Glicenstein; B. Gobbi; M. Goforth; A. Goldschmidt; B. Gómez; P. I. Goncharov; J. L. González Solís; H. Gordon; L. T. Goss; N. Graf; P. D. Grannis; D. R. Green; J. Green; H. Greenlee; G. Griffin; N. Grossman; P. Grudberg; S. Grünendahl; W. X. Gu; G. Guglielmo; J. A. Guida; J. M. Guida; W. Guryn; S. N. Gurzhiev; P. Gutierrez; Y. E. Gutnikov; N. J. Hadley; H. Haggerty; S. Hagopian; V. Hagopian; K. S. Hahn; R. E. Hall; S. Hansen; R. Hatcher; J. M. Hauptman; D. Hedin; A. P. Heinson; U. Heintz; T. Heuring; R. Hirosky; J. D. Hobbs; B. Hoeneisen; J. S. Hoftun; F. Hsieh; Tao Hu; Ting Hu; Tong Hu; T. Huehn; S. Igarashi; A. S. Ito; E. James; J. Jaques; S. A. Jerger; J. Z.-Y. Jiang; T. Joffe-Minor; H. Johari; K. Johns; M. Johnson; H. Johnstad; A. Jonckheere; M. Jones; H. Jöstlein; S. Y. Jun; C. K. Jung; S. Kahn; G. Kalbfleisch; J. S. Kang; R. Kehoe; M. L. Kelly; L. Kerth; C. L. Kim; S. K. Kim; A. Klatchko; B. Klima; B. I. Klochkov; C. Klopfenstein; V. I. Klyukhin; V. I. Kochetkov; J. M. Kohli; D. Koltick; A. V. Kostritskiy; J. Kotcher; J. Kourlas; A. V. Kozelov; E. A. Kozlovski; M. R. Krishnaswamy; S. Krzywdzinski; S. Kunori; S. Lami; G. Landsberg; J. F. Lebrat; A. Leflat; H. Li; J. Li; Y. K. Li; Q. Z. Li-Demarteau; J. G. R. Lima; D. Lincoln; S. L. Linn; J. Linnemann; R. Lipton; Y. C. Liu; F. Lobkowicz; S. C. Loken; S. Lökös; L. Lueking; A. L. Lyon; A. K. A. Maciel; R. J. Madaras; R. Madden; S. Mani; H. S. Mao; S. Margulies; R. Markeloff; L. Markosky; T. Marshall; M. I. Martin; M. Marx; B. May; A. A. Mayorov; R. McCarthy; T. McKibben; J. McKinley; T. McMahon; H. L. Melanson; K. W. Merritt; H. Miettinen; A. Mincer; J. M. de Miranda; C. S. Mishra; M. Mohammadi-Baarmand; N. Mokhov; N. K. Mondal; H. E. Montgomery; P. Mooney; H. da Motta; M. Mudan; C. Murphy; F. Nang; M. Narain; V. S. Narasimham; A. Narayanan; H. A. Neal; J. P. Negret; E. Neis; P. Nemethy; D. Neši?; M. Nicola; D. Norman; L. Oesch; V. Oguri; E. Oltman; N. Oshima; D. Owen; P. Padley; M. Pang; A. Para; C. H. Park; Y. M. Park; R. Partridge; N. Parua; M. Paterno; J. Perkins; A. Peryshkin; M. Peters; H. Piekarz; Y. Pischalnikov; V. M. Podstavkov; B. G. Pope; H. B. Prosper; S. Protopopescu; D. Pušelji?; J. Qian; P. Z. Quintas; R. Raja; S. Rajagopalan; O. Ramirez; M. V. S. Rao; P. A. Rapidis; L. Rasmussen; A. L. Read; S. Reucroft; M. Rijssenbeek; T. Rockwell; N. A. Roe; P. Rubinov; R. Ruchti; J. Rutherfoord; A. Santoro; L. Sawyer; R. D. Schamberger; H. Schellman; J. Sculli; E. Shabalina; C. Shaffer; H. C. Shankar; Y. Y. Shao; R. K. Shivpuri; M. Shupe; J. B. Singh; V. Sirotenko; W. Smart; A. Smith; R. P. Smith; R. Snihur; G. R. Snow; S. Snyder; J. Solomon; P. M. Sood; M. Sosebee; M. Souza; A. L. Spadafora; R. W. Stephens; M. L. Stevenson; D. Stewart; D. A. Stoianova; D. Stoker; K. Streets; M. Strovink; A. Sznajder; A. Taketani; P. Tamburello; J. Tarazi; M. Tartaglia; T. L. Taylor; J. Thompson; T. G. Trippe; P. M. Tuts; N. Varelas; E. W. Varnes; P. R. G. Virador; D. Vititoe; A. A. Volkov; A. P. Vorobiev; H. D. Wahl; G. Wang; J. Warchol; G. Watts; M. Wayne; H. Weerts; F. Wen; A. White; J. T. White; J. A. Wightman; J. Wilcox; S. Willis; S. J. Wimpenny; J. V. D. Wirjawan; J. Womersley; E. Won; D. R. Wood; H. Xu; R. Yamada; P. Yamin; C. Yanagisawa; J. Yang; T. Yasuda; C. Yoshikawa; S. Youssef; J. Yu; Y. Yu; D. H. Zhang; Q. Zhu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=171164"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reovirus inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis: role of the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> gene.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Type 3 reovirus inhibits L cell DNA synthesis, whereas type 1 reovirus exerts little or no effect on L cell DNA synthesis. By using recombinant viruses containing both type 1 and type 3 double-standard RNA segments, we determined that one double-stranded RNA segment, the reovirus type 3 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> double-stranded RNA segment which encodes the viral hemagglutinin, segregates with and is responsible for the capacity of reovirus type 3 to inhibit L cell DNA synthesis. PMID:7241660</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sharpe, A H; Fields, B N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1981-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_18 div --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/pa/pa0603/2005PA001169/2005PA001169.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Source and development of large manganese enrichments above eastern Mediterranean sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The residual dark unit of the most recent eastern Mediterranean sapropel (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) is usually overlain by sediments with enhanced concentrations of MnOx in two separated layers. The variability and magnitude of the Mn enrichment at different locations and water depths indicate that Mn must have been added preferentially to sediments at intermediate (1–2 km) water depths. We propose a two-stage</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anja Reitz; John Thomson; Gert J. de Lange; Christian Hensen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/30924970"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tarlov cyst as a rare cause of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> radiculopathy: A case report</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nadler SF, Bartoli LM, Stitik TP, Chen B. Tarlov cyst as a rare cause of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> radiculopathy: a case report. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2001;82:689-90. A 37-year-old female physician presented with a chief complaint of left posterior thigh pain, which began insidiously approximately 4 months before her initial examination. Initially, she had been evaluated by her physician, and magnetic resonance</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Scott F Nadler; Lisa M Bartoli; Todd P Stitik; Boqing Chen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/11/2014/acp-14-11-2014-supplement.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">1 Table <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2 Feedstock Petroleum Petroleum & Natural/50 blended fuels (right, top)4 are normalized to a standard fuel (JP-8 for AAFEX and Timko et al.; Jet A1 solely.8 9 #12;4 1 2 Fig. S3. JP-8 EIN(T) plotted relative to the interpolated EIN at 15ºC (the ICAO3</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Meskhidze, Nicholas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.agu.org/journals/ja/ja0612/2006JA011972/2006JA011972.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">O(1<span class="hlt">S</span> ? <span class="hlt">1</span>D,3P) branching ratio as measured in the terrestrial nightglow</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The branching ratio of the two optically forbidden atmospheric emission lines, O(1<span class="hlt">S</span> ? <span class="hlt">1</span>D) at 557.7 nm and O(1S ? 3P) at 297.2 nm, is a fixed number in the upper atmosphere because the O(1S) level is common to both lines. The value for the ratio A(557.7)\\/A(297.2) currently recommended by NIST is 16.7, and the ratio found in the laboratory</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. G. Slanger; P. C. Cosby; B. D. Sharpee; K. R. Minschwaner; D. E. Siskind</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFMPP51B1961D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mediterranean Sapropel Formation and Redox-Controled Preservation: the <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Formation and its Interruption</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Deposition of organic-rich units (sapropels) in Mediterraneran sediments is precession-related and associated with humid climate conditions. The last humid period from 11 - 5 ka 14C ago, occurred simultaneous with a sustained circum-Mediterranean wet period. The most recent sapropel (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) formed synchronously between 9.8 and 5.7 14C ka BP at all water depths greater than a few hundred metres. As a consequence of increased fresh water (monsoon) input, surface waters had a reduced salinity and concomitantly the deep (> 1.8 km) eastern Mediterranean Sea was devoid of oxygen during 4,000 years of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. This has resulted in a differential basin-wide preservation of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> determined by water depth, as a result of different ventilation/climate-related redox conditions above and below 1.8 km. The end of this period is marked by a basin-wide high sedimentary manganese-oxide peak that represents an abrupt re-ventilation at 5.7 ka BP and remaining oxic conditions thereafter. Other short-term ventilation events appear to have occurred during sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, notably the 8.2 cal ka BP event. This potentially basin-wide event is particularly noticeable at relatively shallow near-coastal sites of high sedimentation rates. It marks a brief episode of not only re-oxygenated deep water thus reduced preservation, but also decreased primary productivity thus nutrient supply. This 8.2 cal ka BP interruption event is thought to be related to enhanced deep water formation in the Aegean due to a short period of sustained cold air fluxes from Polar regions. Sapropel formation mechanisms, therefore, seem related to a sensitive interplay between N-African monsoonal and northern climate systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">De Lange, G. J.; Goudeau, M. S.; Hennekam, R.; Filippidi, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55607283"> <span id="translatedtitle">First Search for Multijet Resonances in <span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96TeV pp¯ Collisions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first model independent search for three-jet hadronic resonances within multijet events in <span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96TeV pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. Pair production of supersymmetric gluinos and squarks with hadronic R-parity violating decays is employed as an example of a new physics benchmark for this signature. Selection criteria based on the kinematic properties of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Aaltonen; B. Álvarez González; S. Amerio; D. Amidei; A. Anastassov; A. Annovi; J. Antos; G. Apollinari; J. A. Appel; A. Apresyan; T. Arisawa; A. Artikov; J. Asaadi; W. Ashmanskas; B. Auerbach; A. Aurisano; F. Azfar; W. Badgett; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; P. Barria; P. Bartos; M. Bauce; G. Bauer; F. Bedeschi; D. Beecher; S. Behari; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; A. Beretvas; A. Bhatti; M. Binkley; D. Bisello; I. Bizjak; K. R. Bland; B. Blumenfeld; A. Bocci; A. Bodek; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; A. Boveia; B. Brau; L. Brigliadori; A. Brisuda; C. Bromberg; E. Brucken; M. Bucciantonio; J. Budagov; H. S. Budd; S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; P. Bussey; A. Buzatu; C. Calancha; S. Camarda; M. Campanelli; M. Campbell; F. Canelli; A. Canepa; B. Carls; D. Carlsmith; R. Carosi; S. Carrillo; S. Carron; B. Casal; M. Casarsa; A. Castro; P. Catastini; D. Cauz; V. Cavaliere; M. Cavalli-Sforza; A. Cerri; L. Cerrito; Y. C. Chen; M. Chertok; G. Chiarelli; G. Chlachidze; F. Chlebana; K. Cho; D. Chokheli; J. P. Chou; W. H. Chung; Y. S. Chung; C. I. Ciobanu; M. A. Ciocci; A. Clark; G. Compostella; M. E. Convery; J. Conway; M. Corbo; M. Cordelli; C. A. Cox; D. J. Cox; F. Crescioli; C. Cuenca Almenar; J. Cuevas; R. Culbertson; D. Dagenhart; N. D'Ascenzo; M. Datta; P. de Barbaro; S. de Cecco; G. de Lorenzo; M. Dell'Orso; C. Deluca; L. Demortier; J. Deng; M. Deninno; F. Devoto; M. D'Errico; A. di Canto; B. di Ruzza; J. R. Dittmann; M. D'Onofrio; S. Donati; P. Dong; M. Dorigo; T. Dorigo; K. Ebina; A. Elagin; A. Eppig; R. Erbacher; D. Errede; S. Errede; N. Ershaidat; R. Eusebi; H. C. Fang; S. Farrington; M. Feindt; J. P. Fernandez; C. Ferrazza; R. Field; G. Flanagan; R. Forrest; M. J. Frank; M. Franklin; J. C. Freeman; Y. Funakoshi; I. Furic; M. Gallinaro; J. Galyardt; J. E. Garcia; A. F. Garfinkel; P. Garosi; H. Gerberich; E. Gerchtein; S. Giagu; V. Giakoumopoulou; P. Giannetti; K. Gibson; C. M. Ginsburg; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; M. Giunta; G. Giurgiu; V. Glagolev; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; D. Goldin; N. Goldschmidt; A. Golossanov; G. Gomez; G. Gomez-Ceballos; M. Goncharov; O. González; I. Gorelov; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; A. Gresele; S. Grinstein; C. Grosso-Pilcher; J. Guimaraes da Costa; Z. Gunay-Unalan; C. Haber; S. R. Hahn; E. Halkiadakis; A. Hamaguchi; J. Y. Han; F. Happacher; K. Hara; D. Hare; M. Hare; R. F. Harr; K. Hatakeyama; C. Hays; M. Heck; J. Heinrich; M. Herndon; S. Hewamanage; D. Hidas; A. Hocker; W. Hopkins; D. Horn; S. Hou; R. E. Hughes; M. Hurwitz; U. Husemann; N. Hussain; M. Hussein; J. Huston; G. Introzzi; M. Iori; A. Ivanov; G. Jain; E. James; D. Jang; B. Jayatilaka; E. J. Jeon; M. K. Jha; S. Jindariani; W. Johnson; M. Jones; K. K. Joo; S. Y. Jun; T. R. Junk; T. Kamon; P. E. Karchin; Y. Kato; W. Ketchum; J. Keung; V. Khotilovich; B. Kilminster; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; H. W. Kim; J. E. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; N. Kimura; M. Kirby; S. Klimenko; K. Kondo; D. J. Kong; J. Konigsberg; A. V. Kotwal; M. Kreps; J. Kroll; D. Krop; N. Krumnack; M. Kruse; V. Krutelyov; T. Kuhr; M. Kurata; S. Kwang; A. T. Laasanen; S. Lami; S. Lammel; M. Lancaster; R. L. Lander; K. Lannon; A. Lath; G. Latino; I. Lazzizzera; T. Lecompte; E. Lee; H. S. Lee; J. S. Lee; S. W. Lee; S. Leo; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; C.-J. Lin; J. Linacre; M. Lindgren; E. Lipeles; A. Lister; D. O. Litvintsev; C. Liu; Q. Liu; T. Liu; S. Lockwitz; N. S. Lockyer; A. Loginov; H. K. Lou; D. Lucchesi; J. Lueck; P. Lujan; P. Lukens; G. Lungu; J. Lys; R. Lysak; R. Madrak; K. Maeshima; K. Makhoul; P. Maksimovic; S. Malik; G. Manca; A. Manousakis-Katsikakis; F. Margaroli; C. Marino; M. Martínez; R. Martínez-Ballarín; P. Mastrandrea; M. Mathis; M. E. Mattson; P. Mazzanti; K. S. McFarland; P. McIntyre; R. McNulty; A. Mehta; P. Mehtala; A. Menzione; C. Mesropian; T. Miao; D. Mietlicki; A. Mitra; H. Miyake; S. Moed; N. Moggi; M. N. Mondragon; C. S. Moon; R. Moore; M. J. Morello; J. Morlock; P. Movilla Fernandez; A. Mukherjee; Th. Muller; P. Murat; M. Mussini; J. Nachtman; Y. Nagai; J. Naganoma; I. Nakano; A. Napier; J. Nett; C. Neu; M. S. Neubauer; J. Nielsen; L. Nodulman; O. Norniella; E. Nurse; L. Oakes; S. H. Oh; Y. D. Oh; I. Oksuzian; T. Okusawa; R. Orava; L. Ortolan; S. Pagan Griso; C. Pagliarone; E. Palencia; V. Papadimitriou; A. A. Paramonov; J. Patrick; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; C. Paus; D. E. Pellett; A. Penzo; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; E. Pianori; J. Pilot; K. Pitts; C. Plager; L. Pondrom; K. Potamianos; O. Poukhov; F. Prokoshin; A. Pronko; F. Ptohos; E. Pueschel; G. Punzi; J. Pursley; A. Rahaman; V. Ramakrishnan; N. Ranjan; I. Redondo; P. Renton; M. Rescigno; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; A. Robson; T. Rodrigo; T. Rodriguez; E. Rogers; S. Rolli; R. Roser; M. Rossi; F. Rubbo; F. Ruffini; A. Ruiz; J. Russ; V. Rusu; A. Safonov; W. K. Sakumoto; Y. Sakurai; L. Santi; L. Sartori; K. Sato; V. Saveliev</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3816158"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cost-effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy for curatively resected gastric cancer with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background The effectiveness of specific regimens of adjuvant therapy for gastric cancer has not been verified by large clinical trials. Recently, several large trials attempted to verify the effectiveness of adjuvant therapy. The Adjuvant Chemotherapy Trial of TS-1 for Gastric Cancer in Japan, a randomized controlled trial of adjuvant <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy for resected gastric cancer, demonstrated significant improvement in overall and relapse-free survival, compared to surgery alone. To evaluate value for money of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy, cost-effective analysis was carried out. Methods The analysis was carried out from a payer’s perspective. As an economic measure, cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained was estimated. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, up to 5-year observation. Beyond this period, it was simulated by the modified Boag model. Utility score is derived from interviews with sampled patients using a time trade-off method. Costs were estimated from trial data during observation, while in the period beyond observation they were estimated using simulation results. To explore uncertainty of the results, qualitative and stochastic sensitivity analyses were done. Results Adjuvant <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy gained 1.24 QALYs per patient and increased costs by $3,722 per patient for over lifetime (3% discount rate for both effect and costs). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (95% confidence intervals) for over lifetime was estimated to be $3,016 ($1,441, $8,840) per QALY. The sensitivity analyses showed the robustness of these results. Conclusion Adjuvant <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> therapy for curatively resected gastric cancer is likely cost-effective. This therapy can be accepted for wide use in Japan. PMID:24079752</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v455/n7212/extref/nature07179-s7.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">ATP8A2/sh#1 NM_016529.3-2446<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 ATP8A2/sh#2 NM_016529.3-180<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">NM_001260.x-1438<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>.c1 0.35 0.11 ND CDX2 shGFP 1.00 0.21 1.00 0.29 CDX2/sh#1 NM_001265.2-1013<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 0.17 0.08 0.30 0.12 CDX2/sh#2 NM_001265.2-393<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 1.77 0.84 1.36 0.10 CDX2/sh#3 NM_001265.2-1822<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 1.55 1.43 1.50 0.32 CDX2/sh#4 NM_001265.2-882<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 0.41 0.21 0.48 0.04 CDX2/sh#5 NM_001265.2-732<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 0</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cai, Long</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3561821"> <span id="translatedtitle">Osteoclast-specific cathepsin K deletion stimulates <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-dependent bone formation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cathepsin K (CTSK) is secreted by osteoclasts to degrade collagen and other matrix proteins during bone resorption. Global deletion of Ctsk in mice decreases bone resorption, leading to osteopetrosis, but also increases the bone formation rate (BFR). To understand how Ctsk deletion increases the BFR, we generated osteoclast- and osteoblast-targeted Ctsk knockout mice using floxed Ctsk alleles. Targeted ablation of Ctsk in hematopoietic cells, or specifically in osteoclasts and cells of the monocyte-osteoclast lineage, resulted in increased bone volume and BFR as well as osteoclast and osteoblast numbers. In contrast, targeted deletion of Ctsk in osteoblasts had no effect on bone resorption or BFR, demonstrating that the increased BFR is osteoclast dependent. Deletion of Ctsk in osteoclasts increased their sphingosine kinase 1 (Sphk1) expression. Conditioned media from Ctsk-deficient osteoclasts, which contained elevated levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P), increased alkaline phosphatase and mineralized nodules in osteoblast cultures. An <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1,3 receptor antagonist inhibited these responses. Osteoblasts derived from mice with Ctsk-deficient osteoclasts had an increased RANKL/OPG ratio, providing a positive feedback loop that increased the number of osteoclasts. Our data provide genetic evidence that deletion of CTSK in osteoclasts enhances bone formation in vivo by increasing the generation of osteoclast-derived <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P. PMID:23321671</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lotinun, Sutada; Kiviranta, Riku; Matsubara, Takuma; Alzate, Jorge A.; Neff, Lynn; Lüth, Anja; Koskivirta, Ilpo; Kleuser, Burkhard; Vacher, Jean; Vuorio, Eero; Horne, William C.; Baron, Roland</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3952481"> <span id="translatedtitle">BOLD fMRI signal characteristics of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>- and S2-SSFP at 7 Tesla</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Object: To compare the BOLD fMRI signal characteristics at in the cortex and on the pial surface for a non-balanced steady-state free precession sequence (nb-SSFP) at 7 T. Materials and Methods: A multi-echo nb-SSFP sequence was used for high resolution fMRI at 7 T. Two <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (S+) echoes at different echo times were acquired together with an S2 (S?) echo. The primary visual cortex (V1) was examined using a reversing checkerboard paradigm at an isotropic resolution of 0.75 mm, with 35 volumes acquired and a total scan time of 27 min. Results: Significant activation was observed in all subjects for all three acquired echoes. For the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> signal at the longer TE, the activation induced signal change was about 4% in the cortex and 10% at the cortical surface, while for S2 the corresponding values were 3 and 5%. Conclusion: For both <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and S2 data, the BOLD signal peaks at the pial surface. The large pial surface signal change in S2 may be caused by dynamic averaging around post-capillary vessels embedded within CSF. This is made possible by the long diffusion times of the pathways contributing to the S2 signal and the relatively high diffusion coefficient of CSF. The results indicate that S2-SSFP might not be a suited alternative to spin-echo for high-resolution fMRI at 7 T. PMID:24659952</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Goa, Pal E.; Koopmans, Peter J.; Poser, Benedikt A.; Barth, Markus; Norris, David G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20873868"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of charge, hydrophobicity, and structure with antimicrobial activity of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and MIRIAM peptides.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Antimicrobial peptides are key elements of the innate immune system. Many of them interact with membranes of bacteria leading to perturbation of the lipid bilayer and eventually to inactivation of the pathogen. The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria has necessitated innovations of new and more powerful classes of antimicrobials. Here we present the in-depth study of an antimicrobial peptide, MIRIAM, derived from Sushi1 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>), a well-characterized peptide from the horseshoe crab. MIRIAM interacts strongly with negatively charged lipids, forming an ?-helical structure. MIRIAM was found to neutralize LPS and kill Gram-negative bacteria with high efficiency, while not releasing LPS. The promising therapeutic potential of MIRIAM is shown by hemolytic assays, which demonstrate that eukaryotic membranes are unaffected at bactericidal concentrations. Nanoparticle-conjugated MIRIAM used in single-molecule fluorescence and electron microscopy experiments showed that MIRIAM targets bacterial membranes to kill bacteria similarly to parental <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Furthermore, fragments derived from MIRIAM and <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> provided insights on their molecular mechanisms of action, in particular, the relationships of functional motifs comprised by charge, hydrophobicity, and structure within each peptide. We conclude that the combination of charge, hydrophobicity, and length of the peptide is important. A close interaction of amino acids in a single molecule in a carefully balanced ensemble of sequence position and secondary structure is crucial. PMID:20873868</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Leptihn, Sebastian; Har, Jia Yi; Wohland, Thorsten; Ding, Jeak Ling</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19542719"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Two advanced gastric cancer cases with peritoneal metastases successfully treated by <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>/paclitaxel combination therapy].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two unresectable advanced gastric cancer cases with peritoneal metastases were successfully treated by the combination therapy of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and paclitaxel. <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> (1.25m(2): 80 mg/day, 1.25m(2)-1.50m(2)<:120 mg/day) was administered orally for 14 consecutive days followed by 14 days rest and a 2-hour infusion of paclitaxel (50 mg/m(2)) was administered on day 1 and 15 of each course. Treatment was repeated every 4 weeks unless disease progression or severe adverse effects were observed. Case 1: 65-year-old male (performance status: PS 3) with type 1 gastric cancer with malignant ascites. Case 2: 66-year-old male (PS3) with peritoneal metastases whose primary gastric lesion was surgically resected. Partial response was obtained in the former and complete response in the latter. Combination therapy of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> and paclitaxel can be highly recommended for patients with inoperable gastric cancer with poor PS. PMID:19542719</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ina, Kenji; Furuta, Ryuichi; Kataoka, Takae; Nishio, Tomoko; Nagao, Seiji; Kayukawa, Satoshi; Masaki, Ayako; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2047296"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Effectiveness of ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> in Capturing Public Health Diseases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This research study examined the usefulness of the ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> system in capturing public health diseases (reportable diseases or the nationally notifiable infectious diseases, leading causes of death, and morbidity/mortality related to terrorism), when compared to ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>.1–3 It also examined agreement levels of coders when coding public health diseases in both ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> and ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>. Overall results demonstrate that ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> is more specific and fully captures more of the public health diseases examined than ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>. In the analysis of all the public health diseases, such as reportable diseases (p<0.001), top 10 causes of death (p<0.001), and those related to terrorism (p<0.001), it was found that the overall rankings for disease capture for ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> were significantly higher than the rankings for ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>. When examining whether diseases were captured more straightforwardly and clearly (regarding agreement levels) between coding systems, statistically significant differences were found for external causes of injury (p<0.001), diabetes (average rank only, p<0.05), lower respiratory disease (p<0.001), heart disease (p<0.001), and malignant neoplasms (p<0.05). Although this result may be due to the coder's higher level of experience with ICD-9-<span class="hlt">CM</span>, it also points to the potential need for more specific coding education and practice with the ICD-10-<span class="hlt">CM</span> system. PMID:18066356</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Watzlaf, Valerie J.M.; Garvin, Jennifer Hornung; Moeini, Sohrab; Anania-Firouzan, Patricia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24142689"> <span id="translatedtitle">Buffalo alpha <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein gene 5'-flanking region and its interspecies comparison.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The expression of milk protein genes is tightly regulated in a spatio-temporal manner through the combinatorial interaction of lactogenic hormones and a set of transcription factors mediating developmental and tissue-specific gene expression. The recruitment of a unique set of transcription factors is determined by the cis-regulatory motifs present in the gene promoter region. Here, we report the isolation, sequencing, structural analysis and interspecies comparison of the 5'cis-regulatory region of the buffalo alpha <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (?<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>)-casein gene. The proximal promoter region of the buffalo ?<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein gene harbored the insertion of a 72-bp fragment of long interspersed nuclear element of the L1_BT retrotransposon family. Among the core and vertebrate-specific promoter elements, the motifs for the binding of Brn POU domain factors (BRNF), Lim homeodomain factors (LHXF), NK6 homeobox transcription factors (NKX6), nuclear factor kappa B/c-rel (NFKB), AT-rich interactive domain factor (ARID), Brn POU domain factor 5 (BRN5), pancreatic and intestinal homeodomain transcription factor (PDX1), Distal-less homeodomain transcription factors (DLXF), T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor-1 (LEFF) and GHF-1 pituitary-specific POU domain transcription factor (PIT1) were over-represented in the ?<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein gene regulatory region (Z score >4.0). The Multiple EM for Motif elicitation predicted three motifs which consisted of the sequences known to bind mammary gland factor/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (MGF/STAT5), estrogen receptor-related alpha (ER?), steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), indicating their potential role in the mammary gland-specific gene expression. The interspecies comparison of the proximal promoter region revealed conserved sequences for TATA boxes and MGF/STAT5 in all species, whereas activator protein 1 (AP1), pregnancy-specific mammary nuclear factor (PMF), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP), double-stranded and single-stranded DNA-binding protein 1 (DS1 and SS), ying and yang factor 1 (YY1), and GR half-sites were among ruminants. The functional significance of the L1_BT retrotransposon insertion on the buffalo ?<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-casein gene expression needs to be experimentally validated. PMID:24142689</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Patel, Amrutlal K; Singh, Mahavir; Suryanarayana, V V S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v455/n7212/extref/nature07179-s3.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">shRNA Clone Name Gene Symbol Z score NM_016653.x-331<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 ZAK -4.35</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">_004606.2-1480<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 TAF1 -2.78 XM_498204.1-650<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 LOC442313 -2.76 NM_014911.x-3143<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 AAK1 -2.76 rfp_621<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 rfp -2.74 rfp_621<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 -2.74 rfp_621<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 -2.74 rfp_621<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 -2.74 XM_498204.1-118<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 LOC442313 -2.50 rfp_612<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 rfp -2.50 rfp_612<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 -2.50 rfp_612<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 -2.50 rfp_612<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 -2.50 XM_372542.2-640<span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span>c1 LOC</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cai, Long</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14744063"> <span id="translatedtitle">Considerations for applying VARSKIN mod 2 to skin dose calculations averaged over 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">VARSKIN Mod 2 is a DOS-based computer program that calculates the dose to skin from beta and gamma contamination either directly on skin or on material in contact with skin. The default area for calculating the dose is 1 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2. Recently, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued new guidelines for calculating shallow dose equivalent from skin contamination that requires the dose be averaged over 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2. VARSKIN Mod 2 was not filly designed to calculate beta or gamma dose estimates averaged over 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2, even though the program allows the user to calculate doses averaged over 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2. This article explains why VARSKIN Mod 2 overestimates the beta dose when applied to 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2 areas, describes a manual method for correcting the overestimate, and explains how to perform reasonable gamma dose calculations averaged over 10 <span class="hlt">cm</span>2. The article also describes upgrades underway in Varskin 3. PMID:14744063</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Durham, James S</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987NIMPA.257...15A"> <span id="translatedtitle">The preparation of 248<span class="hlt">Cm</span>F 3 deposits on self-supported carbon foils</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Another target preparative technique was recently added to the Isotope Research Materials Laboratory's (IRML) capabilities for custom target fabrication. In support of super-heavy-ion physics experiments, methods and equipment were developed for the preparation of 248<span class="hlt">Cm</span>F 3 deposits on carbon foils. The starting material was obtained as either a chloride or nitrate solution, converted to the flouride, and evaporated on carbon foil substrates. Deposits ranging from 40 to 570 ?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2 were prepared as a 12-mm-diam spot on 45- to 60-?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2 self-supported carbon foils. The deposits were then overcoated with approximately 10 ?g/<span class="hlt">cm</span> 2 of carbon to minimize contamination problems during target handling. The high cost of 248<span class="hlt">Cm</span> ($100/?g) and its limited availability were the key constraints in the development of preparative technology beyond the inherent radioactivity of 248<span class="hlt">Cm</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aaron, W. S.; Petek, M.; Zevenbergen, L. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AstL...40..551L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Results of a long-term monitoring of the 1.35-<span class="hlt">cm</span> water-vapor maser source ON 1 (1981-2013)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the results of our long-term monitoring of the 1.35-<span class="hlt">cm</span> water-vapor maser source ON 1 performed at the 22-m radio telescope of the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory from 1981 to 2013. Maser emissionwas observed in a wide range of radial velocities, from -60 to +60 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>. Variability of the integrated flux with a period of ˜9 years was detected. We show that the stable emission at radial velocities of 10.3, 14.7, and 16.5 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> belongs to compact structures that are composed of maser spots with close radial velocities and that are members of two water-maser clusters, WMC 1 and WMC 2. The detected short-lived emission features in the velocity ranges from -30 to 0 and from 35 to 40 km <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> as well as the high-velocity ones are most likely associated with a bipolar molecular outflow observed in the CO line.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lekht, E. E.; Krasnov, V. V.; Tolmachev, A. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3351440"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Enhances Satellite Cell Activation in Dystrophic Muscles through a <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2/STAT3 Signaling Pathway</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sphingosine-1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) activates a widely expressed family of G protein-coupled receptors, serves as a muscle trophic factor and activates muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs) through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that muscle injury induces dynamic changes in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P signaling and metabolism in vivo. These changes include early and profound induction of the gene encoding the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P biosynthetic enzyme SphK1, followed by induction of the catabolic enzyme sphingosine phosphate lyase (SPL) 3 days later. These changes correlate with a transient increase in circulating <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels after muscle injury. We show a specific requirement for SphK1 to support efficient muscle regeneration and SC proliferation and differentiation. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD), were found to be <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P-deficient and exhibited muscle SPL upregulation, suggesting that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P catabolism is enhanced in dystrophic muscle. Pharmacological SPL inhibition increased muscle <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P levels, improved mdx muscle regeneration and enhanced SC proliferation via <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P receptor 2 (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2)-dependent inhibition of Rac1, thereby activating Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3), a central player in inflammatory signaling. STAT3 activation resulted in p21 and p27 downregulation in a <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2-dependent fashion in myoblasts. Our findings suggest that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P promotes SC progression through the cell cycle by repression of cell cycle inhibitors via <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2/STAT3-dependent signaling and that SPL inhibition may provide a therapeutic strategy for MD. PMID:22606352</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Carlson, Morgan E.; Oskouian, Babak; Kumar, Ashok; Fyrst, Henrik; Zhang, Meng; Proia, Richard L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Saba, Julie D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3723626"> <span id="translatedtitle">Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Is a Conserved Substrate Selector for the Chloroplast Clp Protease System in Arabidopsis[C][W</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Whereas the plastid caseinolytic peptidase (Clp) P protease system is essential for plant development, substrates and substrate selection mechanisms are unknown. Bacterial ClpS is involved in N-degron substrate selection and delivery to the ClpAP protease. Through phylogenetic analysis, we show that all angiosperms contain Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and some species also contain Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-like protein(s). In silico analysis suggests that Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> is the functional homolog of bacterial ClpS. We show that Arabidopsis thaliana Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> interacts with plastid ClpC1,2 chaperones. The Arabidopsis Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> null mutant (clps1) lacks a visible phenotype, and no genetic interactions with ClpC/D chaperone or ClpPR core mutants were observed. However, clps1, but not clpc1-1, has increased sensitivity to the translational elongation inhibitor chloramphenicol suggesting a link between translational capacity and Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Moreover, Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> was upregulated in clpc1-1, and quantitative proteomics of clps1, clpc1, and clps1 clpc1 showed specific molecular phenotypes attributed to loss of ClpC1 or Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. In particular, clps1 showed alteration of the tetrapyrrole pathway. Affinity purification identified eight candidate Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> substrates, including plastid DNA repair proteins and Glu tRNA reductase, which is a control point for tetrapyrrole synthesis. Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> interaction with five substrates strictly depended on two conserved Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> residues involved in N-degron recognition. Clp<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> function, substrates, and substrate recognition mechanisms are discussed. PMID:23898032</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nishimura, Kenji; Asakura, Yukari; Friso, Giulia; Kim, Jitae; Oh, Soo-hyun; Rutschow, Heidi; Ponnala, Lalit; van Wijk, Klaas J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_19 div --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JChPh.140r4310D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Excited-state Raman spectroscopy with and without actinic excitation: <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Raman spectra of trans-azobenzene</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We show that femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy can record excited-state spectra in the absence of actinic excitation, if the Raman pump is in resonance with an electronic transition. The approach is illustrated by recording <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and S0 spectra of trans-azobenzene in n-hexane. The <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> spectra were also measured conventionally, upon n?* (S0 ? <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) actinic excitation. The results are discussed and compared to earlier reports.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dobryakov, A. L.; Quick, M.; Ioffe, I. N.; Granovsky, A. A.; Ernsting, N. P.; Kovalenko, S. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25131879"> <span id="translatedtitle">[A case of complete response to multiple liver metastasis of gastric cancer after discontinuation of <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> administration].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An 80-year-old man was diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer and underwent distal gastrectomy. Although the pathological Stage of the cancer was III A, he refused adjuvant chemotherapy. One year later, CT revealed multiple liver metastases. Therefore, he was started with <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> administration and a complete response was obtained at 10 months after starting <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> administration. He has maintained a complete response for 22 months after <span class="hlt">S</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> discontinuation. PMID:25131879</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koike, Masahiko; Mino, Kazuhiro; Shoji, Hirotaka; Konishi, Yuji; Katayama, Tomonari; Kuwahara, Hiroaki; Kon, Hirofumi; Tamura, Motoshi; Iwasaki, Sari; Suzuki, Akira; Akasaka, Yoshinobu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56595287"> <span id="translatedtitle">The <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1-mTOR axis directs the reciprocal differentiation of TH1 and Treg cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Naive CD4+ T cells differentiate into diverse effector and regulatory lineages to orchestrate immunity and tolerance. Here we found that the differentiation of proinflammatory T helper type 1 (TH1) cells and anti-inflammatory Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) was reciprocally regulated by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1, a receptor for the bioactive lipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P). <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P1 inhibited the generation of extrathymic and natural</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guangwei Liu; Kai Yang; Samir Burns; Sharad Shrestha; Hongbo Chi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13381120"> <span id="translatedtitle">Non-nebular origin of dark mantles around chondrules and inclusions in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Our examination of nine <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites that span the aqueous alteration sequence leads us to conclude that compact dark fine mantles surrounding chondrules and inclusions in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites are not discrete fine-grained rims acquired in the solar nebula as modeled by Metzler et al. [Accretionary dust mantles in <span class="hlt">CM</span> chondrites: evidence for solar nebula processes. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta56, 1992, 2873–2897].</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Josep M. Trigo-Rodriguez; Alan E. Rubin; John T. Wasson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/50369473"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deformable contact liner implosion performed with 8 <span class="hlt">cm</span> diameter electrode apertures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Summary form only given. We present experimental data indicating the feasibility of using a varying thickness in a long cylindrical solid liner, driven as a Z-pinch, to achieve factor ?17 cylindrical convergence, while using large aperture electrodes. The Al liner was 30 <span class="hlt">cm</span> long, with 9.78 <span class="hlt">cm</span> inner diameter for its full length, 10.0 <span class="hlt">cm</span> outer diameter for the central</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. H. Degnan; D. Amdahl; A. Brown; T. Cavazos; S. K. Coffey; G. G. Craddock; M. H. Frese; S. D. Frese; D. Gale; T. C. Grabowski; G. F. Kiuttu; F. M. Lehr; J. D. Letterio; N. F. Roderick; E. L. Ruden; R. E. Siemon; W. Sommars; P. J. Turchi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/44200777"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amino acids in Antarctic <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 meteorites and their relationship to other carbonaceous chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites are the most primitive material present in the solar system, and some of their subtypes, the <span class="hlt">CM</span> and CI chondrites, contain up to 2 wt% of organic carbon. The <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of complex amino acids, while the CI1 meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna display a much simpler composition, with only glycine and beta-alanine</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Oliver Botta; Zita Martins; Pascale Ehrenfreund</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16985081"> <span id="translatedtitle">The mutated <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-haplotype in sour cherry has an altered S-haplotype-specific F-box protein gene.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) is an outcrossing mechanism in flowering plants that is genetically controlled by 2 separate genes located at the highly polymorphic S-locus, termed S-haplotype. This study characterizes a pollen part mutant of the <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)-haplotype present in sour cherry (Rosaceae, Prunus cerasus L.) that contributes to the loss of GSI. Inheritance of S-haplotypes from reciprocal interspecific crosses between the self-compatible sour cherry cultivar Ujfehértói Fürtös carrying the mutated <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)-haplotype (<span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)'S(4)S(d)S(null)) and the self-incompatible sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivars carrying the wild-type <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)-haplotype revealed that the mutated <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)-haplotype confers unilateral incompatibility with a functional pistil component and a nonfunctional pollen component. The altered sour cherry <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)-haplotype pollen part mutant, termed <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)', contains a 615-bp Ds-like element within the <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)-haplotype-specific F-box protein gene (SFB(1)'). This insertion generates a premature in-frame stop codon that would result in a putative truncated SFB(1) containing only 75 of the 375 amino acids present in the wild-type SFB(1). <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)' along with 2 other previously characterized Prunus S-haplotype mutants, S(f) and S(6m), illustrate that mobile element insertion is an evolutionary force contributing to the breakdown of GSI. PMID:16985081</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hauck, Nathanael R; Ikeda, Kazuo; Tao, Ryutaro; Iezzoni, Amy F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3884200"> <span id="translatedtitle">A transcriptomic approach to elucidate the physiological significance of human cytochrome P450 2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> in bronchial epithelial cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Background Cytochrome P450 2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) is an orphan P450 with an unknown biological function. Data from our laboratory and others suggest that CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> may have an important physiological role in modulating the synthesis and metabolism of bioactive lipids including prostaglandins and retinoids. CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> expression is elevated in multiple epithelial-derived cancers as well as in the chronic hyperproliferative disease psoriasis. Whether CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> expression in proliferative disease is protective, detrimental, or neutral to disease progression remains to be determined. Two human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were constructed to represent chronic depletion of CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> using short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) silencing directed toward the 3’UTR (759) and exon 3 (984) of the CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> gene and compared with a non-targeting shRNA control (SCRAM). Both CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> mRNA and protein were depleted by approximately 75% in stable cell lines derived from both targeted shRNA constructs (759 and 984). To elucidate the biological significance of CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>, we analyzed transcriptome alterations in response to CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> depletion in human lung cells. Results RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis was performed to compare the transcriptome of the control (SCRAM) and the CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-depleted (759) BEAS-2B cell lines. Transcriptomes of the replicates from the two cell lines were found to be distinct populations as determined using Principal Component Analysis and hierarchical clustering. Approximately 1000 genes were differentially expressed in response to CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> depletion. Consistent with our previous phenotypes, DAVID analysis revealed altered regulation in key pathways implicated in cell proliferation and migration. Transcriptomic profiles were also consistent with the metabolism of proposed endogenous substrates. Pathway analysis also revealed significant expression changes within mTOR signaling, a critical pathway in cell growth. To determine whether these changes manifest as altered cell size, cell diameter and volume were calculated, revealing that CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> depletion promotes cell growth in BEAS-2B cells. Conclusions These data suggest that pathway analysis of sequence-based gene expression is a powerful method to identify pathways and phenotypic alterations in response to changes in orphan enzyme expression. Our results suggest a novel role for CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>-mediated metabolism in modulating BEAS-2B cell size. These findings warrant further studies on CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> regulated pathways to elucidate potential substrates of CYP2<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. PMID:24279958</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PhRvL..97p1802A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for Neutral, Long-Lived Particles Decaying into Two Muons in pp¯ Collisions at <span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96TeV</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a search for a neutral particle, pair produced in pp¯ collisions at <span class="hlt">s</span>=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96TeV, which decays into two muons and lives long enough to travel at least 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> before decaying. The analysis uses ?380pb-1 of data recorded with the D0 detector. The background is estimated to be about one event. No candidates are observed, and limits are set on the pair-production cross section times branching fraction into dimuons + X for such particles. For a mass of 10 GeV and lifetime of 4×10-11s, we exclude values greater than 0.14 pb (95% C.L.). These results are used to limit the interpretation of NuTeV’s excess of dimuon events.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Anzelc, M. S.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Jesus, A. C. S. Assis; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Ay, C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Benitez, J. A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Berntzon, L.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Bloom, K.; Blumenschein, U.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Calfayan, P.; Calvet, S.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevallier, F.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christofek, L.; Claes, D.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cutts, D.; ?wiok, M.; da Motta, H.; Das, A.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; Cruz-Burelo, E. De La; Martins, C. De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doidge, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dong, H.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fatakia, S. N.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Ginther, G.; Gollub, N.; Gómez, B.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Guo, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haefner, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegeman, J. G.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoeth, H.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jakobs, K.; Jarvis, C.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Juste, A.; Käfer, D.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J. M.; Kalk, J. R.; Kappler, S.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Kasper, P.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Khatidze, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirby, M. H.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Krop, D.; Kryemadhi, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lazoflores, J.; Bihan, A.-C. Le; Lebrun, P.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Lesne, V.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Z.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Martens, M.; McCarthy, R.; Meder, D.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miettinen, H.; Millet, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Monk, J.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17155383"> <span id="translatedtitle">Search for neutral, long-lived particles decaying into two muons in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[<span class="hlt">s</span>]=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a search for a neutral particle, pair produced in pp[over] collisions at sqrt[<span class="hlt">s</span>]=<span class="hlt">1</span>.96 TeV, which decays into two muons and lives long enough to travel at least 5 <span class="hlt">cm</span> before decaying. The analysis uses approximately 380 pb(-1) of data recorded with the D0 detector. The background is estimated to be about one event. No candidates are observed, and limits are set on the pair-production cross section times branching fraction into dimuons + X for such particles. For a mass of 10 GeV and lifetime of 4x10(-11) s, we exclude values greater than 0.14 pb (95% C.L.). These results are used to limit the interpretation of NuTeV's excess of dimuon events. PMID:17155383</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; Cruz-Burelo, E De La; Martins, C De Oliveira; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Bihan, A-C Le; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; McCarthy, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'dell, V; O'neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Peters, K; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-10-20</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56808557"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-Speed (4–6 <span class="hlt">cm</span>? ?sec) Gas-Jet Propagation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A gas-jet experiment was conducted using a Voitenko compressor to deposit approximately 7×1013 erg of energy into 27.5 g of air. This high-energy gas or plasma jetted down a 2-<span class="hlt">cm</span>-i.d. 350-<span class="hlt">cm</span>-long steel exit pipe containing air initially at a pressure of 20 ? of mercury. The jet structure was composed of a 5.5-<span class="hlt">cm</span>??sec low-density (<5×10?5 g?<span class="hlt">cm</span>3) peak followed by a</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. David Glenn; Barbara K. Crowley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://geosci.uchicago.edu/~grossman/BWSG12.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnesium isotopic fractionation in chondrules from the Murchison and Murray <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous. Investigation of the magnesium isotopic compositions of chondrules can place stringent constraints on the timing</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grossman, Lawrence</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2993927"> <span id="translatedtitle">Expanding the Landscape of Chromatin Modification (<span class="hlt">CM</span>)-Related Functional Domains and Genes in Human</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Chromatin modification (<span class="hlt">CM</span>) plays a key role in regulating transcription, DNA replication, repair and recombination. However, our knowledge of these processes in humans remains very limited. Here we use computational approaches to study proteins and functional domains involved in <span class="hlt">CM</span> in humans. We analyze the abundance and the pair-wise domain-domain co-occurrences of 25 well-documented <span class="hlt">CM</span> domains in 5 model organisms: yeast, worm, fly, mouse and human. Results show that domains involved in histone methylation, DNA methylation, and histone variants are remarkably expanded in metazoan, reflecting the increased demand for cell type-specific gene regulation. We find that <span class="hlt">CM</span> domains tend to co-occur with a limited number of partner domains and are hence not promiscuous. This property is exploited to identify 47 potentially novel <span class="hlt">CM</span> domains, including 24 DNA-binding domains, whose role in <span class="hlt">CM</span> has received little attention so far. Lastly, we use a consensus Machine Learning approach to predict 379 novel <span class="hlt">CM</span> genes (coding for 329 proteins) in humans based on domain compositions. Several of these predictions are supported by very recent experimental studies and others are slated for experimental verification. Identification of novel <span class="hlt">CM</span> genes and domains in humans will aid our understanding of fundamental epigenetic processes that are important for stem cell differentiation and cancer biology. Information on all the candidate <span class="hlt">CM</span> domains and genes reported here is publicly available. PMID:21124763</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L.; Vlasblom, James; On, Tuan; Xiong, Xuejian; Emili, Andrew; Zhang, Zhaolei; Greenblatt, Jack; Parkinson, John; Wodak, Shoshana J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21639083"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rotationally resolved C2 symmetric conformers of bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)methane: prototypical examples of excitonic coupling in the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> and S2 electronic states.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rotationally resolved microwave and ultraviolet spectra of jet-cooled bis-(4-hydroxyphenyl)methane (b4HPM) have been obtained using Fourier-transform microwave and UV laser/molecular beam spectrometers. A recent vibronic level study of b4HPM [Rodrigo, C. P.; Mu?ller, C. W.; Pillsbury, N. R.; James, W. H., III; Plusquellic, D. F.; Zwier, T. S. J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 134, 164312] has assigned two conformers distinguished by the orientation of the in-plane OH groups and has identified two excitonic origins in each conformer. In the present study, the rotationally resolved bands of all four states have been well-fit to asymmetric rotor Hamiltonians. For the lower exciton (<span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>)) levels, the transition dipole moment (TDM) orientations are perpendicular to the C(2) symmetry axes and consist of 41(2):59(2) and 34(2):66(2)% a:c hybrid-type character. The <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>) levels are therefore delocalized states of B symmetry and represent the antisymmetric combinations of the zero-order locally excited states of the p-cresol-like chromophores. The TDM polarizations of bands located at ?132 <span class="hlt">cm</span>(-1) above the <span class="hlt">S</span>(<span class="hlt">1</span>) origins are exclusively b-type and identify them as the upper exciton S(2) origin levels of A symmetry. The TDM orientations and the relative band strengths from the vibronic study have been analyzed within a dipole-dipole coupling model in terms of the localized TDM orientations, ?(loc), on the two chromophores. The out-of-the-ring plane angles of ?(loc) are both near 20° and are similar to results for diphenylmethane [Stearns, J. A.; Pillsbury, N. R.; Douglass, K. O.; Mu?ller, C. W.; Zwier, T. S.; Plusquellic, D. F. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 224305]. The in-plane angles are, however, rotated by 14 and 18° relative to DPM and, in part, explain the smaller than expected exciton splittings of these two conformers. PMID:21639083</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chou, Shin Grace; Rodrigo, Chirantha P; Müller, Christian W; Douglass, Kevin O; Zwier, Timothy S; Plusquellic, David F</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://stoltz.caltech.edu/publications/32-s-2003.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ashley, Cruz, and Stoltz, Supporting Information <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> Supporting Information for</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/epsearch/">E-print Network</a></p> <p class="result-summary">.25 mm) and visualized by UV, anisaldehyde, permanganate, or CAM staining. ICN Silica gel (particle size of absorption (<span class="hlt">cm</span>-1). UV spectra were measured on a Beckman-Coulter DU 7400 spectrophotometer. High resolution. G.; Das, P. R.; Pramanik, B.; Puar, M. S. J.Antibiot. 1997, 50, 126- 134. (b) Horan, A. C.; Shearer</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stoltz, Brian M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19571896"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental design and environmental parameters affect Rhodospirillum rubrum <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>H response to space flight.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In view of long-haul space exploration missions, the European Space Agency initiated the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project targeting the total recycling of organic waste produced by the astronauts into oxygen, water and food using a loop of bacterial and higher plant bioreactors. In that purpose, the alpha-proteobacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>H, was sent twice to the International Space Station and was analyzed post-flight using a newly developed R. rubrum whole genome oligonucleotide microarray and high throughput gel-free proteomics with Isotope-Coded Protein Label technology. Moreover, in an effort to identify a specific response of R. rubrum <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>H to space flight, simulation of microgravity and space-ionizing radiation were performed on Earth under identical culture set-up and growth conditions as encountered during the actual space journeys. Transcriptomic and proteomic data were integrated and permitted to put forward the importance of medium composition and culture set-up on the response of the bacterium to space flight-related environmental conditions. In addition, we showed for the first time that a low dose of ionizing radiation (2 mGy) can induce a significant response at the transcriptomic level, although no change in cell viability and only a few significant differentially expressed proteins were observed. From the MELiSSA perspective, we could argue the effect of microgravity to be minimized, whereas R. rubrum <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>H could be more sensitive to ionizing radiation during long-term space exploration mission. PMID:19571896</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mastroleo, Felice; Van Houdt, Rob; Leroy, Baptiste; Benotmane, M Abderrafi; Janssen, Ann; Mergeay, Max; Vanhavere, Filip; Hendrickx, Larissa; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20011147"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of allergenic epitopes of Ory <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> protein from Oryza sativa and its homologs.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vaccination is the most effective technique suggested now days for allergy treatment. Recombinant-based approaches are mostly focused on genetic modification of allergens to produce molecules with reduced allergenic activity and conserved antigenicity. The molecules developed for vaccination in allergy possess significantly reduced allergenicity in terms of IgE binding, and therefore will not lead to anaphylactic reactions upon injection. This approach is probably feasible with every peptide allergen with known amino acid sequence. In this study an in silico approach was used to investigate allergenic protein sequences. Motif analysis of these sequences reveals the allergenic epitopes in the amino acid sequences. Physicochemical analysis of protein sequences shows that the homolog allergens of Ory <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> are highly correlated with the aromaticity, GRAVY and cysteine content. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis of Ory <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> with other sequences reveals that Oryza sativa japonica and Zea mays are close homologs, whilst Lolium perenne and Dactylis glomerata are found to be remote homologs. The multiple sequence alignment reveals of Ory <span class="hlt">s</span><span class="hlt">1</span> with all its homologs in this study reveals the high conservation of residues in DPBB_1 domain (amino acid residue positions 86- 164) and was found distinctly in all the sequences. These findings support the proposal that allergenic epitopes encompass conserved residues. The consensus allergenic was found to be mainly composed of hydrophobic residues. The functional sites of allergenic proteins reported in this study shall be attenuated to develop hypoallergenic vaccine. The sequence comparison strategy adopted in this study would pave way effective evolutionary analysis of these allergens. PMID:20011147</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sharma, Ruchi; Singh, Ashok Kumar; Umashankar, Vetrivel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PalOc..21.3007R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Source and development of large manganese enrichments above eastern Mediterranean sapropel <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The residual dark unit of the most recent eastern Mediterranean sapropel (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>) is usually overlain by sediments with enhanced concentrations of MnOx in two separated layers. The variability and magnitude of the Mn enrichment at different locations and water depths indicate that Mn must have been added preferentially to sediments at intermediate (1-2 km) water depths. We propose a two-stage mechanism for the Mn enrichment that involves decreasing oxygenation with increasing water depth. This mechanism involves the loss of reduced Mn2+ from the deepest sediments (>2 km water depth) into overlying anoxic waters and a variable gain of MnOx in sediments in contact with oxygenated waters at shallower depth. In the <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> unit that receives the extra MnOx input, an upper higher Mn-enriched zone (>3 wt %) is maintained continuously at the top of the accumulating <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> unit because the pore waters are anoxic at shallow sediment depth while bottom waters are oxic to some degree. In a reactive-transport model, the Mn enrichment in the upper zone could not be supported by normal sediment diagenesis. Thus the MnOx in the upper Mn horizon must have formed mainly in the water column. The MnOx in the upper Mn-enriched zone adsorbed Mo and Li from seawater in a similar manner as other Mn-enriched oxic sediments, nodules, and crusts, with a Mn:Mo ratio of ˜600:1, a Mn:Li ratio of ˜750:1, and a ?98/95MoMOMO of -2.5 ‰.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Reitz, Anja; Thomson, John; de Lange, Gert J.; Hensen, Christian</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3996337"> <span id="translatedtitle">A New Electrophysiological Method for the Diagnosis of Extraforaminal Stenosis at L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose To examine the effectiveness of using an electrodiagnostic technique as a new approach in the clinical diagnosis of extraforaminal stenosis at L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. Overview of Literature We introduced a new effective approach to the diagnosis of extraforaminal stenosis at the lumbosacral junction using the existing electrophysiological evaluation technique. Methods A consecutive series of 124 patients with fifth lumbar radiculopathy were enrolled, comprising a group of 74 patients with spinal canal stenosis and a second group of 50 patients with extraforaminal stenosis at L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. The technique involved inserting a pair of needle electrodes into the foraminal exit zone of the fifth lumbar spinal nerves, which were used to provide electrical stimulation. The compound muscle action potentials from each of the tibialis anterior muscles were recorded. Results The distal motor latency (DML) of the potentials ranged from 11.2 to 24.6 milliseconds in patients with extraforaminal stenosis. In contrast, the DML in patients with spinal canal stenosis ranged from 10.0 to 17.2 milliseconds. After comparing the DML of each of the 2 groups and at the same time comparing the differences in DML between the affected and unaffected side of each patient, we concluded there were statistically significant differences (p<0.01) between the 2 groups. Using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the cutoff values were calculated to be 15.2 milliseconds and 1.1 milliseconds, respectively. Conclusions This approach using a means of DML measurement enables us to identify and localize lesions, which offers an advantage in diagnosing extraforaminal stenosis at L5-<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>. PMID:24761195</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshida, Munehito; Yamada, Hiroshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Minamide, Akihito; Nakagawa, Yukihiro; Kawai, Masaki; Tsutsui, Shunji</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApJ...788L...7C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unusual Water Production Activity of Comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON): Outbursts and Continuous Fragmentation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Solar Wind ANisotropies (SWAN) all-sky hydrogen Ly? camera on the SOlar and Heliospheric Observer (SOHO) satellite observed the hydrogen coma of comet C/2012 <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span> (ISON) for most of the last month of its activity from 2013 October 24 to November 24, ending just 4 days before perihelion and its final disruption. The water production rate of the comet was determined from these observations. SOHO has been operating in a halo orbit around the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrange point since its launch in late 1995. Most water vapor produced by comets is ultimately photodissociated into two H atoms and one O atom producing a huge hydrogen coma that is routinely observed in the daily SWAN images in comets of sufficient brightness. Water production rates were calculated from 22 images over most of the last month of the pre-perihelion apparition. The water production rate increased very slowly on average from October 24.9 until November 12.9, staying between 1.8 and 3.4 × 1028 <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span>, after which it increased dramatically, reaching 1.6 to 2 × 1030 <span class="hlt">s</span>-<span class="hlt">1</span> from November 21.6 to 23.6. It was not detected after perihelion on December 3.7 when it should have been visible. We examine the active surface area necessary to explain the water production rate and its variation and are able to place constraints on the physical size of the original nucleus necessary to account for the large amount of activity from November 12.9 and until just before perihelion.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Combi, M. R.; Fougere, N.; Mäkinen, J. T. T.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Quémerais, E.; Ferron, S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> </div><!-- page_20 div --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3990666"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) Induced Interleukin-8 (IL-8) Release Is Mediated by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P Receptor 2 and Nuclear Factor ?B in BEAS-2B Cells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The airway epithelium may release pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the asthmatic airway. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (<span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P) is a bioactive lipid, increased in the airways of asthmatics, that may trigger the release of the potent neutrophil chemoattractant Interleukin-8 (IL-8) by epithelial cells. <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P is a ligand for 5 G protein-coupled receptors, <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR1-5. We wished to explore the mechanisms of <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P induced IL-8 secretion with regard to the receptor(s) and downstream signaling events involved. Our results indicate that <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P induced IL-8 release is mediated by <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 and the transcription factor NF-?B. Since the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in IL-8 release in response to activation of other G protein-coupled receptors, we examined their importance in <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>P induced IL-8 release and established that they are not involved. This study reveals <span class="hlt">S</span><span class="hlt">1</span>PR2 and NF-?B as potential therapeutic targets in neutrophilic airway diseases such as severe asthma. PMID:24743449</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Hirota, Nobuaki; Martin, James G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007M%26PS...42...81B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Amino acids in Antarctic <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 meteorites and their relationship to other carbonaceous chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites are the most primitive material present in the solar system, and some of their subtypes, the <span class="hlt">CM</span> and CI chondrites, contain up to 2 wt% of organic carbon. The <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 carbonaceous chondrites contain a wide variety of complex amino acids, while the CI1 meteorites Orgueil and Ivuna display a much simpler composition, with only glycine and ?-alanine present in significant abundances. <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 carbonaceous chondrites show a higher degree of aqueous alteration than <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 types and therefore provide an important link between the <span class="hlt">CM</span>2 and CI1 carbonaceous chondrites. Relative amino acid concentrations have been shown to be indicative for parent body processes with respect to the formation of this class of compounds. In order to understand the relationship of the amino acid composition between these three types of meteorites, we have analyzed for the first time three Antarctic <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 chondrites, Meteorite Hills (MET) 01070, Allan Hills (ALH) 88045, and LaPaz Icefield (LAP) 02277, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD). The concentrations of the eight most abundant amino acids in these meteorites were compared to those of the <span class="hlt">CM</span>2s Murchison, Murray, Mighei, Lewis Cliff (LEW) 90500, ALH 83100, as well as the CI1s Orgueil and Ivuna. The total amino acid concentration in <span class="hlt">CM</span>1 carbonaceous chondrites was found to be much lower than the average of the <span class="hlt">CM</span>2s. Relative amino acid abundances were compared in order to identify synthetic relationships between the amino acid compositions in these meteorite classes. Our data support the hypothesis that amino acids in <span class="hlt">CM</span>- and CI-type meteorites were synthesized under different physical and chemical conditions and may best be explained with differences in the abundances of precursor compounds in the source regions of their parent bodies in combination with the decomposition of amino acids during ext