Science.gov

Sample records for 100-kyr glacial cycle

  1. Which 100-kyr Cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, A.; Loutre, M. F.; Mélice, J. L.

    The origin of all the fundamental frequencies characterising the long term variations of the astronomical parameters has been identified. This allows to discuss their inter- relationship and possible changes in times. Different sources for the so-called 100-kyr cycle have been found in the astronomical parameters and in the insolation itself. The most popular 100-kyr cycle is certainly the eccentricity one. Actually, the periods of the most important spectral components of e used in Berger (1978) are 412 885, 14 945, 123 297, 99 590 and 131 248 yr. Instability of the resulting average 100-kyr cy- cle has been shown related to the ~ 400-kyr cycle. The derivative of eccentricity is definitely showing a spectrum dominated by the 100-kyr cycle with the same spectral components as e itself. The inclination of the Earth orbital plane on the ecliptic does not display any 100-kyr cycle, but it is not the case for its inclination on the reference plane for which cycles of 98 046 and 107 478 years appear. Finally the frequency modulation of obliquity is characterised by cycles 171 kyr and 97 kyr long. For inso- lation, it is known that there is only a very weak signal around 100-kyr coming from e itself. However, if we consider the seasonal cycle at the equator, its amplitude varies with cycles of 400 kyr, 100 kyr, 41 kyr, 10 kyr and 5 kyr, all related to e. Although all these cycles are close to the 100 kyr cycle found in geological data, the origin of this kind of cycle can be best identified by comparing the proxy record to the re- sponse of the climate system to the astronomical forcing. This forcing signal which contains, in one way or another, the astronomical characteristics mentioned above is, at least, partly distorted and transformed, a modification which can only be estimated through climate models. Such a climate model has been developed in the early 80Ss in Louvain-la-Neuve and used since to simulate the last and next glacial-interglacial cycles.

  2. Insolation-driven 100 kyr glacial cycles and millennial climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Saito, F.; Kawamura, K.; Raymo, M. E.; Okuno, J.; Takahashi, K.; Blatter, H.

    2013-12-01

    The waxing and waning of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets over the past one million years is dominated by an approximately 100-kyr periodicity and a sawtooth pattern (gradual growth and fast termination). Milankovitch theory proposes that summer insolation at high northern latitudes drives the glacial cycles, and statistical tests demonstrated that the glacial cycles are indeed linked to eccentricity, obliquity and precession cycles. However, insolation alone cannot explain the strong 100 kyr cycle which presumably arises through internal climatic feedbacks. Prior work with conceptual models, for example, showed that glacial terminations are associated with the build-up of Northern Hemisphere 'excess ice', but the physical mechanisms of 100-kyr cycle at work remain unclear. Here, using comprehensive climate and ice sheet models, we show that the ~100-kyr periodicity is explained by insolation and internal feedback amongst the climate, ice sheet and lithosphere/asthenosphere system (reference). We found that equilibrium states of ice sheets exhibit hysteresis responses to summer insolation, and that the shape and position of the hysteresis loop play a key role in determining the periodicities of glacial cycles. The hysteresis loop of the North American ice sheet is such that, after its inception, the ice sheet mass balance remains mostly positive or neutral through several precession cycles whose amplitude decreases towards an eccentricity minimum. The larger the ice sheet grows and extends towards lower latitudes, the smaller is the insolation required to turn the mass balance to negative. Therefore, once the large ice sheet is established, only a moderate increase in insolation can trigger a negative mass balance, leading to a complete retreat within several thousand years, due to the delayed isostatic rebound. The effect of ocean circulation and millennial scale climate change are not playing the dominant role for determing the 100kyr cycle, but are effective for

  3. Does ice accretion temperature and geothernmal heating pace the change from ~40 kyr to ~100 kyr glacial cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, W. R.

    2008-12-01

    The growth and decay of ice sheets are clearly linked to cycles of the Earth's orbit, particularly the ~41 kyr obliquity cycle. Early Pleistocene ice ages appear to have grown and decayed on a timescale close to the obliquity period, while the period for late Pleistocene ice ages averages closer to 100 kyr. The thermal state of an ice sheet may control whether the climatic changes produced by orbital changes are can lead to the termination of an ice age. Numerous model studies indicate that the termination of ice ages requires glacial flow that is faster than expected for cold-based ice sheets. Fast flow likely requires that the base of the ice sheet be partially melted. Large ice sheets probably accrete cold, but geothermal heating can melt the base of an ice sheet if the surface of the ice is not too cold (as it may be in Antarctica) or if the accretion rate is not too high (as it may be in Greenland). The timescale for basal melting depends on the initial temperature structure of the ice sheet and on the rate of geothermal heating. For example the melting timescale depends on the square of the initial temperature of the ice sheet base. Although some workers assume parameters that give a melting timescale of less than 10 kyrs, reasonable values of ice temperature and terrestrial heatflow could give a timescale several times longer. One-dimensional numerical ice sheet flow models with a rate of ice accretion/ablation paced at 41 kyrs show a periodicity of the glacial cycles that depends on the period of basal melting. If the melting period is short (say <~30 kyrs) then the base of the ice sheet will be partially melted in time for the obliquity maximum that could produce a termination. The ice sheet then disappears at this first obliquity maximum after ice sheet initiation because it can flow fast enough to melt at lower latitudes and elevations. For longer basal melting periods the entire ice sheet may not be warm enough to flow fast enough to lead to termination

  4. Frequency variations of the earth's obliquity and the 100-kyr ice-age cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Han-Shou

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the earth's climate are induced by variations in the earth's orbital parameters which modulate the seasonal distribution of solar radiation. Periodicities in the geological climate record with cycles of 100, 41, and 23 kyr have been linked with changes in obliquity, eccentricity, and precession of the equinoxes. The effect of variations of eccentricity during a 100 kyr period is weak relative to the signals from obliquity and precession variations and it may therefore be expected that the 100 kyr signal in the climate record would be of low intensity. However, this signal dominates the climate record and internal nonlinear processes within the climate system have previously been proposed to account for this fact. The author shows that variations in the frequency of the obliquity cycle can give rise to strong 100-kyr forcing of climate.

  5. Simulation and understanding the nature of Quaternary glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, A.; Calov, R.

    2012-04-01

    Although it is generally accepted that, as postulated by the Milankovitch theory, Earth's orbital variations play an important role in Quaternary climate dynamics, the mechanism of glacial cycles still remains poorly understood. Among remaining scientific challenges are an understanding of the nature of 100 kyr cycles that dominated global ice volume and climate variability over the late part of Quaternary and the causes of the transition from the "40 kyr world" to the "100 kyr world" around one million years ago. Using the Earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER-2, we demonstrate that both strong 100 kyr periodicity in the ice volume variations and the timing of glacial terminations during past 800 kyr can be successfully simulated as direct, strong nonlinear responses of the climate-cryosphere system to orbital forcing alone. We show that the sharp 100 kyr peak in the power spectrum of ice volume results from the phase locking of the long glacial cycles to the corresponding eccentricity cycles. Variations in obliquity and CO2 concentration are not required to simulate strong 100 kyr cyclicity if the atmospheric CO2 concentration stays below its typical interglacial value. The existence of long glacial cycles is primarily attributed to the North American ice sheet and it requires the presence of a large continental area with exposed rocks. In case when the continents are completely covered by a thick sediment layer, for the realistic range of CO2 concentrations (180-300 ppm), the long glacial cycles can not be simulated. In the experiment with fixed CO2 concentration, ice volume variations contain both strong precessional and obliquity cycles, which apparently is in odd with empirical data that suggest complete dominance of the obliquity cycle. However, in the experiments with interactive carbon cycle, simulated obliquity component becomes much stronger, especially, in the deep ocean temperature. This is explained by the direct and indirect (via the

  6. Late Neogene East Asian monsoon: from winter to summer dominated sub-regime and periodicity transition from 100 kyr to 41 kyr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, F.; Rousseau, D.-D.; Wu, N.; Hao, Q.; Pei, Y.

    2009-04-01

    More and more evidence indicates that the onset of the East Asian (EA) monsoon can be traced back to the Oligocene-Miocene boundary (at about 23 Ma). However, the process of its evolution is still less well known until now. Here we investigate its late Neogene evolution by analyzing a terrestrial mollusk sequence, from the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), covering the period between 7.1 and 3.5 Ma. Considering the modern ecological requirements of these organisms, we were able to define two groups of cold-aridiphilous (CA) and thermo-humidiphilous (TH) species, representing the EA winter and summer monsoon variations, respectively, as previously defined in the Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles. Variations in these two groups indicate two different monsoon dominated periods during 7.1-3.5 Ma. First, between 7.1 and 5.5 Ma, the EA winter monsoon, with a 100 kyr periodicity, was dominant. Second, between 5.1 and 4 Ma, the EA summer monsoon dominated, with a 41 kyr periodicity. Furthermore, our mollusk record yields valuable evidence for a late Miocene-Pliocene transition of about 400 kyr from winter monsoon dominated towards summer monsoon dominated, associated with a periodicity transition from weak 100 kyr to 41 kyr. The strengthened winter monsoon interval, with a 100 kyr periodicity, is coeval with orbital-scale global ice volume changes, in conjunction with the uplift of the Tibetan Plateau which probably reinforced the winter monsoon sub-regime. Conversely, closures of the Panama and Indonesian seaways, associated with changes in obliquity between 5.1 and 4 Ma, are probably major forcing factors for the observed dominant summer monsoon with 41 kyr frequency, favoring heat and moisture transports between low and high latitudes to allow TH mollusks to grow and develop in the CLP. The transition from a 100 kyr dominated interval towards a 41 kyr dominated one is contrary to the mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT), which corresponds to ice volume expansion at high

  7. Inherent characteristics of sawtooth cycles can explain different glacial periodicities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omta, Anne Willem; Kooi, Bob W.; van Voorn, George A. K.; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    At the Mid-Pleistocene Transition about 1 Ma, the dominant periodicity of the glacial-interglacial cycles shifted from 40 to 100 kyr. Here, we use a previously developed mathematical model to investigate the possible dynamical origin of these different periodicities. The model has two variables, one of which exhibits sawtooth oscillations, resembling the glacial-interglacial cycles, whereas the other variable exhibits spikes at the rapid transitions. When applying a sinusoidal forcing with a fixed period, there emerges a rich variety of cycles with different periodicities, each being a multiple of the forcing period. Furthermore, the dominant periodicity of the system can change, while the forcing periodicity remains fixed, due to either random variations or different frequency components of the orbital forcing. Two key relationships stand out as predictions to be tested against observations: (1) the amplitude and the periodicity of the cycles are approximately linearly proportional to each other, a relationship that is also found in the δ ^{18}O temperature proxy. (2) The magnitude of the spikes increases with increasing periodicity and amplitude of the sawtooth. This prediction could be used to identify one or more currently hidden spiking variables driving the glacial-interglacial transitions. Essentially, the quest would be for any proxy record, concurrent with a dynamical model prediction, that exhibits deglacial spikes which increase at times when the amplitude/periodicity of the glacial cycles increases. In the specific context of our calcifier-alkalinity mechanism, the records of interest would be calcifier productivity and calcite accumulation. We believe that such a falsifiable hypothesis should provide a strong motivation for the collection of further records.

  8. Extraterrestrial accretion and glacial cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the approx. 100-k.y. cycle seen in terrestrial glaciation is due to changes in meteor flux that come from changes in the Earth's orbit. This model can explain a 70-k.y. 'anomalous' period in climate data and the apparent discrepancy between present extraterrestrial fluxes and those in oceanic sediments. It can be tested by measuring Ir densities in sediments and ice during glacials and interglacials.

  9. Changing climatic response: a conceptual model for glacial cycles and the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daruka, I.; Ditlevsen, P. D.

    2014-03-01

    Milankovitch's astronomical theory of glacial cycles, attributing ice age climate oscillations to orbital changes in Northern Northern-Hemisphere insolation, is challenged by the paleoclimatic record. The climatic response to the variations in insolation is far from trivial. In general the glacial cycles are highly asymmetric in time, with slow cooling from the interglacials to the glacials (inceptions) and very rapid warming from the glacials to the interglacials (terminations). We shall refer to this fast-slow dynamics as the "saw-tooth" shape of the paleoclimatic record. This is non-linearly related to the time-symmetric variations in the orbital forcing. However, the most pronounced challenge to the Milankovitch theory is the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT) occurring about one million years ago. During that event, the prevailing 41 kyr glacial cycles, corresponding to the almost harmonic obliquity cycle were replaced by longer saw-tooth shaped cycles with a time scale around 100 kyr. The MPT must have been driven by internal changes in climate response, since it does not correspond to any apparent changes in the orbital forcing. In order to identify possible mechanisms causing the observed changes in glacial dynamics, it is relevant to study simplified models with the capability of generating temporal behavior similar to the observed records. We present a simple oscillator type model approach, with two variables, a temperature anomaly and an ice volume analogous, climatic memory term. The generalization of the ice albedo feedback is included in terms of an effective multiplicative coupling between this latter climatic memory term (representing the internal degrees of freedom) and the external drive. The simple model reproduces the temporal asymmetry of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles and suggests that the MPT can be explained as a regime shift, aided by climatic noise, from a period 1 frequency locking to the obliquity cycle to a period 2-3 frequency

  10. A conceptual model for glacial cycles and the middle Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daruka, István; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Milankovitch's astronomical theory of glacial cycles, attributing ice age climate oscillations to orbital changes in Northern-Hemisphere insolation, is challenged by the paleoclimatic record. The climatic response to the variations in insolation is far from trivial. In general the glacial cycles are highly asymmetric in time, with slow cooling from the interglacials to the glacials (inceptions) and very rapid warming from the glacials to the interglacials (terminations). We shall refer to this fast-slow dynamics as the "saw-tooth" shape of the paleoclimatic record. This is non-linearly related to the time-symmetric variations in the orbital forcing. However, the most pronounced challenge to the Milankovitch theory is the middle Pleistocene transition (MPT) occurring about one million years ago. During that event, the prevailing 41 kyr glacial cycles, corresponding to the almost harmonic obliquity cycle were replaced by longer saw-tooth shaped cycles with a time-scale around 100 kyr. The MPT must have been driven by internal changes in climate response, since it does not correspond to any apparent changes in the orbital forcing. In order to identify possible mechanisms causing the observed changes in glacial dynamics, it is relevant to study simplified models with the capability of generating temporal behavior similar to the observed records. We present a simple oscillator type model approach, with two variables, a temperature anomaly and a climatic memory term. The generalization of the ice albedo feedback is included in terms of an effective multiplicative coupling between this latter climatic memory term (representing the internal degrees of freedom) and the external drive. The simple model reproduces the temporal asymmetry of the late Pleistocene glacial cycles and suggests that the MPT can be explained as a regime shift, aided by climatic noise, from a period 1 frequency locking to the obliquity cycle to a period 2-3 frequency locking to the same obliquity

  11. Glacial cycles and astronomical forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, R.A.; MacDonald, G.J.

    1997-07-11

    Narrow spectral features in ocean sediment records offer strong evidence that the cycles of glaciation were driven by astronomical forces. Two million years ago, the cycles match the 41,000-year period of Earth`s obliquity. This supports the Croll/Milankovitch theory, which attributes the cycles to variations in insolation. But for the past million years, the spectrum is dominated by a single 100,000-year feature and is a poor match to the predictions of insolation models. The spectrum can be accounted for by a theory that derives the cycles of glaciation from variations in the inclination of Earth`s orbital plane.

  12. Variations in mid-ocean ridge CO2 emissions driven by glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burley, Jonathan M. A.; Katz, Richard F.

    2015-09-01

    The geological record documents links between glacial cycles and volcanic productivity, both subaerially and, tentatively, at mid-ocean ridges. Sea-level-driven pressure changes could also affect chemical properties of mid-ocean ridge volcanism. We consider how changing sea-level could alter the CO2 emissions rate from mid-ocean ridges on both the segment and global scale. We develop a simplified transport model for a highly incompatible trace element moving through a homogeneous mantle; variations in the concentration and the emission rate of the element are the result of changes in the depth of first silicate melting. The model predicts an average global mid-ocean ridge CO2 emissions rate of 53 Mt/yr or 91 Mt/yr for an average source mantle CO2 concentration of 125 or 215 ppm by weight, in line with other estimates. We show that falling sea level would cause an increase in ridge CO2 emissions about 100 kyrs after the causative sea level change. The lag and amplitude of the response are sensitive to mantle permeability and plate spreading rate. For a reconstructed sea-level time series of the past million years, we predict variations of up to 12% in global mid-ocean ridge CO2 emissions.

  13. Glacial CO2 Cycles: A Composite Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    There are three main contributors to the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content: starvation of the supply of carbon to the ocean-atmosphere reservoir, excess CO2 storage in the deep sea, and surface-ocean cooling. In this talk, I explore a scenario in which all three play significant roles. Key to this scenario is the assumption that deep ocean storage is related to the extent of nutrient stratification of the deep Atlantic. The stronger this stratification, the larger the storage of respiration CO2. Further, it is my contention that the link between Milankovitch insolation cycles and climate is reorganizations of the ocean's thermohaline circulation leading to changes in the deep ocean's CO2 storage. If this is the case, the deep Atlantic d13C record kept in benthic foraminifera shells tells us that deep ocean CO2 storage follows Northern Hemisphere summer insolation cycles and thus lacks the downward ramp so prominent in the records of sea level, benthic 18O and CO2. Rather, the ramp is created by the damping of planetary CO2 emissions during glacial time intervals. As it is premature to present a specific scenario, I provide an example as to how these three contributors might be combined. As their magnitudes and shapes remain largely unconstrained, the intent of this exercise is to provoke creative thinking.

  14. Climatic impact of glacial cycle polar motion: Coupled oscillations of ice sheet mass and rotation pole position

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bills, Bruce G.; James, Thomas S.; Mengel, John G.

    1999-01-01

    Precessional motion of Earth's rotation axis relative to its orbit is a well-known source of long-period climatic variation. It is less well appreciated that growth and decay of polar ice sheets perturb the symmetry of the global mass distribution enough that the geographic location of the rotation axis will change by at least 15 km and possibly as much as 100 km during a single glacial cycle. This motion of the pole will change the seasonal and latitudinal pattern of temperatures. We present calculations, based on a diurnal average energy balance, which compare the summer and winter temperature anomalies due to a 1° decrease in obliquity with those due to a 1° motion of the rotation pole toward Hudson Bay. Both effects result in peak temperature perturbations of about 1° Celsius. The obliquity change primarily influences the amplitude of the seasonal cycle, while the polar motion primarily changes the annual mean temperatures. The polar motion induced temperature anomaly is such that it will act as a powerful negative feedback on ice sheet growth. We also explore the evolution of the coupled system composed of ice sheet mass and pole position. Oscillatory solutions result from the conflicting constraints of rotational and thermal stability. A positive mass anomaly on an otherwise featureless Earth is in rotational equilibrium only at the poles or the equator. The two polar equilibria are rotationally unstable, and the equatorial equilibrium, though rotationally stable, is thermally unstable. We find that with a plausible choice for the strength of coupling between the thermal and rotational systems, relatively modest external forcing can produce significant response at periods of 104–106 years, but it strongly attenuates polar motion at longer periods. We suggest that these coupled oscillations may contribute to the observed dominance of 100 kyr glacial cycles since the mid-Pleistocene and will tend to stabilize geographic patterns that are suitable to

  15. 100 Kyr Old Desert of Western India: Morhodynamics and Environmental Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, N.

    2012-04-01

    The Late Quaternary oscillations in sea levels and resultant changes in the coastal environment have remained a popular aspect of study amongst the earthscientists and archaeologists. The Saurashtra peninsula of the western India that lies on the southwestern side of the Thar Desert, has archived a fascinating record of such environmental changes since last interglacial (~120kyr) in the form of a fossil desert exhibiting various aeolian land forms constituted by the sand largely derived from the coastal areas due to an oscillatory sea level change. A variety of dunes viz., coastal transverse, parabolic, longitudinal, barchans, climbing and falling dunes along with valley fills and sand sheets have been mapped. Being biogenic calcium carbonate rich, the sands have been lithified under the influence of an increase in moisture and thus the dune and bed forms are preserved in its best shape. The intense aeolian activities are also evident in the form of desert varnish on rocky outcrops. The sequence comprises smaller climate perturbations in the form of stabilization, erosion and karstification of older dunes and deposition of fluvial sediments in between. The paper deals with the mode of occurrence, response of sediments to wind dynamics and palaeo topography, internal structures, later modifications of sediments and significance of the geochronologically constrained aeolianites in understanding of environmental changes since 100kyr in the region.

  16. Geothermal activity helps life survive glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Terauds, Aleks; Smellie, John; Convey, Peter; Chown, Steven L

    2014-04-15

    Climate change has played a critical role in the evolution and structure of Earth's biodiversity. Geothermal activity, which can maintain ice-free terrain in glaciated regions, provides a tantalizing solution to the question of how diverse life can survive glaciations. No comprehensive assessment of this "geothermal glacial refugia" hypothesis has yet been undertaken, but Antarctica provides a unique setting for doing so. The continent has experienced repeated glaciations that most models indicate blanketed the continent in ice, yet many Antarctic species appear to have evolved in almost total isolation for millions of years, and hence must have persisted in situ throughout. How could terrestrial species have survived extreme glaciation events on the continent? Under a hypothesis of geothermal glacial refugia and subsequent recolonization of nongeothermal regions, we would expect to find greater contemporary diversity close to geothermal sites than in nongeothermal regions, and significant nestedness by distance of this diversity. We used spatial modeling approaches and the most comprehensive, validated terrestrial biodiversity dataset yet created for Antarctica to assess spatial patterns of diversity on the continent. Models clearly support our hypothesis, indicating that geothermally active regions have played a key role in structuring biodiversity patterns in Antarctica. These results provide critical insights into the evolutionary importance of geothermal refugia and the history of Antarctic species. PMID:24616489

  17. Geothermal activity helps life survive glacial cycles

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Terauds, Aleks; Smellie, John; Convey, Peter; Chown, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change has played a critical role in the evolution and structure of Earth’s biodiversity. Geothermal activity, which can maintain ice-free terrain in glaciated regions, provides a tantalizing solution to the question of how diverse life can survive glaciations. No comprehensive assessment of this “geothermal glacial refugia” hypothesis has yet been undertaken, but Antarctica provides a unique setting for doing so. The continent has experienced repeated glaciations that most models indicate blanketed the continent in ice, yet many Antarctic species appear to have evolved in almost total isolation for millions of years, and hence must have persisted in situ throughout. How could terrestrial species have survived extreme glaciation events on the continent? Under a hypothesis of geothermal glacial refugia and subsequent recolonization of nongeothermal regions, we would expect to find greater contemporary diversity close to geothermal sites than in nongeothermal regions, and significant nestedness by distance of this diversity. We used spatial modeling approaches and the most comprehensive, validated terrestrial biodiversity dataset yet created for Antarctica to assess spatial patterns of diversity on the continent. Models clearly support our hypothesis, indicating that geothermally active regions have played a key role in structuring biodiversity patterns in Antarctica. These results provide critical insights into the evolutionary importance of geothermal refugia and the history of Antarctic species. PMID:24616489

  18. Glacial Events Spanning the Last Glacial Cycle in the Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackray, G. D.; Rittenour, T. M.; Shulmeister, J.; Hyatt, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Rakaia, Rangitata, and Clutha River basins of the Southern Alps were major ice pathways for Southern Alps outlet glaciers during the last glaciation. While extensive CRN dating of moraine boulders has constrained the timing of a major ice advance to around the time of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheet maximum ("LGM"), extensive stratigraphic exposures permit extension of glacial records to important earlier phases of the last glaciation. Those exposures, present in most valleys, yield an extensive and detailed sedimentologic record and a closely linked luminescence chronology of glacial events spanning the entire last glacial cycle. Recently published work from the Rakaia drainage demonstrates multiple ice advances into the middle Rakaia Valley and uppermost Canterbury Plains during the last glacial cycle. Prominent ice advances there are documented largely in glacial-lacustrine and glacial-fluvial sediments, in a coarsening-upward, basin-filling sequence. Those ice advances occurred during MIS 5b (ca. 100-90 ka), MIS 5a/4 (ca. 80 ka), MIS 3 (ca. 48 ka and 40 ka), and MIS 2 (ca. 25-15 ka). In the central Rangitata valley, a spectacular kame terrace sequence superposes LGM and deglacial-phase sediments on extensive MIS 3 and possible MIS 4 sediments. At three distinct locations, provisional OSL ages indicate a prominent ice advance during MIS 3 (ca. 30-50 ka). Near surface sediments associated with kame terraces indicate enhanced fluvial activity around the LGM, and indicate that deglaciation was well under way by 13 ka. Further south in the Clutha valley, exposures at Lakes Wanaka and Hawea demonstrate ice advances during MIS 3 and MIS 2, largely associated with ice-proximal lacustrine deposition. Extensive outwash sequences 2-15 km downvalley reveal a detailed record of glacial-fluvial activity that appears to extend through the last glacial cycle. These valley records demonstrate that, in particular, MIS 3 featured extensive ice advances, with ice extent

  19. The glacial iron cycle from source to export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkings, J.; Wadham, J. L.; Tranter, M.; Raiswell, R.; Benning, L. G.; Statham, P. J.; Tedstone, A. J.; Nienow, P. W.; Telling, J.; Bagshaw, E.; Simmons, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Nutrient availability limits primary production in large sectors of the world's oceans. Iron is the major limiting nutrient in around one third of the oceanic euphotic zone, most significantly in the Southern Ocean proximal to Antarctica. In these areas the availability of bioavailable iron can influence the amount of primary production, and thus the strength of the biological pump and associated carbon drawdown from the atmosphere. Despite experiencing widespread iron limitation, the Polar oceans are among the most productive on Earth. Due to the extreme cold, remoteness and their perceived "stasis", ice sheets have previously been though of as insignificant in global biogeochemical cycles. However, large marine algal blooms have been observed in iron-limited areas where glacial influence is large, and it is possible that these areas are stimulated by glacial bioavailable iron input. Here we discuss the importance of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in the global iron cycle. Using field collected trace element data, bulk meltwater chemistry and mineralogical analysis, including photomicrographs, EELS and XANES, we present, for the first time, a conceptual model of the glacial iron cycle from source to export. Using this data we discuss the sources of iron in glacial meltwater, transportation and alteration through the glacial system, and subsequent export to downstream environments. Data collected in 2012 and 2013 from two different Greenlandic glacial catchments are shown, with the most detailed breakdown of iron speciation and concentrations in glacial areas yet reported. Furthermore, the first data from Greenlandic icebergs is presented, allowing meltwater-derived and iceberg-derived iron export to be compared, and the influence of both in marine productivity to be estimated. Using our conceptual model and flux estimates from our dataset, glacial iron delivery in both the northern and southern hemisphere is discussed. Finally, we compare our flux

  20. Precise prediction of glacial cycle with its rhythm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, C.; Tseng, Y.; Yu, W.; Chueh, P.

    2010-12-01

    An ability to explain and predict the paleoclimatic cycles is one of necessary conditions for reliable predictions of future climate without and with anthropogenic forcing. Here, we solved a big puzzle. Quaternary glacial cycles, as represented by climate proxy data of benthic δ18O, can be divided into four typical periods (TP) with four characteristic points (CP). The cyclic sequence of them goes in the following order: (1) Onset point of glacial termination, (2) Glacial termination period, (3) Zip point of glacial termination, (4) Inter-glacial period, (5) Inception point of glaciations, (6) Period for glacial maturation, (7) Glacial maximum point, and (8) Period for glacial hibernation. The glacial termination (GT) is a swift transition period of about 6,500 years only. A precise prediction of its onset point is a great challenge to the theorem of orbital-forcing that is being developed since Milankovitch. We consider the climate system as a stack of heat capacitors that get warmed up by absorbing part of the insolation and cooled down via gray-body radiation. Part of the insolation is transformed into chemical energy through photosynthesis (CETP) and eventually gets accumulated in the clathrate hydrate (CH) in seawater. We found that, during the last 1.7 million years, every Onset point of GT falls in a very precise time-window defined with three conditions: (1) the eccentricity (E) of Earth’s orbit is increasing, (2) the obliquity (T) is also increasing, and (3) the phase angle of precession (P) falls between 7π/8 and 5π/4. The CETP is converted into sensible heat via oxidation of gases released from dissociated CH. The dissociation of CH depends on its floating level and dissociating level. Those levels are controlled by seawater temperature and the density of CH. The Zip point of GT comes when the average temperature of seawater at 150 m depth is about 18 C, which is mostly influenced by the H2S in the CH. We define the Inception point of glaciations as

  1. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, John W.; Katz, Richard F.; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H.; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between oceans and continents, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with consequences for the melting of Earth’s interior. Using Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations as a forcing function, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that include melt transport predict temporal variations in crustal thickness of hundreds of meters. New bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills, one of the most common bathymetric features on Earth, record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The models and data support a link between glacial cycles at the surface and mantle melting at depth, recorded in the bathymetric fabric of the sea floor.

  2. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust.

    PubMed

    Crowley, John W; Katz, Richard F; Huybers, Peter; Langmuir, Charles H; Park, Sung-Hyun

    2015-03-13

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between oceans and continents, causing pressure changes in the upper mantle, with consequences for the melting of Earth's interior. Using Plio-Pleistocene sea-level variations as a forcing function, theoretical models of mid-ocean ridge dynamics that include melt transport predict temporal variations in crustal thickness of hundreds of meters. New bathymetry from the Australian-Antarctic ridge shows statistically significant spectral energy near the Milankovitch periods of 23, 41, and 100 thousand years, which is consistent with model predictions. These results suggest that abyssal hills, one of the most common bathymetric features on Earth, record the magmatic response to changes in sea level. The models and data support a link between glacial cycles at the surface and mantle melting at depth, recorded in the bathymetric fabric of the sea floor. PMID:25766231

  3. Early Pleistocene Glacial Cycles and the Integrated Summer Insolation Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybers, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Long-term variations in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation are generally thought to control glaciation. But the intensity of summer insolation is primarily controlled by 20,000-year cycles in the precession of the equinoxes, whereas early Pleistocene glacial cycles occur at 40,000-year intervals, matching the period of changes in Earth's obliquity. The resolution of this 40,000-year problem is that glaciers are sensitive to insolation integrated over the duration of the summer. The integrated summer insolation is primarily controlled by obliquity and not precession because, by Kepler's second law, the duration of the summer is inversely proportional to Earth's distance from the Sun.

  4. Development of a glacially dominated shelf-slope-fan system in tectonically active southeast Alaska: Results of IODP Expedition 341 core-log-seismic integrated studies at glacial cycle resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Sean; Jaeger, John; Mix, Alan; Swartz, John; Worthington, Lindsay; Reece, Robert

    2014-05-01

    100 kyr glacial-interglacial cycles. Examination of the sink for both of these systems, which includes the Surveyor Fan and Aleutian Trench wedge, demonstrates a clear climatic driver for sediment flux to the deep sea. The first appearance of ice-rafted debris at our distal drill site closely approximates the start of the Pleistocene and a doubling of sediment accumulation accompanies the MPT. Converting sediment volumes just within the deep-sea sinks back to erosion rates in the orogen and correlating with changes in exhumation rates from thermochronology demonstrates a lack of accelerated tectonic response to the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciations at the start of the Pleistocene but increased shortening and exhumation of sediments at the MPT. The form of tectonic response differs between out-of-sequence thrusting or antiformal stacking within the fold and thrust belt to the west and a near vertical advection of material in a tectonic aneurysm in the core of the orogen to the east.

  5. Obliquity pacing of the late Pleistocene glacial terminations.

    PubMed

    Huybers, Peter; Wunsch, Carl

    2005-03-24

    The 100,000-year timescale in the glacial/interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene epoch (the past approximately 700,000 years) is commonly attributed to control by variations in the Earth's orbit. This hypothesis has inspired models that depend on the Earth's obliquity (approximately 40,000 yr; approximately 40 kyr), orbital eccentricity (approximately 100 kyr) and precessional (approximately 20 kyr) fluctuations, with the emphasis usually on eccentricity and precessional forcing. According to a contrasting hypothesis, the glacial cycles arise primarily because of random internal climate variability. Taking these two perspectives together, there are currently more than thirty different models of the seven late-Pleistocene glacial cycles. Here we present a statistical test of the orbital forcing hypothesis, focusing on the rapid deglaciation events known as terminations. According to our analysis, the null hypothesis that glacial terminations are independent of obliquity can be rejected at the 5% significance level, whereas the corresponding null hypotheses for eccentricity and precession cannot be rejected. The simplest inference consistent with the test results is that the ice sheets terminated every second or third obliquity cycle at times of high obliquity, similar to the original proposal by Milankovitch. We also present simple stochastic and deterministic models that describe the timing of the late-Pleistocene glacial terminations purely in terms of obliquity forcing. PMID:15791252

  6. Volcanic evolution of an active magmatic rift segment on a 100 Kyr timescale: exposure dating of lavas from the Manda Hararo/Dabbahu segment of the Afar Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Vye, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Yirgu, G.

    2012-12-01

    In the Afar depression (Ethiopia), extension is already organised along rift segments which morphologically resemble oceanic rifts. Segmentation here results from interactions between dyke injection and volcanism, as observed during the well documented 2005 event on the Dabbahu rift segment. During this tectono-volcanic crisis, a megadyke was injected, followed by 12 subsequent dike intrusions, sometimes associated with fissure flow eruptions. Despite the accurate surveying of the magmatic and tectonic interplay during this event via remote sensing techniques, there is a lack of data on timescales of 1 to 100 kyr, the period over which the main morphology of a rift is acquired. The Dabbahu rift segment represents an ideal natural laboratory to study the evolution of rift morphology as a response to volcanic and tectonic influences. It is possible to constrain the timing of fault growth relative to the infilling of the rift axial depression by lava flows, and to assess the influence of the different magma bodies involved in lava production along the rift-segment. We use cosmogenic nuclides (3He) to determine the ages of young (<100 kyr) lava flows and to date the initiation and movement of fault scarps which cut the lavas. Combined with major & trace element compositions, field mapping and digital cartography (Landsat, ASTER and SPOT imagery), the rift geomorphology can be linked to the magmatic and tectonic history defined by surface exposure dating. The results show that over the last 100 ka the Northern part of the Dabbahu segment was supplied by two different magma reservoirs which can be identified based on their distinctive chemistries. The main reservoir is located beneath Dabbahu volcano, and has been supplied with magma for at least 72 ka. This magmatic centre supplies magma to most of the northern third of the rift segment. The second reservoir is located further south, on the axis, close to the current mid-segment magma chamber, which was responsible for

  7. Antarctic Zone nutrient conditions during the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studer, Anja S.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Benz, Verena; Winckler, Gisela; Kuhn, Gerhard; Esper, Oliver; Lamy, Frank; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Wacker, Lukas; Oleynik, Sergey; Gersonde, Rainer; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-07-01

    In a sediment core from the Pacific sector of the Antarctic Zone (AZ) of the Southern Ocean, we report diatom-bound N isotope (δ15Ndb) records for total recoverable diatoms and two distinct diatom assemblages (pennate and centric rich). These data indicate tight coupling between the degree of nitrate consumption and Antarctic climate across the last two glacial cycles, with δ15Ndb (and thus the degree of nitrate consumption) increasing at each major Antarctic cooling event. Coupled with evidence from opal- and barium-based proxies for reduced export production during ice ages, the δ15Ndb increases point to ice age reductions in the supply of deep ocean-sourced nitrate to the AZ surface. The two diatom assemblages and species abundance data indicate that the δ15Ndb changes are not the result of changing species composition. The pennate and centric assemblage δ15Ndb records indicate similar changes but with a significant decline in their difference during peak ice ages. A tentative seasonality-based interpretation of the centric-to-pennate δ15Ndb difference suggests that late summer surface waters became nitrate free during the peak glacials.

  8. Caribbean Salinity Variation During the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Spero, H. J.; Lea, D. W.

    2003-12-01

    Evaporation exceeds precipitation in the tropical Atlantic, resulting in a net freshwater removal across the Central American Isthmus. Because most of the north Atlantic's subtropical gyre water circulates through the Caribbean before flowing north to sub-polar regions via the Gulf Stream, changes in tropical atmospheric circulation have the potential to affect the salinity and density structure of the entire north Atlantic, thereby influencing glacial-interglacial oscillations in North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation. Here, we combine Mg/Ca measurements (a proxy for the temperature of calcification) and δ 18O analyses of shells from the surface-dwelling foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber s.s. (white var.) from the western Caribbean Colombian Basin at ODP Site 999A (2827m; 4cm/ka sed. rate) and VM28-122 (3623m; 4-10cm/ka sed. rate) to produce the first continuous record of western tropical Atlantic δ 18OSEAWATER (δ 18OSW) during the last 130ka. In order to generate a record for sea surface salinity (SSS) due to regional hydrological change, we removed the δ 18OSW signal due to glacial ice volume variation and normalized the residual to the modern δ 18OSW value for the Colombian Basin (0.8‰ ). The resulting ice volume-free (Δ δ 18OIVF-SW) record shows that Caribbean Δ δ 18OIVF-SW increased by ˜0.5‰ during the Last Glacial Maximum and Marine Isotope Stage 4. Using a modern western Caribbean δ 18OSW:SSS relationship, these enriched δ 18OSW values suggest glacial Caribbean salinities were 2.3 - 2.8‰ higher than modern after removing the influence of ice-volume. Our data supports the hypothesis that the tropics might have been in a state more similar to the modern El Nino mode, characterized by a more southerly position of the ITCZ, during cold phases of the last glacial cycle. Within the resolution of our Δ δ 18OIVF-SW record from VM28-122, elevated glacial Caribbean salinity decreased to modern levels at the onset of the Bolling-Allerod (B

  9. What Controls the Pacing of 100-ky Glacial Cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymo, M. E.; Kawamura, K.; Lisiecki, L.; Thompson, W. G.; Severinghaus, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    Climate variations over the last ~700,000 years are characterized by orbital periodicities of 100, 41 and 23 ky. While 23- and 41-ky components are understood as linear climatic responses to forcing by precession (modulated by eccentricity) and obliquity, respectively, the 100-ky cycle cannot be explained as a linear response to eccentricity. Rather, it has been suggested that the 100-ky cycle is caused by skipping of higher frequency beats which results in the bundling of either 4 or 5 precession cycles (Raymo, Paleoceanography, 1997), or 2 or 3 obliquity cycles (Huybers and Wunsch, Nature, 2005), each grouping resulting in an average 100 ky periodicity. However, verification of these competing hypotheses has not been possible because of the lack of accurately dated climate proxies. Here, using statistical tests of newly established chronologies of Antarctic climate (Kawamura et al., AGU 2006 fall meeting) and sea level high stands (Thompson, in preparation), we show that precession pacing is statistically more significant than obliquity pacing for the last five glacial terminations. We used the timings of Antarctic warmings at terminations from the Dome Fuji ice core for termination I to III, and from the Vostok core for termination IV. The timing of termination V was estimated by shifting the Dome C (EDC2) timescale to match the timing of peak MIS 11.3 with the Vostok record. The time of onset for the sea level high stands of the last four interglacial periods were estimated by correcting radiometric fossil coral ages with open-system age equations (Thompson et al., 2003, EPSL). Our results show that the null hypothesis for precession pacing can be rejected at the 3% significance level for the last five terminations from ice cores and for four terminations from sea level high stands, whereas the null hypothesis for obliquity pacing can be rejected only at >10% significance level. The statistical power of test for obliquity is high (>95% at the 10% significance

  10. Global Ice-loading History Reconstructed Over Five Glacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, F. H.; Grant, K. M.; Tamisiea, M. E.; Rohling, E. J.; Hibbert, F. D.

    2014-12-01

    High resolution ice-loading reconstructions are a vital tool not only for palaeoclimate studies, but also for providing a palaeoenvironmental context to human development. Here we present a global ice-loading history developed using the high resolution, Red Sea relative sea-level (RSL) record. (Siddall et al. 2003, Rohling et al. 2009, Grant et al. in submission) We use glacial isostatic adjustment modelling to determine a set of corrections to the Red Sea RSL record, which is then translated into a global mean sea level. This global mean sea level allows us to calculate a global ice volume. Global ice volume is geographically distributed within our ice-loading history according to currently available data regarding ice margins, their timing, and constraints on maximum ice load. Where constraints are sparse we use a combination of ICE-5G (Peltier, 2004) and the de Boer coupled ice sheet model (de Boer et al, 2014) as a template for ice distribution. Although an ice-loading history for the past 5 Myr exists, this is the first time that geographic constraints have been applied to global ice volumes over 5 glacial cycles. Our ice-loading reconstruction is further supported by the high resolution of our source RSL data. Our ice-loading history is tested against a global compilation of coral sea-level indicators (Hibbert et al., in prep.), and compared with ice histories developed from alternate ice volume reconstructions or RSL records, including a global ice history based on that developed by de Boer et al. (2014), the sea-level record of Waelbroeck et al. (2002) and a simple ice history based on the δ18O stack of Lisiecki and Raymo (2005).

  11. South China Sea Surface Waters During the Late Pleistocene: Records of the Relationship Between South East Asian Monsoon Variability and Glacial-Interglacial Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, K.; Oppo, D.

    2001-05-01

    One of the major goals of Ocean Drilling Program Leg 184 in the South China Sea was to recover sediment records that could be used to examine the history of the South East Asian monsoon relative to external variation in the global climate, on both orbital and millennial timescales. Examinations of how monsoonal variability in this region interacts with larger changes in global climate speak to the ongoing debate about the role of the tropical and equatorial regions in climate change. In order to reconstruct this interaction we have generated a new 700 kyr record of planktonic foraminiferal (G. ruber) oxygen and carbon isotopes from Ocean Drilling Program site 1145 in the South China Sea (19° 35.04'N, 117° 37.86'E, 3175 m. water depth). The oxygen isotope record reflects both global ice volume and a composite of sea surface salinity and temperature that varies in response to monsoonally driven changes in sea surface circulation and regional precipitation. The carbon isotopic record reflects changes in local productivity and global changes in the carbon budget. Since our record has both a strong 100-kyr glacial component and a strong precessional component, it allows us to examine the interaction between high-latitude glacial influence and local precessional influence on the South East Asian monsoon. As seen at other sites in the South China Sea, there is an overall increase in sedimentation rates coming toward the present. Sedimentation rates at this site decrease threefold at 400 Ka, with sedimentation rates ~6 cm/kyr prior to this time and rates of ~20 cm/kyr after. As a consequence, temporal resolution for the latter part of the record varies between 400 and 1000 years, and is >2000 years before 400 ka. We find that sub-Milankovitch variability in both oxygen and carbon isotopes is consistently high throughout glacial-interglacial cycles, +/-0.6 ‰ in δ 18O and +/-0.4 ‰ in δ 13C. Over the last 400 kyrs we find both variability on 3-4 kyr timescales and on

  12. Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R. F.; Crowley, J. W.; Langmuir, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    Glacial cycles redistribute water between the oceans and continents, causing long-wavelength changes of static pressure in the upper mantle. Previous work has shown that subaerial, glaciated volcanoes respond to these changes with variation in eruption rates (Jull & McKenzie 1996, Huybers & Langmuir 2009), and has suggested that the magmatic flux at mid-ocean ridges may vary with changes in sea-level (Huybers & Langmuir 2009, Lund & Asimow 2011). The latter is speculative, however, because previous theory has assumed highly simplified melt transport and neglected the dependence of the ridge thermal structure on spreading rate. Moreover, it remains a challenge to connect model predictions of variations arising from sea-level change with sea-floor observations. Here we present results from a theoretical model of a mid-ocean ridge based on conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and composition for two phases (magma & mantle) and two thermodynamic components (enriched & depleted) (Katz 2008, 2010). The model is driven by imposed variations in the static pressure within the mantle. We consider both the geochemically inferred record of past sea-level variation, as well as simpler harmonic and instantaneous variations. The output of these models is compared with observations of bathymetry at ridges that are undisturbed by off-axis volcanism. The comparison is preliminary but suggests that some abyssal hills on the sea-floor are, at least in part, the result of glacial cycles. To understand the simulation results in more detail, we develop analytical solutions for a reduced-complexity model. This model is derived according to the idea that the melting induced by sea-level changes can be thought of as a small perturbation to a steady-state system. We obtain a Green's function solution for crustal thickness as a function of sea-level change with the associated dependencies on geophysical parameters of the magma/mantle system. We show that this solution captures much of the

  13. Sea-level fluctuations during the last glacial cycle.

    PubMed

    Siddall, M; Rohling, E J; Almogi-Labin, A; Hemleben, Ch; Meischner, D; Schmelzer, I; Smeed, D A

    2003-06-19

    The last glacial cycle was characterized by substantial millennial-scale climate fluctuations, but the extent of any associated changes in global sea level (or, equivalently, ice volume) remains elusive. Highstands of sea level can be reconstructed from dated fossil coral reef terraces, and these data are complemented by a compilation of global sea-level estimates based on deep-sea oxygen isotope ratios at millennial-scale resolution or higher. Records based on oxygen isotopes, however, contain uncertainties in the range of +/-30 m, or +/-1 degrees C in deep sea temperature. Here we analyse oxygen isotope records from Red Sea sediment cores to reconstruct the history of water residence times in the Red Sea. We then use a hydraulic model of the water exchange between the Red Sea and the world ocean to derive the sill depth-and hence global sea level-over the past 470,000 years (470 kyr). Our reconstruction is accurate to within +/-12 m, and gives a centennial-scale resolution from 70 to 25 kyr before present. We find that sea-level changes of up to 35 m, at rates of up to 2 cm yr(-1), occurred, coincident with abrupt changes in climate. PMID:12815427

  14. A first 10Be cosmogenic glacial chronology from the High Atlas, Morocco, during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Hughes, Philip; Fenton, Cassie

    2014-05-01

    Glacial geomorphological mapping, 10Be cosmogenic exposure ages of 21 erratics from cirque-valley systems and paleo-glacier climate modelling in the High Atlas Mountains, Morocco (31.1° N, 7.9° W), provides new and novel insights as to the history and evolution of the largest desert region on Earth. The Atlas Mountains display evidence of extensive and multiple Late Pleistocene glaciations whose extent is significantly larger than that recognised by previous workers. The largest glaciers formed in the Toubkal massif where we find 3 distinct phases of glacial advances within the last glacial cycle. The oldest moraines occurring at the lowest elevations have yielded eight 10Be ages ranging from 30 to 88 ka. Six of eight samples from moraines at intermediate elevations gave ages of 19 to 25 ka (2 outliers) which correlates well with the global Last Glacial Maximum (ca. 26-21 ka) and the last termination during marine isotope stage 2. Five erratics from the youngest and most elevated moraines yielded a suite of normally distributed exposure ages from 11 to 13 ka which supports a correlation with the northern hemisphere Younger Dryas (12.9-11.7 ka). The glacial record of the High Atlas effectively reflects moisture supply to the north-western Sahara Desert and can provide an indication of shifts between arid and pluvial conditions. The plaeo equilibrium line altitudes (ELA) of these three glacier phases was more than 1000 m lower than the predicted ELA based on today's temperatures. Glacier-climate modelling indicates that for each of these glacier phases climate was not only significantly cooler than today, but also much wetter. The new evidence on the extent, timing and palaeoclimatic significance of glaciations in this region has major implications for understanding moisture transfer between the North Atlantic Ocean and the Sahara Desert during Pleistocene cold stages.

  15. Glacial cycles and the growth and destruction of Alaska volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, M. L.; Calvert, A. T.; Bacon, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Glaciers have affected profoundly the growth, collapse, preservation, and possibly, eruptive behavior of Quaternary stratovolcanoes in Alaska. Holocene alpine glaciers have acted as effective agents of erosion on volcanoes north of ~55 °N and especially north of 60 °N. Cook Inlet volcanoes are particularly vulnerable as they sit atop rugged intrusive basement as high as 3000 m asl. Holocene glaciers have swept away or covered most of the deposits and dome lavas of frequently active Redoubt (60.5 °N); carved through the flanks of Spurr's active vent, Crater Peak (61.3 °N); and all but obscured the edifice of Hayes (61.6 °N), whose Holocene eruptive history is known almost exclusively though far-traveled tephra and flowage deposits. Relationships between Pleistocene eruptive histories, determined by high-precision Ar-Ar dating of lava flows, and marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS) 2-8 (Bassinot et al., 1994, EPSL, v. 126, p. 91­-108) vary with a volcano's latitude, size, and elevation. At Spurr, 26 ages cluster in interglacial periods. At Redoubt, 28 ages show a more continual eruptive pattern from the end of MIS 8 to the present, with a slight apparent increase in output following MIS 6, and almost no preservation before 220 ka. Veniaminof (56.2 °N) and Emmons (55.5°N), large, broad volcanoes with bases near sea level, had voluminous eruptive episodes during the profound deglaciations after MIS 8 and MIS 6. At Akutan (54.1 °N), many late Pleistocene lavas show evidence for ice contact; ongoing dating will be able to pinpoint ice thicknesses. Furthest south and west, away from thick Pleistocene ice on the Alaska Peninsula and mainland, the Tanaga volcanic cluster (51.9 °N) has a relatively continuous eruptive record for the last 200 k.y. that shows no clear-cut correlation with glacial cycles, except a possible hiatus during MIS 6. Finally, significant edifice collapse features have been temporally linked with deglaciations. A ~10-km3 debris

  16. Strong and deep Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, E.; Lippold, J.; Gutjahr, M.; Frank, M.; Blaser, P.; Antz, B.; Fohlmeister, J.; Frank, N.; Andersen, M. B.; Deininger, M.

    2015-01-01

    Extreme, abrupt Northern Hemisphere climate oscillations during the last glacial cycle (140,000 years ago to present) were modulated by changes in ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing. However, the variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), which has a role in controlling heat transport from low to high latitudes and in ocean CO2 storage, is still poorly constrained beyond the Last Glacial Maximum. Here we show that a deep and vigorous overturning circulation mode has persisted for most of the last glacial cycle, dominating ocean circulation in the Atlantic, whereas a shallower glacial mode with southern-sourced waters filling the deep western North Atlantic prevailed during glacial maxima. Our results are based on a reconstruction of both the strength and the direction of the AMOC during the last glacial cycle from a highly resolved marine sedimentary record in the deep western North Atlantic. Parallel measurements of two independent chemical water tracers (the isotope ratios of 231Pa/230Th and 143Nd/144Nd), which are not directly affected by changes in the global cycle, reveal consistent responses of the AMOC during the last two glacial terminations. Any significant deviations from this configuration, resulting in slowdowns of the AMOC, were restricted to centennial-scale excursions during catastrophic iceberg discharges of the Heinrich stadials. Severe and multicentennial weakening of North Atlantic Deep Water formation occurred only during Heinrich stadials close to glacial maxima with increased ice coverage, probably as a result of increased fresh-water input. In contrast, the AMOC was relatively insensitive to submillennial meltwater pulses during warmer climate states, and an active AMOC prevailed during Dansgaard-Oeschger interstadials (Greenland warm periods).

  17. Strong and deep Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the last glacial cycle.

    PubMed

    Böhm, E; Lippold, J; Gutjahr, M; Frank, M; Blaser, P; Antz, B; Fohlmeister, J; Frank, N; Andersen, M B; Deininger, M

    2015-01-01

    Extreme, abrupt Northern Hemisphere climate oscillations during the last glacial cycle (140,000 years ago to present) were modulated by changes in ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing. However, the variability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), which has a role in controlling heat transport from low to high latitudes and in ocean CO2 storage, is still poorly constrained beyond the Last Glacial Maximum. Here we show that a deep and vigorous overturning circulation mode has persisted for most of the last glacial cycle, dominating ocean circulation in the Atlantic, whereas a shallower glacial mode with southern-sourced waters filling the deep western North Atlantic prevailed during glacial maxima. Our results are based on a reconstruction of both the strength and the direction of the AMOC during the last glacial cycle from a highly resolved marine sedimentary record in the deep western North Atlantic. Parallel measurements of two independent chemical water tracers (the isotope ratios of (231)Pa/(230)Th and (143)Nd/(144)Nd), which are not directly affected by changes in the global cycle, reveal consistent responses of the AMOC during the last two glacial terminations. Any significant deviations from this configuration, resulting in slowdowns of the AMOC, were restricted to centennial-scale excursions during catastrophic iceberg discharges of the Heinrich stadials. Severe and multicentennial weakening of North Atlantic Deep Water formation occurred only during Heinrich stadials close to glacial maxima with increased ice coverage, probably as a result of increased fresh-water input. In contrast, the AMOC was relatively insensitive to submillennial meltwater pulses during warmer climate states, and an active AMOC prevailed during Dansgaard-Oeschger interstadials (Greenland warm periods). PMID:25517093

  18. Laurentide Ice Sheet basal temperatures at the Last Glacial Cycle as inferred from borehole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Pickler, Carolyne; Beltrami, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    We measured and inverted thirteen temperature-depth profiles (≥1500 m) in boreholes in eastern and central Canada to determine the ground surface temperature histories during and after the last glacial cycle. The sites are located in the southern part of the region covered by the Laurentide Ice Sheet. The inversions yield ground surface temperatures ranging from -1.4 to 3.0oC throughout the last glacial cycle. These temperatures, near the pressure melting point of ice, demonstrate that the southern portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet was not frozen to the bed, allowing for basal flow and fast flowing ice streams at the base. Despite such conditions, which have been inferred from geomorphological data and models, the ice sheet persisted throughout the last glacial cycle. Our results suggest some regional trends in basal temperatures with possible control by internal heat flow.

  19. Deep Arctic Ocean warming during the last glacial cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.; Farmer, J.; Bauch, H.A.; Spielhagen, R.F.; Jakobsson, M.; Nilsson, J.; Briggs, W.M., Jr.; Stepanova, A.

    2012-01-01

    In the Arctic Ocean, the cold and relatively fresh water beneath the sea ice is separated from the underlying warmer and saltier Atlantic Layer by a halocline. Ongoing sea ice loss and warming in the Arctic Ocean have demonstrated the instability of the halocline, with implications for further sea ice loss. The stability of the halocline through past climate variations is unclear. Here we estimate intermediate water temperatures over the past 50,000 years from the Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca values of ostracods from 31 Arctic sediment cores. From about 50 to 11 kyr ago, the central Arctic Basin from 1,000 to 2,500 m was occupied by a water mass we call Glacial Arctic Intermediate Water. This water mass was 1–2 °C warmer than modern Arctic Intermediate Water, with temperatures peaking during or just before millennial-scale Heinrich cold events and the Younger Dryas cold interval. We use numerical modelling to show that the intermediate depth warming could result from the expected decrease in the flux of fresh water to the Arctic Ocean during glacial conditions, which would cause the halocline to deepen and push the warm Atlantic Layer into intermediate depths. Although not modelled, the reduced formation of cold, deep waters due to the exposure of the Arctic continental shelf could also contribute to the intermediate depth warming.

  20. Insolation-driven 100,000-year glacial cycles and hysteresis of ice-sheet volume.

    PubMed

    Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Saito, Fuyuki; Kawamura, Kenji; Raymo, Maureen E; Okuno, Jun'ichi; Takahashi, Kunio; Blatter, Heinz

    2013-08-01

    The growth and reduction of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets over the past million years is dominated by an approximately 100,000-year periodicity and a sawtooth pattern (gradual growth and fast termination). Milankovitch theory proposes that summer insolation at high northern latitudes drives the glacial cycles, and statistical tests have demonstrated that the glacial cycles are indeed linked to eccentricity, obliquity and precession cycles. Yet insolation alone cannot explain the strong 100,000-year cycle, suggesting that internal climatic feedbacks may also be at work. Earlier conceptual models, for example, showed that glacial terminations are associated with the build-up of Northern Hemisphere 'excess ice', but the physical mechanisms underpinning the 100,000-year cycle remain unclear. Here we show, using comprehensive climate and ice-sheet models, that insolation and internal feedbacks between the climate, the ice sheets and the lithosphere-asthenosphere system explain the 100,000-year periodicity. The responses of equilibrium states of ice sheets to summer insolation show hysteresis, with the shape and position of the hysteresis loop playing a key part in determining the periodicities of glacial cycles. The hysteresis loop of the North American ice sheet is such that after inception of the ice sheet, its mass balance remains mostly positive through several precession cycles, whose amplitudes decrease towards an eccentricity minimum. The larger the ice sheet grows and extends towards lower latitudes, the smaller is the insolation required to make the mass balance negative. Therefore, once a large ice sheet is established, a moderate increase in insolation is sufficient to trigger a negative mass balance, leading to an almost complete retreat of the ice sheet within several thousand years. This fast retreat is governed mainly by rapid ablation due to the lowered surface elevation resulting from delayed isostatic rebound, which is the lithosphere

  1. Sensitivity of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets to AMOC variability during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Malte; Timmermann, Axel; Friedrich, Tobias; Pollard, David

    2016-04-01

    The ocean played an instrumental role during the last glacial cycle, not only as a carbon trap but also during Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. But did the variability of the ocean circulation on timescales of hundreds to a few thousand years also affect the long-term evolution of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets? We address this question using stand-alone ice sheet - ice shelf model simulations of the last glacial cycle. The boundary conditions for these simulations are derived from simulations with the intermediate complexity earth system model LOVECLIM, and from an estimate of past Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) changes based on SST reconstructions. First ice model results suggest that interruptions of the AMOC may have supported the ice sheet build-up during the glacial inception. In particular, during Marine Isotope Stage 3, the AMOC interruptions may have stabilised the Laurentide ice sheet via surface cooling, rather than destabilised it via subsurface warming.

  2. Interhemispheric controls on deep ocean circulation and carbon chemistry during the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David J.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Galy, Albert; Banakar, Virupaxa K.

    2015-06-01

    Changes in ocean circulation structure, together with biological cycling, have been proposed for trapping carbon in the deep ocean during glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, but uncertainty remains in the nature and timing of deep ocean circulation changes through glacial cycles. In this study, we use neodymium (Nd) and carbon isotopes from a deep Indian Ocean sediment core to reconstruct water mass mixing and carbon cycling in Circumpolar Deep Water over the past 250 thousand years, a period encompassing two full glacial cycles and including a range of orbital forcing. Building on recent studies, we use reductive sediment leaching supported by measurements on isolated phases (foraminifera and fish teeth) in order to obtain a robust seawater Nd isotope reconstruction. Neodymium isotopes record a changing North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) component in the deep Indian Ocean that bears a striking resemblance to Northern Hemisphere climate records. In particular, we identify both an approximately in-phase link to Northern Hemisphere summer insolation in the precession band and a longer-term reduction of NADW contributions over the course of glacial cycles. The orbital timescale changes may record the influence of insolation forcing, for example via NADW temperature and/or Antarctic sea ice extent, on deep stratification and mixing in the Southern Ocean, leading to isolation of the global deep oceans from an NADW source during times of low Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. That evidence could support an active role for changing deep ocean circulation in carbon storage during glacial inceptions. However, mid-depth water mass mixing and deep ocean carbon storage were largely decoupled within glacial periods, and a return to an interglacial-like circulation state during marine isotope stage (MIS) 6.5 was accompanied by only minor changes in atmospheric CO2. Although a gradual reduction of NADW export through glacial periods may have produced slow climate feedbacks

  3. Unstable AMOC during glacial intervals and millennial variability: The role of mean sea ice extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sévellec, Florian; Fedorov, Alexey V.

    2015-11-01

    A striking feature of paleoclimate records is the greater stability of the Holocene epoch relative to the preceding glacial interval, especially apparent in the North Atlantic region. In particular, strong irregular variability with an approximately 1500 yr period, known as the Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events, punctuates the last glaciation, but is absent during the interglacial. Prevailing theories, modeling and data suggest that these events, seen as abrupt warming episodes in Greenland ice cores and sea surface temperature records in the North Atlantic, are linked to reorganizations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). In this study, using a new low-order ocean model that reproduces a realistic power spectrum of millennial variability, we explore differences in the AMOC stability between glacial and interglacial intervals of the 100 kyr glacial cycle of the Late Pleistocene (1 kyr = 1000 yr). Previous modeling studies show that the edge of sea ice in the North Atlantic shifts southward during glacial intervals, moving the region of the North Atlantic Deep Water formation and the AMOC also southward. Here we demonstrate that, by shifting the AMOC with respect to the mean atmospheric precipitation field, such a displacement makes the system unstable, which explains chaotic millennial variability during the glacials and the persistence of stable ocean conditions during the interglacials.

  4. Comparing Terrestrial Organic Carbon Cycle Dynamics in Interglacial and Glacial Climates in the South American Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornace, K. L.; Galy, V.; Hughen, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    The application of compound-specific radiocarbon dating to molecular biomarkers has allowed for tracking of specific organic carbon pools as they move through the environment, providing insight into complex processes within the global carbon cycle. Here we use this technique to investigate links between glacial-interglacial climate change and terrestrial organic carbon cycling in the catchments of Cariaco Basin and Lake Titicaca, two tropical South American sites with well-characterized climate histories since the last glacial period. By comparing radiocarbon ages of terrestrial biomarkers (leaf wax compounds) with deposition ages in late glacial and Holocene sediments, we are able to gauge the storage time of these compounds in the catchments in soils, floodplains, etc. before transport to marine or lacustrine sediments. We are also able to probe the effects of temperature and hydrologic change individually by taking advantage of opposite hydrologic trends at the two sites: while both were colder during the last glacial period, precipitation at Titicaca decreased from the last glacial period to the Holocene, but the late glacial was marked by drier conditions at Cariaco. Preliminary data from both sites show a wide range of apparent ages of long-chain n-fatty acids (within error of 0 to >10,000 years older than sediment), with the majority showing ages on the order of several millennia at time of deposition and age generally increasing with chain length. While late glacial leaf waxes appear to be older relative to sediment than those deposited in the Holocene at both sites, at Cariaco we find a ~2-3 times larger glacial-interglacial age difference than at Titicaca. We hypothesize that at Titicaca the competing influences of wetter and colder conditions during the last glacial period, which respectively tend to increase and decrease the rate of organic carbon turnover on land, served to minimize the contrast between glacial and interglacial leaf wax storage time

  5. Indonesian Throughflow variability over the last glacial cycle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.; Regenberg, M.; Xu, J.; Hendrizan, M.; Schröder, J.

    2013-12-01

    The transfer of surface and intermediate waters from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago (Indonesian Throughflow: ITF) strongly influences the heat and freshwater budgets of tropical water masses, in turn affecting global climate. Key areas for monitoring past ITF variations through this critical gateway are the narrow passages through the Makassar Strait and Flores Sea and the main outflow area within the Timor Sea. Here, we integrate high-resolution sea surface temperature and salinity reconstructions (based on paired planktic foraminiferal Mg/Ca and δ18O) with X-ray fluorescence runoff data and benthic isotopes from marine sediment cores retrieved in these regions during several cruises with RV'Sonne' and RV'Marion Dufresne'. Our results show that high latitude climate variability strongly influenced ITF intensity on millennial to centennial timescales as well as on longer glacial-interglacial timescales. Marked declines in ITF strength occurred during Heinrich events and the Younger Dryas, most likely related to slowdown of the global thermohaline circulation during colder northern hemisphere climate spells, when deep water production decreased and the deep ocean became more stratified. Additionally, the surface component of the ITF strongly reflects regional windstress and rainfall patterns, and thus the spatial extent and intensity of the tropical convection over the Indonesian archipelago. Our runoff and salinity estimates reveal that the development of the tropical convection was intricately linked to the latitudinal migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). In particular, our data show that the Australian monsoon intensified during the major deglacial atmospheric CO2 rise through the Younger Dryas and earliest Holocene (12.9-10 ka). This massive intensification of the Australian monsoon coincided with a southward shift of the ITCZ, linked to southern hemisphere warming and enhanced greenhouse forcing

  6. The first Greenland ice core record of methanesulfonate and sulfate over a full glacial cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, M.E.; Saltzman, E.S. )

    1993-06-18

    The authors report on methanesulfonate and non-seasalt sulfate found in an artic ice core from Greenland. The ice core record stretches back in time roughly 130,000 years, through a full glacial cycle. This record reveals a decreasing concentration of MSA with the advance of the glacial period, and a drop in temperatures, while the non-seasalt sulfate increased in concentration. The MSA data is in contrast to similar measurements from the southern hemisphere. The ratio of MSA to non-seasalt sulfate is found to have a strong linear relationship to the temperature, higher ratios being associated with warmer climatic periods.

  7. Role of Marine Biology in Glacial-Interglacial CO2 Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohfeld, Karen E.; Le Quéré, Corinne; Harrison, Sandy P.; Anderson, Robert F.

    2005-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that changes in the marine biological pump caused a major portion of the glacial reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide by 80 to 100 parts per million through increased iron fertilization of marine plankton, increased ocean nutrient content or utilization, or shifts in dominant plankton types. We analyze sedimentary records of marine productivity at the peak and the middle of the last glacial cycle and show that neither changes in nutrient utilization in the Southern Ocean nor shifts in plankton dominance explain the CO2 drawdown. Iron fertilization and associated mechanisms can be responsible for no more than half the observed drawdown.

  8. Role of marine biology in glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles.

    PubMed

    Kohfeld, Karen E; Le Quéré, Corinne; Harrison, Sandy P; Anderson, Robert F

    2005-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that changes in the marine biological pump caused a major portion of the glacial reduction of atmospheric carbon dioxide by 80 to 100 parts per million through increased iron fertilization of marine plankton, increased ocean nutrient content or utilization, or shifts in dominant plankton types. We analyze sedimentary records of marine productivity at the peak and the middle of the last glacial cycle and show that neither changes in nutrient utilization in the Southern Ocean nor shifts in plankton dominance explain the CO2 drawdown. Iron fertilization and associated mechanisms can be responsible for no more than half the observed drawdown. PMID:15802597

  9. Numerical simulations of the Cordilleran ice sheet through the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguinot, Julien; Rogozhina, Irina; Stroeven, Arjen P.; Margold, Martin; Kleman, Johan

    2016-03-01

    After more than a century of geological research, the Cordilleran ice sheet of North America remains among the least understood in terms of its former extent, volume, and dynamics. Because of the mountainous topography on which the ice sheet formed, geological studies have often had only local or regional relevance and shown such a complexity that ice-sheet-wide spatial reconstructions of advance and retreat patterns are lacking. Here we use a numerical ice sheet model calibrated against field-based evidence to attempt a quantitative reconstruction of the Cordilleran ice sheet history through the last glacial cycle. A series of simulations is driven by time-dependent temperature offsets from six proxy records located around the globe. Although this approach reveals large variations in model response to evolving climate forcing, all simulations produce two major glaciations during marine oxygen isotope stages 4 (62.2-56.9 ka) and 2 (23.2-16.9 ka). The timing of glaciation is better reproduced using temperature reconstructions from Greenland and Antarctic ice cores than from regional oceanic sediment cores. During most of the last glacial cycle, the modelled ice cover is discontinuous and restricted to high mountain areas. However, widespread precipitation over the Skeena Mountains favours the persistence of a central ice dome throughout the glacial cycle. It acts as a nucleation centre before the Last Glacial Maximum and hosts the last remains of Cordilleran ice until the middle Holocene (6.7 ka).

  10. Color characteristics of Chinese loess and its paleoclimatic significance during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiansuo; Song, Yougui; Zhao, Zhijun; Li, Jijun

    2016-02-01

    The soil color is widely used in paleoclimate and paleoenvironment reconstructions in the Chinese Loess Plateau. To better understand the color spatial changes during the glacial-interglacial cycle, the soil color lightness (L*), characteristic spectra, magnetic susceptibilities and mean grain sizes of three loess-paleosol sequences were compared. Results showed that high L* and low hematite to goethite ratios (Hm/Gt) appeared in loess units, and low L* and high Hm/Gt ratios accompanied paleosol layers, indicating glacial-interglacial hydrothermal oscillation. L* in the Yulin section was higher than in the Chaona and Lihuacun sections, indicating that different precipitations have great effect on L*. Furthermore, Hm/Gt, magnetic susceptibility (χlf), and mean grain size are correlated closely with L*. L* and Hm/Gt not only document climatic variations in the glacial-interglacial cycle vis-à-vis loess-paleosol sequences, but also can identify Heinrich cold events and millennial scale Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) warm events. It suggests that soil color responds sensitively to global climate change driven by ice volumes. L* and Hm/Gt curves exhibit higher frequencies and larger amplitudes than magnetic susceptibility (χlf) curves, indicating that L* and Hm/Gt can be regarded as sensitive and reliable proxies for characterizing high-resolution climate change during the last glacial-interglacial cycle.

  11. Model experiments on the 100,000-yr glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1980-10-01

    It is believed that during the Quaternary era changes in global ice volume were mainly due to changes in the size of the ice sheets on the Eurasian and American continents. Time spectra of oxygen isotope records from deep-sea cores and of the Earth's orbital parameters are remarkably similar in the 10,000-120,000-yr range1,2, suggesting that changes in global ice volume are forced by insolation variations. Model studies by Weertman3,4 and Pollard5 have confirmed this point to some extent: the 20,000- and 40,000-yr cycles can be reproduced, but the 100,000-yr cycle does not show up. Recently, Imbrie and Imbrie6 have fitted simple nonlinear mathematical models to δ18O curves. They found that reasonable fits are obtained if the time scale for ice-sheet growth is about 27,000 yr and for decay about 7,000 yr. The present study considers the problem of the 100,000-yr cycle in a similar way. Experiments with a Northern Hemisphere ice-sheet model show that the 100,000-yr cycle and its sawtooth shape may be explained by ice sheet/bedrock dynamics alone. This cycle seems to be an internally generated feature and is not forced by variations in the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit.

  12. The Influence of Glacial-Interglacial Cycles on the Erosion of Orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanites, Brian; Ehlers, Todd

    2010-05-01

    The evolution of mountain topography and sediment flux to adjacent basins is dictated by variations in the rates of rock-uplift, climate, lithology, and vegetation. Currently, many mountainous settings are in a state of a ‘glacial hangover' whereby Quaternary glaciation has dramatically altered catchment morphology and produced non-equilibrium conditions with respect to the environmental conditions preceding this major climatic transition. In this study, we investigate transients in mountain erosion and morphology due to glacial-interglacial cycles imposed on landscapes previously dominated by fluvial and hillslope processes. In our approach, we use a surface process model to produce an equilibrium fluvial landscape for rock uplift rates between 0.25-1.0 mm/yr. The landscapes are then subjected to repeated glacial cycles of different periodicity and intensity. Variations in predicted glacial basal sliding velocity, erosion, topography and sediment flux are tracked. Results indicate that glacial processes increase rates of valley bottom erosion by one to two orders of magnitude higher than fluvial processes, a result consistent with low-temperature thermochronological data from a number of glaciated catchments worldwide. Increased rates of hillslope and ridgetop erosion occur in response to increased glacial erosion and lag behind the onset of glaciation, thereby producing a complicated history of local relief. The timescale of this lag can vary by orders of magnitude and depends on model parametrization. We also find that two broad effects compete to control the evolution of sediment leaving such an orogen: 1) the topographic disequilibrium with glacial processes acts to initially increase sediment production, but as the topography readjusts, the disequilibrium wanes; 2) the initial geometry of the drainage basin is inefficient at providing ice to the sliding portions of the glaciers, thus impeding erosion early on, but as the topography becomes more ‘glacial

  13. Millennial-scale climate variability in response to changing glacial and orbital boundary conditions during the Mid-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Patrizia; Crowhurst, Simon; Drysdale, Russell; Bajo, Petra; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    The Mid-Pleistocene transition represents perhaps the most important climate transition in the Quaternary period, yet it is one of the most poorly understood. Although the exact timing and mechanism of the onset of the "100 kyr" regime remain a matter of debate, it is well established that the overall periodicity of the glacial-interglacial cycles changed from a dominant 41 kyr obliquity periodicity prior to ~0.9 Ma to a dominant late Pleistocene 100 kyr variance. This change in the frequency domain was associated with an increase in the amplitude of global ice volume variations that, superimposed on a long-term climatic trend towards more glacial conditions over millions of years, produced some of the most extreme glaciations recorded. This interval of time has often been considered to be important in relation to long-term Milankovitch-scale climate variability. In contrast, here, special emphasis will be placed on assessing the presence and the characteristics of the suborbital-scale variability, and reconstructing the evolution of millennial-scale climate variability as the average climate state evolve toward generally colder conditions with larger ice sheets, and the spectral character of climate variability shifted from dominantly 41 kyr to 100 kyr. Appealing evidence suggests that millennial-scale climate variability is amplified during times of intense forcing changes, but this rapid variability has not been thoroughly explored yet at the time when the major changes in climate periodicity occurred. To address these questions, we have examined the record of climatic conditions from Marine Isotope Stages 25 to 16 (~970-650 ka) using high-resolution stable isotope records from benthic and planktonic foraminifera from a sedimentary sequence in the North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 306, Site U1313) in order to assess millennial-scale changes in sea-surface and deep-water conditions, the dynamics of thermohaline deep-water circulation

  14. Technical Note: Glacial influence in tropical mountain hydrosystems evidenced by the diurnal cycle in water levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauvy-Fraunié, S.; Condom, T.; Rabatel, A.; Villacis, M.; Jacobsen, D.; Dangles, O.

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, the rapid shrinking of glaciers in response to ongoing climate change is modifying the glacial meltwater contribution to hydrosystems in glacierized catchments. Determining the influence of glacial runoff to streams is therefore of critical importance to evaluate potential impact of glacier retreat on water quality and aquatic biota. This task has challenged both glacier hydrologists and ecologists over the last 20 yr due to both structural and functional complexity of the glacier-stream system interface. Here we propose quantifying the diurnal cycle amplitude of the streamflow to determine the glacial influence in glacierized catchments. We performed water-level measurements using water pressure loggers over 10 months at 30 min time steps in 15 stream sites in 2 glacier-fed catchments in the Ecuadorian Andes (> 4000 m a.s.l.) where no perennial snow cover is observed outside the glaciers. For each stream site, we performed wavelet analyses on water-level time series, determined the scale-averaged wavelet power spectrum at 24 h scale and defined three metrics, namely the power, frequency and temporal clustering of the diurnal flow variation. The three metrics were then compared to the percentage of the glacier cover in the catchments, a metric of glacial influence widely used in the literature. As expected, we found that the diurnal variation power of glacier-fed streams decreased downstream with the addition of non-glacial tributaries. We also found that the diurnal variation power and the percentage of the glacier cover in the catchment were significantly positively correlated. Furthermore, we found that our method permits the detection of glacial signal in supposedly non-glacial sites, thereby revealing glacial meltwater resurgence. While we specifically focused on the tropical Andes in this paper, our approach to determine glacial influence may have potential applications in temperate and arctic glacierized catchments. The measure of diurnal water

  15. Periodic orbits for a discontinuous vector field arising from a conceptual model of glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, James; Widiasih, Esther; Hahn, Jonathan; McGehee, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Conceptual climate models provide an approach to understanding climate processes through a mathematical analysis of an approximation to reality. Recently, these models have also provided interesting examples of nonsmooth dynamical systems. Here we develop a new conceptual model of glacial cycles consisting of a system of three ordinary differential equations defining a discontinuous vector field. Our model provides a dynamical systems framework for a mechanism previously shown to play a crucial role in glacial cycle patterns, namely, an increased ice sheet ablation rate during deglaciations. We use ad hoc singular perturbation techniques to prove the existence of a large periodic orbit crossing the discontinuity boundary, provided the ice sheet edge moves sufficiently slowly relative to changes in the snow line and temperature. Numerical explorations reveal the periodic orbit exists when the time constant for the ice sheet edge has more moderate values.

  16. Unstable Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation during Glacial Intervals and Millennial Variability: The Role of Mean Sea Ice Extent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Sevellec, F.

    2014-12-01

    A striking feature of paleoclimate records is the strong irregular variability with an approximately 1500 yr period, known as the Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) events, which punctuate the last glacial interval but disappear during the Holocene. Many theories, modeling and data suggest that these events, seen as abrupt warming episodes in Greenland ice cores and sea surface temperature records in the North Atlantic, are linked to reorganizations of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). In this study, using a new low-order ocean model, we are able to reproduce a realistic power spectrum of this millennial variability, which emerges in the model as a result of unstable AMOC dynamics rather than due to external freshwater forcing. Within this model we explore differences in the AMOC stability between glacial and interglacial intervals of the 100 kyr glacial cycle of the Late Pleistocene. Previous modeling studies show that the edge of sea ice in the North Atlantic shifts southward during glacial intervals, moving the region of the North Atlantic Deep Water formation and the entire AMOC also southward. Here we demonstrate that, by altering the precipitation structure that the AMOC feels, such an expansion of sea ice cover makes the system unstable, which explains chaotic millennial variability during the glacials and the persistence of stable ocean conditions during the interglacials.

  17. Magnetic Properties of Bermuda Rise Sediments Controlled by Glacial Cycles During the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roud, S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediments from ODP site 1063 (Bermuda Rise, North Atlantic) contain a high-resolution record of geomagnetic field behavior during the Brunhes Chron. We present rock magnetic data of the upper 160 mcd (<900 ka) from hole 1063D that show magnetic properties vary in concert with glacial cycles. Magnetite appears to be the main magnetic carrier in the carbonate-dominated interglacial horizons, yet exhibits contrasting grain size distributions depending on the redox state of the horizons. Higher contributions of single domain magnetite exist above the present day sulfate reduction zone (ca. 44 mcd) with relatively higher multidomain magnetite components below that likely arise from the partial dissolution of SD magnetite in the deeper, anoxic horizons. Glacial horizons on the other hand, characterized by enhanced terrigenous deposition, show no evidence for diagenetic dissolution but do indicate the presence of authigenic greigite close to glacial maxima (acquisition of gyro-remanence, strong magnetostatic interactions and SD properties). Glacial horizons contain hematite (maxima in HIRM and S-Ratio consistent with a reddish hue) and exhibit higher ARM anisotropy and pronounced sedimentary fabrics. We infer that post depositional processes affected the magnetic grain size and mineralogy of Bermuda rise sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene. Hematite concentration is interpreted to reflect primary terrigenous input that is likely derived from the Canadian Maritime Provinces. A close correlation between HIRM and magnetic foliation suggests that changes in sediment composition (terrigenous vs. marine biogenic) were accompanied by changes in the depositional processes at the site.

  18. Temperature and precipitation estimates through the last glacial cycle from Clear Lake, California, pollen data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adam, D.P.; James, West G.

    1983-01-01

    Modern pollen surface samples from six lake and marsh sites in the northern California Coast Ranges establish a linear relation between elevation and the oak/(oak + pine) pollen ratio. Modern temperature and precipitation lapse rates were used to convert variations in the pollen ratio into temperature and precipitation changes. Pollen data from two cores from Clear Lake, Lake County, California, spanning the past 40,000 and 130,000 years were used to estimate temperature and precipitation changes through the last full glacial cycle. The maximum glacial cooling is estimated to be 7?? to 8??C; the last full interglacial period was about 1.5??C warmer than the Holocene, and a mid-Holocene interval was warmer than the present. The estimated precipitation changes are probably less reliable than the estimated temperature changes.

  19. Automated reconstruction of drainage basins and water discharge to the sea through glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickert, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Over glacial cycles, ice masses and their geophysical impacts on surface topography dramatically changed drainage patterns and river discharges. These changes impacted meltwater discharge to the ocean, geomorphology, and climate. As the river systems'the threads that tied the ice sheets to the sea'were stretched, severed, and rearranged during deglaciation, they also shrank and swelled with the pulse of meltwater inputs and proglacial lake dynamics. Here I present a general method to compute past river flow paths, drainage basin geometries, and river discharges. I automate these calculations within GRASS GIS to take advantage of rapid solution techniques for drainage networks in an open-source and compute-cluster-ready environment. I combine modern topography and bathymetry with ice sheet reconstructions from the last glacial cycle and a global glacial isostatic adjustment model to build digital elevation models of the past Earth surface. I then sum ice sheet mass balance with computed precipitation and evapotranspiration from a paleoclimate general circulation model to produce grids of water input. I combine these topographic and hydrologic inputs to compute past river networks and discharges through time. These paleodrainage reconstructions connect ice sheets, sea level, and climate models to fluvial systems, which in turn generate measurable terrace and sedimentary records as they carry physical, compositional, and isotopic signatures of ice sheet melt and landscape change through their channels and to the sea. Therefore, this work provides a self-consistent paleogeographic framework within which models and geologic records may be quantitatively compared to build new insights into past glacial systems.

  20. Sensitivity simulations with direct shortwave radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-07-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate and dust deposition records suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key elements controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these elements are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters can be reasonably constrained, the simulated dust DRF spans a~wide uncertainty range related to the strong nonlinearity of the Earth system. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several watts per square metre in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In the case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In the case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods, which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters, dust DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  1. Sensitivity simulations with direct radiative forcing by aeolian dust during glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, E.; Ganopolski, A.

    2014-01-01

    Possible feedback effects between aeolian dust, climate and ice sheets are studied for the first time with an Earth system model of intermediate complexity over the late Pleistocene period. Correlations between climate variables and dust deposits suggest that aeolian dust potentially plays an important role for the evolution of glacial cycles. Here climatic effects from the dust direct radiative forcing (DRF) caused by absorption and scattering of solar radiation are investigated. Key factors controlling the dust DRF are the atmospheric dust distribution and the absorption-scattering efficiency of dust aerosols. Effective physical parameters in the description of these factors are varied within uncertainty ranges known from available data and detailed model studies. Although the parameters are reasonably constrained by use of these studies, the simulated dust DRF spans a wide uncertainty range related to nonlinear dependencies. In our simulations, the dust DRF is highly localized. Medium-range parameters result in negative DRF of several W m-2 in regions close to major dust sources and negligible values elsewhere. In case of high absorption efficiency, the local dust DRF can reach positive values and the global mean DRF can be insignificantly small. In case of low absorption efficiency, the dust DRF can produce a significant global cooling in glacial periods which leads to a doubling of the maximum glacial ice volume relative to the case with small dust DRF. DRF-induced temperature and precipitation changes can either be attenuated or amplified through a feedback loop involving the dust cycle. The sensitivity experiments suggest that depending on dust optical parameters the DRF has the potential to either damp or reinforce glacial-interglacial climate changes.

  2. From the Last Interglacial to the Anthropocene: Modelling a Complete Glacial Cycle (PalMod)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brücher, Tim; Latif, Mojib; Claussen, Martin; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We will give a short overview of the national climate modelling initiative (PalMod - Paleo Modelling, www.palmod.de) on the understanding of the climate system dynamics and its variability during the last glacial cycle. PalMod is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and its specific topics are: (i) to identify and quantify the relative contributions of the fundamental processes which determined the Earth's climate trajectory and variability during the last glacial cycle, (ii) to simulate with comprehensive Earth System Models (ESMs) the climate from the peak of the last interglacial - the Eemian warm period - up to the present, including the changes in the spectrum of variability, and (iii) to assess possible future climate trajectories beyond this century during the next millennia with sophisticated ESMs tested in such a way. The research is intended to be conducted over a period of 10 years, but with shorter funding cycles. The envisioned approach is innovative in three respects. First, the consortium aims at simulating a full glacial cycle in transient mode and with comprehensive ESMs which allow full interactions between the physical and biogeochemical components of the Earth system, including ice sheets. Second, we shall address climate variability during the last glacial cycle on a large range of time scales, from interannual to multi-millennial, and attempt to quantify the relative contributions of external forcing and processes internal to the Earth system to climate variability at different time scales. Third, in order to achieve a higher level of understanding of natural climate variability at time scales of millennia, its governing processes and implications for the future climate, we bring together three different research communities: the Earth system modeling community, the proxy data community and the computational science community. The consortium consists of 18 partners including all major modelling centers within

  3. Does an asymmetric thermohaline-ice-sheet oscillator drive 100 000-yr glacial cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, George H.

    2000-05-01

    A hypothesis is presented that late Quaternary 100 000-yr glacial cycles are driven by an asymmetric thermohaline-ice-sheet oscillator that emerged in the global climate system 650 000-950 000 yr ago, perhaps when the main source of Northern Hemisphere deep-water production shifted south from the Arctic into the Nordic seas. It is hypothesised that the asymmetry is due to the increasing difficulty after 950 000 years ago of resetting an interglacial mode of the critical Nordic limb of the salinity conveyor once it switches off and an ensuing iceberg flux enters the areas of downwelling. A possible reason for both a southward shift and the resulting asymmetry is uplift of the Greenland-Scotland submarine ridge from activity of the Iceland mantle plume.In this hypothesis an individual 100 000-yr glacial cycle begins when the northernmost limb of the salinity conveyor in the Nordic seas is curtailed, or even switched off, perhaps due to the growing strength of competing Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) generated by interglacial recession of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) from the West Antarctic Rift System. Such recession produces southern marginal seas where dense shelf water can collect and overflow into the abyss. When northern ice sheets, nucleated by this circulation switch, develop marine components that calve icebergs into the Nordic seas, the salinity conveyor can no longer revert to an interglacial mode from orbital forcing, as it did prior to 950 000 yr ago. In order to reset an interglacial circulation mode of the conveyor, ice sheets must continue to grow for 100 000 years until they capture enough excess volume to produce a gravitational collapse of marine-based components, so massive that all grounded ice is flushed from North Atlantic continental shelves. The outburst of icebergs produced by this collapse cripples the glacial mode of overturning in the northern North Atlantic. Once this collapse ends, however, the Nordic seas become nearly free of

  4. Molecular evidence for Pleistocene glacial cycles driving diversification of a North American desert spider, Agelenopsis aperta.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Nadia A; Riechert, Susan E

    2004-11-01

    The influence of historical climatic vs. geological changes on species diversification patterns was investigated in a widely distributed North American desert spider, Agelenopsis aperta (Araneae: Agelenidae), with particular reference to Pleistocene glacial cycles and earlier patterns of mountain building. Levels of sequence divergence obtained from the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome oxidase I, dated to the Pleistocene, eliminating Rocky Mountain orogeny as a cause of diversification, as orogeny ended 4 million years ago. The results of phylogenetic and network analyses showed the presence of three geographically defined clades, which were consistent with the presence of at least three glacial refugia: (i) east of the Rocky Mountains; (ii) between the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevadas; and (iii) west of the Sierra Nevadas. In addition, populations within the Rocky Mountains exhibited significantly lower genetic diversity than populations east of the Rocky Mountains and the haplotypes found within the Rockies were a subset of eastern haplotypes. These patterns suggest that a post-Pleistocene range expansion occurred out of an eastern glacial refugium into the Rocky Mountains. Examination of phylogeographical studies of other North American desert taxa indicated that mountain building explained diversification patterns more effectively for some taxa but Pleistocene climate change was more important for others, including A. aperta. PMID:15488003

  5. The nature of millennial-scale climate variability during the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Luke; Margari, Vasiliki; Tzedakis, Chronis; Ganopolski, Andrey; Vautravers, Maryline; Shackleton, Nicholas

    2010-05-01

    During the last glacial period, iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic led to a disruption of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a cooling of the Northern Hemisphere, and a warming of Antarctica. This asymmetric response has been explained in terms of a bipolar seesaw mechanism, whereby changes in the strength of the AMOC result in changes in interhemispheric heat transport. However, it remains unclear to what extent the response of the AMOC and the operation of the bipolar seesaw may depend on background climate conditions, or the magnitude/delivery of freshwater flux to the North Atlantic. Here we present foraminiferal isotope and pollen records from the Portuguese margin from the last and penultimate glacial periods. A comparison of our records with temperature reconstructions from Antarctica indicates that the bipolar seesaw was a characteristic feature of both glacial periods. However, our comparison also underlines the dependence of the bipolar seesaw on background climate as well as the magnitude of iceberg discharge. Our results suggest that an intensified hydrological cycle may lead to a weaker overturning circulation with a smaller disruption threshold and extended North Atlantic stadial durations.

  6. Orbital control of western North America atmospheric circulation and climate over two glacial cycles.

    PubMed

    Lachniet, Matthew S; Denniston, Rhawn F; Asmerom, Yemane; Polyak, Victor J

    2014-01-01

    The now arid Great Basin of western North America hosted expansive late Quaternary pluvial lakes, yet the climate forcings that sustained large ice age hydrologic variations remain controversial. Here we present a 175,000 year oxygen isotope record from precisely-dated speleothems that documents a previously unrecognized and highly sensitive link between Great Basin climate and orbital forcing. Our data match the phasing and amplitudes of 65°N summer insolation, including the classic saw-tooth pattern of global ice volume and on-time terminations. Together with the observation of cold conditions during the marine isotope substage 5d glacial inception, our data document a strong precessional-scale Milankovitch forcing of southwestern paleoclimate. Because the expansion of pluvial lakes was associated with cold glacial conditions, the reappearance of large lakes in the Great Basin is unlikely until ca. 55,000 years into the future as climate remains in a mild non-glacial state over the next half eccentricity cycle. PMID:24787456

  7. Orbital control of western North America atmospheric circulation and climate over two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachniet, Matthew S.; Denniston, Rhawn F.; Asmerom, Yemane; Polyak, Victor J.

    2014-05-01

    The now arid Great Basin of western North America hosted expansive late Quaternary pluvial lakes, yet the climate forcings that sustained large ice age hydrologic variations remain controversial. Here we present a 175,000 year oxygen isotope record from precisely-dated speleothems that documents a previously unrecognized and highly sensitive link between Great Basin climate and orbital forcing. Our data match the phasing and amplitudes of 65°N summer insolation, including the classic saw-tooth pattern of global ice volume and on-time terminations. Together with the observation of cold conditions during the marine isotope substage 5d glacial inception, our data document a strong precessional-scale Milankovitch forcing of southwestern paleoclimate. Because the expansion of pluvial lakes was associated with cold glacial conditions, the reappearance of large lakes in the Great Basin is unlikely until ca. 55,000 years into the future as climate remains in a mild non-glacial state over the next half eccentricity cycle.

  8. What caused the glacial/interglacial atmospheric pCO2 cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, David; Winguth, Arne; Lea, David; Mahowald, Natalie

    2000-05-01

    Fifteen years after the discovery of major glacial/interglacial cycles in the CO2 concentration of the atmosphere, it seems that all of the simple mechanisms for lowering pCO2 have been eliminated. We use a model of ocean and sediment geochemistry, which includes new developments of iron limitation of biological production at the sea surface and anoxic diagenesis and its effect on CaCO3 preservation in the sediments, to evaluate the current proposals for explaining the glacial/interglacial pCO2 cycles within the context of the ocean carbon cycle. After equilibration with CaCO3 the model is unable to generate glacial pCO2 by increasing ocean NO3- but predicts that a doubling of ocean H4SiO4 might suffice. However, the model is unable to generate a doubling of ocean H4SiO4 by any reasonable changes in SiO2 weathering or production. Our conclusions force us to challenge one or more of the assumptions at the foundations of chemical oceanography. We can abandon the stability of the "Redfield ratio" of nitrogen to phosphorus in living marine phytoplankton and the ultimate limitation of marine photosynthesis by phosphorus. We can challenge the idea that the pH of the deep ocean is held relatively invariant by equilibrium with CaCO3. A third possibility, which challenges physical oceanographers, is that diapycnal mixing in ocean circulation models exceeds the rate of mixing in the real ocean, diminishing the model pCO2 sensitivity to biological carbon uptake.

  9. Simulating the Northern Hemispheric Ice sheets throughout the Glacial and Interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Saito, Fuyuki; Kawamura, Kenji

    2010-05-01

    To explain the mechanism of ice age cycle by numerical simulation is a great challenge. Whether Milankovitch cycle or CO2 is the driver and why the dominant periodicity of ice age cycle switched from 40 ka cycle to 100ka cycle have been remained unsolved. Although gradual cooling due to CO2 decrease is raised as a plausible idea, recent proxy of pCO2 for the last 1.5 million years did not show a clear support of it. Here we simulate the glacial cycles and investigate the origin of saw-tooth shape 100ka cycle using a three dimensional ice sheet model with the input examined by GCM. The model is forced by the orbital parameters (Berger, 1978) and atmospheric CO2 content obtained by ice cores (Vostok, EPICA and DomeF), whose dating is partly given by a new method using the N2/ao2 ratio. The ice sheet model includes the thermo-mechanical coupling process of ice sheet with the process of delayed isostatic rebound with a typical time constant. In order to estimate the climate sensitivity to Milankovitch forcing and atmospheric CO2 indicated by ice core data we used an atmospheric GCM (part of MIROC GCM) coupled to a thermodynamical ocean. Within the range of possibilities of the model, ice age cycles with a saw-tooth shape 100 ka cycle, the major NH ice sheetsユ volume and the geographical distribution at the glacial maximum are successfully simulated. The role of the delayed response of viscoelastic earth mantle-crust system is confirmed to be important. Moreover the role of Atmospheric stationary wave feedback are found to be important to sharpen the termination and show the role of North American ice sheet. It is shown by sensitivity studies that this 100ka cycle is mainly obtained by the slowly acting ice sheet response to Milankovitch forcing, amplified by the CO2 change, which affects the global climate change. Concerning the switch from 40ka cycle to 100 ka cycle, mean CO2 decrease of only 20ppm is enough, which could be below the detection level of measurements.

  10. The Emsian - Eifelian (Lower - Middle Devonian) boundary occurs in a 100-kyr eccentricity maximum: A potentially useful secondary marker for the GSSP section (Wetteldorf Richtschnitt, Germany).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vleeschouwer, D.; Makarona, C.; Linnemann, U.; Königshof, P.; Claeys, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    . We observe a mixed forcing of obliquity and eccentricity-modulated precession. Moreover, the Emsian - Eifelian boundary clearly occurs shortly after a 100-kyr eccentricity maximum. This cyclostratigraphic observation can be used as an additional mean in future long-distance correlations between Emsian - Eifelian boundary sections.

  11. A new chronology and probabilistic assessment of sea-level variability over five glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Katharine M.; Rohling, Eelco J.; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Florindo, Fabio; Heslop, David; Marra, Fabrizio; Roberts, Andrew P.; Tamisiea, Mark E.; Williams, Felicity

    2015-04-01

    On geological timescales, changes in sea level give an indication of the global glaciation state. To fully portray how Earth's glaciation state varied in the past, we need to consider the timing and amplitude of sea-level changes during both glacial and interglacial intervals. Ideally, we also need to consider such changes over several glacial-interglacial cycles, so that i) any systematic sea-level/ice-volume relationships can be discerned, and ii) more reliable estimates of sea-level change rates under different boundary conditions can be determined. While an increasing number of well-dated sea-level records exists for periods within the last glacial cycle, older time intervals are much less represented. For example, available reconstructions of sea level prior to the last interglacial tend to be discontinuous or of low resolution, contain large sea-level uncertainties, or have orbitally tuned chronologies that are biased by assumptions about climate: ice-volume phasings. To address these issues, we have developed a robust, radiometrically constrained timescale for continuous and centennial-resolution records of sea level and rates of sea-level change, over the last five glacial cycles (~500,000 years). Our method is based on synchronisation of Red Sea dust and relative sea-level (RSL) records to a speleothem δ18O record from Sanbao Cave (China). We have also used Bayesian and Monte Carlo-style methods to assess chronological and sea-level uncertainties, which has resulted in the first probabilistic records of sea level and sea-level change rates for periods before the last interglacial. This provides an opportunity for detailed comparisons with existing sea-level/ice-volume reconstructions, and for validating models of sea-level rise and ice-sheet dynamics. Finally, to illustrate an implication of our new sea-level records, we explored the relationship between natural (pre-anthropogenic forcing) sea-level rise rates and 'glaciation state', where the latter is

  12. New exposure ages for the Last Glacial Cycle in the Sanabria Lake region (northwestern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María Jose; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier; Valero-Garcés, Blas

    2013-04-01

    The Sanabria Lake region is located in the Trevinca Massif, a mid-latitude mountain area up to 2128 m asl in the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula (42oN 6oW). An ice cap glaciation took place during the Last Glacial Cycle in this massif, with an equilibrium line altitude of 1687 m for the Tera glacial outlet at its local maximum (Cowton et al., 2009). A well preserved glacial sequence occurs on an area of 45 km2 around the present Sanabria Lake (1000 m asl) and is composed by lateral and end moraines in close relationship with glaciolacustrine deposits. This sequence shows the ice snout oscillations of the former Tera glacier during the Last Glacial Cycle and offers a good opportunity to compare radiocarbon and OSL- based chronological models with new cosmogenic isotope dates. The new dataset of 10Be exposure ages presented here for the Sanabria Lake moraines is based on measurements conducted on 23 boulders and is compared with previous radiocarbon and OSL data conducted on ice related deposits (Pérez-Alberti et al., 2011; Rodríguez-Rodríguez et al., 2011). Our results are coherent with the available deglaciation radiocarbon chronology, and support a last deglaciation origin for the whole set of end moraines that are downstream the Sanabria Lake (19.2 - 15.7 10Be ka). Discrepancies between results of the different dating methods concern the timing of the local glacial maximum, with the cosmogenic exposure method always yielding the youngest minimum ages. As proposed to explain similar observations made elsewhere (Palacios et al., 2012), reconciling the ages from different dating methods would imply the occurrence of two glacial advances close enough in extent to generate an overlapping polygenic moraine. Cowton, T., Hughes, P.D., Gibbard, P.L., 2009. Palaeoglaciation of Parque Natural Lago de Sanabria, northwest Spain. Geomorphology 108, 282-291. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., Rico, M.T., Valero-Garcés, B

  13. The interglacial-glacial cycle and geochemical evolution of Canadian and Fennoscandian Shield groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, R. L.; Frape, S. K.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Pitkänen, P.; Blowes, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    Results from cryogenic column experiments are compared with the geochemical data collected in the Canadian and Fennoscandian Shields over the past 25 years to investigate the relative influence of the glacial-interglacial cycle; specifically, the impact of continental glaciers, permafrost, and methane hydrate, on the evolution of groundwater from crystalline shield environments. Several different geochemical indicators of freezing processes (either glacial or permafrost-related) were utilized: comparisons of Na/Cl and Br/Cl ratios, δ 18O and δ 2H values, and δ 18O values and Cl - concentration. During freezing, fluids with different dominant cations follow distinctly different linear trends when Na/Cl and Br/Cl ratios are compared. Significantly, none of the freezing trends follows the trend hypothesized by Herut et al. (1990) for the evolution of seawater chemistry during freezing. Intrusion of glacial meltwater and in situ freezing (i.e., permafrost formation) result in a similar end-member when comparing δ 18O values and Cl - concentration. The geochemical influence of a freezing process on fresh, brackish, and some saline fluids was identified at some, but not all Canadian Shield sites, regardless of site location with respect to modern-day permafrost. Appreciably, physical and geochemical data do not support the formation of brines through any freezing process in the Canadian and Fennoscandian Shields, as hypothesized by Starinsky and Katz (2003). Rather, on all diagnostic freezing plots, brines are an end-member, indicating a different evolutionary pathway. Significant depletions in 18O with respect to modern precipitation, an indication of either glacial meltwater or a freezing process, were identified at depths of up to 1 km at some sites in the Canadian Shield, and to shallower depths in the Fennoscandian Shield. The potential of this fluid to reach such depths could be attributable to artificial gradients and mixing, glacial recharge, permafrost or

  14. Glacial landscape evolution and sediment export: insights from digital topographic analyses and numerical modelling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocklehurst, S. H.; MacGregor, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment accumulation rates in the Gulf of Alaska and low-temperature thermochronology from the European Alps, amongst other lines of evidence, indicate accelerated glacial incision and sediment export associated with the Middle Pleistocene Transition (MPT), ~1 Ma. At this time, the change from symmetrical 40-kyr temperature cycles to larger amplitude, asymmetric 100-kyr cycles would have allowed larger, longer lived glaciers to develop, which is inferred as a key contributor to accelerated glacial erosion. Digital topographic analyses comparing glaciated drainage basins of different sizes in the Southern Alps, New Zealand, and Teton Range, western US, amongst others, indicate the importance of scale in glacial landscape development. In smaller drainage basins, or those at the limit of glaciation, landscape modification is primarily restricted to carving characteristic cirques at the heads of valleys. Glaciers may have occasionally spilled from these to carve U-shaped cross-sections downvalley, but without substantial vertical incision. In larger drainage basins with a longer history of glacial occupation, glacial incision has produced shallower downvalley profiles with characteristic glacial steps, presumably accompanied by greater sediment export. A numerical glacial longitudinal profile evolution model, driven by temperature cycles representing either side of the MPT, is used to compare glacial erosion and sediment export from initial Pleistocene glaciations with post-MPT behaviour. The modelled landscape response to the MPT is strongly dependent on the tectonic setting and the behaviour of the fluvial system downstream of the glacier. With no imposed tectonic rock uplift, the major change in the landscape is the carving of cirque forms and glacial longitudinal profiles at the start of the Pleistocene; the MPT would have had little impact on landscape morphology or sediment export. Imposing tectonic as well as isostatic rock uplift, alongside inefficient fluvial

  15. Environmental evolution in Picos de Europa (Cantabrian Mountains, Northern Spain) since the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Oliva, Marc; Lopes, Vera; Cruces, Anabela; da Conceição Freitas, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The Western Massif of the Picos de Europa includes some of the highest elevations of the Cantabrian Mountains. The maximum ice expansion in this limestone range during the last glacial cycle preceded the global Last Glacial Maximum. A 5.4 m long sedimentary sequence was collected from Belbín, a depression damned by a moraine in a mid-altitude environment of this massif. Using a combination of several approaches we have reconstructed the environmental stages and intensity of cryogenic processes since that period until today: (1) geomorphological mapping combining field evidences, aerial photographs and topographic maps; (2) lithostratigraphic description of the cores identifying different sedimentary units; (3) Grain-size analyses of the fine fraction by laser diffraction; and (4) quartz grains using Cailleux (1942) analysis with modifications from Mycielska-Dowgiałło and Woronko (1998). The studied accumulative kame terrace has preserved a Late Quaternary record with geomorphological and climatic events, variable accumulation rates, and distinct grain properties resulting from frost and chemical weathering. The basal dating of the sediments of this section shows that the maximum glacial extent occurred prior to 37.2 ka cal BP. The lithostratigraphic analysis of the section shows evidence of four major stages regarding the environmental evolution in the area: (1) from 37.2 to 29 ka there was a phase with intense periglacial activity and deposition of slope deposits; (2) from 29 to 22 ka, the depression of Belbín gradually infilled; (3) from 22 to 8 ka, a paleolake was present in the study site; (4) since 8 ka, the lake became infilled. Besides, human-induced fires started at 4.9 ka probably for grazing purposes. Based on the sediment stratigraphy the data presented, demonstrates that in Belbín area there have been persistent cryogenic conditions since the last glacial cycle until present-day, with different degrees of intensity and type of weathering processes

  16. Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating of Glacial Outwash Spanning the Last Glacial Cycle on the Western Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, K. J.; Thackray, G. D.; Rittenour, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    Valley glaciers in the Olympic Mountains, Washington coalesced and advanced onto the Pacific coastal lowlands six times during Late Pleistocene time. With each advance, the valley glaciers constructed extensive landforms and thick stratigraphic sequences. Along the coast of the Olympic Peninsula, between the Hoh and Queets Rivers, wave-cut sea cliffs expose alternating sequences of outwash fans formed during periods of glacial advance and marine transgressive facies formed during periods of sea-level high stand. Previous work, encompassing geomorphic mapping of inland and coastal outcrops, stratigraphy, stratigraphic correlation, and radiocarbon dating, established a provisional glacial chronology for the Olympic coast, but was limited to the range of radiocarbon dating. Within the sea cliffs, three primary units of outwash were identified: the Hoh Oxbow (MIS 3), Lyman Rapids (MIS 4 or 5b), and Steamboat Creek outwash (MIS 6 or older). The outwash units are generally bounded by interglacial sea-level high stand sediments or interstadial terrestrial sediment. Our new investigations utilize detailed sedimentology and stratigraphy, mapping of geomorphic sequences, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating to extend and solidify the coastal glacial chronology. OSL methods provide a means to date outwash sequences directly and enable dating of previously undateable older sediments. The quartz in these sediments appears to be fully bleached and retains the luminescence signal. Furthermore, at two locations where both radiocarbon and OSL methods were applied on the same sediments, the ages are indistinguishable, indicating that OSL is reliable in these settings. Preliminary OSL ages from the outwash units indicate valley glacier advances on the Olympic Peninsula during Hoh Oxbow (MIS 3, ca. 30-50 ka), Lyman Rapids (MIS 4, ca. 50-80 ka), and Steamboat Creek (MIS 5d or older, >/= 105 ka). Additionally, general sediment fining up-section suggests a decrease in

  17. The role of sea ice in the temperature-precipitation feedback of glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildor, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Tziperman, Eli; Lev, Ilit

    2014-08-01

    The response of the hydrological cycle to climate variability and change is a critical open question, where model reliability is still unsatisfactory, yet upon which past climate history can shed some light. Sea ice is a key player in the climate system and in the hydrological cycle, due to its strong albedo effect and its insulating effect on local evaporation and air-sea heat flux. Using an atmospheric general circulation model with specified sea surface temperature and sea-ice distribution, the role of sea ice in the hydrological cycle is investigated under last glacial maximum (LGM) and present day conditions, and by studying its contribution to the "temperature-precipitation feedback". By conducting a set of sensitivity experiments in which the albedo and thickness of the sea ice are varied, the various effects of sea ice in the hydrological cycle are isolated. It is demonstrated that for a cold LGM like state, a warmer climate (as a result of reduced sea-ice cover) leads to an increase in snow precipitation over the ice sheets. The insulating effect of the sea ice on the hydrological cycle is found to be larger than the albedo effect. These two effects interact in a nonlinear way and their total effect is not equal to summing their separate contribution.

  18. Seismic characteristics of Pleistocene glacial cycles near shelf edge, offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J.S.; Schneider, L.; Hilterman, F.

    1987-05-01

    Seismic stratigraphic studies of the shelf edge and the upper slope basins in the southern parts of the South Marsh Island, Eugene Island, Ship Shoal, and Green Canyon areas of the Louisiana outer continental shelf reveal at least four Pleistocene seismic stratigraphic cycles. These apparently reflect cyclic depositional patterns associated with glacially driven highstands and lowstands of sea level during this time. In the upper slope basins, a strong continuous reflector probably of turbiditic origin marks the base of each cycle. This reflector is thought caused by initial slumping occurring as sea level begins to fall. Overlying this reflector is a zone of chaotic-to-hummocky reflectors thought caused by slumping associated with knick-point erosion and channel-cutting during falling sea level. The upper portion of the cycle is largely reflectorless or weakly reflective punctuated with occasional strong, continuous turbidite reflectors. The reflectorless portion of the cycles is thought to represent homogeneous hemipelagic sedimentation during highstands. Shelf reflectors are usually moderately strong and continuous. A strong reflection(s), identified in some instances with gas sands, marks several sea level lowstands. Erosion is locally evident during lowstands. Otherwise, shelf reflectors are relatively uniform and show few characteristics associated with rising, falling, or highstanding parts of the sea level cycle.

  19. Glaciological constraints on current ice mass changes from modelling the ice sheets over the glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huybrechts, P.

    2003-04-01

    The evolution of continental ice sheets introduces a long time scale in the climate system. Large ice sheets have a memory of millenia, hence the present-day ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are still adjusting to climatic variations extending back to the last glacial period. This trend is separate from the direct response to mass-balance changes on decadal time scales and needs to be correctly accounted for when assessing current and future contributions to sea level. One way to obtain estimates of current ice mass changes is to model the past history of the ice sheets and their underlying beds over the glacial cycles. Such calculations assist to distinguish between the longer-term ice-dynamic evolution and short-term mass-balance changes when interpreting altimetry data, and are helpful to isolate the effects of postglacial rebound from gravity and altimetry trends. The presentation will discuss results obtained from 3-D thermomechanical ice-sheet/lithosphere/bedrock models applied to the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. The simulations are forced by time-dependent boundary conditions derived from sediment and ice core records and are constrained by geomorphological and glacial-geological data of past ice sheet and sea-level stands. Current simulations suggest that the Greenland ice sheet is close to balance, while the Antarctic ice sheet is still losing mass, mainly due to incomplete grounding-line retreat of the West Antarctic ice sheet since the LGM. The results indicate that altimetry trends are likely dominated by ice thickness changes but that the gravitational signal mainly reflects postglacial rebound.

  20. Source of the Magnetic Susceptibility Variations in Southern Ocean Sediments Over the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, B.; Thompson, R.

    2014-12-01

    glacial cycle.

  1. Evolution of the stable carbon isotope composition of atmospheric CO2 over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, S.; Schmitt, J.; Bereiter, B.; Schneider, R.; Fischer, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present new δ13C measurements of atmospheric CO2 covering the last glacial/interglacial cycle, complementing previous records covering Terminations I and II. Most prominent in the new record is a significant depletion in δ13C(atm) of 0.5‰ occurring during marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, followed by an enrichment of the same magnitude at the beginning of MIS 3. Such a significant excursion in the record is otherwise only observed at glacial terminations, suggesting that similar processes were at play, such as changing sea surface temperatures, changes in marine biological export in the Southern Ocean (SO) due to variations in aeolian iron fluxes, changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, upwelling of deep water in the SO, and long-term trends in terrestrial carbon storage. Based on previous modeling studies, we propose constraints on some of these processes during specific time intervals. The decrease in δ13C(atm) at the end of MIS 4 starting approximately 64 kyr B.P. was accompanied by increasing [CO2]. This period is also marked by a decrease in aeolian iron flux to the SO, followed by an increase in SO upwelling during Heinrich event 6, indicating that it is likely that a large amount of δ13C-depleted carbon was transferred to the deep oceans previously, i.e., at the onset of MIS 4. Apart from the upwelling event at the end of MIS 4 (and potentially smaller events during Heinrich events in MIS 3), upwelling of deep water in the SO remained reduced until the last glacial termination, whereupon a second pulse of isotopically light carbon was released into the atmosphere.

  2. The impact of the North American glacial topography on the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakka, Johan; Löfverström, Marcus; Colleoni, Florence

    2016-05-01

    Modeling studies have shown that the continental-scale ice sheets in North America and Eurasia in the last glacial cycle had a large influence on the atmospheric circulation and thus yielded a climate distinctly different from the present. However, to what extent the two ice sheets influenced each others' growth trajectories remains largely unexplored. In this study we investigate how an ice sheet in North America influences the downstream evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet, using a thermomechanical ice-sheet model forced by climate data from atmospheric snapshot experiments of three distinctly different phases of the last glacial cycle: the Marine Isotope Stages 5b, 4, and 2 (Last Glacial Maximum - LGM). Owing to the large uncertainty associated with glacial changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, each atmospheric snapshot experiment was conducted using two distinctly different ocean heat transport representations. Our results suggest that changes in the North American paleo-topography may have largely controlled the zonal distribution of the Eurasian ice sheet. In the MIS4 and LGM experiments, the Eurasian ice sheet migrates westward towards the Atlantic sector - largely consistent with geological data and contemporary ice-sheet reconstructions - due to a low wave number stationary wave response, which yields a cooling in Europe and a warming in northeastern Siberia. The expansion of the North American ice sheet between MIS4 and the LGM amplifies the Siberian warm anomaly, which limits the glaciation there and may therefore help explain the progressive westward migration of the Eurasian ice sheet in this time period. The ocean heat transport only has a small influence on the stationary wave response to the North American glacial topography; however, because temperature anomalies have a smaller influence on an ice sheet's ablation in a colder climate than in a warmer one, the impact of the North American glacial topography on the Eurasian ice

  3. Initiation age and incision rates of inner gorges: Do they record multiple glacial-interglacial cycles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delunel, Romain; Casagrande, Jan; Schlunegger, Fritz; Akçar, Naki; Kubik, Peter W.

    2015-04-01

    gorges over multiple interglacial cycles and a relative preservation of Alpine landscapes during glacial periods.

  4. Abrupt Climate Change During the Last Glacial Cycle Based on Gulf of Mexico Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Hastings, D. W.; Hill, H.; Quinn, T. M.

    2003-12-01

    Evidence is emerging that the tropical climate system played a major role in past global climate change during the last glacial cycle. However, existing studies indicate asynchronous temperature variability in the western equatorial Atlantic, complicating the identification of causal mechanisms. Because the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is linked to the equatorial Atlantic, sea-surface temperature (SST) records from the GOM help assess the phasing between low- and high-latitude Atlantic climate. High sedimentation rates of >40 cm/k.y. and laminated sediments in Orca Basin allow sub-centennial-scale resolution. Paired δ 18O and Mg/Ca data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from core EN32-PC6 are used to separate deglacial changes in SST and δ 18Oseawater due to low-salinity meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS). Mg-SST increases by >3.0° C between 17.2 and 15.2 ka (calendar years) encompassing Heinrich Event 1 in the North Atlantic. Comparison to polar ice core records indicates GOM SST was not in phase with Greenland air temperature, consistent with thermohaline circulation modulation of Atlantic climate. This warming represents the bulk of the 4.2+/-0.9° C increase from the last glacial maximum (24.0+/-0.8° C) to early Holocene (29.0+/-0.4° C). Subtracting temperature and ice-volume effects from Gs. ruber δ 18O reveals two episodes of LIS meltwater input, one of >1.5% from ca. 16.2-15.7 ka and a second major spike of >2% from ca. 15.2-13.0 ka that encompassed meltwater pulse 1A (mwp-1A) and peaked at ca. 13.4 ka. These results suggest that (1) subtropical Atlantic SST warming preceded peak LIS decay and mwp-1A by >2 k.y., (2) thermohaline circulation may have modulated Atlantic climate on the millennial scale during the last deglaciation, and (3) major LIS meltwater input to the GOM ended before North Atlantic Deep Water suppression during the Younger Dryas. A new 31.79 m Calypso piston core collected in July 2002 on the R/V Marion Dufresne

  5. Glacial-Interglacial, Orbital and Millennial-Scale Climate Variability for the Last Glacial Cycle at Shackleton Site U1385 based on Dinoflagellate Cysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datema, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Shackleton Site (IODP Expedition 339 Site U1385), located off the West-Portuguese Margin, preserves a continuous high-fidelity record of millennial-scale climate variability for the last several glacial cycles (~1.4 Myr) that can be correlated precisely to patterns observed in polar ice cores. In addition, rapid delivery of terrestrial material to the deep-sea environment allows the correlation of these marine records to European terrestrial climate records. This unique marine-ice-terrestrial linkage makes the Shackleton Site the ideal reference section for studying Quaternary abrupt climate change. The main objective of studying Site U1385 is to establish a marine reference section of Pleistocene climate change. We generated (sub)millennial-scale (~600 year interval) dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) assemblage records from Shackleton Site U1385 (IODP Expedition 339) to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST) and productivity/upwelling over the last 152 kyrs. In addition, our approach allows for detailed land-sea correlations, because we also counted assemblages of pollen and spores from higher plants. Dinocyst SST and upwelling proxies, as well as warm/cold pollen proxies from Site U1385 show glacial-interglacial, orbital and stadial-interstadial climate variability and correlate very well to Uk'37, planktic foraminifer δ18O and Ca/Ti proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and Greenland Ice Core δ18O. The palynological proxies capture (almost) all Dansgaard-Oeschger events of the last glacial cycle, also before ~70 ka, where millennial-scale variability is overprinted by precession. We compare the performance and results of the palynology of Site U1385 to proxies of previously drilled Shackleton Sites and conclude that palynology strengthens the potential of this site to form a multi-proxy reference section for millennial scale climate variability across the Pleistocene-Holocene. Finally, we will present a long-term paleoceanographic perspective down

  6. Possible solar origin of the 1,470-year glacial climate cycle demonstrated in a coupled model.

    PubMed

    Braun, Holger; Christl, Marcus; Rahmstorf, Stefan; Ganopolski, Andrey; Mangini, Augusto; Kubatzki, Claudia; Roth, Kurt; Kromer, Bernd

    2005-11-10

    Many palaeoclimate records from the North Atlantic region show a pattern of rapid climate oscillations, the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger events, with a quasi-periodicity of approximately 1,470 years for the late glacial period. Various hypotheses have been suggested to explain these rapid temperature shifts, including internal oscillations in the climate system and external forcing, possibly from the Sun. But whereas pronounced solar cycles of approximately 87 and approximately 210 years are well known, a approximately 1,470-year solar cycle has not been detected. Here we show that an intermediate-complexity climate model with glacial climate conditions simulates rapid climate shifts similar to the Dansgaard-Oeschger events with a spacing of 1,470 years when forced by periodic freshwater input into the North Atlantic Ocean in cycles of approximately 87 and approximately 210 years. We attribute the robust 1,470-year response time to the superposition of the two shorter cycles, together with strongly nonlinear dynamics and the long characteristic timescale of the thermohaline circulation. For Holocene conditions, similar events do not occur. We conclude that the glacial 1,470-year climate cycles could have been triggered by solar forcing despite the absence of a 1,470-year solar cycle. PMID:16281042

  7. Exploiting multi-proxy analysis of marine sediments in the southeast Atlantic: Intensification of Agulhas leakage tied to the start of the 100ka cycles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Benjamin; McClymont, Erin; Marret, Fabienne

    2013-04-01

    The transition in orbital forcing from a 41 ka world to a 100 ka world was a major change in the climate regime over the last 1.5 Ma but its causes and its impacts are still being investigated. Here, we present reconstructions of sea-surface temperature (SST), salinity, and plankton assemblages obtained from a single core, ODP site 1087 (31°28'S, 15°19'E, 1374m water depth) spanning the last 1.5 Ma. Our hypothesis is that the response and position of the Agulhas leakage, which transfers heat and salt to the SE Atlantic region, has shifted as a result of changes in the dominant periodicity of orbital forcing. We draw on evidence from the alkenone (U37K') proxy for SST, dinoflagllate species analysis, and foraminifera oxygen isotopes for salinity and ice volume, to identify changes in the input of the Agulhas leakage to the SE Atlantic. We present the first continuous record of SE Atlantic SSTs reaching to 1.5 Ma which spans both the 41 kyr and 100 kyr glacial cycles. We identify large changes in SST and salinity on glacial-interglacial timescales, but show that there is a consistent pattern of SSTs leading salinity and then global ice volume change, so that deglaciation occurs some 5-10 kyr after the onset of rapid warming in the SE Atlantic during the recent glacials and interglacials. This early warming pattern, which characterizes the most recent cycles, began to develop as early at 900 ka, as the 100 kyr cycles became dominant. Before this time there is little evidence of Agulhas leakage in the ODP1087 record. We also show that over the last 600 ka there has been a strengthening of the Agulhas Leakage which has led to warmer interglacials over this time period. Overall the record shows that the strength and location of the Agulhas leakage is sensitive to changes in the dominant cycles in the climate.

  8. Leeward vs windward effects on glacial/interglacial periplatform aragonite cycles off Pedro Bank and Jamaica (northern Nicaragua rise)

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, K.S.; Droxler, A.W.; Haddad, G.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Fine (< 62 {mu}m) aragonite content in periplatform sediment from the northern (leeward) and southern (windward) slopes of Pedro Bank shows late Quaternary climate-induced cyclic downcore variations. Intervals characterized by high aragonite content correspond to interglacial stages. The aragonite cycles are clearly developed despite significant windward/leeward differences in sediment sources and composition, pelagic productivity( ), and current regime. Interglacial sedimentation rates on the leeward slope (LS) are nearly twice as high as those on the windward slope (WS), and twice as high as LS glacial sedimentation rates. Carbonate values (75-85%) in sediments deposited on the northern slope of Pedro Bank are higher than those (50-70%) on its southern slope. On both slopes, high carbonate values correspond to interglacial intervals. The lowest carbonate values occur during glacial intervals on the southern slope and are explained by an increase of siliciclastic input from Jamaica during sea level lowstands. This siliciclastic increase could compensate for the drop of bank-derived fine aragonite, and thus, could explain the constant glacial/interglacial sedimentation rates found on the southern slope. In addition, high pteropod abundance during glacial stages along the southern slope may also indicate higher glacial pelagic productivity. Winnowing effects are rather conspicuous in one core from the northern slope within Walton basin (600 m water depth) during glacial intervals, when values of the coarse (> 62 {mu}m) fraction are the highest (the opposite is observed in the other cores). In this relatively shallow core, partial cementation during glacial intervals is also observed.

  9. An episode of rapid bedrock channel incision during the last glacial cycle, measured with 10Be

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reusser, L.; Bierman, P.; Pavich, M.; Larsen, J.; Finkel, R.

    2006-01-01

    We use 10Be to infer when, how fast, and why the Susquehanna River incised through bedrock along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard, one of the world's most prominent and ancient passive margins. Although the rate at which large rivers incise rock is a fundamental control on the development of landscapes, relatively few studies have directly measured how quickly such incision occurs either in tectonically active environments or along passive margins. Exposure ages of fluvially carve d, bedrock strath terraces, preserved along the lower Susquehanna River, demonstrate that even along a passive margin, large rivers are capable of incising through rock for short periods of time at rates approaching those recorded in tectonically active regions, such as the Himalayas. Over eighty samples, collected along and between three prominent levels of strath terraces within Holtwood Gorge, indicate that the Susquehanna River incised more than 10 meters into the Appalachian Piedmont during the last glacial cycle. Beginning ???36 ka, incision rates increased dramatically, and remained elevated until ???14 ka. The northern half of the Susquehanna basin was glaciated during the late Wisconsinan; however, similar rates and timing of incision occurred in the unglaciated Potomac River basin immediately to the south. The concurrence of incision periods on both rivers suggests that glaciation and associated meltwater were not the primary drivers of incision. Instead, it appears that changing climatic conditions during the late Pleistocene promoted an increase in the frequency and magnitude of flood events capable of exceeding thresholds for rock detachment and bedrock erosion, thus enabling a short-lived episode of rapid incision into rock. Although this study has constraine d the timing and rate of bedrock incision along the largest river draining the Atlantic passive margin, the dates alone cannot explain fully why, or by what processes, this incision occurred. However, cosmogenic dating offers

  10. New insights into West Greenland ice sheet/stream dynamics during the last glacial cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Lane, Tim; Rea, Brice; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Jamieson, Stewart; Vieli, Andreas; Rodes, Angel

    2015-04-01

    Onshore and offshore geomorphological mapping and deglacial chronologies from West Greenland constrain the nature and magnitude of ice advance and decay of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) during the last glacial cycle. Several ice stream troughs are known to have fed ice to the shelf edge during the last glacial cycle. Their offshore expression suggests that many were coalescent systems fed by smaller outlet glaciers and ice streams onshore but their central flow pathways were also controlled by geology and preglacial topography. The bed morphology of these large ice streams shows they operated over soft, deforming beds with drumlins, mega-scale glacial lineations and grounding zone wedges marking an offshore transition from predominant areal scour onshore. Records of offshore deglacial chronology remain sparse but the Uummannaq and Disko Bugt ice stream corridors are now well constrained. The Uummannaq ice stream (UIS) completely deglaciated from the continental shelf between 14.8 ka and 11.0 ka in response to rising air temperatures, increasing JJA solar radiation and sea-level rise, but temporary standstills and the asynchronous retreat history of its feeder zones suggest that topography/bathymetry strongly modulated retreat rates as ice became 'locked' back into the coastal fjord system. Initial reconstructions of behaviour UIS discounted an oceanic role in early deglaciation and favoured retreat from the mid-shelf and inner-shelf prior to the Younger Dryas but both these concepts remain under investigation. In Disko Bugt, Jakobshavn Isbrae deglaciated later than the UIS and remained on the outer shelf during the Younger Dyras stadial (12.8 - 11.7 cal. kyrs BP) only reaching in the inner coast fjords at approximately 10.0 ka. The later deglaciation of the Disko system (despite similar external forcing mechanisms) was controlled by regional topographic/bathymetric contrasts in their respective trough morphologies. This hypothesis is supported by recent model

  11. Evaluating ice sheet model performance over the last glacial cycle using paleo data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alexander; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Montoya, Marisa

    2015-04-01

    Estimating the past evolution of ice sheets is important for improving our understanding of their role in the Earth system and for quantifying their contribution to sea-level changes. Limited but significant paleo data and proxies are available to give insights into past changes that are valid, at least, on a local scale. Meanwhile, models can be used to provide a mechanistic picture of ice sheet changes. Combined data-model comparisons are therefore useful exercises that allow models to be confronted with real-world information and lead to better understanding of the mechanisms driving changes. In turn, models can potentially be used to validate the data by providing a physical explanation for observed phenomena. Here we focus on the evolution of the Greenland ice sheet through the last glacial cycle to highlight common problems and potential opportunities for data-model comparisons. We will present several examples of how present generation model results are inconsistent with estimates from paleo data, either in terms of the boundary forcing given to the model or the resulting characteristics of the ice sheet. We also propose a set of data-model comparisons as the starting point for developing a more standardized paleo model performance check. Incorporating such a test into modeling efforts could generate new insights in coupled climate - ice sheet modeling.

  12. Millennial changes in North American wildfire and soil activity over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Hubertus; Schüpbach, Simon; Gfeller, Gideon; Bigler, Matthias; Röthlisberger, Regine; Erhardt, Tobias; Stocker, Thomas F.; Mulvaney, Robert; Wolff, Eric W.

    2015-09-01

    Climate changes in the North Atlantic region during the last glacial cycle were dominated by the slow waxing and waning of the North American ice sheet as well as by intermittent, millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger climate oscillations. However, prior to the last deglaciation, the responses of North American vegetation and biomass burning to these climate variations are uncertain. Ammonium in Greenland ice cores, a product from North American soil emissions and biomass burning events, can help to fill this gap. Here we use continuous, high-resolution measurements of ammonium concentrations between 110,000 to 10,000 years ago from the Greenland NGRIP and GRIP ice cores to reconstruct North American wildfire activity and soil ammonium emissions. We find that on orbital timescales soil emissions increased under warmer climate conditions when vegetation expanded northwards into previously ice-covered areas. For millennial-scale interstadial warm periods during Marine Isotope Stage 3, the fire recurrence rate increased in parallel to the rapid warmings, whereas soil emissions rose more slowly, reflecting slow ice shrinkage and delayed ecosystem changes. We conclude that sudden warming events had little impact on soil ammonium emissions and ammonium transport to Greenland, but did result in a substantial increase in the frequency of North American wildfires.

  13. Subsurface geology of Kansai International Airport: sequence related to global glacial - interglacial cycles and island tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, K.; Kitada, N.; Furudoi, T.; Nakaseko, K.

    2007-12-01

    Tectonic sedimentary basins aligned in the central part of Japan during Quaternary . Thick sediments deposited in these basins provide useful records of climatic changes and tectonics throughout Quaternary. The Osaka sedimentary basin including Osaka Bay and area of Kansai International Airport is one of them. The Quaternary Osaka sedimentary basin has developed at an eastern contractional bend of a major transcurrent fault system named the Median Tectonic Line, which divides the southwest Japan arc. The thickness of Pliocene - Pleistocene sediments reaches to ca 3500m at the deepest part. These sequences are called the Osaka Group and are distributed in the Osaka Bay and exposed in the surrounding mountain areas. The Osaka Group is characterized by alternating sequences of marine and nonmarine strata. The subsurface sediments of Kansai International Airport (KIA) is composed mainly of Pliocene - Pleistocene sediments, which is characterized by alternating sequences of marine and nonmarine strata related to glacial - interglacial cycles. . The stratigraphy at KIA was established by micropaleontological, tephrochronological and magnetostratigraphical method. The sedimentary sequence at KIX is divided into two main units (Kukojima and Sennanoki Formations in ascending order) with the uncomformity within two units. Although thick marine clay units are mainly of the subsurface sequence, characteristics of coarser sediment units have an important role of moving of water during construction of the reclaimed land.

  14. Pliocene Glacial-Deglacial Cycles Deciphered From Southern Kerguelen Plateau Benthic Foraminiferal Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K.; Webb, P. N.

    2008-12-01

    Kerguelen Plateau offers a unique perspective on late Neogene paleoclimate because it is located downstream from the Antarctic cryosphere at a critical location within thermohaline circulation. The Pliocene on the Kerguelen Plateau was a time of dynamic paleoclimatic change that has been documented from planktonic microfossils (Bohaty and Harwood, 1998; Whitehead and McMinn, 2002). Using benthic foraminifera as a proxy for paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic conditions, intervals of change (glacial- deglacial cycles) were deciphered. Benthic foraminiferal data from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 747, 748, and 751 (Mackensen, 1992) were compared with those data from ODP Site 744 in order to develop a regional Pliocene history of the Southern Kerguelen Plateau. Carbonate values fluctuate dramatically throughout the late Neogene in the region. Pliocene Dissolution Events (PDEs) are recorded at Sites 751, 748, and 744 (Ehrmann, 1991; Mackensen, 1992). During these events calcareous benthic foraminifera are dissolved, thus affecting the record of benthic assemblages. Carbonate availability may in part be controlling test abundances and species richness in biocoenoses and thanatocoenoses at the Southern Kerguelen Plateau, especially during PDEs. While benthic foraminifera have limited utility biostratigraphically during the Pliocene on the Kerguelen Plateau, they do offer great value in deciphering paleoenvironmental seafloor conditions and trophic relationships. Benthic assemblages on the Southern Kerguelen Plateau during the Pliocene are dominated by Epistominella exigua (Schroeder-Adams, 1991; Mackensen, 1992). Thus, the major factors driving benthic assemblages during the Pliocene in the region are organic carbon flux to the seafloor and carbonate availability.

  15. The simulated climate of the Last Glacial Maximum and the insights into the global carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matear, R. J.; Lenton, A.; Etheridge, D.; Phipps, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    Global climate models (GCMs) provide an important tool for simulating the earth's climate. Here we present a GCM simulation of the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), which was obtained by setting atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations and the earth's orbital parameters to the values which prevailed at 21 000 years before present (BP). During the LGM, we simulate a significant cooling of the ocean and a dramatic expansion of the sea-ice extent. This behaviour agrees with reconstructions from paleoclimate archives. In the ocean, the LGM simulation produces a significant redistribution of dissolved oxygen and carbon. The oxygen levels rise and the volume of anoxic water declines by more than 50%, which is consistent with paleoclimate reconstructions of denitrification. The simulated LGM climate also stores more carbon in the deep ocean (below 2000 m), but with a reduced atmospheric CO2 level the total carbon stored in the ocean declines by 600 Pg C. The LGM ocean circulation preconditions the ocean to store carbon in the deep; however, the ocean circulation and sea-ice changes are insufficient alone to increase the total carbon stored in the ocean and modifications to the ocean biogeochemical cycles are required. With modifications to organic and inorganic carbon export and organic carbon remineralization one can increase ocean carbon storage (240 Pg C) to a level that is sufficient to explain the reduction in atmospheric and land carbon during the LGM (520 ± 400 Pg C). With the modified biogeochemical cycling in the ocean, the simulated aragonite lysocline depth and dissolved oxygen become more consistent with paleo-reconstructions.

  16. Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone Shifts During the Last Glacial Cycle Near the Line Islands Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimi Sipala, M. A.; Marcantonio, F.

    2015-12-01

    This research focuses on the shift in the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) during the last glacial cycle. Deep sea sediments from the Central Equatorial Pacific (CEP) are used to quantify and isolate the sources and sinks of atmospheric dust. Dust records and influences climate affecting a wide range of process from Earth's Albedo to carbon export. Our aim is to determine the provenance of windblown dust deposited in the CEP near the Line Islands Ridge using radiogenic Nd and Pb isotopes, and to infer the location of the ITCZ and the changes of atmospheric transport through ice-age climate transitions. We focus on three cores from the CEP, along a meridional transect at approximately 160° W --- 0° 28' N (ML1208-17PC), 4° 41' N (ML1208-31BB), and 7 ° 2'N (ML1208-31BB). Radiogenic isotopes (Sr, Nd, Pb) have been successfully used to distinguish between different potential dust sources in the aluminosilicates fractions of Pacific Sediments. Our preliminary data suggest that the equatorial core (17PC) predominantly receives its dust from South America and South American volcanics South America (206Pb/204Pb = 18.62, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.63, 208Pb/204Pb = 38.62; ; ɛNd = ~ -5). The middle core, which more closely reflects the modern position of the ITCZ, has varied dust provenance through time, at times consistent with Asian Loess (average ratios are 206Pb/204Pb = 18.88, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.69, 208Pb/204Pb = 39.06; ɛNd = ~ -7) and Asian Volcanics (ɛNd = ~-1) suggesting a shift in the ITCZ south of 4N before the LGM. Our results for the most northern core are forthcoming. Prior to Holocene time, the changes in Pb isotope ratios in both cores appear to be in anti-phase; the northern core becomes less radiogenic up to the LGM, while the southern core becomes more radiogenic. This is potentially due to a weakening of the ITCZ during glacial times. A secondary aim of this work is to determine if the ITCZ migrated further south than core 17PC during Heinrich stage II.

  17. How the Surface Seawater of the South China Sea Exchanged CO2 with the Atmosphere over the Last Glacial Cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WANG, T.; Jian, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 content, changing synchronously with temperature over recent glacial cycles, is considered as one of the most important mechanisms regulating climate change. The ocean is the dominant force driving atmospheric CO2 changes in glacial cycles. The CO2 sink of global coastal seas currently comprise 21% of the net sea-air CO2 flux of the global ocean, therefore coastal seas play important role in adjusting atmospheric CO2. The South China Sea (SCS), one of the largest coastal seas separating Asia from the Pacific, currently acts as a source of atmospheric CO2 due to high seawater temperature and intense vertical mixing bringing CO2 of deep sea to the surface. We measured B/Ca ratios in planktonic foraminifers, Globigerinoides ruber and Pulleniatina obliquiloculata, from MD05-2896 located in the southern SCS to reconstruct surface water pH (pHsw) and thermocline water pH (pHtw) and then calculate pCO2 of surface water (pCO2sw) and pCO2 of thermocline water (pCO2tw) over the last glacial cycle. Additionally, Mg/Ca ratios and δ18O were measured in G.ruber and P. obliquiloculata to reconstruct seawater temperature and salinity. The difference of pCO2 between surface water and atmosphere (ΔpCO2sw-atm) were positive during Holocene and from MIS5.1 to MIS5.4, implying that the southern SCS was the source of atmospheric CO2. The Holocene result coincides with the modern observation. During the last glacial period, the southern SCS became the sink of atmospheric CO2, indicated from the negative ΔpCO2sw-atm values. We also discovered that ΔpCO2sw-atm, the difference of pCO2 between thermocline and surface water (ΔpCO2tw-sw) and thermocline water temperature (TWT) have similar change trend, presenting obvious 20,000-year precession cycle. Therefore, we regard TWT as one of the dominant elements effecting the SCS to absorb or release CO2. When TWT were lower during glacial time, the mixed layer was able to dissolve more CO2, with larger ΔpCO2tw-sw, and the

  18. A record of the variability of climate transitions between the last four glacial cycles from high-precision speleothem chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyak, V. J.; Asmerom, Y.; Lachniet, M. S.; Lapointe, Z. C.

    2011-12-01

    Speleothem growth in Fort Stanton Cave, central New Mexico in southwestern North America (SWNA), occurred predominantly during glacial periods for the last four glacial cycles, with some, but little growth spilling over into the glacial termination events. Given that lacustrine records show that glacial periods are pluvial periods in SWNA, Fort Stanton Cave speleothem growth seems to be a faithful indicator of periods of greater effective moisture for SWNA. Likewise, Asmerom et al. (2010) provided the first stable isotope record from a Fort Stanton stalagmite (FS-2) and reported an oxygen isotope record between 11.4 and 56 ka that closely mimicked the Greenland ice core oxygen records over much of the last glacial period. The δ18O variation in FS-2 reflected changes in the amount of winter precipitation, which in turn reflected the position of the Polar Jet Stream in response to changes in Northern Hemisphere temperature gradient. In contrast, variations in δ13C primarily reflect changes in the amount and type of vegetation which is linked to changes in local aridity. The stalagmites from this cave have high uranium, high δ234U and low detritus thorium and are thus ideally suited for dating using the uranium-series technique. Here we present a record of climate variability for the previous four ice ages. Based on growth of multiple stalagmites, we define the period from ~60 to 14.5 ka as speleothem-based pluvial 1 (SWNA-P1). Speleothems FS-5, FS-6, TR-2, TR-3 and HH-1 grew during glacial cycles 2-4, which we define as pluvials 2, 3, & 4 (SWNA-P2, P3, and P4) where preliminary results suggest that SWNA-P2 lasted from 170 to 130 ka, SWNA-P3 from 265 to 242 ka, and SWNA-P4 from 352 to 336 ka. Growth hiatuses and the carbon isotope records indicate the timing of pluvial terminations. Overall, SWNA-P3 is more similar to SWNA-P1, showing events that may have been more complex, with both exhibiting stadial- and interstadial-like climatic signals, while SWNA-P2 and P4

  19. Mechanisms behind primary production distribution during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mézo, Priscilla; Kageyama, Masa; Bopp, Laurent; Beaufort, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructions of past climates are possible through the analysis of organisms contained in marine and terrestrial sediments. Most of the paleorecords depend on biological processes, e.g. production of shells for coccolithophorids in the ocean, and these processes are sensitive to climate fluctuations from seasonal to orbital timescales. Consequently, depending on where and when the organisms that record climate conditions lived in the past, different factors may have influenced their abundance, their functioning, and thus it may bias interpretations of paleodata. In this context, it is necessary to evaluate the response of paleorecorders to climate variability at different timescales. In order to do so, we are using the coupled Earth System Model IPSLCM5A, which has a biogeochemical component PISCES that simulates primary production. We use 9 climate simulations of the IPSL-CM5A model, from -80kyr BP climate conditions to a preindustrial state. Thanks to different forcing conditions of these simulations we are able to disentangle the effects of precession changes from those of obliquity, sea level or gases concentrations. The objectives are to characterize the mechanisms behind the observed changes in primary production between the different time periods. The results of this modeling study will also be compared to reconstructed productions in the Indian, West and East Tropical Pacific Oceans obtained from core sediments with the method described in Beaufort et al. 1997. The early results on seasonal cycles show that, in the Indian Ocean, precession is not the main driver of changes in primary production. Indeed, we observe a grouping between simulations having the same sea level, which suggests that changes in primary production are more sensitive to parameters that define glacial-interglacial conditions such as ice sheets which affect oceanic circulation.

  20. Paleoceanographic history of the Lower Bengal Fan during the last glacial cycle - IODP Expedition 354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekens, P. S.; Weber, M. E.; Lantzsch, H.; Das, S. K.; Williams, T.; Adhikari, R. R.; Jia, G.; Fox, L. R.; Ge, J.; Manoj, M. C.; Savian, J. F.; Reilly, B. T.; Selkin, P. A.; Meynadier, L.; Spiess, V.; France-Lanord, C.; Sharma, B.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 354 drilled a ~320 km long transect of seven sites on the Lower Bengal Fan at 8o N in the Northern Indian Ocean. The sediments cores recovered record a complex relationship between turbiditic and hemipelagic environments. This variability offers a unique opportunity to link our understanding of tectonic and terrestrial processes with climate and oceanography. With the exception the westernmost Site U1454, all sites show a several meter thick, hemipelagic top layer, usually representing Late Quaternary sediment. We present physical, geochemical and stable isotopic properties of this interval to establish a time frame and assess the paleoceanographic development of the region during the last glacial cycle. We sampled Site U1452C-1H continuously for the uppermost 480 cm of hemipelagic sediment in 2-cm increments. Preliminary results indicate the Toba Ash 1 (0.74 ka) is a distinct time marker in all physical properties. Furthermore, wet-bulk density as well as color reflectance b* (the red-green component) and L* (the lightness) show a dominant precession cyclicity. Hence, we are able to provide an insolation-tuned chronology for the last 200 ka (MIS1 - 7) as a preliminary age model. These records agree well with d18O records retrieved from Chinese caves. We will present a preliminary paleoceanographic proxy data to reconstruct sea-surface temperature (SST), sea-surface salinity (SSS), ice volume, marine biological productivity, nutrient supply, and deep-water circulation. These oceanographic and climate conditions are linked to changes in monsoonal strength and terrestrial input using sedimentary proxies to reconstruct chemical weathering and sediment sources and transport time. This work addresses one of the primary cruise objectives - linking monsoon variability, regional and global climate, and Bay of Bengal sediment deposition.

  1. Persistent millennial-scale climate variability in the eastern tropical North Pacific over the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano-Torres, Elsa; Ganeshram, Raja S.; Pichevin, Laetitia E.; Salas-de-Leon, David Alberto

    2015-06-01

    High-resolution sediment records from the eastern tropical North Pacific (ETNP) spanning the last ~240 ka B.P. were studied to document the nature of millennial-scale climatic events in the tropical Pacific and to investigate teleconnection mechanisms. We present organic carbon (%OC) and diffuse spectral reflectivity records as indicative of upwelling and productivity changes off NW Mexico over the middle to late Pleistocene. The new productivity records document the persistence of abrupt millennial-scale changes over the last two glacial cycles. Detailed spectral and wavelet time series analyses show the predominance of longer climatic cycles (2-6 ka) during the last and the penultimate glacial periods. The persistence of millennial variability during the penultimate glacial, in absence of large ice rafted debris events in the North Atlantic, suggests that freshwater input through ice sheet dynamics is not essential for millennial-scale climate variability. Given the worldwide emerging picture of remarkable similar millennial-scale records over long time periods, we suggest that the pacing of this climate variability may represent a natural resonance in the climate system, amplified by a tightly coupled oceanic and atmospheric teleconnection processes. We present a schematic scenario of millennial-scale climate change depicting the role of the tropical Pacific in this global teleconnection system by linking productivity and upwelling changes in the ETNP with shifts in the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and the strength of the subtropical North Pacific High.

  2. Trends in stomatal density and 13C/12C ratios of Pinus flexilis needles during last glacial-interglacial cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van De Water, Peter K.; Leavitt, Steven W.; Betancourt, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of stomatal density and ?? 13C of limber pine (Pinus flexilis) needles (leaves) preserved in pack rat middens from the Great Basin reveal shifts in plant physiology and leaf morphology during the last 30,000 years. Sites were selected so as to offset glacial to Holocene climatic differences and thus to isolate the effects of changing atmospheric CO2 levels. Stomatal density decreased ~17 percent and ?? 13C decreased ~1.5 per mil during deglaciation from 15,000 to 12,000 years ago, concomitant with a 30 percent increase in atmospheric CO2. Water-use efficiency increased ~15 percent during deglaciation, if temperature and humidity were held constant and the proxy values for CO2 and ?? 13C of past atmospheres are accurate. The ??13C variations may help constrain hypotheses about the redistribution of carbon between the atmosphere and biosphere during the last glacial-interglacial cycle.

  3. Ice stream behaviour in the western sector of the North Sea during the end of the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Evans, David; Clark, Chris; Bateman, Mark; Livingstone, Stephen; Medialdea, Alicia; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Grimoldi, Elena; Callard, Louise; Dove, Dayton; Stewart, Heather; Davies, Bethan; Chiverell, Richard

    2016-04-01

    During the last glacial cycle the East coast of the UK was overrun by the British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) flowing eastwards and southwards. In recent years it has become evident that several ice streams including the Tweed, Tyne, and Stainmore Gap ice streams, as well as the late stage North Sea Lobe (NSL), all played a role in shaping the glacial landscape during this period, but understanding the flow phasing of these ice streams during advance and collapse has proved challenging. Here we present new data from the seafloor collected during recent work undertaken by the Britice Chrono and Glanam project teams during cruise JC123 in the North Sea. Sub-bottom seafloor data together with new swath data clearly show that the final phases of the collapse of the NSL were controlled by ice sourced from the Firth of Forth ice stream which deglaciated in a NNW trajectory. Other ice streams being fed from the west (e.g. Stainmore, Tyne, Tweed) were not influential in final phase ice retreat from the southern North Sea. The Forth ice imprint is characterised by several grounding zone/till wedges marking dynamic, oscillatory retreat of the ice as it retreated along an offshore corridor between North Yorkshire and Northumberland. Repeated packages of tills, ice marginal and glaciomarine sediments, which drape glacially scoured bedrock terrain and drumlins along this corridor, point to marine inundation accompanying ice retreat. New TCN ages suggest decoupling of the Tyne Gap ice stream and NSL between 17.8 and 16.5 ka and this coincides with rapid, regional collapse of the NSL between 17.2 and 16.0 ka along the Yorkshire and Durham coasts (new OSL ages; Britice Chrono). Hence, both the central and northern sectors of the BIIS were being strongly influenced by marine margin instability during the latter phases of the last glacial cycle.

  4. Modelling of glacial isostatic adjustment in the Barents Sea region: Earth rheology inferred from various ice load scenarios for the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auriac, Amandine; Whitehouse, Pippa L.; Bentley, Michael J.; Patton, Henry; Hubbard, Alun; Lloyd, Jerry M.

    2015-04-01

    The Barents Sea, bordered by Norway to the south, Svalbard to the north and Novaya Zemlya to the east, was covered by ice during the last glacial cycle. The extent and thickness of the marine-based ice sheet as well as timing of glaciation / deglaciation are, however, difficult to constrain, partly due to the few terrestrial areas available. There are various models for the ice load history in this region, but large discrepancies remain between them depending on the dataset used as constraint (e.g. sea-level data, temperature record or geomorphology data). Our aim here is to compare and find the best ice load scenario for this region over the last glacial cycle and solve for the Earth structure in the area. To achieve this, we model the present-day crustal deformation and sea-level variations during the last deglaciation by solving the sea-level equation. We use a wide range of Earth models, where we vary the lithosphere thickness and the upper and lower mantle viscosities, as well as four ice load scenarios. The first three ice load scenarios come from published studies, and include the ICE-5G model as well as models from M. Siegert and J.-O. Näslund, while the last one is currently being developed at the University of Tromsø, Norway. We compare the modelled sea-level predictions to relative sea-level curves at key locations around the Barents Sea using chi square, which enables us to infer the best Earth structure and ice history. We also compare the predicted surface deformation from our best model with GPS observations from stations located around the Barents Sea. The GPS provides a constraint on the present-day evolution of deformation in the area and is complementary to the relative sea-level data, which constrain the long-term deformation. First results show that the published ice load scenarios are not accurate enough to reproduce the sea level curves around the Barents Sea, regardless of the Earth model tried. However, the last model, currently being

  5. Morphologic and Geochronological constraints on the long (> Ma) and short (10-100 Kyr) term vertical rates on south Tibetan normal faults.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kali, E.; van der Woerd, J.; Arnaud, N.; Leloup, P. H.; Mahéo, G.; Liu-Zeng, J.; Chevalier, M. L.; Lacassin, R.; Tapponnier, P.; Thuizat, R.

    2009-04-01

    Quantification of slip and exhumation rates along the long recognized north-south trending active normal faults of the Tibetan plateau are key data in order to constrain mechanical models of the geodynamic evolution of the India-Asia convergence zone. In this study, we combine morphologic, structural, petrological analysis and low to medium thermo-chronology of Quaternary and basement rocks in order to compare short-term and long-term fault rates along two of the main Tibetan rifts systems: Yadong-Gulu and Xainza-Dinggye. At the southern end of the Xainza-Dingyye rift system the Ama Drime range (Everest region) is a horst flanked on each side by N-S trending ductile normal shear zones and active normal faults. Petrological studies combined with U/Pb and Ar/Ar geochronology reveal that the horst formation induced an exhumation on the order of 2 to 4 kbar (7 to 15 km), starting at ~12 Ma. This corresponds to exhumation rates of 0.6 to 1.3 mm/year. Low temperature geochronology (apatite (U-Th)/He dating) indicate Pliocene apparent exhumation rates of about 1 mm/yr since ~5 Ma for the whole massif (this study, Jessup et al., 2008). Short term fault rates can be obtained using cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages of offset geomorphic features such as terraces or moraines. Such features are abundant along the western flank of the Ama Drime range, where the Kharta active fault separates the range from the Kharta basin where the Arun river has abandoned fluvial terraces. The river crosses the fault three times carving deep gorges into the footwall before finally crossing the Himalayas. In the southern part of the Kharta basin, river terraces ~100 m above the present riverbed are offset between 10 and 15 m by one branch of the normal fault. 10Be cosmogenic nuclide exposure ages of these terraces range between 9 and 11 kyr, consistent with aggradation after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM ~20 ka), followed by rapid incision of the Arun. Together, offsets and ages imply a vertical

  6. Polar wander caused by the Quaternary glacial cycles and fluid Love number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Masao

    2002-06-01

    Perturbations of the Earth's rotation caused by the Quaternary glacial cycles provide an important constraint on the viscosity of the deep mantle because they represent a long-wavelength response of the Earth to surface load redistribution. The predicted present-day polar wander speed (PWS) is, however, sensitive to both the lower mantle viscosity ( ηlm), the density jump at 670 km depth, and the lithospheric thickness and viscosity (e.g., Sabadini and Peltier, Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 66 (1981) 553-578; Yuen et al., J. Geophys. Res. 87 (1982) 10745-10762; Peltier and Wu, Geophys. Res. Lett. 10 (1983) 181-184; Wu and Peltier, Geophys, J. R. Astron. Soc. 76 (1984) 753-791; Peltier, J. Geophys. Res. 89 (1984) 11303-11316; Vermeersen et al., J. Geophys. Res. 102 (1997) 27689-27702; Mitrovica and Milne, J. Geophys. Res. 103 (1998) 985-1005; Johnston and Lambeck, Geophys. J. Int. 136 (1999) 537-558; Nakada, Geophys. J. Int. 143 (2000) 230-238). For earth models with ηlm<5×10 21 Pa s and an elastic lithosphere, the present-day PWS is very sensitive to the M1 mode (buoyancy mode) related to the density jump at 670 km depth [Mitrovica and Milne, J. Geophys. Res. 103 (1998) 985-1005]. The contribution of the M1 mode, however, is less significant for earth models with a viscoelastic lithosphere [Nakada, Geophys. J. Int. 143 (2000) 230-238]. This is due to the fact that this contribution depends on the relative strength of the M1 mode, Δ k2T(M1)/ kfT, where Δ k2T(M1) is the magnitude of tidal Love number ( k2T) of the M1 mode and kfT is the value of k2T in the fluid limit (fluid Love number). The magnitude of kfT for earth models with a viscoelastic lithosphere is larger than that for an elastic lithosphere, and it is smaller for a thicker elastic lithosphere than for a thinner one. Thus, for earth models with a viscoelastic lithosphere, the PWS is mainly sensitive to the lower mantle viscosity regardless of the behavior of the 670 km density discontinuity. This

  7. Co-variation of nitrogen isotopes and redox states through glacial-interglacial cycles in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Tracy M.; Wright, James D.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2013-07-01

    In all aquatic environments, nitrogen cycling within the water column is strongly influenced by oxygen. We hypothesize that the nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N) of organic matter deposited in the sediments is a proxy for the redox state of the water column at the time of deposition. We tested the hypothesis by measuring the bulk sedimentary δ15N values in a drill core from the Black Sea, a basin that alternates between oxic, less saline conditions and anoxic, marine conditions on glacial-interglacial time scales. We reconstructed these changes in Black Sea redox conditions using sedimentary δ15N, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), redox-sensitive metals, and micropaleontological data from a deep-sea core (DSDP Site 380). The sedimentary data reveal that during the transitions between oxic and anoxic conditions, δ15N values increased relative to the preceding and succeeding quasi-steady-state oxic and anoxic periods. The results indicate that the reciprocal transitional states from anoxic to oxic conditions were accompanied by intense denitrification; during the quasi-stable oxic and anoxic states (characterized by glacial fresh water and interglacial marine conditions) nitrification and complete nitrate utilization, respectively, dominate the nitrogen cycle. While other factors may influence the δ15N record, our results support the hypothesis that the variations in nitrogen isotopic composition of organic matter are strongly influenced by changes in redox state in the Black Sea subphotic zone on glacial-interglacial time scales, and can be explained by a relatively simple model describing the effects of oxygen on the microbial processes that drive the nitrogen cycle in marine ecosystems. Our model suggests that the nitrogen isotopic composition of marine sediments, on geological time scales, can be used to reconstruct the redox state of the overlying water column.

  8. A stochastic, evolutionary model for range shifts and richness on tropical elevational gradients under Quaternary glacial cycles

    PubMed Central

    Colwell, Robert K.; Rangel, Thiago F.

    2010-01-01

    Quaternary glacial–interglacial cycles repeatedly forced thermal zones up and down the slopes of mountains, at all latitudes. Although no one doubts that these temperature cycles have left their signature on contemporary patterns of geography and phylogeny, the relative roles of ecology and evolution are not well understood, especially for the tropics. To explore key mechanisms and their interactions in the context of chance events, we constructed a geographical range-based, stochastic simulation model that incorporates speciation, anagenetic evolution, niche conservatism, range shifts and extinctions under late Quaternary temperature cycles along tropical elevational gradients. In the model, elevational patterns of species richness arise from the differential survival of founder lineages, consolidated by speciation and the inheritance of thermal niche characteristics. The model yields a surprisingly rich variety of realistic patterns of phylogeny and biogeography, including close matches to a variety of contemporary elevational richness profiles from an elevational transect in Costa Rica. Mountaintop extinctions during interglacials and lowland extinctions at glacial maxima favour mid-elevation lineages, especially under the constraints of niche conservatism. Asymmetry in temperature (greater duration of glacial than of interglacial episodes) and in lateral area (greater land area at low than at high elevations) have opposing effects on lowland extinctions and the elevational pattern of species richness in the model—and perhaps in nature, as well. PMID:20980317

  9. Ocean biology could control atmospheric δ13C during glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, Victor; Hofmann, Matthias; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Ganopolski, Andrey

    2002-05-01

    Estimates of changes in the global carbon budget are often based on the assumption that the terrestrial biosphere controls the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 since terrestrial plants discriminate against the 13C isotope during photosynthesis. However, this method disregards the influence of 13C fractionation by the marine biota. Here an interpretation of the glacial-interglacial shifts in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and δ13CO2 measured in the Taylor Dome ice core [Smith et al., 1999] is given by accounting for possible changes in the ocean biology based on sensitivity simulations undertaken with the intermediate complexity model CLIMBER-2. With a combined scenario of enhanced biological and solubility pumps, the model simulates glacial atmospheric CO2 and δ13CO2 similar to those inferred from the ice core. The simulations reveal that a strengthening of the oceanic biological carbon pump considerably affects the atmospheric δ13CO2.

  10. Distinction of glacial and interglacial cycles in Feni and Gardar drifts, North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Eggers, M.R.; Ehrlich, R.

    1985-02-01

    The Feni and Gardar drifts of the North Atlantic are thought to represent large accumulations of current-deposited material and should record changes through time in direction and intensity of overflows in the Norwegian Sea and Iceland-Faereo Ridge, respectively. Both drifts were drilled by DSDP Leg 94. Initial shipboard examination revealed no visual differences between these sediments and typical pelagic North Atlantic sediments. Fourier shape analysis on quartz silts, augmented by SEM, showed that each sample consists of a mixture of 3 grain populations. One grain type is covered with surface fractures unmodified by subsequent abrasion. Lack of such abrasion and the fact that the abundance of these grains varies independently of other shape types suggest a glacial-ice rafted origin. A second shape family is covered with irregular, platy silica overgrowths, typical of diagenesis in a poorly sorted, clay-rich environment and is likely the production of erosion of submarine lutites. A third grain type, plastered with fine-grained silica, is characterized by protuberences and indentations typical of primary continental source terranes. These last 2 grain types vary inversely with one another, implying that at glacial maxima, bottom currents deposited first-generation continental material, but at glacial minima, they eroded material from the sea bottom and redeposited it as drift sediments.

  11. Extra-long interglacial in Northern Hemisphere during MISs 15-13 arising from limited extent of Arctic ice sheets in glacial MIS 14.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qingzhen; Wang, Luo; Oldfield, Frank; Guo, Zhengtang

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the behavior of Northern Hemisphere (NH) ice sheets over the past million years is crucial for understanding the role of orbitally driven insolation changes on glacial/interglacial cycles. Here, based on the demonstrable link between changes in Chinese loess grain-size and NH ice-sheet extent, we use loess grain-size records to confirm that northern ice-sheets were restricted during marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 14. Thus, an unusually long NH interglacial climate of over 100 kyr persisted during MISs 15-13, much longer than expected from marine oxygen isotope records. Taking a global view of the paleoclimate records, MIS 14 inception seems to be a response to changes in Antarctic ice-sheets rather than to NH cooling. Orbital configuration in the two Polar regions shows that the onset of MIS 14 was forced by austral insolation changes, rather than by boreal summer insolation, as Milankovitch theory proposes. Our analysis of MIS 14 raises the possibility that southern insolation forcing may have played an important role in the inception of several other glacials. We suggest that the extra-long NH interglacial climate during MISs 15-13 provided favorable conditions for the second major dispersal episode of African hominins into Eurasia. PMID:26159304

  12. Sequence and chronology of the Cuerpo de Hombre paleoglacier (Iberian Central System) during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Rosa M.; Pedraza, Javier; Domínguez-Villar, David; Willenbring, Jane K.; Villa, Javier

    2015-12-01

    The Cuerpo de Hombre paleoglacier occupies the upper sector of the Cuerpo de Hombre river basin, located on the northwest slope of the Sierra de Béjar Mountains (Iberian Central System). At the stage of the maximum ice extent during the last glacial cycle, this paleoglacier was one of the longest tongues emerging from the Sierra de Béjar plateau glacier. The study of the morphostratigraphic succession and the geometric and genetic relations between the geomorphological indicators of this paleoglacier has revealed its evolutionary sequence during the last glacial cycle. The comparison between this sequence and the one previously established by a regional evolutionary pattern shows that although they both coincide in general terms, some stages/substages of this pattern must be corrected or more clearly defined. The absolute chronology of the different stages was obtained using terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (10Be). The maximum ice extent of Cuerpo de Hombre paleoglacier has been dated to ˜25.0 ka (MIS2 and concurrent with the LGM). This chronology coincides with date obtained for other paleoglaciers in the Iberian Central System, but is slightly more modern than the regional chronology estimated as most likely for the maximum ice extent in these areas. Subsequent to reaching the maximum extent, the glacier had a retreat (minimum age ˜20.6 ka), followed by another stage of expansion or readvance, after which it stabilised until the start of the deglaciation stage (˜17.8 ka). In all previous work, the deglaciation stages in the Iberian Central System have been described as one continuous recession process. However, in the Cuerpo de Hombre paleoglacier, all the data point to stabilisations of considerable magnitude, and particularly to another stage of readvance of the glacier. Based on its chronology (minimum age ˜11.1 ka) and its evolutionary significance, this new readvance has been correlated with the Older Dryas stadial. Finally, the evolutionary context

  13. Temporal relationships of carbon cycling and ocean circulation at glacial boundaries.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Alexander M; Goldstein, Steven L; Hemming, Sidney R; Fairbanks, Richard G

    2005-03-25

    Evidence from high-sedimentation-rate South Atlantic deep-sea cores indicates that global and Southern Ocean carbon budget shifts preceded thermohaline circulation changes during the last ice age initiation and termination and that these were preceded by ice-sheet growth and retreat, respectively. No consistent lead-lag relationships are observed during abrupt millennial warming events during the last ice age, allowing for the possibility that ocean circulation triggered some millenial climate changes. At the major glacial-interglacial transitions, the global carbon budget and thermohaline ocean circulation responded sequentially to the climate changes that forced the growth and decline of continental ice sheets. PMID:15790848

  14. Evolution of the large-scale atmospheric circulation in response to changing ice sheets over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfverström, M.; Caballero, R.; Nilsson, J.; Kleman, J.

    2014-04-01

    We present modelling results of the atmospheric circulation at the cold periods of marine isotope stage 5b (MIS 5b), MIS 4 and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), as well as the interglacial. The paleo-simulations are forced by ice sheet reconstructions consistent with geological evidence and by appropriate insolation and greenhouse gas concentrations. The results suggest that the large-scale atmospheric winter circulation remained largely similar to the interglacial for a significant part of the glacial cycle. The proposed explanation is that the ice sheets were located in areas where their interaction with the mean flow is limited. However, the LGM Laurentide Ice Sheet induces a much larger planetary wave that leads to a zonalisation of the Atlantic jet. In summer, the ice sheet topography dynamically induces warm temperatures in Alaska and central Asia that inhibits the expansion of the ice sheets into these regions. The warm temperatures may also serve as an explanation for westward propagation of the Eurasian Ice Sheet from MIS 4 to the LGM.

  15. Evolution of the large-scale atmospheric circulation in response to changing ice sheets over the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löfverström, M.; Caballero, R.; Nilsson, J.; Kleman, J.

    2014-07-01

    We present modelling results of the atmospheric circulation at the cold periods of marine isotope stage 5b (MIS 5b), MIS 4 and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), as well as the interglacial. The palaeosimulations are forced by ice-sheet reconstructions consistent with geological evidence and by appropriate insolation and greenhouse gas concentrations. The results suggest that the large-scale atmospheric winter circulation remained largely similar to the interglacial for a significant part of the glacial cycle. The proposed explanation is that the ice sheets were located in areas where their interaction with the mean flow is limited. However, the LGM Laurentide Ice Sheet induces a much larger planetary wave that leads to a zonalisation of the Atlantic jet. In summer, the ice-sheet topography dynamically induces warm temperatures in Alaska and central Asia that inhibits the expansion of the ice sheets into these regions. The warm temperatures may also serve as an explanation for westward propagation of the Eurasian Ice Sheet from MIS 4 to the LGM.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations of glacial erosion in the Rhône valley (Swiss Alps): insights from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, Pietro; Herman, Frédéric; Valla, Pierre; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Willett, Sean

    2013-04-01

    The present-day topography of the European Alps shows evidence of intense glacial reshaping. However, significant questions regarding Alpine landscape evolution during glaciations still persist. For example, large-scale topographic analyses suggest that glacial erosion is maximized at and above the glaciers' long-term Equilibrium Line Altitude. In contrast, measurements of long-term denudation rates from low temperature thermochronology suggest high erosion towards low altitudes, leading to an increase of local relief in response to glacial erosion. Based on sediment record, low-temperature thermochronology and burial cosmogenic nuclide dating, it has also been proposed that the mid-Pleistocene climatic transition from symmetric, 40kyr to asymmetric, 100kyr glacial/interglacial oscillations sets the onset of intense glacial erosion within the Alps. However, this climate threshold in glacial erosion has not been showed in other orogens, and positive feedbacks between climate periodicity and glacial erosion efficiency still remain to be proven. We focus on the Rhône valley (Swiss Alps), and use a numerical model to estimate patterns and magnitudes of glacial erosion. Comparing modeling results on an advanced reconstruction of the pre-glacial topography (Sternai et al., 2012) and the present-day landforms, we found that erosion propagates headward as the landscape evolves from a fluvial to a glacial state, leading to an initial increase of local relief in the major valley trunk followed by subsequent erosion at high elevations. We also test the mid-Pleistocene transition hypothesis by running a 2Myr numerical experiment including a shift from symmetric, 40kyr to asymmetric, 100kyr glacial/interglacial oscillations at 1Myr. Although the change of climate periodicity may have produced an intensification of glacial erosion, our results suggest that other factors such as an increase of rock uplift and/or progressive climate cooling are required to explain enhanced valley

  17. Modelling the Eurasian Ice Sheet through a full (Weichselian) glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, Martin J.; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Hald, Morten; Svendsen, John-Inge

    2001-11-01

    Recently acquired glacial geological and oceanographic datasets provide information on the Weichselian glaciations of Scandinavia and the Eurasian Arctic. A numerical ice-sheet model, forced by global sea level and solar insolation changes, was run to reconstruct ice sheets compatible with these data. A 'maximum' reconstruction assumes that the modern-type temperature distribution across the Eurasian Arctic is reduced by 10 °C at three stages during the Weichselian, which are related to minimum levels of solar insolation. Conversely, a 'minimum' model incorporates a reduction in temperature of only 5 °C in Early and Middle Weichselian time. The 'maximum' reconstruction employs the relatively larger sea-level fall suggested by the δ18O deep-sea record, while the 'minimum' run uses the more conservative sea-level estimate from New Guinea coral reef terraces. The maximum model predicts three major glacial advances in the Weichselian. These compare well to geological evidence for ice-sheet growth during the Early, Middle and Late Weichselian. Geological evidence for the Late Weichselian ice sheet is compatible with either reconstruction if ice growth across the Taymyr Peninsula is curtailed. The models show that ice-sheet advance caused by the interaction of sea level and solar insolation changes yields a time-dependent ice volume function similar to that established from the geological record. Periods of seasonally open water within the seas bordering the Eurasian Arctic generally occur prior to glaciation, and may provide a source of precipitation for ice-sheet growth. In contrast, periods of ice-rafted debris deposition and depletion in surface-ocean δ18O in sea-floor sediments compare well with the model's determination of ice-sheet decay and melting.

  18. Evolution of the Northern Rockweed, Fucus distichus, in a Regime of Glacial Cycling: Implications for Benthic Algal Phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Laughinghouse, Haywood Dail; Müller, Kirsten M; Adey, Walter H; Lara, Yannick; Young, Robert; Johnson, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Northern hemisphere rockweeds (Fucus) are thought to have evolved in the North Pacific and then spread to the North Atlantic following the opening of the Bering Strait. They have dispersed and widely speciated in the North Atlantic and its tributary seas. Fucus distichus is likely near the ancestral member of this genus, and studies have shown that there are several species/subspecies in this complex (i.e. F. evanescens and F. gardneri). We used phylogenetic and haplotype analyses to test the phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of F. distichus. Our data and subsequent analyses demonstrate that, unlike previous studies that lacked samples from an extensive geographical area of the Arctic and Subarctic, there is a distinct Arctic haplotype that is the source of subspecies in both the North Pacific and North Atlantic. Fucus distichus occupies a low tide zone habitat, and in Arctic/Subarctic regions it is adapted to the severe stress of sea ice coverage and disturbance during many months per year. We hypothesize that the very large geographic area of Arctic and Subarctic rocky shores available to this species during interglacials, supported by large Arctic/Subarctic fringe areas as well as unglaciated refugia during glacial cycles, provided a robust population and gene pool (described by the Thermogeographic Model). This gene pool dilutes that of the more fragmented and area-limited Temperate/Boreal area populations when they are brought together during glacial cycles. We suggest that similar subspecies complexes for a variety of Arctic/Subarctic shore biota should be examined further in this context, rather than arbitrarily being split up into numerous species. PMID:26630571

  19. Evolution of the Northern Rockweed, Fucus distichus, in a Regime of Glacial Cycling: Implications for Benthic Algal Phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Laughinghouse, Haywood Dail; Müller, Kirsten M.; Adey, Walter H.; Lara, Yannick; Young, Robert; Johnson, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Northern hemisphere rockweeds (Fucus) are thought to have evolved in the North Pacific and then spread to the North Atlantic following the opening of the Bering Strait. They have dispersed and widely speciated in the North Atlantic and its tributary seas. Fucus distichus is likely near the ancestral member of this genus, and studies have shown that there are several species/subspecies in this complex (i.e. F. evanescens and F. gardneri). We used phylogenetic and haplotype analyses to test the phylogenetic relationships and biogeography of F. distichus. Our data and subsequent analyses demonstrate that, unlike previous studies that lacked samples from an extensive geographical area of the Arctic and Subarctic, there is a distinct Arctic haplotype that is the source of subspecies in both the North Pacific and North Atlantic. Fucus distichus occupies a low tide zone habitat, and in Arctic/Subarctic regions it is adapted to the severe stress of sea ice coverage and disturbance during many months per year. We hypothesize that the very large geographic area of Arctic and Subarctic rocky shores available to this species during interglacials, supported by large Arctic/Subarctic fringe areas as well as unglaciated refugia during glacial cycles, provided a robust population and gene pool (described by the Thermogeographic Model). This gene pool dilutes that of the more fragmented and area-limited Temperate/Boreal area populations when they are brought together during glacial cycles. We suggest that similar subspecies complexes for a variety of Arctic/Subarctic shore biota should be examined further in this context, rather than arbitrarily being split up into numerous species. PMID:26630571

  20. Potential of Lake Ohrid for long palaeoclimatic and palaeoenvironemental records: The last glacial-interglacial cycle (140 ka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmecheri, S.; von Grafenstein, U.; Namiotko, T.; Robert, C. M.; Andersen, N.; Danielopol, D. L.; Caron, B.; Bordon, A.; Regnier, D.; Mazaud, A.; Sulpizio, R.; Zanchetta, G.; Grenier, C.; Tiercelin, J.; Fouache, E.; Lézine, A.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Ohrid (Albania, Macedonia) is probably the oldest and one of the deepest lakes in Europe. It potentially provides a continuous palaeoenvironmental record over the entire Quaternary. In 2004, a 10-m-long sediment record (JO2004-1) was recovered from the south-western part of the lake from a depth of 100 m (40°55.000 N, 20°40.297 E). The record is a composite of two series of consecutive 3-m-long sections taken from two sites within 5 m lateral distance using a modified Streif-Livingston piston corer (UWITEC, Austria). On the basis of seven AMS radiocarbon dating, five tephras layers and derived accumulation rate model, the Ohrid sequence extends back to 140 ka. It covers the last glacial-interglacial cycle with nearly continuous sedimentation (0.075 mm/yr, on average), except for a major hiatus (at 532.4 cm) of roughly 12,000 years between 102.75 and 89.90 ka. We evaluate the potential of using the oxygen and carbon isotope signature of the calcite of the benthic ostracod valves deposited in Lake Ohrid sediments as a palaeoclimate proxy. Twelve ostracod species, which are all endemic to Lake Ohrid, were preserved only during the interglacial phases. Their absence during full glacial periods is most likely due to calcium carbonate under-saturation of the lake water, when permafrost prohibited infiltration of atmospheric water into the limestone complexes in the lake drainage basin. For periods with ostracod preservation, the oxygen isotope signature of ostracod calcite is a reliable measure of the oxygen isotope composition of past lake water. However, the climatic interpretation of this record is strongly biased by water balance variations and by varying contribution of different vapour sources. The carbon isotope record of ostracods responds more consistently to climatic changes, and is a potentially quantifiable proxy for vegetation cover and soil build-up. Ostracod preservation and oxygen and carbon isotopes both record a succession of glacial

  1. Polypedogenic case of loess overlying red clay as a response to the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle in mid-subtropical Southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xue-Feng; Du, Yan; Liu, Xiang-Jun; Zhang, Gan-Lin; Jiang, Ying; Xue, Yong

    2015-03-01

    To study the paleoclimatic implications of the loess-like Yellow-brown Earth (YBE) overlying red clay (RC) along the Yangtze River, mid-subtropical Southeast China, four YBE-RC profiles in southern Anhui Province were investigated. Grain-size and geochemical characteristics indicated that the YBE is homologous to the aeolian Xiashu Loess; and the underlying RC, sub-divided into uniform RC (URC) and reticulate RC (RRC), is more intensively weathered but also exhibits aeolian dust characteristics. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating indicated that the YBE was formed during the Last Glacial, the RRC mainly during the Last Interglacial, and the URC during the transitional period between the YBE and RC. The YBE-RC transition reflects a significant paleoclimatic change in mid-subtropical China during the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle. Sub-events of the Last Glacial, correlated with the marine isotopic stages (MIS) 2 and 3, can be identified within the YBE; however, those of the Last Interglacial, potential correlated with MIS 5a-5e, cannot be identified within the RRC possibly due to paleoclimatic overprinting. The rubification had been replaced by loess deposition along the Yangtze River since the early Last Glacial. With both highly weathered and aeolian-dust characteristics, the underlying RRC may indicate paleoclimatic instability given the multiple alternations between loess deposition and rubification of the Last Interglacial. The climatic change during the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle significantly influenced the pedogenesis and made soil diversified in the study areas.

  2. Mid-Ocean Ridge Magma Supply and Glacial Cycles: Long Time Series Studies of Crustal Thickness and Seafloor Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulahanis, B.; Carbotte, S. M.; Huybers, P. J.; Langmuir, C. H.; Han, S.; Aghaei, O.; Canales, J. P.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Menke, W. H.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial loading has been shown to modulate volcanic melt generation in subaerial systems, and recent studies suggest that eustatic sea level fluctuations induced by glacial cycles may influence mantle-melting regimes at mid-ocean ridges. Models predict temporal variation in crustal thickness, and seafloor topography, linked to sea level change. Recent studies of bathymetry as a proxy for crustal thickness show significant spectral energy at periodicities linked to Milankovitch cycles of 23, 41, and 100ka (Crowley et al., 2015; Tolstoy, M., 2015). In this study we investigate climate driven periodicity in mid-ocean ridge magma supply utilizing basement topography and crustal thickness data. We use multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data from two prior studies of the flanks of the Juan de Fuca (JdF) ridge, and 3D MCS data from the Northern East Pacific Rise (EPR) 9°37-57'N. The JdF datasets extend to crustal ages up to 8.78 Ma, and EPR data to ~180 ka. By performing spectral analysis on these data along with dO18 climate records from Lisiecki and Raymo (2005) for the last 5.32ma and Zachos et al. (2001) for earlier times we investigate intervals of similar periodicities in order to identify potential links between climate and magma supply to mid-ocean ridges. Further analysis is undertaken to determine whether depth to basement and crustal thickness are correlated within and across datasets, and whether significant spectral peaks occur in basement and crustal thickness data outside of known climate cycles. Initial results show significant spectral energy in basement depth at the 100ky cycle in the 0-1Ma time series, when eccentricity is understood to have the most impact. Long-term temporal variability is apparent in JdF data, with low relief abyssal hills (~70m on average) present 1-3.2Ma and 6-8.78Ma, but higher relief bathymetry (~200m) from 3.2-6Ma. These subsets align well with previously identified climatic subgroups (Zachos et al., 2001), correlating both

  3. Isotopic record of Pleistocene glacial/interglacial cycles in pelagic carbonates: Revisiting historical data from the Caribbean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermoso, Michaël

    2016-04-01

    The glacial/interglacial cycles of the Pleistocene were first recognised by variations in the oxygen isotopic composition of planktonic foraminifera from cores in the Caribbean Sea. Since this pioneering work by Emiliani, this proxy has been extensively applied to a variety of carbonate biominerals over the entirety of the Meso-Cenozoic. However, palaeoceanographic studies have overwhelmingly focused on foraminifera compared to other calcifying microorganism fossils, such as the coccoliths. In this study, I revisit coccolith stable isotopic data obtained from the classic P6304-4 core in light of recent developments in the biogeochemistry of coccolithophores. In particular, I show that the coccolith stable isotope record of the last 13 Marine Isotope Stages (∼480 kyrs) is significantly biased by large vital effects. The magnitude of coccolith carbon and oxygen isotope vital effects is not uniform, but shows remarkable co-variance with the Vostok CO2 ice record. During periods of relatively elevated CO2 (interstadials), the expression of the vital effect is relatively small, whereas it can as high as +3‰ for the oxygen isotopes during glacial stadials, which I argue is a result of enhanced CO2 limitation of coccolithophores. Using this paradigm, I propose that coccolithophore vital effects are not a complicating factor, but rather the signal of interest. As the magnitude of the coccolith vital effect is shown to scale with pCO2, coccolith carbon and oxygen isotopes may be used in conjunction with foraminifera data to reconstruct and refine aqueous CO2 concentrations in the past.

  4. Uranium-series dating of fossil coral reefs: Extending the sea-level record beyond the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, Claudine H.; Andersen, Morten B.

    2009-07-01

    Absolutely dated records of past sea-level change are extremely important for understanding the advance and retreat of the large ice sheets. When combined with other complementary climate archives and climate models, such records offer the potential to gain an improved understanding of Earth's natural climate cycles, providing a firmer basis for assessing the role of anthropogenic effects, such as greenhouse gas emissions, in modifying climate. The U-series dating of fossil coral reefs has been widely utilized to provide absolutely dated records of past sea-level change and numerous observations now exist for the past 130,000 years spanning the last glacial cycle. Despite this, controversies still exist regarding the exact timing and character of sea-level events within this time interval, and extending the sea-level history further back in time on the basis of robust and independent age constraints for older fossil reefs remains very elusive. This is primarily due to a progressive loss in the resolution of the U-series chronometer as one goes further back in time, coupled to a lack of well-preserved, dateable coral in older fossil reefs. To overcome these limitations, the primary challenges are three-fold. First, new analytical protocols are required to improve the resolution of the U-series chronometer. Enhanced analytical precision must be coupled to accuracy through continued refinement of the U-series decay constant determinations and via the implementation of rigorous inter-laboratory calibration exercises. Second, efforts should continue to be focussed on gaining an improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling open-system exchange of the U-series isotopes in fossil reef systems. This will allow the number of 'reliable' U-series observations to be extended. Third, alternative dateable archives of past sea-level change must continue to be emphasized to further complement the coral reef database. These limitations are discussed in the context of current

  5. Chronology of glaciations in the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Iberia) during the Last Glacial Cycle based on in situ-produced 10Be

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; Domínguez-Cuesta, María José; Rinterknecht, Vincent; Pallàs, Raimon; Bourlès, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The mountain ranges of the Iberian Peninsula preserve a valuable record of past glaciations that may help reconstruct past atmospheric circulation patterns in response to cooling events in the North Atlantic Ocean. Available chronologies for the glacial record of the Cantabrian Mountains, which are mainly based on radiocarbon and luminescence dating of glacial-related sediments, suggest that glaciers recorded their Glacial Maximum (GM) during MIS 3 and experienced a later Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) advance. This LGM extent is not established yet, preventing a fair correlation with available Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) based chronologies for the glacial record of the Pyrenees and the Sistema Central. We present a glacial reconstruction and a 10Be CRE chronology for the Porma valley, in the southern slope of the central Cantabrian Mountains. Glacial evidence at the lowest altitudes correspond to erratic boulders and composite moraines whose minimum 10Be CRE age of 113.9 ± 7.1 ka suggests that glaciers were at their maximum extent during MIS 5d, most likely in response to the minima in summertime insolation of the Last Glacial Cycle. Recessional moraines preserved within the glacial maximum limits allow the assessment of subsequent glacier advances or stagnations. The most remarkable advance took place prior to 55.7 ± 4.0 ka (probably at the end of MIS 4), consistently with minimum radiocarbon ages previously reported for lacustrine glacial-related deposits in the Cantabrian Mountains. A limited number of 10Be CRE ages from a composite moraine suggest a possible advance of the Porma glacier coeval with the global LGM; the glacier front attributed to the LGM would be placed within the margins of the previous GM like in the western Pyrenees. Erratic boulders perched on an ice-moulded bedrock surface provided a mean 10Be CRE age of 17.7 ± 1.0 ka, suggesting that part of the recessional moraine sequence corresponds to minor advances or stagnations of the glacier fronts

  6. Understanding past climatic and hydrological variability in the Mediterranean from Lake Prespa sediment isotope and geochemical record over the Last Glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Melanie J.; Wagner, Bernd; Boehm, Anne; Panagiotopoulos, Konstantinos; Vane, Christopher H.; Snelling, Andrea; Haidon, Cheryl; Woodley, Ewan; Vogel, Hendrik; Zanchetta, Gianni; Baneschi, Ilaria

    2013-04-01

    Here we present stable isotope and geochemical data from Lake Prespa (Macedonia/Albania border) over the Last Glacial cycle (Marine Isotope Stages 5-1) and discuss past lake hydrology and climate (TIC, oxygen and carbon isotopes), as well as responses to climate of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation (TOC, Rock Eval pyrolysis, carbon isotopes, pollen). The Lake Prespa sediments broadly fall into 5 zones based on their sedimentology, geochemistry, palynology and the existing chronology. The Glacial sediments suggest low supply of carbon to the lake, but high summer productivity; intermittent siderite layers suggest that although the lake was likely to have mixed regularly leading to enhanced oxidation of organic matter, there must have been within sediment reducing conditions and methanogenesis. MIS 5 and 1 sediments suggest much more productivity, higher rates of organic material preservation possibly due to more limited mixing with longer periods of oxygen-depleted bottom waters. We also calculated lakewater δ18O from siderite (authigenic/Glacial) and calcite (endogenic/Holocene) and show much lower lakewater δ18O values in the Glacial when compared to the Holocene, suggesting the lake was less evaporative in the Glacial, probably as a consequence of cooler summers and longer winter ice cover. In the Holocene the oxygen isotope data suggests general humidity, with just 2 marked arid phases, features observed in other Eastern and Central Mediterranean lakes.

  7. Thermocline temperature variability in the Timor Strait over the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Giudice Cappelli, E.; Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.; Regenberg, M.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2012-12-01

    *Lo Giudice Cappelli, E elgc@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Holbourn, A ah@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Kuhnt, W wk@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Regenberg, M regenberg@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Garbe- Schönberg, D dgs@gpi.uni-kiel.de Institute of Geosciences, Christian-Albrechts-University, Kiel, Germany Seafloor temperature variations within the path of the Indonesian Throughflow are mainly influenced by the intensity of the cool throughflow and by glacial-interglacial sea-level changes. We present a study based on core 18471 (9°21.987' S, 129°58.983' E, 485m water depth, 13.5m long) and 30 core tops retrieved in the Timor Sea during the R/V Sonne Cruise 185 ("VITAL"). Multicorer core tops were retrieved along two transects between 130 and 2400m water depths, representing a range of present day bottom water temperatures between 2 and 21°C. For the downcore study, we measured Mg/Ca-ratios in ~10 tests of the benthic foraminifera Hoeglundina elegans, Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and Hyalinea balthica in 10cm intervals (1-2kyr time resolution). The preservation of tests was checked with a scanning electron microscope. Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi and H. balthica were used in one interval, where H. elegans was rare. Duplicate samples were analyzed to inter-calibrate the three species. Mg/Ca ratios were converted into temperature using published calibrations and our regional calibration based on Timor Sea core tops. Preliminary results show that Mg/Ca ratios in H. elegans vary between 0.8 and 2.2mmol mol-1 corresponding to a temperature range between 4 and 10.5°C, in contrast to a modern annual average temperature of 7.9°C at 400m. 22-paired analyses in H. elegans give a reproducibility of 0.16mmol mol-1 (standard deviation

  8. Penultimate and last glacial cycles in the western Bering Sea: evidence from micropaleontological and sedimentary records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsepyan, Ekaterina; Ivanova, Elena; Murdmaa, Ivar

    2014-05-01

    The short- and long-term variability of sea-surface bioproductivity, intermediate-water oxygenation, sea ice conditions and bottom current velocities are inferred from the high-resolution multi-proxy study based on benthic (BF) and planktonic (PF) foraminiferal assemblages and sedimentary record of the 18m-long Core SO201-2-85KL (western Bering Sea). Early MIS 6 is characterized by a very low seasonal bioproductivity, moderate bottom-water oxygenation, and expanded seasonal sea ice conditions, as documented by the abundant phytodetritus species Alabaminella weddelensis, Islandiella norcrossi and Epistominella arctica, suboxic group of BF, and high accumulation rates of gravel grains, respectively. Middle MIS 6 is represented by intercalation of green diatomaceous ooze and grey clayey silt layers with sharp peaks of BF abundance in green interbeds. These spikes might result either from short-term events of enhanced sea surface bioproductivity or from lateral BF transport by intensified bottom currents, as it is demonstrated by high-amplitude variations of the clay/silt ratio. Rather high seasonal productivity and northward migration of the sea ice margin are reconstructed for the late MIS 6 that is also characterized by a slight increase in the Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. Strong dissolution of calcareous microfossils is revealed for MIS 5.5-5.1 when the Bering Strait was open. Dissolution might be caused by an excess of carbon dioxide in the bottom-water due to an abundant organic matter decay and/or to an influence of the old CO2-rich deep water. MIS 4 - early Termination I is characterized by a dominance of glacial benthic foraminiferal assemblages that implies low bioproductivity conditions. A prevalence of suboxic BF group suggests moderate bottom-water oxygenation. Sea ice rafting occurred in the western Bering Sea during MIS 4 - early Termination I but the drifted ice was not so dense as during MIS 6. The well-known productivity spikes at B

  9. Mode change of millennial CO2 variability during the last glacial cycle associated with a bipolar marine carbon seesaw.

    PubMed

    Bereiter, Bernhard; Lüthi, Dieter; Siegrist, Michael; Schüpbach, Simon; Stocker, Thomas F; Fischer, Hubertus

    2012-06-19

    Important elements of natural climate variations during the last ice age are abrupt temperature increases over Greenland and related warming and cooling periods over Antarctica. Records from Antarctic ice cores have shown that the global carbon cycle also plays a role in these changes. The available data shows that atmospheric CO(2) follows closely temperatures reconstructed from Antarctic ice cores during these variations. Here, we present new high-resolution CO(2) data from Antarctic ice cores, which cover the period between 115,000 and 38,000 y before present. Our measurements show that also smaller Antarctic warming events have an imprint in CO(2) concentrations. Moreover, they indicate that during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5, the peak of millennial CO(2) variations lags the onset of Dansgaard/Oeschger warmings by 250 ± 190 y. During MIS 3, this lag increases significantly to 870 ± 90 y. Considerations of the ocean circulation suggest that the millennial variability associated with the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) undergoes a mode change from MIS 5 to MIS 4 and 3. Ocean carbon inventory estimates imply that during MIS 3 additional carbon is derived from an extended mass of carbon-enriched Antarctic Bottom Water. The absence of such a carbon-enriched water mass in the North Atlantic during MIS 5 can explain the smaller amount of carbon released to the atmosphere after the Antarctic temperature maximum and, hence, the shorter lag. Our new data provides further constraints for transient coupled carbon cycle-climate simulations during the entire last glacial cycle. PMID:22675123

  10. Comment on "Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust".

    PubMed

    Goff, John A

    2015-09-01

    Crowley et al. (Reports, 13 March 2015, p. 1237) propose that abyssal hill topography can be generated by variations in volcanism at mid-ocean ridges modulated by Milankovitch cycle-driven changes in sea level. Published values for abyssal hill characteristic widths versus spreading rate do not generally support this hypothesis. I argue that abyssal hills are primarily fault-generated rather than volcanically generated features. PMID:26339022

  11. Comment on “Glacial cycles drive variations in the production of oceanic crust”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John A.

    2015-09-01

    Crowley et al. (Reports, 13 March 2015, p. 1237) propose that abyssal hill topography can be generated by variations in volcanism at mid-ocean ridges modulated by Milankovitch cycle-driven changes in sea level. Published values for abyssal hill characteristic widths versus spreading rate do not generally support this hypothesis. I argue that abyssal hills are primarily fault-generated rather than volcanically generated features.

  12. The rock magnetic characteristics of last glacial cycle loess from the island of Susak (Adriatic Sea, Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, Ulrich; Duchoslav, Maguerita; Rolf, Christian; Wacha, Lara; Frechen, Manfred; Galovic, Lidija

    2010-05-01

    palaeosols occur at 3 and 5.5 metre depth and two macroscopically visible volcanic tephra layers are intercalated in the upper part of the section. At present, we assume that the sequence represents the entire last glacial cycle (11-130 kyr). The concentration dependent magnetic parameters (e.g. magnetic low field susceptibility, SIRM) do not at all resemble the lithology. Volume susceptibility in unaltered loess exceeds even 1*10-3 SI which is at least 3 times higher compared to loess from the middle Danube basin only a few hundreds of kilometres to the East (Markovic et al. 2009). Grain size dependent magnetic parameters (e.g. frequency dependent magnetic susceptibility, S-ratio, etc.) reveal the relative enhancement of superparamagnetic particles and the formation of high-coercivity minerals in the pedogenetically altered horizons. However, in general the magnetic signal seems to be controlled by the primarily detrital minerals and climatically governed relatively weak alterations occur only in the macroscopically visible pedohorizons. During the last glacial cycle, the sea level of the Adriatic Sea was lowered by several decametres at least. As a consequence, the alluvial plain of the Po River extended far to the Southeast and provided the sand and silt which were blown to the shallow mountain ranges forming today the islands of the Dalmatian archipelago (Cremaschi 1990). Pleistocene and recent floodplain deposits of the Po River in North Italy contain large amounts of heavy minerals from the metamorphic series of the Central Alps. This detritus may control the magnetic properties of the aeolian deposits on the island of Susak. Further petrographical and mineral magnetic studies are necessary to prove our hypothesis.

  13. The role of glacial cycles in promoting genetic diversity in the Neotropics: the case of cloud forests during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    The increasing aridity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been proposed as a major factor affecting Neotropical species. The character and intensity of this change, however, remains the subject of ongoing debate. This review proposes an approach to test contrasting paleoecological hypotheses by way of their expected demographic and genetic effects on Neotropical cloud forest species. We reviewed 48 paleoecological records encompassing the LGM in the Neotropics. The records show contrasting evidence regarding the changes in precipitation during this period. Some regions remained fairly moist and others had a significantly reduced precipitation. Many paleoecological records within the same region show apparently conflicting evidence on precipitation and forest stability. From these data, we propose and outline two demographic/genetic scenarios for cloud forests species based on opposite precipitation regimes: the dry refugia and the moist forests hypotheses. We searched for studies dealing with the population genetic structure of cloud forest and other montane taxa and compared their results with the proposed models. To date, the few available molecular studies show insufficient genetic evidence on the predominance of glacial aridity in the Neotropics. In order to disentangle the climatic history of the Neotropics, the present study calls for a general multi-disciplinary approach to conduct future phylogeographic studies. Given the contradictory paleoecological information, population genetic data on Neotropical cloud forest species should be used to explicitly test the genetic consequences of competing paleoecological models. PMID:23531632

  14. The role of glacial cycles in promoting genetic diversity in the Neotropics: the case of cloud forests during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Barahona, Santiago; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2013-03-01

    The increasing aridity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) has been proposed as a major factor affecting Neotropical species. The character and intensity of this change, however, remains the subject of ongoing debate. This review proposes an approach to test contrasting paleoecological hypotheses by way of their expected demographic and genetic effects on Neotropical cloud forest species. We reviewed 48 paleoecological records encompassing the LGM in the Neotropics. The records show contrasting evidence regarding the changes in precipitation during this period. Some regions remained fairly moist and others had a significantly reduced precipitation. Many paleoecological records within the same region show apparently conflicting evidence on precipitation and forest stability. From these data, we propose and outline two demographic/genetic scenarios for cloud forests species based on opposite precipitation regimes: the dry refugia and the moist forests hypotheses. We searched for studies dealing with the population genetic structure of cloud forest and other montane taxa and compared their results with the proposed models. To date, the few available molecular studies show insufficient genetic evidence on the predominance of glacial aridity in the Neotropics. In order to disentangle the climatic history of the Neotropics, the present study calls for a general multi-disciplinary approach to conduct future phylogeographic studies. Given the contradictory paleoecological information, population genetic data on Neotropical cloud forest species should be used to explicitly test the genetic consequences of competing paleoecological models. PMID:23531632

  15. A loess-paleosol record of climate and glacial history over the past two glacial-interglacial cycles (~140 ka), southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Muhs, Daniel R.; Fosberg, Maynard A.; Mahan, Shannon; Rosenbaum, Joseph G.; Licciardi, Joseph M.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2011-01-01

    Loess accumulated on a Bull Lake outwash terrace of Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6) age in southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The 9 m section displays eight intervals of loess deposition (Loess 1 to Loess 8, oldest), each followed by soil development. Our age-depth model is constrained by thermoluminescence, meteoric Be-10 accumulation in soils, and cosmogenic Be-10 surface exposure ages. We use particle size, geochemical, mineral-magnetic, and clay mineralogical data to interpret loess sources and pedogenesis. Deposition of MIS 6 loess was followed by a tripartite soil/thin loess complex (Soils 8,7, and 6) apparently reflecting the large climatic oscillations of MIS 5. Soil 8 (MIS 5e) shows the strongest development. Loess 5 accumulated during a glacial interval (similar to 76-69 ka; MIS 4) followed by soil development under conditions wetter and probably colder than present. Deposition of thick Loess 3 (similar to 43-51 ka, MIS 3) was followed by soil development comparable with that observed in Soil 1. Loess 1 (MIS 2) accumulated during the Pinedale glaciation and was followed by development of Soil 1 under a semiarid climate. This record of alternating loess deposition and soil development is compatible with the history of Yellowstone vegetation and the glacial flour record from the Sierra Nevada. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of University of Washington.

  16. Paleoclimate and growth rates of speleothems in the northwestern Iberian Peninsula over the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Heather M.; Moreno, Ana; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Gonzalez-Lemos, Saul; Jimenez-Sanchez, Montserrat; Dominguez-Cuesta, Maria Jose; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Cheng, Hai; Wang, Xianfeng

    2013-09-01

    Speleothem growth requires humid climates sufficiently warm to stimulate soil CO2 production by plants. We compile 283 U/Th dates on 21 stalagmites from six cave systems in the NW coast of Spain to evaluate if there are patterns in stalagmite growth that are evidence of climatic forcing. In the oldest stalagmites, from marine oxygen isotope stage (MIS) 7-5, growth persists through the glacial period. Hiatuses and major reductions in growth rate occur during extreme minima in summer insolation. Stalagmites active during the last interglaciation cease growth at the MIS 5-4 boundary (74 ka), when regional sea-surface temperature cooled significantly. During MIS 3, only two stalagmites grew; rates were highest between 50 and 60 ka during the maximum in summer insolation. One stalagmite grew briefly at 41 ka, 36.5 and 28.6 ka, all during warm phases of the Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles. A pronounced Holocene optimum in stalagmite growth occurs from 9 to 6 ka. The cessation of most growth by 4.1 ka, coincident with broad increases in aridity over the Mediterranean and areas influenced by the North African Monsoon, suggest that regions such as NW Spain, with dominant Atlantic moisture sources, also experienced increased aridity at this time.

  17. The Taimyr Peninsula and the Severnaya Zemlya archipelago, Arctic Russia: a synthesis of glacial history and palaeo-environmental change during the Last Glacial cycle (MIS 5e-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Per; Alexanderson, Helena; Funder, Svend; Hjort, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We here suggest a glacial and climate history of the Taimyr Peninsula and Severnaya Zemlya archipelago in arctic Siberia for the last about 150 000 years (ka). Primarily it is based on results from seven field seasons between 1996 and 2012, to a large extent already published in papers referred to in the text - and on data presented by Russian workers from the 1930s to our days and by German colleagues working there since the 1990s. Although glaciations even up here often started in the local mountains, their culminations in this region invariably seems to have centred on the shallow Kara Sea continental shelf - most likely due to expanding marine ice-shelves grounding there, as a combined effect of thickening ice and eustatically lowered sea-levels. The most extensive glaciation so far identified in this region (named the Taz glaciation) took place during Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6), i.e. being an equivalent to the late Saale/Illinoian glaciations. It reached c. 400 km southeast of the Kara Sea coast, across and well beyond the Byrranga Mountain range and ended c. 130 ka. It was followed by the MIS 5e (Karginsky/Eemian) interglacial, with an extensive marine transgression to 140 m above present sea level - facilitated by strong isostatic downloading during the preceding glaciation. During the latest (Zyryankan/Weichselian/Wisconsinan) glacial cycle followed a series of major glacial advances. The earliest and most extensive, culminating c. 110-100 ka (MIS 5d-5e), also reached south of the Byrranga mountains and its post-glacial marine limit there was c. 100 m a.s.l. The later glacial phases (around 70-60 ka and 20 ka) terminated at the North Taimyr Ice Marginal Zone (NTZ), along or some distance inland from the present northwest coast of Taimyr. They dammed glacial lakes, which caused the Taimyr River to flow southwards where to-day it flows northwards into the Kara Sea. The c. 20 ka glacial phase, contemporary with the maximum (LGM) glaciation in NW Europe

  18. NW African hydrology and vegetation during the Last Glacial cycle reflected in plant-wax-specific hydrogen and carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuechler, R. R.; Schefuß, E.; Beckmann, B.; Dupont, L.; Wefer, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present a hydrologic reconstruction of the Sahara-Sahel transition, covering the complete Last Glacial cycle (130 ka), based on a combination of plant-wax-specific hydrogen (δD) and carbon isotopes (δ13C). The δD and δ13C signatures of long-chain n-alkanes from ODP Site 659 off NW Africa reveal a significant anti-correlation. Complementary to published pollen data, we infer that this plant-wax signal reflects sensitive responses of the vegetation cover to precipitation changes in the Sahel region, as well as varying contributions from biomes north of the Sahara (C3 domain) by North-East Trade Winds (NETW). During arid phases, especially the northern parts of the Sahel likely experienced crucial water stress, which resulted in a pronounced contraction of the vegetation cover, thus reducing the amount of C4 plant waxes from the region. The increase in NETW strength during dry periods further promoted a more pronounced C3-plant-wax signal derived from the North African C3 plant domain. During humid periods, the C4-dominated Sahelian environments spread northward into the Saharan realm, in association with lower NETW inputs of C3 plant waxes. Arid-humid cycles deduced from plant-wax δD are in accordance with concomitant changes in weathering intensity reflected in varying major element distributions. Environmental shifts are generally linked to periods with large fluctuations in Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. During Marine Isotope Stages 2 and 3, when insolation variability was low, coupling of the hydrologic regime to alkenone-based estimates of NE Atlantic sea-surface temperatures becomes apparent.

  19. Soil profile of Yellow-brown Earth overlying Red Clay in southern Anhui Province: A pedogenic response to the Last Glacial - Interglacial cycle in mid-subtropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xue-Feng; Du, Yan

    2013-04-01

    Soil profile of Yellow-brown Earth (YBE) overlying Red Clay (RC) is commonly seen along the Yangtze River in mid-subtropical China. To study its paleoclimatic implications, one YBE - RC profile in Langxi county, southern Anhui Province, were dated with the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) method in detail. The results indicated that the dual - layered profile is actually a pedogenic response to a great climatic change during the Last Glacial - Last Interglacial cycle: The YBE is homogenous to the aeolian Xiashu Loess widely distributed along the Yangtze River and was dated from 12.2 ka to 57.1 ka; and the underlying RC approximately from 60 ka to 132.8 ka, which fully suggests that the YBE is really the Last Glacial loess, correlated with the Malan Loess in the Chinese Loess Plateau, Northwest China, and the RC was mainly formed during the Last Interglacial. Two sub-class events of the Last Glacial, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and the Last Glacial Optimum (LGO), correlated with the marine oxygen isotopic stage (MIS) 2 and 3, can be separated and identified in the YBE. Likewise, the RC can be divided into the Uniform Red Clay (URC) and Reticulate Red Clay (RRC). The URC was formed during the transitional time from the Last Interglacial to the Last Glacial, and the RRC mainly during the Last Interglacial, MIS 5. The RC is highly weathered but still shows aeolian-dust characteristics. The duplicate information implies that the paleoclimate during the Last Interglacial is instable and might also oscillate between warm and cold, but sub-class paleoclimatic events, potential correlated with MIS 5 a - 5 e, cannot be identified in the RRC possibly due to the overlapped paleoclimatic information caused by highly chemical weathering. A great climatic transfer during the Last Glacial - Interglacial cycle left soil parent materials diversified in the study areas and hence caused the parallel distribution of different zonal soils in a small scale. Two surface soils

  20. Sediment from the Last Two Glacial Periods Amalgamated and Re-Entrained in the Alluvial Piedmont of the North Tian Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, L. C.; Avouac, J. P.; Brown, N.; Rhodes, E. J.; Prancevic, J.; Pan, J.; Chevalier, M. L.; Saint-Carlier, D.; Zhang, W.

    2015-12-01

    The history of the planet is recorded in its sedimentary basins where the product of mountain erosion is stored, reflecting climatic and tectonic forcing. Were the sediments and the signal they carry to be immediately deposited in a basin, paleo-reconstructions would be straightforward as the age and nature of a deposit would be a testimony of the source and transfer conditions. The sometime intricate path of clastic material along the sediment routing system complicates greatly the situation. We set here to investigate quantitatively the effect of an alluvial piedmont on the sediment flux that crosses it en route to a basin. We focus on the northern piedmont of the Tian Shan (Xinjiang, China). The piedmont is actively deformed by a fold-and-thrust system and experienced several cycles of incision and aggradation in the Pleistocene. We present new OSL dating of terrace and fan material. These data suggest that the most prominent terraces match three glacial maxima 100 kyr apart; thereby the landscape would primarily react to eccentricity cycles. As a consequence, a significant fraction of sediments produced in that period is temporarily deposited in the piedmont before a later incision phase can deliver it to the basin. The OSL ages of alluvial fan strata exposed and recently eroded by the incising river hint at two aggradation phases during the last two glacial periods. Furthermore lose sediment dated at 300 ka is found to be available along the transport route of the sediments and likely entrained during incision phases. We expect the modern sediment flux entering the basin to contain a significant amount of recycled material as old as 180 ka and a non-negligible amount of recycled material as old as 300 ka that can significantly skew geochemical or provenance studies if ignored.

  1. Interglacial-glacial cycles recorded in the deposit sequence at Kruzhyky on the Dniester River (East Carpathian Foreland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łanczont, Maria; Boguckyj, Aandrij; Mroczek, Przemysław; Zieliński, Paweł; Jacyszyn, Andrij; Pidek, Agnieszka I.; Urban, Danuta; Kulesza, Piotr; Hołub, Beata

    2010-01-01

    of sands with horizontal stratification and silts with horizontal or flaser lamination; single small-scale lithofacies of sands with trough cross-stratification occur in places; single gravel grains are numerous. Two deformation horizons are found: the higher one is characterized by the occurrence of folds and flexure deflections, and the lower one-involution structures and casts of ice wedges/fissures. This complex is probably the result of deposition on the distal part of flat, periodically inundated fluvioglacial fan connected with advancing ice sheet. 4. Ablation complex-sandy or sandy-silty diamicton occurring as isolated inserts, lenses or tongues. Its lower boundary is sharp, erosional and uneven (concave). This complex represents flows of supraglacial tills, which strongly deformed the deposits of the underlying complex 3. 5. Aeolian complex-silty (loess) and sandy-silty (Table 1) deposits with distinct traces of intensive, postsedimentary alterations of pedogenesis of different ages (Tables 1 and 2). It is composed of two soil units separated by thin, primary loess layer: a) older, well-developed paleosol with several pedofeatures very typical of the Sokal (Mazovian) soil; b) younger unit developed as pedocomplex consisting of two mature soils, the upper of which ("modern" neosol) is formed in the top of relict and exhumed paleosol. The described paleosols should be recognized as at least two soils of different ages and of interglacial rank, developed in periglacial loess-like deposits. The Kruzhyky profile is unique in the Dniester River valley. On account of its situation, it supplements the former information about the terrace 5 structure, which has been determined in detail in the Halyč site. And what is most important, it is the only site on the terrace 5 where glacial deposits were found. Lithofacial analysis carried out in the profile enables us to reconstruct the following events reflecting interglacial-glacial cycles: 1. The lowest, gravelly

  2. Reconstructing paleo-ocean silicon chemistry and ecology during Last Glacial Maximum, a biogeochemical cycle modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Lerman, A.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    It has been established by a number of investigators that opal content and Si-C isotope studies in the marine sediments reveal information about paleooceanography and the impact on silicic acid utilization by marine autotrophes (diatoms, silicoflagellates) and heterotrophes (radiolarians) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Opal, as an amorphous form of SiO2, formed by marine Si-secreting organisms, has been used as a proxy to indicate chemical ocean evolution, paleoproductivity and temperature variations in the paleoenvironment and regional ocean water biogeochemical studies, both on million- and thousand-year scales. Here, we are using a model of the global silicon biogeochemical cycle to understand and reconstruct evolutionary history of the paleobiogeochemical cycle and paleoenvironment since LGM. The model is process-driven, temperature-driven, and land-ocean-sediment coupled with specific marine Si-secreting organisms that represent different trophic levels and physiological mechanisms. Specifically, Si utilization by marine silicoflagellates and radiolarians are each about 5% of that of ubiquitous marine diatoms. Available marine reactive Si is controlled by variation of diatom bioproduction that represents 5% of the total marine primary productivity (Si/C Redfield ratio in the marine organic matter is ~0.13, which is an order of magnitude higher than ratio in land organic matter). River input of Si is controlled by chemical weathering of silicate rocks and biocyling of land plant phytoliths. Decreasing dissolved and particulate Si input from land and less favorable climatic condition into LGM diminished the primary production of marine diatoms. However, because radiolarians favor deep-water habitat, where a higher level of DSi is found and that is less affected by temperature changes, a peak of relative abundance is usually observed in sedimentary record during LGM. Given that opal formation fractionated seawater δ30Si (1‰) and enriched seawater with

  3. Late Quaternary glacial relief evolution revealed by luminescence thermochronometry (Granite Range, Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valla, P.; Guralnik, B.; Lowick, S.; Champagnac, J.; Herman, F.; Jain, M.; Murray, A.

    2012-12-01

    variable erosion rates during the late Quaternary, with preferential high-altitude erosion in the eastern part of the Granite Range and localized valley incision to the west. This presents evidence for a bimodal relief evolution in an active mountain range under glacial environment, and demonstrates the potential of luminescence thermochronometry in resolving topographic evolution and surface processes over 100-kyr timescales and high-frequency climate modulations (e.g., glacial-interglacial oscillations). References: - Braun, J., et al. (2012). Quantifying rates of landscape evolution and tectonic processes by thermochronology and numerical modeling of heat transport in the crust using PECUBE. Tectonophysics. - Herman, F., et al. (2010). Uniform erosion rates and relief amplitude during glacial cycles in the Southern Alps of New Zealand, as revealed from OSL-thermochronology. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. - Murray, A.S., Wintle, A.G. (2000). Luminescence dating of quartz using an improved single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol. Radiation Measurements. - Spotila, J.A., Berger, A.L. (2010). Exhumation at orogenic indentor corners under long-term glacial conditions: Example of the St. Elias orogen, Southern Alaska. Tectonophysics.

  4. Glacial magnetite dissolution in abyssal NW Pacific sediments - evidence for carbon trapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korff, Lucia; von Dobeneck, Tilo; Frederichs, Thomas; Kasten, Sabine; Kuhn, Gerhard; Gersonde, Rainer; Diekmann, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    followed by subsequent interglacial carbon burn-down and CO2 release. Abyssal Northwest Pacific sediments may have served as glacial carbon reservoir in particular since the onset of systematic 100 kyr ice age cycles at the end of the Mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT). Stagnant glacial Antarctic Bottom Water, which expanded primarily into abyssal South Atlantic basins during the MPT interim phase, thereafter seemed to flow preferentially into the deeper and larger abyssal Indo-Pacific basins, where it may have enabled more efficient carbon-trapping. More intensive scavenging of the Northwest Pacific surface ocean by enhanced glacial Asian dust flux is suggested by parallel TOC and quartz contents, enhancing glacial carbon accumulation despite potentially lower export production. The magnetic records also identify numerous partly consistent tephra layers, which can be matched between most records of the core transect.

  5. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes (230Thxs-normalized) in central Baffin Bay sediments during the last glacial cycle: Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Nuttin, Laurence; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes reconstructed using the 230Thxs normalization, proxies of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, have been measured in a sedimentary core from Baffin Bay (North Atlantic) spanning the last 136 ka BP. The normalization applied on the exchangeable (authigenic) 10Be concentrations using the authigenic 9Be isotope and 230Thxs methods yield equivalent results strongly correlated with sedimentological parameters (grain-size and mineralogy). Lower authigenic beryllium (Be) concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are associated with coarse-grained carbonate-rich layers, while higher authigenic Be values are related to fine-grained felspar-rich sediments. This variability is due to: i) sediment composition control over beryllium-scavenging efficiency and, ii) glacial history that contributed to modify the 10Be concentration in Baffin Bay by input and boundary scavenging condition changes. Most paleo-denudation rates inferred from the 10Be/9Be ratio vary weakly around 220 ± 76 tons.km-2.yr-1 (0.09 ± 0.03 mm.yr-1) corresponding to relatively steady weathering fluxes over the last glacial cycle except for six brief intervals characterized by sharp increases of the denudation rate. These intervals are related to ice-surging episodes coeval with Heinrich events and the last deglaciation period. An average freshwater flux of 180.6 km3.yr-1 (0.006 Sv), consistent with recent models, has been calculated in order to sustain glacially-derived 10Be inputs into Baffin Bay. It is concluded that in such environments, the authigenic 10Be measured mainly depends on climatic effects related to the glacial dynamics, which masks the 10Be production variation modulated by geomagnetic field changes. Altogether, these results challenge the simple interpretation of 10Be-concentration variation as a proxy of Interglacial/Glacial (interstadial/stadial) cycles in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. They rather suggest the effect

  6. Size and shape stasis in late Pleistocene mammals and birds from Rancho La Brea during the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothero, Donald R.; Syverson, Valerie J.; Raymond, Kristina R.; Madan, Meena; Molina, Sarah; Fragomeni, Ashley; DeSantis, Sylvana; Sutyagina, Anastasiya; Gage, Gina L.

    2012-11-01

    Conventional neo-Darwinian theory views organisms as infinitely sensitive and responsive to their environments, and considers them able to readily change size or shape when they adapt to selective pressures. Yet since 1863 it has been well known that Pleistocene animals and plants do not show much morphological change or speciation in response to the glacial-interglacial climate cycles. We tested this hypothesis with all of the common birds (condors, golden and bald eagles, turkeys, caracaras) and mammals (dire wolves, saber-toothed cats, giant lions, horses, camels, bison, and ground sloths) from Rancho La Brea tar pits in Los Angeles, California, which preserves large samples of many bones from many well-dated pits spanning the 35,000 years of the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle. Pollen evidence showed the climate changed from chaparral/oaks 35,000 years ago to snowy piñon-juniper forests at the peak glacial 20,000 years ago, then back to the modern chaparral since the glacial-interglacial transition. Based on Bergmann's rule, we would expect peak glacial specimens to have larger body sizes, and based on Allen's rule, peak glacial samples should have shorter and more robust limbs. Yet statistical analysis (ANOVA for parametric samples; Kruskal-Wallis test for non-parametric samples) showed that none of the Pleistocene pit samples is statistically distinct from the rest, indicating complete stasis from 35 ka to 9 ka. The sole exception was the Pit 13 sample of dire wolves (16 ka), which was significantly smaller than the rest, but this did not occur in response to climate change. We also performed a time series analysis of the pit samples. None showed directional change; all were either static or showed a random walk. Thus, the data show that birds and mammals at Rancho La Brea show complete stasis and were unresponsive to the major climate change that occurred at 20 ka, consistent with other studies of Pleistocene animals and plants. Most explanations for such

  7. Gulf of Mexico Climate, Laurentide Ice Sheet History, and Global Sea Level Change During the Last Glacial Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Williams, C.; Brown, E. A.; Hastings, D. W.; Hill, H.; Adams, S.; Hendrix, J.; Martin, E. E.; Biller, N. B.; Goddard, E.

    2011-12-01

    The interactions between low-latitude Atlantic climate and high-latitude ice sheet variability represent an important issue in past abrupt climate change. Specifically, Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) meltwater input seems to be decoupled at the millennial scale from Gulf of Mexico sea-surface temperature (SST), as well as Greenland air temperature, during the last glacial cycle. Indeed, comparison to Greenland ice core records indicate significant meltwater input during some North Atlantic cool episodes, including Heinrich Stadials 4, 3, and 1. Here we present published and new Mg/Ca and δ18O data on the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber from northern Gulf of Mexico sediment cores that provide detailed records of SST, δ18O of seawater (δ18Osw), and inferred salinity for the 48-10 ka interval. Age control for Orca Basin cores MD02-2550 and -2551 is based on AMS 14C dates on G. ruber and documents continuous sedimentation at rates >35 cm/kyr. Significant meltwater input is inferred from δ18Osw data during Antarctic Isotope Maxima (AIM) events and reaches a peak during the Bølling/Allerød, consistent with bipolar warming and a high sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. Furthermore, bulk sediment δ18O data show a brief spike reaching -5.5% ca. 14.5 ka during an interval barren of foraminifera. We speculate that this excursion represents fine carbonate sediment from Canadian Paleozoic marine carbonates, analogous to detrital carbonate in the North Atlantic that has a δ18O value of -5%. Radiogenic isotope data (Nd and Pb) also reach peak values at this interval, indicative of older continental material sourced from Canada vs. younger material from the Mississippi River drainage basin. Inferred major meltwater flow appears to have been associated with meltwater pulse 1a within the Bølling warm interval, consistent with a significant contribution by the LIS to rapid global sea level rise. Overall, the relations between Gulf of Mexico meltwater input, Heinrich

  8. Periodic isolation of the southern coastal plain of South Africa and the evolution of modern humans over late Quaternary glacial to interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    Humans evolved in Africa, but where in Africa and by what mechanisms remain unclear. The evolution of modern humans over the last million years is associated with the onset of major global climate fluctuations, glacial to interglacial cycles, related to the build up and melting of large ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere. During interglacial periods, such as today, warm and wet climates favored human expansion but during cold and dry glacial periods conditions were harsh and habitats fragmented. These large climate fluctuations periodically expanded and contracted African ecosystems and led to human migrations to more hospitable glacial refugia. Periodic isolation of relatively small numbers of humans may have allowed for their rapid evolutionary divergence from the rest of Africa. During climate transitions these divergent groups may have then dispersed and interbred with other groups (hybridization). Two areas at the opposite ends of Africa stand out as regions that were periodically isolated from the rest of Africa: North Africa (the Maghreb) and the southern coastal plain (SCP) of South Africa. The Maghreb is isolated by the Sahara Desert which periodically greens and is reconnected to the rest of Africa during the transition from glacial to interglacial periods. The SCP of South Africa is isolated from the rest of Africa by the rugged mountains of the Cape Fold Belt associated with inedible vegetation and dry climates to the north. The SCP is periodically opened when sea level falls by up to 130 m during glacial maxima to expose the present day submerged inner continental shelf. A five-fold expansion of the SCP receiving more rainfall in glacial periods may have served as a refuge to humans and large migratory herds. The expansive glacial SCP habitat abruptly contracts, by as much as one-third in 300 yr, during the rapid rise in sea level associated with glacial terminations. Rapid flooding may have increased population density and competition on the SCP to

  9. High regional climate sensitivity over continental China constrained by glacial-recent changes in temperature and the hydrological cycle

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Robert A.; Risi, Camille; Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Eiler, John M.; Seibt, Ulrike; Neelin, J. David; Li, Gaojun; Tripati, Aradhna K.

    2013-01-01

    The East Asian monsoon is one of Earth’s most significant climatic phenomena, and numerous paleoclimate archives have revealed that it exhibits variations on orbital and suborbital time scales. Quantitative constraints on the climate changes associated with these past variations are limited, yet are needed to constrain sensitivity of the region to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Here, we show central China is a region that experienced a much larger temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum than typically simulated by climate models. We applied clumped isotope thermometry to carbonates from the central Chinese Loess Plateau to reconstruct temperature and water isotope shifts from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. We find a summertime temperature change of 6–7 °C that is reproduced by climate model simulations presented here. Proxy data reveal evidence for a shift to lighter isotopic composition of meteoric waters in glacial times, which is also captured by our model. Analysis of model outputs suggests that glacial cooling over continental China is significantly amplified by the influence of stationary waves, which, in turn, are enhanced by continental ice sheets. These results not only support high regional climate sensitivity in Central China but highlight the fundamental role of planetary-scale atmospheric dynamics in the sensitivity of regional climates to continental glaciation, changing greenhouse gas levels, and insolation. PMID:23671087

  10. The last glacial-interglacial cycle in Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania): testing diatom response to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. M.; Cvetkoska, A.; Levkov, Z.; Vogel, H.; Wagner, B.

    2010-06-01

    Lake Ohrid is a site of global importance for palaeoclimate research. This study presents results of diatom analysis of a ca. 136 ka sequence, Co1202, from the northeast of the lake basin. It offers the opportunity to test diatom response across two glacial-interglacial transitions and within the Last Glacial, while setting up taxonomic protocols for future research. The results are outstanding in demonstrating the sensitivity of diatoms to climate change, providing proxy evidence for temperature change marked by glacial-interglacial shifts between the dominant planktonic taxa, Cyclotella fottii and C. ocellata, and exact correlation with geochemical proxies to mark the start of the Last Interglacial at ca. 130 ka. Importantly, diatoms show much stronger evidence in this site for warming during MIS3 than recorded in other productivity-related proxies, peaking at ca. 39 ka, prior to the extreme conditions of the Last Glacial maximum. In the light of the observed patterns, and from the results of analysis of early Holocene sediments from a second core, Lz1120, the lack of a response to Late Glacial and early Holocene warming from ca. 15-7.4 ka suggests the Co1202 sequence may be compromised during this phase. After ca. 7.4 ka, there is evidence for enhanced nutrient enrichment compared to the Last Interglacial, following by a post-Medieval cooling trend. Taxonomically, morphological variability in C. fottii shows no clear trends linked to climate, but an intriguing change in central area morphology occurs after ca. 48.7 ka, coincident with a tephra layer. In contrast, C. ocellata shows morphological variation in the number of ocelli between interglacials, suggesting climatically-forced variation or evolutionary selection pressure. The application of a simple dissolution index does not track preservation quality very effectively, underlining the importance of diatom concentration data in future studies.

  11. The last glacial-interglacial cycle in Lake Ohrid (Macedonia/Albania): testing diatom response to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, J. M.; Cvetkoska, A.; Levkov, Z.; Vogel, H.; Wagner, B.

    2010-10-01

    Lake Ohrid is a site of global importance for palaeoclimate research. This study presents results of diatom analysis of a ca. 136 ka sequence, Co1202, from the northeast of the lake basin. It offers the opportunity to test diatom response across two glacial-interglacial transitions and within the Last Glacial, while setting up taxonomic protocols for future research. The results are outstanding in demonstrating the sensitivity of diatoms to climate change, providing proxy evidence for temperature change marked by glacial-interglacial shifts between the dominant planktonic taxa, Cyclotella fottii and C. ocellata, and exact correlation with geochemical proxies to mark the start of the Last Interglacial at ca. 130 ka. Importantly, diatoms show much stronger evidence in this site for warming during MIS3 than recorded in other productivity-related proxies, peaking at ca. 39 ka, prior to the extreme conditions of the Last Glacial maximum. In the light of the observed patterns, and from the results of analysis of early Holocene sediments from a second core, Lz1120, the lack of a response to Late Glacial and early Holocene warming from ca. 14.7-6.9 ka suggests the Co1202 sequence may be compromised during this phase. After ca. 7.4 ka, there is evidence for enhanced nutrient enrichment compared to the Last Interglacial, followed by a post-Medieval loss of diversity which is consistent with cooling, but not definitive. Taxonomically, morphological variability in C. fottii shows no clear trends linked to climate, but an intriguing change in central area morphology occurs after ca. 48.7 ka, coincident with a tephra layer. In contrast, C. ocellata shows morphological variation in the number of ocelli between interglacials, suggesting climatically-forced variation or evolutionary selection pressure. The application of a simple dissolution index does not track preservation quality very effectively, underlining the importance of diatom accumulation data in future studies.

  12. High latitude regulation of low latitude thermocline ventilation and planktic foraminifer populations across glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Philip F.; Norris, Richard D.

    2011-11-01

    One of the earliest discoveries in palaeoceanography was the observation in 1935 that the (sub)tropical planktic foraminifer Globorotalia menardii became absent or extremely rare in the Atlantic Ocean during glacials of the late Pleistocene. Yet a mechanistic explanation for G. menardii's extraordinary biogeographic behaviour has eluded palaeoceanographers for 75 years. Here we show that modern G. menardii, along with two other species that also suffer Atlantic population collapses during glacials, track poorly ventilated waters globally in their thermocline habitats. The ventilation states of low latitude thermoclines are 'set', to a first order, by intermediate water masses originating at high latitudes. In the modern Atlantic this control on low latitude thermocline ventilation is exerted by relatively poorly ventilated, southern-sourced Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) and sub-Antarctic Mode Water (SAMW). We suggest that the glacial Atlantic foraminifer population collapses were a consequence of a low latitude thermocline that was better ventilated during glacials than it is today, in line with geochemical evidence, and driven primarily by a well-ventilated, northern-sourced intermediate water mass. A ventilation mechanism driving the glacial population collapses is further supported by our new constraints on the precise timing of these species' Atlantic proliferation during the last deglaciation — occurring in parallel with a wholesale, bipolar reorganisation of the Atlantic's thermocline-to-abyssal overturning circulation. Our findings demonstrate that a bipolar seesaw in the formation of high latitude intermediate waters has played an important role in regulating the population dynamics of thermocline-dwelling plankton at lower latitudes.

  13. Stratigraphy and palaeoclimatic significance of Late Quaternary loess-palaeosol sequences of the Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle in central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Ager, T.A.; Bettis, E. Arthur, III; McGeehin, J.; Been, J.M.; Beget, J.E.; Pavich, M.J.; Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.; Stevens, D.A.S.P.

    2003-01-01

    Loess is one of the most widespread subaerial deposits in Alaska and adjacent Yukon Territory and may have a history that goes back 3 Ma. Based on mineralogy and major and trace element chemistry, central Alaskan loess has a composition that is distinctive from other loess bodies of the world, although it is quartz-dominated. Central Alaskan loess was probably derived from a variety of rock types, including granites, metabasalts and schists. Detailed stratigraphic data and pedologic criteria indicate that, contrary to early studies, many palaeosols are present in central Alaskan loess sections. The buried soils indicate that loess sedimentation was episodic, or at least rates of deposition decreased to the point where pedogenesis could keep ahead of aeolian input. As in China, loess deposition and pedogenesis are likely competing processes and neither stops completely during either phase of the loess/soil formation cycle. Loess deposition in central Alaska took place before, and probably during the last interglacial period, during stadials of the mid-Wisconsin period, during the last glacial period and during the Holocene. An unexpected result of our geochronological studies is that only moderate loess deposition took place during the last glacial period. Our studies lead us to conclude that vegetation plays a key role in loess accumulation in Alaska. Factors favouring loess production are enhanced during glacial periods but factors that favour loess accumulation are diminished during glacial periods. The most important of these is vegetation; boreal forest serves as an effective loess trap, but sparsely distributed herb tundra does not. Thus, thick accumulations of loess should not be expected where tundra vegetation was dominant and this is borne out by modern studies near the treeline in central Alaska. Much of the stratigraphic diversity of North American loess, including that found in the Central Lowlands, the Great Plains, and Alaska is explained by a new

  14. Genera variation of tropical mid-upper montane rainforest inferred from a marine pollen record in southern Philippines during the glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical vegetation is the most outstanding and obvious feature of South-East Asia, and it is expected to provide valuable information for the palaeoclmatic conditions. Pollen records from the tropical West Pacific indicate that the tropical vegetation is much sensitive to the environment and climate change, and their good correspondence with palaeocliamte change in glacial/interglacial timescales. It is shown that the range of the tropical montane rainforest was affected by the temperature change during the glacial cycle. But, from some marine core, the genera variation of tropical mid-upper montane pollen record is also distinct during the glacial cycle. In this study, examination of the pollen content of marine core MD06-3075 taken from Davao Gulf in the Southern Philippines reveals a ~116,000 year record of tropical vegetation change as well as the influence of the environment and climate variability on the ecosystem of the tropical area. Chronology was determined by 16 AMS 14C dates and a detailed oxygen isotope record. A high representation of pollen from tropical upper montane rainforest (mainly Podocarpus) (40-60%) during the last glacial period indicates that this forest type extended to lower attitudes. And the genera variations of the tropical mid-upper montane rainforest exist between the Phyllocladus and Podocarpus with the environment and climate changing. The pollen content of Phyllocladus is much high in marine isotope stage (MIS) 5, but Podocarpus is much higher in the glacial period. During the onset of MIS 5a and 5c, the percentage of Phyllocladus pollen declines dramatically. Vegetation investigation in Mindanao, shows that Podocarpus exists in altitude ranging from 1,200-1,700 m, and Phyllocladus appear in altitude range from 1700-2100 m, but is more abundant above the 2,400 m. Thus, Phyllocladus might be more sensitive to the temperature change. Then, in this study, the pollen content of is much high during the interglacial period

  15. All together now? Sensitivity, dynamics, and predictability of planktonic foraminiferal species abundance versus community structure across Plio-Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, P. M.; Norris, R. D.; Sexton, P.

    2012-12-01

    Most studies to date of biospheric sensitivity to global change have focused on understanding the sensitivity of modern species and communities to recent or experimental environmental change. However, it is unclear how to scale these results towards predicting the response of the biosphere to ongoing global change given that i) similar species often respond individualistically the same perturbation, ii) biotic response often scales nonlinearly with the size and/or duration of environmental change, and iii) many terrestrial and marine community types known from the recent past lack modern analogs. In this context, marine microfossils from deep sea sediments hold enormous promise for furthering our understanding of biotic sensitivity as they capture temporally expanded records of paleoceanographic and biotic response across a range climatic regimes (e.g., icehouse versus greenhouse climates), disturbance types (e.g., from background climate oscillations to mass extinctions), and habitats (e.g., low vs. high latitudes, upwelling vs. gyre ecosystems, etc). Here we use the repeated glacial-interglacial cycles and longer term trend of intensifying Northern Hemisphere glaciation from the Pliocene-Pleistocene to examine issues related to the sensitivity of planktonic foraminiferal species and communities to global change in an icehouse world. More specifically, we quantify the sensitivity and predictability of changes in planktonic foraminiferal species abundance (species specific mass accumulation rates) and community structure (dissimilarity indices and community classification) to glacial-interglacial cycles in the Plio-Pleistocene in two Atlantic sites (ODP Sites 999 and 662). We first examine whether the sensitivity of species and communities to glacial-interglacial cycles in the early Pliocene (~5-3 million years ago) is predictive of i) their sensitivity to the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (~3-2 million years ago), or ii) their sensitivity to

  16. The impact of the North American ice sheet on the evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet during the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakka, J.; Löfverström, M.; Colleoni, F.

    2015-11-01

    Modeling studies show that the massive ice sheet expanding over the North American and Eurasian continents in the last glacial cycle has a large impact on the atmospheric stationary waves and thus yielded a glacial climate distinctly different from the present. However, to what extent the two ice sheets influenced each others growth trajectories remains largely unexplored. In this study we investigate how ice sheets in North America influence the downstream evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet, using a thermomechanical ice-sheet model forced by climate data from snapshot simulations of three distinctly different phases of the last glacial cycle: the Marine Isotope Stages 5b, 4 and 2 (LGM). Our results suggest that changes in the North American paleo-topography may have had a large influence on evolution of the Eurasian ice sheet. In the MIS4 and LGM experiments, the Eurasian ice sheet migrates westward towards the Atlantic sector - largely consistent with geological data and contemporary ice-sheet reconstructions - due to a low wavenumber stationary wave response, which yields a cooling in Europe and a warming in northeastern Siberia. The expansion of the North American ice sheet between MIS4 and LGM amplifies the Siberian warm anomaly, which limits the glaciation there and may therefore help to explain the progressive westward migration of the Eurasian ice sheet over this time period. While the Eurasian ice sheet in the MIS4 and LGM experiments appears to be in equilibrium with the simulated climate conditions, the MIS5b climate forcing is too warm to grow an ice sheet. First-order sensitivity experiments suggest that most of the MIS5b ice sheet was established during preceding colder stages.

  17. Evolution of Temperature and Carbon Storage Within the Deep Southeast Atlantic Ocean Across the Last Glacial/Interglacial Cycle Inferred from a Highly-Resolved Sedimentary Depth Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C. D.; Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Slowey, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    Many models show that the relative intensity of stratification is a primary variable governing the sequestration and release of carbon from the ocean over ice ages. The wide-scale observations necessary to test these model-derived hypotheses are not yet sufficient, but sedimentary depth transects represent a promising approach for making progress. Here we present paired stable isotopic (d18O, d13C) and trace metal data (Mg/Ca, B/Ca) from benthic foraminifera collected from a highly vertically-resolved depth transect from the mid-depth and deep SE Atlantic. These observations, which cover Marine Isotope Stages 5e, 5d, 5a, 4, and the Last Glacial Maximum, document the evolution of glacial conditions from the previous interglacial, and provide detailed observations regarding the magnitude and timing of changes in temperature and salinity within the deep ocean at key time points over the last glacial/interglacial cycle. Furthermore, the comparison between purely 'physical' tracers (i.e. Mg/Ca, d18O) and tracers sensitive to the carbon cycle (i.e. d13C and B/Ca) provides critical insight into the relationship between deep/mid-depth stratification and global carbon dynamics. Notably among our observations, the paired stable isotope and trace metal results strongly suggest that much of the ice-age cooling of deep South Atlantic occurred at the MIS 5e/5d transition, while the onset of salinity stratification in the mid-depth South Atlantic occurred at the MIS 5/4 transition.

  18. Numerical modelling of subglacial erosion and sediment transport and its application to the North American ice sheets over the Last Glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melanson, Alexandre; Bell, Trevor; Tarasov, Lev

    2013-05-01

    Present-day sediment distribution offers a potentially strong constraint on past ice sheet evolution. Glacial system models (GSMs), however, cannot address this constraint while lacking appropriate representations of subglacial sediment production and transport. Incorporating these elements in GSMs is also required in order to quantify the impact of a changing sediment cover on glacial cycle dynamics. Towards these goals, we present a subglacial process model (hereafter referred to as the sediment model) that incorporates mechanisms for sediment production, entrainment, transport, and deposition. Bedrock erosion is calculated by both Hallet's and Boulton's abrasion laws separately, and by a novel quarrying law parametrized as a function of subglacial cavity extent. These process-oriented erosion laws are compared against a simple empirical relationship between erosion rate and the work done by basal stress. Sediment entrainment is represented by Philip's law for regelation intrusion and soft-bed deformation is included as a subglacial sediment transport mechanism. The model is driven by the data-calibrated MUN (3D) GSM and a newly developed subglacial hydrology module. The sediment model is applied to the last North American glacial cycle and predicts sediment thickness and cumulative erosion patterns. Results are obtained in the context of a sensitivity analysis and are compared against the present-day distribution of glacigenic sediment and geological estimates of Laurentide Ice Sheet erosion. Given plausible ranges for the sensitivity parameters, chosen a priori based on available literature or on heuristic arguments, the calculated erosion depths overlap with the geological estimates of Laurentide erosion. Most of the runs in the sensitivity set produce unrealistically thick and continuous moraines along the eastern, southern and western margins of the North American ice complex, which suggests that the model overestimates sediment entrainment and thus

  19. Climate-induced changes to the ancestral population size of two Patagonian galaxiids: the influence of glacial cycling.

    PubMed

    Zemlak, Tyler S; Walde, Sandra J; Habit, Evelyn M; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2011-12-01

    Patagonia is one of the few areas in the Southern Hemisphere to have been directly influenced by Quaternary glaciers. In this study, we evaluate the influence that Quaternary glacial ice had on the genetic diversity of two congeneric fish species, the diadromous Galaxias maculatus and the nondiadromous Galaxias platei, using multilocus estimates of effective population size through time. Mid-Quaternary glaciations had far-reaching consequences for both species. Galaxias maculatus and G. platei each experienced severe genetic bottlenecks during the period when Patagonia ice sheet advance reached its maximum positions c. 1.1-0.6 Ma. Concordant drops in effective size during this time suggest that range sizes were under similar constraints. It is therefore unlikely that coastal (brackish/marine) environments served as a significant refuge for G. maculatus during glacial periods. An earlier onset of population declines for G. platei suggests that this species was vulnerable to modest glacial advances. Declines in effective sizes were continuous for both species and lasted into the late-Pleistocene. However, G. maculatus exhibited a strong population recovery during the late-Quaternary (c. 400,000 bp). Unusually long and warm interglacials associated with the late-Quaternary may have helped to facilitate a strong population rebound in this primarily coastal species. PMID:22077139

  20. Pliocene switch in orbital-scale carbon cycle/climate dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Sandra Kirtland

    2014-12-01

    The high-frequency (periods of ~105 years) relationship between carbon and oxygen isotopes in benthic foraminifera—the two proxies most extensively used to reconstruct past changes in Earth's carbon cycle and climate—shows two distinct patterns across the Cenozoic. The first, "glacial-style," pattern associates negative excursions in δ13C with positive excursions in δ18O indicative of relatively cold temperatures and greater ice volume. The second, "hyperthermal-style," pattern associates negative excursions in δ13C with negative excursions in δ18O indicative of warming. Here I assess the coherence and phasing of these high-frequency, orbital-scale cycles (in particular, the ~100 kyr eccentricity period) in δ13C and δ18O from multiple high-resolution benthic foraminiferal records spanning the last ~65 million years of Earth history in order to identify which of these patterns is most persistent across the Cenozoic and when the switch between these patterns occurred. I find that the glacial-style δ13C-δ18O pattern is a feature restricted to the Plio-Pleistocene, suggesting a fundamental change in the interplay between the carbon cycle and climate associated with the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. This relative stability of the high-frequency relationship between δ13C and δ18O across most of the Cenozoic persists despite significant secular changes in climate and may suggest a dichotomous response of terrestrial carbon cycle dynamics to orbital forcing with a switch occurring in the last ~5 Myr.

  1. Running hotter, faster, shallower: acceleration of the marine nitrogen cycle from the Last Glacial Maximum to the pre-industrial, and implications for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbraith, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biologically-available nitrogen is the primary limiting nutrient in the global ocean. The complex physical-biological interdependencies of nitrogen fixation and denitrification, the source and sink of bioavailable nitrogen, have led to uncertainty over their future trajectories under higher CO2. Sedimentary nitrogen isotope evidence suggests that the global rate of denitrification was on the order of 50% lower during the last glacial maximum, and reveals that significant changes in denitrification have occurred on a decadal-centennial timescale. Coupled atmosphere-ocean-biogeochemistry models simulate similar changes, through physically-driven changes in anoxia, which then feed back on nitrogen fixation through the availability of phosphorus to diazotrophs. In addition, diazotroph culture experiments suggest that nitrogen fixation was further limited during glacial maxima by low CO2, causing an additional slowdown of the nitrogen cycle. The emergent picture suggests that deglaciation accelerated both sides of the N cycle, with more rapid loss encouraged by expanded shallow anoxia, and more rapid gain encouraged by higher CO2. It will be argued that the net effect on the nitrogen inventory can be approximated by knowing the distribution of surface ocean PO4, given the observed correlation of surface PO4 concentrations on the P:C ratio of exported organic matter.

  2. The Last Interglacial-Glacial cycle (MIS 5-2) re-examined based on long proxy records from central and northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmens, Karin F.

    2014-02-01

    Current multi-proxy studies on a long sediment sequence preserved at Sokli (N Finland), i.e. in the central area of Fennoscandian glaciations, are drastically changing classic ideas of glaciations, vegetation and climate in northern Europe during the Late Pleistocene. The sediments in the Sokli basin have escaped major glacial erosion due to non-typical bedrock conditions. In this review, the Sokli record is compared in great detail with other long proxy records from central, temperate and northern, boreal Europe. These comprise the classic records of La Grande Pile (E France) and Oerel (N Germany) and more recently obtained records from Horoszki Duże (E Poland) and Lake Yamozero (NW Russia). The focus of the review is on pollen, lithology and macrofossil- and insect-based temperature inferences. The long records are further compared with recent proxy data from nearby terrestrial sites as well as with the rapidly accumulating high-resolution proxy data from the ocean realm. The comparison allows a re-examination of the environmental history and climate evolution of the Last Interglacial-Glacial (LI-G) cycle (MIS 5-2). It shows that environmental and climate conditions during MIS 5 (ca 130-70 ka BP) were distinctly different from those during MIS 4-2 (ca 70-15 ka BP). MIS 5 is characterized by three long forested intervals (broadly corresponding to MIS 5e, 5c, 5a), both in temperate and northern boreal Europe. These mild periods were interrupted by two short, relatively cold and dry intervals (MIS 5d and 5b) with mountain-centered glaciation in Fennoscandia. Millennial scale climate events were superimposed upon these longer lasting climate fluctuations. The time interval encompassing MIS 4-2 shows open vegetation. It is characterized by two glacial maxima (MIS 4 and 2) with sub-continental scale glaciation over northern Europe and dry conditions in strongly continental eastern European settings. High amplitude climate oscillations of millennial duration

  3. Climatic control of sediment transport from the Himalayas to the proximal NE Bengal Fan during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joussain, Ronan; Colin, Christophe; Liu, Zhifei; Meynadier, Laure; Fournier, Léa; Fauquembergue, Kelly; Zaragosi, Sébastien; Schmidt, Frédéric; Rojas, Virginia; Bassinot, Franck

    2016-09-01

    Clay mineralogy, siliciclastic grain-size, major elements, 87Sr/86Sr, and εNd analyses of deep-sea sediments cored in the north-eastern Bay of Bengal are used to reconstruct evolution of detrital sources and sediment transport to the proximal part of the Bengal deep-sea fan during the last climatic cycle. εNd values (-13.3 to -9.7) and 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.721-0.733) indicate a mixture of sediments originating from the Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers and the Indo-Burman ranges. Interglacial Marine Isotopic Stages (MIS) 5 and 1 are associated with a higher contribution of sediments from the Ganges-Brahmaputra river system than is the case for glacial MIS 6, 4, 3, and 2. Siliciclasitic grain-size combined with Si/Al and Si/Fe ratios indicate coarser glacial sediments with numerous turbidite layers. Glacial turbidite layers display similar clay mineralogical compositions to hemipelagic sediments. Only few of turbidite layers (MIS 6, 4, and 2) are slightly unradiogenic (εNd -13.3), suggesting a higher contribution of Ganges-Brahmaputra river sediments. Independently of changes in the sedimentary sources, the smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratio of cores located on the NE Bengal Fan indicates higher inputs of primary minerals (illite and chlorite) from the highlands of the river basins (relief) during glacial MIS 6, 4, 3, and 2 and an increased contribution of pedogenic minerals (smectite and kaolinite) during interglacial MIS 5 and 1. Maximum smectite/(illite + chlorite) ratios during the warm sub-stages of MIS 5 suggest an intensification of summer monsoon rainfall associated with higher rates of physical erosion of the Indo-Gangetic flood-plain and/or dominant summer hydrological conditions transporting a higher proportion of sediments deriving from the Ganges-Brahmaputra rivers to the NE Bengal Fan. In addition, a higher production of smectite in soils of the Indo-Gangetic flood-plain during periods of intensification of monsoon rainfall cannot be excluded.

  4. Iron and manganese speciation and cycling in glacially influenced high-latitude fjord sediments (West Spitsbergen, Svalbard): Evidence for a benthic recycling-transport mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrmann, Laura M.; Formolo, Michael J.; Owens, Jeremy D.; Raiswell, Robert; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Riedinger, Natascha; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-09-01

    Glacial environments may provide an important but poorly constrained source of potentially bioavailable iron and manganese phases to the coastal ocean in high-latitude regions. Little is known about the fate and biogeochemical cycling of glacially derived iron and manganese in the coastal marine realm. Sediment and porewater samples were collected along transects from the fjord mouths to the tidewater glaciers at the fjord heads in Smeerenburgfjorden, Kongsfjorden, and Van Keulenfjorden along Western Svalbard. Solid-phase iron and manganese speciation, determined by sequential chemical extraction, could be linked to the compositions of the local bedrock and hydrological/weathering conditions below the local glaciers. The concentration and sulfur isotope composition of chromium reducible sulfur (CRS) in Kongs- and Van Keulenfjorden sediments largely reflect the delivery rate and isotope composition of detrital pyrite originating from adjacent glaciers. The varying input of reducible iron and manganese oxide phases and the input of organic matter of varying reactivity control the pathways of organic carbon mineralization in the sediments of the three fjords. High reducible iron and manganese oxide concentrations and elevated metal accumulation rates coupled to low input of “fresh” organic matter lead to a strong expression of dissimilatory metal oxide reduction evidenced in very high porewater iron (up to 800 μM) and manganese (up to 210 μM) concentrations in Kongsfjorden and Van Keulenfjorden. Sediment reworking by the benthic macrofauna and physical sediment resuspension via iceberg calving may be additional factors that promote extensive benthic iron and manganese cycling in these fjords. On-going benthic recycling of glacially derived dissolved iron into overlying seawater, where partial re-oxidation and deposition occurs, facilitates the transport of iron across the fjords and potentially into adjacent continental shelf waters. Such iron-dominated fjord

  5. Carbon cycle constraints during the last glacial/interglacial cycle derived from [CO2] and δ13Catm measurements from ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, S.; Schmitt, J.; Chappellaz, J. A.; Joos, F.; Fischer, H.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic ice cores represent an invaluable source for understanding the climate of the past. Climatically important gases, including CO2, can be extracted from the ice and measured, thus providing atmospheric records for the past 800 kyr. Research has shown that atmospheric CO2 has varied naturally in conjunction with Antarctic air temperature. Additional knowledge of the variations of the stable carbon isotope of CO2, δ13Catm, can help us better understand the processes involved in these fluctuations. Here, we present a complete δ13Catm record extending from 160 kyrBP to the present. The present record, measured primarily on ice from the EPICA Dome C and Talos Dome ice cores, demonstrates a complex interplay of the ocean, terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere carbon reservoirs. For instance, a long-term increasing trend in δ13Catm, starting at the penultimate glacial maximum, extends well into MIS 4, while CO2 shows major drops already between 115 kyrBP and the MIS 5/4 boundary. In contrast, δ13Catm evolved roughly in antiphase during the MIS 4/3 transition with the atmospheric carbon storage increasing by 50 Gt while δ13Catm decreased by 0.5‰, a signal larger than that observed during the last glacial/interglacial termination. This antiphase relationship suggests that a single natural process or multiple processes acting on similar timescales may be responsible for this change in CO2. Modelling studies have shown that the ocean has the greatest impact on the concentration and stable isotope abundance of this greenhouse gas, in particular due to changes in stratification, upwelling, or marine productivity in the Southern Ocean. Similar to the situation at the onset of the last glacial/interglacial termination (Schmitt et al., 2012), the MIS 4/3 transition is characterized by the occurrence of a Heinrich event in the North Atlantic, presumably related to changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and the upwelling of old carbon enriched

  6. Glacial-interglacial cycles of erosion and sediment transport along the western North American margin constrained by reconciling geologic and climate model data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanlaningham, S.; Pisias, N. G.; Duncan, R. A.; Hostetler, S. W.; Wilson, K. L.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to determine whether observed shifts in sediment source (indicated by bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar and Nd isotopic tracers) at a northeast Pacific core site are in response to variations in river basin erosion or transport pathways of terrigenous sediment once it reaches the ocean. We synthesize geologic and climate model data sets to evaluate whether climate model (REGCM2) outputs of precipitation-evaporation (P-E) can be linked to observed changes in erosion and landscape evolution along the western North American margin (core site EW9504-17PC, offshore southern Oregon) over the last glacial-interglacial cycle. This site is ideally located to test this new approach as it captures the combined sediment fluxes from coastal N. California/S. Oregon and the interior Cascade Volcanic Ranges, which have drastically different 40Ar-39Ar bedrock ages (130-147 Ma versus 10-30 Ma, respectively) and different climate responses occurring on glacial-interglacial timescales. We perturb a watershed-scale model of bedrock 40Ar-39Ar ages by the P-E changes to reproduce the total range of variability observed in downcore, bulk sediment 40Ar-39Ar ages and Nd isotopic values at the core site. We find that climate model percent changes in P-E values cannot reproduce the total range of variability seen in the provenance record before 22 ka without invoking drastic reductions in Klamath Mountain and Eel River sediment sources. A relatively unconstrained variable in the source area at this time is the presence of a large pluvial lake, Lake Modoc. It is possible that discharges from it could carry large volumes of young, Cascade Mountain-derived sediments offshore. Alternatively, an offshore switch in ocean current direction or reduction (relative to present-day) could explain the downcore sedimentological changes, as material discharged from the Eel River (the largest sediment source south of the core site) would not be carried north. To reproduce the observed downcore shift in

  7. Dust Deposition and Migration of the ITCZ through the Last Glacial Cycle in the Central Equatorial Pacific (Line Islands).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimi Sipala, M. A.; Marcantonio, F.

    2014-12-01

    weakening of the ITCZ during glacial times. Future work on Nd isotope will shed additional light on subtle differences in dust isotopic composition within the source regions of interest, including the different volcanic zones of South America.

  8. Endogenic carbonate sedimentation in Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho, over the last two glacial-interglacial cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, W.E.

    2009-01-01

    that is at least 50 yr old, and probably older. Apparently, the microbialite mound also stopped forming aragonite cement sometime after Bear River diversion. Because of reworking of old aragonite, the bulk mineralogy of carbonate in bottom sediments has not changed very much since the diversion. However, the diversion is marked by very distinct changes in the chemical and isotopic composition of the bulk carbonate. After the last glacial interval (LGI), a large amount of endogenic carbonate began to precipitate in Bear Lake when the Pacific moisture that filled the large pluvial lakes of the Great Basin during the LGI diminished, and Bear River apparently abandoned Bear Lake. At first, the carbonate that formed was low-Mg calcite, but ???11,000 years ago, salinity and Mg2+:Ca2+ thresholds must have been crossed because the amount of aragonite gradually increased. Aragonite is the dominant carbonate mineral that has accumulated in the lake for the past 7000 years, with the addition of high-Mg calcite after the diversion of Bear River into the lake at the beginning of the twentieth century. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  9. Spatial and temporal variations of glacial erosion in the European Alps: numerical models and implications for slope stability (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, P.; Herman, F.; Willett, S.; Champagnac, J.; Fox, M.; Valla, P.; Salcher, B.

    2013-12-01

    Glacial erosion in alpine landscapes can be highly variable in space and time and lead to significant morphologic modification and mass redistribution at virtually all scales. Because they affect the near-surface stress and strain distribution by producing cyclic variations of the surface load, removing and abrading rocks, storing/releasing sediments and affecting the surface and subsurface hydrology, glaciations have multiple effects on slope stability. Understanding how glacial erosion evolves in space and time is thus important for investigating potential feedbacks between glacial erosion and deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD). The present-day topography of the European Alps shows evidence of intense glacial erosion. However, significant questions regarding Alpine landscape evolution during glaciations still persist. For example, large-scale topographic analyses suggest that glacial erosion is maximized at and above the glaciers' long-term Equilibrium Line Altitude. In contrast, measurements of long-term denudation rates from low-temperature thermochronology and reconstructions of the pre-glacial Alpine topography suggest high erosion towards low altitudes and formation of overdeepnenings, in turn indicating an increase of local relief in response to glacial processes. Based on sediment record, low-temperature thermochronology and burial cosmogenic nuclide dating, it has also been proposed that the mid-Pleistocene climatic transition from symmetric, 40kyr to asymmetric, 100kyr glacial/interglacial oscillations sets the onset of intense glacial erosion within the Alps. However, this climate threshold in glacial erosion has not been showed in other orogens, and positive feedbacks between climate periodicity and glacial erosion efficiency still remain to be proven. Numerical modeling provides estimates of the patterns and magnitudes of glacial erosion through time. Modeling results on an advanced reconstruction of the pre-glacial topography and the

  10. Radiolarian artificial neural network based paleo sea surface water temperature and salinity changes during the last glacial cycle in the Timor Sea, Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S. M.; Malmgren, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    The western Pacific water enters into the Timor Sea (tropical Indian Ocean) by the thermohaline conveyor belt, and this region is under the influence of the SW monsoon. The higher precipitation during the monsoon rains lower the surface salinity in the north-eastern Indian Ocean towards the Bay of Bengal; whereas, the Arabian Sea remains highly saline due to higher evaporation in the region surrounding Arabian deserts. The salinity contrast in the northern Indian Ocean is very unique, and the radiolarian micro-zooplanktons living in the surface water serve a very good proxy for the monsoonal changes in the surface sea-water temperature (SST) and salinity in the geological past. We studied radiolarian faunal variation in the core MD01-2378, located at ~13oS and ~121oE (1783 m water depth), at the inlet of the thermohaline circulation into the Timor Sea. We applied the modern radiolarian based artificial neural networks (ANNs) (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009) to derive the SST and salinity during August-October for the last 140 ka (the full last glacial cycle). Based on the mean estimates of the 10 ANNs, the root mean square error in prediction (RMSEP) for SST is ~1.4oC with correlation between observed and estimated values r=0.98 (Gupta and Malmgren, 2009). Similarly, the RMSEP is 0.3 psu (r=0.94) for the salinity estimates. We derived paleo-SSTs and salinity values using modern radiolarian ANNs and the fossil radiolarian data generated from the core for the last 140-ka (Fig.1). The age model of the core is based on δ18O benthic oxygen isotope stratigraphy and 21 AMS 14C ages up to ~30-ka (Holbourn et al., 2005). Paleo SST-summer varied between 22-28.5oC, and it is in very good agreement with the δ18O benthic record of Holbourn et al. (2005) defining the Last Glacial Maximum (~24 ka) and the Eemian (~125 ka) stages. The salinity fluctuated between 34-35 psu, and compared well with oxygen isotope record representing the LGM and Eemian periods. We gratefully acknowledge

  11. Phase Relations Between Gulf of Mexico SST and High-Latitude Climate During the Last Glacial Cycle: Implications for Tropical Climate Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Hastings, D. W.; Hollander, D. J.; Hill, H. W.; Lodico, J.; Quinn, T. M.

    2003-04-01

    As part of the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool (WHWP), the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is an important part of the tropical heat engine and a major source of heat and moisture to the North American continent and the higher latitudes. Laminated Orca Basin on the Louisiana slope in the northern GOM provides a unique, high-resolution record of WHWP sea-surface temperature (SST) for comparison to Greenland and Antarctic climate records. Our group is investigating phase relations between GOM SST and high-latitude climate throughout the last glacial cycle, including key intervals within (a) marine isotope stage (MIS) 3, (b) the last deglaciation, and (c) the Holocene. During MIS 3, new paired δ18O and Mg/Ca data on the planktic foraminifer (Globigerinoides, ruber) from R/V Marion, Dufresne core MD02-2551 indicate substantial SST and δ18Oseawater variability associated with Dansgaard-Oeschger events 7 and 8, as well as Heinrich Event 4. In particular, δ18Oseawater estimates suggest episodic Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) meltwater input to the GOM. During the last deglaciation, paired δ18O and Mg/Ca data on piston cores EN32-PC4 and -PC6 indicate SST increased from full-glacial values of ˜24^oC at ca. 20-18 ka (calendar years) to >28^oC by ca. 15.5 ka in both cores, including a marked increase of >3^oC from ca. 18-16 ka. This warming appears to coincide with Antarctic warming as recorded by Byrd δ18O (Johnsen et al., 1972; Bender et al., 1994; Blunier and Brook, 2001) and clearly precedes Greenland warming during the Bølling/Allerød based on the GISP2 ice core records (Grootes et al., 1993). Furthermore, Mg-SST can be subtracted from Gs., ruber δ18O to isolate δ18Oseawater, which refines estimates of LIS meltwater variations. The results indicate a peak in meltwater input from ca. 14.5-13 ka, close to the timing of Bølling/Allerød warming and encompassing meltwater pulse 1A. Finally, our preliminary Holocene results from R/V Marion, Dufresne core MD02-2550 indicate

  12. Impact of glacial/interglacial changes in water column geochemistry on the diagenetic cycling of barium in Black Sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasten, S.; Henkel, S.; Mogollón, J. M.; Nöthen, K.; Franke, C.; Bogus, K.; Robin, E.; Bahr, A.; Blumenberg, M.; Pape, T.; Seifert, R.; Marz, C.; De Lange, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Changes in depositional conditions and redox environment over time affect biogeochemical processes in the seabed and in this way control the variable and selective preservation, alteration and formation of various sediment constituents and attributes - including particulate organic matter, mineral assemblages and magnetic properties. As many of these solid-phase compounds are used as paleo-environmental tracers or stratigraphic tools an assessment of diagenetic influences on the sedimentary record is crucial for accurate environmental reconstructions. We present an integrated approach of pore-water and solid-phase geochemistry as well as transport reaction modeling for sediments of the Black Sea to assess the biogeochemical history of these deposits with particular emphasis on post-depositional redistribution of barium as a consequence of changes in water column geochemistry and redox (Henkel et al., 2012). High-resolution sedimentary records of major and minor elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Sr, Ti), total organic carbon (TOC), and profiles of pore-water constituents (SO42-, CH4, Ca2+, Ba2+, Mg2+, alkalinity) were obtained for two gravity cores (core 755, 501 m water depth and core 214, 1686 m water depth) from the northwestern Black Sea. The records were examined in order to gain insight into the cycling of Ba in anoxic marine sediments characterized by a shallow sulfate-methane transition (SMT) as well as the applicability of barite as a primary productivity proxy in such a setting. The Ba records are strongly overprinted by diagenetic barite (BaSO4) remobilization and precipitation; authigenic Ba enrichments were found at both sites at and slightly above the current SMT. Transport reaction modeling was applied to simulate the migration of the SMT during the changing geochemical conditions after the Holocene seawater intrusion into the Black Sea. Based on this, sediment intervals affected by diagenetic Ba redistribution were identified. Results reveal that the intense

  13. Solar Influence on Recurring Global, Decadal, Climate Cycles Recorded by Glacial Fluctuations, Ice Cores, Sea Surface Temperatures, and Historic Measurements Over the Past Millennium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easterbrook, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Global, cyclic, decadal, climate patterns can be traced over the past millennium in glacier fluctuations, oxygen isotope ratios in ice cores, sea surface temperatures, and historic observations. The recurring climate cycles clearly show that natural climatic warming and cooling have occurred many times, long before increases in anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 levels. The Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age are well known examples of such climate changes, but in addition, at least 23 periods of climatic warming and cooling have occurred in the past 500 years. Each period of warming or cooling lasted about 25-30 years (average 27 years). Two cycles of global warming and two of global cooling have occurred during the past century, and the global cooling that has occurred since 1998 is exactly in phase with the long term pattern. Global cooling occurred from 1880 to ~1915; global warming occurred from ~1915 to ~1945; global cooling occurred from ~1945-1977;, global warming occurred from 1977 to 1998; and global cooling has occurred since 1998. All of these global climate changes show exceptionally good correlation with solar variation since the Little Ice Age 400 years ago. The IPCC predicted global warming of 0.6° C (1° F) by 2011 and 1.2° C (2° F) by 2038, whereas Easterbrook (2001) predicted the beginning of global cooling by 2007 (± 3-5 yrs) and cooling of about 0.3-0.5° C until ~2035. The predicted cooling seems to have already begun. Recent measurements of global temperatures suggest a gradual cooling trend since 1998 and 2007-2008 was a year of sharp global cooling. The cooling trend will likely continue as the sun enters a cycle of lower irradiance and the Pacific Ocean changed from its warm mode to its cool mode. Comparisons of historic global climate warming and cooling, glacial fluctuations, changes in warm/cool mode of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), and sun spot activity over the past century

  14. Responses of ocean circulation and carbon cycle to changes in the position of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies at Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Völker, Christoph; Köhler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We explore the impact of a latitudinal shift in the westerly wind belt over the Southern Ocean on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and on the carbon cycle for Last Glacial Maximum background conditions using a state-of-the-art ocean general circulation model. We find that a southward (northward) shift in the westerly winds leads to an intensification (weakening) of no more than 10% of the AMOC. This response of the ocean physics to shifting winds agrees with other studies starting from preindustrial background climate, but the responsible processes are different. In our setup changes in AMOC seemed to be more pulled by upwelling in the south than pushed by downwelling in the north, opposite to what previous studies with different background climate are suggesting. The net effects of the changes in ocean circulation lead to a rise in atmospheric pCO2 of less than 10 μatm for both northward and southward shift in the winds. For northward shifted winds the zone of upwelling of carbon- and nutrient-rich waters in the Southern Ocean is expanded, leading to more CO2outgassing to the atmosphere but also to an enhanced biological pump in the subpolar region. For southward shifted winds the upwelling region contracts around Antarctica, leading to less nutrient export northward and thus a weakening of the biological pump. These model results do not support the idea that shifts in the westerly wind belt play a dominant role in coupling atmospheric CO2 rise and Antarctic temperature during deglaciation suggested by the ice core data. PMID:26074663

  15. Post-glacial inflation-deflation cycles, tilting, and faulting in the Yellowstone Caldera based on Yellowstone Lake shorelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Cannon, Kenneth P.; Meyer, Grant A.; Trebesch, Matthew J.; Watts, Raymond D.

    2002-01-01

    by a ~5 m rise in lake level to S2. The lowest generally recognizable shoreline is S2. It is ~5 m above datum (3 m above S1) and is ~8 ka, as dated on both sides of the outlet. Yellowstone Lake and the river near Fishing Bridge were 5-6 m below their present level about 3-4 ka, as indicated by 14C ages from submerged beach deposits, drowned valleys, and submerged Yellowstone River gravels. Thus, the lake in the outlet region has been below or near its present level for about half the time since a 1 km-thick icecap melted from the Yellowstone Lake basin about 16 ka. The amplitude of two rises in lake and river level can be estimated based on the altitude of Le Hardys Rapids, indicators of former lake and river levels, and reconstruction of the river gradient from the outlet to Le Hardys Rapids. Both between ~9.5 ka and ~8.5 ka, and after ~3 ka, Le Hardys Rapids (LHR) was uplifted about 8 meters above the outlet, suggesting a cyclic deformation process. Older possible rises in lake level are suggested by locations where the ~10.7 ka S4 truncates older shorelines, and valleys truncated by the ~12.6 ka S5 shoreline. Using these controls, a plot of lake level through time shows 5-7 millennial-scale oscillations since 14.5 ka. Major cycles of inflation and deflation are thousands of years long. Le Hardys Rapids has twice been uplifted ~8 m relative to the lake outlet. These two locations span only the central 25% of the historic caldera doming, so that if we use historic doming as a model, total projected uplift would be ~32 m. This ?heavy breathing? of the central part of the Yellowstone caldera may reflect a combination of several possible processes: magmatic inflation, tectonic stretching and deflation, and hydrothermal fluid sealing and inflation followed by cracking of the seal, pressure release, and deflation. Over the entire postglacial period, subsidence has balanced or slightly exceeded uplift as shown by older shorelines that descend towards the caldera axis. We

  16. Mid-ocean ridge eruptions as a climate valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstoy, Maya

    2015-03-01

    Seafloor eruption rates and mantle melting fueling eruptions may be influenced by sea level and crustal loading cycles at scales from fortnightly to 100 kyr. Recent mid-ocean ridge eruptions occur primarily during neap tides and the first 6 months of the year, suggesting sensitivity to minor changes in tidal forcing and orbital eccentricity. An ~100 kyr periodicity in fast-spreading seafloor bathymetry and relatively low present-day eruption rates at a time of high sea level and decreasing orbital eccentricity suggest a longer-term sensitivity to sea level and orbital variations associated with Milankovitch cycles. Seafloor spreading is considered a small but steady contributor of CO2 to climate cycles on the 100 kyr time scale; however, this assumes a consistent short-term eruption rate. Pulsing of seafloor volcanic activity may feed back into climate cycles, possibly contributing to glacial/interglacial cycles, the abrupt end of ice ages, and dominance of the 100 kyr cycle.

  17. Sedimentary Environment and Climate Evolution at the Northern Continental Margin of the South China Sea During the Last Glacial Cycle and Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Kaiser, J.; Borowka, R. K.; Chen, H.; Zhang, J.; Harff, J.; Qiu, Y.; Witkowski, A.

    2014-12-01

    Climate, oceanographic and sea level history during last glacial cycle (LGC) and Holocene at the NW continental margin of the South China Sea (SCS) are investigated within the SECEB project. For that purpose two sediment cores (HDQ2 & 83PC) and single-channel seismic sections were selected to serve as a proxy data source for paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic reconstructions. The sedimentary facies is interpreted by multi-proxy approaches considering micropaleontological, sedimentological and geochemical analyses. According to 14C and OSL datings, sediments of shallow water drill core HDQ2 (88.3 m) cover a time span of ca. 115 kyr BP. Seismic images of the sampling site show a series of reflectors which can be correlated with coarse layers of core HDQ2. These layers are interpreted as transgression / regression horizons. Due to the age model it is possible to correlate these horizons with the general sea level dynamics within the SCS as it is displayed in relative sea level excursions for the MIS 5 to 2 from the Sunda Shelf (Hanebuth et al. 2011). Core 83PC (8.6 m) retrieved from the continental slope provide constant record and calm environment. Therefore, this core is used as a source for data proxy for environmental reconstructions. According to δ18O and paleomagnetic analysis, a good age model which indicate age of this core to ca. 110 kyr BP was elaborated and help correlate the paleoenvironmental data with core HDQ2. Alkenones, δ18O, the Mg/Ca ratio, and microfossil proxies serve for paleo-SST curves and monsoon variability reconstructions. δ15N and δ13C indicate nutrient supply to the marine environment. Diatomological analysis outlines the environmental evolution and interrelations between their parameters during the LGC. Interpretation of seismic profiling allowed identification of submarine paleo-delta. It's anticipated that deposited sediments descent from the Hainan Island and allow correlation of the source and sink area.Hanebuth, T.J.J, Voris, H

  18. Vegetation, climate and fire-dynamics in East Africa inferred from the Maundi crater pollen record from Mt Kilimanjaro during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, Lisa; Hemp, Andreas; Zech, Wolfgang; Behling, Hermann

    2012-04-01

    The pollen, charcoal and sedimentological record from the Maundi crater, located at 2780 m elevation on the south-eastern slope of Mt Kilimanjaro, is one of the longest terrestrial records in equatorial East Africa, giving an interesting insight into the vegetation and climate dynamics back to the early last Glacial period. Our sediment record has a reliable chronology until 42 ka BP. An extrapolation of the age-depth model, as well as matching with other palaeo-records from tropical East Africa, suggest a total age of about 90 ka BP at the bottom of the record. During the last Glacial the distribution as well as the composition of the vegetation belts classified as colline savanna, submontane woodland, montane forest, ericaceous belt, and alpine vegetation changed. The early last Glacial is characterized by high amounts of Poaceae and Asteraceae pollen suggesting a climatically dry but stable phase. Based on the absence of pollen grains in samples deposited around 70 ka BP, we assume the occurrence of distinct drought periods. During the pre-LGM (Last Glacial Maximum) a higher taxa diversity of the ericaceous and montane zone is recorded and suggests a spread of forest and shrub vegetation, thus indicating a more humid period. The taxa diversity increases steadily during the recorded time span. The decent of vegetation zones indicate dry and cold conditions during the LGM and seem to have been detrimental for many taxa, especially those of the forest vegetation; however, the early last Glacial seems to have been markedly drier than the LGM. The reappearance of most of the taxa (most importantly Alchemilla, Araliaceae, Dodonea, Hagenia, Ilex, Myrsine, Moraceae, Piperaceae) during the deglacial and Holocene period suggest a shift into humid conditions. An increase in ferns and the decrease in grasses during the Holocene also indicate increasing humidity. Fire played an important role in controlling the development and elevation of the ericaceous zone and the tree

  19. Glacial-Interglacial changes in silicon cycling in the subarctic North Pacific: Insights from diatom δ30Si over Termination 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevenell, A.; Emerson, S. R.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Swann, G.; Jaccard, S.

    2009-12-01

    Subarctic North Pacific Ocean paleoceanographic records reveal a breakdown of glacial surface and deepwater stratification and an increase in biogenic opal flux during each of the large deglaciations since the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (2.7 Ma). The North Pacific oceanographic and biogenic changes are similar to those observed in the Southern Ocean, suggesting a potential role for the North Pacific in regulating glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. To better understand the role of North Pacific ventilation and biological productivity in glacial-interglacial climate variability, we generated a detailed silicon isotope (δ30Si; a proxy for the extent of dissolved silicon depletion in surface waters) record from biogenic opal across Termination 1 (20-9 ka) at ODP Site 882 in the western North Pacific (50°21’N, 167°35’E; water depth: 3244 m). At present, Site 882 is situated in an iron limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyl region of the North Pacific. The δ30Si data range between 0.04-1.54‰ with the lowest isotopic values occurring between 25 and 15 ka, when opal accumulation rates are relatively low. A 1‰ increase in δ30Si occurs between 15.3 and 14.3 ka, coincident with an increase in opal accumulation rates and the arrival of more oxygenated deep waters to Site 882. However, the increase in δ30Si begins 1500 years before the abrupt increase in opal accumulation associated with the onset of the Bolling/Allerod (B/A). Elevated δ30Si values characterize the deglacial interval between 14.4 and 10.3 ka, but decline progressively after reaching a peak value (1.54‰) at 13 ka. Holocene δ30Si values are ~1‰. Our results may reflect an increase in the percent drawdown of available silicic acid during the last glacial maximum resulting from stratification of regional surface waters and/or the addition of iron-rich dust. Low glacial δ30Si values at Site 882 and the abrupt increase at the B/A may relate to a change in regional source

  20. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, D.

    2015-05-01

    A two-dimensional model of a sediment column, with Darcy fluid flow, biological and thermal methane production, and permafrost and methane hydrate formation, is subjected to glacial-interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to the cold atmosphere during glacial times and immersing it in the ocean in interglacial times. The glacial cycles are followed by a "long-tail" 100 kyr warming due to fossil fuel combustion. The salinity of the sediment column in the interior of the shelf can be decreased by hydrological forcing to depths well below sea level when the sediment is exposed to the atmosphere. There is no analogous advective seawater-injecting mechanism upon resubmergence, only slower diffusive mechanisms. This hydrological ratchet is consistent with the existence of freshwater beneath the sea floor on continental shelves around the world, left over from the last glacial period. The salt content of the sediment column affects the relative proportions of the solid and fluid H2O-containing phases, but in the permafrost zone the salinity in the pore fluid brine is a function of temperature only, controlled by equilibrium with ice. Ice can tolerate a higher salinity in the pore fluid than methane hydrate can at low pressure and temperature, excluding methane hydrate from thermodynamic stability in the permafrost zone. The implication is that any methane hydrate existing today will be insulated from anthropogenic climate change by hundreds of meters of sediment, resulting in a response time of thousands of years. The strongest impact of the glacial-interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is due to bubbles dissolving in the ocean when sea level is high. When sea level is low and the sediment surface is exposed to the atmosphere, the atmospheric flux is sensitive to whether permafrost inhibits bubble migration in the model. If it does, the atmospheric flux is highest during the glaciating, sea level regression (soil

  1. Orbital forcing of glacial/interglacial variations in chemical weathering and silicon cycling within the upper White Nile basin, East Africa: Stable-isotope and biomarker evidence from Lakes Victoria and Edward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockerton, Helen E.; Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Barker, Philip A.; Leng, Melanie J.; Sloane, Hilary J.; Ficken, Katherine J.

    2015-12-01

    On Quaternary time scales, the global biogeochemical cycle of silicon is interlocked with the carbon cycle through biotic enhancement of silicate weathering and uptake of dissolved silica by vascular plants and aquatic microalgae (notably diatoms, for which Si is an essential nutrient). Large tropical river systems dominate the export of Si from the continents to the oceans. Here, we investigate variations in Si cycling in the upper White Nile basin over the last 15 ka, using sediment cores from Lakes Victoria and Edward. Coupled measurements of stable O and Si isotopes on diatom separates were used to reconstruct past changes in lake hydrology and Si cycling, while the abundances of lipid biomarkers characteristic of terrestrial/emergent higher plants, submerged/floating aquatic macrophytes and freshwater algae document past ecosystem changes. During the late-glacial to mid-Holocene, 15-5.5 ka BP, orbital forcing greatly enhanced monsoon rainfall, forest cover and chemical weathering. Riverine inputs of dissolved silica from the lake catchments exceeded aquatic demand and may also have had lower Si-isotope values. Since 5.5 ka BP, increasingly dry climates and more open vegetation, reinforced by the spread of agricultural cropland over the last 3-4 ka, have reduced dissolved silica inputs into the lakes. Centennial-to millennial-scale dry episodes are also evident in the isotopic records and merit further investigation.

  2. Observational and Model Constraints on Glacial Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, T. A.; Enkelmann, E.; Yanites, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying the controls on glacial erosion over geologic timescales is necessary to understand the role of Cenozoic climate change on the development of modern mountain belts. Unfortunately, understanding the spatial distribution of glacial erosion during repeated glaciations has proven difficult. We present results that integrate bedrock and detrital thermochronometer cooling ages with a glacial landscape evolution model. We use this to quantify the spatial distribution and temporal variability of glacial erosion in the Coast Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. A total of 100 apatite (U-Th)/He and 106 fission track single grain ages are presented from modern outwash of the Tiedemann Glacier whose catchment elevations range from 530-3960 m a.s.l.. Detrital thermochronometer ages utilize the tendency of thermochronometer cooling ages to increase with elevation and provide a sediment tracer for the elevation that eroded sediment is derived from. Bedrock ages used include 79 apatite (U-Th)/He ages collected in multiple catchments. Erosion rates derived from bedrock ages are compared to predicted erosion rates from a shallow-ice approximation glacial landscape evolution model of the region. Results from the observed distribution of detrital ages indicate that maximum glacial erosion occurs between elevations of 1200-1800m. Furthermore, near-uniform erosion is documented beneath the glacier with nearly all sediment derived from between elevations of 650- 3000 m a.s.l. Second, comparison of erosion rates derived from bedrock thermochronometer ages with the landscape evolution model suggest that a linear glacial sliding velocity is the primary control on erosion (r2=0.6). This result is important as it provides observational validation of the linear slide velocity erosion rule for million-year timescales. Finally, comparison of model and thermochronometer derived erosion rates reveals that active subglacial erosion occurs for only ~10-20% of a glacial-interglacial cycle

  3. Chilean and Southeast Pacific paleoclimate variations during the last glacial cycle: directly correlated pollen and δ18O records from ODP Site 1234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusser, Linda; Heusser, Cal; Mix, Alan; McManus, Jerry

    2006-12-01

    Joint pollen and oxygen isotope data from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1234 in the southeast Pacific provide the first, continuous record of temperate South American vegetation and climate from the last 140 ka. Located at ˜36°S, ˜65 km offshore of Concepcion, Chile, Site 1234 monitors the climatic transition zone between northern semi-arid, summer dry-winter wet climate and southern year-round, rainy, cool temperate climate. Dominance of onshore winds suggests that pollen preserved here reflects transport to the ocean via rivers that drain the region and integrate conditions from the coastal mountains to the Andean foothills. Down-hole changes in diagnostic pollen assemblages from xeric lowland deciduous forest (characterized by grasses, herbs, ferns, and trees such as deciduous beech, Nothofagus obliqua), mesic Valdivian Evergreen Forest (including conifers such as the endangered Prumnopitys andina), and Subantarctic Evergreen Rainforest (comprised primarily of southern beech, N. dombeyi) reveal large rapid shifts that likely reflect latitudinal movements in atmospheric circulation and storm tracks associated with the southern westerly winds. During glacial intervals (MIS 2-4, and 6), rainforests and parkland dominated by Nothofagus moved northward into the region. At the MIS 6/5e transition, coeval with the rapid shift to lower isotopic values, rainforest vegetation was rapidly replaced by xeric plant communities associated with Mediterranean-type climate. An increased prominence of halophytic vegetation suggests that MIS 5e was more arid and possibly warmer than MIS 1. Although rainforest pollen rises again at the end of MIS 5e, lowland deciduous forest pollen persists through MIS 5d and 5c, into MIS 5b. Substantial millennial-scale variations occur in both interglacial and glacial regimes, attesting to the sensitivity of the southern westerly belt to climate change. Comparison of the cool, mesic N. dombeyi rainforest assemblage from Site 1234 with δ18O in

  4. Multiple Glacial Advance and Retreat Cycles Preserved in Yakutat Bay, Southern Alaska: Potential for Constraining Cordilleran Ice Sheet and Southern Alaskan Climate Histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, B. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Powell, R. D.; Jaeger, J. M.; Cowan, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    Determining the timing and extent of past advances of temperate tidewater glaciers can be difficult. However, identifying and constraining such advances in the sedimentary record is necessary for understanding local, regional or global climate change. Disenchantment and Yakutat Bays fronting the Hubbard Glacier, southern Alaska, were the focus of two geophysical surveys in 2004. These studies aimed to more accurately determine the history of sediment fluxes, advances and retreats of Hubbard Glacier, and how these processes may relate to climatic oscillations. One survey collected high-resolution, deep-tow boomer (Huntec) sub-bottom profiles and piston cores, whereas the other survey recorded a high-resolution, deeper penetrating (ca.3600ms vs. ca.100ms TWT with boomer), single GI-gun profile up Yakutat and Disenchantment Bays as well as swath maps with associated Chirp profiles, and jumbo piston cores. Together, the data provide a better understanding of Late Quaternary to Holocene sedimentation of the area. The Huntec record is valuable when evaluating Holocene sedimentary fluxes and processes. Several facies occur within the record, which have been interpreted as representing sediment debris flows and turbidity currents. This record also demonstrates the extent and frequency of large scale flooding events within the bay, such as those recorded in 1986 and 2002. Multiple glacial advance/retreat sequences have been interpreted from the GI-gun profile. Each sequence is primarily recognized by an unconformity (Glacial Erosion Surface) that is commonly overlain by 3 seismic facies. The basal ice-contact facies, which also commonly include morainal bank forms, has low-amplitude, chaotic reflections. The middle facies has slightly stratified to hummocky reflections interpreted as ice-proximal facies. The upper facies has highly stratified, continuous, high frequency reflections representing ice-distal conditions. Two or more retrogressive retreat sequences occur up

  5. The silicon isotope composition of Ethmodiscus rex laminated diatom mats from the tropical West Pacific: Implications for silicate cycling during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhifang; Li, Tiegang; Algeo, Thomas; Doering, Kristin; Frank, Martin; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Chang, Fengming; Opfergelt, Sophie; Crosta, Xavier; Jiang, Fuqing; Wan, Shiming; Zhai, Bin

    2015-07-01

    The cause of massive blooms of Ethmodiscus rex laminated diatom mats (LDMs) in the eastern Philippine Sea (EPS) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) remains uncertain. In order to better understand the mechanism of formation of E. rex LDMs from the perspective of dissolved silicon (DSi) utilization, we determined the silicon isotopic composition of single E. rex diatom frustules (δ30SiE. rex) from two sediment cores in the Parece Vela Basin of the EPS. In the study cores, δ30SiE. rex varies from -1.23‰ to -0.83‰ (average -1.04‰), a range that is atypical of marine diatom δ30Si and that corresponds to the lower limit of reported diatom δ30Si values of any age. A binary mixing model (upwelled silicon versus eolian silicon) accounting for silicon isotopic fractionation during DSi uptake by diatoms was constructed. The binary mixing model demonstrates that E. rex dominantly utilized DSi from eolian sources (i.e., Asian dust) with only minor contributions from upwelled seawater sources (i.e., advected from Subantarctic Mode Water, Antarctic Intermediate Water, or North Pacific Intermediate Water). E. rex utilized only ~24% of available DSi, indicating that surface waters of the EPS were eutrophic with respect to silicon during the LGM. Our results suggest that giant diatoms did not always use a buoyancy strategy to obtain nutrients from the deep nutrient pool, thus revising previously proposed models for the formation of E. rex LDMs.

  6. Evolution of salt diapir and karst morphology during the last glacial cycle: Effects of sea-level oscillation, diapir and regional uplift, and erosion (Persian Gulf, Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruthans, Jiří; Filippi, Michal; Zare, Mohammad; Churáčková, Zdenka; Asadi, Naser; Fuchs, Markus; Adamovič, Jiří

    2010-09-01

    Marine, fluvial and cave sediments, and karst phenomena were studied and dated by 14C, U-series, and OSL methods to determine the evolution of the Namakdan diapir and the world's longest salt cave (3N Cave) during the Holocene and the Last Glacial. Sea-level oscillations, the uplift rate of the diapir and its surroundings, and erosion are the main factors influencing the diapir morphology. Although the diapir uplift rate has been constant for the last 50 kyr (˜ 4 mm/yr at a distance 600 m from the diapir edge), the uplift rate decreases with the distance from the diapir center. Drag-induced host rock deformation extends for ˜ 300 m from the outside edge of the diapir, and host rocks in this zone have an uplift rate of 0.4-0.6 mm/yr, which is 2-3 times greater than the regional uplift rate. Based on known sea-level oscillations, radiometric dating, and geological evidence, the Namakdan diapir was repeatedly flooded by sea water between 130 and 80 kyr BP. Submarine residuum composed mainly of gypsum and dolomite formed cap rock on the diapir. After ˜ 80 kyr BP, surficial drainage network and karst development started. Blind valleys and their corresponding cave systems evolved continuously for ˜ 20-30 kyr. Between 9 and 6 cal kyr BP the rate of sea-level rise exceeded the Namakdan diapir uplift rate by the factor of 3. As a consequence upward incision of cave streams (paragenetic trend) occurred, and blind valleys near the seashore were filled with gravels. Cave passages now accessible on the Namakdan and Hormoz diapirs started to form 3-6 cal kyr BP when sea level stabilized and downward stream incision began. Older cave levels are still preserved but are filled with sediments and salt precipitates. A comparison of the Namakdan diapir evolution with data from the Hormoz and Larak diapirs shows that the evolution of diapir morphology is strongly affected by the differences in uplift rates and geological settings. The general scheme of the evolution of the Namakdan

  7. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Archer, D.

    2015-05-21

    A two-dimensional model of a sediment column, with Darcy fluid flow, biological and thermal methane production, and permafrost and methane hydrate formation, is subjected to glacial–interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to the cold atmosphere during glacial times and immersing it in the ocean in interglacial times. The glacial cycles are followed by a "long-tail" 100 kyr warming due to fossil fuel combustion. The salinity of the sediment column in the interior of the shelf can be decreased by hydrological forcing to depths well below sea level when the sediment is exposed to the atmosphere. Theremore » is no analogous advective seawater-injecting mechanism upon resubmergence, only slower diffusive mechanisms. This hydrological ratchet is consistent with the existence of freshwater beneath the sea floor on continental shelves around the world, left over from the last glacial period. The salt content of the sediment column affects the relative proportions of the solid and fluid H2O-containing phases, but in the permafrost zone the salinity in the pore fluid brine is a function of temperature only, controlled by equilibrium with ice. Ice can tolerate a higher salinity in the pore fluid than methane hydrate can at low pressure and temperature, excluding methane hydrate from thermodynamic stability in the permafrost zone. The implication is that any methane hydrate existing today will be insulated from anthropogenic climate change by hundreds of meters of sediment, resulting in a response time of thousands of years. The strongest impact of the glacial–interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is due to bubbles dissolving in the ocean when sea level is high. When sea level is low and the sediment surface is exposed to the atmosphere, the atmospheric flux is sensitive to whether permafrost inhibits bubble migration in the model. If it does, the atmospheric flux is highest during the glaciating, sea level regression

  8. Quaternary evolution of glaciated gneiss terrains: pre-glacial weathering vs. glacial erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbendam, Maarten; Bradwell, Tom

    2014-07-01

    Vast areas previously covered by Pleistocene ice sheets consist of rugged bedrock-dominated terrain of innumerable knolls and lake-filled rock basins - the ‘cnoc-and-lochan' landscape or ‘landscape of areal scour'. These landscapes typically form on gneissose or granitic lithologies and are interpreted (1) either to be the result of strong and widespread glacial erosion over numerous glacial cycles; or (2) formed by stripping of a saprolitic weathering mantle from an older, deeply weathered landscape. We analyse bedrock structure, erosional landforms and weathering remnants and within the ‘cnoc-and-lochan' gneiss terrain of a rough peneplain in NW Scotland and compare this with a geomorphologically similar gneiss terrain in a non-glacial, arid setting (Namaqualand, South Africa). We find that the topography of the gneiss landscapes in NW Scotland and Namaqualand closely follows the old bedrock-saprolite contact (weathering front). The roughness of the weathering front is caused by deep fracture zones providing a highly irregular surface area for weathering to proceed. The weathering front represents a significant change in bedrock physical properties. Glacial erosion (and aeolian erosion in Namaqualand) is an efficient way of stripping saprolite, but is far less effective in eroding hard, unweathered bedrock. Significant glacial erosion of hard gneiss probably only occurs beneath palaeo-ice streams. We conclude that the rough topography of glaciated ‘cnoc-and-lochan' gneiss terrains is formed by a multistage process: 1) Long-term, pre-glacial chemical weathering, forming deep saprolite with an irregular weathering front; 2) Stripping of weak saprolite by glacial erosion during the first glaciation(s), resulting in a rough land surface, broadly conforming to the pre-existing weathering front (‘etch surface'); 3) Further modification of exposed hard bedrock by glacial erosion. In most areas, glacial erosion is limited, but can be significant beneath palaeo

  9. Concurrent and opposed environmental trends during the last glacial cycle between the Carpathian Basin and the Black Sea coast: evidence from high resolution enviromagnetic loess records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, Ulrich; Zeeden, Christian; Veres, Daniel; Obreht, Igor; Bösken, Janina; Marković, Slobodan B.; Eckmeier, Eileen; Fischer, Peter; Lehmkuhl, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Danube Basin near to the Black Sea (Urluia quarry, Dobrogea, Romania). In order to investigate the potential of Danubian loess in recording millennial-scale palaeoclimate variability, a 22 m deep drill-core from the Titel loess plateau and a more than 15 metres thick LPSS from the Urluia quarry were contiguously sampled. Both sides provide improved insight into past climate evolution of the regions down to MIS 6. The presentation will focus on the down-core/down-section variability of χ and χfd as environmental proxy parameters. Based on these mineral magnetic proxies we can already draw the following conclusions: 1) The dust accumulation rates in both regions were relatively constant over the past c. 130 kyrs, even during full interglacial conditions. 2) In the studied sections, the pedo-complex S1 represents ± the Eemian and not the entire MIS 5, as previously assumed. 3) There are a lot of similarities between the mineral magnetic records of the Titel-Plateau (Vojvodina, South Carpathian Basin) and the Urluia quarry (Dobrogea, Lower Danube Basin) and also between these records and those from the Chinese Loess Plateau, but also fundamental differences. 4) During the early glacial (end of MIS5) we find no evidence for soil formation in the South Carpathian Basin whereas in the Dobrogea near to the Black Sea coast embryonic soils developed. On the contrary, during the younger part of MIS 3 (≤ 40 ka) near to the Black Sea coast soil humidity sharply decreased towards the LGM whereas in the South Carpathian Basin the mineral magnetic proxies indicate a relative maximum in pedogenesis/soil humidity. Sedimentological, geochemical, geochronological and palaeomagnetic investigations are in progress. They will provide further high quality data sets leading to an improved understanding of the Late Pleistocene environmental evolution in the Danube Basin.

  10. Glacial integrative modelling.

    PubMed

    Ganopolski, Andrey

    2003-09-15

    Understanding the mechanisms of past climate changes requires modelling of the complex interaction between all major components of the Earth system: atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. This paper reviews attempts at such an integrative approach to modelling climate changes during the glacial age. In particular, the roles of different factors in shaping glacial climate are compared based on the results of simulations with an Earth-system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2. It is shown that ice sheets, changes in atmospheric compositions, vegetation cover, and reorganization of the ocean thermohaline circulation play important roles in glacial climate changes. Another example of this approach is the modelling of two major types of abrupt glacial climate changes: Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. Our results corroborate some of the early proposed mechanisms, which relate abrupt climate changes to the internal instability of the ocean thermohaline circulation and ice sheets. At the same time, it is shown that realistic representation of the temporal evolution of the palaeoclimatic background is crucial to simulate observed features of the glacial abrupt climate changes. PMID:14558899

  11. In-Stream Metabolism Differences Between Glacial and Non-Glacial Streams in Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassry, M. Q.; Scott, D.; Vermilyea, A.; Hood, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    As glacier ice gives way to successional vegetation, streams located in glacier-containing watersheds receive decreased contributions from glacial meltwater and increased contributions from terrestrial landscapes. These changes result in increased water temperature, increased shading from vegetation, and changes in the composition and concentration of organic matter delivered to the stream from the landscape. Organic matter and source water contributions from the surrounding landscape can influence in-stream metabolism through both biotic and abiotic factors. The impact of these landscape controls on the in-stream cycling of carbon and nutrients is not well understood in glacial systems. Here, we are focusing on understanding the differences in processing of organic carbon by heterotrophic microbial communities between glacial and non-glacial streams. In this study, the metabolism in streams receiving glacial meltwater was compared to the metabolism of streams located in nearby non-glaciated watersheds to determine the effect of changing inputs of glacial meltwater on stream metabolism. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that decreased inputs of glacier meltwater will result in increased net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) in coastal streams in southeast Alaska. Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide measurements as well as temperature and PAR values were collected at 10-minute increments at each study site for 4 days. This data was used to generate diel curves to establish community respiration (CR24) and gross primary production (GPP) estimates. Lab-scale mesocosms containing sediment and stream water from each end-member stream were used to quantify the relative importance of glacial contributions to respiration rates in the surface sediments. Ultimately, this will provide a better understanding of the changing in-stream processing capabilities in watersheds affected by land cover changes resulting from glacial recession.

  12. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-03-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H~0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H~1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles.

  13. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard–Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  14. Contrasting scaling properties of interglacial and glacial climates.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhi-Gang; Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Understanding natural climate variability is essential for assessments of climate change. This is reflected in the scaling properties of climate records. The scaling exponents of the interglacial and the glacial climates are fundamentally different. The Holocene record is monofractal, with a scaling exponent H∼0.7. On the contrary, the glacial record is multifractal, with a significantly higher scaling exponent H∼1.2, indicating a longer persistence time and stronger nonlinearities in the glacial climate. The glacial climate is dominated by the strong multi-millennial Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events influencing the long-time correlation. However, by separately analysing the last glacial maximum lacking DO events, here we find the same scaling for that period as for the full glacial period. The unbroken scaling thus indicates that the DO events are part of the natural variability and not externally triggered. At glacial time scales, there is a scale break to a trivial scaling, contrasting the DO events from the similarly saw-tooth-shaped glacial cycles. PMID:26980084

  15. Glacial Geology of Wisconsin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    This publication is a teacher's resource and guidebook for the presentation of the three filmstrips in the "Glacial Geology of Wisconsin" series. The first filmstrip is subtitled, "Evidence of the Glaciers," the second "How the Glaciers Reshaped the Landscape," and the third "Fossils of the Ice Age." Included are a list of objectives, an outline…

  16. Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of the oldest glacial successions in the Himalayan orogen: Ladakh Range, northern India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, L.A.; Caffee, M.W.; Bovard, K.R.; Finkel, R.C.; Sharma, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of moraine boulders and alluvial fan sediments define the timing of five glacial advances over at least the last five glacial cycles in the Ladakh Range of the Transhimalaya. The glacial stages that have been identified are: the Indus Valley glacial stage, dated at older than 430 ka; the Leh glacial stage occurring in the penultimate glacial cycle or older; the Karglacial stage, occurring during the early part of the last glacial cycle; the Bazgo glacial stage, at its maximum during the middle of the last glacial cycle; and the early Holocene Khalling glacial stage. The exposure ages of the Indus Valley moraines are the oldest observed to date throughout the Himalayan orogen. We observe a pattern of progressively more restricted glaciation during the last five glacial cycles, likely indicating a progressive reduction in the moisture supply necessary to sustain glaciation. A possible explanation is that uplift of Himalayan ranges to the south and/or of the Karakoram Mountains to the west of the region may have effectively blocked moisture supply by the south Asian summer monsoon and mid-latitude westerlies, respectively. Alternatively, this pattern of glaciation may reflect a trend of progressively less extensive glaciation in mountain regions that has been observed globally throughout the Pleistocene. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  17. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  18. Rapid Environmental Fluctuations Recorded over the Last Glacial/Interglacial Cycle in the Sediments from Borehole PRGL1-4 (Gulf of Lions; Western Mediterranean) using Radiogenic Isotopes (Sr & Nd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizou, J.

    2015-12-01

    The study of sediments deposited and preserved in oceanic basins unable us to examine how terrigenous sediment supply varied through time in relation to paleoenvironmental and climatic changes on land. The geochemical and isotopic compositions of marine sediment are used to unravel its provenance, and provide information about its formation. Providing that the paleoclimatic frame is known, such data give an insight into the rock-source location and allow us to decipher between genetic processes of mechanical erosion and chemical alteration. Borehole PRGL1-4 (European project PROMESS), located in the Gulf of Lions (W Mediterranean) at 300 mwd, was investigated geochemically at high-temporal resolution over the last glacial/interglacial cycle (i.e. 130 ka) to study sediment-source variations during rapid climate changes. Besides, sediments originating from the Rhône's and the Pyreneo-Languedocian's catchment areas have been analyzed to measure the isotopic composition of five source end-members that are the Alps, the Higher Rhône valley, the Lower Rhône valley, the Languedoc and the Pyrenees. Epsilon Nd and 87Sr/86Sr were measured on 60 samples encompassing 4 marine isotopic stages with an emphasis on Heinrich events. The epsilon Nd values of PRGL1-4 lean towards the Lower Rhône valley unradiogenic end-member during cold stadial intervals, and towards the Alpine radiogenic end-member during warm interstadials. The presence of an ice cap over the crystalline Alpine watershed during cold phases could prevent the sediments originating from this region from reaching the Gulf of Lions. The same pattern is observed during the time of Heinrich events. An influence of the sea level variations on the sedimentation at the borehole site during the Heinrich events is unlikely since they are only 10 to 15 m in amplitude. Furthermore, a major isotopic shift in epsilon Nd mean values is displayed around 40 ka that coincides with the connection of the Durance to the Rhône River

  19. Earth's glacial record and its tectonic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, N.

    1993-09-01

    Glaciations have occurred episodically at different time intervals and for different durations in Earth's history. Ice covers have formed in a wide range of plate tectonic and structural settings but the bulk of Earth's glacial record can be shown to have been deposited and preserved in basins within extensional settings. In such basins, source area uplift and basin subsidence fulfill the tectonic preconditions for the initiation of glaciation and the accomodation and preservation of glaciclastic sediments. Tectonic setting, in particular subsidence rates, also dictates the type of glaciclastic facies and facies successions that are deposited. Many pre-Pleistocene glaciated basins commonly contain well-defined tectonostratigraphic successions recording the interplay of tectonics and sedimentation; traditional climatostratigraphic approaches involving interpretation in terms of either ice advance/retreat cycles or glacio-eustatic sea-level change require revision. The direct record of continental glaciation in Earth history, in the form of classically-recognised continental glacial landforms and "tillites", is meagre; it is probable that more than 95% of the volume of preserved "glacial" strata are glacially-influenced marine deposits that record delivery of large amounts of glaciclastic sediment to offshore basins. This flux has been partially or completely reworked by "normal" sedimentary processes such that the record of glaciation and climate change is recorded in marine successions and is difficult to decipher. The dominant "glacial" facies in the rock record are subaqueous debris flow diamictites and turbidites recording the selective preservation of poorly-sorted glaciclastic sediment deposited in deep water basins by sediment gravity flows. However, these facies are also typical of many non-glacial settings, especially volcanically-influenced environments; numerous Archean and Proterozoic diamictites, described in the older literature as tillites, have no

  20. Early local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacqueline A; Seltzer, Geoffrey O; Farber, Daniel L; Rodbell, Donald T; Finkel, Robert C

    2005-04-29

    The local last glacial maximum in the tropical Andes was earlier and less extensive than previously thought, based on 106 cosmogenic ages (from beryllium-10 dating) from moraines in Peru and Bolivia. Glaciers reached their greatest extent in the last glacial cycle approximately 34,000 years before the present and were retreating by approximately 21,000 years before the present, implying that tropical controls on ice volumes were asynchronous with those in the Northern Hemisphere. Our estimates of snowline depression reflect about half the temperature change indicated by previous widely cited figures, which helps resolve the discrepancy between estimates of terrestrial and marine temperature depression during the last glacial cycle. PMID:15860623

  1. Kennebunk glacial advance: A reappraisal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey W.

    1981-06-01

    Evidence for the Kennebunk glacial advance (readvance) in southwestern Maine is discussed in light of recent geologic mapping. Orientations of glacially produced lineations record the response of ice to major topographic controls and do not indicate glacial readvance. Minor end moraines and large stratified end moraines associated with deformed marine sediments of the Presumpscot Formation occur throughout the southwestern coastal zone. These features outline the general pattern of ice retreat from this part of the coastal zone and suggest that withdrawal of the last ice from southwestern Maine occurred with minor stillstands and local frontal fluctuations but without significant readvance. The Kennebunk glacial advance (readvance) appears to have been one of many local fluctuations of the ice front during general recession, occurring at about 13,200 yr B.P.

  2. The Southern Glacial Maximum 65,000 years ago and its Unfinished Termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joerg M.; Putnam, Aaron E.; Denton, George H.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Birkel, Sean; Doughty, Alice M.; Kelley, Sam; Barrell, David J. A.; Finkel, Robert C.; Winckler, Gisela; Anderson, Robert F.; Ninneman, Ulysses S.; Barker, Stephen; Schwartz, Roseanne; Andersen, Bjorn G.; Schluechter, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Glacial maxima and their terminations provide key insights into inter-hemispheric climate dynamics and the coupling of atmosphere, surface and deep ocean, hydrology, and cryosphere, which is fundamental for evaluating the robustness of earth's climate in view of ongoing climate change. The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼26-19 ka ago) is widely seen as the global cold peak during the last glacial cycle, and its transition to the Holocene interglacial, dubbed 'Termination 1 (T1)', as the most dramatic climate reorganization during this interval. Climate records show that over the last 800 ka, ice ages peaked and terminated on average every 100 ka ('100 ka world'). However, the mechanisms pacing glacial-interglacial transitions remain controversial and in particular the hemispheric manifestations and underlying orbital to regional driving forces of glacial maxima and subsequent terminations remain poorly understood. Here we show evidence for a full glacial maximum in the Southern Hemisphere 65.1 ± 2.7 ka ago and its 'Unfinished Termination'. Our 10Be chronology combined with a model simulation demonstrates that New Zealand's glaciers reached their maximum position of the last glacial cycle during Marine Isotope Stage-4 (MIS-4). Southern ocean and greenhouse gas records indicate coeval peak glacial conditions, making the case for the Southern Glacial Maximum about halfway through the last glacial cycle and only 15 ka after the last warm period (MIS-5a). We present the hypothesis that subsequently, driven by boreal summer insolation forcing, a termination began but remained unfinished, possibly because the northern ice sheets were only moderately large and could not supply enough meltwater to the North Atlantic through Heinrich Stadial 6 to drive a full termination. Yet the Unfinished Termination left behind substantial ice on the northern continents (about 50% of the full LGM ice volume) and after another 45 ka of cooling and ice sheet growth the earth was at inter

  3. A High-Resolution Record of Early Miocene Antarctic Glacial History From Downhole Logs, Site 1165, ODP Leg 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, T.; Barr, S.; Handwerger, D.

    2002-12-01

    ODP Site 1165, located 400 km NW of Prydz Bay, contains the most detailed record yet obtained of Early Miocene Antarctic glacial history. The 520-m-thick Early Miocene consists of dark grey claystone with silt laminae (contourites) alternating with decimeter-scale layers of greenish-grey bioturbated claystone that contain common ice rafted debris (IRD). These sediments are interpreted to record pulses of IRD from the continent, and alternations in the position or strength of the currents at the site. Downhole logs of electrical resistivity, natural gamma radiation, and density also record the alternations between the two facies. Here we assess the lithological significance of the logs by examining the opal, IRD, and susceptibility of two short intervals at high resolution, with samples taken every 10 cm, or about 1250 yr. The IRD-bearing greenish-grey claystone corresponds to higher resistivity and density because of increased cementation by silica, and corresponds to lower natural gamma radiation because of decreased clay content. Thus, using the logs, lithology can be inferred for intervals where no core was recovered. Based mainly on magnetostratigraphy, the age of the base of the hole is 22 Ma, and the sedimentation rate for the Early Miocene about 9 cm/kyr. The regular spacing of the facies alternations in the logs suggests they are astronomically paced. Between 18-20 Ma, the main periodicity is in the precessional range, and between 20-22 Ma, the logs have a saw-toothed form, with a major peak in IRD at the beginning of each, repeating about every 100 kyr. We think that the IRD pulses represent deglaciations. Hence our data suggest that the Antarctic continent, at least around the Prydz Bay region, was glaciated in the Early Miocene, and that the size of the ice sheet oscillated on Milankovitch time scales.

  4. Modeling glacial climates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    North, G. R.; Crowley, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Mathematical climate modelling has matured as a discipline to the point that it is useful in paleoclimatology. As an example a new two dimensional energy balance model is described and applied to several problems of current interest. The model includes the seasonal cycle and the detailed land-sea geographical distribution. By examining the changes in the seasonal cycle when external perturbations are forced upon the climate system it is possible to construct hypotheses about the origin of midlatitude ice sheets and polar ice caps. In particular the model predicts a rather sudden potential for glaciation over large areas when the Earth's orbital elements are only slightly altered. Similarly, the drift of continents or the change of atmospheric carbon dioxide over geological time induces radical changes in continental ice cover. With the advance of computer technology and improved understanding of the individual components of the climate system, these ideas will be tested in far more realistic models in the near future.

  5. Sub-glacial volcanic eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald Edward

    1956-01-01

    The literature on sub-glacial volcanic eruptions and the related flood phenomena has been reviewed as a minor part of the larger problem of convective and conductive heat transfer from intrusive magma. (See Lovering, 1955, for a review of the extensive literature on this subject.) This summary of data on sub-glacial eruptions is part of a program that the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting in connection with its Investigations of Geologic Processes project on behalf of the Division of Research, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission.

  6. Tectonic stress feedback loop explains U-shaped glacial valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2014-03-01

    In the shadow of the Matterhorn, the broad form of the Matter Valley—like so many throughout the Alps—is interrupted by a deep U-shaped glacial trough. Carved into a landscape reflecting millennia of tectonic uplift and river erosion, growing evidence suggests the 100-meter-deep U-shaped groove was produced shortly after a shift toward major cycles of Alpine glaciation almost a million years ago. Subsequent glaciations may have therefore had little effect on the landscape.

  7. Obliquity Control On Southern Hemisphere Climate During The Last Glacial

    PubMed Central

    Fogwill, C.J.; Turney, C.S.M.; Hutchinson, D.K.; Taschetto, A.S.; England, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent. PMID:26115344

  8. Glacial isostatic stress shadowing by the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, E. R.; James, T. S.; Klemann, V.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous examples of fault slip that offset late Quaternary glacial deposits and bedrock polish support the idea that the glacial loading cycle causes earthquakes in the upper crust. A semianalytical scheme is presented for quantifying glacial and postglacial lithospheric fault reactivation using contemporary rock fracture prediction methods. It extends previous studies by considering differential Mogi-von Mises stresses, in addition to those resulting from a Coulomb analysis. The approach utilizes gravitational viscoelastodynamic theory and explores the relationships between ice mass history and regional seismicity and faulting in a segment of East Antarctica containing the great Antarctic Plate (Balleny Island) earthquake of 25 March 1998 (Mw 8.1). Predictions of the failure stress fields within the seismogenic crust are generated for differing assumptions about background stress orientation, mantle viscosity, lithospheric thickness, and possible late Holocene deglaciation for the D91 Antarctic ice sheet history. Similar stress fracture fields are predicted by Mogi-von Mises and Coulomb theory, thus validating previous rebound Coulomb analysis. A thick lithosphere, of the order of 150-240 km, augments stress shadowing by a late melting (middle-late Holocene) coastal East Antarctic ice complex and could cause present-day earthquakes many hundreds of kilometers seaward of the former Last Glacial Maximum grounding line.

  9. Obliquity Control on Southern Hemisphere Climate during the Last Glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwill, C. J.; Hutchinson, D. K.; Turney, C. S.; Taschetto, A.; England, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent paleoclimate reconstructions have challenged the traditional view that Northern Hemisphere insolation and associated feedbacks drove synchronous global climate and ice-sheet volume during the last glacial cycle. Here we focus on the response of the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and demonstrate that its maximum expansion culminated at 28,400 ± 500 years before present (28.4 ± 0.5 ka), more than 5,000 years before the minima in 65°N summer insolation and the formally-defined Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 21,000 ± 2,000 years before present. To investigate the potential drivers of this early LGM (eLGM), we simulate the effects of orbital changes using a suite of climate models incorporating prescribed and evolving sea-ice anomalies. Our analyses suggest that Antarctic sea-ice expansion at 28.5 ka altered the location and intensity of the Southern Hemisphere storm track, triggering regional cooling over Patagonia of 5°C that extends across the wider mid-southern latitudes. In contrast, at the LGM, continued sea-ice expansion reduced regional temperature and precipitation further, effectively starving the ice sheet and resulting in reduced glacial expansion. Our findings highlight the dominant role that orbital changes can play in driving Southern Hemisphere glacial climate via the sensitivity of mid-latitude regions to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent.

  10. Glacial onset predated Late Ordovician climate cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Alexandre; Donnadieu, Yannick; Le Hir, Guillaume; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Dumas, Christophe; Alvarez-Solas, Jorge; Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.

    2016-06-01

    The Ordovician glaciation represents the acme of one of only three major icehouse periods in Earth's Phanerozoic history and is notorious for setting the scene for one of the "big five" mass extinction events. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that drove ice sheet growth remain poorly understood and the final extent of the ice sheet crudely constrained. Here using an Earth system model with an innovative coupling method between ocean, atmosphere, and land ice accounting for climate and ice sheet feedback processes, we report simulations portraying for the first time the detailed evolution of the Ordovician ice sheet. We show that the emergence of the ice sheet happened in two discrete phases. In a counterintuitive sequence of events, the continental ice sheet appeared suddenly in a warm climate. Only during the second act, and set against a background of decreasing atmospheric CO2, followed steeply dropping temperatures and extending sea ice. The comparison with abundant sedimentological, geochemical, and micropaleontological data suggests that glacial onset may have occurred as early as the Middle Ordovician Darriwilian, in agreement with recent studies reporting third-order glacioeustatic cycles during the same period. The second step in ice sheet growth, typified by a sudden drop in tropical sea surface temperatures by ˜8°C and the further extension of a single, continental-scale ice sheet over Gondwana, marked the onset of the Hirnantian glacial maximum. By suggesting the presence of an ice sheet over Gondwana throughout most of the Middle and Late Ordovician, our models embrace the emerging paradigm of an "early Paleozoic Ice Age."

  11. Large inert carbon pool in the terrestrial biosphere during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciais, P.; Tagliabue, A.; Cuntz, M.; Bopp, L.; Scholze, M.; Hoffmann, G.; Lourantou, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Prentice, I. C.; Kelley, D. I.; Koven, C.; Piao, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    During each of the late Pleistocene glacial-interglacial transitions, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations rose by almost 100ppm. The sources of this carbon are unclear, and efforts to identify them are hampered by uncertainties in the magnitude of carbon reservoirs and fluxes under glacial conditions. Here we use oxygen isotope measurements from air trapped in ice cores and ocean carbon-cycle modelling to estimate terrestrial and oceanic gross primary productivity during the Last Glacial Maximum. We find that the rate of gross terrestrial primary production during the Last Glacial Maximum was about 40+/-10 Pg C yr-1, half that of the pre-industrial Holocene. Despite the low levels of photosynthesis, we estimate that the late glacial terrestrial biosphere contained only 330 Pg less carbon than pre-industrial levels. We infer that the area covered by carbon-rich but unproductive biomes such as tundra and cold steppes was significantly larger during the Last Glacial Maximum, consistent with palaeoecological data. Our data also indicate the presence of an inert carbon pool of 2,300 Pg C, about 700 Pg larger than the inert carbon locked in permafrost today. We suggest that the disappearance of this carbon pool at the end of the Last Glacial Maximum may have contributed to the deglacial rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

  12. Impacts of alpine glacial erosion on the shapes of glacial valleys, heights of mountains, and sediment delivery to the foreland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. S.; Dühnforth, M.; Anderson, L. S.; Colgan, W.

    2012-12-01

    assess how the roughness of a glacier bed evolves, and track the generation of both coarse (quarried) and fine (abraded) subglacial sediment. The coarse sediment eroded from cavity corners at the bed serves as tools for downstream abrasion, thereby linking the quarrying and abrasion processes. The evolving micro-topography influences both the basal drag experienced by overlying ice, and the generation of basal niches in which interglacial sediment can be stored. The basal micro-topography, combined with reduced stream power due to a flattened valley profile, leads to low interglacial sedimentation rates in the foreland. During glacials, however, the same valley becomes a strong source of sediment for the foreland. This results in a nearly binary response of the sediment system to glacial cycles, with the strongest sediment delivery occurring during the onset of a glaciation. This strong temporal pattern of sediment export from the glacial landscape is likely responsible for fluvial terrace sequences in the foreland.

  13. Intermittent glacial sliding velocities explain variations in long-timescale denudation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanites, Brian J.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2016-09-01

    Quantifying controls on glacial erosion over geologic timescales is central to understanding the role of Cenozoic climate change on the development of modern mountain belts, yet the mechanisms that produce the distinct relief and topography visible in glaciated regions remain poorly constrained. We test the hypothesis that commonly assumed glacial sliding parameterizations control denudation rates over geologic timescales. We do this by modeling glacier dynamics over a glacial-interglacial cycle and compare with a dense dataset of (U-Th)/He thermochronometer derived denudation rates from the southern Coast Mountains, BC. Results indicate zones of rapid Quaternary erosion correspond to locations where the model predicts the highest averaged sliding velocities. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that sliding influences the rate of glacial erosion. Regression between sliding predicted by the model and erosion rates shows a statistically significant correlation (r2 = 0.6). The coefficient of the regression (10-5) is smaller than previous estimates based on data from much shorter timescales. The model results also reveal that for a specific location, active subglacial sliding, and hence erosion, occurs for only ∼10-20% of a glacial-interglacial cycle, suggesting high temporal variations in erosion rates. This intermittency of erosion requires instantaneous erosion rates to be greater than long term averages, explaining how timescale averaging can impact estimates of glacial erosion rates.

  14. Deglaciation and glacial erosion: A joint control on magma productivity by continental unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, Pietro; Caricchi, Luca; Castelltort, Sébastien; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Glacial-interglacial cycles affect the processes through which water and rocks are redistributed across the Earth's surface, thereby linking the solid Earth and climate dynamics. Regional and global scale studies suggest that continental lithospheric unloading due to ice melting during the transition to interglacials leads to increased continental magmatic, volcanic, and degassing activity. Such a climatic forcing on the melting of the Earth's interior, however, has always been evaluated regardless of continental unloading by glacial erosion, albeit the density of rock exceeds that of ice by approximately 3 times. Here we present and discuss numerical results involving synthetic but realistic topographies, ice caps, and glacial erosion rates suggesting that erosion may be as important as deglaciation in affecting continental unloading. Our study represents an additional step toward a more general understanding of the links between a changing climate, glacial processes, and the melting of the solid Earth.

  15. Evidence for Obliquity Forcing of Glacial Termination II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drysdale, R. N.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Zanchetta, G.; Fallick, A. E.; Sánchez Goñi, M. F.; Couchoud, I.; McDonald, J.; Maas, R.; Lohmann, G.; Isola, I.

    2009-09-01

    Variations in the intensity of high-latitude Northern Hemisphere summer insolation, driven largely by precession of the equinoxes, are widely thought to control the timing of Late Pleistocene glacial terminations. However, recently it has been suggested that changes in Earth’s obliquity may be a more important mechanism. We present a new speleothem-based North Atlantic marine chronology that shows that the penultimate glacial termination (Termination II) commenced 141,000 ± 2500 years before the present, too early to be explained by Northern Hemisphere summer insolation but consistent with changes in Earth’s obliquity. Our record reveals that Terminations I and II are separated by three obliquity cycles and that they started at near-identical obliquity phases.

  16. Phosphorus burial in the ocean over glacial-interglacial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Föllmi, K. B.

    2009-04-01

    The role of nutrients, such as phosphorus (P), and their impact on primary productivity and the fluctuations in atmospheric CO2 over glacial-interglacial periods are intensely debated. Suggestions as to the importance of P evolved from an earlier proposal that P actively participated in changing productivity rates and therefore climate change, to most recent ones that changes in the glacial ocean inventory of phosphorus were important but not influential if compared to other macronutrients, such as nitrate. Using new data coming from a selection of ODP sites, we analyzed the distribution of oceanic P sedimentary phases and calculate reactive P burial fluxes, and we show how P burial fluxes changed over the last glacial-interglacial period at these sites. Concentrations of reactive P are generally lower during glacial times, while mass accumulation rates (MAR) of reactive P show higher variability. If we extrapolate for the analyzed sites, we may assume that in general glacial burial fluxes of reactive P are lower than those during interglacial periods by about 8%, because the lack of burial of reactive P on the glacial shelf reduced in size, was apparently not compensated by burial in other regions of the ocean. Using the calculated changes in P burial, we evaluate their possible impact on the phosphate inventory in the world oceans. Using a simple mathematical approach, we find that these changes alone could have increased the phosphate inventory of glacial ocean waters by 17-40% compared to interglacial stages. Variations in the distribution of sedimentary P phases at the investigated sites seem to indicate that at the onset of interglacial stages, shallower sites experienced an increase in reactive P concentrations, which seems to point to P-richer waters at glacial terminations. All these findings would support the Shelf-Nutrient Hypothesis, which assumes that during glacial low stands nutrients are transferred from shallow sites to deep sea with possible

  17. Modeling the Glacial Buzzsaw in the Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, M. T.; Tomkin, J. H.

    2006-12-01

    ELA. The proportionality constant is dependent on specifics of the local area, including precipitation. Nonetheless, this yield law, together with the assumption of a constant wedge taper, allows us to predict the time evolution of the Patagonia Andes. We consider three examples. The first is the growth of the Patagonian wedge upward to a fixed ELA. The second is the topographic response of the Patagonian wedge to a dropping ELA, as expected for global cooling during the late Cenozoic. The third is the influence of the short-term glacial cycles, as has been typical for the Quaternary. We found that short-term climate fluctuations (~100 ka glacial cycles) would have little influence on the topographic evolution of the Patagonian wedge. Instead, our conclusion is that the southward decreasing size of the Patagonian Andes is mainly due to the southward slope of the ELA, which has probably been a constant feature for the range over its full 25 Ma history. Late Cenozoic cooling may have contributed by promoting faster glacial erosion as the ELA dropped to lower elevations everywhere. What is interesting is that this change would have caused shortening to be focused in the core of the range, in order to maintain the wedge taper there. We suggest that the wedge is still adjusting to this change in erosion rates, which may explain why thrusting stopped along the east side of the range at about 9 Ma. Continental subduction would still be active but would be accommodated now by distributed shortening in the core of the range.

  18. Simulated Last Glacial Maximum Δ14CATM and the Deep Glacial Ocean Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, V.; Paillard, D.; Roche, D. M.; Bouttes, N.; Bopp, L.

    2012-12-01

    Δ14Catm has been estimated at 420 ± 80‰ (INTCAL09) during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) compared to preindustrial times (0‰), but mechanisms explaining this difference are not yet resolved. Δ14Catm is a function of cosmogenic production in high atmosphere and of carbon cycling in the Earth system (through carbon exchange with the superficial reservoirs, ocean and continental biosphere). 10Be-based reconstructions show a contribution of the cosmogenic production term of only 200 ± 200‰ at the LGM. The remaining 220‰ of Δ14Catm variation between the LGM and preindustrial times have thus to be explained by changes in the carbon cycle. Recently, Bouttes et al. (2010) proposed to explain most of the difference in atmospheric pCO2 between glacial and interglacial times by brine-induced ocean stratification in the Southern Ocean. This mechanism involves the formation of very saline water masses that can store Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC) in the deep ocean. During glacial times, the sinking of brines is enhanced and more DIC is stored in the deep ocean, lowering atmospheric pCO2. Such an isolated ocean reservoir would be characterized by a low Δ14C signature. Evidence of such 14C-depleted deep waters during the LGM has recently been found in the Southern Ocean (Skinner et al., 2010). The degassing of this carbon with low Δ14C would then reduce Δ14Catm throughout the deglaciation. We have further developed the CLIMBER-2 model to include a cosmogenic production of 14C as well as an interactive atmospheric 14C reservoir. We investigate the role of both sinking of brines and cosmogenic production, alongside iron and vertical diffusion mechanisms to explain changes in Δ14Catm during the last deglaciation. In our simulations, not only the sinking of brine mechanism is consistent with past Δ14C data but also it explains most of the differences in atmospheric pCO2 and Δ14C between LGM and preindustrial times.

  19. Microbial Succession in Glacial Foreland Soils of the Canadian Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, S.; Lanoil, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Canadian arctic has experienced increasing temperatures over the past century leading to heightened rate of glacial retreat. Glacial retreat leads to subsequent exposure of foreland soils to atmospheric conditions, thus creating a sequence of change in these ecosystems. Microbes are critical for soil development and nutrient dynamics in glacial systems as they are the primary colonizers of these soils and have been demonstrated to play a role in geochemical weathering and nutrient cycling beneath the glacier. Although viable microbial communities exist beneath glaciers and are known to be important for the glacial ecosystem, the impact of glacial retreat on these communities and development of the resulting foreland ecosystem is not well understood. Here, we investigate how microbial communities respond to changing conditions brought on by glacial retreat and whether a pattern of succession, such as those found in well characterized plant systems, occurs along a soil foreland in these microbial communities. We hypothesis that time since deglaciation is the major determinant of structure and composition of microbial assemblages. To test this, soil samples were collected along two glacier forelands, Trapridge Glacier and Duke River Glacier, located in Kluane National Park, Yukon Territory. Chronosequence dating of satellite images using geographic information system software revealed sampling sites have been ice-free from ~30 years to over 60 years. Soil chemistry analysis of major nutrients revealed no change in chemical parameters along the chronosequence, suggesting that presence of microbes after exposure from subglacial environments does not significantly alter soil characteristics in the timeframe observed. Furthermore, next-generation IonTorrentTM sequencing performed on soil samples revealed over five million sequencing reads, suggesting prominent microbial presence within these soils. Further analysis on sequencing data is needed to establish the

  20. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima.

    PubMed

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L; Galbraith, Eric D

    2016-01-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean-atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink. PMID:26923945

  1. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima

    PubMed Central

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean–atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink. PMID:26923945

  2. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2016-02-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean-atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink.

  3. Sedimentary architecture of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf, West Antarctica, from pre-glacial to glacial processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohl, Karsten; Uenzelmann-Neben, Gabriele; Hillenbrand, Claus-Dieter; Larter, Robert; Nitsche, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Studies of the sedimentary architecture and characteristics of Antarctic shelves provide clues of past ice sheet advance-retreat cycles and help improve constraints for paleo-ice dynamic models since early glacial periods. A first seismostratigraphic analysis of the Amundsen Sea Embayment shelf and slope of West Antarctica reveals insights into the structural architecture of the continental margin and shows stages of sediment deposition, erosion and transport history from pre-glacial times to early glaciation and to the most recent glacial periods. The shelf geometry consists of a large pre- and syn-rift basin in the middle shelf region between outcropping basement of the inner shelf and basement ridges and highs beneath the outer shelf. A middle shelf sub-basin exists which may have formed as a result of motion along an early West Antarctic Rift System branch. At least 4 km of pre-glacial strata has been eroded from the present inner shelf and coastal hinterland by ice sheet advances since the onset of glaciation. Some of the eroded sediments were deposited as a progradational wedge extending the outer shelf by 25 to 65 km oceanward of the pre-glacial shelf-break. Comparing the observed seismic characteristics with those of other Antarctic shelf sequences, we assign an Early Cretaceous age for bottom sedimentary unit ASS-1, a Late Cretaceous to Oligocene age for unit ASS-2, an Early to Mid-Miocene age for unit ASS-3, a Mid-Miocene age for unit ASS-4, a Late Miocene to Early Pliocene age for unit ASS-5, and a Pliocene to Pleistocene age for the top unit ASS-6. The survival of buried grounding zone wedges in the upper part of unit ASS-5 of the outer shelf is consistent with the onset of a long warming phase and a retreated ice sheet in the early Pliocene as observed for the Ross Sea shelf and reconstructed from paleo-ice sheet models. Our data also reveal that the paleo-ice flow paths of the central Pine Island Trough system have remained stationary across the

  4. Evidence of strong ocean heating during glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimov, S. A.; Zimov, N.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous hypotheses have addressed glacial-interglacial climatic dynamics, but none of them explain the sharp 25C temperature increase in Greenland in the last deglaciation (Cuffey et al. 1995; Dahl-Jensen et al. 1998). These robust data were obtained through analyzing the temperature profile in the Greenland ice sheet where cold from the last glaciation is preserved in the depth of the glacial sheet. We suggest that during glaciations the ocean accumulated energy: interior ocean water heated up to ~20-30C and during deglaciation this energy is released. In the analogy with reconstructing the ice sheet temperature profiles, the most reliable proof of ocean interior warming during the last glaciation is the heat flux profiles in the bottom sediments. In the final reports based on temperature measurements conducted during the DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) it is stated that heat flux in the bottom sediments doesn't vary with depth and consequently there were no substantial temperature changes in the ocean interior during the last glacial cycle, and heat flux on the surface of the ocean bottom is the geothermal heat flux (Erickson et al., 1975, Hyndman et al., 1987). However, we have critically investigated data in all initial reports of all deep sea drilling projects and have noticed that all temperature data show that heat flow decreases strongly with depth (a minimum of 40 mW/m2), i.e. most of the heat flux detected on the surface of the ocean floor is not the geothermal heat flux but remaining heat that bottom sediments release. Sharp shifts in heat flow are seen within boreholes at depths crossing gas hydrate bottom. All this means that during the last glacial period interior water temperature was on 25-30C degrees warmer. Conversely, in isolated seas heat flow in the sediments shows little change with depth.

  5. Tentative correlation of midcontinent glacial sequence with marine chronology

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    A tentative glacial-interglacial 3-million-year chronology is synthesized by regional correlation of Midcontinent tills and paleosols to marine paleotemperature/eustatic cycles and oxygen isotope stages. The paleotemperature curves of Beard et al. (1982), based on planktonic foraminiferal abundances, correspond directly with eustatic cycles during the last 3 Ma. These generalized curves are shown to correlate reasonably well with standard oxygen isotope stages at least for the past 900 ka. This indicates that paleotemperature and Vail-type eustatic cycles have been glacially induced during the last 3 Ma. The chronology developed here utilizes both paleotemperature and oxygen isotope stages; however, below the Jaramillo magnetic subchron, isotope curves are more variable and only paleotemperature stages are used. Tills and paleosols at type localities in the Midcontinent area of the US are correlated to the SPECMAP oxygen isotope time scale. Because mid-Brunhes events are poorly constrained by radiometric dates, alternative correlations are possible. The oldest known Midcontinent tills correlate to the first Plio-Pleistocene cold paleotemperature stage and drop in sea level at 2.4 Ma. This Late Pliocene event also corresponds to the first major isotopic enrichment and the onset of late Cenozoic ice-rafting in the North Atlantic region.

  6. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow. PMID:17806883

  7. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  8. High-resolution mapping of glacial landforms in the North Alpine Foreland, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcher, Bernhard C.; Hinsch, Ralph; Wagreich, Michael

    2010-10-01

    In this study results from traditional field mapping were merged with precise elevation information from airborne LiDAR (Light detection and ranging) surveys. Morphological and sedimentological data provide new results from the Austrian (eastern) part of the Salzach piedmont glacier during times of and shortly after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The variations in meltwater discharge had a major impact on the development of glacial landforms. In areas with high meltwater supply erosional or debris reworking processes play a major role, represented by drainage channels, drumlins and kettled, low relief hummocky moraine with low slope angles. Low discharge areas are associated with distinct depositional forms such as high relief end moraines (up to 30 m) and hummocky moraine (averaging 20 m) with high slope angles. Isolated conical kames may reach heights up to 45 m. Fluvial activity is supposed to rise towards the end of the glacial cycle causing high melting rates and comprehensive debris reworking. The formation of terminal lakes and associated widespread, inorganic lake clays are the last deposits within the study area before the Salzach Glacier completely receded to its main valley. The survey of glacial landforms through the combination of field mapping and high-resolution DEM derived from airborne LiDAR missions gives precise information on transport and deposition during the last glacial cycle of the eastern Salzach Glacier piedmont lobe.

  9. Southern Ocean buoyancy forcing of ocean ventilation and glacial atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Andrew J.; Vallis, Geoffrey K.; Nikurashin, Maxim

    2015-11-01

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles closely correspond to Antarctic temperature patterns. These are distinct from temperature variations in the mid to northern latitudes, so this suggests that the Southern Ocean is pivotal in controlling natural CO2 concentrations. Here we assess the sensitivity of atmospheric CO2 concentrations to glacial-interglacial changes in the ocean's meridional overturning circulation using a circulation model for upwelling and eddy transport in the Southern Ocean coupled with a simple biogeochemical description. Under glacial conditions, a broader region of surface buoyancy loss results in upwelling farther to the north, relative to interglacials. The northern location of upwelling results in reduced CO2 outgassing and stronger carbon sequestration in the deep ocean: we calculate that the shift to this glacial-style circulation can draw down 30 to 60 ppm of atmospheric CO2. We therefore suggest that the direct effect of temperatures on Southern Ocean buoyancy forcing, and hence the residual overturning circulation, explains much of the strong correlation between Antarctic temperature variations and atmospheric CO2 concentrations over glacial-interglacial cycles.

  10. Timing the last interglacial-glacial transition in glacial sedimentary sequences of the Hudson Bay lowlands (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, M.; Allard, G.; Ghaleb, B.; Lamothe, M.

    2010-12-01

    Paleoclimate records (oxygen isotopes and speleothems) indicate that the onset of the last glacial cycle was characterized by rapid and large-scale growth of continental ice sheets. The timing of the inception of the Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) and its subsequent evolution (extent) remain, however, largely unconstrained. The depositional record of the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is of particular interest to these issues because this region is located near the former geographic center of the LIS. The presence of nonglacial deposits in HBL glacial sedimentary sequences thus implies drastic changes in ice sheet configuration, but constraining these ice volume changes through absolute dating of nonglacial sediments has been so far inconclusive. Here we use radiocarbon, U-series, and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) methods to constrain the age of an extensive nonglacial unit containing abundant wood fragments enclosed in compacted clay lying below several meters of glacial deposits along the Nottaway River, in the southeastern sector of the HBL. This region is particularly interesting because it lies near one of the inception centers of the LIS. Radiocarbon dating of a wood fragment yielded a nonfinite 14C age of >55.2 ka, in agreement with similar dating attempts throughout the HBL. Measurements of U and Th concentrations and isotope ratios on fossil wood samples revealed consistent 230Th/U ages, indicating that the wood fragments were subject to a single episode of uranium uptake, with apparently no subsequent disturbance of the geochemical system. Despite mechanical cleaning of the wood outer surfaces, non-authigenic 230Th was found in most samples and correction for this detrital contamination yielded an isochron age of 106.8 (+12.3, -10.3) ka, which represents a minimum age for this unit. The 230Th/U age constraint is nonetheless supported by a series of OSL ages obtained for the overlying fluvial sands, thereby assigning the Nottaway nonglacial unit to the end

  11. The Role of Glacial Erosion in Limiting Ice Sheet Extents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, S.; Hulton, N.

    2007-12-01

    , the thermal regime of the ice alters and the drawdown and capture of warm ice into 'streams' causes more focussed selective erosion. The main control on the pattern of retreat is the pre-existing topography, which strongly controls erosion patterns. Ice streams retreat progressively in response to lowering valley floors and the impact of erosion induced self-limiting remains over successive glacial cycles. References: Jamieson, S.S.R., Hulton, N.R.J. and Hagdorn, M., 2007. Modelling landscape evolution under ice sheets. Geomorphology, doi:10.1016/j.geomorph.2007.02.047. Oerlemans, J., 1984. Numerical experiments on large-scale glacial erosion. Zeitschrift fur Gletscherkunde und Glazialgeologie, 20: 107-126. Payne, A.J., 1999. A thermomechanical model of ice flow in West Antarctica. Climate Dynamics, 15(2): 115-125.

  12. Record of glacial Lake Missoula floods in glacial Lake Columbia, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Michelle A.; Clague, John J.

    2016-02-01

    During the last glaciation (marine oxygen isotope stage 2), outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula deposited diagnostic sediments within glacial Lake Columbia. Two dominant outburst flood lithofacies are present within glacial Lake Columbia deposits: a flood expansion bar facies and a finer-grained hyperpycnite facies. We conclude that the flood sediments have a glacial Lake Missoula source because: (1) current indicators indicate westward flow through the lake, and upvalley flow followed by downvalley flow in tributary valleys; (2) no flood sediments are found north of a certain point; (3) there is a dominance of Belt-Purcell Supergroup clasts in a flood expansion bar; and (4) some of the finer-grained beds have a pink colour, reflective of glacial Lake Missoula lake-bottom sediments. A new radiocarbon age of 13,400 ± 100 14C BP on plant detritus found below 37 flood beds helps constrain the timing of outburst flooding from glacial Lake Missoula.

  13. The Glacial-Interglacial Monsoon Recorded by Speleothems from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrough, A. K.; Gagan, M. K.; Dunbar, G. B.; Krause, C.; Hantoro, W. S.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Shen, C. C.; Sun, H.; Cai, B.; Hellstrom, J. C.; Rifai, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Indo-Pacific Warm Pool is a primary source of heat and moisture to the global atmosphere and a key player in tropical and global climate variability. There is mounting evidence that atmospheric convection and oceanic processes in the tropics can modulate global climate on orbital and sub-orbital timescales. Glacial-interglacial cycles represent the largest natural climate changes over the last 800 kyr with each cycle terminated by rapid global warming and sea level rise. Our understanding of the role and response of tropical atmospheric convection during these periods of dramatic warming is limited. We present the first speleothem paleomonsoon record for southwest Sulawesi (5ºS, 119ºE), spanning two glacial-interglacial cycles, including glacial termination IV (~340 kyr BP) and both phases of termination III (~248 and ~220 kyr BP). This unique record is constructed from multiple stalagmites from two separate caves and is based on a multi-proxy approach (δ18O, δ13C, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca) that provides insight into the mechanisms controlling Australian-Indonesian summer monsoon variability. Speleothem δ18O and trace element data indicate a rapid increase in rainfall at glacial terminations and wet interglacials. Terminations IV, III, and I are each characterized by an abrupt 3‰ decrease in δ18O. Variability in δ18O leading-in to glacial terminations is also similar, and corresponds to October insolation. Prior to deglaciation, there is a distinct shift to higher δ18O that is synchronized with weak monsoon intervals in Chinese speleothem records. The remarkably consistent pattern among terminations implies that the response of tropical convection to changing background climates is well regulated. Furthermore, we find that speleothem δ13C leads δ18O by ~5 kyr during glacial terminations. The early decrease in speleothem δ13C may reflect the response of tropical vegetation to rising atmospheric CO2 and temperature, rather than regional changes in rainfall.

  14. Meltwater input to the southern ocean during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, A.; Burckle, L.H.; Hays, J.D.

    1994-12-02

    Three records of oxygen isotopes in biogenic silica from deep-sea sediment cores from the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean reveal the presence of isotopically depleted diatomaceous opal in sediment from the last glacial maximum. This depletion is attributed to the presence of lids of meltwater that mixed with surface water along certain trajectories in the Southern Ocean. An increase in the drainage from Antarctica or extensive northward transport of icebergs are among the main mechanisms that could have produced the increase in meltwater input to the glacial Southern Ocean. Similar isotopic trends were observed in older climatic cycles at the same cores.

  15. Glacial migrations of plants: island biogeographical evidence.

    PubMed

    Simpson, B B

    1974-08-23

    Analyses of the floras of the high north Andean habitat islands (paramos) and the Galápagos Islands show that plant species diversity conforms to the MacArthur and Wilson model of island biogeography but that immigration occurred primarily during glacial periods. Modern plant species diversity is more significantly correlated with area and distance measures of the glacial forms of the islands than with similar measures of the present-day islands. PMID:17736375

  16. Analysis of recent glacial earthquakes in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, K.; Nettles, M.

    2015-12-01

    Large calving events at Greenland's outlet glaciers produce teleseismically detectable glacial earthquakes. These events are observed in the seismic record for the past 22 years, but the complete catalog of glacial earthquakes still numbers only ~300. The annual occurrence of these long-period events has increased over time, which makes recent years especially valuable in expanding the global dataset. Glacial earthquakes from 1993- 2010 have been analyzed systematically (Tsai and Ekström, 2007; Veitch and Nettles, 2012). Here, we analyze more recent events using the same centroid—single-force (CSF) approach as previous authors, focusing initially on data from 2013. In addition, we perform a focused study of selected events from 2009-2010 to assess the reliability of the force azimuths obtained from such inversions. Recent spatial and temporal patterns of glacial earthquakes in Greenland differ from those in previous years. In 2013, three times as many events occurred on the west coast as on the east, and these events originated predominantly from two glaciers: Jakobshavn Glacier on the west coast and Helheim Glacier on the east. Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier, on the east coast, produced no glacial earthquakes in 2013, though it produced many events in earlier years. Previous CSF results for glacial earthquakes show force azimuths perpendicular to the glacier front during a calving event, with force plunges near horizontal. However, some azimuths indicate forces initially oriented upglacier, while others are oriented downglacier (seaward). We perform a set of experiments on events from 2009 and 2010 and find two acceptable solutions for each glacial earthquake, oriented 180° apart with plunges of opposite sign and centroid times differing by approximately one half of the assumed duration of the earthquake time function. These results suggest the need for a more complex time function to model glacial earthquakes more accurately.

  17. A fresh look at glacial foods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, it has become clear that ice ages are characterized by glacial as well as climatic instability on millennial time scales. In his Perspective, Colman highlights two recent papers investigating the role of glacial meltwater and continental drainage in this instability. The results suggest a fundamental instability feedback between ocean circulation and ice sheet dynamics and provides an explanation for why instability was greatest at times of intermediate ice volume.

  18. Neoproterozoic Glacial Extremes: How Plausible is the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, W. R.

    2004-05-01

    The suggestion that the glaciation events of the Neoproterozoic could have been global in extent, so-called "snowball" glaciations, during which the oceans were entirely covered by sea ice and the continents by massive continental ice sheets, is an idea tha is recurrent in the geological and climate dynamics literature. It is an idea that haa both critics and defenders but concensus concerning it's plausiblity has yet to emerge. Previous work on this problem has led to the suggestion that a more likely scenario than the "hard snowball" is one in which open water continues to persist at the equator, thus enabling biological evolution into the Cambrian to proceed, perhaps stimulated by the transition from the cold conditions of the Neoproterozoic to the warm condition of the Cambrian, thus leading to the Cambrian "explosion of life". We will discuss recent extensions of our previous efforts to model the extreme climate of the Neoproterozoic, using both the University of Toronto Glacial Systems Model and the NCAR Community Climate System Model. With an appropriate choice for the albedo of sea ice, the former model conntinues to deliver hysteresis in the surface temperature vs. CO2 concentration space when solar luminosity is reduced by 6% below modern, and thus continues to suggest the existence of the previously hypothesized "CO2 attractor". We argue here that the system could be locked onto this attractor by the strong "out of equilibrium" effects of the carbon cycle recently discussed by Rothman et al. (PNAS, 2003). The open water solution is confirmed as the preferred mode of the system by the detailed CCSM integrations that we have performed.

  19. Last glacial aeolian dynamics at the Titel loess plateau (Vojvodina, Serbia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, S. B.; Bokhorst, M. P.; Machalett, B.; Štrbac, D.; Hambach, U.; Basarin, B.; Svirčev, Z.; Stevens, T.; Frechen, M.; Vandenberghe, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Titel loess plateau (Vojvodina, Serbia) is situated at the confluence of the rivers Danube and Tisa, in the southeastern part of the Bačka subregion. Various phases of fluvial erosion have shaped the ellipsoid form of the plateau, which is characterized by steep slopes on the margins. The Titel loess plateau is a unique geomorphologic feature, further emphasising the wide diversity of the loess landforms. The plateau is an island of loess with a maximum length of about 16 km and a maximum width of 7.2 km. Thick loess deposits of between 35 and 55 m are intercalated by 5 main pedocomplexes likely deposited thought the last 5 glacial/interglacial cycles. Steep loess cliffs expose several important sections for understanding climatic and environmental change during the middle and late Pleistocene in the region. The succession of palaeosols through the sequence strongly suggests a transition from humid interglacial climates in the middle Pleistocene, to drier interglacial climates in the late Pleistocene. Past aeolian dynamics have been reconstructed using magnetic susceptibility, grain size, geochemical and malacological investigations by depth in the thick last glacial unit. Luminescence dating and magnetic susceptibility inter-profile correlation provide the chronological framework. Lower last glacial loess unit V-L1L2 is loosely cemented porous sandy loess, with occasional fine laminations and thin, fine sand beds. Identified malacofauna indicates very dry climatic conditions and poor steppic vegetation. It is hypothesized that while the last glacial vegetation cover is extremely sparse, significant sedimentation rates during the lower last glacial can be explained by the presence of a cyanobacterial crust. Protection of loess sediments from deflation by the presence of a cyanobacterial crust is observed at present in loess quarries (Ruma, Crvenka, Petrovaradin). The middle glacial was warmer and relatively moist, as indicated by an increase in clay content

  20. Mapping Glacial Lakes on the Tibetan Plateau with Landsat TM/ETM+ Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Sheng, Y.

    2009-12-01

    With a pronounced temperature rise of 0.16oC per decade, the Tibetan plateau is one of the world’s most vulnerable areas responding to global change. Glaciers and glacial lakes serve as sensitive indicators to these regional climate and water cycle variations. Recent study shows that glaciers on the plateau have retreated dramatically, leading to the expansion of the existing glacial lakes and the emergence ofnew glacial lakes. The existence of these lakes increases the possibility of outburst floods to the downstream areas during the ice melting season. Mapping and monitoring these glacial lakes will facilitate our understanding of the glacier-related hazards and regional climate changes. However, rigorous field surveys of glacial lake dynamics are prohibitive in high-mountainous areas on the plateau due to their low accessibility. Satellite remote sensing provides an efficient and objective tool to analyze the status and variations of glacial lakes. Theoretically, lakes and other surface open water bodies are readily identified in satellite images owing to their very low reflectance in near-infrared (NIR) channels of Landsat sensors. In the mountain regions where glacial lakes are located, cloud shadows, mountain shadows, melting glaciers or even lakes under different conditions (e.g., ice lakes, salt lakes, turbid lakes) could become disturbing factors and create problems to glacial lake delineation. We use normalized difference water index (NDWI), the normalized ratio index between the green and near infrared spectral bands, to differentiate water bodies from other land features. As lake features are on the relatively flat areas, topographic features such as terrain slope and hill shades derived from digital elevation model (DEM) are also used to remove the shadows from lakes. Based on NDWI and topographic characteristics, We have developed an automated hierarchical method to monitor glacial lakes using Landsat TM/ETM+ imagery. Firstly, lakes are roughly

  1. The impact of glaciations and glacial processes on groundwater flow dynamics: a numerical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterckx, A.; Lemieux, J. M.; Vaikmae, R.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical models are widely used to investigate the impact of glaciations on groundwater flow systems because they can simulate complex glacial processes. However, it isn't clear which of these processes are relevant to adequately capture groundwater flow dynamics. Given the complexity of representing these processes in a numerical model and the paucity of field data available for their validation, it is of prime interest to assess how they impact groundwater flow and if any of these processes could be neglected. In order to assess the specific impact of glacial processes on groundwater flow dynamics, those processes were included in the numerical model FEFLOW and simulations were conducted in a simple conceptual model representing a 21 ky glacial cycle in a sedimentary basin. The following processes have been simulated: subglacial recharge, linear and non-linear compaction of the porous medium under the weight of the ice, isostasy, proglacial lakes, as well as permafrost. Solute transport was simulated along with groundwater flow to track groundwater originating from the ice-sheet. To interpret the results, a base case scenario considering only subglacial recharge was selected and compared with the other scenarios, where individual glacial processes were simulated. When comparing the results at the end of the simulations, it appears that most of the aforementioned glacial processes don't lead to a significant difference in meltwater distribution with respect to the base case. Only hydromechanical coupling brings some noticeable change. Conversely, the type and the value of the boundary condition applied at the base of the ice-sheet play a major role in groundwater flow dynamics. The presence of confining hydrogeological units also seems to be a key to understand the long-term effect of glaciations. These results suggest that some of the glacial processes may be neglected for the simulation of groundwater flow dynamics during a glacial period.

  2. Terrigenous Fe input and biogenic sedimentation in the glacial and interglacial equatorial Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.W.; Leinen, M.; Knowlton, C.W.

    1995-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the relationship of particulate iron from land erosion to the accumulation of biogenic matter in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Sediment cores representing the last six glacial-interglacial cycles and previously published mineralogic records were used as data input. Total iron, terrigenous, and biogenic components were determined for three sediment cores. The study determined that there is no relationship between terrigenous iron input and sedimentary carbon sequestering. This is based on chemical, spectral, and stratigraphic anlyses which showed: (1) no consistent pattern of terrigenous input during glacial or interglacial periods, (2) a close relationshipe between the accumulation of particulate iron and the accumulation of terrigenous matter, (3) no coherent spectral correlations between glacial periodicity and iron input, (4) an inverse correlation of iron input and calcium carbonate, and (5) no spectral or linear relationship between iron accumulation and calcium carbonate, organic carbon, or opal. 55 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Critical insolation-CO2 relation for diagnosing past and future glacial inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, A.; Winkelmann, R.; Schellnhuber, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    The past rapid growth of Northern Hemisphere continental ice sheets, which terminated warm and stable climate periods, is generally attributed to reduced summer insolation in boreal latitudes. Yet such summer insolation is near to its minimum at present, and there are no signs of a new ice age. This challenges our understanding of the mechanisms driving glacial cycles and our ability to predict the next glacial inception. Here we propose a critical functional relationship between boreal summer insolation and global carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, which explains the beginning of the past eight glacial cycles and might anticipate future periods of glacial inception. Using an ensemble of simulations generated by an Earth system model of intermediate complexity constrained by palaeoclimatic data, we suggest that glacial inception was narrowly missed before the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The missed inception can be accounted for by the combined effect of relatively high late-Holocene CO2 concentrations and the low orbital eccentricity of the Earth. Additionally, our analysis suggests that even in the absence of human perturbations no substantial build-up of ice sheets would occur within the next several thousand years and that the current interglacial would probably last for another 50,000 years. However, moderate anthropogenic cumulative CO2 emissions of 1,000 to 1,500 gigatonnes of carbon will postpone the next glacial inception by at least 100,000 years. Our simulations demonstrate that under natural conditions alone the Earth system would be expected to remain in the present delicately balanced interglacial climate state, steering clear of both large-scale glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere and its complete deglaciation, for an unusually long time.

  4. Critical insolation-CO2 relation for diagnosing past and future glacial inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganopolski, Andrey; Winkelmann, Ricarda; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Past rapid growth of Northern Hemisphere continental ice sheets, which terminated rather stable and warm climate periods, is generally attributed to reduced summer insolation in boreal latitudes (Milanković , 1941; Hays et al., 1976, Paillard, 1998). Yet pertinent summer insolation is near to its minimum at present (Berger and Loutre, 2002), and there are no signs of a new ice age (Kemp et al., 2011). This challenges our scientific understanding of the mechanisms driving glacial cycles and our ability to predict the next glacial inception (Masson-Delmotte et al., 2013). Here we propose a fundamental functional relationship between boreal summer insolation and global CO2 concentration, which explains the beginning of the past eight glacial cycles and can anticipate future periods when glacial inception may occur again. Using a simulations ensemble generated by an Earth system model of intermediate complexity constrained by paleoclimatic data, we show that glacial inception was narrowly missed before the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. This can be explained by the combined effect of relatively high late-Holocene CO2 concentration and low orbital eccentricity of the Earth (Loutre and Berger, 2003). Additionally, our analysis shows that even in the absence of human perturbations no significant buildup of ice sheets would occur within the next several thousand years and that the current interglacial would likely last for another 50,000 years. However, moderate anthropogenic cumulative CO2 emissions of 1000 to 1500 GtC may already postpone the next glacial inception by at least 100,000 years (Archer and Ganopolski, 2005; Paillard, 2006). Our simulations demonstrate that under natural conditions alone the Earth system would be expected to stay in the delicate interglacial climate state, steering clear of both large-scale glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere and its complete deglaciation, for an unusually long time.

  5. Critical insolation-CO2 relation for diagnosing past and future glacial inception.

    PubMed

    Ganopolski, A; Winkelmann, R; Schellnhuber, H J

    2016-01-14

    The past rapid growth of Northern Hemisphere continental ice sheets, which terminated warm and stable climate periods, is generally attributed to reduced summer insolation in boreal latitudes. Yet such summer insolation is near to its minimum at present, and there are no signs of a new ice age. This challenges our understanding of the mechanisms driving glacial cycles and our ability to predict the next glacial inception. Here we propose a critical functional relationship between boreal summer insolation and global carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, which explains the beginning of the past eight glacial cycles and might anticipate future periods of glacial inception. Using an ensemble of simulations generated by an Earth system model of intermediate complexity constrained by palaeoclimatic data, we suggest that glacial inception was narrowly missed before the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. The missed inception can be accounted for by the combined effect of relatively high late-Holocene CO2 concentrations and the low orbital eccentricity of the Earth. Additionally, our analysis suggests that even in the absence of human perturbations no substantial build-up of ice sheets would occur within the next several thousand years and that the current interglacial would probably last for another 50,000 years. However, moderate anthropogenic cumulative CO2 emissions of 1,000 to 1,500 gigatonnes of carbon will postpone the next glacial inception by at least 100,000 years. Our simulations demonstrate that under natural conditions alone the Earth system would be expected to remain in the present delicately balanced interglacial climate state, steering clear of both large-scale glaciation of the Northern Hemisphere and its complete deglaciation, for an unusually long time. PMID:26762457

  6. Similar millennial climate variability on the Iberian margin during two early Pleistocene glacials and MIS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, B.; Hodell, D. A.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Skinner, L. C.

    2016-01-01

    Although millennial-scale climate variability (<10 ka) has been well studied during the last glacial cycles, little is known about this important aspect of climate in the early Pleistocene, prior to the Middle Pleistocene Transition. Here we present an early Pleistocene climate record at centennial resolution for two representative glacials (marine isotope stages (MIS) 37-41 from approximately 1235 to 1320 ka) during the "41 ka world" at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1385 (the "Shackleton Site") on the southwest Iberian margin. Millennial-scale climate variability was suppressed during interglacial periods (MIS 37, MIS 39, and MIS 41) and activated during glacial inceptions when benthic δ18O exceeded 3.2‰. Millennial variability during glacials MIS 38 and MIS 40 closely resembled Dansgaard-Oeschger events from the last glacial (MIS 3) in amplitude, shape, and pacing. The phasing of oxygen and carbon isotope variability is consistent with an active oceanic thermal bipolar see-saw between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres during most of the prominent stadials. Surface cooling was associated with systematic decreases in benthic carbon isotopes, indicating concomitant changes in the meridional overturning circulation. A comparison to other North Atlantic records of ice rafting during the early Pleistocene suggests that freshwater forcing, as proposed for the late Pleistocene, was involved in triggering or amplifying perturbations of the North Atlantic circulation that elicited a bipolar see-saw response. Our findings support similarities in the operation of the climate system occurring on millennial time scales before and after the Middle Pleistocene Transition despite the increases in global ice volume and duration of the glacial cycles.

  7. Geomorphical and Geochronological Constrains of the Last Glacial Period in Southern Patagonia, Southern South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Hall, B. L.; Kaplan, M. R.; Vega, R. M.; Binnie, S. A.; Hein, A.; Gómez, G. N.; Ferrada, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Despite the outer limits of the former Patagonian ice sheet (PIS, ~38-55S) having been extensively mapped, it remains unknown if the Patagonian glaciers fluctuated synchronously or asynchronously during the last glacial period. Previous work has revealed asynchronous spatiotemporal ice dynamics along the eastern and western ice-margins at the end of the last glaciation but it is not well understood if the northern and southern parts of the PIS reached concurrent maximum glaciation during the last glacial cycle. The Patagonian Andes is the only landmass involving the southern westerly wind belt latitudinal range, which is thought to have played a key role in past glacial and climate changes. Therefore, reconstructing southern Andes glacier history constitutes a key element for understanding the cause of glaciations in Patagonia and the role of the westerlies in climate change. Here, we discuss paleoglaciological and paleoclimatological implications of new 10Be and 14C data obtained from moraines and strategically selected mires in two contiguous glacially molded basins of south Patagonia (48-55S): Torres del Paine (51S) and Última Esperanza (52S). In this region, we focused our 10Be cosmogenic-dating efforts in the previously undated outer moraines deposited (supposedly) during the last glacial cycle. In order to crosscheck cosmogenic data we collected boulders embedded in moraines and cobbles from the main glaciofluvial plains grading from the outermost moraines. Geomorphic and cosmogenic dating affords evidence for glacial maximum conditions occurring between 40-50 ka (ka = thousand of years before present) in southern Patagonia, which is different from other chronologies within southern South America. We obtained 14C basal ages from sites located within moraine depressions and on former paleolake shorelines and thus these may provide key data on deglaciation and debated regional paleolake history.

  8. Reduced North Atlantic Deep Water flux to the glacial Southern Ocean inferred from neodymium isotope ratios

    PubMed

    Rutberg; Hemming; Goldstein

    2000-06-22

    The global circulation of the oceans and the atmosphere transports heat around the Earth. Broecker and Denton suggested that changes in the global ocean circulation might have triggered or enhanced the glacial-interglacial cycles. But proxy data for past circulation taken from sediment cores in the South Atlantic Ocean have yielded conflicting interpretations of ocean circulation in glacial times--delta13C variations in benthic foraminifera support the idea of a glacial weakening or shutdown of North Atlantic Deep Water production, whereas other proxies, such as Cd/Ca, Ba/Ca and 231Pa/230Th ratios, show little change from the Last Glacial Maximum to the Holocene epoch. Here we report neodymium isotope ratios from the dispersed Fe-Mn oxide component of two southeast Atlantic sediment cores. Both cores show variations that tend towards North Atlantic signatures during the warm marine isotope stages 1 and 3, whereas for the full glacial stages 2 and 4 they are closer to Pacific Ocean signatures. We conclude that the export of North Atlantic Deep Water to the Southern Ocean has resembled present-day conditions during the warm climate intervals, but was reduced during the cold stages. An increase in biological productivity may explain the various proxy data during the times of reduced North Atlantic Deep Water export. PMID:10879531

  9. Periodic floods from glacial Lake Missoula into the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia, northeastern Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atwater, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    At least 15 floods ascended the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia during a single glaciation. Varves between 14 of the flood beds indicate one backflooding every 35 to 55 yr. This regularity suggests that the floods came from an ice-dammed lake that was self-dumping, probably glacial Lake Missoula, Montana. -from Author

  10. Causes of strong ocean heating during glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    During the last deglaciation period, the strongest climate changes occurred across the North Atlantic regions. Analyses of borehole temperatures from the Greenland ice sheet have yielded air temperature change estimates of 25°C over the deglaciation period (Dahl-Jensen et al. 1998). Such huge temperature changes cannot currently be explained in the frames of modern knowledge about climate. We propose that glacial-interglacial cycles are connected with gradual warming of ocean interior waters over the course of glaciations and quick transport of accumulated heat from ocean to the atmosphere during the deglaciation periods. Modern day ocean circulation is dominated by thermal convection with cold waters subsiding in the Northern Atlantic and filling up the ocean interior with cold and heavy water. However during the glaciation thermal circulation stopped and ocean circulation was driven by 'haline pumps' -Red and Mediterranean seas connected with ocean with only narrow but deep straights acts as evaporative basins, separating ocean water into fresh water which returns to the ocean surface (precipitation) and warm but salty, and therefore heavy, water which flows down to the ocean floor. This haline pump is stratifying the ocean, allowing warmer water locate under the colder water and thus stopping thermal convection in the ocean. Additional ocean interior warming is driven by geothermal heat flux and decomposition of organic rain. To test the hypothesis we present simple ocean box model that describes thermohaline circulation in the World Ocean. The first box is the Red and Mediterranean sea, the second is united high-latitude seas, the third is the ocean surface, and the fourth the ocean interior. The volume of these water masses and straight cross-sections are taken to be close to real values. We have accepted that the exchange of water between boxes is proportional to the difference in water density in these boxes, Sun energy inputs to the ocean and sea surface

  11. Paleodust variability since the Last Glacial Maximum and implications for iron inputs to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albani, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Murphy, L. N.; Raiswell, R.; Moore, J. K.; Anderson, R. F.; McGee, D.; Bradtmiller, L. I.; Delmonte, B.; Hesse, P. P.; Mayewski, P. A.

    2016-04-01

    Changing climate conditions affect dust emissions and the global dust cycle, which in turn affects climate and biogeochemistry. In this study we use observationally constrained model reconstructions of the global dust cycle since the Last Glacial Maximum, combined with different simplified assumptions of atmospheric and sea ice processing of dust-borne iron, to provide estimates of soluble iron deposition to the oceans. For different climate conditions, we discuss uncertainties in model-based estimates of atmospheric processing and dust deposition to key oceanic regions, highlighting the large degree of uncertainty of this important variable for ocean biogeochemistry and the global carbon cycle. We also show the role of sea ice acting as a time buffer and processing agent, which results in a delayed and pulse-like soluble iron release into the ocean during the melting season, with monthly peaks up to ~17 Gg/month released into the Southern Oceans during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).

  12. Geochemical Weathering in Glacial and Proglacial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranter, M.

    2003-12-01

    It seems counterintuitive that chemical erosion in glaciated regions proceeds at rates comparable to those of temperate catchments with comparable specific runoff (Anderson et al., 1997). All the usual factors that are associated with elevated rates of chemical weathering ( Drever, 1988, 1994), such as water, soil, and vegetation, are either entirely absent or absent for much of the year. For example, glaciated regions are largely frozen for significant periods each year, the residence time of liquid water in the catchment is low ( Knight, 1999), there are thin, skeletal soils at best, and vegetation is either absent or limited ( French, 1997). Other chapters in this volume have highlighted how these factors are important in other, more temperate and tropical environments. Even so, chemical erosion rates in glaciated terrain are usually near to or greater than the continental average ( Sharp et al., 1995; Wadham et al., 1997; Hodson et al., 2000). This is because glaciated catchments usually have high specific runoff, there are high concentrations of freshly comminuted rock flour, which is typically silt sized and coated with microparticles, and adsorbed organic matter or surface precipitates that may hinder water-rock interactions are largely absent ( Tranter, 1982). In short, the rapid flow of water over fine-grained, recently crushed, reactive mineral surfaces maximizes both the potential rates of chemical weathering and chemical erosion.A range of both lab- and field-based studies of glacial chemical weathering have been undertaken, mainly on the smaller glaciers of Continental Europe (e.g., Brown et al., 1993a, b), Svalbard (e.g., Hodson et al., 2002), and North America (e.g., Anderson et al., 2000). The field-based studies typically generate hydrographs of glacier runoff, which show a characteristic diurnal cycle during summer in low latitudes ( Figure 1), and more subdued diurnal cycles at high latitudes (Figure 2 and Figure 3). The concentration of ions in

  13. Glacial history of Tranquilo glacier (Central Patagonia) since the Last Glacial Maximum through to the present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagredo, E. A.; Araya, P. S.; Schaefer, J. M.; Kaplan, M. R.; Kelly, M. A.; Lowell, T. V.; Aravena, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Deciphering the timing and the inter-hemispheric phasing of former glacial fluctuations is critical for understanding the mechanisms and climate signals underlying these glacial events. Here, we present a detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations for Río Tranquilo glacier (47°S), since the LGM, including up to the present. Río Tranquilo is a small glacial valley located on the northern flank of Monte San Lorenzo, an isolated granitic massif, ~70 km to the east of the southern limit of the Northern Patagonian Icefield. Although Mt. San Lorenzo is located on the leeward side of the Andes, it is one of the most glacierized mountains in the region, with an ice surface area of ~140 km2. Geomorphic evidence suggests that during past episodes of climate change several small glaciers that today occupy the headwalls of Río Tranquilo valley expanded and coalesced, depositing a series of moraines complexes along the flanks and bottom of the valley. We used two independent dating techniques to constrain the age of the glacial history of the area. 10Be surface exposure ages from boulders located atop moraine ridges reveal that Río Tranquilo valley underwent glacial expansion/stabilization during at least the LGM (late LGM?), Late glacial (ACR and Younger Dryas) and Mid-Holocene. Within the Mid-Holocene limits, tree-ring based chronology indicates that Río Tranquilo glacier expanded during the Late Holocene as well. Our results are the first detailed chronology of glacial fluctuations from a single valley glacier, spanning the entire period from the (end of the) LGM up to the present, in southern South America. By identifying different glacial episodes within a single alpine valley, this study provides baseline data for studying the relative magnitude of the climate events responsible for these glacial events.

  14. Humid glacials, arid interglacials? Results from a multiproxy study of the loess-paleosol sequence Crvenka, Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, R.; Zech, M.; Markovic, S.; Huang, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The loess-paleosol sequences in the Carpathian Basin, southeast Europe, are up to tens of meters thick and provide valuable archives for paleoenvironmental and -climate change over several glacial-interglacial cycles. The Crvenka section spans the full last glacial cycle and is used in this multi-proxy study to reconstruct past climate conditions. Crvenka features the characteristic pattern in terms of grain size and weathering intensity, i.e. finer grain sizes and more intensive weathering in the paleosols compared to the glacial loess units. The analysis of plant-derived long-chain n-alkanes as molecular biomarkers for past vegetation indicates the presence of trees during glacials, which is consistent with other e.g. macrofossil findings and the notion that parts of southeast Europe served as tree-refugia. However, virtually tree-less grass steppes are reconstructed for the Eemian, the last interglacial. More humid conditions during glacials and more arid conditions during interglacials would be in good agreement with lake-level reconstructions from the Dead Sea, but they seem to be at odds with traditional interpretations of pollen and stable isotope records for the Mediterranean region. In order to further contribute to this issue, we performed compound-specific D/H analyses on the most abundant alkanes C29 and C31, which should mainly record past changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation. The absence of a clear signal towards more depleted values during glacials shows that the temperature-effect is not dominant and probably offset by a strong source-effect, namely the enrichment of the Mediterranean sea water during glacials. This very same source effect may generally need to be taken into account when interpreting terrestrial isotope records in the Mediterranean, which implies that more positive values during glacials may not necessarily indicate an amount-effect and more arid conditions.

  15. Glacial greenhouse-gas fluctuations controlled by ocean circulation changes.

    PubMed

    Schmittner, Andreas; Galbraith, Eric D

    2008-11-20

    Earth's climate and the concentrations of the atmospheric greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) varied strongly on millennial timescales during past glacial periods. Large and rapid warming events in Greenland and the North Atlantic were followed by more gradual cooling, and are highly correlated with fluctuations of N(2)O as recorded in ice cores. Antarctic temperature variations, on the other hand, were smaller and more gradual, showed warming during the Greenland cold phase and cooling while the North Atlantic was warm, and were highly correlated with fluctuations in CO(2). Abrupt changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) have often been invoked to explain the physical characteristics of these Dansgaard-Oeschger climate oscillations, but the mechanisms for the greenhouse-gas variations and their linkage to the AMOC have remained unclear. Here we present simulations with a coupled model of glacial climate and biogeochemical cycles, forced only with changes in the AMOC. The model simultaneously reproduces characteristic features of the Dansgaard-Oeschger temperature, as well as CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations. Despite significant changes in the land carbon inventory, CO(2) variations on millennial timescales are dominated by slow changes in the deep ocean inventory of biologically sequestered carbon and are correlated with Antarctic temperature and Southern Ocean stratification. In contrast, N(2)O co-varies more rapidly with Greenland temperatures owing to fast adjustments of the thermocline oxygen budget. These results suggest that ocean circulation changes were the primary mechanism that drove glacial CO(2) and N(2)O fluctuations on millennial timescales. PMID:19020618

  16. Last Glacial loess in the conterminous USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettis, E. Arthur, III; Muhs, Daniel R.; Roberts, Helen M.; Wintle, Ann G.

    2003-01-01

    The conterminous United States contains an extensive and generally well-studied record of Last Glacial loess. The loess occurs in diverse physiographic provinces, and under a wide range of climatic and ecological conditions. Both glacial and non-glacia lloess sources are present, and many properties of the loess vary systematically with distance from loess sources. United States' mid-continent Last Glacial loess is probably the thickest in the world, and our calculated mass accumulation rates (MARs) are as high as 17,500 g/m2/yr at the Bignell Hill locality in Nebraska, and many near-source localities have MARs greater than 1500 g/m2/yr. These MARs are high relative to rates calculated in other loess provinces around the world. Recent models of LastGlacial dust sources fail to predict the extent and magnitude of dust flux from the mid-continent of the United States. A better understanding of linkages between climate, ice sheet behaviour, routing of glacial meltwater, land surface processes beyond the ice margin, and vegetation is needed to improve the predictive capabilities of models simulating dust flux from this region.

  17. Iceland Dust Storms Linked to Glacial Outwash Deposits and to Sub-Glacial Flood (Jökulhlaup) Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, J. M.; Arnalds, Ó.; Olafsson, H.; Bullard, J.; Hodgkins, R.

    2008-12-01

    Studies of Arctic snow and ice cores reveal large temporal changes in dust concentrations, especially over glacial-interglacial cycles. Most efforts to model dust variability with climate have focused on sources in tropical and mid-latitude arid regions and have neglected high latitude emissions because of a lack of information on possible sources. Here we report on aerosol measurements which show that dust storms are common on Iceland and that major events are associated with glacial sedimentary environments. In July 1991 we established an aerosol sampling site on Heimaey, a small island located 18 km off the southeast coast of Iceland, with the objective of studying the transport of pollutant species to the Arctic. We found that although concentrations of nitrate and non-sea-salt sulfate were generally quite low, there were sporadic peaks that were primarily attributed to pollutant transport from Europe [Prospero et al., 1995]. Recently we expanded our analyses to include mineral dust, covering the period 1997 through 2004. Dust is present during much of the year (annual average 3.9 μg m-3) with a strong seasonal cycle (maximum in April, 14.0 μg m-3). However there are many spikes in the dust record, some exceeding 100 μg m-3, which are not associated with pollutant transport peaks. A search of NASA satellite web archives yielded six "dust storm" images that were acquired during our data period. These show prominent dust plumes streaming off the coast of Iceland. Here we show that each image could be closely linked to a major dust peak in our record (although there were many more peaks than satellite images). Most of these dust events were associated with dust emitted from glacial outwash (sandur) deposits. Some of the largest dust peaks were linked to jökulhlaups, an Icelandic term for sub-glacially generated outburst floods. The dust clouds were typically comprised of a series of well-defined plumes emitted from large "point" sources, mostly associated with

  18. A new view on the driving mechanism of Milankovitch glaciation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han-Shou

    1995-03-01

    Dynamical instabilities in the glaciation and deglaciation of the ice sheets can be triggered by pulsations of the rate of change of the orbital and rotational parameters. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the Milankovitch glaciation cycles are extremely sensitive to the rate of change of the obliquity frequency. The first of our three contributions is a pedagogic principle of dynamical instability which provides a scientific basis for the driving mechanism of the glaciation cycles. The second contribution is a clarification of the origin and climate significance of the obliquity related 100 kyr cycle in terms of nonlinear coupling between various orbital and rotational parameters. Finally, the fluctuations in the size of the ice sheets are computed using the Weertman-Birchfield-Watts model of ice sheets. It is demonstrated that the growth and decay of the width of the ice sheets are in good agreement with the variations in the continental ice volume as seen in the late Pleistocene δ 18O record.

  19. Ice Age Reboot: Thermohaline Circulation Crisis during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, L.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT) marked a fundamental change in glacial-interglacial periodicity, when it increased from ~41- to 100-kyr cycles and developed higher amplitude climate variability. Because it took place without significant changes in the Milankovitch forcing, this fundamental change must reflect either non-linear responses of the climate system to these external forcings, or internal changes in the ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system that led to longer periodicities and more intense glacial periods. We document using Nd isotopes a major disruption of the ocean thermohaline circulation (THC) system during the MPT between MIS 25-21 at ~950-860 ka, which effectively marks the first 100-kyr cycle, including an exceptional weakening through critical interglacial MIS 23 at ~900 ka. The data are from ODP Sites 1088 (41°8.163'S, 13°33.77'E, 2082m) and 1090 (42°54.82'S, 8°53.98E', 3702m) in the SE Atlantic Subantarctic Zone, near the upper and lower boundaries of NADW and Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Given evidence for nearly stable NADW and North Pacific Water (NPW) ɛNd-values over the last 2 Ma, we interpret the ɛNd variations to reflect changes in the NADW:NPW mixing fractions. During the studied pre-MPT 41-kyr world (MIS 31-25, 1,100-950 ka), at both sites the differences in glacial and interglacial ɛNd-values are small, indicating strong glacial as well as interglacial export of NADW. A major weakening of NADW export occurred during MIS 24-22, including MIS 23, which is unique as the only known interglacial in which the THC did not strengthen, and thus can be considered as a 'trans-glacial' period. The recovery into the post-MPT 100-kyr world is characterized by continued weak glacial THC. We conclude that the MPT ocean circulation crisis 'rebooted' the pacing and intensity of ice ages and facilitated the coeval drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and high latitude ice sheet growth, generating the conditions that stabilized 100-kyr cycles.

  20. Glacial sequence stratigraphy reveal the Weichselian glacial history of the SE sector of the Eurasian Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Matti

    2016-04-01

    Reconstructions of the last Weichselian glacial cycle 117,000-11,700 years (kyr) ago propose that S Finland, adjacent Russia and the Baltic countries in the SE sector of the Eurasian Ice Sheet (EIS), were glaciated during the Middle Weichselian time [marine isotope stage (MIS) 4, 71-57 kyr ago] and that this glaciation was preceded in S Finland by an Early Weichselian interstadial (MIS 5c, 105-93 kyr ago) with pine forest. Here glacial sequence stratigraphy (Powell and Cooper 2002) is applied to isolated Late Pleistocene onshore outcrop sections in S Finland. The analysed sedimentary records have traditionally been investigated, interpreted and published separately by different authors without an attempt to a methodologically more systematic survey. By putting new field data and old observations into a regional sequence stratigraphic framework it is shown how previously unnoticed regularities can be found in the lithofacies and fossil successions. It is shown that the proposed Middle Weichselian glaciation or the pine dominated interstadial did not take place at all (Räsänen et al. 2015). The one Late Weichselian glaciation (MIS 2, 29-11 kyr ago) at the SE sector of EIS was preceded in S Finland by a nearly 90 kyr long still poorly known non-glacial period, featuring tundra with permafrost and probably birch forest. The new Middle Weichselian paleoenvironmental scenario revises the configuration and hydrology of the S part of EIS and gives new setting for the evolution of Scandinavian biota. References Powell, R. D., and Cooper, J. M., 2002, A glacial sequence stratigraphic model for temperate, glaciated continental shelves, in Dowdeswell, J. A., and Cofaig, C. Ó. eds., Glacier-Influenced Sedimentation on High-Latitude Continental Margins: The Geological Society of London, London, Geological Society London, Special Publication v. 203, p. 215-244. Räsänen, M.E., Huitti, J.V., Bhattarai, S. Harvey, J. and Huttunen, S. 2015, The SE sector of the Middle

  1. Glacial-interglacial variability in ocean oxygen and phosphorus in a global biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastanga, V.; Slomp, C. P.; Heinze, C.

    2013-02-01

    Increased transfer of particulate matter from continental shelves to the open ocean during glacials may have had a major impact on the biogeochemistry of the ocean. Here, we assess the response of the coupled oceanic cycles of oxygen, carbon, phosphorus, and iron to the input of particulate organic carbon and reactive phosphorus from shelves. We use a biogeochemical ocean model and specifically focus on the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). When compared to an interglacial reference run, our glacial scenario with shelf input shows major increases in ocean productivity and phosphorus burial, while mean deep-water oxygen concentrations decline. There is a downward expansion of the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean, while the extension of the OMZ in the Pacific is slightly reduced. Oxygen concentrations below 2000 m also decline but bottom waters do not become anoxic. The model simulations show when shelf input of particulate organic matter and particulate reactive P is considered, low oxygen areas in the glacial ocean expand, but concentrations are not low enough to generate wide scale changes in sediment biogeochemistry and sedimentary phosphorus recycling. Increased reactive phosphorus burial in the open ocean during the LGM in the model is related to dust input, notably over the southwest Atlantic and northwest Pacific, whereas input of material from shelves explains higher burial fluxes in continental slope and rise regions. Our model results are in qualitative agreement with available data and reproduce the strong spatial differences in the response of phosphorus burial to glacial-interglacial change. Our model results also highlight the need for additional sediment core records from all ocean basins to allow further insight into changes in phosphorus, carbon and oxygen dynamics in the ocean on glacial-interglacial timescales.

  2. Across the southern Andes on fin: glacial refugia, drainage reversals and a secondary contact zone revealed by the phylogeographical signal of Galaxias platei in Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Zemlak, Tyler S; Habit, Evelyn M; Walde, Sandra J; Battini, Miguel A; Adams, Emily D M; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2008-12-01

    We employed DNA sequence variation at two mitochondrial (control region, COI) regions from 212 individuals of Galaxias platei (Pisces, Galaxiidae) collected throughout Patagonia (25 lakes/rivers) to examine how Andean orogeny and the climatic cycles throughout the Quaternary affected the genetic diversity and phylogeography of this species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed four deep genealogical lineages which likely represent the initial division of G. platei into eastern and western lineages by Andean uplift, followed by further subdivision of each lineage into separate glacial refugia by repeated Pleistocene glacial cycles. West of the Andes, refugia were likely restricted to the northern region of Patagonia with small relicts in the south, whereas eastern refugia appear to have been much larger and widespread, consisting of separate northern and southern regions that collectively spanned most of Argentinean Patagonia. The retreat of glacial ice following the last glacial maximum allowed re-colonization of central Chile from nonlocal refugia from the north and east, representing a region of secondary contact between all four glacial lineages. Northwestern glacial relicts likely followed pro-glacial lakes into central Chilean Patagonia, whereas catastrophic changes in drainage direction (Atlantic --> Pacific) for several eastern palaeolakes were the likely avenues for invasions from the east. These mechanisms, combined with evidence for recent, rapid and widespread population growth could explain the extensive contemporary distribution of G. platei throughout Patagonia. PMID:19017262

  3. Central Michigan University's Glacial Park: Instruction through Landscaping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Bruce; Francek, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the creation of a glacial park on a university campus. Suggests that the park is a useful instructional resource that helps students relate classroom material to outdoor phenomena by visualizing and identifying glacial landforms, recognizing their spatial relationships, and understanding how glacial features originated. Offers advice for…

  4. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  5. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Takenaka, S.; Nuimura, T.; Surazakov, A. B.; Sawagaki, T.; Yamanokuchi, T.

    2013-01-01

    Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs), and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the risk of such flooding, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs). We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes flooded. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA), on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV); i.e. the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability because it requires no particular expertise to carry out. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using the ASTER data. The distribution follows a power-law function, and we identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3 that require further detailed field investigations.

  6. Dust fluxes and iron fertilization in Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Fabrice; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Shaffer, Gary; Lamy, Frank; Winckler, Gisela; Farias, Laura; Gallardo, Laura; De Pol-Holz, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    Mineral dust aerosols play a major role in present and past climates. To date, we rely on climate models for estimates of dust fluxes to calculate the impact of airborne micronutrients on biogeochemical cycles. Here we provide a new global dust flux data set for Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions based on observational data. A comparison with dust flux simulations highlights regional differences between observations and models. By forcing a biogeochemical model with our new data set and using this model's results to guide a millennial-scale Earth System Model simulation, we calculate the impact of enhanced glacial oceanic iron deposition on the LGM-Holocene carbon cycle. On centennial timescales, the higher LGM dust deposition results in a weak reduction of <10 ppm in atmospheric CO2 due to enhanced efficiency of the biological pump. This is followed by a further ~10 ppm reduction over millennial timescales due to greater carbon burial and carbonate compensation.

  7. Glacial history of a mid-altitude mountain massif: cartography and dating in the Chablais area (France, Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, A.; Reynard, E.; Delannoy, J.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The Chablais area, considered as one of the cradles of glaciology (de Charpentier, 1841; Morlot, 1859), has been studied for a long time but several questions still remain unresolved. This study aims to reconstruct the glacial history of the massif, in order to explain the glacial landforms, which constitute an important part of the local geomorphology. The study focuses on the last glacial cycle (OIS 5 - OIS 2). The area is primarily associated with the the Valais glacier, by several local glacial flows and, to a lesser extent, by the Giffre glacier. Its position at the interface of the important Valais glacial flow and less powerful local flows is a specificity of the study area, which implies several bifurcations, penetration of the main glacier into laterals valleys, damming situations, and different responses of the various ice bodies to climatic changes. The study is divided in four steps. (1) The first step was to carry out a wide bibliographic survey to identify the state of knowledge, especially in relation to areas previously poorly studied and areas that needed to be reconsidered given developments in dating methods. (2) Field surveys allowed us to complete observations and prepare local geomorphological maps (of glacial landforms and associated phenomena). (3) The third step was to assemble heterogeneous data (old and new maps, Digital Terrain Models, aerial photographies) in a GIS to establish maps of glacial stages. (4) Finally, the absolute and relative chronology of deglaciation (Guitter, 2003) was completed by cosmogenic nuclide dating. Results have allowed us to address the conditions of glacial landform deposition and evolution in a mid-altitude mountain range, and show the need to be prudent in comparing results of different dating methods. Our results suggest that the ages obtained are overall too young in regard to 10Be ages on the northern alpine foreland (Ivy-Ochs et al., 2004) and are in conflict with 14C dates obtained in the area

  8. Glacial/Interglacial changes of southwest Pacific intermediate- and deep-water circulation over the last 350,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronge, Thomas; Tiedemann, Ralf; Prange, Matthias; Merkel, Ute; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lamy, Frank

    2015-04-01

    On glacial/interglacial timescales, Southern Ocean air-sea gas exchange is considered to be an important factor, driving the variability of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. To understand the role of oceanic variability in the global carbon cycle, it is necessary to reconstruct changes in deep- and intermediate-water circulation and chemistry of Southern Ocean water masses. In this context, our study aims on the reconstruction of glacial/interglacial changes in the vertical expansion of southwest Pacific Antarctic Intermediate Water. For our study, we compared isotope records (δ13C and δ18O) measured on the epibenthic foraminifera Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi from the Antarctic Intermediate Water and the Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (943 - 2066 m water depth) off New Zealand. We used two sediment cores from the Tasman Sea (MD06-2990 and MD06-2986), retrieved during R/V Marion Dufresne cruise MD152, and three sediment cores from the Bounty Trough east of New Zealand (MD97-2120, SO 213-82-1 and SO 213-84-1). Comparing these records, we can monitor changes in southwest Pacific water mass circulation over the past 350,000 years. Over this time period, we record a significant shoaling of the boundary between Antarctic Intermediate Water and Upper Circumpolar Deep Water during all glacial stages. We propose that freshwater input by melting sea ice into the glacial intermediate-water increased the buoyancy difference to underlying deep-waters, thus hampering the downward expansion of southwest Pacific Antarctic Intermediate Water during glacials. This interpretation is consistent with our modeling results, based on the Community Climate System model version 3, which also indicate a shoaling of glacial intermediate waters due to the input of meltwater. The glacial upward displacement of the water mass boundary significantly increased the vertical extent of circumpolar deep-waters, consequently extending the volume of the proposed glacial deep-water carbon pool.

  9. Glacial-marine and glacial-lacustrine sedimentation in Sebago Lake, Maine: Locating the marine limit

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.A.; Kelley, J.T. ); Belknap, D. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The marine limit in Maine marks a sea-level highstand at approximately 13 ka. It was inferred to cross Sebago Lake near Frye Island by Thompson and Borns (1985) on the Surficial Geological Map of Maine, dividing the lake into a northern glacial-lacustrine basin and a southern glacial-marine basin. This study examined the accuracy of the mapped marine limit in the lake and the nature of glacial-lacustrine and glacial-marine facies in Maine. Recognition of the marine limit is usually based on mapped shorelines, glacial-marine deltas, and contacts with glacial-marine sediments. This study, in Maine's second largest lake, collected 100 kilometers of side-scan sonar images, 100 kilometers of seismic reflection profiles, and one core. Side-scan sonar records show coarse sand and gravel and extensive boulder fields at an inferred grounding-line position near Frye Island, where the marine limit was drawn. ORE Geopulse seismic reflection profiles reveal a basal draping unit similar to glacial-marine units identified offshore. Later channels cut more than 30 m into the basal stratified unit. In addition, till and a possible glacial-tectonic grounding-line feature were identified. Slumps and possible spring disruptions are found in several locations. The top unit is an onlapping ponded Holocene lacustrine unit. Total sediment is much thicker in the southern basin; the northern basin, >97 m deep, north of the marine limit appears to have been occupied by an ice block. Retrieved sediments include 12 meters of rhythmites. Microfossil identifications and dating will resolve the environments and time of deposition in this core.

  10. Potential flood volume of Himalayan glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sakai, A.; Takenaka, S.; Nuimura, T.; Surazakov, A. B.; Sawagaki, T.; Yamanokuchi, T.

    2013-07-01

    Glacial lakes are potentially dangerous sources of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs), and represent a serious natural hazard in Himalayan countries. Despite the development of various indices aimed at determining the outburst probability, an objective evaluation of the thousands of Himalayan glacial lakes has yet to be completed. In this study we propose a single index, based on the depression angle from the lakeshore, which allows the lakes to be assessed using remotely sensed digital elevation models (DEMs). We test our approach on five lakes in Nepal, Bhutan, and Tibet using images taken by the declassified Hexagon KH-9 satellite before these lakes experienced an outburst flood. All five lakes had a steep lakefront area (SLA), on which a depression angle was steeper than our proposed threshold of 10° before the GLOF event, but the SLA was no longer evident after the events. We further calculated the potential flood volume (PFV); i.e., the maximum volume of floodwater that could be released if the lake surface was lowered sufficiently to eradicate the SLA. This approach guarantees repeatability to assess the possibility of GLOF hazards because it requires no particular expertise to carry out, though the PFV does not quantify the GLOF risk. We calculated PFVs for more than 2000 Himalayan glacial lakes using visible band images and DEMs of ASTER data. The PFV distribution follows a power-law function. We found that 794 lakes did not have an SLA, and consequently had a PFV of zero, while we also identified 49 lakes with PFVs of over 10 million m3, which is a comparable volume to that of recorded major GLOFs. This PFV approach allows us to preliminarily identify and prioritize those Himalayan glacial lakes that require further detailed investigation on GLOF hazards and risk.

  11. The permafrost glacial hypothesis: Is permafrost carbon the black box between insolation forcing and global climate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, R.

    2012-04-01

    Global climate is tightly correlated with and controlled by the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, and both show frequencies of orbital insolation on glacial-interglacial timescales. However, the 'black box', i.e. the mechanisms that control atmospheric CO2 and climate, remain enigmatic. Soil organic carbon pools in northern permafrost regions have long been extremely underestimated and may exceed 1670 Pg - more than twice the atmospheric carbon pool. The reason for this large 'permafrost carbon' storage is that cold and waterlogging conditions are favorable for the preservation of soil organic matter, which more than compensates for low biomass productivity. Recent findings of increasing CO2 and methane emissions from warming and thawing permafrost ecosystems have fueled concerns about strong positive climate feedbacks, but the potential role of permafrost carbon dynamics for atmospheric CO2 levels and global climate on glacial-interglacial timescales has largely been ignored. I propose a conceptual model - the permafrost glacial hypothesis - to explain the rhythm of the Pleistocene ice ages based on the strong positive climate feedback related to insolation-driven permafrost carbon dynamics: 1. Obliquity is the dominant mean annual insolation signal at high latitudes, and obliquity forcing of permafrost carbon dynamics can thus readily help explaining the '40 ka world', i.e. the pronounced 40 ka cyclicity of the ice ages, during the early Pleistocene. 2. The long-term Pleistocene cooling trend led to an expansion of permafrost areas to lower (~45°N) latitudes at ~1 Ma. Here, integrated annual insolation is no longer controlled by obliquity, but by eccentricity. As a consequence, obliquity cycles (glacial terminations) were skipped, unless they coincided with increasing eccentricity, resulting in ~80 or 120 ka glacial cycles and marking the Mid-Pleistocene Transition. The characteristic saw-tooth pattern of the ~100 ka ice ages during the Late and Middle

  12. Glacial-interglacial Changes in Ocean Carbon Chemistry constrained by Boron Isotopes, Trace Elements, and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, J. W. B.; Adkins, J. F.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2014-12-01

    Deep ocean carbon storage and release is commonly invoked to explain glacial-interglacial CO2 cycles, but records of the carbonate chemistry of the glacial ocean have, until recently, been scarce. Here we present new boron isotope (δ11B) and trace metal data from benthic foraminifera from a suite of 15 cores from the South Atlantic from depths ranging from 1500 to 4000 m. These records show distinct changes in the water column depth structure of these tracers between the last glacial maximum (LGM) and late Holocene. Comparison of these paired trace element and isotope ratios reveals new insights to the shared and individual controls on tracers including Li/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca, Mg/Li and δ11B. We further examine these data using a recently developed tracer fields modelling approach (Lund et al. 2011). This has previously been applied to δ18O data to investigate changes in circulation at the LGM. Here we extend this method to non-conservative isotopic and trace elemental tracers, allowing us to constrain the roles of circulation, the biological pump of organic carbon and CaCO3, and carbonate compensation, in setting deep ocean carbon storage at the LGM. Lund, D. C., J. F. Adkins, and R. Ferrari (2011), Abyssal Atlantic circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum: Constraining the ratio between transport and vertical mixing, Paleoceanography, 26, PA1213, doi:10.1029/2010PA001938.

  13. Glacial refugia, recolonization patterns and diversification forces in Alpine-endemic Megabunus harvestmen.

    PubMed

    Wachter, Gregor A; Papadopoulou, Anna; Muster, Christoph; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Knowles, L Lacey; Steiner, Florian M; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C

    2016-06-01

    The Pleistocene climatic fluctuations had a huge impact on all life forms, and various hypotheses regarding the survival of organisms during glacial periods have been postulated. In the European Alps, evidence has been found in support of refugia outside the ice shield (massifs de refuge) acting as sources for postglacial recolonization of inner-Alpine areas. In contrast, evidence for survival on nunataks, ice-free areas above the glacier, remains scarce. Here, we combine multivariate genetic analyses with ecological niche models (ENMs) through multiple timescales to elucidate the history of Alpine Megabunus harvestmen throughout the ice ages, a genus that comprises eight high-altitude endemics. ENMs suggest two types of refugia throughout the last glacial maximum, inner-Alpine survival on nunataks for four species and peripheral refugia for further four species. In some geographic regions, the patterns of genetic variation are consistent with long-distance dispersal out of massifs de refuge, repeatedly coupled with geographic parthenogenesis. In other regions, long-term persistence in nunataks may dominate the patterns of genetic divergence. Overall, our results suggest that glacial cycles contributed to allopatric diversification in Alpine Megabunus, both within and at the margins of the ice shield. These findings exemplify the power of ENM projections coupled with genetic analyses to identify hypotheses about the position and the number of glacial refugia and thus to evaluate the role of Pleistocene glaciations in driving species-specific responses of recolonization or persistence that may have contributed to observed patterns of biodiversity. PMID:27037513

  14. Estuarine removal of glacial iron and implications for iron fluxes to the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, Andrew W.; Crusius, John; Hoyer, Ian; Campbell, Robert

    2014-06-01

    While recent work demonstrates that glacial meltwater provides a substantial and relatively labile flux of the micronutrient iron to oceans, the role of high-latitude estuary environments as a potential sink of glacial iron is unknown. Here we present the first quantitative description of iron removal in a meltwater-dominated estuary. We find that 85% of "dissolved" Fe is removed in the low-salinity region of the estuary along with 41% of "total dissolvable" iron associated with glacial flour. We couple these findings with hydrologic and geochemical data from Gulf of Alaska (GoA) glacierized catchments to calculate meltwater-derived fluxes of size and species partitioned Fe to the GoA. Iron flux data indicate that labile iron in the glacial flour and associated Fe minerals dominate the meltwater contribution to the Fe budget of the GoA. As such, GoA nutrient cycles and related ecosystems could be strongly influenced by continued ice loss in its watershed.

  15. The relative efficacy of fluvial and glacial erosion over modern to orogenic timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppes, Michele N.; Montgomery, David R.

    2009-09-01

    Since the late nineteenth century, it has been debated whether rivers or glaciers are more effective agents of erosion. The dramatic landscapes associated with glaciated terrain have often led to the argument that glaciers are more erosive than rivers, and recent studies have documented the topographic signature of an ice-controlled limit of mountain height known as the `glacial buzz-saw'. Here we present a new global compilation of erosion rates, which questions the conventional view of glaciers and erosion. In regions of rapid tectonic uplift, erosion rates from rivers and glaciers both range from 1 to over 10mmyr-1, indicating that both are capable of generating erosion rates matching or exceeding the highest rates of rock uplift. Moreover, a comparison of erosion rates over timescales ranging from 101 to 107years indicates that glacial erosion tends to decrease by one to two orders of magnitude over glacial cycles, whereas fluvial erosion rates show no apparent dependence on time. We conclude that tectonics controls rates of both fluvial and glacial erosion over millennial and longer timescales and that the highest rates of erosion (>10mmyr-1) generally result from a transient response to disturbance by volcanic eruptions, climate change and modern agriculture.

  16. Millennial-scale sea ice variability in the southern Indian Ocean during the last glacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikehara, M.; Katsuki, K.; Yamane, M.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean has played an important role in the evolution of the global climate system. Sea ice coverage on sea surface strongly affects the climate of the Southern Hemisphere through its impacts on the energy and gas budget, on the atmospheric circulation, on the hydrological cycle, and on the biological productivity. In this study, we have conducted fundamental analyses of ice-rafted debris (IRD) and diatom assemblage to reveal a rapid change of sea ice distribution in the glacial southern Indian Ocean. Piston cores COR-1bPC and DCR-1PC were collected from the Conrad Rise and Del Caño Rise, Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. Age models of the cores were established by radiocarbon dating and oxygen isotope stratigraphy of planktic and benthic foraminifers. Records of IRD concentration suggest millennial-scale pulses of IRD delivery during the last glacial period. The depositions of rock-fragment IRD excluding volcanic glass and pumice were associated with increasing of sea-ice diatoms, suggesting that the millennial-scale events of cooling and sea-ice expansion were occurred in the southern Indian Ocean during the last glacial period. Provenance study of IRD grains suggest that the source of IRD in the southern Indian Ocean was mainly volcanic arc in the South Atlantic, based on chemical compositions of rock-fragment IRD grains. Thus prominent IRD layers in the glacial Southern Ocean suggest episodes of sea ice expansion and cooling in the Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean.

  17. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, T. M.; Wolff, E. W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H. E.

    2015-07-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial-interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1-42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01-0.84 mg m-2 per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been >=10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply.

  18. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-06-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters.

  19. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Howe, Jacob N W; Piotrowski, Alexander M; Noble, Taryn L; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial-interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ(13)C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  20. Glacial-eustatic sea-level curve for early Late Pennsylvanian sequence in north-central Texas and biostratigraphic correlation with curve for midcontinent North America

    SciTech Connect

    Boardman, D.R. II ); Heckel, P.H. )

    1989-09-01

    At least 30 transgressive-regressive cycles of deposition are recognized from the upper Desmoinesian East Mountain Shale to the mid-Virgilian Wayland Shale in north-central Texas. Maximum regressive deposits are typically paleosol mudstones and fluvial sandstones; maximum transgressive deposits are typically widespread, ammonoid-bearing, conodont-rich, dark phosphatic shales in more major cycles, and persistent fossiliferous shales or limestones overlying terrestrial deposits in more minor cycles. Delta complexes dominate the regressive sequences of many cycles. Using biostratigraphic criteria of first, last, sole, or acme occurrence of ammonoid, conodont, and fusulinid taxa, the authors correlate 17 cycles in the Texas sequence directly with 17 glacial-eustatic cycles of similar magnitude in the northern midcontinent. This correlation suggests that glacial eustacy was the basic control over the cyclic sequence in Texas, that tectonic masking of the eustatic signal by nearby orogenic movement in Texas was negligible, and that delta shifting, though conspicuous, was only a secondary control over the cyclicity there. Minor cycles recognized between the correlated cycles also match well enough between Texas and the midcontinent to further discount potential tectonic or deltaic masking of glacial-eustatic cyclicity. This strengthens the likelihood of correlating glacial-eustatic events across larger parts of North America, and perhaps with other parts of the world.

  1. High-precision radiogenic strontium isotope measurements of the modern and glacial ocean: Limits on glacial-interglacial variations in continental weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokadem, Fatima; Parkinson, Ian J.; Hathorne, Ed C.; Anand, Pallavi; Allen, John T.; Burton, Kevin W.

    2015-04-01

    Existing strontium radiogenic isotope (87Sr/86Sr) measurements for foraminifera over Quaternary glacial-interglacial climate cycles provide no evidence for variations in the isotope composition of seawater at the ±9-13 ppm level of precision. However, modelling suggests that even within this level of uncertainty significant (up to 30%) variations in chemical weathering of the continents are permitted, accounting for the longer-term rise in 87Sr/86Sr over the Quaternary, and the apparent imbalance of Sr in the oceans at the present-day. This study presents very high-precision 87Sr/86Sr isotope data for modern seawater from each of the major oceans, and a glacial-interglacial seawater record preserved by planktic foraminifera from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 758 in the north-east Indian ocean. Strontium isotope 87Sr/86Sr measurements for modern seawater from the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans are indistinguishable from one another (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7091792 ± 0.0000021, n = 17) at the level of precision obtained in this study (±4.9 ppm 2σ). This observation is consistent with the very long residence time of Sr in seawater, and underpins the utility of this element for high precision isotope stratigraphy. The 87Sr/86Sr seawater record preserved by planktic foraminifera shows no resolvable glacial-interglacial variation (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7091784 ± 0.0000035, n = 10), and limits the response of seawater to variations in the chemical weathering flux and/or composition to ±4.9 ppm or less. Calculations suggest that a variation of ±12% around the steady-state weathering flux can be accommodated by the uncertainties obtained here. The new data cannot accommodate a short-term weathering pulse during de-glaciation, although a more a diffuse weathering pulse accompanying protracted ice retreat is permissible. However, these results still indicate that modern weathering fluxes are potentially higher than average over the Quaternary, and such variations through

  2. Glacial curvilineations: gradual or catastrophic origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Livingstone, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Glacial curvilineations (GCLs) are enigmatic landforms that have recently been discovered in Poland (Lesemann et al., 2010, 2014). They comprise parallel sets of sinuous ridges separated by troughs that are found in tunnel valleys and replicate the morphology and pattern of the valley sides. The sedimentology for some has been reported to indicate that the sediment composition relates to a pre-GCL phase. So far just one theory for their formation exists - erosion by longitudinal-vortices within high-energy subglacial meltwater flows (Lesemann et al., 2010). Here, we provide an alternative hypothesis for their formation developed from observations of GCLs found along the southern sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. In all cases GCLs were found associated with tunnel valley widenings or hollows and occur as distinct parallel sets that mimic each other in terms of nicks and cusps. Using analogies from tree-rings and coral growth we take such mimicry as indicating either incremental growth or development from a template over time. Although without a strong physical explanation we find it much less likely that a series of parallel water channels would maintain such strong mimicry. We instead suggest that subglacial thawing of frozen ground in association with discrete water bodies (tunnel valleys or subglacial lakes) resulted in retrogressive bank failure, possibly along a glide plane provided by a frozen surface. References: Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J. a, Wysota, W., 2010. "Glacial curvilineations": New glacial landforms produced by longitudinal vortices in subglacial meltwater flows. Geomorphology 120, 153-161. Lesemann, J.-E., Piotrowski, J. a, Wysota, W., 2014. Genesis of the "glacial curvilineation" landscape by meltwater processes under the former Scandinavian Ice Sheet, Poland. Sediment. Geol. 312, 1-18.

  3. Glacial bed forms at Findelengletscher, Zermatt, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madella, Andrea; Nyffenegger, Franziska; Schlüchter, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The current glacier meltdown is increasingly unveiling the glacial bed forms produced by the most recent glacial advance of the 1980ies, such as flutes, mega-flutes and drumlins. This is a challenging opportunity to study these morphologies and the processes involved in their formation; in addition, our observation suggests a new question to be answered: why can't any of these features in units belonging to previous glacial advances be recognised? Similar forms could either have been washed away already, or never been built during LGM and since. The most beautiful and evident of the forms under investigation are the flutes and mega-flutes: elongated streamlined ridges of sediments either starting from an obstacle or just sticking out of the basal lodgement till. The way flutes have been initiated and then evolve is still partially unknown, due to their variety in shape, size and material. The glacial forefield at Findelengletscher under investigation deglaciated over the past two years, offers a well-preserved variety of such forms at all scales. Their material (basal lodgement till) is homogeneous and consistent all over the site, as well as their fabric. In addition, this silty sand shows a low plasticity index. These preliminary results support the idea that flutes build up very quickly during repeated seasonal advances in thin ice conditions with retreating trend (Coray, 2007), and that they could be equally easily and rapidly washed away. References: Coray Sandro (2007): Genesis and significance of flutes at Findelengletscher, Valais, Switzerland, Institute of Geological Sciences, University of Bern.

  4. Glacial hydrology and erosion patterns: A mechanism for carving glacial valleys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric; Beaud, Flavien; Champagnac, Jean-Daniel; Lemieux, Jean-Michel; Sternai, Pietro

    2011-10-01

    Most glacial erosion models assume that erosion rates are proportional to ice-sliding velocity. While recent studies have shown that water plays a major role in modulating sliding velocities, the impact it might have on erosion rates is still unclear. Here we incorporate subglacial hydrology into a glacial erosion model that is based on a sliding rule. Our results explicitly highlight that adding subglacial hydrology has profound impacts on the temporal and spatial patterns of glacial erosion. First, it suggests that erosion might mainly occur during melting seasons, when subglacial water pressure is large and effective pressure is low (i.e., before the channels fully develop and reduce the water pressure at the ice bedrock interface), which promotes sliding and erosion. Second, the distribution of erosion is bimodal with a peak at the equilibrium line altitude and, as we demonstrate, enhanced erosion at much lower altitudes within the ablation area where water due to melting abounds. This has important implications because it explains why glacial erosion can simultaneously set a limit on the mean elevation of mountain ranges and carve large fjords or glacial lakes.

  5. Late Glacial ice advances in southeast Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasky, Stefan; Graf, Angela A.; Zhao, Zhizhong; Kubik, Peter W.; Baur, Heinrich; Schlüchter, Christian; Wieler, Rainer

    2009-03-01

    The sensitivity of Tibetan glacial systems to North Atlantic climate forcing is a major issue in palaeoclimatology. In this study, we present surface exposure ages of erratic boulders from a valley system in the Hengduan Mountains, southeastern Tibet, showing evidence of an ice advance during Heinrich event 1. Cosmogenic nuclide analyses ( 10Be and 21Ne) revealed consistent exposure ages, indicating no major periods of burial or pre-exposure. Erosion-corrected (3 mm/ka) 10Be exposure ages range from 13.4 to 16.3 ka. This is in agreement with recalculated exposure ages from the same valley system by [Tschudi, S., Schäfer, J.M., Zhao, Z., Wu, X., Ivy-Ochs, S., Kubik, P.W., Schlüchter, C., 2003. Glacial advances in Tibet during the Younger Dryas? Evidence from cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 22, 301-306.]. Thus this indicates that local glaciers advanced in the investigated area as a response to Heinrich event 1 cooling and that periglacial surface adjustments during the Younger Dryas overprinted the glacial morphology, leading to deceptively young exposure ages of certain erratic boulders.

  6. Glacial Lake Outburst Flood on Lemon Creek, Southeastern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, S. L.; Schwarz, T. C.; Walter, M. T.

    2001-12-01

    A system of small glacial lakes on Lemon Glacier near Juneau, AK was studied to better understand its annual jokulhlaup cycle. Although jokulhlaup behaviors of many supraglacial and glacially-dammed lakes around the world have been studied, some observed relationships among the governing parameters remain mysterious. An associated two-lake system, Lakes Linda and Lynn, which are uniquely small among similar research, provide an opportunity to investigate the applicability of previously developed relationships between discharge magnitude and lake volume to a different spatial scale. The system proved to be interesting in that its behavior does not fit well with established jokulhlaup taxonomy. Additionally, this glacier discharges into Lemon Creek, an important development corridor for Juneau, AK and a productive salmon stream. Understanding how the yearly Lemon Glacier jokulhlaup event impacts this stream is essential to monitoring and meaningfully interpreting water quality data. Historical USGS Lemon Creek streamflow data and icefield observations from the Juneau Icefield Research Program (JIRP) were used to characterize the Lemon Glacier Jokulhlaup and identify changes in system since its discovery in 1962. A detailed field study was carried out from 6/15/01 to 8/2/01 to improve our understanding of the mechanics and thermodynamics of this system. Monitored during this period were lake-levels, lake-temperature profiles, air temperature, surface temperature, relative humidity, precipitation, wind speed/direction, solar radiation, and Lemon Creek streamflow and water-quality. This system has undergone substantial historical changes including the relatively recent development of Lake Lynn, which is now the larger of the two lakes. Continued enlargement of this system is increasing its contribution to peak streamflows in Lemon Creek and thus its impact on stream water quality, especially with respect to sediment loading.

  7. Constraints on the glacial erosion rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    It is thought that glaciers erode their underlying bedrock mainly through abrasion and quarrying. Theories predict erosion to be proportional to ice-sliding velocity raised to some power: ˙e = Kguls (1) where ė is the erosion rate, and Kg a proportionality constant and l an exponent. By implementing such a rule in numerical models, it has been possible to reproduce typical glacial landscape features, such as U-shape valleys, hanging valleys, glacial cirques or fjords. Although there have been great advances in the level of sophistication of these models, for example through the inclusion of high-order ice dynamics and subglacial hydrology, the proportionality constant, and the exponent have remained poorly constrained parameters. Recently, two independent studies in the Antarctic Peninsula and Patagonian Andes (Koppes et al., 2015) and the Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand (Herman et al., 2015) simultaneously collected erosion rate and ice velocity data to find that erosion depends non-linearly on sliding velocity, and that the exponent on velocity is about 2. Such a nonlinear rule is appealing because it may, in part, explain the observed variations in erosion rates globally. Furthermore, an exponent about 2 closely matches theoretical predictions for abrasion. Although it is tempting to argue that abrasion is the dominant process for fast flowing glaciers like the Franz Josef Glacier, there is a clear need for more data and better quantification for the role of quarrying. Both studies also led to very similar values for the proportionality constant Kg. These new results therefore imply that glacial erosion processes might be better constrained than previously thought. Given that glacial velocity can nowadays be measured and modeled at an unprecedented resolution, it may potentially become possible to use glacial erosion models in a predictive manner. Herman, F. et al. "Erosion by an Alpine glacier." Science 350.6257 (2015): 193-195. Koppes, M. et al. "Observed

  8. Nutrient conditions in the North Atlantic during the last glacial period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, M. M.; Straub, M.; Ellis, K. K.; Wang, X.; Rafter, P. A.; Sigman, D. M.; Haug, G. H.; Toggweiler, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    One proposed mechanism for lower atmospheric CO2 during past glacial periods is reduced overturning in the Southern Ocean, which reduces the leakage of deeply sequestered CO2 back into the atmosphere from this region. This mechanism relies on the assumption that nutrient consumption in the North Atlantic surface has remained relatively constant across glacial/interglacial cycles. Due to isotope fractionation during nitrate assimilation, nitrate in the sunlit surface waters is progressively elevated in 15N/14N as it is consumed by phytoplankton. The 15N/14N of organic matter bound within the walls of planktonic foraminiferal tests covary with the 15N/14N of nitrate consumed in surface waters across the global ocean and is thus expected to record past changes in nutrient consumption in high latitude surface waters, an assertion currently being tested with core top measurements. We have measured a down-core record of foraminifera-bound 15N/14N in the subpolar North Atlantic in an effort to reconstruct nutrient conditions in this region during the last glacial period. The foraminifera species N. pachyderma (sin.) was picked from regular depth intervals in core VM28-73 (57.2°N, 20.9°W). After chemical cleaning of the tests, the test-bound organic N was released by acid digestion of the tests, oxidized to nitrate with potassium persulfate, converted bacterially to nitrous oxide, and finally analyzed on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Foraminifera-bound 15N/14N is generally lower during the last glacial period than during the Holocene, suggesting less complete nutrient consumption during the former. However, at least two single-point maxima in 15N/14N are observed within the glacial section; these coincide with distinct sedimentological changes in the core and may be associated with Heinrich events. Full interpretation of the data awaits an improved age model for the core as well as a suite of ancillary measurements.

  9. The Glacial and Relative Sea Level History of Southern Banks Island, NT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Jessica Megan

    The mapping and dating of surficial glacial landforms and sediments across southern Banks Island document glaciation by the northwest Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) during the last glacial maximum. Geomorphic landforms confirm the operation of an ice stream at least 1000 m thick in Amundsen Gulf that was coalescent with thin, cold-based ice crossing the island's interior, both advancing offshore onto the polar continental shelf. Raised marine shorelines across western and southern Banks Island are barren, recording early withdrawal of the Amundsen Gulf Ice Stream prior to the resubmergence of Bering Strait and the re-entry of Pacific molluscs ~13,750 cal yr BP. This withdrawal resulted in a loss of ~60,000 km2 of ice --triggering drawdown from the primary northwest LIS divide and instigating changes in subsequent ice flow. The Jesse moraine belt on eastern Banks Island records a lateglacial stillstand and/or readvance of Laurentide ice in Prince of Wales Strait (13,750 -- 12,750 cal yr BP). Fossiliferous raised marine sediments that onlap the Jesse moraine belt constrain final deglaciation to ~12,600 cal yr BP, a minimum age for the breakup of the Amundsen Gulf Ice Stream. The investigation of a 30 m thick and 6 km wide stratigraphic sequence at Worth Point, southwest Banks Island, identifies an advance of the ancestral LIS during the Mid-Pleistocene (sensu lato), substantially diversifying the glacial record on Banks Island. Glacial ice emplaced during this advance has persisted through at least two glacial-interglacial cycles, demonstrating the resilience of circumpolar permafrost. Pervasive deformation of the stratigraphic sequence also records a detailed history of glaciotectonism in proglacial and subglacial settings that can result from interactions between cold-based ice and permafrost terrain. This newly recognized history rejects the long-established paleoenvironmental model of Worth Point that assumed a simple 'layer-cake' stratigraphy.

  10. Glacial Retreat and Associated Glacial Lake Hazards in the High Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. T.

    2013-12-01

    A number of studies have identified glacial retreat throughout the greater Himalayan region over the past few decades, but the Karakorum region remains an anomaly with large stagnating or advancing glaciers. The glacial behavior in the Tien Shan is still unclear, as few studies have investigated mass balances in the region. This study focuses on the highest peaks of the Tien Shan mountain range, in the region of Jengish Chokusu along the Kyrgyzstan-China-Kazakhstan border. In a first step, a 30-year time series of Landsat imagery (n=27) and ASTER imagery (n=10) was developed to track glacial growth and retreat in the region. Using a combination of spectral and topographic information, glacial outlines are automatically delineated. As several important glaciers in the study region contain medium to high levels of debris cover, our algorithm also improves upon current methods of detecting debris-covered glaciers by using topography, distance weighting methods, river networks, and additional spectral data. Linked to glacial retreat are glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) that have become increasingly common in High Mountain Asia over the last few decades. As glaciers retreat, their melt water is often trapped by weakly bonded moraines. These moraines have been known to fail due to overtopping caused by surge waves created by avalanches, rockslides, or glacial calving. A suite of studies throughout High Mountain Asia have used remotely-sensed data to monitor the formation and growth of glacial lakes. In a second step of the work, lake-area changes over the past 15 years were tracked monthly and seasonally using dense Landsat/ASTER coverage (n=30) with an automatic procedure based on spectral and topographic information. Previous work has identified GLOFs as a significant process for infrastructural damage in the southern Tien Shan/northern Pamir, as well as in the better studied Himalaya region. Lake identification and quantification of lake-growth rates is a valuable

  11. Glacial and periglacial geomorphology and its paleoclimatological significance in three North Ethiopian Mountains, including a detailed geomorphological map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickx, Hanne; Jacob, Miro; Frankl, Amaury; Nyssen, Jan

    2015-10-01

    Geomorphological investigations and detailed mapping of past and present (peri)glacial landforms are required in order to understand the impact of climatic anomalies. The Ethiopian Highlands show a great variety in past and contemporary climate, and therefore, in the occurrence of glacial and periglacial landforms. However, only a few mountain areas have been studied, and detailed geomorphological understanding is lacking. In order to allow a fine reconstruction of the impact of the past glacial cycle on the geomorphology, vegetation complexes, and temperature anomalies, a detailed geomorphological map of three mountain areas (Mt. Ferrah Amba, 12°51‧N 39°29‧E; Mt. Lib Amba, 12°04‧N 39°22‧; and Mt. Abuna Yosef, 12°08‧N 39°11‧E) was produced. In all three study areas, inactive solifluction lobes, presumably from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), were found. In the highest study area of Abuna Yosef, three sites were discovered bearing morainic material from small late Pleistocene glaciers. These marginal glaciers occurred below the modeled snowline and existed because of local topo-climatic conditions. Evidence of such Pleistocene avalanche-fed glaciers in Ethiopia (and Africa) has not been produced earlier. Current frost action is limited to frost cracks and small-scale patterned ground phenomena. The depression of the altitudinal belts of periglacial and glacial processes during the last cold period was assessed through periglacial and glacial landform mapping and comparisons with data from other mountain areas taking latitude into account. The depression of glacial and periglacial belts of approximately 600 m implies a temperature drop around 6 °C in the last cold period. This cooling is in line with temperature depressions elsewhere in East Africa during the LGM. This study serves as a case study for all the intermediate mountains (3500-4200 m) of the North Ethiopian highlands.

  12. Frost weathering versus glacial grinding in the micromorphology of quartz sand grains: Processes and geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronko, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Micromorphology of quartz sand grains is used to reconstruct processes occurring in the glacial environment and to distinguish the latter from other environments. Two processes dominate in the glacial environment, i.e., crushing and abrasion, or a combination thereof. Their effect is a wide range of microstructures on the surface of quartz grains, e.g., chattermarks, conchoidal fractures and multiple grooves. However, the periglacial environment also effectively modifies the surface of quartz grains. The active layer of permafrost is considered to have a significantly higher contribution to the formation of crushed grains and the number of microstructures resulting from mechanical destruction (e.g., breakage blocks or conchoidal fractures), as compared to deposits which are not affected by freeze-thaw cycles. However, only a few microstructures are found in both environments. At the same time, there are several processes in subglacial environments related to freeze-thaw cycles, e.g., regelation, congelation, basal adfreezing, and glaciohydraulic supercooling. Most likely, therefore, the role of the glacial environment in the destruction of quartz grains has been misinterpreted, and consequently the conclusions regarding environmental processes drawn on the basis of the number of crushed grains and edge-to-edge contacts are erroneous.

  13. Periodic floods from glacial Lake Missoula into the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia, northeastern Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Brian F.

    1984-08-01

    At least 15 floods ascended the Sanpoil arm of glacial Lake Columbia during a single glaciation. Varves between 14 of the flood beds indicate one backflooding every 35 to 55 yr. This regularity suggests that the floods came from an ice-dammed lake that was self-dumping. Probably the self-dumping lake was glacial Lake Missoula, Montana, because the floods accord with inferred emptyings of that lake in frequency and number, apparently entered Lake Columbia from the east, and produced beds resembling backflood deposits of Lake Missoula floods in southern Washington.

  14. North Atlantic Deep Water Production during the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Jacob N. W.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Noble, Taryn L.; Mulitza, Stefan; Chiessi, Cristiano M.; Bayon, Germain

    2016-01-01

    Changes in deep ocean ventilation are commonly invoked as the primary cause of lower glacial atmospheric CO2. The water mass structure of the glacial deep Atlantic Ocean and the mechanism by which it may have sequestered carbon remain elusive. Here we present neodymium isotope measurements from cores throughout the Atlantic that reveal glacial–interglacial changes in water mass distributions. These results demonstrate the sustained production of North Atlantic Deep Water under glacial conditions, indicating that southern-sourced waters were not as spatially extensive during the Last Glacial Maximum as previously believed. We demonstrate that the depleted glacial δ13C values in the deep Atlantic Ocean cannot be explained solely by water mass source changes. A greater amount of respired carbon, therefore, must have been stored in the abyssal Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum. We infer that this was achieved by a sluggish deep overturning cell, comprised of well-mixed northern- and southern-sourced waters. PMID:27256826

  15. Varied response of western Pacific hydrology to climate forcings over the last glacial period.

    PubMed

    Carolin, Stacy A; Cobb, Kim M; Adkins, Jess F; Clark, Brian; Conroy, Jessica L; Lejau, Syria; Malang, Jenny; Tuen, Andrew A

    2013-06-28

    Atmospheric deep convection in the west Pacific plays a key role in the global heat and moisture budgets, yet its response to orbital and abrupt climate change events is poorly resolved. Here, we present four absolutely dated, overlapping stalagmite oxygen isotopic records from northern Borneo that span most of the last glacial cycle. The records suggest that northern Borneo's hydroclimate shifted in phase with precessional forcing but was only weakly affected by glacial-interglacial changes in global climate boundary conditions. Regional convection likely decreased during Heinrich events, but other Northern Hemisphere abrupt climate change events are notably absent. The new records suggest that the deep tropical Pacific hydroclimate variability may have played an important role in shaping the global response to the largest abrupt climate change events. PMID:23744779

  16. Fire in Ice: Glacial-Interglacial biomass burning in the NEEM ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zennaro, Piero; Kehrwald, Natalie; Zangrando, Roberta; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Earth is an intrinsically flammable planet. Fire is a key Earth system process with a crucial role in biogeochemical cycles, affecting carbon cycle mechanisms, land-surface properties, atmospheric chemistry, aerosols and human activities. However, human activities may have also altered biomass burning for thousands of years, thus influencing the climate system. We analyse the specific marker levoglucosan to reconstruct past fire events in ice cores. Levoglucosan (1,6-anhydro-β-D-glucopyranose) is an organic compound that can be only released during the pyrolysis of cellulose at temperatures > 300°C. Levoglucosan is a major fire product in the fine fraction of woody vegetation combustion, can be transported over regional to global distances, and is deposited on the Greenland ice sheet. The NEEM, Greenland ice core (77 27'N, 51 3'W, 2454 masl) documents past fire activity changes from the present back to the penultimate interglacial, the Eemian. Here we present a fire activity reconstruction from both North American and Eurasian sources over the last 120,000 yrs based on levoglucosan signatures in the NEEM ice core. Biomass burning significantly increased over the boreal Northern Hemisphere since the last glacial, resulting in a maximum between 1.5 and 3.5 kyr BP yet decreasing from ~2 kyr BP until the present. Major climate parameters alone cannot explain the observed trend and thus it is not possible to rule out the hypothesis of early anthropogenic influences on fire activity. Over millennial timescales, temperature influences Arctic ice sheet extension and vegetation distribution at Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and may have altered the distance between NEEM and available fuel loads. During the last Glacial, the combination of dry and cold climate conditions, together with low boreal insolation and decreased atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may have also limited the production of available biomass. Diminished boreal forest extension and the southward

  17. Cyclic 100-ka (glacial-interglacial) migration of subseafloor redox zonation on the Peruvian shelf

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Sergio; Meister, Patrick; Liu, Bo; Prieto-Mollar, Xavier; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Khalili, Arzhang; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-01-01

    The coupling of subseafloor microbial life to oceanographic and atmospheric conditions is poorly understood. We examined diagenetic imprints and lipid biomarkers of past subseafloor microbial activity to evaluate its response to glacial-interglacial cycles in a sedimentary section drilled on the Peruvian shelf (Ocean Drilling Program Leg 201, Site 1229). Multiple and distinct layers of diagenetic barite and dolomite, i.e., minerals that typically form at the sulfate−methane transition (SMT), occur at much shallower burial depth than the present SMT around 30 meters below seafloor. These shallow layers co-occur with peaks of 13C-depleted archaeol, a molecular fossil of anaerobic methane-oxidizing Archaea. Present-day, non-steady state distributions of dissolved sulfate also suggest that the SMT is highly sensitive to variations in organic carbon flux to the surface shelf sediments that may lead to shoaling of the SMT. Reaction-transport modeling substantiates our hypothesis that shallow SMTs occur in response to cyclic sediment deposition with a high organic carbon flux during interglacials and a low organic carbon flux during glacial stages. Long diffusion distances expectedly dampen the response of deeply buried microbial communities to changes in sediment deposition and other oceanographic drivers over relatively short geological time scales, e.g., glacial-interglacial periods. However, our study demonstrates how dynamically sediment biogeochemistry of the Peru Margin has responded to glacial-interglacial change and how these changes are now preserved in the geological record. Such changes in subsurface biogeochemical zonation need to be taken into account to assess the role of the subseafloor biosphere in global element and redox cycling. PMID:24145422

  18. Glacial transport and local ice dynamics under the Keewatin Ice Divide of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, central Nunavut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, C.; Roy, M.; McMartin, I.

    2009-12-01

    Goulet, C.; Roy, M., Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and GEOTOP, University of Quebec in Montreal, QC, H3C 3P8; McMartin, I., Geological Survey of Canada, 601 Booth Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A OE8 Recent paleogeographic reconstructions indicate that the Keewatin Ice Divide (KID) of the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) was highly dynamic throughout the last glacial cycle. Extensive field measurements of cross-cutting ice-flow erosional features (striations, grooves) on multi-faceted bedrock outcrops, as well as mapping of streamlined landforms indicate significant displacements (up to 500 km) of this ice flow center during the last glacial cycle. These episodes of ice-flow reorganization likely affected the patterns of glacial transport, but the extent of the reworking of former glacial dispersal trains is often unconstrained in certain regions. Here we report ice-flow directional data and associated glacial-dynamic considerations for an area located 100 km north of Baker Lake, central Nunavut. This area lies underneath the zone of migration of the KID (essentially north of its final position), thus representing a key area for understanding the dynamics of this sector of the LIS. Measurements of ice-flow indicators indicate at least 7 ice-flow directions, going from N, NNW, NW to WNW, NNE, W, SE, and SW to WSW. A relative chronology was established from multiple intersecting striations and geometrical relations between multi-faceted outcrops, starting from older phases to younger ones with W, NW, NNW, and N. Surficial mapping using air-photo and satellite images indicate that this region is characterized by zones of fast and slower ice velocity. The presence in the centre of the study area of a drift-free positive relief formed by resistant NE-SW-oriented Proterozoic quartzite appears to have played an important role on the local ice dynamics by slowing down the velocity of the ice. Local example of varying ice velocity systems is expressed by a glacially

  19. Hypsometric analysis to identify spatially variable glacial erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternai, P.; Herman, F.; Fox, M. R.; Castelltort, S.

    2011-09-01

    Relatively little research has been undertaken on the use of digital elevation models to recognize the spatially variable glacial imprint of a landscape. Using theoretical topographies and a landscape evolution model, we investigate to what extent the hypsometric analysis of digital elevation models may be used to recognize the glacial signature of mountain ranges. A new morphometric parameter, which we term the hypsokyrtome (from the Greek: ipsos = elevation, kyrtoma = curvature), is derived from the gradient of the hypsometric curve. The efficacy of the hypsometric integral and hypsokyrtome is tested through the study of the Ben Ohau Range, New Zealand, whose glacial imprint has been described previously. With a numerical model we further test the geomorphic parameters in describing the morphologies of regions subject to diverse climatic and tectonic conditions. The hypsokyrtome is highly sensitive to glacial erosion, and the maps produced provide insights into the spatial distribution of glacial erosion. We use SRTM data and focus on two alternative geomorphic settings: the European Alps and the Apennines. The former has been affected by both fluvial and glacial erosion while the latter mainly exhibits a fluvially dominated morphology. The correlation between elevations with increased glacial erosion and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) equilibrium line altitudes (ELAs) suggests the prevalence of a "glacial buzz saw" in the Alps, indicating that climate may put a limit on alpine topography.

  20. Glacial isostatic uplift of the European Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mey, Juergen; Scherler, Dirk; Wickert, Andrew D.; Egholm, David L.; Tesauro, Magdala; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-04-01

    Present-day vertical movements of the Earth's surface are mostly due to tectonic deformation, volcanic processes, and crustal loading/unloading. In tectonically stable regions of North America and Scandinavia, vertical movements are almost entirely attributable to glacial isostatic rebound after the melting of the Laurentide and Fennoscandian ice sheets. In contrast, the Pleistocene Alpine icecap grew on a younger mountain belt that formed by collision of the European and African plates, still subject to shortening. Therefore, measured uplift is potentially a composite signal of tectonic shortening and unloading after deglaciation and concomitant erosion. Deciphering the contributions of tectonics and crustal unloading to present-day uplift rates in formerly-glaciated mountain belts is a prerequisite to using uplift data to estimate the viscosity structure of the Earth's mantle, a key variable in geodynamics. We evaluate the post-LGM glacial-isostatic rebound of the Alps following a 4-tiered procedure. First, we estimated the thickness distribution of sedimentary valley fills to create a bedrock map of the entire mountain belt. Second, this map was used as topographic basis for the reconstruction of the Alpine icecap using a numerical ice-flow model. Third, we estimated the equilibrium deflection of the Alpine lithosphere, using the combined loads of ice and sediments with a variable effective elastic thickness. Finally, we used an exponential decay function to infer the residual deflection and the present-day uplift rate for a range of upper mantle viscosities. Our analysis shows that virtually all of the geodetically measured surface uplift in the Swiss and the Austrian Alps can be attributed to glacial unloading and redistribution of sediments, assuming an upper-mantle viscosity lower than that inferred for an old craton (e.g., Fennoscandia), but higher than that for a region with recent crustal thinning (e.g., Basin and Range province).

  1. QUANTIFICATION OF GLACIAL EROSION IN THE ALPS USING VERY LOW-TEMPERATURE THERMOCHRONOLOGY (OSL & AHe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagnac, J.; Herman, F.; Rhodes, E. J.; Fellin, M.; Jaiswal, M.; Schwenninger, J.; Reverman, R. L.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of glaciations on the topography of the Alps is still unclear: Long-term denudation rate determined by low-T thermochronology are in the range of 0.2 to 1 mm/yr, and increased during the Plio-Quaternary by 3 fold (Vernon et al., 2008). Such an increase is also documented by peri-alpine sediment budget (Kuhleman, 2000), with a similar increase in sediment yields since 5-3 Ma. This increase was considered as evidence of a climatically-driven surface process change, attributed to increased precipitation (Cederbom et al., 2004) and erosion by glacial processes (Champagnac et al., 2007). The timing of the onset of intense glacial erosion as well as its rates are still ambiguous. The glacial erosion seems to have accelerated around 0.9 Ma as suggested by the ten fold increase of incision rates of a valley in the Central Alps (Häuselmann et al., 2007), and by information about vegetation and sedimentologic changes (Muttoni et al., 2003). There is however no direct quantification of topographic change during the Plio-Quaternary. We present here how we use OSL-thermochronology, a new thermochronometer of exceptionally low closure temperature (about 30°-40°C) (Herman et al subm.), new {U-Th}/He on apatites data, and a glacial erosion model (Herman and Braun 2008) to estimate topographic changes in the Alps in response to glaciations. Because of their low closure temperature, OSL and AHe thermochronology enables quantification of events of less than 1 Ma at very small wavelength of the topography. We collected two vertical profiles, one in the Zermatt Valley (Valais) and one in Maurienne Valley (Savoy). We infer from these results changes in topography, date and quantify relief creation under glacial-interglacial cycles. Cederbom, C.E, et al., Climate induced rebound and exhumation of the European Alps. Geology 32, 709-712 (2000). Champagnac, J.-D., et al., Quaternary erosion-induced isostatic rebound in the western Alps. Geology 35, 195-198 (2007). Ha

  2. Quaternary glacial geomorphosites from the Cantabrian Mountains (northern Iberian Peninsula): the Redes Natural Reservation and Picos de Europa Regional Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María

    2013-04-01

    the Quaternary glaciations, especially after the last local glacial maximum. Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., García-Ruiz, J.M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., Farias, P., Valero-Garcés, B., Moreno, A., Rico, M., Valcárcel, M., in press. A review of glacial geomorphology and chronology in northern Spain: timing and regional variability during the last glacial cycle. Geomorphology, doi: 10.1016/j.geomorph.2012.06.009. Serrano, E., González-Trueba, J.J., Pellitero, R., González-García, M., Gómez-Lende, M., in press. Quaternary glacial evolution in the Central Cantabrian Mountains (Northern Spain). Geomorphology, doi:10.1016/j.geomorph.2012.05.001. Research funded by the project CANDELA (CGL2012-31938) of the Spanish national research program in Earth Sciences and Hydric Resources (MICINN) and the project FC-11-PC-10-14 (FICYT-Asturias). L. Rodríguez-Rodríguez has developed her research under a grant of the Severo Ochoa Program (FICYT- Asturias).

  3. Outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, G. K. C.; Mathews, W. H.; Pack, R. T.

    1984-11-01

    The Pleistocene outburst floods from glacial Lake Missoula, known as the "Spokane Floods", released as much as 2184 km 3 of water and produced the greatest known floods of the geologic past. A computer simulation model for these floods that is based on physical equations governing the enlargement by water flow of the tunnel penetrating the ice dam is described. The predicted maximum flood discharge lies in the range 2.74 × 10 6-13.7 × 10 6 m 3 sec -1, lending independent glaciological support to paleohydrologic estimates of maximum discharge.

  4. Resolving Large Pre-glacial Valleys Buried by Glacial Sediment Using Electric Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, D. R.; Welz, M.; Rokosh, C. D.; Pontbriand, M.-C.; Smith, D. G.

    2004-05-01

    Two-dimensional electric resistivity imaging (ERI) is the most exciting and promising geological tool in geomorphology and stratigraphy since development of ground-penetrating radar. Recent innovations in 2-D ERI provides a non-intrusive mean of efficiently resolving complex shallow subsurface structures under a number of different geological scenarios. In this paper, we test the capacity of ERI to image two large pre-late Wisconsinan-aged valley-fills in central Alberta and north-central Montana. Valley-fills record the history of pre-glacial and glacial sedimentary deposits. These fills are of considerable economical value as groundwater aquifers, aggregate resources (sand and gravel), placers (gold, diamond) and sometime gas reservoirs in Alberta. Although the approximate locations of pre-glacial valley-fills have been mapped, the scarcity of borehole (well log) information and sediment exposures make accurate reconstruction of their stratigraphy and cross-section profiles difficult. When coupled with borehole information, ERI successfully imaged three large pre-glacial valley-fills representing three contrasting geological settings. The Sand Coulee segment of the ancestral Missouri River, which has never been glaciated, is filled by electrically conductive pro-glacial lacustrine deposits over resistive sandstone bedrock. By comparison, the Big Sandy segment of the ancestral Missouri River valley has a complex valley-fill composed of till units interbedded with glaciofluvial gravel and varved clays over conductive shale. The fill is capped by floodplain, paludal and low alluvial fan deposits. The pre-glacial Onoway Valley (the ancestral North Saskatchewan River valley) is filled with thick, resistive fluvial gravel over conductive shale and capped with conductive till. The cross-sectional profile of each surveyed pre-glacial valley exhibits discrete benches (terraces) connected by steep drops, features that are hard to map using only boreholes. Best quality ERI

  5. Glacial lakes in the Indian Himalayas--from an area-wide glacial lake inventory to on-site and modeling based risk assessment of critical glacial lakes.

    PubMed

    Worni, Raphael; Huggel, Christian; Stoffel, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Glacial lake hazards and glacial lake distributions are investigated in many glaciated regions of the world, but comparably little attention has been given to these topics in the Indian Himalayas. In this study we present a first area-wide glacial lake inventory, including a qualitative classification at 251 glacial lakes >0.01 km(2). Lakes were detected in the five states spanning the Indian Himalayas, and lake distribution pattern and lake characteristics were found to differ significantly between regions. Three glacial lakes, from different geographic and climatic regions within the Indian Himalayas were then selected for a detailed risk assessment. Lake outburst probability, potential outburst magnitudes and associated damage were evaluated on the basis of high-resolution satellite imagery, field assessments and through the use of a dynamic model. The glacial lakes analyzed in the states of Jammu and Kashmir and Himachal Pradesh were found to present moderate risks to downstream villages, whereas the lake in Sikkim severely threatens downstream locations. At the study site in Sikkim, a dam breach could trigger drainage of ca. 16×10(6)m(3) water and generate maximum lake discharge of nearly 7000 m(3) s(-). The identification of critical glacial lakes in the Indian Himalayas and the detailed risk assessments at three specific sites allow prioritizing further investigations and help in the definition of risk reduction actions. PMID:23218457

  6. The Growth Response of Two Diatom Species to Atmospheric Dust from the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linn J.; Breitbarth, Eike; Strzepek, Robert F.; Wolff, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the surface Southern Ocean has been suggested as one driver of the regular glacial-interglacial cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed cause is enhanced deposition of Fe-bearing atmospheric dust to the oceans during glacial intervals, with consequent effects on export production and the carbon cycle. However, understanding the role of enhanced atmospheric Fe supply in biogeochemical cycles is limited by knowledge of the fluxes and ‘bioavailability’ of atmospheric Fe during glacial intervals. Here, we assess the effect of Fe fertilization by dust, dry-extracted from the Last Glacial Maximum portion of the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core, on the Antarctic diatom species Eucampia antarctica and Proboscia inermis. Both species showed strong but differing reactions to dust addition. E. antarctica increased cell number (3880 vs. 786 cells mL-1), chlorophyll a (51 vs. 3.9 μg mL-1) and particulate organic carbon (POC; 1.68 vs. 0.28 μg mL-1) production in response to dust compared to controls. P. inermis did not increase cell number in response to dust, but chlorophyll a and POC per cell both strongly increased compared to controls (39 vs. 15 and 2.13 vs. 0.95 ng cell-1 respectively). The net result of both responses was a greater production of POC and chlorophyll a, as well as decreased Si:C and Si:N incorporation ratios within cells. However, E, antarctica decreased silicate uptake for the same nitrate and carbon uptake, while P. inermis increased carbon and nitrate uptake for the same silicate uptake. This suggests that nutrient utilization changes in response to Fe addition could be driven by different underlying mechanisms between different diatom species. Enhanced supply of atmospheric dust to the surface ocean during glacial intervals could therefore have driven nutrient-utilization changes which could permit greater carbon fixation for lower silica utilization. Additionally, both species responded more

  7. The Growth Response of Two Diatom Species to Atmospheric Dust from the Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Conway, Tim M; Hoffmann, Linn J; Breitbarth, Eike; Strzepek, Robert F; Wolff, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the surface Southern Ocean has been suggested as one driver of the regular glacial-interglacial cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed cause is enhanced deposition of Fe-bearing atmospheric dust to the oceans during glacial intervals, with consequent effects on export production and the carbon cycle. However, understanding the role of enhanced atmospheric Fe supply in biogeochemical cycles is limited by knowledge of the fluxes and 'bioavailability' of atmospheric Fe during glacial intervals. Here, we assess the effect of Fe fertilization by dust, dry-extracted from the Last Glacial Maximum portion of the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core, on the Antarctic diatom species Eucampia antarctica and Proboscia inermis. Both species showed strong but differing reactions to dust addition. E. antarctica increased cell number (3880 vs. 786 cells mL-1), chlorophyll a (51 vs. 3.9 μg mL-1) and particulate organic carbon (POC; 1.68 vs. 0.28 μg mL-1) production in response to dust compared to controls. P. inermis did not increase cell number in response to dust, but chlorophyll a and POC per cell both strongly increased compared to controls (39 vs. 15 and 2.13 vs. 0.95 ng cell-1 respectively). The net result of both responses was a greater production of POC and chlorophyll a, as well as decreased Si:C and Si:N incorporation ratios within cells. However, E, antarctica decreased silicate uptake for the same nitrate and carbon uptake, while P. inermis increased carbon and nitrate uptake for the same silicate uptake. This suggests that nutrient utilization changes in response to Fe addition could be driven by different underlying mechanisms between different diatom species. Enhanced supply of atmospheric dust to the surface ocean during glacial intervals could therefore have driven nutrient-utilization changes which could permit greater carbon fixation for lower silica utilization. Additionally, both species responded more strongly

  8. Arctic ocean sediment texture and the Pleistocene climate cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Morris, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Arctic Ocean sediment texture accurately reflects the Plio-Pleistocene climate cycle. The precision of paleoclimate interpretation is improved when deglaciation is recognized as a distinct climate stage, overlapping both glacial and interglacial stages, and for the later Pleistocene, perhaps never completed. Oxygen isotope stratigraphy and foraminifera productivity are out of phase but can be understood in the context of the transitional nature of the glacial, deglacial and interglacial climate stages of the Arctic Ocean.

  9. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, R.; Lund, B.; Wu, P. P.

    2013-12-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  10. Fault activation due to glacially induced stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Rebekka; Lund, Björn

    2014-05-01

    Melting glaciers worldwide have an effect on sea level, but also on the stability of pre-existing faults. The load due to continental ice sheets or glaciers depresses the surface below, leading to changes in the lithospheric stresses. The accumulation of ice mass increases the vertical stress, and the horizontal stresses increase due to the accompanying flexure of the lithosphere. During deglaciation, ice-mass loss causes a simultaneous decrease in vertical stress; however, horizontal stresses decrease only slowly due to the slow readjusting of the Earth. After the end of deglaciation, only the induced horizontal stresses remain as the process of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) proceeds visco-elastically. The modelling of this process and the estimation of fault slip is enabled by a new GIA-fault model. However, this finite-element model is only available in two dimensions, and the extension to three dimensions is a necessary step further to allow the comparison of obtained fault slips to observations of glacially induced faults in Europe and North America. The model has several input parameters, which affect the activation time of faults and their resulting slip (e.g. ice history, rheology of the Earth, frictional properties, pore-fluid pressure). We will present the results of the new 3D model and show the sensitivity of faults with respect to modelling parameters. Furthermore, a comparison to observations will be presented.

  11. Glacial isostasy - possible tilting of petroleum reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjeldskaar, Willy; Amantov, Aleksey

    2015-04-01

    Scandinavia has experienced major uplift after the last ice age. The rate of uplift along the coasts is so high that its effects have been observed within one generation. Glaciers, sediments and erosion act as loads on the Earth's surface - positive or negative. When a load is applied to the lithosphere covering the asthenosphere, part of the applied load will be supported by the elastic stiffness of the lithosphere, and part by the buoyant forces of the asthenosphere. This process is called isostasy, and the rebound over the last thousands of years has revealed how the Earth reacts to loads. Prior to the last glaciation, northern Europe has experienced more than 30 glaciations. Glacial erosion and repeated ice loading over the last millions of years has significantly influenced the temperature history of sedimentary basins, and associated hydrocarbon maturation in potential source rocks. In addition, repeated loading of glaciers leads to an isostatic response of the lithosphere, which may cause tilting of potential reservoirs, and possible remigration of hydrocarbons. The effects of glaciations are assumed to have caused parts of the accumulation in the Johan Sverdrup field (Utsira High) due to changed migration pathways. Glacial isostasy will lead to tilting of potential reservoirs on the entire Norwegian Continental Shelf. In the western Barents Sea and offshore mid Norway the tilts could exceed 4 m/km, dipping towards east during the glaciations.

  12. Interhemispheric correlation of late pleistocene glacial events

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, T.V.; Heusser, C.J.; Andersen, B.G.

    1995-09-15

    A radiocarbon chronology shows that piedmont glacier lobes in the Chilean Andes achieved maxima during the last glaciation at 13,900 to 14,890, 21,000, 23,060, 26,940, 29,600, and {ge}33,500 carbon-14 years before present ({sup 14}C yr B.P.) in a cold and wet Subantarctic Parkland environment. The last glaciation ended with massive collapse of ice lobes close to 14,000 {sup 14}C yr B.P., accompanied by an influx of North Patagonian Rain Forest species. In the Southern Alps of New Zealand, additional glacial maxima are registered at 17,720 {sup 14}C yr B.P., and at the beginning of the Younger Dryas at 11,050 {sup 14}C yr B.P. These glacial maxima in mid-latitude mountains rimming the South Pacific were coeval with ice-rafting pulses in the North Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, the last termination began suddenly and simultaneously in both polar hemispheres before the resumption of the modern mode of deep-water production in the Nordic Seas. Such interhemispheric coupling implies a global atmospheric signal rather than regional climatic changes caused by North Atlantic thermohaline switches or Laurentide ice surges. 51 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-09-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of measured glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38), and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), there are distinct outliers in the dataset. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume, and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion, and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled dataset to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  14. Quaternary Glacial Mapping in Western Wisconsin Using Soil Survey Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oehlke, Betsy M.; Dolliver, Holly A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of soils in the western Wisconsin have developed from glacial sediments deposited during the Quaternary Period (2.6 million years before present). In many regions, multiple advances and retreats have left a complex landscape of diverse glacial sediments and landforms. The soils that have developed on these deposits reflect the nature…

  15. Testing the Mass Balance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet During the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, D. J.; Carlson, A. E.; Legrande, A. N.; Anslow, F. S.; Licciardi, J. M.; Caffee, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    Recent findings have suggested that the global Last Glacial Maximum occurred 26.5-20 ka. During this time, ice sheets were at their maximum extent and eustatic sea level was nearly 130 m lower than present. Such stability of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets suggests a nearly neutral net mass balance. Here we test the mass balance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet at the Last Glacial Maximum using an energy-mass balance model and two different ice sheet configurations. The energy-mass balance model is forced by simulated climate from the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Model E-R, consistent with Last Glacial Maximum conditions. This coupled atmosphere-ocean global climate model contains water isotope tracers throughout the hydrologic cycle, which are used to constrain model skill against water isotopic records. Two model experiments are performed with different Laurentide Ice Sheet configurations: one using the ICE-5G geophysical reconstruction and the other using an alternative reconstruction based on a flow-line model that simulates glacier dynamics over deformable and rigid beds. These two reconstructions have widely contrasting ice sheet geometries at the Last Glacial Maximum, with the ICE-5G reconstruction having a much larger Keewatin Dome over west-central Canada, while the largest mass center according to the flow-line model is in the Labrador Dome over eastern Canada. This disparity in ice sheet geometry may result in large differences in simulated climate and net ice sheet mass balance. Initial results suggest that 1) the ICE-5G ice sheet forces a Last Glacial Maximum climate in conflict with paleoceanographic reconstructions of ocean circulation, whereas the flow-line ice sheet is in better agreement with circulation reconstructions; and 2) the initial increase in boreal summer insolation could trigger a negative mass balance for the Laurentide Ice Sheet by 21 ka, driving ice retreat. We will also compare our mass balance results with existing

  16. Reconstruction of the glacial maximum recorded in the central Cantabrian Mountains (N Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Laura; Jiménez-Sánchez, Montserrat; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María

    2014-05-01

    The Cantabrian Mountains is a coastal range up to 2648 m altitude trending parallel to northern Iberian Peninsula edge at a maximum distance of 100 km inland (~43oN 5oW). Glacial sediments and landforms are generally well-preserved at altitudes higher than 1600 m, evidencing the occurrence of former glaciations. Previous research supports a regional glacial maximum prior to ca 38 cal ka BP and an advanced state of deglaciation by the time of the global Last Glacial Maximum (Jiménez-Sánchez et al., 2013). A geomorphological database has been produced in ArcGIS (1:25,000 scale) for an area about 800 km2 that partially covers the Redes Natural Reservation and Picos de Europa Regional Park. A reconstruction of the ice extent and flow pattern of the former glaciers is presented for this area, showing that an ice field was developed on the study area during the local glacial maximum. The maximum length of the ice tongues that drained this icefield was remarkably asymmetric between both slopes, recording 1 to 6 km-long in the northern slope and up to 19 km-long in southern one. The altitude difference between the glacier fronts of both mountain slopes was ca 100 m. This asymmetric character of the ice tongues is related to geologic and topo-climatic factors. Jiménez-Sánchez, M., Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L., García-Ruiz, J.M., Domínguez-Cuesta, M.J., Farias, P., Valero-Garcés, B., Moreno, A., Rico, M., Valcárcel, M., 2013. A review of glacial geomorphology and chronology in northern Spain: timing and regional variability during the last glacial cycle. Geomorphology 196, 50-64. Research funded by the CANDELA project (MINECO-CGL2012-31938). L. Rodríguez-Rodríguez is a PhD student with a grant from the Spanish national FPU Program (MECD).

  17. The nature of millennial-scale climate variability during the past two glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margari, V.; Skinner, L. C.; Tzedakis, P. C.; Ganopolski, A.; Vautravers, M.; Shackleton, N. J.

    2010-02-01

    During the last glacial period, iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic disrupted the meridional overturning circulation, leading to cooling in the Northern Hemisphere and warming in Antarctica. This asymmetric response can be explained by a bipolar see-saw mechanism, whereby changes in the strength of the meridional overturning circulation lead to changes in the interhemispheric heat transport. It is unclear, however, to what extent the response of the overturning circulation is a function of freshwater flux and boundary climate conditions. Here we use foraminiferal isotope and pollen records from the Portuguese margin to reconstruct surface- and deep-water hydrography and atmospheric changes during the last and penultimate glacial periods. When we compare our records with temperature reconstructions from Antarctica, we find that the bipolar see-saw was a characteristic feature of both glacial periods. However, the comparison also underlines the dependence of the bipolar see-saw on background climate and magnitude of iceberg discharge. It also suggests that an intensified hydrological cycle may lead to a weaker overturning circulation with a smaller disruption threshold and extended North Atlantic stadial durations.

  18. Incursions of southern-sourced water into the deep North Atlantic during late Pliocene glacial intensification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, David C.; Bailey, Ian; Wilson, Paul A.; Chalk, Thomas B.; Foster, Gavin L.; Gutjahr, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    The circulation and internal structure of the oceans exert a strong influence on Earth's climate because they control latitudinal heat transport and the segregation of carbon between the atmosphere and the abyss. Circulation change, particularly in the Atlantic Ocean, is widely suggested to have been instrumental in the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation when large ice sheets first developed on North America and Eurasia during the late Pliocene, approximately 2.7 million years ago. Yet the mechanistic link and cause/effect relationship between ocean circulation and glaciation are debated. Here we present new records of North Atlantic Ocean structure using the carbon and neodymium isotopic composition of marine sediments recording deep water for both the Last Glacial to Holocene (35-5 thousand years ago) and the late Pliocene to earliest Pleistocene (3.3-2.4 million years ago). Our data show no secular change. Instead we document major southern-sourced water incursions into the deep North Atlantic during prominent glacials from 2.7 million years ago. Our results suggest that Atlantic circulation acts as a positive feedback rather than as an underlying cause of late Pliocene Northern Hemisphere glaciation. We propose that, once surface Southern Ocean stratification and/or extensive sea-ice cover was established, cold-stage expansions of southern-sourced water such as those documented here enhanced carbon dioxide storage in the deep ocean, helping to increase the amplitude of glacial cycles.

  19. Enhanced subarctic Pacific stratification and nutrient utilization during glacials over the last 1.2 Myr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudson, Karla P.; Ravelo, Ana Christina

    2015-11-01

    The relationship between climate, biological productivity, and nutrient flux is of considerable interest in the subarctic Pacific, which represents an important high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll region. While previous studies suggest that changes in iron supply and/or physical ocean stratification could hypothetically explain orbital-scale fluctuations in subarctic Pacific nutrient utilization and productivity, previous records of nutrient utilization are too short to evaluate these relationships over many glacial-interglacial cycles. We present new, high-resolution records of sedimentary δ15N, which offer the first opportunity to evaluate systematic, orbital-scale variations in subarctic Pacific nitrate utilization from 1.2 Ma. Nitrate utilization was enhanced during all glacials, varied with orbital-scale periodicity since the mid-Pleistocene transition, was strongly correlated with enhanced aeolian dust and low atmospheric CO2, but was not correlated with productivity. These results suggest that glacial stratification, rather than iron fertilization, systematically exerted an important regional control on nutrient utilization and air-sea carbon flux.

  20. Two contributors to the glacial CO2 decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broecker, Wallace S.; Yu, Jimin; Putnam, Aaron E.

    2015-11-01

    It is generally accepted that the glacial drawdown of atmospheric CO2 content is the sole result of uptake by the ocean. Here we make a case that the reduction of planetary CO2 outgassing made a significant contribution. We propose that the ocean contribution to CO2 reduction closely followed Northern Hemisphere summer insolation and was superimposed on a ramp-like decline resulting from a reduction in the input of planetary CO2. We base this scenario on new records of δ13C and B to Ca ratio in cores from the upper and lower portions of the deep Atlantic. They demonstrate that the waxing and waning of the stratification of Atlantic deep water follows summer insolation. Our thoughts were driven by the observation that over the last 30 kyr the extent of mountain glaciation in both hemispheres appears to have tracked the atmosphere's CO2 content, suggesting that the connection between orbital cycles and land ice cover is via the ocean. Instead of a direct connection between ice extent and summer insolation, the tie is a modulation of the heat and fresh water budgets of the northern Atlantic. Changes in the boundary conditions lead to reorganizations of ocean circulation and, as a consequence, changes in CO2 storage in the ocean.

  1. Vegetation of the Central Beringian Lowlands: Evidence of a Glacial Refugium Found in IODP Expedition 323 Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, R.; Fowell, S. J.; Bigelow, N. H.; VanLaningham, S.

    2011-12-01

    The lowlands of central Beringia may have acted as a glacial refugium for boreal vegetation, which expanded into eastern and western Beringia as climate changed and glaciers retreated. Persistence of trees, shrubs and mesic-adapted vegetation in the vicinity of the modern Bering Strait and Bering Sea Shelf could have presented a barrier to migrating fauna during Pleistocene glacial stages. These hypotheses have been difficult to test, because sampling has been restricted to lacustrine sediment and peat deposits accessible in eastern and western Beringia. Pollen analysis of cores from IODP Expedition 323 (Bering Sea Expedition) sites U1339 and U1343, on the edge of the Bering Sea Shelf, permits reconstruction of the terrestrial vegetation of adjacent south-central Beringia. Palynological assemblages extracted from sediment that accumulated during Marine Isotope Stages 2 and 6 are dominated by grass (Poaceae ≥ 15%) and sedge (Cyperaceae ≥ 20%). Spruce (Picea ≥ 5%), birch (Betula ≥ 10%) and alder (Alnus ≥ 5%) are also consistently present throughout glacial/interglacial cycles, suggesting that small populations of trees and shrubs remained in central Beringia during glacial maxima. These results support the refugium hypothesis. Although it is possible that some of the boreal plant pollen deposited during glacial stages is derived from interglacial sediment reworked by rivers flowing across the emergent shelf, we postulate that such sources only contribute about 1-5% of the total sediment found at these Bering slope sites. Thus we consider the palynological assemblages from IODP Expedition 323 a robust proxy for the glacial vegetation of central Beringia.

  2. Quaternary glacial evolution in the Central Cantabrian Mountains (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, E.; González-Trueba, J. J.; Pellitero, R.; González-García, M.; Gómez-Lende, M.

    2013-08-01

    The glacial evolution of the Cantabrian Mountains is not well known. Previous studies have focused on the extent of the glacial maximum and the presence of younger features in several massifs. Recently, efforts have been made to date glacial periods, particularly the glacial maximum. This work presents a reconstruction of the glacial evolution in the Cantabrian Mountains, providing data on the environmental characteristics and timing of the different stages from the Quaternary glacial maximum to the Little Ice Age. The study area covers 3000 km2 between the 4°58'W and 3°34'W and includes eleven massifs of the central area of the Cantabrian Mountains. The selected sectors have an Atlantic and Atlantic-Mediterranean transitional climate and include the highest massifs (above 2600 m) and low-altitude glacierised massifs (lower than 2000 m). Glacial extent and evolution have been reconstructed on the basis of detailed geomorphological and morphostratigraphic mapping. The equilibrium line altitude (palaeo-ELA) has been estimated for the different stages of each tongue. The ELA has been assessed by the AAR and modified Kurowski methods and altitude methods have been considered. A numerical chronological framework is proposed using 17 AMS radiocarbon and one OSL data obtained in lake and bog deposits from three massifs. Four main glacial stages have been differentiated, between 38,000 BP and the Little Ice Age. They correspond to different cold environments, and the number of glacial stages varies from one to four among the different massifs. Conclusions are analysed in the context of the Quaternary glacial evolution of other Iberian mountains.

  3. Global Inventory of Terrestrial Glacial Megafloods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, V. R.

    2010-12-01

    After centuries of geological controversy it is now well-established that the last major deglaciation of planet Earth involved huge fluxes of water from the wasting continental ice sheets, and that much of this water was delivered as floods of immense magnitude and relatively short duration. These late Quaternary megafloods had short-term peak flows comparable in discharge to the more prolonged fluxes of ocean currents. (The discharges for both ocean currents and megafloods generally exceed one million cubic meters per second, hence the prefix “mega.”) Some outburst floods likely induced very rapid, short-term effects on Quaternary climates. The late Quaternary megafloods also greatly altered drainage evolution and the planetary patterns of water and sediment movement to the oceans. The classic Channeled Scabland region is now seen a but a small component in a source-to-sink system extending from ice-marginal lacustrine (glacial lakes Columbia and Missoula) and possible subglacial sources beneath the Cordilleran Ice Sheet, through the scabland intermediate zone, and on to sink relationships on the abyssal plain of the Pacific Ocean. Other North American glacial megaflood landscapes are now recognized in the Columbia and Snake River drainages of the northwestern U.S.; in the spillway systems of the upper Mississippi Basin; near the Great Lakes and adjacent St. Lawrence Basin; the Hudson River Basin; the Mackenzie Basin; the Yukon Basin (Porcupine River); the Sustina and Copper River Basins (Alaska); and the Hudson Strait. South American megafloods in the Santa Cruz River system (Argentina) emanated from the Patagonian Ice Sheet, and other Patagonian megaflooding probably occurred on the Chilean side. In Eurasia, the megaflooding from the margins of the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet spilled through the English Channel. In the mountain areas of central northern Asia, there were megaflood outbursts from the Issyk-Kul area, the Altai Mountains (upper Ob drainage), and the

  4. The influence of glacial ice sheets on Atlantic meridional overturning circulation through atmospheric circulation change under glacial climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, Sam; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Yoshimori, Masakazu; Oka, Akira; Chan, Wing-Le

    2016-04-01

    Recent coupled modeling studies have shown that the existence of the glacial ice sheets intensifies the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Since this may play an important role in maintaining a strong AMOC over the last glacial period, which is suggested by recent reconstruction study, it is very important to understand the process by which glacial ice sheets intensify the AMOC. Here, a decoupled simulation is conducted to investigate the effect of wind change due to glacial ice sheets on the AMOC, the crucial region where wind modifies the AMOC and the mechanism, which remained elusive in previous studies. First, from atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) experiments, the effect of glacial ice sheets on the surface wind is evaluated. Second, from ocean general circulation model (OGCM) experiments, the influence of the wind stress change on the AMOC is evaluated by applying only the changes in the surface wind as a boundary condition, while leaving surface heat and freshwater fluxes unchanged. Moreover, several sensitivity experiments are conducted. Using the AGCM, glacial ice sheets are applied individually. Using the OGCM, changes in the wind are applied regionally or at different magnitudes, ranging from the full glacial to modern levels. These experiments demonstrate that glacial ice sheets intensify the AMOC through an increase in the wind stress curl mainly at the North Atlantic mid-latitudes. This intensification is caused by the increased Ekman upwelling and gyre transport of salt while the change in sea ice transport works as a negative, though minor, feedback.

  5. Developing a chronology for glacial advances in the Spanish Pyrenees with luminescence dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edward; Sancho, Carlos; McDonald, Eric; Garcia-Ruiz, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Over the course of 15 years, a significant number of sediment samples directly from glacial contexts, or from significant fluvial aggradations related to glacial advances, have been dated using OSL in the Spanish Pyrenees. These provide a record of significant glaciation early during the last glacial cycle, with subsequent events decreasing in size; the LGM advance appears surprisingly small. The development and further extension of this chronology is limited by two issues. These are i) the degree of incomplete zeroing of the luminescence signal experienced by sand grains during transport in high energy fluvial systems and in glacial contexts, and ii) the poor luminescence characteristics of quartz in this region. Both of these limitations are common, if not ubiquitous, in glaciated mountain landscapes. The second limitation is caused by the luminescence properties of quartz in bedrock, and of quartz in short-residence geomorphic contexts where grains are derived directly from bedrock before being flushed from these environments. In order to overcome these constraints, several different approaches have been taken, using quartz OSL, and more recently taking advantage of recent developments in the dating of K-feldspar using IRSL (Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence). Single grains of K-feldspar have been dated from a wide range of different high-energy fluvial contexts around the globe, using a post-IR IRSL dating protocol. Several of these localities have independent age control, providing the opportunity to assess this approach. Future directions for luminescence dating applications in Spain, and other circum-Mediterranean regions will be provided.

  6. A simple metabolic model of glacial-interglacial energy supply to the upper ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelegrí, J. L.; Olivella, R.; García-Olivares, A.

    2011-03-01

    We use a simple two-state two-box ocean to simulate the CO2 signal during the last four glacial-interglacial transitions in the earth system. The model is inspired by the similarity in spatial organization and temporal transition patterns between the earth and other complex systems, such as mammals. The comparison identifies the earth's metabolic rate with net autotrophic primary production in the upper ocean, sustained through new inorganic carbon and nutrients advected from the deep ocean and organic matter remineralized within the upper ocean. We view the glacial-interglacial transition as a switch of the upper ocean from a basal to an enhanced metabolic state, with energy supply initially relying on the remineralization of the local organic sources and the eventual steady state resulting from the increased advective supply of inorganic deep sources. During the interglacial-glacial transition the opposite occurs, with an initial excess of advective supply and primary production that allows the replenishment of the upper-ocean organic storages. We set the relative change in energy supply from the CO2 signal and use genetic algorithms to explore the sensitivity of the model output to both the basal recirculation rate and the intensity-timing of the maximum recirculation rate. The model is capable of reproducing quite well the long-term oscillations, as shown by correlations with observations typically about 0.8. The dominant time scale for each cycle ranges between about 40 and 45 kyr, close to the 41 kyr average obliquity astronomical period, and the deep-ocean recirculation rate increases between one and two orders of magnitude from glacial to interglacial periods.

  7. Lowering of glacial atmospheric CO2 in response to changes in oceanic circulation and marine biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, Victor; Ganopolski, Andrey; Archer, David; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    We use an Earth system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2, to investigate what recent improvements in the representation of the physics and biology of the glacial ocean imply for the atmospheric concentration. The coupled atmosphere-ocean model under the glacial boundary conditions is able to reproduce the deep, salty, stagnant water mass inferred from Antarctic deep pore water data and the changing temperature of the entire deep ocean. When carbonate compensation is included in the model, we find a CO2 drawdown of 43 ppmv associated mainly with the shoaling of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation and an increased fraction of water masses of southern origin in the deep Atlantic. Fertilizing the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Southern Ocean north of the polar front leads to a further drawdown of 37 ppmv. Other changes to the glacial carbon cycle include a decrease in the amount of carbon stored in the terrestrial biosphere (540 Pg C), which increases atmospheric CO2 by 15 ppmv, and a change in ocean salinity resulting from a drop in sea level, which elevates CO2 by another 12 ppmv. A decrease in shallow water CaCO3 deposition draws down CO2 by 12 ppmv. In total, the model is able to explain more than two thirds (65 ppmv) of the glacial to interglacial CO2 change, based only on mechanisms that are clearly documented in the proxy data. A good match between simulated and reconstructed distribution of δ13C changes in the deep Atlantic suggests that the model captures the mechanisms of reorganization of biogeochemistry in the Atlantic Ocean reasonably well. Additional, poorly constrained mechanisms to explain the rest of the observed drawdown include changes in the organic carbon:CaCO3 ratio of sediment rain reaching the seafloor, iron fertilization in the subantarctic Pacific Ocean, and changes in terrestrial weathering.

  8. Phylogeography and Post-Glacial Recolonization in Wolverines (Gulo gulo) from across Their Circumpolar Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Zigouris, Joanna; Schaefer, James A.; Fortin, Clément; Kyle, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Interglacial-glacial cycles of the Quaternary are widely recognized in shaping phylogeographic structure. Patterns from cold adapted species can be especially informative - in particular, uncovering additional glacial refugia, identifying likely recolonization patterns, and increasing our understanding of species’ responses to climate change. We investigated phylogenetic structure of the wolverine, a wide-ranging cold adapted carnivore, using a 318 bp of the mitochondrial DNA control region for 983 wolverines (n = 209 this study, n = 774 from GenBank) from across their full Holarctic distribution. Bayesian phylogenetic tree reconstruction and the distribution of observed pairwise haplotype differences (mismatch distribution) provided evidence of a single rapid population expansion across the wolverine’s Holarctic range. Even though molecular evidence corroborated a single refugium, significant subdivisions of population genetic structure (0.01< ΦST <0.99, P<0.05) were detected. Pairwise ΦST estimates separated Scandinavia from Russia and Mongolia, and identified five main divisions within North America - the Central Arctic, a western region, an eastern region consisting of Ontario and Quebec/Labrador, Manitoba, and California. These data are in contrast to the nearly panmictic structure observed in northwestern North America using nuclear microsatellites, but largely support the nuclear DNA separation of contemporary Manitoba and Ontario wolverines from northern populations. Historic samples (c. 1900) from the functionally extirpated eastern population of Quebec/Labrador displayed genetic similarities to contemporary Ontario wolverines. To understand these divergence patterns, four hypotheses were tested using Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC). The most supported hypothesis was a single Beringia incursion during the last glacial maximum that established the northwestern population, followed by a west-to-east colonization during the Holocene. This

  9. Dust deposition in Antarctica in glacial and interglacial climate conditions: a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudarchikova, N.; Mikolajewicz, U.; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, D.; Zhang, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide a unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distance. These cores are a paleoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret paleodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time-slices such as the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP) and Eemian (126 000 yr BP). One glacial time interval, which is Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP) was simulated as well as to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase of mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change of dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher Southern Hemisphere dust emissions, two times stronger atmospheric transport towards Antarctica, and

  10. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission,more » atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times

  11. Modelling of mineral dust for interglacial and glacial climate conditions with a focus on Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Sudarchikova, Natalia; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Timmreck, C.; O'Donnell, D.; Schurgers, G.; Sein, Dmitry; Zhang, Kai

    2015-05-19

    The mineral dust cycle responds to climate variations and plays an important role in the climate system by affecting the radiative balance of the atmosphere and modifying biogeochemistry. Polar ice cores provide unique information about deposition of aeolian dust particles transported over long distances. These cores are a palaeoclimate proxy archive of climate variability thousands of years ago. The current study is a first attempt to simulate past interglacial dust cycles with a global aerosol–climate model ECHAM5-HAM. The results are used to explain the dust deposition changes in Antarctica in terms of quantitative contribution of different processes, such as emission, atmospheric transport and precipitation, which will help to interpret palaeodata from Antarctic ice cores. The investigated periods include four interglacial time slices: the pre-industrial control (CTRL), mid-Holocene (6000 yr BP; hereafter referred to as \\"6 kyr\\"), last glacial inception (115 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"115 kyr\\") and Eemian (126 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"126 kyr\\"). One glacial time interval, the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (21 000 yr BP; hereafter \\"21 kyr\\"), was simulated as well to be a reference test for the model. Results suggest an increase in mineral dust deposition globally, and in Antarctica, in the past interglacial periods relative to the pre-industrial CTRL simulation. Approximately two-thirds of the increase in the mid-Holocene and Eemian is attributed to enhanced Southern Hemisphere dust emissions. Slightly strengthened transport efficiency causes the remaining one-third of the increase in dust deposition. The moderate change in dust deposition in Antarctica in the last glacial inception period is caused by the slightly stronger poleward atmospheric transport efficiency compared to the pre-industrial. Maximum dust deposition in Antarctica was simulated for the glacial period. LGM dust deposition in Antarctica is substantially increased due to 2.6 times higher

  12. Understanding Antarctic Climate and Glacial History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeConto, Rob; Escutia, Carlota

    2010-01-01

    First Antarctic Climate Evolution Symposium; Granada, Spain, 7-11 September 2009; Antarctic Climate Evolution (ACE; http://www.ace.scar.org), a scientific research project of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research and a core International Polar Year project, held its first international symposium in Spain in September 2009. ACE's mission is to facilitate the study of Antarctic climate and glacial history through integration of numerical modeling with geophysical and geological data. Nearly 200 international scientists from the fields of climate, ocean, and ice modeling joined geologists, geophysicists, and geochemists for 5 days of intense interaction. Oral sessions were plenary and were limited to allow time for poster viewing, discussion, and workshops (http://www.acegranada2009.com/).

  13. Characterization methods for fractured glacial tills

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haefner, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a literature review of methods successfully employed to characterize finegrained and fractured or unfractured glacial deposits. Descriptions and examples are given for four major categories of characterization methods: physical, hydraulic, chemical, and indirect. Characterization methods have evolved significantly within the past ten years; however, there still exists uncertainty about the reliability of individual characterization methods applied to till deposits. Therefore, a combination of methods is best, the choice of which depends on the objectives of the work. Sampling methods, sampling scales, and reporting methods are extremely important and should be considered when interpreting and comparing results between sites. Recognition of these issues is necessary to ensure that decisions regarding the transport of fluids in fractured tills are not based on the assumption that poorly permeable tills are always an inhibitor of subsurface flow.

  14. Dissolved organic matter export in glacial and non-glacial streams along the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E. W.; Scott, D.; Jeffery, A.; Schreiber, S.; Heavner, M.; Edwards, R.; D'Amore, D. V.; Fellman, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Gulf of Alaska drainage basin contains more than 75,000 km2 of glaciers, many of which are rapidly thinning and receding. We are using a paired watershed approach to evaluate how changes in glacier ecosystems will impact the export dissolved organic matter (DOM) into the Gulf of Alaska. Our primary study watersheds, Lemon Creek and Montana Creek, are similar in size, bedrock lithology and elevation range and extend from near sea level to the margin or interior of the Juneau Icefield. Lemon Creek has a glacial coverage of ~60%, while Montana Creek is free of glacier ice. Our goal is to evaluate seasonal differences in the quantity, chemical character and reactivity of DOM being exported from these watersheds to downstream near-shore marine ecosystems. In addition, we are monitoring a variety of physical parameters that influence instream DOM metabolism in both watersheds. Our initial results from the 2009 runoff season indicate that concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are substantially higher in the non-glacial watershed. However, fluorescence analyses indicate that DOM from the glacier watershed has a higher protein and lower humic material content compared to DOM from the non-glacial watershed. After the spring snowmelt season, physical parameters between the two watersheds diverged, with higher streamflow and turbidity as well as colder water temperatures in the glacial watershed. Although our previous yield calculations show significantly higher DOC fluxes from the forested watershed, our results here suggest that glacier watersheds may be an important source of labile carbon to the near shore marine ecosystem. The contrast in the physical habitat between the two rivers (e.g glacier stream = cold, low light penetration, unstable substrate) supports the hypothesis that that in-stream DOM processing is limited within glacier dominated rivers, therefore delivering a higher percentage of labile DOM downstream.

  15. Glacial thermohaline circulation and climate: Forcing from the north or south?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Y.

    2006-03-01

    Based on the evidence available from both observations and model simulations, the author proposes a view that may provide a unified interpretation of the North Atlantic thermohaline variability. Because of the slow response time of the Southern Ocean (millennia) and the relatively faster response time of the North Atlantic (centuries), the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation is controlled predominantly by the climate forcing over the Southern Ocean at the long glacial cycle timescales, but by the North Atlantic climate forcing at the short millennial timescales.

  16. Late Glacial lakes - uniform or contrasting ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawiska, Izabela; Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka M.; Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Słowiński, Michał; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2015-04-01

    Climate changes are one of the most investigated topic in paleolimnology. The Late Glacial and Early Holocene time are specially interesting as than most abrupt changes happened. Lake sediments are known to be great source of information of the past environments. They are functioning as natural archives because in them preserve animal and plants remains. In this study we investigated three cores of the biogenic sediments from the lakes located in close vicinity in Tuchola Forest (Northern Poland): paleolake Trzechowskie, Lake Czechowskie-deepest part and Lake Czechowskie-bay. We made Cladocera, diatom and pollen analysis, the chronology was determined by varve counting, Laacher See Tephra (12,880 yrs BP) and 14C dating. The aim of our research was to find out the response of zooplankton, phytoplankton, lake and catchment vegetation to abrupt climate changes. We were interested in similarities and differences between those three locations in response of entire communities but also species composition. The preliminary results revealed that the Cladocera, diatoms and plants communities were sensitive to climatic shifts and it is well shown in the results of ordination method (PCA). However in the Cladocera and diatoms assemblages, which reflect well lake environment conditions, the dominant species and total number of species present, were different in all three locations. Especially great difference was noted between paleolake Trzechowskie and Lake Czechowskie (core from the deepest part). The results of our research shows that in Late Glacial time landscape in Lake Czechowskie region (Tuchola Forest, Northern Poland) had mosaic character. Local factors such as relief, edaphic conditions strongly modified type of vegetation and in close vicinity existed lakes that had very diverse environments.

  17. Numerical simulation of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglio, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's crust, stress can be subdivided into tectonic background stress, overburden pressure, and pore-fluid pressure. The superposition of the first two and the variation of the third part are key factors in controlling movement along faults. Furthermore, stresses due to sedimentation and erosion contribute to the total stress field. In deglaciated regions, an additional stress must be considered: the rebound stress, which is related to rebounding of the crust and mantle after deglaciation. During the growth of a continental ice sheet, the lithosphere under the iceload is deformed and the removal of the ice load during deglaciation initiates a rebound process. The uplift is well known in formerly glaciated areas, e.g.North America and Scandinavia, and in currently deglaciating areas, e.g.Alaska, Antarctica, and Greenland. The whole process of subsiding and uplifting during the growth and melting of an iceload and all related phenomena is known as glacial isostatic adjustment. During the process of glaciation, the surface of the lithosphere is depressed underneath the ice load and compressional flexural stresses are induced in the upper lithosphere, whereas the bottom of the lithosphere experiences extensional flexural stresses; an additional vertical stress due to the ice load is present and it decreases to zero during deglaciation. During rebound, flexural stresses relax slowly. These stresses are able to change the original stress directions and regime.In this work we aim to study the effect of the GIA process in the context of petroleum engineering. The main aspect we will focus on is the mathematical and numerical modeling of the GIA including thermal effects. We plan also to include a preliminary study of the effect of the glacial erosion. All these phenomena are of paramount importance in petroleum engineering: for example some reservoir have been depleted due to tilting caused by both GIA, erosion and thermal effects.

  18. Estimating the volume of Alpine glacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S. J.; Quincey, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Supraglacial, moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes represent a potential glacial lake outburst flood (GLOF) threat to downstream communities in many mountain regions. This has motivated the development of empirical relationships to predict lake volume given a measurement of lake surface area obtained from satellite imagery. Such relationships are based on the notion that lake depth, area and volume scale predictably. We critically evaluate the performance of these existing empirical relationships by examining a global database of glacial lake depths, areas and volumes. Results show that lake area and depth are not always well correlated (r2 = 0.38) and that although lake volume and area are well correlated (r2 = 0.91), and indeed are auto-correlated, there are distinct outliers in the data set. These outliers represent situations where it may not be appropriate to apply existing empirical relationships to predict lake volume and include growing supraglacial lakes, glaciers that recede into basins with complex overdeepened morphologies or that have been deepened by intense erosion and lakes formed where glaciers advance across and block a main trunk valley. We use the compiled data set to develop a conceptual model of how the volumes of supraglacial ponds and lakes, moraine-dammed lakes and ice-dammed lakes should be expected to evolve with increasing area. Although a large amount of bathymetric data exist for moraine-dammed and ice-dammed lakes, we suggest that further measurements of growing supraglacial ponds and lakes are needed to better understand their development.

  19. High-resolution Geophysical Mapping of Submarine Glacial Landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsson, M.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Canals, M.; Todd, B. J.; Dowdeswell, E. K.; Hogan, K. A.; Mayer, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial landforms are generated from the activity of glaciers and display spatial dimensions ranging from below one meter up to tens of kilometers. Glacial landforms are used as diagnostic features of past activity of ice sheets and glaciers; they are specifically important in the field of palaeoglaciology. Mapping of submarine glacial landforms is largely dependent on geophysical survey methods capable of imaging the seafloor and sub-bottom through the water column. Full "global" seafloor mapping coverage, equivalent to what exists for land elevation, is to-date only achieved by the powerful method of deriving bathymetry from altimeters on satellites like GEOSAT and ERS-1. The lateral resolution of satellite derived bathymetry is, however, limited by the footprint of the satellite and the need to average out local wave and wind effects resulting in values of around 15 km. Consequently, mapping submarine glacial landforms requires for the most part higher resolution than is achievable by satellite derived bathymetry. The most widely-used methods for mapping submarine glacial landforms are based on echo-sounding principles. This presentation shows how the evolution of marine geophysical mapping techniques, in particular the advent of side-scan and multibeam bathymetric sonars, has made it possible to study submarine glacial landforms in unprecedented detail. Examples are shown from the Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms: Modern, Quaternary and Ancient, which will be published in late 2015 in the Memoir Series of the Geological Society of London.

  20. Extensive glaciation in Transbaikalia, Siberia, at the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margold, Martin; Jansen, John D.; Gurinov, Artem L.; Codilean, Alexandru T.; Fink, David; Preusser, Frank; Reznichenko, Natalya V.; Mifsud, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Successively smaller glacial extents have been proposed for continental Eurasia during the stadials of the last glacial period leading up to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). At the same time the large mountainous region east of Lake Baikal, Transbaikalia, has remained unexplored in terms of glacial chronology despite clear geomorphological evidence of substantial past glaciations. We have applied cosmogenic 10Be exposure dating and optically stimulated luminescence to establish the first quantitative glacial chronology for this region. Based on eighteen exposure ages from five moraine complexes, we propose that large mountain ice fields existed in the Kodar and Udokan mountains during Oxygen Isotope Stage 2, commensurate with the global LGM. These ice fields fed valley glaciers (>100 km in length) reaching down to the Chara Depression between the Kodar and Udokan mountains and to the valley of the Vitim River northwest of the Kodar Mountains. Two of the investigated moraines date to the Late Glacial, but indications of incomplete exposure among some of the sampled boulders obscure the specific details of the post-LGM glacial history. In addition to the LGM ice fields in the highest mountains of Transbaikalia, we report geomorphological evidence of a much more extensive, ice-cap type glaciation at a time that is yet to be firmly resolved.

  1. Glacial and periglacial buzzsaws: fitting mechanisms to metaphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adrian M.; Kleman, Johan

    2014-03-01

    The buzzsaw hypothesis refers to the potential for glacial and periglacial processes to rapidly denude mountains at and above glacier Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs), irrespective of uplift rates, rock type or pre-existing topography. Here the appropriateness of the buzzsaw metaphor is examined alongside questions of the links between glacial erosion and ELAs, and whether the glacial system can produce low-relief surfaces or limit summit heights. Plateau fragments in mountains on both active orogens and passive margins that have been cited as products of glacial and periglacial buzzsaw erosion instead generally represent dissected remnants of largely inherited, pre-glacial relief. Summit heights may correlate with ELAs but no causal link need be implied as summit erosion rates are low, cirque headwalls may not directly abut summits and, on passive margins, cirques are cut into pre-existing mountain topography. Any simple links between ELAs and glacial erosion break down on passive margins due to topographic forcing of ice-sheet growth, and to the km-scale vertical swaths through which ELAs have shifted through the Quaternary. Glaciers destroy rather than create low-relief rock surfaces through the innate tendency for ice flow to be faster, thicker and warmer along valleys. The glacial buzzsaw cuts down.

  2. Glacial Erosion Rates from Bayesian Inversion of Cosmogenic Nuclide Concentrations in a Bedrock Core, Streaked Mtn., ME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploskey, Z. T.; Stone, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Glacial erosion is an important source of sediment and could be an important coupling to glacier and ice sheet models that track sediment. However, glacial erosion is difficult to quantify, and models of glacial erosion can benefit from independent erosion rate estimates. Here we present the results of a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion of a cosmogenic nuclide (CN) geomorphic model for glacial erosion rates on a bedrock landform formerly eroded beneath the Laurentide ice sheet. The CN 10Be was measured in quartz to 8 m depth in a bedrock core from the summit of Streaked Mountain, ME. The accumulation of 10Be was modeled over multiple glacial cycles of alternating exposure and glacial erosion. This model was invertedfor glacial erosion rates and burial history using MCMC algorithms implemented in PyMC (Patil et al., 2010). This Bayesian approach allows us to incorporate prior constraints on ice cover history, including oxygen isotope records and radiometric dates, which is otherwise difficult to differentiate from erosion in rapidly eroding areas. We compare these results to depth profile and surface CN measurements elsewhere in Maine (Ploskey and Stone, 2013).The forward model of CN production used in the inversion is part of Cosmogenic (github.com/cosmolab/cosmogenic), an open-source Python-based software library we developed for modeling the growth and decay of in-situ CN inventories in rock during geomorphic evolution. It includes calibrated production rates for 10Be and 26Al in quartz and 36Cl in K-feldspar by both neutrons and muons, with more isotopic production pathways and material targets to be added in the future. Production rates are scaled to the site altitude and latitude using modular scaling schemes. Cosmogenic includes a variety of functions representing common geomorphic histories, and can be used to model any arbitrary exposure, erosion and burial history that can be defined as Python function.ReferencesPatil, A., D. Huard and C

  3. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  4. Probability of moraine survival in a succession of glacial advances.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbons, A.B.; Megeath, J.D.; Pierce, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    Emplacement of glacial moraines normally results in obliteration of older moraines deposited by less extensive glacial advances, a process we call 'obliterative overlap'. Assuming randomness and obliterative overlap, after 10 glacial episodes the most likely number of surviving moraines is only three. The record of the Pleistocene is in agreement with the probability analysis: the 10 glaciations during the past 0.9 Myr inferred from the deep-sea record resulted in moraine sequences in which only two or three different-aged moraine belts can generally be distinguished. -from Authors

  5. Late Ordovician (Ashgillian) glacial deposits in southern Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Brian R.; Makhlouf, Issa M.; Armstrong, Howard A.

    2005-11-01

    The Late Ordovician (Ashgillian) glacial deposits in southern Jordan, comprise a lower and upper glacially incised palaeovalley system, occupying reactivated basement and Pan-African fault-controlled depressions. The lower palaeovalley, incised into shoreface sandstones of the pre-glacial Tubeiliyat Formation, is filled with thin glaciofluvial sandstones at the base, overlain by up to 50 m of shoreface sandstone. A prominent glaciated surface near the top of this palaeovalley-fill contains intersecting glacial striations aligned E-W and NW-SE. The upper palaeovalley-fill comprises glaciofluvial and marine sandstones, incised into the lower palaeovalley or, where this is absent, into the Tubeiliyat Formation. Southern Jordan lay close to the margin of a Late Ordovician terrestrial ice sheet in Northwest Saudi Arabia, characterised by two major ice advances. These are correlated with the lower and upper palaeovalleys in southern Jordan, interrupted by two subsidiary glacial advances during late stage filling of the lower palaeovalley when ice advanced from the west and northwest. Thus, four ice advances are now recorded from the Late Ordovician glacial record of southern Jordan. Disturbed and deformed green sandstones beneath the upper palaeovalley-fill in the Jebel Ammar area, are confined to the margins of the Hutayya graben, and have been interpreted as structureless glacial loessite or glacial rock flour. Petrographic and textural analyses of the deformed sandstones, their mapped lateral transition into undeformed Tubeiliyat marine sandstones away from the fault zone, and the presence of similar sedimentary structures to those in the pre-glacial marine Tubeiliyat Formation suggest that they are a locally deformed facies equivalent of the Tubeiliyat, not part of the younger glacial deposits. Deformation is attributed to glacially induced crustal stresses and seismic reactivation of pre-existing faults, previously weakened by epeirogenesis, triggering sediment

  6. Isotopic evidence for reduced productivity in the glacial Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Shemesh, A. ); Macko, S.A. ); Charles, C.D. ); Rau, G.H. )

    1993-10-15

    Records of carbon and nitrogen isotopes in biogenic silica and carbon isotopes in planktonic foraminifera from deep-sea sediment cores from the Southern Ocean reveal that the primary production during the last glacial maximum was lower than Holocene productivity. These observations conflict with the hypothesis that the low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations were introduced by an increase in the efficiency of the high-latitude biological pump. Instead, different oceanic sectors may have had high glacial productivity, or alternative mechanisms that do not involve the biological pump must be considered as the primary cause of the low glacial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations.

  7. Influences of glacial melt and permafrost thaw on the age of dissolved organic carbon in the Yukon River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, George R.; Robert Spencer; Striegl, Rob; Schuster, Paul F.; Peter Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Responses of near-surface permafrost and glacial ice to climate change are of particular significance for understanding long-term effects on global carbon cycling and carbon export by high-latitude northern rivers. Here we report Δ14C-dissolved organic carbon (DOC) values and dissolved organic matter optical data for the Yukon River, 15 tributaries of the Yukon River, glacial meltwater, and groundwater and soil water end-member sources draining to the Yukon River, with the goal of assessing mobilization of aged DOC within the watershed. Ancient DOC was associated with glacial meltwater and groundwater sources. In contrast, DOC from watersheds dominated by peat soils and underlain by permafrost was typically enriched in Δ14C indicating that degradation of ancient carbon stores is currently not occurring at large enough scales to quantitatively influence bulk DOC exports from those landscapes. On an annual basis, DOC exported was predominantly modern during the spring period throughout the Yukon River basin and became older through summer-fall and winter periods, suggesting that contributions of older DOC from soils, glacial meltwaters, and groundwater are significant during these months. Our data indicate that rapidly receding glaciers and increasing groundwater inputs will likely result in greater contributions of older DOC in the Yukon River and its tributaries in coming decades.  

  8. Change in atmospheric mineral aerosols in response to climate: Last glacial period, preindustrial, modern, and doubled carbon dioxide climates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahowald, N.M.; Muhs, D.R.; Levis, S.; Rasch, P.J.; Yoshioka, M.; Zender, C.S.; Luo, C.

    2006-01-01

    Desert dust simulations generated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Climate System Model for the current climate are shown to be consistent with present day satellite and deposition data. The response of the dust cycle to last glacial maximum, preindustrial, modern, and doubled-carbon dioxide climates is analyzed. Only natural (non-land use related) dust sources are included in this simulation. Similar to some previous studies, dust production mainly responds to changes in the source areas from vegetation changes, not from winds or soil moisture changes alone. This model simulates a +92%, +33%, and -60% change in dust loading for the last glacial maximum, preindustrial, and doubled-carbon dioxide climate, respectively, when impacts of carbon dioxide fertilization on vegetation are included in the model. Terrestrial sediment records from the last glacial maximum compiled here indicate a large underestimate of deposition in continental regions, probably due to the lack of simulation of glaciogenic dust sources. In order to include the glaciogenic dust sources as a first approximation, we designate the location of these sources, and infer the size of the sources using an inversion method that best matches the available data. The inclusion of these inferred glaciogenic dust sources increases our dust flux in the last glacial maximum from 2.1 to 3.3 times current deposition. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Fundamentals of Glacial-Interglacial Variability in Tropical Pangaean Aridity during the Late Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, N. G.; Mahowald, N. M.; Soreghan, G. S.; Soreghan, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    explore the sensitivity of precipitation and evaporation in tropical Pangaea to climate forcings, such as orbital variability, changes in greenhouse gas levels, changes in sea level, and the extent of Gondwanan glaciation. The results of the simulations support general glacial aridity in equatorial Pangaea. Under eccentric orbital conditions, the precipitation regime over equatorial Pangaea and elsewhere in the Pangaean tropics would have been strongly affected by monsoonal precipitation variability forced by the precession cycle. Resulting pluvials and droughts controlled dust source variability in tropical Pangaea. Therefore, cyclical dust sedimentation away from the Equator would have been strongly in phase with precession cycles modulated by the eccentricity cycles. Moreover, under conditions either of full ice sheet retreat or of retreat to a stable state much like the current East Antarctic ice sheet, the amplitude of sedimentary cycles in northern Pangaea would have intensified. Thus, the spectral characteristics of tropical Pangaean dust deposits should provide low-latitude insight into the amplitude of high-latitude climate variability.

  10. The taphonomy of human remains in a glacial environment.

    PubMed

    Pilloud, Marin A; Megyesi, Mary S; Truffer, Martin; Congram, Derek

    2016-04-01

    A glacial environment is a unique setting that can alter human remains in characteristic ways. This study describes glacial dynamics and how glaciers can be understood as taphonomic agents. Using a case study of human remains recovered from Colony Glacier, Alaska, a glacial taphonomic signature is outlined that includes: (1) movement of remains, (2) dispersal of remains, (3) altered bone margins, (4) splitting of skeletal elements, and (5) extensive soft tissue preservation and adipocere formation. As global glacier area is declining in the current climate, there is the potential for more materials of archaeological and medicolegal significance to be exposed. It is therefore important for the forensic anthropologist to have an idea of the taphonomy in this setting and to be able to differentiate glacial effects from other taphonomic agents. PMID:26917542

  11. What happened to the coal forests during Pennsylvanian glacial phases?

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon-Lang, H.J.; Dimichele, W.A.

    2010-09-15

    Sequence stratigraphic analysis of Pennsylvanian coal-bearing strata suggests that glacial-interglacial fluctuations at high latitudes drove cyclic changes in tropical biomes. A literature review of plant assemblages in this paleoclimatic context suggests that coal forests dominated during humid interglacial phases, but were replaced by seasonally dry vegetation during glacial phases. After each glacial event, coal forests reassembled with largely the same species composition. This remarkable stasis implies that coal-forest refugia existed across the equatorial landscape during glacial phases, expanding to repopulate lowlands during and following deglaciation. One possibility is that refugia comprised small pockets of wetland forest strung out along valleys at some sites, but data are currently insufficient to test this hypothesis. The model presented here, if accepted, dramatically alters our understanding of the coal forests and helps explain aspects of their dynamics.

  12. Patterns of glacial-interglacial vegetation and climate variability in eastern South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, Lydie; Caley, Thibaut; Malaizé, Bruno; Giraudeau, Jacques

    2010-05-01

    Vegetation is an integrated part of the earth system and our understanding needs records of its glacial-interglacial variability. Although the data coverage for South Africa is slightly better than for some other parts of Africa, there are only very few records that allow us a glimpse of the vegetation history and development through one or more late Quaternary climate cycles. The existing evidence is fragmentary and in some cases contradictory. Marine sediments can offer here continuous sequences that cover large periods of time and provide a record of a signal that integrates rather large continental regions. Core MD96-2048 has been cored off the Limpopo River mouth at 26°10'S 34°01'E in 660 m water depth. This area is under the double influence of continental discharge and Agulhas current water advection. The sedimentation is slow and continuous. The upper 5 meter (down till 250 ka) have been analysed for pollen and spores at millennial resolution. The terrestrial pollen assemblages indicate that during interglacials the vegetation of eastern South Africa and southern Mozambique largely consisted of evergreen and deciduous forests with an increase of dry deciduous forest and open woodland during interglacial optima. During glacials open mountainous shrubland extended. The pattern strongly suggests a shifting of altitudinal vegetation belts in the mountains primarily depending on temperature, although the decline of forested areas during glacial times might also be the effect of low atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. This pattern in eastern South Africa differs from that suggested for western South Africa, where extension of the winter rain climate seems likely, and corroborates findings of increased C4 vegetation during the Glacial of eastern South Africa. The spread of dry deciduous forest and open woodland suggests a hot and dry climate during interglacial optima. The vegetation and climate of eastern South Africa seems to follow a mid to high

  13. Glacial morphology and depositional sequences of the Antarctic Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Schneider, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Proposes a simple model for the unusual depositional sequences and morphology of the Antarctic continental shelf. It considers the regional stratal geometry and the reversed morphology to be principally the results of time-integrated effects of glacial erosion and sedimentation related to the location of the ice grounding line. The model offers several guidelines for stratigraphic interpretation of the Antarctic shelf and a Northern Hemisphere shelf, both of which were subject to many glacial advances and retreats. -Authors

  14. Oceanographic gradients and seabird prey community dynamics in glacial fjords

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Piatt, John F.; Madison, Erica N.; Conaway, Jeff; Hillgruber, N.

    2012-01-01

    Glacial fjord habitats are undergoing rapid change as a result of contemporary global warming, yet little is known about how glaciers influence marine ecosystems. These ecosystems provide important feeding, breeding and rearing grounds for a wide variety of marine organisms, including seabirds of management concern. To characterize ocean conditions and marine food webs near tidewater glaciers, we conducted monthly surveys of oceanographic variables, plankton, fish and seabirds in Kenai Fjords, Alaska, from June to August of 2007 and 2008. We also measured tidal current velocities near glacial features. We found high sediment load from glacial river runoff played a major role in structuring the fjord marine ecosystem. Submerged moraines (sills) isolated cool, fresh, stratified and silt-laden inner fjord habitats from oceanic influence. Near tidewater glaciers, surface layers of turbid glacial runoff limited availability of light to phytoplankton, but macrozooplankton were abundant in surface waters, perhaps due to the absence of a photic cue for diel migration. Fish and zooplankton community structure varied along an increasing temperature gradient throughout the summer. Acoustic measurements indicated that low density patches of fish and zooplankton were available in the surface waters near glacial river outflows. This is the foraging habitat occupied most by Kittlitz's murrelet (Brachyramphus brevirostris), a rare seabird that appears to be specialized for life in glacially influenced environments. Kittlitz's murrelets were associated with floating glacial ice, and they were more likely to occur near glaciers, in deeper water, and in areas with high acoustic backscatter. Kittlitz's murrelet at-sea distribution was limited to areas influenced by turbid glacial outflows, and where prey was concentrated near the surface in waters with low light penetration. Tidewater glaciers impart unique hydrographic characteristics that influence marine plankton and fish

  15. Atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate at onset of the last glacial termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, J.; Brook, E.

    2011-12-01

    Deciphering exact phase relationship between greenhouse gases and climate is important for understanding how greenhouse effect and climate are linked. Especially, onset of the last glacial termination is of great interest because that time interval is important for cracking glacial-interglacial climate cycles. However, previous ice core studies were not able to well handle the issue due to lack of sufficient resolution, precision and/or chronology of greenhouse gas records. Here we present high resolution of CO2 and CH4 records from Siple Dome core, Antarctica. We take advantages from the high accumulation rate in the coring site and high-precision analytical techniques. We also take advantage from the high-resolution of the CH4 records that help better synchronize the CO2 ages with GICC05 Greenland ice core timescale, being consistent with absolute ages obtained from stalagmite records. Implications of our new data for carbon cycles and climate during onset of the last termination will be discussed in the presentation.

  16. Early Circum-Arctic Glacial Decay Following the Last Glacial Maximum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, T.; Alonso-Garcia, M.; Flower, B. P.; Shevenell, A.; Roehl, U.; Goddard, E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent rapid warming, glacial retreat, and sea ice reduction observed in the Arctic suggest extreme regional environmental sensitivity to ongoing anthropogenic climate change. To place these recent environmental changes in context and better understand the forcings and feedbacks involved in Arctic climate change, regional studies of past intervals of rapid warming are required. Paleoceanographic studies from the high-latitude North Atlantic indicate close relationships between meltwater discharges from circum-Arctic ice sheets, perturbations of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), and global climate variations on sub-orbital timescales during the Late Quaternary. During the last glacial-interglacial transition (25-10 ka), when atmospheric temperatures over Greenland warmed 10-15°C and the AMOC experienced millennial-scale variability, low-resolution stable isotope studies from Fram Strait sediment cores indicate that the circum-Arctic ice sheets began to melt earlier than lower latitude Northern Hemisphere ice sheets, discharging their meltwater into the high latitude North Atlantic. Fram Strait, located at the gateway between the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans, is the only region where Arctic meltwater can exchange with the world oceans on both glacial and interglacial timescales. Thus, high-resolution paleoceanographic studies of Fram Strait sediments are critically required for understanding changes in Arctic meltwater flux to the North Atlantic on sub-orbital timescales. Here we present the first high-resolution (<100 yr) multi-proxy dataset from Fram Strait (ODP Site 986; 77°20.43'N, 9°04.66'E; water depth: 2063 m) to assess the timing of circum-Arctic ice sheet decay since the Last Glacial Maximum. Foraminiferal isotopic and elemental, scanning X-Ray Fluorescence, and ice-rafted debris records are used to isolate Arctic meltwater and iceberg discharge signals. Sharp increases in productivity and changes in water mass ventilation are inferred

  17. Rapid loss of glacial ice reveals stream community assembly processes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lee E; Milner, Alexander M

    2012-01-01

    Glacial retreat creates new habitat which is colonized and developed by plants and animals during the process of primary succession. While there has been much debate about the relative role of deterministic and stochastic processes during terrestrial succession, evidence from freshwater ecosystems remains minimal and a general consensus is lacking. Using a unique 27 years record of community assembly following glacial recession in southeast Alaska, we demonstrate significant change in the trait composition of stream invertebrate communities as catchment glacial cover decreased from ∼70% to zero. Functional diversity increased significantly as glacier cover decreased and taxonomic richness increased. Null modelling approaches led to a key finding that niche filtering processes were dominant when glacial cover was extensive, reflecting water temperature and dispersal constraints. Thereafter the community shifted towards co-occurrence of stochastic and deterministic assembly processes. A further novel discovery was that intrinsic functional redundancy developed throughout the study, particularly because new colonizers possessed similar traits to taxa already present. Rapid glacial retreat is occurring in Arctic and alpine environments worldwide and the assembly processes observed in this study provide new fundamental insights into how glacially influenced stream ecosystems will respond. The findings support tolerance as a key primary successional mechanism in this system, and have broader value for developing our understanding of how biological communities in river ecosystems assemble or restructure in response to environmental change.

  18. Global Perturbation of the Carbon Cycle at the Onset of the Miocene Climatic Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.; Kochhann, K. G. D.; Andersen, N.

    2014-12-01

    The processes driving high-amplitude climate variability and sustaining global warmth during the Miocene climatic optimum (~17-14.7 Ma) are highly enigmatic. We present high-resolution benthic and bulk carbonate isotope records in an exceptional sedimentary archive (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1337, eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean), which offer a new view of climate evolution over the onset of the climatic optimum. A sharp decline in benthic and bulk carbonate δ18O and δ13C at ~16.9 Ma, contemporaneous with a massive increase in carbonate dissolution, demonstrates that abrupt climate warming was coupled to an intense perturbation of the carbon cycle. We conclude that elevated atmospheric pCO2 acted as an amplifier of climate variability after 16.9 Ma, driving profound changes in the global carbon reservoir. Comparison with a high-resolution δ13C record spanning the onset of the Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a (~120 Ma ago) reveals common forcing factors and climatic responses during two unusually warm episodes of Earth's history with widely differing boundary conditions: the virtually ice-free Cretaceous "Super Greenhouse" and the Miocene "Icehouse" with dominant Southern Hemisphere ice cover. In both periods, rapid CO2 addition to the atmosphere induced abrupt climate warming and drove fundamental changes in the carbon cycle that were only mitigated over long timescales (>100 kyr). Despite obvious differences with the modern ocean/climate system, these results provide a useful perspective to evaluate future climate impacts in response to anthropogenic CO2 rise.

  19. Tropical Cyclones in Simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, R. A.; Korty, R. L.; Camargo, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    How tropical cyclones respond to large-scale changes in climate is an important and complex question. Here we study the question using the response to the climate forcing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Utilizing two detecting and tracking algorithms of tropical cyclones (TC), we assess the sensitivity of the genesis and frequency of TCs in a 1° x 1° simulation of a global climate model (CCSM), a limited-area simulation (western north Pacific; WNP) of the higher resolution WRF model (36 km horizontal resolution), and the statistical downscaling approach developed by Emanuel. We assess how changes between the LGM and 20th century climatology of TCs are related to changes in the large-scale environmental variables known to be important to TCs (e.g. vorticity, wind shear, and available moisture). Several facets of the TC climatology at the LGM are similar across all three modeling techniques: regions that spawn TCs and their seasonal cycle at the LGM is similar to the present-day distribution, while the total counts are slightly reduced at the LGM. The average intensity in the WRF model (which features resolution high enough to resolve strong storms) is similar between the two climates, though the distribution of intensity is more concentrated at the LGM (there are fewer weak events and fewer of the strongest events at the LGM). Conditions are similarly favorable in much of the deep tropics at the LGM compared to the 20th century, particularly in the central and western Pacific, but conditions become more hostile at the subtropical margins. We compare the resulting climatology with the underlying changes in environmental factors, and empirically derive a genesis index to identify the best fit between changes in the factors and climatology of events.

  20. Black Sea temperature response to glacial millennial-scale climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegwerth, Antje; Ganopolski, Andrey; Ménot, Guillemette; Kaiser, Jérôme; Dellwig, Olaf; Bard, Edouard; Lamy, Frank; Arz, Helge W.

    2015-10-01

    The Eurasian inland propagation of temperature anomalies during glacial millennial-scale climate variability is poorly understood, but this knowledge is crucial to understanding hemisphere-wide atmospheric teleconnection patterns and climate mechanisms. Based on biomarkers and geochemical paleothermometers, a pronounced continental temperature variability between 64,000 and 20,000 years ago, coinciding with the Greenland Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles, was determined in a well-dated sediment record from the formerly enclosed Black Sea. Cooling during Heinrich events was not stronger than during other stadials in the Black Sea. This is corroborated by modeling results showing that regular Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles penetrated deeper into the Eurasian continent than Heinrich events. The pattern of coastal ice-rafted detritus suggests a strong dependence on the climate background state, with significantly milder winters during periods of reduced Eurasian ice sheets and an intensified meridional atmospheric circulation.

  1. SW Barents Sea sediment composition in response to Late Glacial-Holocene ice sheet retreat and provenance changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaparulina, Ekaterina; Junttila, Juho; Pekka Lunkka, Juha; Strand, Kari

    2015-04-01

    The SW Barents Sea sediments preserve the data of Late Glacial to Holocene development in this area. The marine sediment components are the most reliable recorders for climatic and environmental changes, providing valuable information for reconstructions of past ice sheet dynamics in high latitudes. Detailed investigations of the distribution of clay minerals, geochemical composition of heavy minerals and ice-rafted debris (IRD) of Late Glacial-Holocene sediments from the SW Barents Sea provide important new information about the prominent provenances and retreat of Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS). Our particular interest is a study of geochemical composition of Late Glacial-Holocene sediments from the SW Barents Sea via mineralogical proxies and compilation the final results. This may help to advance the knowledge on distribution, pathways and sources of sediment components in these sediments which are currently poorly studied. The mineralogical and geochemical data were generated from the three sediment cores located in Nordkappbanken, SW Barents Sea and display mostly sedimentation cycles from the last deglaciation and Holocene. Sediment analysis will include clay mineral content analysed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), IRD counting and heavy minerals compositions obtained by Electron Probe Microanalyzer (EPMA). It will represent an integrated input function over time which will provide a chronological record of glacial history and paleoclimate. Furthermore, integrated study of these sediment components will elucidate the development of SIS during Late Glacial time. Preliminary results show variations in content of clay minerals. The Barents Sea sources of kaolinite are referred to Franz Josef Land, rock outcroppings on the sea floor, and to a lesser extent the Fennoscandian Shield weathering crust. This can be supported by the lithologies of IRD and heavy mineral contents.

  2. Glacial History of a Modern Invader: Phylogeography and Species Distribution Modelling of the Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Porretta, Daniele; Mastrantonio, Valentina; Bellini, Romeo; Somboon, Pradya; Urbanelli, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Background The tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is one of the 100 most invasive species in the world and a vector of human diseases. In the last 30 years, it has spread from its native range in East Asia to Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Although this modern invasion has been the focus of many studies, the history of the species’ native populations remains poorly understood. Here, we aimed to assess the role of Pleistocene climatic changes in shaping the current distribution of the species in its native range. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the phylogeography, historical demography, and species distribution of Ae. albopictus native populations at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Individuals from 16 localities from East Asia were analyzed for sequence variation at two mitochondrial genes. No phylogeographic structure was observed across the study area. Demographic analyses showed a signature of population expansion that started roughly 70,000 years BP. The occurrence of a continuous and climatically suitable area comprising Southeast China, Indochinese Peninsula, and Sundaland during LGM was indicated by species distribution modelling. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest an evolutionary scenario in which, during the last glacial phase, Ae. albopictus did not experience a fragmentation phase but rather persisted in interconnected populations and experienced demographic growth. The wide ecological flexibility of the species probably played a crucial role in its response to glacial-induced environmental changes. Currently, there is little information on the impact of Pleistocene climatic changes on animal species in East Asia. Most of the studies focused on forest-associated species and suggested cycles of glacial fragmentation and post-glacial expansion. The case of Ae. albopictus, which exhibits a pattern not previously observed in the study area, adds an important piece to our understanding of the Pleistocene history of East Asian biota

  3. High-resolution opal records from the eastern tropical Pacific provide evidence for silicic acid leakage from HNLC regions during glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano-Torres, Elsa; Pichevin, Laetitia E.; Ganeshram, Raja S.

    2011-05-01

    A shift from carbonate- to silica-dominated primary production could significantly affect the oceanic carbon cycle via changes in the particulate carbon rain-rate ratio ( C organic:C inorganic fluxes). An increase in C rain rate ratio has been invoked to explain lower glacial pCO 2; however, firm evidence of an ecological shift towards silica-dominated productivity during the last glacial period is lacking. Here, we present new high-resolution reconstructions of biogenic silica and total production over the past 40,000 yr BP in 3 cores from the eastern tropical North Pacific (ETNP) off Mexico and Nicaragua. These records reveal a clear regional pattern of higher siliceous productivity with higher opal accumulation during the last glacial period compared to interglacial times. Higher Si:C and Si:N ratios of glacial sediments in these records suggest a net increase in siliceous production over total production. We attribute this to the additional supply of silicic acid to the ETNP margins favouring diatoms over other non-siliceous algae. This suggestion for increased supply of Si during glacial periods is consistent with the proposed large-scale redistribution of excess silicic acid from High Nitrate Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions like the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) and the Southern Ocean by the Silicic Acid Leakage Hypothesis (SALH). In these HNLC regions, the Si-isotope composition of diatom frustules (δ 30Si) has provided evidence for the generation of surplus of silicic acid during diatom growth under conditions of higher Fe availability during glacial periods. We suggest that silicic acid leakage from the HNLC regions to the adjoining oceans may have increased the carbon rain rate ratio and ultimately, contributed to the decrease in glacial atmospheric pCO 2.

  4. Glacial-Lake Outburst Erosion of the Grand Valley, Michigan, and Impacts on Glacial Lakes in the Lake Michigan Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehew, Alan E.

    1993-01-01

    Geomorphic and sedimentologic evidence in the Grand Valley, which drained the retreating Saginaw Lobe of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and later acted as a spillway between lakes in the Huron and Erie basins and in the Michigan basin, suggests that at least one drainage event from glacial Lake Saginaw to glacial Lake Chicago was a catastrophic outburst that deeply incised the valley. Analysis of shoreline and outlet geomorphology at the Chicago outlet supports J H Bretz's hypothesis of episodic incision and lake-level change. Shoreline features of each lake level converge to separate outlet sills that decrease in elevation from the oldest to youngest lake phases. This evidence, coupled with the presence of boulder lags and other features consistent with outburst origin, suggests that the outlets were deepened by catastrophic outbursts at least twice. The first incision event is correlated with a linked series of floods that progressed from Huron and Erie basin lakes to glacial Lake Saginaw to glacial Lake Chicago and then to the Mississippi. The second downcutting event occurred after the Two Rivers Advance of the Lake Michigan Lobe. Outbursts from the eastern outlets of glacial Lake Agassiz to glacial Lake Algonquin are a possible cause for this period of downcutting at the Chicago outlets.

  5. Status of glacial Lake Columbia during the last floods from glacial Lake Missoula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atwater, B.F.

    1987-01-01

    The last floods from glacial Lake Missoula, Montana, probably ran into glacial Lake Columbia, in northeastern Washington. In or near Lake Columbia's Sanpoil arm, Lake Missoula floods dating from late in the Fraser glaciation produced normally graded silt beds that become thinner upsection and which alternate with intervals of progressively fewer varves. The highest three interflood intervals each contain only one or two varves, and about 200-400 successive varves conformably overlie the highest flood bed. This sequence suggests that jo??kulhlaup frequency progressively increased until Lake Missoula ended, and that Lake Columbia outlasted Lake Missoula. The upper Grand Coulee, Lake Columbia's late Fraser-age outlet, contains a section of 13 graded beds, most of them sandy and separated by varves, that may correlate with the highest Missoula-flood beds of the Sanpoil River valley. The upper Grand Coulee also contains probable correlatives of many of the approximately 200-400 succeeding varves, as do nearby parts of the Columbia River valley. This collective evidence casts doubt on a prevailing hypothesis according to which one or more late Fraser-age floods from Lake Missoula descended the Columbia River valley with little or no interference from Lake Columbia's Okanogan-lobe dam. ?? 1987.

  6. Status of glacial Lake Columbia during the last floods from glacial Lake Missoula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwater, Brian F.

    1987-03-01

    The last floods from glacial Lake Missoula, Montana, probably ran into glacial Lake Columbia, in northeastern Washington. In or near Lake Columbia's Sanpoil arm, Lake Missoula floods dating from late in the Fraser glaciation produced normally graded silt beds that become thinner upsection and which alternate with intervals of progressively fewer varves. The highest three interflood intervals each contain only one or two varves, and about 200-400 successive varves conformably overlie the highest flood bed. This sequence suggests that jökulhlaup frequency progressively increased until Lake Missoula ended, and that Lake Columbia outlasted Lake Missoula. The upper Grand Coulee, Lake Columbia's late Fraser-age outlet, contains a section of 13 graded beds, most of them sandy and separated by varves, that may correlate with the highest Missoula-flood beds of the Sanpoil River valley. The upper Grand Coulee also contains probable correlatives of many of the approximately 200-400 succeeding varves, as do nearby parts of the Columbia River valley. This collective evidence casts doubt on a prevailing hypothesis according to which one or more late Fraser-age floods from Lake Missoula descended the Columbia River valley with little or no interference from Lake Columbia's Okanogan-lobe dam.

  7. Biogeochemistry of glacial runoff along the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E.; Scott, D.; Vermilyea, A.; Stubbins, A.; Raymond, P.; Spencer, R.

    2012-04-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets represent the second largest reservoir of water in the global hydrologic system and glacier ecosystems cover 10% of the Earth, however the biogeochemistry of glacier discharge has not been well characterized. Preliminary investigations have shown that runoff from glaciers can be an important contributor of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and macro- and micro- nutrients such as P and Fe to downstream aquatic ecosystems. There is also mounting evidence that glacier ecosystems may be a source of anthropogenically derived constituents such as fossil fuel combustion by-products and persistent organic pollutants that are deposited in precipitation and released in melting glacier ice. As a result, it is critical to develop our understanding of glacial biogeochemistry, particularly in near-shore marine ecosystems along glacially-dominated coastal margins that receive large volumes of glacial runoff. To examine the spatial and temporal variability in the biogeochemical properties of glacial runoff, we sampled snow, ice melt, and glacial runoff at the Mendenhall Glacier near Juneau, Alaska during the summer of 2012. Mendenhall Glacier extends from near-sea level to >1700 m.a.s.l. and encompasses ~120 km2 of the 3900 km2 Juneau Icefield. The main sub-glacial drainage channel was sampled weekly throughout the glacier melt season (May-October) for a suite of physical (temperature, conductivity, suspended sediment) and biogeochemical (C, N, P, Fe and trace metals) parameters. In addition, we did opportunistic sampling of snow in the glacier accumulation zone and supra-glacial meltwater streams on the glacier surface. We also analyzed particulate and dissolved Hg in glacial runoff to quantify the export of Hg to downstream aquatic ecosystems. Preliminary results show that concentrations of dissolved organic carbon in snow, ice melt, and sub-glacial runoff were typically low (<0.5 mg C/L) and not well correlated with discharge. Recent research has shown that

  8. Should precise numerical dating overrule glacial geomorphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Numerical age dating techniques, namely different types of terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide dating (TCND), have achieved an impressive progress in both laboratory precision and regional calibration models during the past few decades. It is now possible to apply precise TCND even to young landforms like Late Holocene moraines, a task seemed hardly achievable just about 15 years ago. An increasing number of studies provide very precise TCND ages for boulders from Late Holocene moraines enabling related reconstruction of glacier chronologies and the interpretation of these glacial landforms in a palaeoclimatological context. These studies may also solve previous controversies about different ages assigned to moraines obtained by different dating techniques, for example relative-age dating techniques or techniques combining relative-age dating with few fixed points derived from numerical age dating. There are a few cases, for example Mueller Glacier and nearby long debris-covered valley glacier in Aoraki/Mt.Cook National Park (Southern Alps, New Zealand), where the apparent "supremacy" of TCND-ages seem to overrule glacial geomorphological principles. Enabled by a comparatively high number of individual boulders precisely dated by TCND, moraine ridges on those glacier forelands have been primarily clustered on basis of these boulder ages rather than on their corresponding morphological position. To the extreme, segments of a particular moraine complex morphologically and sedimentologically proven to be formed during one event have become split and classified as two separate "moraines" on different parts of the glacier foreland. One ledge of another moraine complex contains 2 TCND-sampled boulders apparently representing two separate "moraines"-clusters of an age difference in the order of 1,500 years. Although recently criticism has been raised regarding the non-contested application of the arithmetic mean for calculation of TCND-ages for individual moraines, this

  9. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  10. Use of Digital Elevation Models to understand and map glacial landforms — The case of the Canigou Massif (Eastern Pyrenees, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankl, Amaury; Nyssen, Jan; Calvet, Marc; Heyse, Irenée

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents an improved geomorphological methodology that uses remotely-sensed data, a Geographical Information System and a brief field campaign to allow rapid, yet, precise mapping as well as interpretation and analysis of glacial earth surface morphology in high mountain areas. The study area consists of the Quaternary-glaciated part of the Coumelade valley (Canigou massif, eastern Pyrenees, France), which ranges between 1450 and 2731 m a.s.l. A topographical-map-derived Digital Elevation Model was used for analyzing glacial landforms by extracting the slope gradient, valley profiles and the slope aspect. The results were gradually refined from the interpretations of aerial photograph and the field investigation. Glacial landforms are present above 1500 m a.s.l. and include glacial and nivation cirques, cirque and latero-frontal moraines (7.7 × 10 6 m³) and micro-scale landforms such as chattermarks, crescent grooves and polished surfaces. The geomorphological investigation reveals that the Quaternary glaciation of the Coumelade valley remained limited, resulting in a low denudation rate of 0.011 mm yr - 1 over the last glacial cycle.

  11. Aspects of conducting site investigations in glacial terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.E. )

    1993-03-01

    Much of northern US is mantled by Pleistocene glacial drift consisting of heterogeneous deposits of fine to coarse-textured sediments. Hazardous waste site investigations in glacial settings can often present unique design and implementation considerations. Complex glacial stratigraphy encountered during drilling activities demands flexibility built into work plans to allow for field decisions based on field conditions. Continuous cores should be collected from boreholes on a routine basis for stratigraphic purposes with particular importance assigned to field identification of relative permeabilities of stratigraphic units. Selection of appropriate field screening methodology should be based on site conditions. Utilization of open borehole groundwater sampling is recommended for fine-textured glacial settings where soil gas and well point sampling are ineffective. Installation of boreholes allows for collection of stratigraphic information and enables more surface area exposed beneath the water table for groundwater recharge and sampling. Water level determinations can be made on open boreholes for an initial assessment of the horizontal direction of groundwater flow. Placement of screens for monitoring wells should be based on field determination of likely groundwater flow paths. Nested wells are necessary to define the vertical groundwater flow system at most sites. Evaluation of the vertical flow system can often dominate site investigations in fine-textured glacial terrain. Two case studies from Iowa illustrate the usefulness of incorporating the above considerations in planning and implementing in fine-textured glacial sediments. Field investigations utilizing open borehole groundwater sampling successfully delineated site glacial geology and hydrogeology for determination of the nature and extent of groundwater contamination and better located the horizontal and vertical placement of monitoring wells.

  12. On the issue of equifinality in glacial geomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Per; Dowling, Thomas; Cleland, Carol; Johnson, Mark

    2016-04-01

    A contemporary trend in glacial geomorphology is the quest for some form of unifying theory for drumlin and/or ribbed moraine formation: there MUST be ONE explanation. The result of this is attempts to apply 'instability theory' to the formation of all drumlinoid and ribbed moraine formation or, as an alternative to this, the 'erodent layer hypothesis' for single processes driven formation. However, based on field geology evidence on internal composition and architecture and the internals relation to the exterior, i.e. the shape of drumlins or ribbed moraine, many glacial sedimentologists would argue that it is instead different processes in their own or in combination that lead to similar form, i.e. look-alike geomorphologic expression or equifinality in spite of different process background for their formation. As expressed by Cleland (2013) from a philosophical point of view of a 'common cause explanation', as exemplified with mass extinctions through geologic time, there is probably a 'common cause explanation' for the K/T boundary extinction (massive meteorite impact on Earth), but this is not a common explanation for every other mass extinction. The parallel to our Quaternary enigma is that there can of course be a single common cause for explaining a specific drumlinoid flow set (a particular case), but that does not have to be the explanation of another flow set showing other sedimentological/structural attributes, in turn suggesting that the particular case cause cannot be used for explaining the general case, i.e. all drumlins over glaciated terrain on the globe. We argue in the case of streamlined terrain, which often have considerable morphologic difference between features at local landscape scale whilst still remaining part of the drumlinoid continuum on regional scale, is a product of different processes or process combinations (erosion/deformation/accumulation) in the subglacial system, tending towards the most efficient obstacle shape and thus

  13. Repeated pulses of vertical methane flux recorded in glacial sediments from the southeast Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Mea S.; Keigwin, Lloyd D.; Birgel, Daniel; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-06-01

    There is controversy over the role of marine methane hydrates in atmospheric methane concentrations and climate change during the last glacial period. In this study of two sediment cores from the southeast Bering Sea (700 m and 1467 m water depth), we identify multiple episodes during the last glacial period of intense methane flux reaching the seafloor. Within the uncertainty of the radiocarbon age model, the episodes are contemporaneous in the two cores and have similar timing and duration as Dansgaard-Oeschger events. The episodes are marked by horizons of sediment containing 13C-depleted authigenic carbonate minerals; 13C-depleted archaeal and bacterial lipids, which resemble those found in ANME-1 type anaerobic methane oxidizing microbial consortia; and changes in the abundance and species distribution of benthic foraminifera. The similar timing and isotopic composition of the authigenic carbonates in the two cores is consistent with a region-wide increase in the upward flux of methane bearing fluids. This study is the first observation outside Santa Barbara Basin of pervasive, repeated methane flux in glacial sediments. However, contrary to the "Clathrate Gun Hypothesis" (Kennett et al., 2003), these coring sites are too deep for methane hydrate destabilization to be the cause, implying that a much larger part of the ocean's sedimentary methane may participate in climate or carbon cycle feedback at millennial timescales. We speculate that pulses of methane in these opal-rich sediments could be caused by the sudden release of overpressure in pore fluids that builds up gradually with silica diagenesis. The release could be triggered by seismic shaking on the Aleutian subduction zone caused by hydrostatic pressure increase associated with sea level rise at the start of interstadials.

  14. Paleoclimatic significance of Middle Pleistocene glacial deposits in the Kotzebue Sound region, northwest coastal Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Roof, S.R.; Brigham-Grette, J. )

    1992-01-01

    During Middle Pleistocene time, glaciers extended from the western Brooks Range in NW Alaska to the coast at Kotzebue Sound, forming Baldwin Peninsula, a 120 km-long terminal moraine. Marine, glacigenic, and fluvial facies exposed along coastal bluffs surrounding Kotzebue Sound and Hotham Inlet indicate that at least the initial stages of the glacial advance occurred while sea level was high enough to cover the shallow Bering Shelf. Although it is presently uncertain if the ice actually reached tidewater before extensive middle-latitude ice-sheet formation, the marine and glacigenic facies clearly indicate that this advance must have occurred significantly out-of-phase with lower latitude glaciation. The authors believe an ice-free Bering Sea provided the moisture for glacier growth during the waning phases of a global interglacial climate. Although the magnitude of the Baldwin Peninsula advance was large compared to late Pleistocene advances, the timing with respect to sea level is consistent with observations by Miller and de Vernal that late Pleistocene polar glaciations also occurred near the end of interglacial periods, when global sea level was high, high-latitude oceans were relatively warm, and summer insolation was decreasing. An important implication of this out-of-phase glaciation hypothesis is that the critical transition point between climate states may be earlier in the interglacial-glacial cycle than previously thought. Because it appears that climate change is initiated in polar regions while the rest of Earth is experiencing an interglacial climate, many of their climate models must be revised. The glacial record at Baldwin Peninsula provides an opportunity to test, revise, and perhaps extend this out-of-phase glaciation hypothesis to the middle Pleistocene interval.

  15. Late-glacial recolonization and phylogeography of European red deer (Cervus elaphus L.).

    PubMed

    Meiri, Meirav; Lister, Adrian M; Higham, Thomas F G; Stewart, John R; Straus, Lawrence G; Obermaier, Henriette; González Morales, Manuel R; Marín-Arroyo, Ana B; Barnes, Ian

    2013-09-01

    The Pleistocene was an epoch of extreme climatic and environmental changes. How individual species responded to the repeated cycles of warm and cold stages is a major topic of debate. For the European fauna and flora, an expansion-contraction model has been suggested, whereby temperate species were restricted to southern refugia during glacial times and expanded northwards during interglacials, including the present interglacial (Holocene). Here, we test this model on the red deer (Cervus elaphus) a large and highly mobile herbivore, using both modern and ancient mitochondrial DNA from the entire European range of the species over the last c. 40,000 years. Our results indicate that this species was sensitive to the effects of climate change. Prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) haplogroups restricted today to South-East Europe and Western Asia reached as far west as the UK. During the LGM, red deer was mainly restricted to southern refugia, in Iberia, the Balkans and possibly in Italy and South-Western Asia. At the end of the LGM, red deer expanded from the Iberian refugium, to Central and Northern Europe, including the UK, Belgium, Scandinavia, Germany, Poland and Belarus. Ancient DNA data cannot rule out refugial survival of red deer in North-West Europe through the LGM. Had such deer survived, though, they were replaced by deer migrating from Iberia at the end of the glacial. The Balkans served as a separate LGM refugium and were probably connected to Western Asia with genetic exchange between the two areas. PMID:23927498

  16. Ocean - ice sheet interaction along the NW European margin during the last glacial phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, L. W. M.; Sejrup, H. P.; Haflidason, H.; Hjelstuen, B. O. B.

    2015-12-01

    The NW European continental margin was repeatedly covered by shelf edge glaciations during the last glacial cycles. Here, we present a compilation of new and previously published data from a SW to NE transect of 8 sediment cores raised along the upper continental slope. This study aims to investigate the interaction between sea surface conditions and the variability seen in the British Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) and the Fennoscandian Ice Sheet (FIS) during the last 13-40 ka BP. Ice Rafted Debris (IRD) counts, IRD flux data, grain size data, the content of the polar planktonic foraminifera Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sin) and ∂18O measurements were compiled and combined with new Bayesian age models. From 40-24.5 ka BP the build up and consecutive confluence of the BIIS and the FIS are reflected in sediment composition and flux data. Pulses of large quantities of fine material to the southern part of the transect suggest riverine BIIS related influx. The sediment composition in cores close to the Norwegian channel indicates that the Norwegian Channel Ice Stream (NCIS) was only active between 24.5-18.5 ka BP during the last glacial stage. The planktonic foraminifera data during this period strongly suggests a dependence of NCIS extent variability and pulses in warm Atlantic water entering the Nordic Seas. In the northernmost cores rapidly deposited, laminated sediments and ∂18O spikes in planktonic foraminifera dated to 18.5 ka BP were interpreted as meltwater plume deposits. This may reflect NCIS retreat allowing BIIS and FIS to unzip and route ice dammed lake- and meltwater to the margin. In conclusion, the investigation suggests a close co-variation in extent of marine based parts of the BIIS, the FIS and ocean circulation while demonstrating the strong influence of the local glacial history on standard open marine proxies. This suggests that tuning chronologies of single marine records to ice cores in some regions might be more challenging than previously

  17. Evaluating Object-Based Image Analysis on Glacial Micromorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, K. S.; Sjogren, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    Micromorphology has recently been applied more in analyzing glacial sediments at a microscopic level. It provides additional information and details that may help to explain glacial processes in areas where macro- scale observations cannot yield sufficient information. However, the process of interpreting thin sections has been very subjective, and reaching general consensus about glacial processes is difficult. Remote sensing technology is increasingly helpful in the development and advancement of many sciences; the concepts that lie behind the technology in object cognition used in other fields, such as landscape ecology, can be applied to micromorphology. Similar to what has been done to landscape ecology in the past, automating the process of interpreting objects in glacial sediments may potentially simplify and decrease the subjectivity of the process. Definiens Professional 5 is an object-based image analysis program that imitates human cognitive methods; it is used in this study to identify objects apart from background matrices in multiple thin section images of glacial sediments. The program's initial results proved that more work was needed to be done for better results, but overall the software produced promising results. The method is repeatable and continues to generate consistent results with no bias or ambiguity, so the application of this method to micromorphology and other areas alike will be valuable.

  18. Crevassing and calving of glacial ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenneally, James Patrick

    Calving of ice is a relatively new area of research in the still young field of glaciology. In the short time that calving has been studied, it has been mainly treated as an afterthought, with the predominant mode of thinking being that it will happen so to concern oneself with why is not important. Many studies dealt with observations of calving front positions over time vs. ice velocity in an attempt to quantify the calving rate as the difference between the two, while others have attempted to deduce some empirical relationship between calving rate and variables such as water depth or temperature. This study instead addresses the question of why, where, and when ice will first become crevassed, which is an obviously necessary condition for a later calving event to occur. Previous work examining the causes of calving used ideas put forth from a variety of fields, including civil engineering, materials science, and results from basic physics and mechanics. These theories are re-examined here and presented as part of a larger whole. Important results from the field of fracture mechanics are utilized frequently, and these results can be used as a predictor of ice behavior and intrinsic properties of ice, as well as properties like back stresses induced by local pinning points and resistive shears along glacial ice boundaries. A theory of fracture for a material experiencing creep is also presented with applications to ice shelves and crevasse penetration. Finally, a speculative theory regarding large scale iceberg formation is presented. It is meant mainly as an impetus to further discussion on the topic, with the hope that a model relating crevasse geometries to flow parameters can result in crevasse spacings that could produce the tabular icebergs which are so newsworthy. The primary focus of this thesis is to move away from the "after the fact" studies that are so common in calving research, and instead devote energy to determining what creates the conditions that

  19. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography

    PubMed Central

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J.; Montgomery, David R.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 104 years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain. PMID:26271245

  20. Tectonic control on the persistence of glacially sculpted topography.

    PubMed

    Prasicek, Günther; Larsen, Isaac J; Montgomery, David R

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental insights for understanding how landscapes evolve is based on determining the extent to which topography was shaped by glaciers or by rivers. More than 10(4) years after the last major glaciation the topography of mountain ranges worldwide remains dominated by characteristic glacial landforms such as U-shaped valleys, but an understanding of the persistence of such landforms is lacking. Here we use digital topographic data to analyse valley shapes at sites worldwide to demonstrate that the persistence of U-shaped valleys is controlled by the erosional response to tectonic forcing. Our findings indicate that glacial topography in Earth's most rapidly uplifting mountain ranges is rapidly replaced by fluvial topography and hence valley forms do not reflect the cumulative action of multiple glacial periods, implying that the classic physiographic signature of glaciated landscapes is best expressed in, and indeed limited by, the extent of relatively low-uplift terrain. PMID:26271245

  1. Glacial geology of the Hellas region on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Strom, Robert G.; Johnson, Natasha

    1991-01-01

    A glacial geologic interpretation was recently presented for Argyre, which is herein extended to Hellas. This glacial event is believed to constitute an important link in a global cryohydric epoch of Middle Amazonian age. At glacial maximum, ice apparently extended far beyond the regions of Argyre and Hellas, and formed what is termed as the Austral Ice Sheet, an agglomeration of several ice domes and lobes including the Hellas Lobe. It is concluded that Hellas was apparently heavily glaciated. Also glaciation was young by Martian standards (Middle Amazonian), and ancient by terrestrial standards. Glaciation appears to have occurred during the same period that other areas on Mars were experiencing glaciation and periglacial activity. Glaciation seems to have occurred as a geological brief epoch of intense geomorphic activity in an era characterized by long periods of relative inactivity.

  2. Magmatic cycles pace tectonic and morphological expression of rifting (Afar depression, Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Dumont, S.; Grandin, R.; Williams, A.; Blard, P.-H.; Schimmelpfennig, I.; Vye-Brown, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Benedetti, L.; Yirgu, G.

    2016-07-01

    The existence of narrow axial volcanic zones of mid-oceanic ridges testifies of the underlying concentration of both melt distribution and tectonic strain. As a result of repeated diking and faulting, axial volcanic zones therefore represent a spectacular topographic expression of plate divergence. However, the submarine location of oceanic ridges makes it difficult to constrain the interplay between tectonic and magmatic processes in time and space. In this study, we use the Dabbahu-Manda Hararo (DMH) magmatic rift segment (Afar, Ethiopia) to provide quantitative constraints on the response of tectonic processes to variations in magma supply at divergent plate boundaries. The DMH magmatic rift segment is considered an analogue of an oceanic ridge, exhibiting a fault pattern, extension rate and topographic relief comparable to intermediate- to slow-spreading ridges. Here, we focus on the northern and central parts of DMH rift, where we present quantitative slip rates for the past 40 kyr for major and minor normal fault scarps in the vicinity of a recent (September 2005) dike intrusion. The data obtained show that the axial valley topography has been created by enhanced slip rates that occurred during periods of limited volcanism, suggestive of reduced magmatic activity, probably in association with changes in strain distribution in the crust. Our results indicate that the development of the axial valley topography has been regulated by the lifetimes of the magma reservoirs and their spatial distribution along the segment, and thus to the magmatic cycles of replenishment/differentiation (<100 kyr). Our findings are also consistent with magma-induced deformation in magma-rich rift segments. The record of two tectonic events of metric vertical amplitude on the fault that accommodated the most part of surface displacement during the 2005 dike intrusion suggests that the latter type of intrusion occurs roughly every 10 kyr in the northern part of the DMH segment.

  3. 20 Myr of eccentricity paced lacustrine cycles in the Cenozoic Ebro Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, Luis; Garcés, Miguel; Cabrera, Lluís; Costa, Elisenda; Sáez, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Long-period orbital forcing is a crucial component of the major global climate shifts during the Cenozoic as revealed in marine pelagic records. A complementary regional perspective of climate change can be assessed from internally drained lake basins, which are directly affected by insolation and precipitation balance. The Ebro Basin in northeastern Iberia embraces a 20 Myr long continuous sedimentary record where recurrent expansions and retractions of the central lacustrine system suggest periodic shifts of water balance due to orbital oscillations. In order to test climatic (orbital) forcing a key-piece of the basin, the Los Monegros lacustrine system, has been analyzed in detail. The cyclostratigraphic analysis points to orbital eccentricity as pacemaker of short to long-term lacustrine sequences, and reveals a correlation of maxima of the 100-kyr, 400-kyr and 2.4-Myr eccentricity cycles with periods of lake expansion. A magnetostratigraphy-based chronostratigraphy of the complete continental record allows further assessing long-period orbital forcing at basin scale, a view that challenges alternate scenarios where the stratigraphic architecture in foreland systems is preferably associated to tectonic processes. We conclude that while the location of lacustrine depocenters reacted to the long-term tectonic-driven accommodation changes, shorter wavelenght oscillations of lake environments, still million-year scale, claims for a dominance of orbital forcing. We suggest a decoupling between (tectonic) supply-driven clastic sequences fed from basin margins and (climatic) base level-driven lacustrine sequences in active settings with medium to large sediment transfer systems.

  4. Quantitative interpretation of atmospheric carbon records over the last glacial termination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KöHler, Peter; Fischer, Hubertus; Munhoven, Guy; Zeebe, Richard E.

    2005-12-01

    The glacial/interglacial rise in atmospheric pCO2 is one of the best known changes in paleoclimate research, yet the cause for it is still unknown. Forcing the coupled ocean-atmosphere-biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle BICYCLE with proxy data over the last glacial termination, we are able to quantitatively reproduce transient variations in pCO2 and its isotopic signatures (δ13C, Δ14C) observed in natural climate archives. The sensitivity of the Box model of the Isotopic Carbon cYCLE (BICYCLE) to high or low latitudinal changes is comparable to other multibox models or more complex ocean carbon cycle models, respectively. The processes considered here ranked by their contribution to the glacial/interglacial rise in pCO2 in decreasing order are: the rise in Southern Ocean vertical mixing rates (>30 ppmv), decreases in alkalinity and carbon inventories (>30 ppmv), the reduction of the biological pump (˜20 ppmv), the rise in ocean temperatures (15-20 ppmv), the resumption of ocean circulation (15-20 ppmv), and coral reef growth (<5 ppmv). The regrowth of the terrestrial biosphere, sea level rise and the increase in gas exchange through reduced sea ice cover operate in the opposite direction, decreasing pCO2 during Termination I by ˜30 ppmv. According to our model the sequence of events during Termination I might have been the following: a reduction of aeolian iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean together with a breakdown in Southern Ocean stratification, the latter caused by rapid sea ice retreat, trigger the onset of the pCO2 increase. After these events the reduced North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) formation during the Heinrich 1 event and the subsequent resumption of ocean circulation at the beginning of the Bølling-Allerød warm interval are the main processes determining the atmospheric carbon records in the subsequent time period of Termination I. We further deduce that a complete shutdown of the NADW formation during the Younger Dryas was

  5. Hidden levels of phylodiversity in Antarctic green algae: further evidence for the existence of glacial refugia

    PubMed Central

    De Wever, Aaike; Leliaert, Frederik; Verleyen, Elie; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Van der Gucht, Katleen; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Recent data revealed that metazoans such as mites and springtails have persisted in Antarctica throughout several glacial–interglacial cycles, which contradicts the existing paradigm that terrestrial life was wiped out by successive glacial events and that the current inhabitants are recent colonizers. We used molecular phylogenetic techniques to study Antarctic microchlorophyte strains isolated from lacustrine habitats from maritime and continental Antarctica. The 14 distinct chlorophycean and trebouxiophycean lineages observed point to a wide phylogenetic diversity of apparently endemic Antarctic lineages at different taxonomic levels. This supports the hypothesis that long-term survival took place in glacial refugia, resulting in a specific Antarctic flora. The majority of the lineages have estimated ages between 17 and 84 Ma and probably diverged from their closest relatives around the time of the opening of Drake Passage (30–45 Ma), while some lineages with longer branch lengths have estimated ages that precede the break-up of Gondwana. The variation in branch length and estimated age points to several independent but rare colonization events. PMID:19625320

  6. Glacial-interglacial changes in central tropical Pacific surface seawater property gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean; Polissar, Pratigya J.; Jacobel, Allison W.; Hovan, Steven A.; Pockalny, Robert A.; Lyle, Mitchell; Murray, Richard W.; Ravelo, A. Christina; Bova, Samantha C.; Dunlea, Ann G.; Ford, Heather L.; Hertzberg, Jennifer E.; Wertman, Christina A.; Maloney, Ashley E.; Shackford, Julia K.; Wejnert, Katherine; Xie, Ruifang C.

    2015-05-01

    Much uncertainty exists about the state of the oceanic and atmospheric circulation in the tropical Pacific over the last glacial cycle. Studies have been hampered by the fact that sediment cores suitable for study were concentrated in the western and eastern parts of the tropical Pacific, with little information from the central tropical Pacific. Here we present information from a suite of sediment cores collected from the Line Islands Ridge in the central tropical Pacific, which show sedimentation rates and stratigraphies suitable for paleoceanographic investigations. Based on the radiocarbon and oxygen isotope measurements on the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber, we construct preliminary age models for selected cores and show that the gradient in the oxygen isotope ratio of G. ruber between the equator and 8°N is enhanced during glacial stages relative to interglacial stages. This stronger gradient could reflect enhanced equatorial cooling (perhaps reflecting a stronger Walker circulation) or an enhanced salinity gradient (perhaps reflecting increased rainfall in the central tropical Pacific).

  7. Antarctic density stratification and the strength of the circumpolar current during the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean; Ito, Takamitsu; Michel, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    The interaction between ocean circulation and biological processes in the Southern Ocean is thought to be a major control on atmospheric carbon dioxide content over glacial cycles. A better understanding of stratification and circulation in the Southern Ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) provides information that will help us to assess these scenarios. First, we evaluate the link between Southern Ocean stratification and circulation states in a suite of climate model simulations. While simulated Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) transport varies widely (80-350 Sverdrup (Sv)), it co-varies with horizontal and vertical stratification and the formation of the southern deep water. We then test the LGM simulations against available data from paleoceanographic proxies, which can be used to assess the density stratification and ACC transport south of Australia. The paleoceanographic data suggest a moderate increase in the Southern Ocean stratification and the ACC strength during the LGM. Even with the relatively large uncertainty in the proxy-based estimates, extreme scenarios exhibited by some climate models with ACC transports of greater than 250 Sv and highly saline Antarctic Bottom Water are highly unlikely.

  8. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Conway, T.M.; Wolff, E.W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Relief of iron (Fe) limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial–interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and marine sediment records demonstrate that atmospheric dust supply to the oceans increased by up to an order of magnitude during glacial intervals. However, poor constraints on soluble atmospheric Fe fluxes to the oceans limit assessment of the role of Fe in glacial–interglacial change. Here, using novel techniques, we present estimates of water- and seawater-soluble Fe solubility in Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) atmospheric dust from the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) Dome C and Berkner Island ice cores. Fe solubility was very variable (1–42%) during the interval, and frequently higher than typically assumed by models. Soluble aerosol Fe fluxes to Dome C at the LGM (0.01–0.84 mg m−2 per year) suggest that soluble Fe deposition to the Southern Ocean would have been ≥10 × modern deposition, rivalling upwelling supply. PMID:26204562

  9. Erosion of the Laurentide region of North America by glacial and glaciofluvial processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, M.; Laine, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Collection of seismic reflection data from continental margins and ocean basins surrounding North America makes it possible to estimate the amount of material eroded from the area formerly covered by Laurentide ice sheets since major glaciation began in North America. A minimum estimate is made of 1.62 ?? 106 km3, or an average 120 m of rock physically eroded from the Laurentide region. This figure is an order of magnitude higher than earlier estimates based on the volume of glacial drift, Cenozoic marine sediments, and modern sediment loads of rivers. Most of the sediment produced during Laurentide glaciation has already been transported to the oceans. The importance of continental glaciation as a geomorphic agency in North America may have to be reevaluated. Evidence from sedimentation rates in ocean basins surrounding Greenland and Antarctica suggests that sediment production, sediment transport, and possibly denudation by permanent ice caps may be substantially lower than by periodic ice caps, such as the Laurentide. Low rates of sediment survival from the time of the Permo-Carboniferous and Precambrian glaciations suggest that predominance of marine deposition during some glacial epochs results in shorter lived sediment because of preferential tectonism and cycling of oceanic crust versus continental crust. ?? 1985.

  10. Polar front shift and atmospheric CO2 during the glacial maximum of the Early Paleozoic Icehouse

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Thijs R. A.; Armstrong, Howard A.; Williams, Mark; Paris, Florentin; Zalasiewicz, Jan A.; Sabbe, Koen; Nõlvak, Jaak; Challands, Thomas J.; Verniers, Jacques; Servais, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Our new data address the paradox of Late Ordovician glaciation under supposedly high pCO2 (8 to 22× PAL: preindustrial atmospheric level). The paleobiogeographical distribution of chitinozoan (“mixed layer”) marine zooplankton biotopes for the Hirnantian glacial maximum (440 Ma) are reconstructed and compared to those from the Sandbian (460 Ma): They demonstrate a steeper latitudinal temperature gradient and an equatorwards shift of the Polar Front through time from 55°–70° S to ∼40° S. These changes are comparable to those during Pleistocene interglacial-glacial cycles. In comparison with the Pleistocene, we hypothesize a significant decline in mean global temperature from the Sandbian to Hirnantian, proportional with a fall in pCO2 from a modeled Sandbian level of ∼8× PAL to ∼5× PAL during the Hirnantian. Our data suggest that a compression of midlatitudinal biotopes and ecospace in response to the developing glaciation was a likely cause of the end-Ordovician mass extinction. PMID:20696937

  11. Giant glacial cirques of non-mountainous terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amantov, A.; Amantova, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cirques are usually considered as specific landforms of hill and mountain terrains produced by alpine glaciers, and/or slope failures (landslides). However, glacial cirques seem to be present also in non-mountainous terrains that underwent extensive Pleistocene ice-sheet glaciations and strong glacial and fluvio-glacial erosion. The largest form in the Baltic region is Severoladozhsky (North Lake Ladoga) cirque, probably the world's largest representative, with the length and width close to 100 km. Another example is the deepest Landsort basin of the Baltic Sea. In those cases Meso-Neoproterozoic sediments were subject to selected erosion, with evident overdeepening of the bedrock surface in comparison with surrounding crystalline frame. The bowl headwall shape of the cirque-like landforms was determined by the outline of the margin of exhumed basin. The origin of the major basins of margins of the Baltic and Canadian shields are similar. However, direct analogues of giant cirques are not well developed in this part of North America due to geological deviations and dominant directions of ice movement. Comparable landforms (like the South Chippewa basin of the Lake Michigan) are therefore less mature. We define glacial cirque as an amphitheatre-shape depression with comparable values of length and width, steep headwall with adjacent side slopes and gentle lip with commonly increased glacial accumulation. They are usually located within an ice stream that created typical relief profile with normal horseshoe overdeepening, and in areas predefined by geological and geomorphological peculiarities. This definition likely fits both classic mountain cirques, and giant ones created in favorable conditions in domains that underwent extensive glaciations and relevant selective glacial erosion. Length/width ratio typical for giant cirques group is close to 1:1, being comparable with classical alpine ones. Major differences (like length/height ratio of other order and possible

  12. Is rate of glacial retreat accelerated in Indian Himalaya? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    The Himalaya has one of the largest concentration of glaciers and rivers like Indus, Ganga and Bramhputra originate from this region. The snow and glacier melt is an important source of water for these rivers. However, this source of water may get affected in the near future due to changes in the cryosphere. Therefore, retreat of Himalayan glaciers are discussed extensively in scientific and public forums in India. Conventionally health of glaciers is assessed using changes in glacial length, as it is widely measured. However changes in glacial length and loss in areal extent near terminus needs to be interpreted carefully, as these changes can be influenced by numerous terrain and climatically sensitive parameters. The terrain parameters which can influence glacial retreat are slope, area altitude distribution, debris cover and orientation. In addition, climatically sensitive parameters like mass balance, glacial lakes and black carbon can also influence glacier retreat. These multiple influences can produce a complex pattern of glacial retreat. In this paper long-term glacier retreat in three river basins in the Indian Himalaya as Tista, Baspa and Parbati will be discussed. These basins are located in different climatically sensitive regions and each basin has unique dominant process of mass wasting. In addition to terrain parameters, influence of process like formation and expansion of moraine dammed lakes in Tista basin, deposition of black carbon on accumulation area in Baspa basin and debris cover in Parbati basin will also be discussed. This will provide understanding on varying influence of different mass wasting processes on glacial retreat during last five decades in the Indian Himalaya.

  13. Glacial Processes on Earth and Mars: New Perspectives from Remote Sensing and Laboratory Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, Alicia Marie

    Chemical and physical interactions of flowing ice and rock have inexorably shaped planetary surfaces. Weathering in glacial environments is a significant link in biogeochemical cycles --- carbon and strontium --- on Earth, and may have once played an important role in altering Mars' surface. Despite growing recognition of the importance of low-temperature chemical weathering, these processes are still not well understood. Debris-coated glaciers are also present on Mars, emphasizing the need to study ice-related processes in the evolution of planetary surfaces. During Earth's history, subglacial environments are thought to have sheltered communities of microorganisms from extreme climate variations. On Amazonian Mars, glaciers such as lobate debris aprons (LDA) could have hosted chemolithotrophic communities, making Mars' present glaciers candidates for life preservation. This study characterizes glacial processes on both Earth and Mars. Chemical weathering at Robertson Glacier, a small alpine glacier in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, is examined with a multidisciplinary approach. The relative proportions of differing dissolution reactions at various stages in the glacial system are empirically determined using aqueous geochemistry. Synthesis of laboratory and orbital thermal infrared spectroscopy allows identification of dissolution rinds on hand samples and characterization of carbonate dissolution signals at orbital scales, while chemical and morphological evidence for thin, discontinuous weathering rinds at microscales are evident from electron microscopy. Subglacial dissolution rates are found to outpace those of the proglacial till plain; biologically-mediated pyrite oxidation drives the bulk of this acidic weathering. Second, the area-elevation relationship, or hypsometry, of LDA in the midlatitudes of Mars is characterized. These glaciers are believed to have formed ˜500 Ma during a climate excursion. Hypsometric measurements of these debris-covered glaciers

  14. Eolian delivery of highly reactive iron to the glacial ocean of the late Paleozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, S.; Soreghan, G. S.; Owens, J. D.; Lyons, T. W.; Soreghan, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    at the source (highlands of western Pangaea) or other ice-related processes that enhance Fe reactivity and likely its bioavailability. Our data imply delivery of extraordinarily large amounts of glacially produced, biogeochemically reactive Fe to glacial-stage, late Paleozoic seas of western equatorial Pangaea with obvious importance for the cycling of carbon in the ocean and atmosphere.

  15. Simulating the last glacial-interglacial transition with a coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice sheet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Ziemen, Florian

    2015-04-01

    One of the major challenges in climate modeling is the simulation of glacial-interglacial transitions. A few models of intermediate complexity have been successful in simulating the last termination. Complex atmosphere-ocean general circulation models have been shown to be able to yield realistic climate changes with prescribed ice sheets. Here we presents results from a first attempt to simulate a substantial part of the last glacial cycle with an AOGCM coupled interactively with a state-of-the-art ice sheet model. The ECHAM5/MPIOM AOGCM has been interactively coupled to the dynamical ice sheet model PISM. The latter is run for most of the northern hemisphere with a horizontal resolution of 20 km. An earlier version of this model ( Ziemen et al. 2014) has been applied to a steady state simulation of the last glacial maximum (LGM). The model was integrated from the late Glacial into the Holocene using insolation and greenhouse gas concentrations as transient forcing. Land sea mask and ocean topography are fixed at LGM conditions, river routing and surface elevation for the atmospheric model component are calculated interactively depending on the simulated ice sheets. To make these long simulations feasible, the atmosphere is accelerated by a factor of 10 relative to the other model components using a periodically-synchronous coupling technique. A mini-ensemble with different initial conditions has been run. In all simulation the northern hemispheric deglaciation starts between 18 and 17 kyr BP, consistent with the onset of global warming. The model produces Heinrich event like variability as part of its internal variability. These rapid ice discharge events have a strong impact on the North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (NAMOC). During the peak deglaciation the NAMOC is collapsed (with a few short interruptions) for several thousand years, which is longer than the estimates from reconstructions. This seems to be an artifact due to keeping ocean

  16. Morphologic Map of Glacial and Periglacial Features in the Northwestern Argyre Basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raack, J.; Hiesinger, H.; Reiss, D.

    2010-03-01

    We produced a morphological map of the northwestern rim of the Argyre Basin with focus on glacial and periglacial features. We report on features such as gullies, pingo-like forms and glacial remnants which are observed.

  17. Last Glacial - Present Glacial Activity in East Greenland Fjords Inferred from Swath Bathymetry and High-Resolution Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forwick, M.; Laberg, J. S.; Husum, K.; Olsen, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    Swath bathymetry and high-resolution penetration echo sounder (chirp) data from fjords and sounds between Kong Oscars Fjord and Bredefjord, East Greenland, reveal glacial landforms and sedimentary processes that can be used to infer glacial activity from the last glacial to the present. Relatively straight, linear features oriented parallel to the fjord axes, as well as beyond the mouths of some fjords, are interpreted to be glacial lineations providing evidence of fast-flowing grounded ice draining the eastern parts of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last glacial. In some areas, the glacial lineations are the only preserved glacigenic landfjorms (e.g. beyond the mouth of Bredefjord). However, in other areas, they are covered with multiple transverse ridges interpreted to be small terminal moraines (e.g. in Youngsund). Whereas the absence of such moraines is suggested to represent a rapid ice retreat due to lift-up and disintegration during parts of the deglaciation, their presence reflects that multiple halts and/or re-advances interrupted the retreat. Acoustically stratified sediment sequences dominate the fjord-fill stratigraphies (up to 180 ms two-way travel time). These deposits are suggested to reflect repeatedly changing lithological compositions in a glacimarine environment where deposition mainly occurred from suspension fall-out, in addition to ice rafting from icebergs calving off from tidewater glaciers, and sea ice. The stratified deposits form often relatively uniform drapes indicating that the tidewater glaciers were mainly located near the fjord heads since the last deglaciation. However, acoustically transparent bodies with irregular geometries, intercalated within the stratified deposits, occur in some of the inner fjords. These are suggested to be glacigenic sediment wedges (debris-flow lobes) that formed during relatively recent advances of tidewater glaciers (e.g. in Nordfjord and Moskusoksefjord).

  18. Timing of maximum glacial extent and deglaciation from HualcaHualca volcano (southern Peru), obtained with cosmogenic 36Cl.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Jesus; Palacios, David; Vazquez, Lorenzo; Juan Zamorano, Jose

    2015-04-01

    Andean glacial deposits are key records of climate fluctuations in the southern hemisphere. During the last decades, in situ cosmogenic nuclides have provided fresh and significant dates to determine past glacier behavior in this region. But still there are many important discrepancies such as the impact of Last Glacial Maximum or the influence of Late Glacial climatic events on glacial mass balances. Furthermore, glacial chronologies from many sites are still missing, such as HualcaHualca (15° 43' S; 71° 52' W; 6,025 masl), a high volcano of the Peruvian Andes located 70 km northwest of Arequipa. The goal of this study is to establish the age of the Maximum Glacier Extent (MGE) and deglaciation at HualcaHualca volcano. To achieve this objetive, we focused in four valleys (Huayuray, Pujro Huayjo, Mollebaya and Mucurca) characterized by a well-preserved sequence of moraines and roches moutonnées. The method is based on geomorphological analysis supported by cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating. 36Cl ages have been estimated with the CHLOE calculator and were compared with other central Andean glacial chronologies as well as paleoclimatological proxies. In Huayuray valley, exposure ages indicates that MGE occurred ~ 18 - 16 ka. Later, the ice mass gradually retreated but this process was interrupted by at least two readvances; the last one has been dated at ~ 12 ka. In the other hand, 36Cl result reflects a MGE age of ~ 13 ka in Mollebaya valley. Also, two samples obtained in Pujro-Huayjo and Mucurca valleys associated with MGE have an exposure age of 10-9 ka, but likely are moraine boulders affected by exhumation or erosion processes. Deglaciation in HualcaHualca volcano began abruptly ~ 11.5 ka ago according to a 36Cl age from a polished and striated bedrock in Pujro Huayjo valley, presumably as a result of reduced precipitation as well as a global increase of temperatures. The glacier evolution at HualcaHualca volcano presents a high correlation with

  19. Variability of neodymium isotopes associated with planktonic foraminifera in the Pacific Ocean during the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Bostock, Helen C.; Crowhurst, Simon; Rennie, Victoria

    2016-08-01

    The deep Pacific Ocean holds the largest oceanic reservoir of carbon which may interchange with the atmosphere on climatologically important timescales. The circulation of the deep Pacific during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), however, is not well understood. Neodymium (Nd) isotopes of ferromanganese oxide coatings precipitated on planktonic foraminifera are a valuable proxy for deep ocean water mass reconstruction in paleoceanography. In this study, we present Nd isotope compositions (εNd) of planktonic foraminifera for the Holocene and the LGM obtained from 55 new sites widely distributed in the Pacific Ocean. The Holocene planktonic foraminiferal εNd results agree with the proximal seawater data, indicating that they provide a reliable record of modern bottom water Nd isotopes in the deep Pacific. There is a good correlation between foraminiferal εNd and seawater phosphate concentrations (R2 = 0.80), but poorer correlation with silicate (R2 = 0.37). Our interpretation is that the radiogenic Nd isotope is added to the deep open Pacific through particle release from the upper ocean during deep water mass advection and aging. The data thus also imply the Nd isotopes in the Pacific are not likely to be controlled by silicate cycling. In the North Pacific, the glacial Nd isotopic compositions are similar to the Holocene values, indicating that the Nd isotope composition of North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW) remained constant (-3.5 to -4). During the LGM, the southwest Pacific cores throughout the water column show higher εNd corroborating previous studies which suggested a reduced inflow of North Atlantic Deep Water to the Pacific. However, the western equatorial Pacific deep water does not record a corresponding radiogenic excursion, implying reduced radiogenic boundary inputs during the LGM probably due to a shorter duration of seawater-particle interaction in a stronger glacial deep boundary current. A significant negative glacial εNd excursion is evident in

  20. Glacial landforms of the southern Ungava Bay region (Canada): implications for the late-glacial dynamics and the damming of glacial Lake Naskaupi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube-Loubert, Hugo; Roy, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The Laurentide ice sheet played an important role in the late Pleistocene climate, notably through discharges of icebergs and meltwater. In this context, the Ungava Bay region in northern Quebec-Labrador appears particularly important, especially during the last deglaciation when the retreating ice margin dammed major river valleys, creating large proglacial lakes (e.g., McLean, aux Feuilles). The history of these lakes is closely related to the temporal evolution of the Labrador-Quebec ice dome. There are, however, large uncertainties regarding the position of its ice divide system through time, thereby limiting our understanding of the history of these glacial lakes. Here we focus on glacial and deglacial landforms present in the George River valley, south of Ungava Bay, in order to bring additional constraints on the late-glacial ice dynamics of this region, which also comprised glacial Lake Naskaupi. This work is based on surficial mapping using aerial photos and satellite imagery, combined with extensive fieldwork and sediment sampling. Our investigation showed significant differences in the distribution of glacial landforms across the region. The area east of the George River is characterized by well-developed Naskaupi shorelines while the elevated terrains show a succession of geomorphological features indicative of cold-based ice or ice with low basal velocities. In the easternmost part of this sector, ice flow directional data indicate that the ice was flowing towards ENE, against the regional slope. Eskers show paleocurrent directions indicating a general ice retreat from east to west. In the western part of this sector, near the George River valley, eskers are absent and the region is covered by felsenmeer and ground moraine that likely reflect the presence of a residual ice mass that was no longer dynamic. The presence of a stagnant ice represents the best mechanism to explain the formation of glacial lakes in the George River valley and its main

  1. Stratigraphy and reservoir potential of glacial deposits of the Itarare Group (Carboniferous-Permian), Parana basin, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Franca, A.B. ); Potter, P.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Drilling in the Parana basin of Brazil in the mid-1980s discovered gas and condensate in the Itarare Group, and showed that glacial deposits in Brazil can contain hydrocarbons. The reservoir potential of the Carboniferous-Permian Itarare Group of the basin is analyzed using new subsurface data from 20 deep wells drilled in the early to middle 1980s. Central to the analysis was the construction of over 3000 km of cross sections based on more than 100 wells, the description of more than 400 m of core, and study of 95 thin sections. Subsurface exploration and mapping of the Itarare are greatly aided by the recognition of three recently defined and described formations and four members, which are traceable for hundreds of kilometers. These units belong to three major glacial cycles in which the pebbly mudstones and shales are seals and glacially related sandstones are reservoirs. The best sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface belong to the Rio Segredo Member, the upper-most sandy unit of the Itarare. The Rio Segredo Member is the best petroleum target because it is overlain by thick seals and massive pebbly mudstones and shales, and because it is shallower and less compacted than underlying, more deeply buried sandstones. This member has little detrital matrix and much of its porosity is secondary, developed by carboxylic acid and CO{sub 2} generated when Jurassic-Cretaceous basalts, sills, and dikes were intruded into the Parana basin as Gondwana broke up.

  2. Reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to the deep central South Pacific during the last two glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Kescher, Mario; Frank, Martin; Tapia, Raúl; Ronge, Thomas A.; Nürnberg, Dirk; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The South Pacific is a sensitive location for the variability of the global oceanic thermohaline circulation given that deep waters from the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and the Pacific Basin are exchanged. Here we reconstruct the deep water circulation of the central South Pacific for the last two glacial cycles (from 240,000 years ago to the Holocene) based on radiogenic neodymium (Nd) and lead (Pb) isotope records complemented by benthic stable carbon data obtained from two sediment cores located on the flanks of the East Pacific Rise. The records show small but consistent glacial/interglacial changes in all three isotopic systems with interglacial average values of -5.8 and 18.757 for ɛNd and 206Pb/204Pb, respectively, whereas glacial averages are -5.3 and 18.744. Comparison of this variability of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) to previously published records along the pathway of the global thermohaline circulation is consistent with reduced admixture of North Atlantic Deep Water to CDW during cold stages. The absolute values and amplitudes of the benthic δ13C variations are essentially indistinguishable from other records of the Southern Hemisphere and confirm that the low central South Pacific sedimentation rates did not result in a significant reduction of the amplitude of any of the measured proxies. In addition, the combined detrital Nd and strontium (87Sr/86Sr) isotope signatures imply that Australian and New Zealand dust has remained the principal contributor of lithogenic material to the central South Pacific.

  3. Rapid climate change and conditional instability of the glacial deep ocean from the thermobaric effect and geothermal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Jess F.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Pasquero, Claudia

    2005-03-01

    Previous results from deep-sea pore fluid data demonstrate that the glacial deep ocean was filled with salty, cold water from the South. This salinity stratification of the ocean allows for the possible accumulation of geothermal heat in the deep-sea and could result in a water column with cold fresh water on top of warm salty water and with a corresponding increase in potential energy. For an idealized 4000 dbar two-layer water column, we calculate that there are ˜10 6 J/m 2 (˜0.2 J/kg) of potential energy available when a 0.4 psu salinity contrast is balanced by a ˜2 °C temperature difference. This salt-based storage of heat at depth is analogous to Convectively Available Potential Energy (CAPE) in the atmosphere. The "thermobaric effect" in the seawater equation of state can cause this potential energy to be released catastrophically. Because deep ocean stratification was dominated by salinity at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), the glacial climate is more sensitive to charging this "thermobaric capacitor" and can plausibly explain many aspects of the record of rapid climate change. Our mechanism could account for the grouping of Dansgaard/Oeschger events into Bond Cycles and for the different patterns of warming observed in ice cores from separate hemispheres.

  4. Paleodistribution modeling suggests glacial refugia in Scandinavia and out-of-Tibet range expansion of the Arctic fox.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Hurtado, Marcelo; Hof, Anouschka R; Jansson, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Quaternary glacial cycles have shaped the geographic distributions and evolution of numerous species in the Arctic. Ancient DNA suggests that the Arctic fox went extinct in Europe at the end of the Pleistocene and that Scandinavia was subsequently recolonized from Siberia, indicating inability to track its habitat through space as climate changed. Using ecological niche modeling, we found that climatically suitable conditions for Arctic fox were found in Scandinavia both during the last glacial maximum (LGM) and the mid-Holocene. Our results are supported by fossil occurrences from the last glacial. Furthermore, the model projection for the LGM, validated with fossil records, suggested an approximate distance of 2000 km between suitable Arctic conditions and the Tibetan Plateau well within the dispersal distance of the species, supporting the recently proposed hypothesis of range expansion from an origin on the Tibetan Plateau to the rest of Eurasia. The fact that the Arctic fox disappeared from Scandinavia despite suitable conditions suggests that extant populations may be more sensitive to climate change than previously thought. PMID:26811782

  5. The Influence of Glacial Ice Sheets on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Through Atmospheric Circulation Change under Glacial Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff-Tadano, S.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; Yoshimori, M.; Oka, A.; Chan, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that glacial ice sheets (Laurentide, Fennoscandian and Antarctic ice sheets) exert a large influence on the climate including the atmospheric circulation. Moreover, recent climate modeling studies suggest that glacial ice sheets have a large impact on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). However, the process by which the ice sheets impact on the AMOC is not yet fully understood. On the other hand, recent studies showed that surface wind changes play a crucial role on changes to the AMOC under glacial climate. Therefore, in this study, we investigate in detail, the process by which the ice sheet modifies the AMOC through surface wind change. Here we conduct numerical experiments using an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) and an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) separately. Our method consists of 2 steps. First, from AGCM experiments, we evaluate the effect of glacial ice sheets on the surface wind. Second, from OGCM experiments, we evaluate the influence of the wind stress change on the AMOC by applying the surface wind change as a boundary condition, while leaving other boundary conditions (surface heat and water fluxes) unchanged. In addition, we conduct several sensitivity experiments. Using the AGCM, we explore individual ice sheet effect, ice sheet topography effect and albedo effect on surface wind change. Moreover, using the OGCM, we change the surface wind gradually or apply the surface wind change only at a specific region in order to explore the wind change effect in detail. We find that glacial ice sheets largely intensify the AMOC by surface wind change under glacial climate. Compare to other regions, it reveals that the wind change at the North Atlantic (NA) is a key region. There, the northern glacial ice sheet topography intensifies the Icelandic Low and anti-cyclonic circulation over the Laurentide ice sheet. However, this wind effect is effective only when the NA is not widely covered by sea ice

  6. Amazonian and neotropical plant communities on glacial time-scales: The failure of the aridity and refuge hypotheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinvaux, P. A.; De Oliveira, P. E.; Bush, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    Plants respond to Pleistocene climatic change as species, not as associations or biomes. This has been demonstrated unequivocally by paleobotanical data for temperate latitudes. In the far richer vegetations of the tropics species populations also fluctuated independently in response to climatic forcing, from their longlasting glacial states to the patterns of brief interglacials like the present and back again. We use pollen data to reconstruct the vegetation of the Amazon basin in oxygen isotope stages 3 and 2 of the last glaciation in order to measure how the plant populations of the Amazon responded to the global warming at the onset of the Holocene. We find that plant communities of the neotropics vent copious pollen to lake sediments and that this pollen yields powerful signals for community composition. Three continuous sedimentary records reaching through oxygen isotope stage 2 are available from the Amazon lowlands, those from Carajas, Lake Pata and marine deposits off the mouth of the Amazon River. All three records yield pollen histories of remarkable constancy and stability. By comparing them with deposits of equal antiquity from the cerrado (savanna) of central Brazil, we show that most of the Amazon lowlands remained under forest throughout a glacial cycle. This forest was never fragmented by open vegetation as postulated by the refugia hypothesis. Instead the intact forest of glacial times included significant populations of plants that are now montane, suggesting that the global warming of the early Holocene resulted in the expulsion of heat intolerant plants from the lowland forest. Pollen data from the Amazonian flank of the Andes and from Pacific Panama provide evidence that populations of these heat intolerant plants survive the heat of interglacials in part by maintaining large populations at cooler montane altitudes. Our conclusion that the Amazon lowlands were forested in glacial times specifically refutes the hypothesis of Amazonian glacial

  7. On the Syn-glacial Sedimentary Record of Snowball Earth: Tales of Three Ice-mass Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, P. F.; Maloof, A. C.; Halverson, G. P.

    2004-05-01

    We sketch a conceptual model of the glacial history of a snowball Earth, based on new field studies of Marinoan (c640 Ma), Sturtian (c710 Ma) and Huronian (c2.4 Ga) syn-glacial deposits, and informed by sea-ice dynamics modeling. If the oceans froze over from pole to pole, sea ice would thicken and flow glacially towards the Equator, maintained in dynamic steady state by sublimation-precipitation and melting-freezing (Goodman & Pierrehumbert, 2003). Flowage thickens tropical sea ice (and thins extratropical sea ice) relative to adjacent landfast sea ice, where ice thickness is set by one-dimensional thermal diffusion. The latter, called 'sikussak' on Greenland fjords, would occur on rimmed shelves, silled basins and inland seas that are physically protected from invasion by sea glaciers. Such areas have high preservation potential in the geological record and their stratigraphic development through a snowball cycle (CO2 hysteresis loop) ought to reflect an interplay between three distinct ice-mass types: (1) sea glaciers, (2) sikussak, and (3) grounded ice domes. The snowball stage begins when sea glaciers invade the tropics and sikussak prevents calving from outlet glaciers and associated shelf ice. The snowball onset might easily be mistaken for a glacial termination in the sedimentary record. Suspended sediment discharged from wet-base grounded ice may accumulate beneath the sikussak, producing deposits previously interpreted as interstadial or non-glacial. Despite tropical sea ice c450 m thick (GP2003), sea glacier movement ensures a perpetual habitat for photoautotrophy in grounding-line crack systems. After greenhouse forcing raises tropical sea-surface temperature to the melting point, sikussak is replaced by 'oases' of open water, but the tropical ocean remains ice covered due to sea glacial inflow from higher latitudes. If evolved snowball seawater is anoxic and charged with dissolved iron, banded iron-formation will precipitate in snowball oases due to

  8. Glacial melting: an overlooked threat to Antarctic krill.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Verónica; Alurralde, Gastón; Meyer, Bettina; Aguirre, Gastón E; Canepa, Antonio; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Hass, H Christian; Williams, Gabriela N; Schloss, Irene R

    2016-01-01

    Strandings of marine animals are relatively common in marine systems. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We observed mass strandings of krill in Antarctica that appeared to be linked to the presence of glacial meltwater. Climate-induced glacial meltwater leads to an increased occurrence of suspended particles in the sea, which is known to affect the physiology of aquatic organisms. Here, we study the effect of suspended inorganic particles on krill in relation to krill mortality events observed in Potter Cove, Antarctica, between 2003 and 2012. The experimental results showed that large quantities of lithogenic particles affected krill feeding, absorption capacity and performance after only 24 h of exposure. Negative effects were related to both the threshold concentrations and the size of the suspended particles. Analysis of the stomach contents of stranded krill showed large quantities of large particles ( > 10(6 )μm(3)), which were most likely mobilized by glacial meltwater. Ongoing climate-induced glacial melting may impact the coastal ecosystems of Antarctica that rely on krill. PMID:27250339

  9. Ecology of invasive Melilotus alba on Alaskan glacial river floodplains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White sweetclover has recently invaded glacial river floodplains in Alaska. We sampled vegetation and measured environmental variables along transects located along the Nenana, Matanuska, and Stikine Rivers to describe plant communities and to determine the effects of white sweetclover on other plan...

  10. A new benchmark study for post-glacial rebound codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Modern modelling approaches to post-glacial rebound (PGR) are based on several techniques ranging from purely analytical formulations to fully numerical methods. Various European teams nowadays are independently working on the post-glacial rebound process in order to constrain the rheological profile of the mantle and the extent and chronology of the late-Pleistocene ice sheets which are prerequisites for the determination of the PGR contribution to geodetic observables. With the aim of i) testing the codes currently in use by the various teams, ii) to establish a minimum set of agreed results, iii) correct possible systematic errors embedded in the various physical formulations and/or computer implementations, and iv) facilitate the dissemination of numerical tools for surface loading studies to the geodynamical community and to young scientists, we present a set of benchmark computations mainly based on models with spherical symmetry and viscoelastic rheology but also including inputs from finite elements modelers. This study is performed within the Working Group 4 of the ESF COST Action ES0701 "Improved constraints on models of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment" and focuses on i) load Love numbers and relaxation spectra, ii) the deformation and gravity variations driven by surface loads characterized by simple geometry and time-history, and iii) the rotational fluctuations in response to glacial unloading.

  11. Glacial melting: an overlooked threat to Antarctic krill

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Verónica; Alurralde, Gastón; Meyer, Bettina; Aguirre, Gastón E.; Canepa, Antonio; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Hass, H. Christian; Williams, Gabriela N.; Schloss, Irene R.

    2016-01-01

    Strandings of marine animals are relatively common in marine systems. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We observed mass strandings of krill in Antarctica that appeared to be linked to the presence of glacial meltwater. Climate-induced glacial meltwater leads to an increased occurrence of suspended particles in the sea, which is known to affect the physiology of aquatic organisms. Here, we study the effect of suspended inorganic particles on krill in relation to krill mortality events observed in Potter Cove, Antarctica, between 2003 and 2012. The experimental results showed that large quantities of lithogenic particles affected krill feeding, absorption capacity and performance after only 24 h of exposure. Negative effects were related to both the threshold concentrations and the size of the suspended particles. Analysis of the stomach contents of stranded krill showed large quantities of large particles ( > 106 μm3), which were most likely mobilized by glacial meltwater. Ongoing climate-induced glacial melting may impact the coastal ecosystems of Antarctica that rely on krill. PMID:27250339

  12. Terrestrial glacial eskers: Analogs for Martian sinuous ridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kargel, Jeffrey S.; Strom, Roger G.

    1991-01-01

    A glacial model was introduced last year for the Argyre region, a concept which is now extended, and which was recently integrated with a Global Hydrologic Model incorporating many other aspects of Martian geology. Despite wide agreement that the Martian ridges strongly resemble glacial eskers, this hypothesis has been presented with great equivocation due to a perceived lack of other glacial landforms. Quite to the contrary, it is shown that the Martian ridges actually do occur in logical ordered sequences with many other types of characteristically glacial appearing landforms. Herein, the esker hypothesis is further supported in isolation from considerations of regional landform assemblages. It is concluded that Martian sinuous ridges are similar in every respect to terrestrial eskers: scale, morphology, planimetric pattern, and associations with other probable glaciogenic landforms. It is found that the esker hypothesis is well supported. Eskers are glaciofluvial structures, and owe their existence to large scale melting of stagnant temporate glaciers. Thus, eskers are indicators of an ameliorating climatic regime after a protracted episode of cold, humid conditions.

  13. Sulfur/Carbonate Springs and Life in Glacial Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Grasby, S.; Longazo, T.

    2001-01-01

    Glacial springs are useful analogs to channels and seeps issuing from frozen strata on Mars. Mineralized water can move through, and discharge from, solid ice. This water, even near freezing, can support microbial life and bring it to the surface. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Remote Wetland Assessment for Missouri Coteau Prairie Glacial Basins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Missouri Coteau prairie glacial wetlands are subject to numerous anthropogenic disturbances, such as cultivation, construction, and chemical inputs from upland land-use practices. High wetland density and temporal variability among these ecosystems necessitate synoptic tools for watershed-scale wetl...

  15. Glacial Influences on Solar Radiation in a Subarctic Sea.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding macroscale processes controlling solar radia­tion in marine systems will be important in interpreting the potential effects of global change from increasing ultraviolet radiation (UV) and glacial retreat. This study provides the first quantitative assessment of UV i...

  16. Alaskan mountain glacial melting observed by satellite gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. L.; Tapley, B. D.; Wilson, C. R.

    2006-08-01

    We use satellite gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) as an indication of mass change to study potential long-term mountain glacial melting in southern Alaska and West Canada. The first 3.5 yr of GRACE monthly gravity data, spanning April 2002-November 2005, show a prominent glacial melting trend in the mountain regions around the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). GRACE-observed surface mass changes correlate remarkably well with available mass balance data at Gulkana and Wolverine, two benchmark glaciers of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), although the GRACE signals are smaller in magnitude. In addition, terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes estimated from an advanced land surface model show significant mass loss in this region during the same period. After correcting for the leakage errors and removing TWS contributions using model estimates, we conclude that GRACE-observed glacial melting in the GOA mountain region is equivalent to ˜ - 101 ± 22 km 3/yr, which agrees quite well with the assessment of ˜ - 96 ± 35 km 3/yr based on airborne laser altimetry data, and is consistent with an earlier estimate based on the first 2 yr of GRACE data. This study demonstrates the significant potentials of satellite gravity measurements for monitoring mountain glacial melting and regional climate change.

  17. Multiple glacial refugia for cool-temperate deciduous trees in northern East Asia: the Mongolian oak as a case study.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Wang, Wen-Ting; Liao, Wan-Jin; Wang, Hong-Fang; Zhang, Da-Yong

    2015-11-01

    In East Asia, temperate forests are predicted to have retracted southward to c. 30° N during the last glacial maximum (LGM) based on fossil pollen data, whereas phylogeographic studies have often suggested glacial in situ survival of cool-temperate deciduous trees in their modern northern ranges. Here we report a study of the genetic diversity and structure of 29 natural Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) populations using 19 nuclear simple sequence repeat (nSSR) loci and four chloroplast DNA fragments. Bayesian clustering analysis with nSSRs revealed five groups, which were inferred by approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to have diverged in multiple refugia through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles. Analysis of chloroplast DNA variation revealed four lineages that were largely but incompletely geographically disjunct. Ecological niche modelling (ENMs) indicated a southward range shift of the oak's distribution at the LGM, although high suitability scores were also evident in the Changbai Mts. (Northeast China), the Korean Peninsula, areas surrounding the Bohai Sea, and along the coast of the Russian Far East. In addition, endemic chloroplast DNA haplotypes and nuclear lineages occurred in high-latitude northern areas where the ENM predicted no suitable habitat. The combined evidence from nuclear and chloroplast DNA, and the results of the ENM clearly demonstrate that multiple northern refugia, including cryptic ones, were maintained across the current distributional range of the Mongolian oak during the LGM or earlier glacial periods. Though spatially limited, postglacial expansions from these refugia have led to a pattern of decreased genetic diversity with increasing latitude. PMID:26439083

  18. Storage of Heat in the Glacial Deep Ocean and the Importance of Seawater Thermodynamics in Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, J. F.; Pasquero, C.

    2004-12-01

    A variety of records of both oceanic and atmospheric variability link Dansgaard/Oeschger events and Bond Cycles to changes in the overturning strength of the deep ocean. Various models have shown that the observed temperature changes and circulation switches can be forced with variations in the freshwater budget of the North Atlantic surface ocean. However, recent evidence from sediment pore fluids show that the stratification of LGM deep waters was dominated by salinity, rather than temperature. If the saltiest waters of the glacial deep ocean were produced in the Southern Ocean, than salinification of surface waters in the North Atlantic cannot produce large transients in overturning strength without some other source of buoyancy to erode the deep stratification. Here we present an energy storage mechanism, thermobaricity, and an energy source, geothermal heating, that implicate the deep ocean as the origin of the glacial rapid climate changes and the source of this buoyancy. Salinity stratification of the deep ocean during the glacial can lead to heat storage in the abyss that will decrease the deep to surface density difference and then, due to the non-linearity of the seawater equation of state, could periodically cause catastrophic convective events. This "thermobaric convection" arises from the pressure dependence of the seawater thermal expansion coefficient. Our contention is that the thermodynamics of seawater could play an important a role in glacial ocean/atmosphere reorganizations. We will outline how the pressure dependence of the seawater thermal expansion coefficient can lead to occasional rapid overturning of the deep ocean and present some new model results that examine the feasibility of this idea.

  19. Oxygen-isotope variations in post-glacial Lake Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyniuk, Ryan; Longstaffe, Fred J.

    2016-02-01

    The role of glacial meltwater input to the Atlantic Ocean in triggering the Younger Dryas (YD) cooling event has been the subject of controversy in recent literature. Lake Ontario is ideally situated to test for possible meltwater passage from upstream glacial lakes and the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) to the Atlantic Ocean via the lower Great Lakes. Here, we use the oxygen-isotope compositions of ostracode valves and clam shells from three Lake Ontario sediment cores to identify glacial meltwater contributions to ancient Lake Ontario since the retreat of the LIS (∼16,500 cal [13,300 14C] BP). Differences in mineralogy and sediment grain size are also used to identify changes in the hydrologic regime. The average lakewater δ18O of -17.5‰ (determined from ostracode compositions) indicates a significant contribution from glacial meltwater. Upon LIS retreat from the St. Lawrence lowlands, ancient Lake Ontario (glacial Lake Iroquois) lakewater δ18O increased to -12‰ largely because of the loss of low-18O glacial meltwater input. A subsequent decrease in lakewater δ18O (from -12 to -14‰), accompanied by a median sediment grain size increase to 9 μm, indicates that post-glacial Lake Ontario received a final pulse of meltwater (∼13,000-12,500 cal [11,100-10,500 14C] BP) before the onset of hydrologic closure. This meltwater pulse, which is also recorded in a previously reported brief freshening of the neighbouring Champlain Valley (Cronin et al., 2012), may have contributed to a weakening of thermohaline circulation in the Atlantic Ocean. After 12,900 cal [11,020 14C] BP, the meltwater presence in the Ontario basin continued to inhibit entry of Champlain seawater into early Lake Ontario. Opening of the North Bay outlet diverted upper Great Lakes water from the lower Great Lakes causing a period (12,300-8300 cal [10,400-7500 14C] BP) of hydrologic closure in Lake Ontario (Anderson and Lewis, 2012). This change is demarcated by a shift to higher δ18Olakewater

  20. On the role of thermohaline advection and sea ice in glacial transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, S.; Dewar, W. K.

    2003-06-01

    A two-dimensional, one-basin thermohaline oceanic circulation (THC) model coupled to an atmospheric energy balance model (EBM) with land ice albedo effect and a thermodynamic sea ice model is used to study global climate on centennial, and longer, timescales. The model is interpreted to represent the effect of the global ocean, rather than the Atlantic, as is commonly done. It is forced by symmetric insolation and includes a diagnostic parameterization of the hydrologic cycle. Here the strength of the ocean's haline forcing is controlled by a parameter, which reflects the effect of river runoff. This parameter is varied in a set of experiments, which also differ by the magnitude of solar insolation. In wide ranges of the hydrologic cycle, multiple climatic equilibria exist, consisting of circulations with different degrees of asymmetry. More symmetric states have a higher global atmospheric temperature, characteristic of modern climate, whereas less symmetric states are colder and resemble glacial conditions. The maximum global atmospheric temperature difference between such states is consistent with proxy-data-derived temperature drop of about 4°C during the glacial, in contrast to EBM-only sensitivity of about 0.4°C. The mechanics of climate transitions in the model are due to amplification of the orbitally induced global heat budget changes by a major reorganization of the oceanic heat transport. In our model this reorganization is caused by the nonlinear dynamics of the ocean's THC, whose stability regime shifts subject to variable external forcing. Sea ice enhances model climate sensitivity by anchoring deep-ocean temperature to be near freezing [, 2000] and by affecting atmospheric temperature and land ice extent near the poles because of sea ice insulating properties.

  1. Debris flow sensitivity to glacial-interglacial climate change - supply vs transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda Boluda, Duna C.; Whittaker, Alexander C.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models suggest that small mountain catchment-alluvial fan systems might be sensitive to climate changes over glacial-interglacial cycles, and record these palaeoclimate signals in the sedimentology of their deposits. However, these models are still largely untested, and the propagation of climate signals through simple sediment routing systems remains contentious. Here, we present detailed sedimentological records from 8 debris flow fan systems in Owens Valley, California, that capture the past ~ 120 ka of deposition. We identify a strong and sustained relationship between deposit grain size and palaeoclimate records over a full glacial-interglacial cycle, with significantly coarser-grained deposits found in warm and dry periods. Our data show that these systems are highly sensitive to climate with a rapid response timescale of < 10ka, which we attribute to rapid transfer from source to sink. This sensitive record might be explained by changes in sediment supply and/or changes in sediment mobilisation, and we evaluate these mechanisms quantitatively. We find little evidence that changes in catchment hypsometry, weathering patterns, past glaciation or sediment production can explain the grain size changes we observe on the fans. However we do find that grain size has increased exponentially with rising temperatures, at a rate that matches the intensification of storms with warming. As these debris flows are triggered by surface runoff during intense storms, we interpret that enhanced runoff rates in warm and stormy conditions are responsible for entraining larger clasts during debris flow initiation. This implies that debris flow fans might record signals of past storm intensity. Our study utilises field sedimentology and focuses on short transport distances (~ 10 km) and climate changes over ~ 1-100 ka timespans, but could additionally have important implications for how eroding landscapes might respond to future warming scenarios. We address the

  2. Fragile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatti, Ch.; Díaz, L. J.

    We study diffeomorphisms f with heterodimensional cycles, that is, heteroclinic cycles associated to saddles p and q with different indices. Such a cycle is called fragile if there is no diffeomorphism close to f with a robust cycle associated to hyperbolic sets containing the continuations of p and q. We construct a codimension one submanifold of Diff(S×S) that consists of diffeomorphisms with fragile heterodimensional cycles. Our construction holds for any manifold of dimension ⩾4.

  3. Numerical model of the glacially-induced intraplate earthquakes and faults formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunin, Alexey; Schmeling, Harro

    2016-04-01

    According to the plate tectonics, main earthquakes are caused by moving lithospheric plates and are located mainly at plate boundaries. However, some of significant seismic events may be located far away from these active areas. The nature of the intraplate earthquakes remains unclear. It is assumed, that the triggering of seismicity in the eastern Canada and northern Europe might be a result of the glacier retreat during a glacial-interglacial cycle (GIC). Previous numerical models show that the impact of the glacial loading and following isostatic adjustment is able to trigger seismicity in pre-existing faults, especially during deglaciation stage. However this models do not explain strong glaciation-induced historical earthquakes (M5-M7). Moreover, numerous studies report connection of the location and age of major faults in the regions undergone by glaciation during last glacial maximum with the glacier dynamics. This probably imply that the GIC might be a reason for the fault system formation. Our numerical model provides analysis of the strain-stress evolution during the GIC using the finite volume approach realised in the numerical code Lapex 2.5D which is able to operate with large strains and visco-elasto-plastic rheology. To simulate self-organizing faults, the damage rheology model is implemented within the code that makes possible not only visualize faulting but also estimate energy release during the seismic cycle. The modeling domain includes two-layered crust, lithospheric mantle and the asthenosphere that makes possible simulating elasto-plastic response of the lithosphere to the glaciation-induced loading (unloading) and viscous isostatic adjustment. We have considered three scenarios for the model: horizontal extension, compression and fixed boundary conditions. Modeling results generally confirm suppressing seismic activity during glaciation phases whereas retreat of a glacier triggers earthquakes for several thousand years. Tip of the glacier

  4. Glacial geology, glacial recession, proglacial lakes, and postglacial environments, Fishers Island, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkin, L. ); Funk, R.E. . Anthropological Survey)

    1993-03-01

    The Fishers Island Moraine, a complex of three parallel ice margin depositional trends, forms the west-central segment of a major recessional moraine of the Connecticut-Rhode Island Lobe of the late Wisconsinan glacier. As such, the moraine links the Orient Point Moraine of eastern Long Island and the Charlestown Moraine of western Rhode Island and marks a prominent recessional ice margin. The moraine is correlative with the Roanoke Point Moraine of the Connecticut Lobe of northeastern Long Island. Pollen stratigraphy of >13,180 ka bog sediments begins early in the spruce (A) pollen zone with evidence of a cold, late-glacial climate. The pine (B) pollen zone, beginning prior to 11,145 ka, and the oak (C) pollen zone, dating from about 9,000 ka with hickory and hemlock subzones, are well represented. However, after about 2,000 ka, the stratigraphic record in the bog sections is missing in most cases due to peat harvesting. Pollen spectra from several archeological sites fall within the late oak pollen zone, well within the land clearing interval with evidence of hardwood forests and locally holly and cedar. Evidence of cultigens in the pollen record is sparse. Marine deposits over fresh water bog and proglacial lake sediments show that some coastal bogs were drowned by sea level rise.

  5. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-21

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials. PMID:25119027

  6. Abrupt glacial climate shifts controlled by ice sheet changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Lohmann, Gerrit; Knorr, Gregor; Purcell, Conor

    2014-08-01

    During glacial periods of the Late Pleistocene, an abundance of proxy data demonstrates the existence of large and repeated millennial-scale warming episodes, known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events. This ubiquitous feature of rapid glacial climate change can be extended back as far as 800,000 years before present (BP) in the ice core record, and has drawn broad attention within the science and policy-making communities alike. Many studies have been dedicated to investigating the underlying causes of these changes, but no coherent mechanism has yet been identified. Here we show, by using a comprehensive fully coupled model, that gradual changes in the height of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets (NHISs) can alter the coupled atmosphere-ocean system and cause rapid glacial climate shifts closely resembling DO events. The simulated global climate responses--including abrupt warming in the North Atlantic, a northward shift of the tropical rainbelts, and Southern Hemisphere cooling related to the bipolar seesaw--are generally consistent with empirical evidence. As a result of the coexistence of two glacial ocean circulation states at intermediate heights of the ice sheets, minor changes in the height of the NHISs and the amount of atmospheric CO2 can trigger the rapid climate transitions via a local positive atmosphere-ocean-sea-ice feedback in the North Atlantic. Our results, although based on a single model, thus provide a coherent concept for understanding the recorded millennial-scale variability and abrupt climate changes in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system, as well as their linkages to the volume of the intermediate ice sheets during glacials.

  7. Climatic Oscillations 10,000-155,000 yr B.P. at Owens Lake, California Reflected in Glacial Rock Flour Abundance and Lake Salinity in Core OL-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Menking, K.M.; Fitts, J.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the acid-soluble and clay-size fractions of sediment samples (1500-yr resolution) reveal oscillations of lake salinity and of glacial advances in core OL-92 back to 155,000 yr B.P. Relatively saline conditions are indicated by the abundance of carbonate and smectite (both pedogenic and authigenic), reflected by Ca, Sr, and Mg in the acid-soluble suite, and by Cs2O, excess MgO, and LOI (loss on ignition) in the clay-size fraction. Rock flour produced during glacial advances is represented by the abundance of detrital plagioclase and biotite in the clay-size fraction, the ratio of which remains essentially constant over the entire time span. These phases are quantitatively represented by Na2O, TiO2, Ba, and Mn in the clay fraction. The rock-flour record indicates two major ice-advances during the penultimate glacial cycle corresponding to marine isotope stage (MIS) 6, no major advances during the last interglaciation (entire MIS 5), and three major advances during the last glacial cycle (MIS 2, 3, and 4). The ages of the latter three correspond rather well to 36Cl dates reported for Sierra Nevada moraines. The onset of the last interglaciation is shown by abrupt increases in authigenic CaCO3 and an abrupt decrease in rock flour, at about 118,000 yr B.P. according to our time scale. In contrast, the boundary appears to be gradual in the ??18O record in which the change from light to heavy values begins at about 140,000 yrs B.P. The exact position of the termination, therefore, may be proxy-dependent. Conditions of high carbonate and low rock flour prevailed during the entire period from 118,000 yr B.P. until the glacial advance at 53,000 yr B.P. signaled the end of this long interglaciation. ?? 1997 University of Washington.

  8. Thriving in the Cold: Glacial Expansion and Post-Glacial Contraction of a Temperate Terrestrial Salamander (Plethodon serratus)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Catherine E.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic geologic history of the southeastern United States has played a major role in shaping the geographic distributions of amphibians in the region. In the phylogeographic literature, the predominant pattern of distribution shifts through time of temperate species is one of contraction during glacial maxima and persistence in refugia. However, the diverse biology and ecology of amphibian species suggest that a “one-size-fits-all” model may be inappropriate. Nearly 10% of amphibian species in the region have a current distribution comprised of multiple disjunct, restricted areas that resemble the shape of Pleistocene refugia identified for other temperate taxa in the literature. Here, we apply genetics and spatially explicit climate analyses to test the hypothesis that the disjunct regions of these species ranges are climatic refugia for species that were more broadly distributed during glacial maxima. We use the salamander Plethodon serratus as a model, as its range consists of four disjunct regions in the Southeast. Phylogenetic results show that P. serratus is comprised of multiple genetic lineages, and the four regions are not reciprocally monophyletic. The Appalachian salamanders form a clade sister to all other P. serratus. Niche and paleodistribution modeling results suggest that P. serratus expanded from the Appalachians during the cooler Last Glacial Maximum and has since been restricted to its current disjunct distribution by a warming climate. These data reject the universal applicability of the glacial contraction model to temperate taxa and reiterate the importance of considering the natural history of individual species. PMID:26132077

  9. Interglacial geomorphic dynamics during the Quaternary: Does glacial erosion dominates interglacial adjustment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, T.; Johnson, E. A.

    2012-04-01

    High mountains are generally sculptured by glacial erosion, which resulted in the formation of glacial cirques and U-shaped valleys with strongly over-steepened hillslopes and widespread glacial deposits. The abundance of glacial (erosion and depositional) landforms in high mountains has been attributed to very effective glacial erosion and sediment transfer. Furthermore, it has been argued that geomorphic activity remains increased after the retreat of valley glaciers at the transition between glacial and interglacial periods. Thus, geologists and geomorphologist generally tend to look at glaciers as geomorphic agents that strongly enhance erosion and sediment fluxes. An important aspect of glacial erosion is the affect of glacial erosion on the decoupling of headwater basins from main river systems. Strong glacial erosion results in flat valley bottoms and glacial over-deepenings, with reduced transport capacities of the interglacial rivers draining formerly glaciated headwaters. While this effect has been described earlier, quantitative estimates of the degree of decoupling of glacial headwaters are missing. In this paper, we will present evidences of decreased sediment yields in glacial headwaters, which results from the transition of glacial to peri-/paraglacial process regimes. These evidences are derived from geomorphomteric analysis, numerical sediment flux models and sediment budget approaches, which were conducted in the Kananaskis Valley (Canadian Rocky Mountains). Furthermore, we will compare the duration of glacial and interglacial periods during the Quaternary and the calculated interglacial erosion rates with glacial rates. We discuss the wider implications of the results with respect to the landform evolution of glaciated mountains during the Quaternary.

  10. New glacial evidences at the Talacasto paleofjord (Paganzo basin, W-Argentina) and its implications for the paleogeography of the Gondwana margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Carolina Danielski; Milana, Juan Pablo; Faccini, Ubiratan Ferrucio

    2014-12-01

    The Talacasto paleovalley is situated in the Central Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina, where upper Carboniferous-Permian rocks (Paganzo Group) rest on Devonian sandstones of the Punta Negra Formation. This outcrop is an excellent example of a glacial valley-fill sequence that records at least two high-frequency cycles of the advance and retreat of a glacier into the valley. The paleocurrent analysis shows transport predominantly to the south, indicating that at this site the ice flow differs from the other nearby paleovalleys. Evidence of the glacial origin of this valley can be seen in the glacial striae on the valley's sides, as well as the U-shape of the valley, indicated by very steep locally overhanging valley walls. Deglaciation is indicated by a set of retransported conglomerates deposited in a shallow-water environment followed by a transgressive succession, which suggests eustatic rise due to meltwater input to the paleofjord. The complete sedimentary succession records distinct stages in the evolution of the valley-fill, represented by seven stratigraphical units. These units are identified based on facies associations and their interpreted depositional setting. Units 1 to 5 show one cycle of deglaciation and unit 6 marks the beginning of a new cycle of glacier advance which is characterized by different types of glacial deposits. All units show evidence of glacial influence such as dropstones and striated clasts, which indicates that the glaciers were always present in the valley or in adjacent areas during sedimentation. The Talacasto paleofjord provides good evidence of the Late Paleozoic Gondwana glaciation in western Argentina and examples of sedimentary successions which have been interpreted as being deposited by a confined wet-based glacier in advance and retreat cycles, with eventual release of icebergs into the basin. The outcrop is also a key for reconstructing the local glacial paleogeography, and it suggests a new interpretation that is

  11. Palynological evidence for the astronomical origin of lignite-detritus sequence in the Middle Pleistocene Marathousa Member, Megalopolis, SW Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuda, M.; van Vugt, N.; Nakagawa, T.; Ikeya, M.; Hayashida, A.; Yasuda, Y.; Setoguchi, T.

    2002-07-01

    The Marathousa Member, Middle Pleistocene strata in the fluvio-lacustrine Megalopolis basin, southwest Greece, displays distinct but complicated lithological cycles comprising first-order alternation of lignites and detrital muds and second-order alternation expressed by frequent intercalation of organic layers. Palynological evidence indicates that the lithological cycles are driven by the Earth's orbital forcing. All the lignite seams yield temperate oak forest whereas the detrital beds provide semi-arid steppe mainly of Artemisia. This means that the first-order lithological cycle represents the glacial/interglacial cycle (i.e., the 100-kyr eccentricity cycle), providing a timescale of at least 350 kyr to the Marathousa Member. Pollen also detects smaller-scale climate fluctuations in many of the subordinate organic layers, with the total number of fluctuations being five in a complete lignite-detritus couplet. This means that the second-order lithological cycle reflects the 21-kyr insolation cycle. A tentative phase relation between the lithological cycles and the astronomical cycles is shown based on palynostratigraphy and electron spin resonance dating. Lacustrine environments with increased water tables are implied for the glacial periods sedimentologically, in contrast to local swamp vegetation for the interglacial periods. The subordinate organic layers were formed under intermediate environments (climate, water depth, etc.) between full glacials and interglacials.

  12. Late Neogene evolution of the East Asian monsoon revealed by terrestrial mollusk record in Western Chinese Loess Plateau: From winter to summer dominated sub-regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengjiang; Rousseau, Denis-Didier; Wu, Naiqin; Hao, Qingzhen; Pei, Yunpeng

    2008-10-01

    More and more evidence indicates that the onset of the East Asian (EA) monsoon can be traced back to the Oligocene-Miocene boundary (at about 23 Ma). However, the process of its evolution is still less well-known until now. Here we investigate its late Neogene evolution by analyzing a terrestrial mollusk sequence, from the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP), covering the period between 7.1 and 3.5 Ma. Considering the modern ecological requirements of these organisms, we were able to define two groups of cold-aridiphilous (CA) and thermo-humidiphilous (TH) species, representing the EA winter and summer monsoon varia