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Sample records for 100-year peak flow

  1. Estimated 100-year peak flows and flow volumes in the Big Lost River and Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Kjelstrom, L.C.; Berenbrock, C.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to provide estimates of the 100-year peak flows and flow volumes that could enter the INEL area from the Big Lost River and Brich Creek are needed as input data for models that will be used to delineate the extent of the 100-year flood plain at the INEL. The methods, procedures and assumptions used to estimate the 100-year peak flows and flow volumes are described in this report.

  2. Simulation of water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Berenbrock, C.; Kjelstrom, L.C.

    1997-10-01

    Delineation of areas at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory that would be inundated by a 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek is needed by the US Department of Energy to fulfill flood-plain regulatory requirements. Birch Creek flows southward about 40 miles through an alluvium-filled valley onto the northern part of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory site on the eastern Snake River Plain. The lower 10-mile reach of Birch Creek that ends in Birch Creek Playa near several Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory facilities is of particular concern. Twenty-six channel cross sections were surveyed to develop and apply a hydraulic model to simulate water-surface elevations for a hypothetical 100-year peak flow in Birch Creek. Model simulation of the 100-year peak flow (700 cubic feet per second) in reaches upstream from State Highway 22 indicated that flow was confined within channels even when all flow was routed to one channel. Where the highway crosses Birch Creek, about 315 cubic feet per second of water was estimated to move downstream--115 cubic feet per second through a culvert and 200 cubic feet per second over the highway. Simulated water-surface elevation at this crossing was 0.8 foot higher than the elevation of the highway. The remaining 385 cubic feet per second flowed southwestward in a trench along the north side of the highway. Flow also was simulated with the culvert removed. The exact location of flood boundaries on Birch Creek could not be determined because of the highly braided channel and the many anthropogenic features (such as the trench, highway, and diversion channels) in the study area that affect flood hydraulics and flow. Because flood boundaries could not be located exactly, only a generalized flood-prone map was developed.

  3. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  4. Peak flow meter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  5. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  6. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Checking your peak flow is one of the best ways to control your asthma and to keep it from getting worse. Asthma attacks ... Most times, they build slowly. Checking your peak flow can tell you if an attack is coming, ...

  7. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    Peak flow meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  8. Quantification of uncertainties in the 100-year flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station and its application in Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Huidae; Bones, Emma

    2016-08-01

    The Federal Emergency Management Agency has introduced the concept of the "1-percent plus" flow to incorporate various uncertainties in estimation of the 100-year or 1-percent flow. However, to the best of the authors' knowledge, no clear directions for calculating the 1-percent plus flow have been defined in the literature. Although information about standard errors of estimation and prediction is provided along with the regression equations that are often used to estimate the 1-percent flow at ungaged sites, uncertainty estimation becomes more complicated when there is a nearby gaged station because regression flows and the peak flow estimate from a gage analysis should be weighted to compute the weighted estimate of the 1-percent flow. In this study, an equation for calculating the 1-percent plus flow at an ungaged site near a gaged station is analytically derived. Also, a detailed process is introduced for calculating the 1-percent plus flow for an ungaged site near a gaged station in Georgia as an example and a case study is performed. This study provides engineers and practitioners with a method that helps them better assess flood risks and develop mitigation plans accordingly.

  9. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. Related Content News: American Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: American Lung Association Invests More Than $ ...

  10. Global flood hazard mapping using statistical peak flow estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, C.; Mouton, F.

    2011-01-01

    Our aim is to produce a world map of flooded areas for a 100 year return period, using a method based on large rivers peak flow estimates derived from mean monthly discharge time-series. Therefore, the map is supposed to represent flooding that affects large river floodplains, but not events triggered by specific conditions like coastal or flash flooding for instance. We first generate for each basin a set of hydromorphometric, land cover and climatic variables. In case of an available discharge record station at the basin outlet, we base the hundred year peak flow estimate on the corresponding time-series. Peak flow magnitude for basin outlets without gauging stations is estimated by statistical means, performing several regressions on the basin variables. These peak flow estimates enable the computation of corresponding flooded areas using hydrologic GIS processing on digital elevation model.

  11. Flow and sediment processes in a cutoff meander of the Danube Delta during 100-year recurrent flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugaru Tiron, L.; Le Coz, J.; Provansal, M.; Dutu, F.

    2009-04-01

    River training operations, such as meander cutoff, initiated for navigational purposes often lead to dramatic changes in the streamwise profiles (Hooke, 1986, Kesel, 2003; Kiss et al., 2007). Meander correction affects both the hydraulic and morphodynamical behavior of the modified branches that sedimentation occurs in time, while newly built canals usually experience degradation (Jugaru et. al, 2006). This study reports and analyzes new data on the hydrological and sedimentary processes at work during a morphogenic flood in a large modified meander (the Mahmudia meander) of the St. George branch, the southern branch of the Danube Delta. The 100-year recurrent flood that occurred in 2006 offered an exceptional opportunity for scanning different cross sections of the Mahmudia meander system by means of the emerging Doppler profiler (aDcp) technology in order to analyze the impact on sedimentation and dynamic processes in the study area. The Mahmudia study site corresponds to a vast natural meander which was cut off in 1984-1988 by an artificial canal opened to shipping. The meander correction accelerated fluxes through the artificial canal and dramatically enhanced deposition in the former meander. After his formation, the cutoff meander acted as sediment storage locations, essentially removing channel and point bar sediments from the active sediment budget of the main channel (Popa, 1997). During the one-hundred-year recurrent flood in April 2006, bathymetry, flow velocity and discharge data were acquired across several sections of both natural and artificial channels with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (aDcp Workhorse Sentinel 600 kHz, Teledyne RDI) in order to investigate the distribution of the flow and sediment and his impact on sedimentation in a channelized reach and its adjacent cutoff. The contrasting hydro-sedimentary processes at work in both channels and bifurcation/confluence nodal points are analyzed from the measured flux distribution

  12. Peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Peak-flow annual exceedance probabilities, also called probability-percent chance flow estimates, and regional regression equations are provided describing the peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate peak-flow data. Analysis of Virginia peak-flow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating unregulated peak flow of gaged and ungaged streams. Station peak-flow characteristics identified by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows to a Log Pearson Type III frequency distribution yield annual exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.4292, 0.2, 0.1, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.002 for 476 streamgaging stations. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression model equations for six physiographic regions to estimate regional annual exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted peak-flow values that combine annual exceedance probabilities computed from gaging station data and from regional regression equations provide improved peak-flow estimates. Text, figures, and lists are provided summarizing selected peak-flow sites, delineated physiographic regions, peak-flow estimates, basin characteristics, regional regression model equations, error estimates, definitions, data sources, and candidate regression model equations. This study supersedes previous studies of peak flows in Virginia.

  13. Determination of peak expiratory flow.

    PubMed

    Kano, S; Burton, D L; Lanteri, C J; Sly, P D

    1993-10-01

    It is still unknown whether peak expiratory flow (PEF) is determined by "wave speed" flow limitation in the airways. To investigate the influences of airway mechanical properties on PEF, five healthy adults performed maximal forced expiratory effort (MFEE) manoeuvres, in the standard manner and following breathholds at total lung capacity (TLC) of 2 s and 10 s. Oesophageal pressure (Poes) was measured as an index of respiratory effort. Subjects also performed a MFEE following a 10 s breathhold during which intrathoracic pressure was voluntarily raised by a Valsalva manoeuvre, which would increase transmural pressure and cross-sectional area of the extrathoracic airway. Additional MFEEs were performed with the neck fully flexed and extended, to change longitudinal tracheal tension. In separate studies, PEF was measured with a spirometer and with a pneumotachograph. Breathholds at TLC (2 s and 10 s), and neck flexion reduced PEF by a mean of 9.8% (SD 2.9%), 9.6% (SD 1.6%), and 8.7% (SD 2.8%), respectively, when measured with the spirometer. The same pattern of results was seen when measured with the pneumotachograph. These reductions occurred despite similar respiratory effort. Voluntarily raising intrathoracic pressure during a 10 s breathhold did not reverse a fall in PEF. MFEE manoeuvre with neck extension did not result in an increase in PEF, the group mean % changes being -3.0% (SD 5.0%). We conclude that these results do not allow the hypothesis that "wave-speed" (Vws) is reached at PEF to be rejected. A breathhold at TLC could increase airway wall compliance by allowing stress-relaxation of the airway, thus reducing the "Vws" achievable. PMID:8287953

  14. Tuskegee: 100 Years Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Renelda

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the history and accomplishments of Tuskegee Institute over the past 100 years. Highlights the role played by Booker T. Washington, and W. E. B. DuBois; discusses the career of the school's retiring president, Luther Foster. Provides information on the new president, Dr. Benjamin Payton, and discusses future directions for the college. (APM)

  15. Predicting Peak Flows following Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Dobre, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Following forest fires, peak flows in perennial and ephemeral streams often increase by a factor of 10 or more. This increase in peak flow rate may overwhelm existing downstream structures, such as road culverts, causing serious damage to road fills at stream crossings. In order to predict peak flow rates following wildfires, we have applied two different tools. One is based on the U.S.D.A Natural Resource Conservation Service Curve Number Method (CN), and the other is by applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) to the watershed. In our presentation, we will describe the science behind the two methods, and present the main variables for each model. We will then provide an example of a comparison of the two methods to a fire-prone watershed upstream of the City of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, where a fire spread model was applied for current fuel loads, and for likely fuel loads following a fuel reduction treatment. When applying the curve number method, determining the time to peak flow can be problematic for low severity fires because the runoff flow paths are both surface and through shallow lateral flow. The WEPP watershed version incorporates shallow lateral flow into stream channels. However, the version of the WEPP model that was used for this study did not have channel routing capabilities, but rather relied on regression relationships to estimate peak flows from individual hillslope polygon peak runoff rates. We found that the two methods gave similar results if applied correctly, with the WEPP predictions somewhat greater than the CN predictions. Later releases of the WEPP model have incorporated alternative methods for routing peak flows that need to be evaluated.

  16. Nasal peak inspiratory flow at altitude.

    PubMed

    Barry, P W; Mason, N P; Richalet, J P

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigated whether there are changes in nasal peak inspiratory flow (NPIF) during hypobaric hypoxia under controlled environmental conditions. During operation Everest III (COMEX '97), eight subjects ascended to a simulated altitude of 8,848 m in a hypobaric chamber. NPIF was recorded at simulated altitudes of 0 m, 5,000 m and 8,000 m. Oral peak inspiratory and expiratory flow (OPIF, OPEF) were also measured. Ambient air temperature and humidity were controlled. NPIF increased by a mean +/- SD of 16 +/- 12% from sea level to 8,000 m, whereas OPIF increased by 47 +/- 14%. NPIF rose by 0.085 +/- 0.03 L x s(-1) per kilometre of ascent (p<0.05), significantly less than the rise in OPIF and OPEF of 0.35 +/- 0.10 and 0.33 +/- 0.04 L x s(-1) per kilometre (p<0.0005). Nasal peak inspiratory flow rises with ascent to altitude. The rise in nasal peak inspiratory flow with altitude was far less than oral peak inspiratory flow and less than the predicted rise according to changes in air density. This suggests flow limitation at the nose, and occurs under controlled environmental conditions, refuting the hypothesis that nasal blockage at altitude is due to the inhalation of cold, dry air. Further work is needed to determine if nasal blockage limits activity at altitude. PMID:11843316

  17. Estimates of Flow Duration, Mean Flow, and Peak-Discharge Frequency Values for Kansas Stream Locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Wolock, David M.; Artman, Joshua C.

    2004-01-01

    Streamflow statistics of flow duration and peak-discharge frequency were estimated for 4,771 individual locations on streams listed on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. These statistics included the flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent, as well as the mean flow value. Peak-discharge frequency values were estimated for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods. Least-squares multiple regression techniques were used, along with Tobit analyses, to develop equations for estimating flow-duration values of 90, 75, 50, 25, and 10 percent and the mean flow for uncontrolled flow stream locations. The contributing-drainage areas of 149 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Kansas and parts of surrounding States that had flow uncontrolled by Federal reservoirs and used in the regression analyses ranged from 2.06 to 12,004 square miles. Logarithmic transformations of climatic and basin data were performed to yield the best linear relation for developing equations to compute flow durations and mean flow. In the regression analyses, the significant climatic and basin characteristics, in order of importance, were contributing-drainage area, mean annual precipitation, mean basin permeability, and mean basin slope. The analyses yielded a model standard error of prediction range of 0.43 logarithmic units for the 90-percent duration analysis to 0.15 logarithmic units for the 10-percent duration analysis. The model standard error of prediction was 0.14 logarithmic units for the mean flow. Regression equations used to estimate peak-discharge frequency values were obtained from a previous report, and estimates for the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year floods were determined for this report. The regression equations and an interpolation procedure were used to compute flow durations, mean flow, and estimates of peak-discharge frequency for locations along uncontrolled flow streams on the 1999 Kansas Surface Water Register. Flow durations, mean

  18. NETL: The First 100 Years

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-21

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory celebrates 100 years of innovative energy technology development. NETL has been a leader in energy technology development. This video takes a look back at the many accomplishments over the past 100 years. These advances benefit the American people, enhance our nation's energy security and protect our natural resources.

  19. Techniques for estimating peak-flow frequency relations for North Dakota streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Sether, Tara

    1992-01-01

    This report presents techniques for estimating peak-flow frequency relations for North Dakota streams. In addition, a generalized skew coefficient analysis was completed for North Dakota to test the validity of using the generalized skew coefficient map in Bulletin 17B of the Hydrology Subcommittee of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data, 1982, 'Guidelines for Determining Flood Flow Frequency.' The analysis indicates that the generalized skew coefficient map in Bulletin 17B provides accurate estimates of generalized skew coefficient values for natural-flow streams in North Dakota. Peak-flow records through 1988 for 192 continuous- and partial-record streamflow gaging stations that had 10 or more years of record were used in a generalized least-squares regression analysis that relates peak flows for selected recurrence intervals to selected basin characteristics. Peak-flow equations were developed for recurrence intervals of 2, 10, 15, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years for three hydrologic regions in North Dakota. The peak-flow equations are applicable to natural-flow streams that have drainage areas of less than or equal to 1,000 square miles. The standard error of estimate for the three hydrologic regions ranges from 60 to 70 percent for the 100-year peak-flow equations. Methods are presented for transferring peak-flow data from gaging stations to ungaged sites on the same stream and for determining peak flows for ungaged sites on ungaged streams. Peak-flow relations, weighted estimates of peak flow, and selected basin characteristics are tabulated for the 192 gaging stations used in the generalized skew coefficient and regression analyses. Peak-flow relations also are provided for 63 additional gaging stations that were not used in the generalized skew coefficient and regression analyses. These 63 gaging stations generally represent streams that are significantly controlled by regulation and those that have drainage areas greater than 1,000 square miles.

  20. The accuracy of portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M R; Dickinson, S A; Hitchings, D J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is now commonly used in the diagnosis and management of asthma. It is essential for PEF meters to have a linear response in order to obtain an unbiased measurement of PEF variability. As the accuracy and linearity of portable PEF meters have not been rigorously tested in recent years this aspect of their performance has been investigated. METHODS: The response of several portable PEF meters was tested with absolute standards of flow generated by a computer driven, servo controlled pump and their response was compared with that of a pneumotachograph. RESULTS: For each device tested the readings were highly repeatable to within the limits of accuracy with which the pointer position can be assessed by eye. The between instrument variation in reading for six identical devices expressed as a 95% confidence limit was, on average across the range of flows, +/- 8.5 l/min for the Mini-Wright, +/- 7.9 l/min for the Vitalograph, and +/- 6.4 l/min for the Ferraris. PEF meters based on the Wright meter all had similar error profiles with overreading of up to 80 l/min in the mid flow range from 300 to 500 l/min. This overreading was greatest for the Mini-Wright and Ferraris devices, and less so for the original Wright and Vitalograph meters. A Micro-Medical Turbine meter was accurate up to 400 l/min and then began to underread by up to 60 l/min at 720 l/min. For the low range devices the Vitalograph device was accurate to within 10 l/min up to 200 l/min, with the Mini-Wright overreading by up to 30 l/min above 150 l/min. CONCLUSION: Although the Mini-Wright, Ferraris, and Vitalograph meters gave remarkably repeatable results their error profiles for the full range meters will lead to important errors in recording PEF variability. This may lead to incorrect diagnosis and bias in implementing strategies of asthma treatment based on PEF measurement. PMID:1465746

  1. Estimating instantaneous peak flow from mean daily flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2015-12-01

    While instantaneous peak flow (IPF) records have historically been necessary for practical applications in flood risk management and hydraulic structure design, mean daily flow (MDF) values are often all that are available. To address this problem, we propose a simple method, which requires only MDF records as its input and uses the rising and falling slopes of daily hydrographs, to estimate IPFs. We applied this method to 144 catchments in Iowa, USA, with drainage areas ranging from about 7 to 220,000 km2. This application involves about 3800 peak flow events originating from different flood generation mechanisms over the period from 1997 to 2014. About 55% of the catchments have prediction errors within ±10%, and 85% of the catchments have predictions errors within ±20%. The method works well for catchments larger than 500 km2, poorly for catchments smaller than 100 km2, and fairly well for catchments in between these sizes. The reduction in the method's effectiveness with decreasing catchment size is due to the fact that the smaller the catchment, the more information is lost when using MDF to characterize the instantaneous flow processes. Our proposed method is simple and promising in terms of estimating IPFs from MDFs for areas where IPF records are unavailable or are insufficient.

  2. [100 years' of clinical electrocardiography].

    PubMed

    Bergovec, Mijo

    2003-01-01

    In 1903 Willem Einthoven published in Pflügers Arch his classic article on the investigation of human electrocardiogram by his string galvanometer. Many historians of medicine, Einthoven also marked that publication as the beginning of clinical electrocardiography. Many investigators like Galvani, Manteucci, Kölliker, Müller, Lipmann, Waller, Ader, Einthoven, Lewis, Wilson and others participated in creation and development of electrocardiogram. From that time electrocardiogram quickly became, and has remained the most essential diagnostic laboratory tool in investigation of heart diseases. The aim of this article is to remind us of the beginning of this part of cardiology 100 years ago. PMID:15209030

  3. Peak expiratory flow at increased barometric pressure: comparison of peak flow meters and volumetric spirometer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P S; Ng, C; Bennett, M

    2000-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are receiving hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an intensive care treatment, some of whom have pre-existing airway obstruction. Spirometers are the ideal instruments for measuring airway obstruction, but peak flow meters are useful and versatile devices. The behaviour of both types of device was therefore studied in a hyperbaric unit under conditions of increased pressure. It is important to have a non-electrical indicator of airway obstruction, to minimize the fire risk in the hyperoxic environment. The hypothesis was tested that, assuming that dynamic resistance is unchanged, both the Wright's standard and mini-peak flow meters would over-read peak expiratory flow (PEF) under increased pressure when compared with a volumetric spirometer, as the latter is unaffected by air density. It was postulated that a correction factor could be derived so that PEF meters could be used in this setting. Seven normal subjects performed volume-dependent spirometry to derive PEF, and manoeuvres using both standard and mini PEF meters at sea level, under hyperbaric conditions at 303, 253 and 152 kPa (3, 2.5 and 1.5 atmospheres respectively; 1 atmosphere absolute=101.08 kPa), and again at sea level. There was a progressive and significant decline in PEF with increasing pressure as measured by the spirometer (69.46+/-0.8% baseline at 303 kPa compared with 101 kPa), while the PEF meters showed a progressive increase in their readings (an increase of 7.86+/-1.69% at 303 kPa with the mini PEF meter). Using these data points, a correction factor was derived which allows appropriate values to be calculated from the Wright's meter readings under these conditions. PMID:10600666

  4. Analysis of the peak-flow gaging network in North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Sether, Tara

    1996-01-01

    A network analysis technique using generalized least-squares regression was used to evaluate the current (1993) peak-flow gaging network that provides regional peak-flow information for North Dakota. The analysis was conducted to evaluate the current (1993) network and to determine if reactivating discontinued gaging stations and adding new gaging stations on small drainage areas would improve regional peak-flow information. Peak flows having recurrence intervals of 15, 50, and 100 years and planning horizons of zero and 10 years for three hydrologic regions in North Dakota were used in the network analysis. Results of the network analysis indicate that the average sampling mean-square error could be reduced by about 10 percent for the 15-, 50-, and 100-year recurrence intervals by reactivating a minimum of two to five discontinued gaging stations in each hydrologic region. The reactivated discontinued gaging stations added to the current (1993) network should be located on streams having small drainage areas and steep main-channel slopes. For the 15-year recurrence interval and a 10-year planning horizon, adding a new gaging station at two new locations in each region instead of reactivating two discontinued gaging stations in each region would reduce the average sampling mean-square error by an average of about 13 percent in each region. The new gaging stations added to the current (1993) network should be located on streams having small drainage areas and mild or steep main-channel slopes in order to obtain improved regional peak-flow information.

  5. 100 years of Lewy pathology.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Del Tredici, Kelly; Braak, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    In 1817, James Parkinson described the symptoms of the shaking palsy, a disease that was subsequently defined in greater detail, and named after Parkinson, by Jean-Martin Charcot. Parkinson expected that the publication of his monograph would lead to a rapid elucidation of the anatomical substrate of the shaking palsy; in the event, this process took almost a century. In 1912, Fritz Heinrich Lewy identified the protein aggregates that define Parkinson disease (PD) in some brain regions outside the substantia nigra. In 1919, Konstantin Nikolaevich Tretiakoff found similar aggregates in the substantia nigra and named them after Lewy. In the 1990s, α-synuclein was identified as the main constituent of the Lewy pathology, and its aggregation was shown to be central to PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and multiple system atrophy. In 2003, a staging scheme for idiopathic PD was introduced, according to which α-synuclein pathology originates in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagal nerve and progresses from there to other brain regions, including the substantia nigra. In this article, we review the relevance of Lewy's discovery 100 years ago for the current understanding of PD and related disorders. PMID:23183883

  6. Flow-velocity and depth data during peak discharge events at selected bridge crossings in North Carolina, 1964-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, Benjamin F.

    2000-01-01

    Flow-velocity and depth data were collected from July 1996 through December 1998 during peak discharge events at 21 bridge crossings that are adjacent to U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations in North Carolina. These data were collected during measurements of peak discharges that had recurrence intervals ranging from less than 2 years to about 100 years. The velocity and depth data can be used to evaluate predicted flow velocities and scour depths that are computed as part of scour analyses at the selected bridge crossings.

  7. Mean annual runoff and peak flow estimates based on channel geometry of streams in southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Omang, R.J.; Parrett, Charles; Hull, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Equations using channel-geometry measurements were developed for estimating mean runoff and peak flows of ungaged streams in southeastern Montana. Two separate sets of esitmating equations were developed for determining mean annual runoff: one for perennial streams and one for ephemeral and intermittent streams. Data from 29 gaged sites on perennial streams and 21 gaged sites on ephemeral and intermittent streams were used in these analyses. Data from 78 gaged sites were used in the peak-flow analyses. Southeastern Montana was divided into three regions and separate multiple-regression equations for each region were developed that relate channel dimensions to peak discharge having recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years. Channel-geometery relations were developed using measurements of the active-channel width and bankfull width. Active-channel width and bankfull width were the most significant channel features for estimating mean annual runoff for al types of streams. Use of this method requires that onsite measurements be made of channel width. The standard error of estimate for predicting mean annual runoff ranged from about 38 to 79 percent. The standard error of estimate relating active-channel width or bankfull width to peak flow ranged from about 37 to 115 percent. (USGS)

  8. Measuring peak expiratory flow in general practice: comparison of mini Wright peak flow meter and turbine spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K P; Mullee, M A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare measurements of the peak expiratory flow rate taken by the mini Wright peak flow meter and the turbine spirometer. DESIGN--Pragmatic study with randomised order of use of recording instruments. Phase 1 compared a peak expiratory flow type expiration recorded by the mini Wright peak flow meter with an expiration to forced vital capacity recorded by the turbine spirometer. Phase 2 compared peak expiratory flow type expirations recorded by both meters. Reproducibility was assessed separately. SETTING--Routine surgeries at Aldermoor Health Centre, Southampton. SUBJECTS--212 Patients aged 4 to 78 presenting with asthma or obstructive airways disease. Each patient contributed only once to each phase (105 in phase 1, 107 in phase 2), but some entered both phases on separate occasions. Reproducibility was tested on a further 31 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--95% Limits of agreement between measurements on the two meters. RESULTS--208 (98%) Of the readings taken by the mini Wright meter were higher than the corresponding readings taken by the turbine spirometer, but the 95% limits of agreement (mean difference (2 SD] were wide (1 to 173 l/min). Differences due to errors in reproducibility were not sufficient to predict this level of disagreement. Analysis by age, sex, order of use, and the type of expiration did not detect any significant differences. CONCLUSIONS--The two methods of measuring peak expiratory flow rate were not comparable. The mini Wright meter is likely to remain the preferred instrument in general practice. PMID:2142611

  9. Effects of equipment and technique on peak flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Thomas; O'Driscoll, B Ronan

    2006-01-01

    Background Different lung function equipment and different respiratory manoeuvres may produce different Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) results. Although the PEF is the most common lung function test, there have been few studies of these effects and no previous study has evaluated both factors in a single group of patients. Methods We studied 36 subjects (PEF range 80–570 l/min). All patients recorded PEF measurements using a short rapid expiration following maximal inspiration (PEF technique) or a forced maximal expiration to residual volume (FVC technique). Measurements were made using a Wright's peak flow meter, a turbine spirometer and a Fleisch pneumotachograph spirometer. Results The mean PEF was 8.7% higher when the PEF technique was used (compared with FVC technique, p < 0.0001). The mean PEF recorded with the turbine spirometer was 5.5% lower than the Wright meter reading. The Fleisch spirometer result was 19.5% lower than the Wright reading. However, adjustment of the Wrights measurements from the traditional Wright's scale to the new EU Peak Flow scale produced results that were only 7.2% higher than the Fleisch pneumotachograph measurements. Conclusion Peak flow measurements are affected by the instruction given and by the device and Peak Flow scale used. Patient management decisions should not be based on PEF measurement made on different instruments. PMID:16787543

  10. Emergency assessment of potential debris-flow peak discharges, Missionary Ridge fire, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Rea, Alan H.; Gleason, J. Andrew; Garcia, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    These maps present the results of assessments of peak discharges that can potentially be generated by debris flows issuing from the basins burned by the Missionary Ridge fire of June 9 through July 14, 2002, near Durango, Colorado. The maps are based on a regression model for debris-flow peak discharge normalized by average storm intensity as a function of basin gradient and burned extent, and limited field checking. A range of potential peak discharges that could be produced from each of the burned basins between 1 ft3/s (0.03 m3/s) and 6,446 ft3/s (183 m3/s) is calculated for the 5-year, 1-hour storm of 0.80 inches (20 mm). Potential peak discharges between 1 ft3/s (0.03 m3/s) and >8,000 ft3/s (227 m3/s) are calculated for the 25-year, 1-hour storm of 1.3 inches (33 mm) and for the 100-year, 1-hour storm of 1.8 inches (46 mm). These maps are intended for use by emergency personnel to aid in the preliminary design of mitigation measures, and for the planning of evacuation timing and routes.

  11. Emergency assessment of potential debris-flow peak discharges, Coal Seam fire, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Michael, John A.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Rea, Alan H.; Garcia, Steven P.

    2002-01-01

    These maps present the results of assessments of peak discharges that can potentially be generated by debris flows issuing from the basins burned by the Coal Seam fire of June and July 2002, near Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The maps are based on a regression model for debris-flow peak discharge normalized by average storm intensity as a function of basin gradient and burned extent, and limited field checking. A range of potential peak discharges that could potentially be produced from each of the burned basins between 1 ft3/s (0.03 m3/s) and greater than 5,000 ft3/s (>141 m3/s) is calculated for the 5-year, 1-hour storm of 0.80 inches (20 mm). The 25-year, 1-hour storm of 1.3 inches (33 mm). The 100- year, 1-hour storm of 1.8 inches (46 mm) produced peak discharges between 1 and greater than 8,000 ft3/s (>227 m3/s). These maps are intended for use by emergency personnel to aid in the preliminary design of mitigation measures, and the planning of evacuation timing and routes.

  12. Technique for estimating depths of 100-year floods in Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flippo, Herbert N., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are developed for estimating 100-year flood depths in natural channels of unregulated Pennsylvania streams that drain less than 2,200 square miles. Equations and graphs are presented relating the depth of the 100-year flood above median stage and drainage area in five defined hydrologic areas in the State. Another graph defines the relation between drainage area and median depth of flow over the low point of riffles. Thus 100-year depths on riffles can be estimated by summing depth values derived from two simple relations.

  13. Metals in Particulate Pollutants Affect Peak Expiratory Flow of Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yun-Chul; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yu, Seung-Do; Kim, Dae-Seon

    2007-01-01

    Background The contribution of the metal components of particulate pollutants to acute respiratory effects has not been adequately evaluated. Moreover, little is known about the effects of genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic metabolism on pulmonary function. Objectives This study was conducted to assess lung function decrement associated with metal components in particulate pollutants and genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1. Methods We studied 43 schoolchildren who were in the 3rd to 6th grades. Each student measured peak expiratory flow rate three times a day for 42 days. Particulate air concentrations were monitored every day, and the concentrations of iron, manganese, lead, zinc, and aluminum in the particles were measured. Glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 genetic polymorphisms were determined using DNA extracted from participant buccal washings. We used a mixed linear regression model to estimate the association between peak expiratory flow rate and particulate air pollutants. Results We found significant reduction in the peak expiratory flow rate after the children’s exposure to particulate pollutants. The effect was shown most significantly 1 day after exposure to the ambient particles. Manganese and lead in the particles also reduced the peak expiratory flow rate. Genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 did not significantly affect peak expiratory flow rate. Conclusions This study demonstrated that particulate pollutants and metals such as manganese and lead in the particles are associated with a decrement of peak expiratory flow rate. These effects were robust even with consideration of genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase. PMID:17431494

  14. Robust detection of peak signals for lateral flow immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongwon; Kim, Jong Dae; Nahm, Kie Bong; Choi, Eui Yul; Lee, Geumyoung

    2011-02-01

    Template matching method is presented to identify the peaks from the scanned signals of lateral flow immunoassay strips. The template is composed of two pulses separated by the distance of the control and the target ligand line in the assay, and is convolved with the scanned signal to deliver the maximum at the center of the two peaks. The peak regions were identified with the predefined distances from the center. Glycosylated haemoglobin immunoassay strips and fluorescent strip readers from Boditechmed Inc. were tested to estimate the lot and reader variations of the concentration measurands. The results showed the robustness of the propose method.

  15. Gas compression in lungs decreases peak expiratory flow depending on resistance of peak flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O F; Pedersen, T F; Miller, M R

    1997-11-01

    It has recently been shown (O. F. Pedersen T. R. Rasmussen, O. Omland, T. Sigsgaard, P. H. Quanjer. and M. R. Miller. Eur. Respir. J. 9: 828-833, 1996) that the added resistance of a mini-Wright peak flowmeter decreases peak expiratory flow (PEF) by approximately 8% compared with PEF measured by a pneumotachograph. To explore the reason for this, 10 healthy men (mean age 43 yr, range 33-58 yr) were examined in a body plethysmograph with facilities to measure mouth flow vs. expired volume as well as the change in thoracic gas volume (Vb) and alveolar pressure (PA). The subjects performed forced vital capacity maneuvers through orifices of different sizes and also a mini-Wright peak flowmeter. PEF with the meter and other added resistances were achieved when flow reached the perimeter of the flow-Vb curves. The mini-Wright PEF meter decreased PEF from 11.4 +/- 1.5 to 10.3 +/- 1.4 (SD) l/s (P < 0.001), PA increased from 6.7 +/- 1.9 to 9.3 +/- 2.7 kPa (P < 0.001), an increase equal to the pressure drop across the meter, and caused Vb at PEF to decrease by 0.24 +/- 0.09 liter (P < 0.001). We conclude that PEF obtained with an added resistance like a mini-Wright PEF meter is a wave-speed-determined maximal flow, but the added resistance causes gas compression because of increased PA at PEF. Therefore, Vb at PEF and, accordingly, PEF decrease. PMID:9375314

  16. Assessment of a peak flow whistle in nonasthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Terblanche, E; Fourie, P R; Wessels, J A

    1999-06-01

    We tested the agreement of peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements between an electronic spirometer and a peak flow whistle (Whistle Watch, HarMed, Capetown, South Africa). One hundred and three healthy children between ages 6-13 years and with no previous experience in lung function tests participated in the study. Sequential PEF-readings were obtained from the spirometer and the peak flow whistle; all children had an equal number of attempts using both devices. In the case of the spirometer, the highest PEF reading of three acceptable and reproducible efforts was noted as the best PEF (PEF(SPIRO)). Whistle Watch readings were taken as the highest value when the child could activate the whistle. Despite a strong correlation (r = 0.91; R2 = 83%) between the readings of the spirometer and Whistle Watch, there was a lack of agreement between the two devices. For any individual subject, the 95% probability interval ranged between +30.4 to -47 L.min(-1); 64% of the children obtained higher PEF-values on Whistle Watch, compared to the spirometer. These findings suggest that the whistle sound of the peak flow whistle was a significant incentive, which resulted in greater maximal expiratory efforts. PMID:10380096

  17. Potential effects of translatory waves on estimation of peak flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hjalmarson, H.W.; Phillips, J.V.

    1997-01-01

    During the afternoon of August 19, 1971, an intense thunderstorm a few miles southwest of Wikieup, Arizona, produced one of the largest known flood peaks for a 49.2-square-km drainage basin. Initial computations of the peak discharge assumed stable flow conditions and a four-section slope area measurement indicated that discharge was 2,082 m3/s. Recent findings based on free-surface instability characteristics at the site suggest that gravitational forces exceeded boundary retarding forces, and flow in the wide sand channel was unstable. Computations for roll or translatory waves indicate that waves crashed into the highway bridge at velocities of as much as 12.5 m/s. The close agreement of free surface instability results, translatory wave computations, estimates of the steady flow on which the translatory waves traveled, and an eyewitness account of the translatory waves suggest the total peak discharge could have been 2,742 m3/s or 32% greater than the published discharge. The occurrence of translatory waves in natural channels may be more common than previously thought, and instability criteria should be considered for hydraulic analysis of flow in steep smooth channels.

  18. Asthma-like peak flow variability in various lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Virendra; Meena, Pradeep; Sharma, Bharat Bhushan

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bronchodilator reversibility and diurnal peak flow variability are considered characteristic of asthma patients. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) show poor reversibility. But reversibility and variability in other pulmonary diseases manifesting with airflow obstruction in not known. Therefore, we assessed reversibility and peak flow variability in patients with various lung diseases to recognize the pattern. Materials and Methods: Seventy consecutive patients with a diagnosis of lung diseases manifesting with airflow obstruction were recruited in the study. These included 23 patients with asthma, 11 patients with bronchiectasis, 16 patients with post-tubercular lung disease (PTLD), and 20 patients with COPD. Ten healthy matched control subjects were also selected to pair with asthmatic patients. Bronchodilator reversibility test was done initially and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured for a duration of 1 week by patients themselves on a chart that was given to them. The mean amplitude percentage of these records were analyzed. Results: The mean values of peak flow variability were 14.73% ± 6.1% in asthmatic patients, 11.98% ± 7.5% in patients with bronchiectasis, and 10.54% ± 5.3% in PTLD. The difference in the mean values of peak flow variability between asthma and bronchiectasis, that is, 14.73 (6.1) vs 11.98 (7.5) was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Forced expiratory volume one second (FEV1) reversibility values were 14.77% ± 26.93%, 11.24% ± 20.43%, 10.85% ± 13.02%, 16.83% ± 22.84%, and 5.47% ± 4.99% in asthma, COPD, PTLD, bronchiectasis, and healthy subjects, respectively. Conclusion: Both reversibility and diurnal peak flow variability were higher in patients with various lung diseases compared with normal healthy subjects. Although these are characteristic of asthma, some cases of bronchiectasis and PTLD patients may also manifest asthma-like PEFR variability and reversibility

  19. Estimation of instantaneous peak flow from simulated maximum daily flow using the HBV model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Instantaneous peak flow (IPF) data are the foundation of the design of hydraulic structures and flood frequency analysis. However, the long discharge records published by hydrological agencies contain usually only average daily flows which are of little value for design in small catchments. In former research, statistical analysis using observed peak and daily flow data was carried out to explore the link between instantaneous peak flow (IPF) and maximum daily flow (MDF) where the multiple regression model is proved to have the best performance. The objective of this study is to further investigate the acceptability of the multiple regression model for post-processing simulated daily flows from hydrological modeling. The model based flood frequency analysis allows to consider change in the condition of the catchments and in climate for design. Here, the HBV model is calibrated on peak flow distributions and flow duration curves using two approaches. In a two -step approach the simulated MDF are corrected with a priory established regressions. In a one-step procedure the regression coefficients are calibrated together with the parameters of the model. For the analysis data from 18 mesoscale catchments in the Aller-Leine river basin in Northern Germany are used. The results show that: (1) the multiple regression model is capable to predict the peak flows with the simulated MDF data; (2) the calibrated hydrological model reproduces well the magnitude and frequency distribution of peak flows; (3) the one-step procedure outperforms the two-step procedure regarding the estimation of peak flows.

  20. Evaluation of peak cough flow in Brazilian healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In this study we aimed to evaluate the peak cough flow (PCF) in healthy Brazilian subjects. Methods We evaluated 484 healthy subjects between 18 and 40 years old. Subjects were seated and oriented were asked to perform a maximal inspiration followed by a quick, short and explosive expiration on the peak flow meter. Three measures were carried out and recorded the average of the three results for each individual. Results The PCF values ranged between 240 and 500 L/min. The PCF values were lower in females than in males. The PCF was inversely proportional to age. Conclusion The values for Brazilian adult healthy subjects regarding PCF were between 240 and 500 L/min. PMID:23021434

  1. 100 Years of the Physics of Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luginsland, John

    2013-10-01

    The Child-Langmuir Law (CL), discovered 100 years ago, gives the maximum current that can be transported across a planar diode in the steady state. As a quintessential example of the impact of space-charge shielding near a charged surface, it is central to the studies of high current diodes, such as high power microwave sources, vacuum microelectronics, electron and ion sources, and high current drivers used in high-energy density physics experiments. CL remains a touchstone of fundamental sheath physics, including contemporary studies of nano-scale quantum diodes and plasmonic devices. Its solid state analog is the Mott-Gurney law, governing the maximum charge injection in solids, such as organic materials and other dielectrics, which is important to energy devices, such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. This paper reviews the important advances in the physics of diodes since the discovery of CL, including virtual cathode formation and extension of CL to multiple dimensions, to the quantum regime, and to ultrafast processes. We will review the influence of magnetic fields, multiple species in bipolar flow, electromagnetic and time dependent effects in both short pulse and high frequency THz limits, and single electron regimes. Transitions from various emission mechanisms (thermionic, field, and photo-emission) to the space charge limited state (CL) will be addressed, especially highlighting important simulation and experimental developments in selected contemporary areas of study. This talk will stress the fundamental physical links between the physics of beams to limiting currents in other areas, such as low temperature plasmas, laser plasmas, and space propulsion. Also emphasized is the role of non-equilibrium phenomena associated with materials and plasmas in close contact. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Peak flowmeter resistance decreases peak expiratory flow in subjects with COPD.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Pedersen, O F

    2000-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the added resistance of a mini-Wright peak expiratory flow (PEF) meter reduced PEF by approximately 8% in normal subjects because of gas compression reducing thoracic gas volume at PEF and thus driving elastic recoil pressure. We undertook a body plethysmographic study in 15 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), age 65.9 +/- 6.3 yr (mean +/- SD, range 53-75 yr), to examine whether their recorded PEF was also limited by the added resistance of a PEF meter. The PEF meter increased alveolar pressure at PEF (Ppeak) from 3.7 +/- 1.4 to 4.7 +/- 1.5 kPa (P = 0.01), and PEF was reduced from 3.6 +/- 1.3 l/s to 3.2 +/- 0.9 l/s (P = 0.01). The influence of flow limitation on PEF and Ppeak was evaluated by a simple four-parameter model based on the wave-speed concept. We conclude that added external resistance in patients with COPD reduced PEF by the same mechanisms as in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the much lower Ppeak in COPD patients is a consequence of more severe flow limitation than in healthy subjects and not of deficient muscle strength. PMID:10904063

  3. Convergence: Human Intelligence The Next 100 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluellen, Jerry E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    How might human intelligence evolve over the next 100 years? This issue paper explores that idea. First, the paper summarizes five emerging perspectives about human intelligence: Howard Gardner's multiple intelligences theory, Robert Sternberg's triarchic theory of intelligence, Ellen Langer's mindfulness theory, David Perkins' learnable…

  4. The AAS: Its Next 100 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, S.

    1999-05-01

    The AAS: Its Next Hundred Years "We are probably nearing the limit of all we can know about astronomy."-- Simon Newcomb, 1888. The best way to celebrate the centennial of the AAS is to look forward, not backward, and to begin planning for the next 100 years. However, predicting the future is even more difficult than it was in Newcomb's time. We live in an era characterized by an unprecedented rate of change in the kinds of scientific questions we ask, the tools we use to answer them, and the way we communicate our results. This talk will highlight some of the issues that we will face as a community during the next 10--but not the next 100!--years and suggests that the AAS has a fundamental role to play in shaping the community response to these issues.

  5. [Accuracy of MiniWright peak expiratory flow meters

    PubMed

    Camargos, P A; Ruchkys, V C; Dias, R M; Sakurai, E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of the Mini-Wright (Clement Clarke International Ltd.) peak-flow meters. METHODS: Twenty of those meters were checked by use of electronic calibration syringe (Jones Flow-Volume Calibrator(R)). Nine of them had an old scale, with values displayed equidistantly, and eleven had a new mechanical scale with non-equidistant values. Each device was connected in series to the calibration syringe to perform eight hand-driven volume injections, with flows ranging from 100 to 700 l/min. Absolute and relative differences between meters and syringe were calculated, the syringe values taken as standard. The accuracy of the twenty Mini-Wright devices was validated by the American Thoracic Society criteria (-/+ 10% or -/+ 20 l/min), and/or European Respiratory Society criteria (-/+ 5% or -/+ 5 l/ min). RESULTS: New scale instruments were more accurate than old scale meters (p < 0.001), by both ATS and ERS criteria. Every meter was rechecked after 600 measurements. Both the old, and the new scale instruments maintained the same level of performance after this evaluation. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that new scale meters were accurate and can be safely used in clinical practice. The authors strongly recommend that they are rechecked regularly to ensure that they are within the ATS and ERS variation limits. PMID:14647633

  6. Peak power prediction of a vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, V. K.; Chen, D.

    2014-12-01

    The vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) is a promising grid-scale energy storage technology, but future widespread commercialization requires a considerable reduction in capital costs. Determining the appropriate battery size for the intended power range can help minimize the amount of materials needed, thereby reducing capital costs. A physics-based model is an essential tool for predicting the power range of large scale VRFB systems to aid in the design optimization process. This paper presents a modeling framework that accounts for the effects of flow rate on the pumping losses, local mass transfer rate, and nonuniform vanadium concentration in the cell. The resulting low-order model captures battery performance accurately even at high power densities and remains computationally practical for stack-level optimization and control purposes. We first use the model to devise an optimal control strategy that maximizes battery life during discharge. Assuming optimal control is implemented, we then determine the upper efficiency limits of a given VRFB system and compare the net power and associated overpotential and pumping losses at different operating points. We also investigate the effects of varying the electrode porosity, stack temperature, and total vanadium concentration on the peak power.

  7. Determining the minimum instream flow for hydro peaking projects

    SciTech Connect

    Milhous, R.T. )

    1992-10-01

    A new analytical technique is available for quantifying and predicting the effect that a proposed hydro peaking operation, or a change in an existing project's operation, will have on physical habitat for aquatic populations downstream of the project. The technique, known as the dual flow analysis, is based on elements of the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Physical Habitat Simulation System (PHABSIM). PHABSIM is used to calculate the physical habitat for aquatic organisms in a stream. The assumption behind the development of this technique is that if the effects of a proposed project on physical habitat are known, one can better understand the effects on aquatic organisms. Thus, a defensible selection of an instream flow requirement can be made. The technique was developed as a result of a joint study by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. at the 26.4-MW Bennetts Bridge and the 7.8-MW Lighthouse Hill developments on the Salmon river in upstate New York.

  8. Remembering Robert Goddard's vision 100 years later

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, David P.

    “Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” —such are the goals of most of us.Yet a few always exist who feel called by a higher purpose. Society often owes them a great deal.Robert Hutchins Goddard, whose work made spaceflight possible, found his vision 100 years ago this October as a youth of 17. His family was staying on the farm of a relative, when he was asked to trim the branches of a cherry tree behind the barn.

  9. Estimation of instantaneous peak flow from maximum daily flow-a comparison of methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    Estimation of flood frequency based on instantaneous peak flow (IPF) is important for the design of hydraulic structures. However, observed flow data with high temporal resolution are scarce, especially regarding the limited length of the available flow time series. Here, three different methods are developed and compared to estimate the IPF based on maximum daily flow (MDF), which is available usually at more gauges and for longer time periods. In the first approach, simple linear regressions with non-intercept of probability weighted moments (PWM) or quantile values between IPF and MDF data are employed. Secondly, stepwise multiple linear regressions is used to generate regression equations describing the relationship between easily obtained catchment attributes and MDF predictors and the IPF as target variable. With the third method, the temporal scaling properties of IPF series based on the hypothesis of piece wise simple scaling are investigated for 3 different flow gauges with 15 min data and then utilized to estimate the IPF for all gauges in the area. The study region is the Aller-Leine river basin in northern Germany with 45 stream flow gauges. Cross validation results from the three presented models show good performance in reproducing the peak flow and the potential to be used in other catchment. The simple regressions are the easiest to apply given enough peak flow data, the scaling method is the most efficient one among these three models but stepwise multiple linear regressions gives the best results compared with the other two methods.

  10. Vitamins: preparing for the next 100 years.

    PubMed

    Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2012-10-01

    The insights gained from the last 100 years of vitamin research and applications have contributed substantially to our fundamental understanding of biology and importantly to the promotion of human health. There is no reason to think that the next 100 years will be any less fruitful if we are committed to preparing for them, particularly by changing four critical nutrition paradigms. First, we must move beyond the concept of preventing vitamin deficiencies and inadequacies to establishing health and, further, to creating optimal physiological functions. Each essential vitamin possesses different concentration thresholds for its variety of effects and the required balance necessary to achieving each has yet to be fully defined. Second, we must apply the research approaches and methods of “-omics,” systems biology, and imaging technologies to define the dynamic role of vitamins and their broad array of genomic, molecular, biochemical, and functional interactions. Such work is necessary to understand the multiplicity of vitamin actions and ultimately apply them directly at the level of the individual. Third, we must revise the concept of evidence-based nutrition away from its current hierarchical system to recognize in a comprehensive and integrated way the attributes of each type of approach to research. To adhere to a single gold standard of the randomized clinical trial ignores both how we have moved forward so productively during the last 100 years and the vital information to be gained from basic research and other human studies; further, it acts to stifle innovation in both scientific and regulatory affairs. Fourth, we must understand that changes in the supply and distribution of food during the next century are likely to be at least as dramatic as those which have occurred over this last one. For example, inevitable environmental constraints will require more food protein be derived from plant than animal sources, a shift that will directly impact the

  11. Combined effects of projected sea level rise, storm surge, and peak river flows on water levels in the Skagit Floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamman, Josheph J; Hamlet, Alan F.; Fuller, Roger; Grossman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Current understanding of the combined effects of sea level rise (SLR), storm surge, and changes in river flooding on near-coastal environments is very limited. This project uses a suite of numerical models to examine the combined effects of projected future climate change on flooding in the Skagit floodplain and estuary. Statistically and dynamically downscaled global climate model scenarios from the ECHAM-5 GCM were used as the climate forcings. Unregulated daily river flows were simulated using the VIC hydrology model, and regulated river flows were simulated using the SkagitSim reservoir operations model. Daily tidal anomalies (TA) were calculated using a regression approach based on ENSO and atmospheric pressure forcing simulated by the WRF regional climate model. A 2-D hydrodynamic model was used to estimate water surface elevations in the Skagit floodplain using resampled hourly hydrographs keyed to regulated daily flood flows produced by the reservoir simulation model, and tide predictions adjusted for SLR and TA. Combining peak annual TA with projected sea level rise, the historical (1970–1999) 100-yr peak high water level is exceeded essentially every year by the 2050s. The combination of projected sea level rise and larger floods by the 2080s yields both increased flood inundation area (+ 74%), and increased average water depth (+ 25 cm) in the Skagit floodplain during a 100-year flood. Adding sea level rise to the historical FEMA 100-year flood resulted in a 35% increase in inundation area by the 2040's, compared to a 57% increase when both SLR and projected changes in river flow were combined.

  12. Assessment of potential debris-flow peak discharges from basins burned by the 2002 Missionary Ridge fire, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Michael, John A.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Gleason, J. Andrew

    2003-01-01

    These maps present the results of assessments of peak discharges that can potentially be generated by debris flows issuing from the basins burned by the Missionary Ridge fire of June 9 through July 14, 2002, near Durango, Colorado. The maps are based on a regression model for debris-flow peak discharge normalized by average storm intensity as a function of basin gradient and burned extent, and limited field checking. A range of potential peak discharges that could be produced from each of the burned basins between 1 ft3/s (0.03 m3/s) and 6,446 ft3/s (183 m3/s) is calculated for the 5-year, 1-hour storm of 0.80 inches (20 mm). Potential peak discharges between 1 ft3/s (0.03 m3/s) and >8,000 ft3/s (227 m3/s) are calculated for the 25-year, 1-hour storm of 1.3 inches (33 mm) and for the 100-year, 1-hour storm of 1.8 inches (46 mm). These maps are intended for use by emergency personnel to aid in the preliminary design of mitigation measures, and for the planning of evacuation timing and routes.

  13. Assessment of potential debris-flow peak discharges from basins burned by the 2002 Coal Seam fire, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Michael, John A.; Gartner, Joseph E.

    2003-01-01

    These maps present the results of assessments of peak discharges that can potentially be generated by debris flows issuing from the basins burned by the Coal Seam fire of June and July 2002, near Glenwood Springs, Colorado. The maps are based on a regression model for debris-flow peak discharge normalized by average storm intensity as a function of basin gradient and burned extent, and limited field checking. A range of potential peak discharges that could potentially be produced from each of the burned basins between 1 ft3/s (0.03 m3/s) and greater than 5,000 ft3/s (>141 m3/s) is calculated for the 5-year, 1-hour storm of 0.80 inches (20 mm). The 25-year, 1-hour storm of 1.3 inches (33 mm). The 100- year, 1-hour storm of 1.8 inches (46 mm) produced peak discharges between 1 and greater than 8,000 ft3/s (>227 m3/s). These maps are intended for use by emergency personnel to aid in the preliminary design of mitigation measures, and the planning of evacuation timing and routes.

  14. Impact of Wet-Weather Peak Flow Blending on Disinfection Performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S. EPA study evaluated the impact on disinfection during peak flows (wet-weather flow events) when a portion of the flow to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bypasses secondary treatment prior to disinfection. The practice of bypassing secondary treatment during peak flow...

  15. Remediation scenarios for attenuating peak flows and reducing sediment transport in Fountain Creek, Colorado, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohn, Michael S.; Fulton, John W.; Williams, Cory A.; Stogner, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    -RAS version 4.2 was used to simulate streamflow and sediment transport for the Fountain Creek watershed generated by a design-storm event. The Laursen-Copeland sediment-transport function was used in conjunction with the Exner 5 sorting method and the Ruby fall-velocity method to predict sediment transport. Six USGS streamgages equipped with suspended-sediment samplers were used to develop sediment-flow rating curves for the sediment-transport-model calibration. The critical Shields number in the Laursen-Copeland sediment-transport function and the volume of sediment available at a given cross section were adjusted during the HEC-RAS sediment-model calibration process. HEC-RAS model simulations used to evaluate the 14 remediation scenarios were based on unsteady-state streamflows associated with a 24-hour, 1-percent annual exceedance probability (100-year) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Type II precipitation event. Scenario 0 represents the baseline or current conditions in the watershed and was used to compare the remaining 13 scenarios. Scenarios 1–8 and 12 rely on side-detention facilities to reduce peak flows and sediment transport. Scenario 9 has a diversion channel, and scenario 10 has a reservoir. Scenarios 11 and 13 incorporate channel armoring and channel widening, respectively. Scenarios 8 and 10, the scenario with the most side-detention facilities, and the scenario with the reservoir, respectively, were the most effective at reducing sediment transport and peak flow at the Pueblo, Colorado, streamgage. Scenarios 8 and 10 altered the peak flow by –58.9 and –56.4 percent, respectively. In turn, scenarios 8 and 10 altered the sediment transport by –17.7 and –62.1 percent, respectively.

  16. Flood boundaries and water-surface profile for the computed 100-year flood, Swift Creek at Afton, Wyoming, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, James G.; Wallace, Joe C.

    1989-01-01

    Flood flows on Swift Creek near Afton, Wyoming, were analyzed. Peak discharge with an average recurrence interval of 100 years was computed and used to determine the flood boundaries and water surface profile in the study reach. The study was done in cooperation with Lincoln County and the Town of Afton to determine the extent of flooding in the Town of Afton from a 100-year flood on Swift Creek. The reach of Swift Creek considered in the analysis extends upstream from the culvert at Allred County Road No. 12-135 to the US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station located in the Bridger National Forest , a distance of 3.2 miles. Boundaries of the 100-year flood are delineated on a map using the computed elevation of the flood at each cross section, survey data, and a 1983 aerial photograph. The computed water surface elevation for the 100-year flood was plotted at each cross section, then the lateral extent of the flood was transferred to the flood map. Boundaries between cross sections were sketched using information taken from the aerial photograph. Areas that are inundated, but not part of the active flow, are designated on the cross sections. (Lantz-PTT)

  17. Ernst Mach on the vestibular organ 100 years ago.

    PubMed

    Henn, V; Young, L R

    1975-01-01

    Ernst Mach (1838-1916) performed pioneering research on vestibular function 100 years ago. His experiments were mainly psychophysical and included measurements of threshold and study of the vestibular-visual interaction. Contrary to general belief, he concluded that the adequate stimulus for the semicircular canals must be pressure. He presented evidence specifically against the sustained endolymph flow theory of Breuer (1874) and Crum Brown (1874), with which he is frequently associated. Excerpts from his publications are given and their relevance to current research is discussed. PMID:1093083

  18. IMPACT ON DISINFECTION AT PEAK FLOWS DURING BLENDING/PARTIAL BYPASSING OF SECONDARY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S EPA study evaluated the impact on disinfection during peak flows when a portion of the flow to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bypasses secondary treatment prior to disinfection. The practice of bypassing secondary treatment during peak flows, referred to as “blending...

  19. Flow among Musicians: Measuring Peak Experiences of Student Performers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnamon, Sarah; Moran, Aidan; O'Connell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    "Flow" is a highly coveted yet elusive state of mind that is characterized by complete absorption in the task at hand as well as by enhanced skilled performance. Unfortunately, because most measures of this construct have been developed in physical activity and sport settings, little is known about the applicability of flow scales to the…

  20. Peak-flow frequency for tributaries of the Colorado River downstream of Austin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Peak-flow frequency for 38 stations with at least 8 years of data in natural (unregulated and nonurbanized) basins was estimated on the basis of annual peak-streamflow data through water year 1995. Peak-flow frequency represents the peak discharges for recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 250, and 500 years. The peak-flow frequency and drainage basin characteristics for the stations were used to develop two sets of regression equations to estimate peak-flow frequency for tributaries of the Colorado River in the study area. One set of equations was developed for contributing drainage areas less than 32 square miles, and another set was developed for contributing drainage areas greater than 32 square miles. A procedure is presented to estimate the peak discharge at sites where both sets of equations are considered applicable. Additionally, procedures are presented to compute the 50-, 67-, and 90-percent prediction interval for any estimation from the equations.

  1. Simulation of Peak Flows Using Remote Sensing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaña Hernández, F.; Ba, K. M.; Guerra-Cobián, V.

    2013-05-01

    In this study we utilized remotely sensed data (radar and satellite precipitation products) to simulate the peak discharges of some storm events of the Escondido River. This is a poorly gauged watershed located in Northern Mexico, in the State of Coahuila and is a sub-basin of Rio Bravo, known also as Río Grande. The radar data are from NOAA (Radar KDFX located in Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas). We used two satellite product estimates PERSIANN and CMORPH. These three estimated precipitation products have been compared using the hydrologic model HEC-HMS to simulate the peak discharge. The results of the simulations show the importance of the use of this type of data in hydrologic modeling.

  2. Improved Simulation of Peak Flows Under Climate Change: Post-Processing or Multi-Objective Calibration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Booij, M. J.; Xu, Y. P.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to have large impacts on peak flows. There are, however, large uncertainties in the simulation of peak flows by hydrological models. This study aims to improve the simulation of peak flows under climate change in Lanjiang catchment, East China by comparing two approaches: post-processing of peak flows and multi-objective calibration. Two hydrological models (SWAT and GR4J) are employed to simulate the daily flows and the peaks-over-threshold method is used to extract peak flows from the simulated daily flows. Three post-processing methods, namely the quantile mapping method and two generalized linear models, are set up to correct the biases in the simulated raw peak flows. Besides, a multi-objective calibration of the GR4J model by taking the peak flows into account in the calibration process is carried out. The regional climate model PRECIS with boundary forcing from two GCMs (HadCM3 and ECHAM5) under greenhouse gas emission scenario A1B is applied to produce the climate data for the baseline period and the future period 2011-2040. The results show that the post-processing methods, particularly quantile mapping method, can correct the biases in the raw peak flows effectively. The multi-objective calibration also resulted in a good simulation performance of peak flows. The final estimated peak flows in the future period show an obvious increase compared with those in the baseline period, indicating there are probably more frequent floods in Lanjiang catchment in the future.

  3. 21 CFR 868.1860 - Peak-flow meter for spirometry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peak-flow meter for spirometry. 868.1860 Section 868.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spirometry. (a) Identification. A peak-flow meter for spirometry is a device used to measure a...

  4. 21 CFR 868.1860 - Peak-flow meter for spirometry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Peak-flow meter for spirometry. 868.1860 Section 868.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spirometry. (a) Identification. A peak-flow meter for spirometry is a device used to measure a...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1860 - Peak-flow meter for spirometry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Peak-flow meter for spirometry. 868.1860 Section 868.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spirometry. (a) Identification. A peak-flow meter for spirometry is a device used to measure a...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1860 - Peak-flow meter for spirometry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Peak-flow meter for spirometry. 868.1860 Section 868.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spirometry. (a) Identification. A peak-flow meter for spirometry is a device used to measure a...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1860 - Peak-flow meter for spirometry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Peak-flow meter for spirometry. 868.1860 Section 868.1860 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... spirometry. (a) Identification. A peak-flow meter for spirometry is a device used to measure a...

  8. 100 years of sedimentation study by the USGS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glysson, G. Douglas

    1989-01-01

    On January 15, 1889, the U.S. Geological Survey began collecting sediment data on the Rio Grande at Embudo, New Mexico. During the past 100 years the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division (WRD) has collected daily sediment data at more than 1,200 sites. Projects have addressed the problems associated with reservoir construction, agricultural irrigation projects, energy production, and transport and deposition of pollutants sorbed to sediments. The Survey has been active as a charter member of the Federal Interagency Sediment Project and currently has three full-time hydrologists working on the project. The WRD's sediment-research projects have covered a wide variety of subjects from the fundamental theories of resistance to flow and sediment transport in alluvial channels to lunar erosion mechanisms.

  9. Impacts of Mountain Pine Beetle on Peak Flow in the Fraser Basin in British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, C.; Rosin, K.; Weiler, M.

    2008-12-01

    Increasing winter temperature in combination with forest management practices are the main drivers for the Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) epidemic in British Columbia (BC). The infestation of MPB has now turned into a major threat to the natural habitat of the province. The Fraser basin, the largest watershed in BC, is the most affected watershed with an infested forest area of 7.7 million hectares (88% of the watershed) [Redding and Pike 2007]. Forest cover is a key modifier of the watershed's peak flow regime. The peak flow generally increases when forest cover is reduced. Major parts of the Fraser basin have only a limited number of gauging stations (or are even ungauged). The goal of the project was to develop a hydrological model that can predict peak flow increases but does not rely on complex data inputs for its validation and calibration procedures. The model consists of two major components: climate input and runoff. The climate input component determines the mean annual snowmelt as well as the maximum rainfall based on long term climatic averages. This information is then used to determine the time and the capacity of the peak flow for every 3rd order watershed. The runoff component delineates hydrologic processes such as Hortonain Overland Flow, Saturation Overland Flow and Shallow Surface Flow. The model combines the two components and computes a map of peak flow contribution. A peak flow analysis has been carried out to validate the model results using available gauging stations in subcatchments. The validated model has been then applied to the entire watershed to analyze the impacts of MPB on peak flow in the Fraser basin. The presentation will show the conceptual presentation of the hydrological model. It will highlight the results of the peak flow analysis and show initial results of the application of the model. Cited Literature: Redding, T. and Pike, R (2007). Mountain Pine Beetle and Watershed Hydrology Workshop Summary, Streamline Watershed

  10. Assessing Watershed Sensitivity to Minimize Peak Flow Modification due to Logging After Forest Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, M.

    2007-12-01

    Forest cover is a key modifier of a watershed's peak flow regime. Where forest cover is reduced due to logging or natural disturbances such as fire and insect/disease outbreaks, peak flows are, in most cases, increased. Based on GIS data available for the entire province of British Columbia (BC), Canada, with its diverse climatic regimes, land cover and hydrologic processes, we developed a methodology that classifies the sensitivity of watersheds to peak flow modification based on input characteristics and hydrological runoff generation processes. The input model component uses climatic data to derive mean annual snowmelt and maximum rainfall rates for BC for each month at a 400m grid resolution. It calculates the time of occurrence of peak flow and the precipitation regime of a watershed: snowmelt-dominated, rainfall-dominated, and transitional. This allows mapping peak flow generating input for each 3rd order watershed in BC. The runoff generation model component delineates dominant peak flow producing hydrologic processes at the watershed level: channel interception, Hortonian Overland Flow, Saturation Overland Flow and Shallow Subsurface Flow. This delineation is based on a combination of factors such as land cover, relief, slope, aspect, drainage density, drainage pattern, and hillslope morphology. The model components are validated against provincial hydro-climatic data sets. Derived maps at 25m resolution are then used to classify the watershed into different peak flow regimes to derive a sensitivity rating for different disturbance scenarios. This rating is then incorporated into a framework to assess risks to infrastructure, drinking water, and fish habitat and to minimize peak flow modification by optimizing timing, extend and location of logging in watersheds.

  11. Lower crustal xenoliths, Chinese Peak lava flow, central Sierra Nevada.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Calk, L.C.; Kistler, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This assemblage of pyroxenite, peridotite and mafic granulite xenoliths in the toe of a 10 m.y. trachybasalt flow remnant overlying late Cretaceous granitic rocks, indicates the presence of a mafic-ultramafic complex beneath this part of central California; orthopyroxenites, websterites and clinopyroxenites are dominant. A few of the xenoliths contain ovoid opaque patches that are apparently pseudomorphs after garnet and have pyralspite garnet compositions; using a garnet-orthopyroxene geobarometer, they indicate a lower crustal depth of approx 40 km. Abundant mafic granulites can be subdivided into those with Al2O3 = or 15% and showing considerable scatter on oxide variation diagrams. The high-alumina granulite xenoliths have relatively low 87Rb/86Sr but high 87Sr/86Sr, whereas the low-alumina and ultramafic xenoliths have a wide range of 87Rb/86Sr, but lower 87Sr/86Sr; the isotopic data indicate roughly the same age as that of overlying granitic plutons (approx 100 m.y.). However, the granitic rocks have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios intermediate between those of the high-alumina and ultramafic xenoliths, suggesting that they result from the mixing of basaltic magma (represented by the ultramafic rocks) and crustal materials, with subsequent crystal fractionation.-R.A.H.

  12. Asthma ski day: cold air sports safe with peak flow monitoring.

    PubMed

    Silvers, W; Morrison, M; Wiener, M

    1994-08-01

    The Colorado Asthma Ski Day, an annual cross-country and alpine skiing event, encourages children with asthma to participate fully in outdoor winter sports. Since cold air and exercise can trigger bronchospasm, we examined the peak expiratory flow rates of 80 children who attended Asthma Ski Day 1992 or Asthma Ski Day 1993 to establish a safety profile for this event. Peak expiratory flow rates were measured prior to skiing, at lunchtime, and at the end of the day's activities. We asked the children to pretreat with their regular medications, as prescribed by their physicians, to use their bronchodilator inhalers p.r.n., and to report to our medical station if an episode of acute asthma occurred. The average age of the participants was 9.5 years, and the average baseline daytime peak flow rate was 100.03% of predicted. The average percent change in peak flow rates during the day was an increase of 5.00%. Our results demonstrate that with medical supervision, peak expiratory flow rate monitoring, and properly administered medications, peak flow rates can be stabilized and even improve during cold-weather exercise to an extent that safety concerns need not restrict children with asthma from engaging in exercise or cold-weather sports. The Colorado Asthma Ski Day can serve as a model event for other organizations that want to promote outdoor activities for children with asthma. PMID:8067591

  13. Pedernales oilfield, eastern Venezuela: The first 100 years

    SciTech Connect

    Gluyas, J.; Oliver, J.; Wilson, W.

    1996-08-01

    Petroleum seeps and surface tar mats attracted oil explorers to Pedernales in eastern Venezuela 100 years ago. Commercial production from the Pedernales Field was established by Creole in 1933. In three production periods, broken by WWII and the end of the Creole-Texaco refining contract, Creole and Lagoven produced about 60 MMSTB from about 60 wells in about 60 years. Peak production was in the late 1950s, when the field delivered 12,000 BOPD. Production was stopped in 1986. In March 1993, BP Venezuela acquired the license to reactivate Pedernales on behalf of Lagoven, and BP`s first well in the field was drilled in August 1994. A second was completed in early 1995. The production from each well was sufficiently encouraging for commerciality to be declared in March 1995. Phase 1 of the field reactivation demanded a production rate of 11,500 BOPD. As of now (September, 1995) six wells, including one gas disposal well, have been completed. Wells have been placed using a combination of old well data and mapping based on a close spaced 2D seismic survey shot in early 1994. Results from these first few wells indicate that the required production rate will be achieved despite severely depleted reservoir pressures. This paper tells the story of reactivation and re-evaluation of one of eastern Venezuela`s oldest oilfields.

  14. Influence of peak flow changes on the macroinvertebrate drift downstream of a Brazilian hydroelectric dam.

    PubMed

    Castro, D M P; Hughes, R M; Callisto, M

    2013-11-01

    Successive daily peak flows from hydropower plants can disrupt aquatic ecosystems and alter the composition and structure of macroinvertebrates downstream. We evaluated the influence of peak flow changes on macroinvertebrate drift downstream of a hydroelectric plant as a basis for determining ecological flows that might reduce the disturbance of aquatic biota. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of flow fluctuations on the seasonal and daily drift patterns of macroinvertebrates. We collected macroinvertebrates during fixed flow rates (323 m3.s-1 in the wet season and 111 m3.s-1 in the dry season) and when peak flows fluctuated (378 to 481 m3.s-1 in the wet season, and 109 to 173 m3.s-1 in the dry season) in 2010. We collected 31,924 organisms belonging to 46 taxa in the four sampling periods. Taxonomic composition and densities of drifting invertebrates differed between fixed and fluctuating flows, in both wet and dry seasons, but family richness varied insignificantly. We conclude that macroinvertebrate assemblages downstream of dams are influenced by daily peak flow fluctuations. When making environmental flow decisions for dams, it would be wise to consider drifting macroinvertebrates because they reflect ecological changes in downstream biological assemblages. PMID:24789393

  15. Technique for estimating magnitude and frequency of peak flows in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillow, Jonathan J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Methods are presented for estimating peak-flow magnitudes of selected frequencies for drainage basins in Maryland. The methods were developed by generalized least-squares regression techniques using data from 219 streamflow-gaging stations in and near Maryland, and apply to peak flows with recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, and 500 years. The State is divided into five hydrologic regions: the Appalachian Plateaus and Allegheny Ridges region, the Blue Ridge and Great Valley region, the Piedmont region, the Western Coastal Plain region, and the Eastern Coastal Plain region. Sets of equations for calculating peak discharges based on physical basin characteristics and their associated standard errors of prediction are provided for each of the five hydrologic regions. Basin characteristics and flood-frequency characteristics are tabulated for 236 streamflow- gaging stations in Maryland and surrounding States. Methods of estimating peak flows at sites in Maryland for ungaged and gaged sites are presented.

  16. Flood moderation: Declining peak flows along some Rocky Mountain rivers and the underlying mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, Stewart B.; Foster, Stephen G.; Hillman, Evan J.; Luek, Andreas; Zanewich, Karen P.

    2016-05-01

    It has been proposed that global warming will amplify the water cycle and intensify river floods. We tested this hypothesis by investigating historic trends in magnitudes, durations and timing of the annual peak flows of rivers that drain the Rocky Mountains around the North American hydrographic apex, the source for rivers flowing to the Pacific, Arctic (including Hudson Bay) and Atlantic Oceans. We sought century-long records and to reduce influences from land-use we assessed drainages from parks and protected areas. Of 30 rivers and reaches that were free-flowing or slightly regulated, seven displayed declining peak flows (7 p < 0.1, 4 p < 0.05), and one showed increase (p < 0.05); three of five moderately regulated rivers displayed decline (p < 0.05). Substantial floods, exceeding the 1-in-5 year recurrence (Q5), were more common in the early versus latter halves of the records for some Arctic drainages and were more common during the Pacific Decadal Oscillation negative phase for all regions. The timing of peak flows was relatively unchanged and Q5 flood durations declined for a few rivers. These results indicate flood moderation rather than flood intensification, particularly for Arctic Ocean drainages. This could reflect regional hydrological consequences from climate change including: (1) declining overall annual river flows; (2) winter warming that would increase the rain versus snow proportion, thus reducing snow accumulation and melt; and (3) spring warming that advances snow melt, lengthening the melt interval before peak flows. These changes would shift the seasonality of river flows and reduce annual peaks. We might expect continuing moderation of peak flows but there will probably still be occasional major floods from exceptional rain events such as occurred in northern Montana in 1964 and in southern Alberta in 2013.

  17. Annual Peak-Flow and Peak Dam-Pool-Elevation Frequency Characteristics of Selected Dry Dams in the Great Miami River Basin, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the results of a study to determine frequency characteristics of post-regulation annual peak flows at streamflow-gaging stations near the Taylorsville, Huffman, and Germantown dry dams in the Miami Conservancy District flood-protection system (southwestern Ohio), and of annual peak elevations of the corresponding dam pools. Log-Pearson Type III distributions were fit to annual peak flow values for the period 1921 or 1922 through 2007 (the most recent year of published peak flow values at the time of this analysis) and annual peak dam-pool storage values for the period 1922- 2008 to determine peaks with recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 500 years. Once storages had been estimated for the various recurrence intervals, corresponding dam-pool elevations were determined from elevation-storage ratings provided by the Miami Conservancy District.

  18. Suspended sediment dynamics in a tidal channel network under peak river flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achete, Fernanda Minikowski; van der Wegen, Mick; Roelvink, Dano; Jaffe, Bruce

    2016-05-01

    Peak river flows transport fine sediment, nutrients, and contaminants that may deposit in the estuary. This study explores the importance of peak river flows on sediment dynamics with special emphasis on channel network configurations. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, which is connected to San Francisco Bay (California, USA), motivates this study and is used as a validation case. Besides data analysis of observations, we applied a calibrated process-based model (D-Flow FM) to explore and analyze high-resolution (˜100 m, ˜1 h) dynamics. Peak river flows supply the vast majority of sediment into the system. Data analysis of six peak flows (between 2012 and 2014) shows that on average, 40 % of the input sediment in the system is trapped and that trapping efficiency depends on timing and magnitude of river flows. The model has 90 % accuracy reproducing these trapping efficiencies. Modeled deposition patterns develop as the result of peak river flows after which, during low river flow conditions, tidal currents are not able to significantly redistribute deposited sediment. Deposition is quite local and mainly takes place at a deep junction. Tidal movement is important for sediment resuspension, but river induced, tide residual currents are responsible for redistributing the sediment towards the river banks and to the bay. We applied the same forcing for four different channel configurations ranging from a full delta network to a schematization of the main river. A higher degree of network schematization leads to higher peak-sediment export downstream to the bay. However, the area of sedimentation is similar for all the configurations because it is mostly driven by geometry and bathymetry.

  19. 100-Year Flood-It's All About Chance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Dinicola, Karen

    2010-01-01

    In the 1960's, the United States government decided to use the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood as the basis for the National Flood Insurance Program. The 1-percent AEP flood was thought to be a fair balance between protecting the public and overly stringent regulation. Because the 1-percent AEP flood has a 1 in 100 chance of being equaled or exceeded in any 1 year, and it has an average recurrence interval of 100 years, it often is referred to as the '100-year flood'. The term '100-year flood' is part of the national lexicon, but is often a source of confusion by those not familiar with flood science and statistics. This poster is an attempt to explain the concept, probabilistic nature, and inherent uncertainties of the '100-year flood' to the layman.

  20. Effect of banana on cold stress test & peak expiratory flow rate in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, C; Bairy, K L; Rao, N M; Udupa, E G

    1999-07-01

    The effect of banana on cold stress induced hypertension, peak expiratory flow rate and plasma ACE activity in healthy human volunteers was tested. Systolic blood pressure (P < 0.005), diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.025) and mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.005) were significantly decreased during cold stress after banana treatment compared to controls subjected to cold stress. There was no significant changes in heart rate and peak expiratory flow rate but only significant decrease in plasma ACE activity after banana treatment. Banana decreased the rise of systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure in healthy volunteers subjected to cold stress test without much effect on heart rate and peak expiratory flow rate. PMID:10709336

  1. Plantation Forestry and Peak Flow Responses in Experimental Catchments and Large River Basins in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iroume, A.; Huber, A.

    2007-05-01

    Land use changes are inextricably linked to water resources and the consequences of such changes are a problem faced by water managers and governments across the world. This particular study considers the impact of changes in plantation forest cover on the hydrological response, with a specific focus on the issue of peak flow conditions and variation. The research still in progress is focused in small catchments and large river basins of Chile. The analysis of the data and the preparation of this document were carried out within the framework of the INCO- CT2004-510739 EPIC FORCE Project. EPIC FORCE aims to improve the integrated management of forest and water resources at the river basin scale through the development of policies based on sound science, focusing on extreme rainfall/snowmelt events. The focus areas are four Latin American countries (Costa Rica, Ecuador, Chile and Argentina.), which represent a range of humid forest and rainfall/snowmelt regimes with major flood and erosion problems and which suffer from a lack of integrated water and forest policies. Much of the controversy surrounding changes in peak flows following forest treatment arises from uncertainty over the response from different sizes of storms; whilst most studies agree that mean peak flow generally increases (even for only a short period) in the post harvesting period, there have been a number of different conclusions regarding influence of forest cover on peak flows from small storms compared with the flows from large events. In Chile, this research is been carried out in experimental catchments (less than 1 km2) and in large river basins (greater than 94 and up to 1,545 km2). Results from La Reina (34.4 ha), where peak flows from the pre-harvesting period (years 1997 to 1999, plantation of Pinus radiata established in 1977 covering the 79.5% of the area) were compared with those from the post- harvesting period (plantation clearcut between end of 1999 and first months of 2000 and

  2. Portable peak flow meters: physical characteristics, influence of temperature, altitude, and humidity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O F; Miller, M R; Sigsgaard, T; Tidley, M; Harding, R M

    1994-05-01

    Little is known about the linearity of portable peak flow meters, or about physical gas factors affecting peak expiratory flow (PEF) readings. We therefore tested five portable peak flow meters of three types in an altitude chamber (sea level to 5,500 m) and in a climate chamber at sea level (7-37 degrees C) to determine the influence of the physical conditions of the gas on the reading of the meters. The nonlinear response of the variable orifice meters was confirmed and, when this was corrected for, the readings of these meters were found to be significantly reduced by higher altitude and lower temperature. The readings from a turbine type of peak flow meter were not affected by altitude but were reduced at low temperature. A mathematical model for the variable orifice meters could correct for both their nonlinear behaviour and the effect of gas density (altitude, temperature and humidity). The model showed that correction is not necessary for the differences in gas conditions between calibration and taking of measurements under normal laboratory conditions. All the meters tested had impedances higher than recommended (0.05 kPa.l-1.s) and this may influence PEF at high flows. The mean uncorrected PEF of six healthy subjects when measured with a Mini Wright peak flow meter at sea level and at 3,000 m fell by 5%, but the mean corrected PEF increased by 12%. This increase in PEF was about 60% of that predicted for fully density-dependent flow and agreed with the findings of other similar studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8050558

  3. Peak-flow frequency and extreme flood potential for streams in the vicinity of the Highland Lakes, central Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Slade, R.M.; Lanning-Rush, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    The Highland Lakes on the Colorado River are in an area periodically threatened by large storms and floods. Many storms exceeding 10 inches (in.) in depth have been documented in the area, including some with depths approaching 40 in. These storms typically produce large peak discharges that often threaten lives and property. The storms sometimes occur with little warning. Steep stream slopes and thin soils characteristic of the area often cause large peak discharges and rapid movement of floods through watersheds. A procedure to predict the discharge associated with large floods is needed for the area so that appropriate peak discharges can be used in the design of flood plains, bridges, and other structures.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), studied flood peaks for streams in the vicinity of the Highland Lakes of central Texas. The Highland Lakes are a series of reservoirs constructed on the Colorado River. The chain of lakes (and year each was completed) comprises Lake Buchanan (1937), Inks Lake (1938), Lake Lyndon B. Johnson (1950), Lake Marble Falls (1951), Lake Travis (1942), and lake Austin (1890). The study area (fig. 1), which includes all or parts of 21 counties in the vicinity of the Highland Lakes, was selected because most streams in the area have flood characteristics similar to streams entering the Highland Lakes. The entire study area is in a region subject to large storms.The purpose of this report is to present (1) peak-flow frequency data for stations and equations to estimate peak-flow frequency for large streams with natural drainage basins in the vicinity of the Highland Lakes, and (2) a technique to estimate the extreme flood peak discharges for the large streams in the vicinity of the Highland Lakes. Peak-flow frequency in this report refers to the peak discharges for recurrence intervals of 2,5, 10,25,50, and 100 years. A large stream is defined as having a contributing drainage

  4. Assessing the ecological base and peak flow of the alpine streams in Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, C.; Yang, P. S.; Tian, P. L.

    2009-04-01

    The ecological base and peak flow are crucial for the assessment and design for habitat rehabilitation and recovery. The amount of discharge affects the aquatic creatures and may severely damage the existence and balance of the community under extreme conditions. Aquatic insects are selected as the target species in this study to evaluate the influence of the discharge and to estimate the ecological base and peak flow. The distribution of the number of species and abundance (density) versus discharge is assessed to define the critical discharge. Two streams located at the alpine area in central Taiwan are selected as the study area to evaluate the base and peak flow. From the preliminary data (Aug 2008 to Dec 2008) collected from one stream Creek C originating from Sitou Area in Central Taiwan shows that the abundance of several species varies with the discharge. The dominate family and genus of aquatic insects is Baetidae (Order Ephemeroptera) and Baetis spp. that accounts for 32.47% and 31.11%, respectively. The Hilsenhoff family biotic index (FBI) shows that the water quality is classified to "Good" and "Very Good" level while the river pollution index (RPI) indicates that the stream is non-polluted. The discharge of base flow interpreted from the 95% curve of duration for the daily discharge is 0.0234 cms. Consistent observations are yet to be collected to yield more accurate result and ecological peak flow in rainy and typhoon seasons.

  5. Tests of peak flow scaling in simulated self-similar river networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menabde, M.; Veitzer, S.; Gupta, V.; Sivapalan, M.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of linear flow routing incorporating attenuation and network topology on peak flow scaling exponent is investigated for an instantaneously applied uniform runoff on simulated deterministic and random self-similar channel networks. The flow routing is modelled by a linear mass conservation equation for a discrete set of channel links connected in parallel and series, and having the same topology as the channel network. A quasi-analytical solution for the unit hydrograph is obtained in terms of recursion relations. The analysis of this solution shows that the peak flow has an asymptotically scaling dependence on the drainage area for deterministic Mandelbrot-Vicsek (MV) and Peano networks, as well as for a subclass of random self-similar channel networks. However, the scaling exponent is shown to be different from that predicted by the scaling properties of the maxima of the width functions. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Center-to-center analysis of flow lineation and flow direction in Eocene welded ignimbrites, Twin Peaks, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, H.J. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Ignimbrites of the Eocene Twin Peaks caldera (Hardyman, 1982) in central Idaho's Challis Volcanic Field comprise both caldera-fill and outflow facies. The vents and mode of emplacement of these ignimbrites are problematic, because the Twin Peaks caldera has been strongly structurally disrupted, and lineations are sparse in the ignimbrites. Six oriented samples from three separate cooling units were studied using the Fry center-to-center method (Seaman and Williams, 1992) in order to determine flow lineation and flow direction of the ignimbrites inside the caldera. Flow lineation is defined in the plane parallel to flattened pumice and assumes that phenocryst are at maximum spacing in this plane. The flow lineation then coincides with the long axis of a center-to-center ellipse. Flow direction is defined in the plane perpendicular to flattening, which is inclined with respect to the flow plane and dips towards the source of flow. Four of five samples from the upper two cooling units near the thickest part of the caldera fill have well developed center-to-center strain ellipsoids producing flow lineations oriented N35W ([+-]7[degree]). The samples from the bottom cooling unit also has a well developed strain ellipsoid, but with a lineation oriented N80E. The difference in flow lineation suggests that the lowest cooling unit had a separate vent. Strain analysis of perpendicular sections are underway to establish the flow direction of the ignimbrites.

  7. Flow in a mechanical bileaflet heart valve at laminar and near-peak systole flow rates: CFD simulations and experiments.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liang; Leo, Hwa-Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2005-10-01

    Time-accurate, fully 3D numerical simulations and particle image velocity laboratory experiments are carried out for flow through a fully open bileaflet mechanical heart valve under steady (nonpulsatile) inflow conditions. Flows at two different Reynolds numbers, one in the laminar regime and the other turbulent (near-peak systole flow rate), are investigated. A direct numerical simulation is carried out for the laminar flow case while the turbulent flow is investigated with two different unsteady statistical turbulence modeling approaches, unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and detached-eddy simulation (DES) approach. For both the laminar and turbulent cases the computed mean velocity profiles are in good overall agreement with the measurements. For the turbulent simulations, however, the comparisons with the measurements demonstrate clearly the superiority of the DES approach and underscore its potential as a powerful modeling tool of cardiovascular flows at physiological conditions. The study reveals numerous previously unknown features of the flow. PMID:16248308

  8. Classical and generalized Horton laws for peak flows in rainfall-runoff events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vijay K.; Ayalew, Tibebu B.; Mantilla, Ricardo; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2015-07-01

    The discovery of the Horton laws for hydrologic variables has greatly lagged behind geomorphology, which began with Robert Horton in 1945. We define the classical and the generalized Horton laws for peak flows in rainfall-runoff events, which link self-similarity in network geomorphology with river basin hydrology. Both the Horton laws are tested in the Iowa River basin in eastern Iowa that drains an area of approximately 32 400 km2 before it joins the Mississippi River. The US Geological Survey continuously monitors the basin through 34 stream gauging stations. We select 51 rainfall-runoff events for carrying out the tests. Our findings support the existence of the classical and the generalized Horton laws for peak flows, which may be considered as a new hydrologic discovery. Three different methods are illustrated for estimating the Horton peak-flow ratio due to small sample size issues in peak flow data. We illustrate an application of the Horton laws for diagnosing parameterizations in a physical rainfall-runoff model. The ideas and developments presented here offer exciting new directions for hydrologic research and education.

  9. NORMAL OF RANGE OF DIURNAL CHANGES IN PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measuring peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR) several times a day can provide an objective assessment of functional changes relative to environmental or occupational exposures. his report describes the pattern of diurnal changes in PEFR in a reference population, and defines ranges...

  10. Methods for Estimating Magnitude and Frequency of Peak Flows for Natural Streams in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenney, Terry A.; Wilkowske, Chris D.; Wright, Shane J.

    2007-01-01

    Estimates of the magnitude and frequency of peak streamflows is critical for the safe and cost-effective design of hydraulic structures and stream crossings, and accurate delineation of flood plains. Engineers, planners, resource managers, and scientists need accurate estimates of peak-flow return frequencies for locations on streams with and without streamflow-gaging stations. The 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence-interval flows were estimated for 344 unregulated U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Utah and nearby in bordering states. These data along with 23 basin and climatic characteristics computed for each station were used to develop regional peak-flow frequency and magnitude regression equations for 7 geohydrologic regions of Utah. These regression equations can be used to estimate the magnitude and frequency of peak flows for natural streams in Utah within the presented range of predictor variables. Uncertainty, presented as the average standard error of prediction, was computed for each developed equation. Equations developed using data from more than 35 gaging stations had standard errors of prediction that ranged from 35 to 108 percent, and errors for equations developed using data from less than 35 gaging stations ranged from 50 to 357 percent.

  11. Flow among Music Teachers and Their Students: The Crossover of Peak Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakker, Arnold B.

    2005-01-01

    This study among 178 music teachers and 605 students from 16 different music schools examined the peak experience of flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 1990). On the basis of the literature, it is hypothesized that job resources, including autonomy, performance feedback, social support, and supervisory coaching have a positive influence on the balance…

  12. Classical and generalized Horton laws for peak flows in rainfall-runoff events.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vijay K; Ayalew, Tibebu B; Mantilla, Ricardo; Krajewski, Witold F

    2015-07-01

    The discovery of the Horton laws for hydrologic variables has greatly lagged behind geomorphology, which began with Robert Horton in 1945. We define the classical and the generalized Horton laws for peak flows in rainfall-runoff events, which link self-similarity in network geomorphology with river basin hydrology. Both the Horton laws are tested in the Iowa River basin in eastern Iowa that drains an area of approximately 32 400 km(2) before it joins the Mississippi River. The US Geological Survey continuously monitors the basin through 34 stream gauging stations. We select 51 rainfall-runoff events for carrying out the tests. Our findings support the existence of the classical and the generalized Horton laws for peak flows, which may be considered as a new hydrologic discovery. Three different methods are illustrated for estimating the Horton peak-flow ratio due to small sample size issues in peak flow data. We illustrate an application of the Horton laws for diagnosing parameterizations in a physical rainfall-runoff model. The ideas and developments presented here offer exciting new directions for hydrologic research and education. PMID:26232981

  13. Estimating peak-flow frequency statistics for selected gaged and ungaged sites in naturally flowing streams and rivers in Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Skinner, Kenneth D.; Veilleux, Andrea G.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Transportation Department, updated regional regression equations to estimate peak-flow statistics at ungaged sites on Idaho streams using recent streamflow (flow) data and new statistical techniques. Peak-flow statistics with 80-, 67-, 50-, 43-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities (1.25-, 1.50-, 2.00-, 2.33-, 5.00-, 10.0-, 25.0-, 50.0-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals, respectively) were estimated for 192 streamgages in Idaho and bordering States with at least 10 years of annual peak-flow record through water year 2013. The streamgages were selected from drainage basins with little or no flow diversion or regulation. The peak-flow statistics were estimated by fitting a log-Pearson type III distribution to records of annual peak flows and applying two additional statistical methods: (1) the Expected Moments Algorithm to help describe uncertainty in annual peak flows and to better represent missing and historical record; and (2) the generalized Multiple Grubbs Beck Test to screen out potentially influential low outliers and to better fit the upper end of the peak-flow distribution. Additionally, a new regional skew was estimated for the Pacific Northwest and used to weight at-station skew at most streamgages. The streamgages were grouped into six regions (numbered 1_2, 3, 4, 5, 6_8, and 7, to maintain consistency in region numbering with a previous study), and the estimated peak-flow statistics were related to basin and climatic characteristics to develop regional regression equations using a generalized least squares procedure. Four out of 24 evaluated basin and climatic characteristics were selected for use in the final regional peak-flow regression equations.Overall, the standard error of prediction for the regional peak-flow regression equations ranged from 22 to 132 percent. Among all regions, regression model fit was best for region 4 in west

  14. Modelling of peak-flow wall shear stress in major airways of the lung.

    PubMed

    Green, A S

    2004-05-01

    Some respiratory diseases result in the inflammation of the lung airway epithelium. An associated chronic cough, as found in many cases of asthma and in long-term smokers, can exacerbate damage to the epithelial layer. It has been proposed that wall shear stresses, created by peak expiratory flow-rates during a coughing episode, are responsible. The work here uses a computational fluid dynamics technique to model peak expiratory flow in the trachea and major lung bronchi. Calculated wall shear stress values are compared to a limited set of published measurements taken from a physical model. The measurements are discussed in the context of a flow study of a complex bronchial network. A more complete picture is achieved by the calculation method, indicating, in some cases, higher maximum wall shear stresses than measured, confirming the original findings of the experimental work. Recommendations are made as to where further work would be beneficial to medical applications. PMID:15046995

  15. Peak Flow Responses and Recession Flow Characteristics After Thinning of Japanese Cypress Forest in a Headwater Catchment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the effects of forest thinning on peak flow and recession characteristics of storm runoff in headwater catchments at Mie Prefecture, Japan. In catchment M5, 58.3% of stems were removed, whereas catchment M4 remained untreated as a control catchment. Storm precipitati...

  16. Peak flow, volume, and frequency of the January 1982 flood, Santa Cruz Mountains and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blodgett, J.C.; Poeschel, K.R.

    1984-01-01

    The areal distribution of precipitation and flooding during the January 1982 storm in the Santa Cruz Mountains and vicinity was influenced by the orographic effect of the Santa Cruz Mountains. Precipitation depths ranged from 12.2 inches in 1 day on the west side to 1.33 inches on the east side. Unit peak discharge ranged from 626 cubic feet per second per square mile on the west side to 83 cubic feet per second per square mile on the east side. The median recurrence interval of peak flow on the west side is 22 years, whereas on the east side it is 6.8 years. Development of a relation between rainfall at Ben Lomond and runoff on the San Lorenzo River at Big Trees shows that the significant climatic factors that describe the flood hydrology of the basin are (1) precipitation for the 3 consecutive days including the day of peak flows and (2) precipitation for a 60-day duration prior to the peak. A study of historical floods and precipitation characterisitics in the San Lorenzo River basin suggests that major floods in the area are the product of (1) greater-than-normal antecedent precipitation for up to 60 days prior to the flood and (2) subsequent intense frontal-type storms immediately prior to the peak. (USGS)

  17. Evaluation of the Effects of Development on Peak-Flow Hydrographs for Collyer Brook, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dudley, Robert W.; Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Mann, Alexander; Chisolm, John

    2001-01-01

    The development of former agricultural or forested lands creates more impervious areas and drainage improvements that can increase the volume of runoff and decrease infiltration and ground-water recharge in a watershed. Drainage improvements also can improve the conveyance of runoff, decreasing the time of rise to peak flow between the start of a rainfall event and the peak surface-water runoff, and likewise decreasing the duration of the peak-flow event. The watershed of Collyer Brook in southern Maine was studied to evaluate the effect of land-use changes on peakflow hydrographs because of the known development in the area during the past 35 years and the availability of aerial photos and streamflow data for this time period. Although aerial photography indicates that suburban development has increased in the watershed between 1964 and 1999, the overall effect of suburbanization on rainfall-runoff processes in the watershed did not produce a statistically detectable change in the peak-flow hydrographs for Collyer Brook.

  18. Impact of Wet-Weather Peak Flow Blending on Disinfection and Treatment: A Case Study at Three Wastewater Treatment Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S. EPA study evaluated the impact on disinfection during peak flows (wet-weather flow events) when a portion of the flow to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bypasses secondary treatment prior to disinfection. The practice of bypassing secondary treatment during peak flo...

  19. Impact of Wet Weather Peak Flow Blending on Disinfection and Treatment: A Case Study at Three Wastewater Treatment Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    A U.S. EPA study evaluated the impact on disinfection during peak flows (wet-weather flow events) when a portion of the flow to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) bypasses secondary treatment prior to disinfection. The practice of bypassing secondary treatment during peak flo...

  20. 100 Years of Commitment to Children: Change and Continuity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rima

    The Foundation for Child Development (FCD) is the oldest philanthropy in the nation focused on improving the life prospects of children. This booklet, produced for FCD's centennial, describes the organization's origins and changes during the past 100 years. The booklet's sections, which include photographs, quotes, and a timeline, are: (1) "The…

  1. Centennial Calendar- 100 Years of the American Phytopathological Society

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    I edited a 40-page publication (calendar) that covered 18 chapters written by members of our society. This covered pioneering researchers, departments, and epidemics of the last 100 years of plant pathology in the U. S. This was given to all members of the American Phytopathological Society who att...

  2. Spring wheat gliadins: Have they changed in 100 years?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There have been many hard red spring (HRS) wheat cultivars released in North Dakota during the last 100 years. These cultivars have been improved for various characteristics such as, adaptation to weather conditions, high yield, and good milling and baking quality. The objectives of this study wer...

  3. Peak flow transitions from snowmelt to rainfall dominance along the Colorado Front Range: Spatial patterns and temporal trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, S. K.; Lefsky, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    For a given quantity of precipitation, its form (snow or rain) will affect the magnitude and timing of streamflow, with consequences for both water resource and flood management. Using 20 streamflow gaging stations along a gradient of snow persistence and elevation, we identify annual peak flow sources (snowmelt, rainfall, mixed) from a gridded snow accumulation and melt model. We then relate these peak flow sources to annual average January-June snow persistence (SP), evaluate whether peak flow sources have changed over time, and examine how peak flow magnitude and timing differ with flow source. Results show that watersheds with SP<0.3 (low snow, mean elevation <2000 m) have experienced only rainfall-runoff annual peak flows in the period of record, and watersheds with SP>0.7 (persistent snow, mean elevation >3100 m) have mostly snowmelt-runoff peak flows, with mixed sources between these thresholds. At all elevations, rainfall may produce the annual peak flow, but the likelihood of rainfall-runoff peaks declines with increasing SP. Regional Kendall trend tests show that the contributions of snowmelt to peak flows and total annual inputs have declined in the mixed zone but not in the snowmelt-dominated zone, where SP is still high enough for peak flows to remain snowmelt-dominated. While rainfall runoff has produced some of the highest unit area peak flows in the region, on average snowmelt runoff produces higher unit discharge and more attenuated hydrographs than rainfall runoff. This example illustrates how peak flow sources are most sensitive to loss of snow in elevations where snow transitions from persistent to intermittent, whereas high elevations still have long enough snow persistence that they have remained snowmelt-dominated.

  4. Geomorphic and hydrologic study of peak-flow management on the Cedar River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magirl, Christopher S.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Konrad, Christopher P.; Marineau, Mathieu D.

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the linkages between high-flow events, geomorphic response, and effects on stream ecology is critical to river management. High flows on the gravel-bedded Cedar River in Washington are important to the geomorphic function of the river; however, high flows can deleteriously affect salmon embryos incubating in streambed gravels. A geomorphic analysis of the Cedar River showed evidence of historical changes in river form over time and quantified the effects of anthropogenic alterations to the river corridor. Field measurements with accelerometer scour monitors buried in the streambed provided insight into the depth and timing of streambed scour during high-flow events. Combined with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, the recorded accelerometer disturbances allowed the prediction of streambed disturbance at the burial depth of Chinook and sockeye salmon egg pockets for different peak discharges. Insight gained from these analyses led to the development of suggested monitoring metrics for an ongoing geomorphic monitoring program on the Cedar River.

  5. Secondary Peak in Nusselt Number for Jet Impinging Flows: LES Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rabijit; Dewan, Anupam; Srinivasan, Balaji

    2013-11-01

    Jet impingement heat transfer is widely studied because of its industrial and as well as fundamental relevance. A secondary peak in Nusselt number at some distance away from the stagnation point is observed for both round and slot jet impingement flows at a small nozzle-to-plate spacing. Although various researchers have studied the reason behind this secondary peak, it is still an open question in the literature. We present large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent slot jet impingement heat transfer to gain further insight into the phenomenon of secondary peak in Nusselt number. Profiles of mean velocities, turbulent fluctuating velocities and Nusselt numbers have been analyzed along the impingement plate. A sudden increase in the wall normal turbulence fluctuations have been observed in the region where the secondary peak in Nusselt number occurs. Further, an analysis of vortex structures of the flow showed that the increase in the wall normal turbulence could be associated with the secondary vortex observed near the impingement wall. PhD candidate.

  6. Impacts of peat restoration on peak flow characteristics of upland headwater catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allott, Tim; Evans, Martin; Agnew, Clive; Milledge, Dave; Pilkington, Mike; Maskill, Rachael

    2014-05-01

    As part of the current focus on ecosystem services provided by peatlands, there is renewed interest in the hydrology of upland blanket peats and more specifically in the hydrological changes associated with peat erosion and restoration. Peat restoration has often been cited as having potential benefits for downstream flood risk through the reduction of peak flows and increases in storm hydrograph lag times. However, evidence of the impacts of peatland restoration practices on storm hydrology and downstream discharge peaks has been limited by lack of measurement of flow response following restoration programmes. This paper reports a hydrological monitoring programme associated with the restoration of a blanket peatland in the Peak District, UK through the practices of erosion gully blocking and the re-vegetation of bare peat. The main component of the project is a before-after-control-impact (BACI) study on three hectare-scale eroded, bare peat catchments, two of which have been restored and one of which is acting as an unmodified control. Monitoring commenced in early summer 2010, and restoration of the experimental sites by reseeding and gully blocking took place between July 2011 and March 2012. To complement the main study, a broader spatial comparison of the hydrological behaviour of catchments with different degradation and restoration conditions has been made, including (i) an intact reference peatland, (ii) the eroded/bare peat sites, and (iii) a 'late stage' restored area of peatland which was re-vegetated in 2003. Results reveal significant differences between the storm hydrograph characteristics of intact, eroded and restored catchments consistent with the hypotheses that (a) peat erosion significantly decreases storm flow lag times and increases storm flow peaks in these peatland systems and (b) peat restoration reverses these effects. Associated overland flow data suggest that gully blocking and re-vegetation within gully systems are crucial controls on

  7. A universal celebration: 100 years of Korotkoff sounds, 1905 - 2005.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Nasim H

    2005-12-01

    The measurement of systolic and diastolic blood pressure by auscultation was first described 100 years ago, when a young Russian army doctor, Nicolai Sergeevich Korotkoff, addressed a meeting at the Medical Academy of St. Petersburg on 8th November 1905. During the last hundred years, Korotkoff's contribution has proved to be one of the most useful methods in the diagnosis, treatment, monitoring and prevention of life threatening cardiovascular ailments and the centenary of his discovery should be celebrated universally. PMID:17153281

  8. Generalized Skew Coefficients of Annual Peak Flows for Rural, Unregulated Streams in West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkins, John T.; Wiley, Jeffrey B.; Paybins, Katherine S.

    2009-01-01

    Generalized skew was determined from analysis of records from 147 streamflow-gaging stations in or near West Virginia. The analysis followed guidelines established by the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data described in Bulletin 17B, except that stations having 50 or more years of record were used instead of stations with the less restrictive recommendation of 25 or more years of record. The generalized-skew analysis included contouring, averaging, and regression of station skews. The best method was considered the one with the smallest mean square error (MSE). MSE is defined as the following quantity summed and divided by the number of peaks: the square of the difference of an individual logarithm (base 10) of peak flow less the mean of all individual logarithms of peak flow. Contouring of station skews was the best method for determining generalized skew for West Virginia, with a MSE of about 0.2174. This MSE is an improvement over the MSE of about 0.3025 for the national map presented in Bulletin 17B.

  9. Statistical models for overdispersion in the frequency of peaks over threshold data for a flow series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastoe, Emma F.; Tawn, Jonathan A.

    2010-02-01

    In a peaks over threshold analysis of a series of river flows, a sufficiently high threshold is used to extract the peaks of independent flood events. This paper reviews existing, and proposes new, statistical models for both the annual counts of such events and the process of event peak times. The most common existing model for the process of event times is a homogeneous Poisson process. This model is motivated by asymptotic theory. However, empirical evidence suggests that it is not the most appropriate model, since it implies that the mean and variance of the annual counts are the same, whereas the counts appear to be overdispersed, i.e., have a larger variance than mean. This paper describes how the homogeneous Poisson process can be extended to incorporate time variation in the rate at which events occur and so help to account for overdispersion in annual counts through the use of regression and mixed models. The implications of these new models on the implied probability distribution of the annual maxima are also discussed. The models are illustrated using a historical flow series from the River Thames at Kingston.

  10. Ragnar Granit 100 years--memories and reflections.

    PubMed

    Kernell, D

    2000-12-01

    The Swedish-Finnish Nobel laureate Ragnar Granit, born 100 years ago, is commemorated in a brief article by one of his former PhD students and collaborators. After a short account of Granit's life and scientific career, special attention is given to Granit's role as a teacher in research training and his published thoughts on this matter, partly reflecting Granit's own experience as a "postdoc" in the laboratory of Sherrington (Oxford). The article includes personal recollections of how it was to work together with Granit in his laboratory. PMID:11232369

  11. Peak flow rate and recession-curve characteristics of a karst spring in the Inner Bluegrass, central Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Felton, G.K.; Currens, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The flow rate at the terminal spring of a 1929 ha karst ground-water catchment has been continuously monitored for 2 years, and 108 identifiable events were analyzed. The peak flow rates followed a beta frequency distribution with parameters ?? = 0.365 and ?? = 1.135. Events were separated into high-flow and low-flow. High-flow events had characteristics attributable to pipe flow. Correlation and stepwise regression were used to develop peak flow rate prediction equations for the combined 108 events and for the 81 low-flow events. The portion of the recession curve identified as pipe flow was a watershed constant and time invariant. The base flow was seasonal, increasing in the winter to approximately 0.071 m3s-1 and decreasing in the summer to approximately 0.014 m3s-1. ?? 1994.

  12. Relationship between the transition frequency of local fluid flow and the peak frequency of attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cheng-Hao; Zhang, Hong-Bing; Pan, Yi-Xin; Teng, Xin-Bao

    2016-03-01

    Local fluid flow (LFF) at the mesoscopic scale is the main dissipation mechanism of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous media within the seismic frequency band. LFF is easily influenced by the structure and boundary conditions of the porous media, which leads to different behaviors of the peak frequency of attenuation. The associated transition frequency can provide detailed information about the trend of LFF; therefore, research on the transition frequency of LFF and its relationship with the peak frequency of the corresponding attenuation (i.e., inverse of quality factor) facilitates the detailed understanding of the effect of inner structures and boundary conditions in porous media. In this study, we firstly obtain the transition frequency of fluid flux based on Biot's theory of poroelasticity and the fast Fourier transform algorithm in a sample containing one repeating unit cell (RUC). We then analyze changes of these two frequencies in porous media with different porous properties. Finally, we extend our analysis to the influence of the undrained boundary condition on the transition frequency and peak frequency in porous media with multiple RUCs. This setup can facilitate the understanding of the effect from the undrained boundary condition. Results demonstrate that these two frequencies have the same trend at low water saturation, but amplitude variations differ between the frequencies as the amount of saturation increases. However, for cases of high water saturation, both the trend and the amplitude variation of these two frequencies fit well with each other.

  13. Entropy-based snow network design for spring peak flow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, J.; Coulibaly, P. D.; Tapsoba, D.

    2015-12-01

    In northern regions the dominant phase of precipitation is snow, this precipitation persists and accumulates throughout the winter season until freshet. Quantitative information on snow, such as snow water equivalent and snow cover extent, is essential for water resources management in northern regions. Due to the inaccessibility and remoteness of snow course locations, snow surveys are usually expensive. Therefore an efficient network design strategy is required to provide a maximum amount of information while also minimizing the network cost. In this study, an entropy-based multiobjective optimization method is applied to design a snow network by adding new stations to the existing network in the La Grande River Basin of Quebec, Canada. Three hydrologic models, Sacramento, HBV, and HSAMI, are calibrated to 12 subwatersheds in the La Grande River Basin. Pareto optimal networks are given by the multiobjective optimization by maximizing joint entropy and minimizing total correlation. Each of the potential optimal networks is then evaluated using the calibrated hydrologic models to determine the most appropriate network for spring peak flow forecasting. The proposed methodology provides useful information for designing snow network appropriate for spring peak flow forecasting, which is essential for reservoir operation.

  14. Relation between respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function and peak flow variability in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Boezen, H. M.; Schouten, J. P.; Postma, D. S.; Rijcken, B.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A study was carried out to determine whether subjects with respiratory symptoms are more likely to have impaired lung function or increased airway lability, and to quantify these relationships in a population of adults. METHODS--Data were collected from 511 participants (aged 20-70 years) from the Dutch part of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). The symptoms analysed were: wheeze, dyspnoea > or = grade 3, nocturnal dyspnoea, cough and phlegm, and history of allergy. Lung function was measured by peak expiratory flow (PEF) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). PEF variability was used as an index for bronchial lability. RESULTS--Both FEV1 and PEF were decreased with increasing numbers of symptoms. Subjects with one symptom had an increased risk of having an FEV1 value of < 70% (OR = 4.2) and this risk increased with an increasing number of symptoms. Subjects with three or more symptoms had an increased risk of having a PEF value of < 70%, a diurnal variation in PEF of > 10% (both OR = 4.4), and an increased risk of high between day variation (OR = 6.6). CONCLUSIONS--Subject-reported symptoms are related to impaired lung function and to increased variability of peak flow. PMID:7701448

  15. Extending dry storage of spent LWR fuel for 100 years.

    SciTech Connect

    Einziger, R. E.

    1998-12-16

    Because of delays in closing the back end of the fuel cycle in the U.S., there is a need to extend dry inert storage of spent fuel beyond its originally anticipated 20-year duration. Many of the methodologies developed to support initial licensing for 20-year storage should be able to support the longer storage periods envisioned. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing information and methodologies to support dry storage up to 100 years. The thrust of the analysis is the potential behavior of the spent fuel. In the USA, the criteria for dry storage of LWR spent fuel are delineated in 10 CFR 72 [1]. The criteria fall into four general categories: maintain subcriticality, prevent the release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable levels, and maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. These criteria need to be considered for normal, off-normal, and postulated accident conditions. The initial safety analysis report submitted for licensing evaluated the fuel's ability to meet the requirements for 20 years. It is not the intent to repeat these calculations, but to look at expected behavior over the additional 80 years, during which the temperatures and radiation fields are lower. During the first 20 years, the properties of the components may change because of elevated temperatures, presence of moisture, effects of radiation, etc. During normal storage in an inert atmosphere, there is potential for the cladding mechanical properties to change due to annealing or interaction with cask materials. The emissivity of the cladding could also change due to storage conditions. If there is air leakage into the cask, additional degradation could occur through oxidation in breached rods, which could lead to additional fission gas release and enlargement of cladding breaches. Air in-leakage could also affect cover gas conductivity, cladding oxidation, emissivity changes, and

  16. Revisiting the 100 Year Old Radioactivity Lectures of Frederick Soddy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Between 1908 and 1922, Frederick Soddy, MA., FRS (Dr. Lee`s Professor of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Univ. of Oxford) published four editions of a compendium of his experimental lectures delivered at the University of Glasgow, under the title ``The Interpretation of Radium, and the Structure of the Atom''. Professor Soddy taught his students about `radium writing' and the emanation of radium. He presented a radium clock designed by Professor Strutt; showed students `Pleochroic Halos'; and described the separation of `ionium' from its isotope, thorium. The process of constructing a cohesive logic to empirical observations of this newly discovered phenomenon of radioactivity was a challenging one. Some aspects did not stand the test of time. However, revisiting these lectures after 100 years gives us fascinating insight into the mental processes of the early pioneers in radioactivity.

  17. Opening the 100-Year Window for Time-Domain Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grindlay, Jonathan; Tang, Sumin; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2012-04-01

    The large-scale surveys such as PTF, CRTS and Pan-STARRS-1 that have emerged within the past 5 years or so employ digital databases and modern analysis tools to accentuate research into Time Domain Astronomy (TDA). Preparations are underway for LSST which, in another 6 years, will usher in the second decade of modern TDA. By that time the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) project will have made available to the community the full sky Historical TDA database and digitized images for a century (1890-1990) of coverage. We describe the current DASCH development and some initial results, and outline plans for the ``production scanning'' phase and data distribution which is to begin in 2012. That will open a 100-year window into temporal astrophysics, revealing rare transients and (especially) astrophysical phenomena that vary on time-scales of a decade. It will also provide context and archival comparisons for the deeper modern surveys.

  18. A regression approach to the analysis of serial peak flow among fuel oil ash exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Hauser, R; Daskalakis, C; Christiani, D C

    1996-10-01

    We investigated the association between exposure to fuel oil ash and acute airway obstruction in 31 boilermakers and 31 utility workers during the overhaul of a large oil-fired boiler. Air flow was assessed with self-recorded serial peak expiratory flow rate measurements (PEFR) using a mini-Wright meter. Exposure to thoracic particulates with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 gm or smaller (PM10) was assessed using personal sampling devices and detailed work diaries. All subjects were male, with an average age of 43 yr, and an average of 18 yr at their current trade. Average PM10 exposure on work days was 2.75 mg/m3 for boilermakers and 0.57 mg/m3 for utility workers. Three daily PEFR measurements (start-of-shift, end-of-shift, and bed-time) were analyzed simultaneously, using Huber linear regression. After adjustment for job title, welder status, age, height, smoking, and weld-years, for each mg/m3 increase in PM10, the estimated decline in PEFR was 13.2 L/min (p = 0.008) for end-of-shift, 9.9 L/min (p = 0.045) for bed-time, and 6.6 L/min (p = 0.26) for start-of-shift of the following day. This decline of the exposure effect over the 24-h period that follows was statistically significant (p = 0.004). No other factors were found to significantly modify the effect of exposure. Our results suggest that occupational exposure to fuel oil ash is associated with significant acute decrements in peak flow. PMID:8887594

  19. Regional analysis of the mean annual maximum peak flow in South West Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Thomas; Cooper, David

    2010-05-01

    The work reported here is a pilot study carried out as part of the EU FP7 project Mirage, and aims to derive flood frequency relationships for temporary rivers in the Mediterranean region. Regional studies of flood characteristics are often limited to national, or even sub-national, regions. Reasons for these spatially limited studies are manifold, but include: lack of international co-operation, difficulties in getting access to hydrometric data from other countries, and inconsistencies in national datasets for deriving catchment characteristics. As part of this study, preliminary regional datasets from south-west Europe of flood statistics and relevant catchment descriptors have been derived. The annual maximum peak flow data have been obtained from the UNESCO/FRIEND project and includes 381 time series of daily river flow from Portugal, Spain and southern France. Note that a majority of these data comes from perennial rivers. The catchment descriptors including catchment area, mean annual rainfall, soil properties and land-use characteristics. These characteristics have been derived from pan-European dataset including the SRTM (90m) dtm, gridded precipitation data from CRU (18km), the JRC soil database (1km) and CORINE land-cover data (250m). The logarithm of the mean annual maximum peak flow (QBAR) has been linked to a subset of log-transformed catchment descriptors using a linear regression-type model, including correlation in both observations and regression model errors. The existence of model error correlation suggests that the data contains more between-catchment variation in QBAR than can be explained by the catchment descriptors alone. Thus, further research is needed to identify additional explanatory variables with the potential to be made available on a pan-European scale.

  20. The effect of drain blocking on dissolved organic carbon under the peak flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhang, zhuoli

    2014-05-01

    There are numerous studies that have shown increasing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration down stream of upland peat catchments (eg. Worrall et al., 2007; Clark et al., 2007; Gibson et al., 200). In the UK, upland peat soils are both an important water source and an important carbon store, therefore, the transportation of DOC from soil to the aquatic system remains a critical part of the impact that upland peat environments have on wider society. The majority of the DOC is delivered from the peat soil during the peak flow events (Clark et al., 2008), however, most of the storm events analysis has been developed for organo-mineral soil rather than for peat soil catchments. Worrall et al., (2007) suggested that drain blocking as a potential method for controlling DOC release from peat soil. An events analysis was conducted on the drain blocking data collected from 2008 to 2010 from Cronkley Fell (UK National grid reference NY 83800 26996). A total of 756 peak flow events were chosen to access the impact of drain blocking on DOC concentration and flux during the events. The data was analysed by the combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and end member mixing analysis (EMMA). The results showed that during the peak flow events, the effects of drain blocking was minimised by the rapid flushing of the event water: the DOC concentration on storm events increased after blocking rather than decreased; DOC flux did decrease after blocking but rather as a result of the increased volume of the event water. Worrall, F., Armstrong, A., Holden, J., 2007. Short term impact of peat drain blocking on water color, dissolved organic carbon concentration and water table depth. Journal of Hydrology 337,315-325 Clark, J.M., Lane, S.N., Chapman, P.J., Adamson, J.K., 2007. Export of dissolved organic carbon from an upland peat during storm events: Implication for flux estimates. Journal of Hydrology 347, 438-447. Aitkenhead, J.A., McDowell, W. H., 2000. Soil C: N ratio

  1. Overuse syndrome in musicians--100 years ago. An historical review.

    PubMed

    Fry, H J

    Overuse syndrome in musicians was extensively reported 100 years ago. The clinical features and results of treatment, which were recorded in considerable detail, match well the condition that is described today. The medical literature that is reviewed here extends from 1830 to 1911 and includes 21 books and 54 articles from the English language literature, apart from two exceptions; however, the writers of the day themselves reviewed French, German and Italian literature on the subject. The disorder was said to result from the overuse of the affected parts. Two theories of aetiology, not necessarily mutually exclusive, were argued. The central theory regarded the lesion as being in the central nervous system, the peripheral theory implied a primary muscle disorder. No serious case was put forward for a psychogenic origin, though emotional factors were believed to aggravate the condition. Advances in musical instrument manufacture--particularly the development of the concert piano and the clarinet--may have played a part in the prevalence of overuse syndrome in musicians. Total rest from the mechanical use of the hand was the only effective treatment recorded. PMID:3540544

  2. Colloquium: 100 years of mass spectrometry: Perspectives and future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Simon; Jjunju, Fred P. M.; Taylor, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is widely regarded as the most sensitive and specific general purpose analytical technique. More than a century has passed for MS since the ground-breaking work of Nobel laureate Sir Joseph John Thomson in 1913. This Colloquium aims to (1) give an historical overview of the major instrumentation achievements that have driven mass spectrometry forward in the past century, including those leading up to the initial work of Thomson, (2) provide the nonspecialist with an introduction to MS, and (3) highlight some key applications of MS and explore the current and future trends. Because of the vastness of the subject area and quality of the manifold research efforts that have been undertaken over the last 100 years, which have contributed to the foundations and subsequent advances in mass spectrometry, it should be understood that not all of the key contributions may have been included in this Colloquium. Mass spectrometry has embraced a multitude of scientific disciplines and to recognize all of the achievements is an impossible task, such has been the diverse impact of this invaluable technique. Scientific progress is usually made via the cumulative effort of a large number of researchers; the achievements reported herein are only a representation of that effort.

  3. 100 years of Belgian rainfall: are there trends?

    PubMed

    Vaes, G; Willems, P; Berlamont, J

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 the digitisation of old rainfall records of measurements at Uccle (Belgium) was completed, which resulted in a unique rainfall series of 100 years (period 1898-1997). This is an ideal opportunity to search for trends in the rainfall over the last century. Large variations in rainfall probability over the century have been observed. For small aggregation levels there is a small decrease in extreme rainfall events over the century. For large aggregation levels there is a more explicit increase in extreme rainfall. Because the rainfall on seasonal aggregation level is only slightly increased, the increase in extreme rainfall events for aggregation levels between a few days and a few months can only occur due to larger clustering. However, the final conclusion is that no significant trend can be observed. A pure random variation of the rainfall can cause equally large variations. This does not exclude a possible trend in flooding frequency, due to the strong increase in urbanisation over the last century. PMID:11888184

  4. Slope restoration for a 100-year old canal

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, R.L.; Lewis, S.W.; Liebersbach, D.C.

    1995-12-31

    Turlock Irrigation District (TID) is located in the northern portion of the fertile San Joaquin Valley of California. TID`s primary water supply is conveyed from the 100-year-old LaGrange Diversion Dam via their historic Upper Main Canal. The original canal was constructed by excavating into slate bedrock for the uphill (cut) bank, and constructing unmortared rock walls and rock fill for the downhill (fill) embankment; the excavation was then lined with concrete. Soil fill raises of the downhill embankment over the last 30 years have reduced the slope stability to unacceptable levels in the steepest embankment areas. In March of 1994, two surficial slides prompted investigation of the long term embankment stability in the Warehouse Slide Area. Based on results of analysis for various stabilization scenarios, TID chose a stabilization method which included: (1) excavation of an access bench below the existing canal, (2) installation of steel pipe piles through the existing rock fill and into the bedrock, (3) construction of a mechanically stabilized earth (MSE) retaining wall and (4) construction of a soil-cement canal roadway pavement. The design was chosen by the owner because of cost competitiveness compared to other design alternatives and because the construction sequence allowed uninterrupted use of the canal. By using local river cobble for the MSE wall facing material, TID met the desired 50-year design life of the repair while maintaining the area`s historic visual features.

  5. Estimation of instantaneous peak flow from daily data using the HBV model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Haberlandt, Uwe

    2015-04-01

    The length of the observed instantaneous peak flow (IPF) period has a great influence on the flood design whereas these high resolution flow data are not always available. Our previous research has shown that IPFs can be derived from the easier available observed long time series of mean daily flows (MDFs) using a multiple regression model. The primary aim here is to explore the possibility of deriving frequency distributions of IPFs using hydrological modelling with daily and hourly time steps in comparison. In the post-correction approach the rainfall-runoff model is operated on daily time steps , a flood frequency distribution is fitted to the simulated annual MDFs and the resulting daily quantiles are transferred into IPF quantiles using the multiple regression model. In the pre-processing approach, hourly rainfall is produced by disaggregation of daily data. Then the rainfall-runoff model is operated on hourly time steps resulting in a frequency distribution of IPFs. In addition, two calibrations strategies for the hydrological model using the hydrograph and using flow statistics, respectively, are applied for both approaches. Finally, the performances of estimating the IPFs from daily data using these two approaches are compared considering also the two different calibration strategies. The hydrological simulations are carried out with the HBV-IWW model and the case study is carried out for 18 catchments of the Aller-Leine-River basin in northern Germany. The results show that: (1) the multiple regression model is capable to predict IPFs with the simulated MDFs as well; (2) the estimation of extreme flow quantiles in summer is not as good as in winter; (3) both of the two approaches enable a reasonable estimation of IPFs; (4) if on hand the hydrological model is calibrated on the hydrograph the post-correction approach with daily simulations is superior and if on the other hand the model is calibrated on flow statistics the pre-processing with hourly

  6. Global change and water resources in the next 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. C.; Hirsch, R. M.

    2010-03-01

    We are in the midst of a continental-scale, multi-year experiment in the United States, in which we have not defined our testable hypotheses or set the duration and scope of the experiment, which poses major water-resources challenges for the 21st century. What are we doing? We are expanding population at three times the national growth rate in our most water-scarce region, the southwestern United States, where water stress is already great and modeling predicts decreased streamflow by the middle of this century. We are expanding irrigated agriculture from the west into the east, particularly to the southeastern states, where increased competition for ground and surface water has urban, agricultural, and environmental interests at odds, and increasingly, in court. We are expanding our consumption of pharmaceutical and personal care products to historic high levels and disposing them in surface and groundwater, through sewage treatment plants and individual septic systems. These substances are now detectable at very low concentrations and we have documented significant effects on aquatic species, particularly on fish reproduction function. We don’t yet know what effects on human health may emerge, nor do we know if we need to make large investments in water treatment systems, which were not designed to remove these substances. These are a few examples of our national-scale experiment. In addition to these water resources challenges, over which we have some control, climate change models indicate that precipitation and streamflow patterns will change in coming decades, with western mid-latitude North America generally drier. We have already documented trends in more rain and less snow in western mountains. This has large implications for water supply and storage, and groundwater recharge. We have documented earlier snowmelt peak spring runoff in northeastern and northwestern States, and western montane regions. Peak runoff is now about two weeks earlier than it was

  7. Estimating an Impedance-to-Flow Parameter for Flood Peak Prediction in Semi-Arid Watersheds 1997

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The time of concentration equation used in Pima County, Arizona, includes a hydrologic parameter representing the impedance to flow for peak discharge estimation on small (<10 mi2) semiarid watersheds. The impedance-to-flow parameter is similar in function to the hydraulic Manning’s n roughness coef...

  8. Mean annual runoff and peak flow estimates based on channel geometry of streams in northeastern and western Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Omang, R.J.; Hull, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for estimating mean annual runoff and peak discharge from measurements of channel geometry were developed for western and northeastern Montana. The study area was divided into two regions for the mean annual runoff analysis, and separate multiple-regression equations were developed for each region. The active-channel width was determined to be the most important independent variable in each region. The standard error of estimate for the estimating equation using active-channel width was 61 percent in the Northeast Region and 38 percent in the West region. The study area was divided into six regions for the peak discharge analysis, and multiple regression equations relating channel geometry and basin characteristics to peak discharges having recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 years were developed for each region. The standard errors of estimate for the regression equations using only channel width as an independent variable ranged from 35 to 105 percent. The standard errors improved in four regions as basin characteristics were added to the estimating equations. (USGS)

  9. Trends in the First Two Moments of Peak Flow Data in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, N. A.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently updating California's flood frequency statistics, for the first time in 30 years. This much overdue project is necessary to not only help protect lives and property, but for the effective planning management, and use of the State's land and water resources, both of which are coming under unprecedented demand in the 21st Century. This new study has the benefit of using an additional 30 years of peak discharge data, as well as new methodologies for incorporating historical floods to more accurately predict characteristics of flood frequency distributions. Yet with global climate change likely to affect long-term streamflow characteristics, a fundamental assumption of flood frequency analysis- stationarity(no systematic change over time) of the annual flood data--is being questioned. To test whether the first two moments (mean and standard deviation) required to fit probability distributions to annual peak flow data are stationary, trends in the moments over three different periods, will be examined at currently operated or recently discontinued (through water year 2006) USGS stream-gaging stations. All stations included in this trend analysis will be stream sites that the USGS database indicates have no upstream regulation or diversion effects, nor any significant effects due to urbanization. Thus these sites will represent unregulated systems for which trends, if any, would most likely be the result of changing climate forcings. To ensure that the sampled moments are reasonably stable and reliable representatives of the population moments, a 30-year record period will be used to calculate the mean and standard deviation. The three different periods selected for testing trends will cover the past 30 years (1977-2006), the past 40 years (1967-2006), and the past 50 years (1957-2006). For each successive year in the trend test period, the mean and standard deviation will be calculated using a sliding-window basis using

  10. Investigating the impact of land cover change on peak river flow in UK upland peat catchments, based on modelled scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jihui; Holden, Joseph; Kirkby, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Changes to land cover can influence the velocity of overland flow. In headwater peatlands, saturation means that overland flow is a dominant source of runoff, particularly during heavy rainfall events. Human modifications in headwater peatlands may include removal of vegetation (e.g. by erosion processes, fire, pollution, overgrazing) or pro-active revegetation of peat with sedges such as Eriophorum or mosses such as Sphagnum. How these modifications affect the river flow, and in particular the flood peak, in headwater peatlands is a key problem for land management. In particular, the impact of the spatial distribution of land cover change (e.g. different locations and sizes of land cover change area) on river flow is not clear. In this presentation a new fully distributed version of TOPMODEL, which represents the effects of distributed land cover change on river discharge, was employed to investigate land cover change impacts in three UK upland peat catchments (Trout Beck in the North Pennines, the Wye in mid-Wales and the East Dart in southwest England). Land cover scenarios with three typical land covers (i.e. Eriophorum, Sphagnum and bare peat) having different surface roughness in upland peatlands were designed for these catchments to investigate land cover impacts on river flow through simulation runs of the distributed model. As a result of hypothesis testing three land cover principles emerged from the work as follows: Principle (1): Well vegetated buffer strips are important for reducing flow peaks. A wider bare peat strip nearer to the river channel gives a higher flow peak and reduces the delay to peak; conversely, a wider buffer strip with higher density vegetation (e.g. Sphagnum) leads to a lower peak and postpones the peak. In both cases, a narrower buffer strip surrounding upstream and downstream channels has a greater effect than a thicker buffer strip just based around the downstream river network. Principle (2): When the area of change is equal

  11. 323 Annual Change of Peak Expiratory Flow Rate in Asthma and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kwang H. A.; Lee, Kye Young

    2012-01-01

    Background Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) is a useful measurement for the follow-up examination in a chronic airway disease because it has the advantage of simple measuring and repetitive examination. The aim of this study is to examine the annual decrease of PEFR in asthma and COPD patients and to confirm the factors which influence the annual decreasing rate of PEFR. Methods From May, 2003 to September, 2010, the annual decreasing rate of PEFR is obtained from the asthma and COPD patients attending an outpatient pulmonary clinic. PEFR was measured using Mini-Wright (Clement Clarke International Ltd. UK). We conducted an analysis of the factors to influence on the change of PEFR and the average of it. Results The result indicated decrease of 3.72 ± 12.55 L/min annually in the asthmatic patient and decrease of 8.69 ± 8.87 L/min annually in the COPD patient. In the asthma, age and FEV1 are the predictive factor to influence on the change, on the other hand, age, FEV1, smoking and the number of aggravation are the factors in the COPD. Conclusions We could confirm the annual decreasing rate in patients of chronic airway disease and similar factor with FEV1 to influence on the change.

  12. Effect of swimming on peak expiratory flow rate of atopic children.

    PubMed

    Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Shirkhoda, Shima; Nakhjavani, Mina; Mozafari, Habibeh

    2009-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the role of swimming on mechanic of lung in healthy individual and patients with asthma. A total 76 girls who took part in the course of regular swimming session three day per week for eight weeks enrolled in this study. All of them completed ISAAC written questionnaire and individual who was suspected of asthma or other atopic diseases was referred to allergist for more evaluation. Peak expiratory flow rate was recorded for participants at beginning, one hour after swimming and two months later. According to ISAAC questionnaire 35.4% had asthma or other atopic diseases. Increase in PEFR more than 20% of personal best was seen in 21.9% after one hour swimming and in 27.6% after two months. Increase in PEFR was significant in healthy individual and asthmatic patients and obese but was not significant in patients with allergic rhinitis or eczema. This study suggests swimming in indoor pool is useful for patients with asthma in spite of potential toxic role of chlorine in exacerbation of asthma symptoms and lung mechanics. PMID:19671943

  13. Peak flow rate records in the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to colophony.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, P S; O'Brien, I M; Harries, M G

    1979-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) has been measured hourly from waking to sleeping in 29 workers with respiratory symptoms exposed to the fumes of soft soldering fluxes containing colophony (pine resin). Thirty-nine records of mean length 33 days have been analysed, and the results compared with the occupational history and bronchial provocation testing in the same workers. From plots of daily mean, maximum, and minimum PEFR, recurring physiological patterns of asthma emerge. The most common pattern is for asthma to increase with each successive working day. Some workers have an equivalent deterioration each working day. Regular recovery patterns taking one, two, and three days are described. The combination of a three-day recovery pattern and a late asthmatic reaction on Monday results in Monday being the best day of each week. Assessment of these records has shown them to be specific and sensitive, provided the worker was not taking corticosteroids or sodium cromoglycate during the period of the record and that bronchodilator usage was kept constant on days at home and at work. The results of the PEFR records correlate well with bronchial provocation testing, and provide a suitable alternative to this for the diagnosis of mild to moderate occupational asthma. The records are of particular use for screening symptomatic workers whose symptoms appear unlikely to be related to work. PMID:483205

  14. Daily air pollution effects on children's respiratory symptoms and peak expiratory flow

    SciTech Connect

    Vedal, S.; Schenker, M.B.; Munoz, A.; Samet, J.M.; Batterman, S.; Speizer, F.E.

    1987-06-01

    To identify acute respiratory health effects associated with air pollution due to coal combustion, a subgroup of elementary school-aged children was selected from a large cross-sectional study and followed daily for eight months. Children were selected to obtain three equal-sized groups: one without respiratory symptoms, one with symptoms of persistent wheeze, and one with cough or phlegm production but without persistent wheeze. Parents completed a daily diary of symptoms from which illness constellations of upper respiratory illness (URI) and lower respiratory illness (LRI) and the symptom of wheeze were derived. Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) was measured daily for nine consecutive weeks during the eight-month study period. Maximum hourly concentrations of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and coefficient of haze for each 24-hour period, as well as minimum hourly temperature, were correlated with daily URI, LRI, wheeze, and PEFR using multiple regression models adjusting for illness occurrence or level of PEFR on the immediately preceding day. Respiratory illness on the preceding day was the most important predictor of current illness. A drop in temperature was associated with increased URI and LRI but not with increased wheeze or with a decrease in level of PEFR. No air pollutant was strongly associated with respiratory illness or with level of PEFR, either in the group of children as a whole, or in either of the symptomatic subgroups; the pollutant concentrations observed, however, were uniformly lower than current ambient air quality standards.

  15. Effect of Cigarette and Cigar Smoking on Peak Expiratory Flow Rate

    PubMed Central

    Medabala, Tambi; B.N., Rao; Mohesh M.I., Glad; Kumar M., Praveen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tobacco smoking in India has been increasing alarmingly. Smoking is a known risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular diseases and certain cancers, especially, the lung cancer. The percentage prevalence of cigarette smoking (18.5%) and cigar smoking (4%) in males is high in Andhra Pradesh compared to other southern states. There is not enough scientific literature to correlate about intensity of cigarette and cigar smoking and their impact on lung function though high prevalence is reported in Andhra Pradesh, India. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine whether PEFR differs between cigarette and cigar smokers compared to non-smokers and also to estimate the intensity of cigarette and cigar smoking on PEFR. Methods: PEFR was recorded in cigarette smokers (n=49) and cigar smokers (n=10) as well as in non-smokers (n=64) using Wright’s mini Peak Flow Meter. Results: PEFR is decreased in both cigarette as well in cigar smokers compared to non-smokers and the magnitude of decline was higher in cigar smoking elderly individuals. Conclusion: The intensity of cigarette and cigar smoking (pack-years) emerged as the main variable to influence airway obstruction in smokers that caused greater reduction in PEFR. PMID:24179889

  16. [The usefulness of the Peak Flow Meter for assessing patients with acute respiratory disease].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Torices, J C; Diego Domínguez, F; Franch Nadal, J; Alvarez Guisasola, F; Pablo Pons, M L

    1990-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the utility of the extrahospital use of "Peak Flow Meter" (PFM) in patients with an acute respiratory disease. 70 patients were studied. PFM, arterial gasometry, physical examination and dyspnea evaluation were performed on all of them. The PFM were posteriorly transformed into the rate related to the ideal result, following the Nunn and Gregg equation (1989). We found an association between the PFM rate and the different arterial blood gas test results, and a relation to the degree of dyspnea and the listening of sibilant rales. There was more significance with the rate of PFM than with the PFM transformed in all cases, and only association was found between arterial blood changes and PFM. We concluded that all patients with an acute respiratory disease with a rate of PFM greater than 50% should be evaluated carefully because of the probability of existing hypoxemia, and those with rate of less than 20% must be referred to hospital. PMID:2103210

  17. Development of flood regressions and climate change scenarios to explore estimates of future peak flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Smith, Martyn J.; Freehafer, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    The application uses predictions of future annual precipitation from five climate models and two future greenhouse gas emissions scenarios and provides results that are averaged over three future periods—2025 to 2049, 2050 to 2074, and 2075 to 2099. Results are presented in ensemble form as the mean, median, maximum, and minimum values among the five climate models for each greenhouse gas emissions scenario and period. These predictions of future annual precipitation are substituted into either the precipitation variable or a water balance equation for runoff to calculate potential future peak flows. This application is intended to be used only as an exploratory tool because (1) the regression equations on which the application is based have not been adequately tested outside the range of the current climate and (2) forecasting future precipitation with climate models and downscaling these results to a fine spatial resolution have a high degree of uncertainty. This report includes a discussion of the assumptions, uncertainties, and appropriate use of this exploratory application.

  18. Environmental exposure to air pollution and allergens and peak flow changes.

    PubMed

    Higgins, B G; Francis, H C; Yates, C; Warburton, C J; Fletcher, A M; Pickering, C A; Woodcock, A A

    2000-07-01

    Laboratory-based studies have shown that ozone and nitrogen dioxide can potentiate the effect of allergen in sensitized asthmatic subjects, but it is not known whether this interaction is important under natural exposure conditions. Thirty-five subjects with clinical diagnoses of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and with a provocative dose causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second methacholine <12.25 micromol (using the Yan method) kept peak expiratory flow (PEF) records for a 4-week period during late summer, with concurrent measurement of spore and pollen counts and pollution levels. Multiple regression analysis was then used to determine the effect on PEF of aeroallergen, and of the interaction between aeroallergen and pollutant levels. A statistically significant interaction was demonstrated between total spore count and ozone, but not nitrogen dioxide. Mean PEF fell in association with increasing spore count (same-day and 24-h lag level) and PEF variability increased with increasing spore count (24-h lag level only); both changes were greater the higher the prior ozone level. These results suggest that ozone can potentiate the effect of aeroallergens in subjects with bronchial hyperreactivity under natural exposure conditions. However, the effect was small, and the clinical significance of the interaction requires further study. PMID:10933086

  19. [Effect of fog on diurnal changes in peak expiratory flow rates in an asthmatic].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Honma, S; Imada, A; Sugaya, F; Nishi, M; Abe, S

    1995-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of fog on asthmatics, we analyzed the symptoms of a 45-year-old female during the foggy season and the relation between diurnal peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and fog and other meteorological factors. Her asthma attacks had been induced by specific smells: perfume, smoke from burning grass or industrial smoke. Two years previously, she had moved to the suburbs of Sapporo, where fog frequently occurs. From that time her asthmatic symptoms had been exacerbated, so it was suspected that the fog might have had some influence. We analyzed 251 measures of PEFR from June to August 1994. The average and standard deviation of PEFR in the absence of fog and specific smells was 403 +/- 40 L/min (n = 195). PEFR was significantly lower (p < 0.01) when it was foggy (347 +/- 60 L/min; n = 40), when specific smells were present (333 +/- 60 L/min; n = 5) and when there were both fog and specific smells (340 +/- 53 L/min: n = 11). On the other hand, there were no changes associated with other meteorological factors: barometric pressures, relative humidity, mean temperature, minimal temperature and most frequent wind direction. These results suggested that the inhalation of fog decreases PEFR and is an exacerbating factor in bronchial asthma. PMID:7726750

  20. Progress of Cometary Science in the Past 100 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek

    1999-01-01

    Enormous strides made by cometary science during the 20th century defy any meaningful comparison of its state 100 years ago and now. The great majority of the subfields enjoying much attention nowadays did not exist in the year 1900. Dramatic developments, especially in the past 30-50 years, have equally affected observational and theoretical studies of comets. The profound diversification of observing techniques has been documented by the ever widening limits on the electromagnetic spectrum covered. While the time around 1900 marked an early period of slow and painful experimentation with photographic methods in cometary studies, observations of comets from the x-ray region to the radio waves have by now become routine. Many of the new techniques, and all those involved with the wavelengths shorter than about 300 nm, were made possible by another major breakthrough of this century - observing from space. Experiments on dedicated Earth-orbiting satellites as well as several deep-space probes have provided fascinating new information on the nature and makeup of comets. In broader terms, much of the progress has been achieved thanks to fundamental discoveries and major advances in electronics, whose applications resulted in qualitatively new instruments (e.g. radiotelescopes) and sensors or detectors (e.g. CCD arrays). The most universal effect on the entire cometary science, from observing to data handling to quantitative interpretations, has been, as in any other branch of science, due to the introduction of electronic computers, with their processing capabilities not only unheard of, but literally unimaginable, in the age of classical desk calculators. As if all this should not be enough, the today's generations of comet scientists have, in addition, been blessed with nature's highly appreciated cooperation. Indeed, in the span of a dozen years, between 1985 and 1997, we were privileged to witness four remarkable cometary events: (i) a return of Halley

  1. Effects of air stacking on pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong-Hwa; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of air stacking on pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with cervical spinal cord injury. [Subjects] Twenty-six patients were included in the study and were randomized into experimental (n = 14) and control (n = 12) groups. [Methods] Both groups performed therapeutic exercises: the control group performed incentive spirometry, while the experimental group performed 20 repetitions of air stacking exercise twice a day. The training for both groups continued for 5 days a week for 6 weeks. [Results] Forced vital capacity and peak cough flow increased significantly in the experimental group compared to the controls. All within-group variables in the experimental group differed significantly at 6 weeks compared to baseline, while in the control group only Forced vital capacity differed significantly at 6 weeks compared to baseline. [Conclusion] Air stacking exercise significantly improved pulmonary function and peak cough flow in patients with a cervical spinal cord injury. PMID:26180355

  2. Ernst Mach on the vestibular organ 100 years ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henn, V.; Young, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The paper reviews the contributions of Ernst Mach to vestibular research. His experiments, mainly psychophysical in nature, included measurements of threshold and investigation of the vestibular-visual interaction. Among his conclusions are that the adequate stimulus for the semicircular canals must be pressure, and that the sustained endolymph flow theory of Breuer (1874) and Crum Brown (1874) is erroneous. Excerpts are given of Mach's publications on vestibular functions.-

  3. Mechanical insufflation-exsufflation. Comparison of peak expiratory flows with manually assisted and unassisted coughing techniques.

    PubMed

    Bach, J R

    1993-11-01

    Pulmonary complications are major causes of morbidity and mortality for patients with severe expiratory muscle weakness. The purpose of this study was to compare peak cough expiratory flows (PCEFs) during unassisted and assisted coughing and review the long-term use of mechanical insufflation-exsufflation (MI-E) for 46 neuromuscular ventilator users. These individuals used noninvasive methods of ventilatory support for a mean of 21.1 h/d for 17.3 +/- 15.5 years. They relied on manually assisted coughing and/or MI-E during periods of productive airway secretion. They reported a mean of 0.7 +/- 1.2 cases of pneumonia and other serious pulmonary complications and 2.8 +/- 5.6 hospitalizations during the 16.4-year period and no complications of MI-E. A sample of 21 of these patients with a mean forced vital capacity of 490 +/- 370 ml had a mean maximum insufflation capacity (MIC) achieved by a combination of air stacking of ventilator insufflations and glossopharyngeal breathing of 1,670 +/- 540 ml. The PCEFs for this sample were: following an unassisted inspiration, 1.81 +/- 1.03 L/s; following a MIC maneuver, 3.37 +/- 1.07 L/s; with manual assistance by abdominal compression following a MIC maneuver, 4.27 +/- 1.29 L/s; and with MI-E, 7.47 +/- 1.02 L/s. Each PCEF was significantly greater than the preceding, respectively (p < 0.01). We conclude that manually assisted coughing and MI-E are effective and safe methods for facilitating airway secretion clearance for neuromuscular ventilator users who would otherwise be managed by endotracheal suctioning. Severely decreased MIC, but not necessarily vital capacity, is an indication for tracheostomy. PMID:8222823

  4. Geomorphic response of rivers to glacial retreat and increasing peak flows downstream from Mount Rainier, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuba, J. A.; Barnas, C. R.; Magirl, C. S.; Voss, F. D.

    2010-12-01

    On Mount Rainier, Washington, the National Park Service has documented widespread aggradation of as much as 10 m since the early 20th century, of rivers draining the glaciated stratovolcano. This rapid sedimentation appears to be related to glacial retreat and also may be a function of the increased magnitude and timing of peak flows that mobilize and transport sediment. We are conducting an assessment of the Puget Lowland rivers that drain Mount Rainier, 25-100 km downstream from the park boundary, to document the geomorphic response of the downstream reaches given the widespread aggradation upstream. These downstream reaches provide critical aquatic habitat for spawning and rearing of several species of salmonids, including endangered Chinook salmon and steelhead. Fluvial sedimentation can have both deleterious and beneficial effects on aquatic habitat depending on sediment particle size, river slope and width, and river management. To date, our work shows sedimentation of as much as 2 m between 1984 and 2009 in these lowland rivers. Aggradation rates that were calculated by comparing channel change at 156 cross sections, ranged between 4.8 and 9.1 cm/yr in reaches where rivers exit the mountain front and enter the lowland. Analysis of streamflow-gaging station data from throughout the watersheds draining Mount Rainier show rapid incision and aggradation, suggesting pulses of coarse-grained bedload may be moving down the mountainous rivers as kinetic waves. Preliminary results, however, seem to indicate that the rivers in the Puget Lowland have not yet experienced significant widespread sedimentation directly related to glacial retreat. Estimating the time of arrival of mobilized alluvium is a critical need for resource managers given the potential effects of sedimentation on river flood-conveyance capacity, fish habitat, and estuarine wetlands.

  5. A technique for estimating heights reached by the 100-year flood on unregulated, nontidal streams in North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coble, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method for estimating the heights reached by floods having a recurrence interval of 100 years is defined for nontidal streams with unregulated flows in North Carolina. The flood heights are the vertical distance between stream stage at median discharge (50 percent duration) and the 100-year flood stage and are defined for streams draining areas between 1 and 10,000 square miles for each of the three physiographic areas in the State. An illustrated example of how the method can be used in conjunction with topographic maps to estimate flood heights and delineate inundated areas by interpolation is given.

  6. Regional regression equations to estimate peak-flow frequency at sites in North Dakota using data through 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Sether, Tara

    2015-01-01

    Annual peak-flow frequency data from 231 U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in North Dakota and parts of Montana, South Dakota, and Minnesota, with 10 or more years of unregulated peak-flow record, were used to develop regional regression equations for exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.20, 0.10, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, and 0.002 using generalized least-squares techniques. Updated peak-flow frequency estimates for 262 streamflow-gaging stations were developed using data through 2009 and log-Pearson Type III procedures outlined by the Hydrology Subcommittee of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data. An average generalized skew coefficient was determined for three hydrologic zones in North Dakota. A StreamStats web application was developed to estimate basin characteristics for the regional regression equation analysis. Methods for estimating a weighted peak-flow frequency for gaged sites and ungaged sites are presented.

  7. Impact of Wet-Weather Peak Flow Blending on Disinfection and Treatment: A Case Study at Three Wastewater Treatment Plants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was administered by the EPA Office of Research and Development and funded by Office of Water; Office of Policy, Economics and Innovation; and Office of R4search and Development. Blending is the practice of diverting apart of peak wet-weather flows at was...

  8. Effects of Ropivacaine on Postoperative Pain and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate in Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Farsad; Zamani, Somayyeh; Etezadi, Farhad; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative analgesic effects of ropivacaine have been demonstrated in various surgical procedures; however, its beneficial effect on postoperative pain relief and ability to breathe out air in urological surgeries, particularly in local interventions such as percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), has remained uncertain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of ropivacaine on postoperative pain severity and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in patients undergoing PCNL procedure. Patients and Methods: This randomized double-blinded clinical trial was performed on 55 consecutive adult patients aged 15 to 60 years who underwent Tubeless PCNL surgery. The patients were randomly assigned to instill 30 mL of ropivacaine 0.2% or 30 mL of isotonic saline with the same protocol. The parameters of visual analogue scale (VAS) (for assessment of pain severity) and PEF (for assessment of ability to breathe out air) were measured 4 and 6 hours after completing the procedure. Moreover, the amounts of opioids or analgesics administered within 6 hours after the operation were recorded. Results: We found no difference in the mean pain severity score between the case and control groups 4 hours (P = 0.332) and 6 hours (P = 0.830) after the operation. The mean PEF at baseline was similar in case and control groups (P = 0.738). Moreover, no difference was revealed in PEF index 4 hours (P = 0.398) and 6 hours (P = 0.335) after PCNL between the groups. The mean VAS scores 4 hours after the operation slightly decreased 2 hours later (P < 0.001) in the both groups. Moreover, in the both groups, a sudden decrease in PEF index was observed within 4 hours after the operation and increased with a mild gradient for the next 2 hours. No difference was found in the amount of postoperative analgesic used in the both groups. Conclusions: Instillation of ropivacaine 0.2% (30 mL) within tubeless PCNL surgery does not have a significant effect on postoperative pain relief

  9. Ion-pair ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic analysis of monoamines: peak-splitting at high flow rates.

    PubMed

    Van Schoors, Jolien; Brouwer, Hendrik-Jan; Maes, Katrien; Michotte, Yvette; Van Eeckhaut, Ann

    2013-12-20

    The use of ion-pair ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with electrochemical detection (ECD) is of great interest for the fast and sensitive determination of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in microdialysis samples. However, when applying high flow rates in ion-pair UHPLC, other peaks than the initial compound peaks appear on the chromatogram. This peak-splitting phenomenon is caused by disturbed ion-pair retention mechanisms. The influence of several chromatographic parameters is investigated. Peak-splitting is delayed to higher flow rates when increasing the concentration of ion-pair reagent or buffering agent in the mobile phase, when decreasing the percentage of organic modifier in the mobile phase, when applying a stationary phase with a smaller amount of packing material or when increasing the separation temperature. One or a combination of these conditions can be applied to analyze the monoamine neurotransmitters using ion-pair UHPLC-ECD at high flow rates. PMID:24238712

  10. Storing of Extracts in Polypropylene Microcentrifuge Tubes Yields Contaminant Peak During Ultra-flow Liquid Chromatographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R.; Hegde, Harsha; Pai, Sandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: This study was designed to understand the effect of storage in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes and glass vials during ultra-flow liquid chromatographic (UFLC) analysis. Materials and Methods: One ml of methanol was placed in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes (PP material, Autoclavable) and glass vials (Borosilicate) separately for 1, 2, 4, 8, 10, 20, 40, and 80 days intervals stored at −4°C. Results: Contaminant peak was detected in methanol stored in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes using UFLC analysis. The contaminant peak detected was prominent, sharp detectable at 9.176 ± 0.138 min on a Waters 250–4.6 mm, 4 μ, Nova-Pak C18 column with mobile phase consisting of methanol:water (70:30). Conclusion: It was evident from the study that long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peak. Further, this may mislead in future reporting an unnatural compound by researchers. SUMMARY Long-term storage of biological samples prepared using methanol in polypropylene microcentrifuge tubes produce contaminant peakContamination peak with higher area under the curve (609993) was obtained in ultra-flow liquid chromatographic run for methanol stored in PP microcentrifuge tubesContamination peak was detected at retention time 9.113 min with a lambda max of 220.38 nm and 300 mAU intensity on the given chromatographic conditionsGlass vials serve better option over PP microcentrifuge tubes for storing biological samples. Abbreviations used: UFLC: Ultra Flow Liquid Chromatography; LC: Liquid Chromatography; MS: Mass spectrometry; AUC: Area Under Curve. PMID:27563216

  11. Tree rings record 100 years of hydrologic change within a wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, Thomas M.; Kappel, William M.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrology and tree growth were investigated within a small wetland in the Tully Valley of central New York, about 20 miles south of Syracuse. In late 1994 it was noted that some wetland trees were dying, and local residents reported that flow of a small stream draining the wetland seemingly increased and became more brackish since the mid to late 1980s. The wetland is about 3 miles north of an extensive salt mining operation known to have degraded local water quality, but no effects of mining had been confirmed previously near the wetland. The oldest wetland trees started to grow before the onset of mining in 1889, and thus tree-ring studies were undertaken not only to investi-gate recent hydrologic change within the wetland, but also to search for evidence of any other changes during the last 100 years.

  12. Effect of metalworking fluid mist exposure on cross-shift decrement in peak expiratory flow.

    PubMed

    Park, Donguk; Chin, Kuwon; Kwag, Hunseok; Youn, Kanwoo; Choi, Sangjun; Ha, Kwonchul; Yoon, Chungsik; Yim, Sanghyuk

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to metalworking fluids (MWF) mist and cross-shift decrements in peak expiratory flow (PEF) were evaluated and their relationship was analyzed using several statistical methods. The objective of this study was to assess workers, exposure to MWF mineral mist and to find the MWF mist level for predicting cross-shift decrements in PEF. A total of 158 workers handling water-soluble MWF had MWF mist exposures with an arithmetic mean (AM) of 0.4 mg/m(3) (range: LOD-13.5 mg/m(3)), and 9.2% of workers (219) showed a cross-shift decline greater than 10% in PEF. MWF mist exposure and cross-shift decrements in PEF that were matched (n=113) were linearly significantly associated (R(2)=0.036, p=0.045) although the correlation was quite weak (r=0.189). We found a slight increase in cross-shift decrements in PEF with increased exposure to MWF aerosol mass concentration. The MWF mist exposure level was categorized into two or three groups by the cutoffs of either the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's Recommended Exposure Level (NIOSH REL: 0.5 mg/m(3)) or the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Notice of Intended Change (ACGIH NIC: 0.2 mg/m(3)). The cross-shift decrement in PEF observed from workers exposed to > or =0.2 mg/m(3) was slightly higher than that of the exposure level of < or =0.2 mg/m(3) at p=0.207 while significant differences among categorized exposure groups (2 categories, <0.5 and > or =0.5 mg/m(3), or 3 categories, <0.2, 0.2-0.5 and > or =0.5 mg/m(3)) were not detected. In order to find out whether there is a specific level that allows us to predict cross-shift decrements in PEF, several statistical models were constructed. Logistic regression showed that the MWF concentration, whether treated as a continuous variable or a categorical variable, was not significantly associated with cross-shift decrements dichotomized by a cutoff of either 10% or 15% in PEF. We couldn't find evidence of a significant PEF decrement

  13. Annual snowmelt and rainfall peak-flow data on selected foothills region streams, South Platte River, Arkansas River, and Colorado River basins, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, J.G.; Jarrett, R.D.; Ebling, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Peak flows in the foothills region of Colorado are attributable to two meteorological sources--snowmelt and rainfall. As part of a study of the hydrology of foothills streams in Colorado, charts from streamflow gages on unregulated streams were examined to determined the source of peak-flow events. Snowmelt-runoff peaks were distinguished from rainfall-runoff peaks on the basis of daily and seasonal occurrence, hydrograph shape, and local weather conditions. Peak-flow data for snowmelt runoff and rainfall runoff are presented for 69 streamflow-gaging stations in the South Platte River, the Arkansas River, and the Colorado River basins. (USGS)

  14. Evaluation of Potential Wetlands to Reduce Peak Flows in Future Climate Scenarios in the Eagle Creek Watershed, IN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, K. M.; Babbar-Sebens, M.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change is expected to increase the severity of floods and droughts and the frequency of extreme streamflow events in the Midwestern United States. Managing these projected impacts poses a major challenge for water resources, conservation, and land use management. Wetlands have been considered as a conservation strategy and work to increase the capacity of watersheds by storing runoff upstream. The implementation of wetlands, especially in tile-drained agricultural watersheds, can reduce peak flows and help mitigate the anticipated impacts of climate change. The goal of this study was to evaluate the long-term performance of wetlands to reduce peak flows in future climate scenarios in the Eagle Creek Watershed in Indiana. A secondary goal of this research was to establish a methodology for incorporating climate change into hydrological models to conduct long-term land management studies and decisions. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was forced with an ensemble of bias corrected climate projections from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) to evaluate the impacts of climate change on watershed hydrology and the ability of wetlands to reduce peak flows. Long-term monthly streamflow results predicted a slight increase in streamflow in the winter and a slight decrease in the summer from the past (1971-2000) to future (2041-2070) time periods. About half of the climate realizations produced an increase in the 5% exceedance flow and half a decrease, but all predictions agreed that high flow events will increase in frequency in the winter and decrease in the spring and summer. Results from the wetland analysis showed that if all potential wetlands identified in a previous study are installed in the watershed, maximum peak flow reductions of around 20-50 cubic meters per second for the past and future, as well as decreased frequency of extreme events, can be seen. Wetlands proved to be a robust solution for

  15. Confirmation of the existence of pressure peaks in helium II flow through a series of porous plugs

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.L.; Mord, A.J.; Snyder, H.A. |

    1994-12-31

    Experiments were performed in which superfluid helium (He II) was flowed by thermomechanical pressure through a series of porous plugs. Temperature and pressure measurements were made along the flow path and the flow rate was measured. The pores were geometrically well characterized, with nearly straight, uniform holes 0.3 microns in diameter. The data confirms the existence of a pressure peak in the middle of the flow path under certain conditions, as predicted by the SUPERFLOW numerical model. Model predictions match the data well with no adjustable parameters and the standard bulk values for the Gorter-Mellink interaction parameter. The SUPERFLOW model and the two-fluid theory on which it is based have been verified under extreme conditions.

  16. A new Goodness-of-fit test for Frequency Analysis of Peak Flows in L-moment Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Bidroha; Srinivas Vemavarapu, Venkata

    2015-04-01

    Over the past two decades, L-moment based flood frequency analysis (FFA) procedure is being extensively used in hydrology for estimation of flood quantiles at target locations in river basins. The procedure is based on the assumption that (i) peak flows at a location constitute a sample drawn from one of the known frequency distributions such as Generalized extreme value (GEV), Generalized Pareto (GPA), and Pearson Type III (PE3), and (ii) the distribution can be identified using L-moment ratio diagram. Through Monte-Carlo simulation experiments it would be demonstrated that conventional L-moment goodness-of-fit (GOF) test, which is widely used for identifying the best-fit frequency distribution, may not be effective in identifying true distribution (population) corresponding to samples, when L-moments specified for sample generation belong to certain ranges. The ranges identified corresponding to various forms of frequency distributions would be presented and discussed. To overcome the limitation of L-moment GOF test, an alternate test would be presented, which examines the hypothesis that peak flow data follows GEV, GPA, PE3, Generalized Logistic or Generalized Normal distributions. The proposed test involves: (i) use of a transformation mechanism to map peak flows from the original space to a dimensionless space where the form of their frequency distribution does not change, (ii) estimation of location, scale and shape parameters of the hypothesized distribution using the transformed data, (iii) computation of deviation of the estimated parameters with respect to their population values that are determined based on analytic formulations proposed by the authors in a previous work, and (iv) considering the deviation as the basis to accept/reject the hypothesis that the chosen distribution is appropriate to fit the peak flow data. The proposed GOF test would be demonstrated to be effective compared to conventional L-moment GOF test through Monte-Carlo simulation

  17. Wetland Restoration as a Tool for Peak Flow Mitigation: Combining Watershed Scale Modeling with a Genetic Algorithm Approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, B. J.; Gassman, P. W.; Kling, C.

    2015-12-01

    In the Minnesota River Basin, sediments originating from failing stream banks and bluffs account for the majority of the riverine load and contribute to water quality impairments in the Minnesota River as well as portions of the Mississippi River upstream of Lake Pepin. One approach for mitigating this problem may be targeted wetland restoration in Minnesota River Basin tributaries in order to reduce the magnitude and duration of peak flow events which contribute to bluff and stream bank failures. In order to determine effective arrangements and properties of wetlands to achieve peak flow reduction, we are employing a genetic algorithm approach coupled with a SWAT model of the Cottonwood River, a tributary of the Minnesota River. The genetic algorithm approach will evaluate combinations of basic wetland features as represented by SWAT: surface area, volume, contributing area, and hydraulic conductivity of the wetland bottom. These wetland parameters will be weighed against economic considerations associated with land use trade-offs in this agriculturally productive landscape. Preliminary results show that the SWAT model is capable of simulating daily hydrology very well and genetic algorithm evaluation of wetland scenarios is ongoing. Anticipated results will include (1) combinations of wetland parameters that are most effective for reducing peak flows, and (2) evaluation of economic trade-offs between wetland restoration, water quality, and agricultural productivity in the Cottonwood River watershed.

  18. Precipitation-snowmelt timing and snowmelt augmentation of large peak flow events, western Cascades, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, Keith; Jones, Julia A.

    2015-09-01

    This study tested multiple hydrologic mechanisms to explain snowpack dynamics in extreme rain-on-snow floods, which occur widely in the temperate and polar regions. We examined 26, 10 day large storm events over the period 1992-2012 in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in western Oregon, using statistical analyses (regression, ANOVA, and wavelet coherence) of hourly snowmelt lysimeter, air and dewpoint temperature, wind speed, precipitation, and discharge data. All events involved snowpack outflow, but only seven events had continuous net snowpack outflow, including three of the five top-ranked peak discharge events. Peak discharge was not related to precipitation rate, but it was related to the 10 day sum of precipitation and net snowpack outflow, indicating an increased flood response to continuously melting snowpacks. The two largest peak discharge events in the study had significant wavelet coherence at multiple time scales over several days; a distribution of phase differences between precipitation and net snowpack outflow at the 12-32 h time scale with a sharp peak at π/2 radians; and strongly correlated snowpack outflow among lysimeters representing 42% of basin area. The recipe for an extreme rain-on-snow event includes persistent, slow melt within the snowpack, which appears to produce a near-saturated zone within the snowpack throughout the landscape, such that the snowpack may transmit pressure waves of precipitation directly to streams, and this process is synchronized across the landscape. Further work is needed to understand the internal dynamics of a melting snowpack throughout a snow-covered landscape and its contribution to extreme rain-on-snow floods.

  19. Grizzly Peak cauldron, Colorado: structure and petrology of a deeply dissected resurgent ash-flow caldera

    SciTech Connect

    Fridrich, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    The 34-Ma-old Grizzly Peak cauldron is a deeply eroded 17- by 23-k caldera structure on the crest of the Sawatch Range in west-central Colorado. Subsidence of the cauldron along bounding ring faults resulted from eruption of the Grizzly Peak Tuff, which ponded in the caldera as it formed. An inner ring fracture zone divides the cauldron into two segments and is a growth fault in the intracaldera tuff. Following subsidence, the cauldron was uplifted to form a complexely faulted resurgent dome. Intracaldera Grizzly Peak Tuff, as thick as 2.7 km, is a single cooling unit zoned from high-silica rhyolite at the base to low-silica rhyolite at the eroded top and, further, contains dacite to mafic latite welded pumice clasts (fiamme) in two heterogeneous tuff horizons in the upper half of the unit. Tuff zoning defined by fiamme is unusually strong for a single volcanic unit: 77 to 57% SiO2. Major-element trends can be modeled by crystal fractionation using observed phenocrysts. Inflections in the trends of Zr, Hf, Th, REE, Y, Mn, and Sc correlated with changes in phenocryst mineralogy and composition, indicating control by crystal-liquid equilibria. Trends for some trace-element cannot be fit with the crystal-fractionation model; over different portions of the zonation, Zr, Hf, LREE, and Rb enrich at too high a rate, and Ta, Nb, and Ba enrich at too low a rate. Progressive batch melting of a single source can also be eliminated because Co, Cr, Eu, and Sr, and Ba are too strongly depleted over different silica intervals. The zonation must therefore be the result of a combination of processes. Compositional trends defined by a series of intracaldera intrusions can be explained by hybridization, during resurgence, of the unerupted portion of the zoned magma column sampled in the tuff eruption.

  20. Annual Peak-Flow Frequency Characteristics and (or) Peak Dam-Pool-Elevation Frequency Characteristics of Dry Dams and Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations in the Great Miami River Basin, Ohio

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koltun, G.F.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the results of a study to determine frequency characteristics of postregulation annual peak flows at streamflow-gaging stations at or near the Lockington, Taylorsville, Englewood, Huffman, and Germantown dry dams in the Miami Conservancy District flood-protection system (southwestern Ohio) and five other streamflow-gaging stations in the Great Miami River Basin further downstream from one or more of the dams. In addition, this report describes frequency characteristics of annual peak elevations of the dry-dam pools. In most cases, log-Pearson Type III distributions were fit to postregulation annual peak-flow values through 2007 (the most recent year of published peak-flow values at the time of this analysis) and annual peak dam-pool storage values for the period 1922-2008 to determine peaks with recurrence intervals of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 500 years. For one streamflow-gaging station (03272100) with a short period of record, frequency characteristics were estimated by means of a process involving interpolation of peak-flow yields determined for an upstream and downstream gage. Once storages had been estimated for the various recurrence intervals, corresponding dam-pool elevations were determined from elevation-storage ratings provided by the Miami Conservancy District.

  1. Rib Fracture Fixation Restores Inspiratory Volume and Peak Flow in a Full Thorax Human Cadaveric Breathing Model

    PubMed Central

    Slobogean, Gerard P.; Kim, Hyunchul; Russell, Joseph P.; Stockton, David J.; Hsieh, Adam H.; O’Toole, Robert V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multiple rib fractures cause significant pain and potential for chest wall instability. Despite an emerging trend of surgical management of flail chest injuries, there are no studies examining the effect of rib fracture fixation on respiratory function. Objectives: Using a novel full thorax human cadaveric breathing model, we sought to explore the effect of flail chest injury and subsequent rib fracture fixation on respiratory outcomes. Patients and Methods: We used five fresh human cadavers to generate negative breathing models in the left thorax to mimic physiologic respiration. Inspiratory volumes and peak flows were measured using a flow meter for all three chest wall states: intact chest, left-sided flail chest (segmental fractures of ribs 3 - 7), and post-fracture open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of the chest wall with a pre-contoured rib specific plate fixation system. Results: A wide variation in the mean inspiratory volumes and peak flows were measured between specimens; however, the effect of a flail chest wall and the subsequent internal fixation of the unstable rib fractures was consistent across all samples. Compared to the intact chest wall, the inspiratory volume decreased by 40 ± 19% in the flail chest model (P = 0.04). Open reduction and internal fixation of the flail chest returned the inspiratory volume to 130 ± 71% of the intact chest volumes (P = 0.68). A similar 35 ± 19% decrease in peak flows was seen in the flail chest (P = 0.007) and this returned to 125 ± 71% of the intact chest following ORIF (P = 0.62). Conclusions: Negative pressure inspiration is significantly impaired by an unstable chest wall. Restoring mechanical stability of the fractured ribs improves respiratory outcomes similar to baseline values. PMID:26848471

  2. Impact of urban WWTP and CSO fluxes on river peak flow extremes under current and future climate conditions.

    PubMed

    Keupers, Ingrid; Willems, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The impact of urban water fluxes on the river system outflow of the Grote Nete catchment (Belgium) was studied. First the impact of the Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) and the Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) outflows on the river system for the current climatic conditions was determined by simulating the urban fluxes as point sources in a detailed, hydrodynamic river model. Comparison was made of the simulation results on peak flow extremes with and without the urban point sources. In a second step, the impact of climate change scenarios on the urban fluxes and the consequent impacts on the river flow extremes were studied. It is shown that the change in the 10-year return period hourly peak flow discharge due to climate change (-14% to +45%) was in the same order of magnitude as the change due to the urban fluxes (+5%) in current climate conditions. Different climate change scenarios do not change the impact of the urban fluxes much except for the climate scenario that involves a strong increase in rainfall extremes in summer. This scenario leads to a strong increase of the impact of the urban fluxes on the river system. PMID:23787302

  3. Comparison of hydrochemical tracers to estimate source contributions to peak flow in a small, forested, headwater catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, K.C.; Hornberger, G.M.

    1998-01-01

    Three-component (throughfall, soil water, groundwater) hydrograph separations at peak flow were performed on 10 storms over a 2-year period in a small forested catchment in north-central Maryland using an iterative and an exact solution. Seven pairs of tracers (deuterium and oxygen 18, deuterium and chloride, deuterium and sodium, deuterium and silica, chloride and silica, chloride and sodium, and sodium and silica) were used for three-component hydrograph separation for each storm at peak flow to determine whether or not the assumptions of hydrograph separation routinely can be met, to assess the adequacy of some commonly used tracers, to identify patterns in hydrograph-separation results, and to develop conceptual models for the patterns observed. Results of the three-component separations were not always physically meaningful, suggesting that assumptions of hydrograph separation had been violated. Uncertainties in solutions to equations for hydrograph separations were large, partly as a result of violations of assumptions used in deriving the separation equations and partly as a result of improper identification of chemical compositions of end-members. Results of three-component separations using commonly used tracers were widely variable. Consistent patterns in the amount of subsurface water contributing to peak flow (45-100%) were observed, no matter which separation method or combination of tracers was used. A general conceptual model for the sequence of contributions from the three end-members could be developed for 9 of the 10 storms. Overall results indicated that hydrochemical and hydrometric measurements need to be coupled in order to perform meaningful hydrograph separations.

  4. Model Related Estimates of time dependent quantiles of peak flows - case study for selected catchments in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupczewski, Witold G.; Bogdanowich, Ewa; Debele, Sisay

    2016-04-01

    Under Polish climate conditions the series of Annual Maxima (AM) flows are usually a mixture of peak flows of thaw- and rainfall- originated floods. The northern, lowland regions are dominated by snowmelt floods whilst in mountainous regions the proportion of rainfall floods is predominant. In many stations the majority of AM can be of snowmelt origin, but the greatest peak flows come from rainfall floods or vice versa. In a warming climate, precipitation is less likely to occur as snowfall. A shift from a snow- towards a rain-dominated regime results in a decreasing trend in mean and standard deviations of winter peak flows whilst rainfall floods do not exhibit any trace of non-stationarity. That is why a simple form of trends (i.e. linear trends) are more difficult to identify in AM time-series than in Seasonal Maxima (SM), usually winter season time-series. Hence it is recommended to analyse trends in SM, where a trend in standard deviation strongly influences the time -dependent upper quantiles. The uncertainty associated with the extrapolation of the trend makes it necessary to apply a relationship for trend which has time derivative tending to zero, e.g. we can assume a new climate equilibrium epoch approaching, or a time horizon is limited by the validity of the trend model. For both winter and summer SM time series, at least three distributions functions with trend model in the location, scale and shape parameters are estimated by means of the GAMLSS package using the ML-techniques. The resulting trend estimates in mean and standard deviation are mutually compared to the observed trends. Then, using AIC measures as weights, a multi-model distribution is constructed for each of two seasons separately. Further, assuming a mutual independence of the seasonal maxima, an AM model with time-dependent parameters can be obtained. The use of a multi-model approach can alleviate the effects of different and often contradictory trends obtained by using and identifying

  5. Persistence of peak flow decrement in children following ozone exposures exceeding the national ambient air quality standard

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.; Vollmuth, T.A.; Lippmann, M.

    1985-10-01

    A linear regression was calculated between the peak one-hour ozone concentration for a given day and forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV), and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) as determined the same day from spirograms for each of the 39 children tested on six or more days. All mean slopes were negative, except for FVC in boys, indicating a general tendency for decreased function with increasing ozone concentration. In another analysis, a summary weighted correlation coefficient between peak ozone level and each pulmonary function parameter was calculated for each of 49 children seen on four or more days. As in the regression analysis, decrements in PEFR were significantly correlated with the ozone exposure. Analysis of residuals from the regression lines provide evidence for responses of greater potential significance to the future health of the children. They indicate a different kind of response, i.e., a persistent decrement in function lasting for as much as a week after the end of a smog period of about four days' duration. The persistent effects associated with ozone could have been due to acidic sulfates as well as, or in addition to, ozone. 10 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Investigating flow properties of partially cemented fractures in Travis Peak Formation using image-based pore-scale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokan-Lawal, Adenike; Prodanović, Maša.; Eichhubl, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Natural fractures can provide preferred flow pathways in otherwise low-permeability reservoirs. In deep subsurface reservoirs including tight oil and gas reservoirs, as well as in hydrothermal systems, fractures are frequently lined or completely filled with mineral cement that reduces or occludes fracture porosity and permeability. Fracture cement linings potentially reduce flow connectivity between the fracture and host rock and increase fracture wall roughness, which constricts flow. We combined image-based fracture space characterization, mercury injection capillary pressure and permeability experiments, and numerical simulations to evaluate the influence of fracture-lining cement on single-phase and multiphase flows along a natural fracture from the Travis Peak Formation, a tight gas reservoir sandstone in East Texas. Using X-ray computed microtomographic image analysis, we characterized fracture geometry and the connectivity and geometric tortuosity of the fracture pore space. Combining level set method-based progressive quasistatic and lattice Boltzmann simulations, we assessed the capillary-dominated displacement properties and the (relative) permeability of a cement-lined fracture. Published empirical correlations between aperture and permeability for barren fractures provide permeability estimates that vary among each other, and differ from our results, vary by several orders of magnitude. Compared to barren fractures, cement increases the geometric tortuosity, aperture variation of the pore space, and capillary pressure while reducing the single-phase permeability by up to 2 orders of magnitude. For multiphase displacement, relative permeability and fluid entrapment geometry resemble those of porous media and differ from those characteristic of barren fractures.

  7. Changes in Stream Peak Flow and Regulation in Naoli River Watershed as a Result of Wetland Loss

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yunlong; Wang, Lei; Lv, Xianguo; Yu, Hongxian; Li, Guofu

    2014-01-01

    Hydrology helps determine the character of wetlands; wetlands, in turn, regulate water flow, which influences regional hydrology. To understand these dynamics, we studied the Naoli basin where, from 1954 to 2005, intensive marshland cultivation took place, and the watershed's wetland area declined from 94.4 × 104 ha to 17.8 × 104 ha. More than 80% of the wetland area loss was due to conversion to farmland, especially from 1976 to 1986. The processes of transforming wetlands to cultivated land in the whole Naoli basin and subbasins can be described using a first order exponential decay model. To quantify the effects of wetlands cultivation, we analyzed daily rainfall and streamflow data measured from 1955 to 2005 at two stations (Baoqing Station and Caizuizi Station). We defined a streamflow regulation index (SRI) and applied a Mann-Kendall-Sneyers test to further analyze the data. As the wetland area decreased, the peak streamflow at the Caizuizi station increased, and less precipitation generated heavier peak flows, as the runoff was faster than before. The SRI from 1959 to 2005 showed an increasing trend; the SRI rate of increase was 0.05/10a, demonstrating that the watershed's regulation of streamflow regulation was declined as the wetlands disappeared. PMID:25114956

  8. Changes in stream peak flow and regulation in Naoli River watershed as a result of wetland loss.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunlong; Wang, Lei; Lv, Xianguo; Yu, Hongxian; Li, Guofu

    2014-01-01

    Hydrology helps determine the character of wetlands; wetlands, in turn, regulate water flow, which influences regional hydrology. To understand these dynamics, we studied the Naoli basin where, from 1954 to 2005, intensive marshland cultivation took place, and the watershed's wetland area declined from 94.4 × 10(4)ha to 17.8 × 10(4)ha. More than 80% of the wetland area loss was due to conversion to farmland, especially from 1976 to 1986. The processes of transforming wetlands to cultivated land in the whole Naoli basin and subbasins can be described using a first order exponential decay model. To quantify the effects of wetlands cultivation, we analyzed daily rainfall and streamflow data measured from 1955 to 2005 at two stations (Baoqing Station and Caizuizi Station). We defined a streamflow regulation index (SRI) and applied a Mann-Kendall-Sneyers test to further analyze the data. As the wetland area decreased, the peak streamflow at the Caizuizi station increased, and less precipitation generated heavier peak flows, as the runoff was faster than before. The SRI from 1959 to 2005 showed an increasing trend; the SRI rate of increase was 0.05/10a, demonstrating that the watershed's regulation of streamflow regulation was declined as the wetlands disappeared. PMID:25114956

  9. Using WEPP Technology to Assess the Distribution of Erosion Risk, Mitigation Benefit, and Peak Flow Following Wildfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, I.; Elliot, W.; Glaza, B.; Robichaud, P.

    2006-12-01

    , the ten year peak runoff from any watershed following this fire can be estimated by: Peak runoff (cubic meters per second per square km) = 3.1512 × (Watershed area (sq km))^{-0.5446} (R2 = 0.90). We concluded that these three WEPP tools can be of great benefit to watershed managers when determining the spatial distribution of soil erosion, the risks of a given amount of erosion occurring, and the return period of peak flows the year following the wildfire.

  10. Achieving Peak Flow and Sediment Loading Reductions through Increased Water Storage in the Le Sueur Watershed, Minnesota: A Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, N. A.; Gran, K. B.; Cho, S. J.; Dalzell, B. J.; Kumarasamy, K.

    2015-12-01

    A combination of factors including climate change, land clearing, and artificial drainage have increased many agricultural regions' stream flows and rates at which channel banks and bluffs are eroded. Increasing erosion rates within the Minnesota River Basin have contributed to higher sediment-loading rates, excess turbidity levels, and increases in sedimentation rates in Lake Pepin further downstream. Water storage sites (e.g., wetlands) have been discussed as a means to address these issues. This study uses the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to assess a range of water retention site (WRS) implementation scenarios in the Le Sueur watershed in south-central Minnesota, a subwatershed of the Minnesota River Basin. Sediment loading from bluffs was assessed through an empirical relationship developed from gauging data. Sites were delineated as topographic depressions with specific land uses, minimum areas (3000 m2), and high compound topographic index values. Contributing areas for the WRS were manually measured and used with different site characteristics to create 210 initial WRS scenarios. A generalized relationship between WRS area and contributing area was identified from measurements, and this relationship was used with different site characteristics (e.g., depth, hydraulic conductivity (K), and placement) to create 225 generalized WRS scenarios. Reductions in peak flow volumes and sediment-loading rates are generally maximized by placing site with high K values in the upper half of the watershed. High K values allow sites to lose more water through seepage, emptying their storages between precipitation events and preventing frequent overflowing. Reductions in peak flow volumes and sediment-loading rates also level off at high WRS extents due to the decreasing frequencies of high-magnitude events. The generalized WRS scenarios were also used to create a simplified empirical model capable of generating peak flows and sediment-loading rates from near

  11. Determination of the 100-year flood plain on Upper Three Runs and selected tributaries, and the Savannah River at the Savannah River site, South Carolina, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanier, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The 100-year flood plain was determined for Upper Three Runs, its tributaries, and the part of the Savannah River that borders the Savannah River Site. The results are provided in tabular and graphical formats. The 100-year flood-plain maps and flood profiles provide water-resource managers of the Savannah River Site with a technical basis for making flood-plain management decisions that could minimize future flood problems and provide a basis for designing and constructing drainage structures along roadways. A hydrologic analysis was made to estimate the 100-year recurrence- interval flow for Upper Three Runs and its tributaries. The analysis showed that the well-drained, sandy soils in the head waters of Upper Three Runs reduce the high flows in the stream; therefore, the South Carolina upper Coastal Plain regional-rural-regression equation does not apply for Upper Three Runs. Conse- quently, a relation was established for 100-year recurrence-interval flow and drainage area using streamflow data from U.S. Geological Survey gaging stations on Upper Three Runs. This relation was used to compute 100-year recurrence-interval flows at selected points along the stream. The regional regression equations were applicable for the tributaries to Upper Three Runs, because the soil types in the drainage basins of the tributaries resemble those normally occurring in upper Coastal Plain basins. This was verified by analysis of the flood-frequency data collected from U.S. Geological Survey gaging station 02197342 on Fourmile Branch. Cross sections were surveyed throughout each reach, and other pertinent data such as flow resistance and land-use were col- lected. The surveyed cross sections and computed 100-year recurrence-interval flows were used in a step-backwater model to compute the 100-year flood profile for Upper Three Runs and its tributaries. The profiles were used to delineate the 100-year flood plain on topographic maps. The Savannah River forms the southwestern border

  12. Model for predicting peak expiratory flow rate of Nigerian workers in a cement factory in Itori, Ogun State, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ismaila, Salami Olasunkanmi; Akanbi, Olusegun Gabriel; Olaoniye, Wasiu

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to propose a model for predicting the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of Nigerian workers in a cement factory. Sixty randomly selected non-smoker and healthy workers (30 in production sections, 30 in the administrative section of the factory) participated in the study. Their physical characteristics and PEFR were measured. Multiple correlations using SPSS version 16.0 were performed on the data. The values of PEFR, using the obtained model, were compared with the measured values using a two-tailed t test. There were positive correlations among age, height and PEFR. A prediction equation for PEFR based on age, height, weight and years of exposure (experience) was obtained with R² = .843 (p < 0.001). The developed model will be useful for the management in determining PEFR of workers in the cement industry for possible medical attention. PMID:26694007

  13. Quantifying volume reduction and peak flow mitigation for three bioretention cells in clay soils in northeast Ohio.

    PubMed

    Winston, Ryan J; Dorsey, Jay D; Hunt, William F

    2016-05-15

    Green infrastructure aims to restore watershed hydrologic function by more closely mimicking pre-development groundwater recharge and evapotranspiration (ET). Bioretention has become a popular stormwater control due to its ability to reduce runoff volume through these pathways. Three bioretention cells constructed in low permeability soils in northeast Ohio were monitored for non-winter quantification of inflow, drainage, ET, and exfiltration. The inclusion of an internal water storage (IWS) zone allowed the three cells to reduce runoff by 59%, 42%, and 36% over the monitoring period, in spite of the tight underlying soils. The exfiltration rate and the IWS zone thickness were the primary determinants of volume reduction performance. Post-construction measured drawdown rates were higher than pre-construction soil vertical hydraulic conductivity tests in all cases, due to lateral exfiltration from the IWS zones and ET, which are not typically accounted for in pre-construction soil testing. The minimum rainfall depths required to produce outflow for the three cells were 5.5, 7.4, and 13.8mm. During events with 1-year design rainfall intensities, peak flow reduction varied from 24 to 96%, with the best mitigation during events where peak rainfall rate occurred before the centroid of the rainfall volume, when adequate bowl storage was available to limit overflow. PMID:26906696

  14. Cross-shift peak expiratory flow changes are unassociated with respirable coal dust exposure among South African coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Naidoo, R.N.; Robins, T.G.; Becklake, M.; Seixas, N.; Thompson, M.L.

    2007-12-15

    he objectives of this study were to determine whether cross-shift changes in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were related to respirable dust exposure in South African coalminers. Fifty workers were randomly selected from a cohort of 684 miners from 3 bituminous coal mines in Mpumalanga, South Africa. Peak expiratory efforts were measured prior to the commencement of the shift, and at the end of the shift on at least two occasions separated by at least 2 weeks, with full shift personal dust sampling being conducted on each occasion for each participant. Interviews were conducted, work histories were obtained and cumulative exposure estimates were constructed. Regression models examined the associations of cross-shift changes in PEFR with current and cumulative exposure, controlling for shift, smoking and past history of tuberculosis. There were marginal differences in cross-shift PEFR (ranging from 0.1 to 2 L/min). Linear regression analyses showed no association between cross-shift change in PEFR and current or cumulative exposure. The specific shift worked by participants in the study showed no effect. Our study showed no association between current respirable dust exposure and cross-shift changes in PEFR. There was a non-significant protective effect of cumulative dust exposure on the outcome, suggesting the presence of a 'healthy worker survivor effect' in this data.

  15. Applying Physically Representative Watershed Modelling to Assess Peak and Low Flow Response to Timber Harvest: Application for Watershed Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, R. J.; Anderson, A.; Silins, U.; Craig, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Forest harvesting, insects, disease, wildfire, and other disturbances can combine with climate change to cause unknown changes to the amount and timing of streamflow from critical forested watersheds. Southern Alberta forest and alpine areas provide downstream water supply for agriculture and water utilities that supply approximately two thirds of the Alberta population. This project uses datasets from intensely monitored study watersheds and hydrological model platforms to extend our understanding of how disturbances and climate change may impact various aspects of the streamflow regime that are of importance to downstream users. The objectives are 1) to use the model output of watershed response to disturbances to inform assessments of forested watersheds in the region, and 2) to investigate the use of a new flexible modelling platform as a tool for detailed watershed assessments and hypothesis testing. Here we applied the RAVEN hydrological modelling framework to quantify changes in key hydrological processes driving peak and low flows in a headwater catchment along the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. The model was applied to simulate the period from 2006 to 2011 using data from the Star Creek watershed in southwestern Alberta. The representation of relevant hydrological processes was verified using snow survey, meteorological, and vegetation data collected through the Southern Rockies Watershed Project. Timber harvest scenarios were developed to estimate the effects of cut levels ranging from 20 to 100% over a range of elevations, slopes, and aspects. We quantified changes in the timing and magnitude of low flow and high flow events during the 2006 to 2011 period. Future work will assess changes in the probability of low and high flow events using a long-term meteorological record. This modelling framework enables relevant processes at the watershed scale to be accounted in a physically robust and computational efficient manner. Hydrologic

  16. Analysis of Daily-Peaking and Run-of-River Dam Operations on Flow Variability Metrics Considering Subdaily to Seasonal Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, N. A.; O'Connor, B. L.; Hayse, J.; Bevelhimer, M.; Endreny, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    Stakeholders are applying increasing pressure on many hydropower owners to change plant operations such that downstream river flows are more conducive to healthy aquatic biological communities. These changes often result in a move away from daily-peaking operations to lower-energy run-of-river operations based on the assumption that downstream biological communities will improve under more natural flow regimes. Previous studies on natural flow regimes have focused primarily on characterizing pre- and post-dam effects by using metrics of flow variability based on daily-averaged flows, which do not accurately represent flow variability resulting from daily-peaking hydropower operations or natural flow pulses. We evaluated flow variability at four hydropower projects located in Michigan and Vermont, where the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission relicensing process resulted in a change in operations from daily-peaking to run-of-river. These hydropower projects were chosen because the relicensing occurred in the 1990s, thereby allowing for a sufficient post-operation flow record. In addition, the hydropower projects evaluated are located on rivers for which subdaily flow data were available for locations downstream of the facilities and at representative unregulated reaches. The flow data collected for the four sites were processed using three analytical tools: Indicators of Hydrological Alteration, GeoTools, and a subdaily flow worksheet developed for this study. Flow metrics were calculated using the three analytical tools, which depict flow variability at subdaily to seasonal timescales. Comparisons in flow metrics were made between unregulated and regulated reaches, as well as between daily-peaking and run-of-river operations. Results indicate that flow variability metrics calculated for run-of-river operations closely resemble unregulated reaches across temporal scales. Small to large variations in flow variability metrics were observed between daily-peaking and

  17. Real-time three-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography for characterizing the spatial velocity distribution and quantifying the peak flow rate in the left ventricular outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsujino, H.; Jones, M.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Cardon, L. A.; Morehead, A. J.; Zetts, A. D.; Travaglini, A.; Bauer, F.; Panza, J. A.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Quantification of flow with pulsed-wave Doppler assumes a "flat" velocity profile in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), which observation refutes. Recent development of real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) color Doppler allows one to obtain an entire cross-sectional velocity distribution of the LVOT, which is not possible using conventional 2-D echo. In an animal experiment, the cross-sectional color Doppler images of the LVOT at peak systole were derived and digitally transferred to a computer to visualize and quantify spatial velocity distributions and peak flow rates. Markedly skewed profiles, with higher velocities toward the septum, were consistently observed. Reference peak flow rates by electromagnetic flow meter correlated well with 3-D peak flow rates (r = 0.94), but with an anticipated underestimation. Real-time 3-D color Doppler echocardiography was capable of determining cross-sectional velocity distributions and peak flow rates, demonstrating the utility of this new method for better understanding and quantifying blood flow phenomena.

  18. Fractures, stress and fluid flow prior to stimulation of well 27-15, Desert Peak, Nevada, EGS project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Hickman, Stephen H.

    2009-01-01

    A suite of geophysical logs has been acquired for structural, fluid flow and stress analysis of well 27-15 in the Desert Peak Geothermal Field, Nevada, in preparation for stimulation and development of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Advanced Logic Technologies Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) and Schlumberger Formation MicroScanner (FMS) image logs reveal extensive drilling-induced tensile fractures, showing that the current minimum compressive horizontal stress, Shmin, in the vicinity of well 27-15 is oriented along an azimuth of 114±17°. This orientation is consistent with the dip direction of recently active normal faults mapped at the surface and with extensive sets of fractures and some formation boundaries seen in the BHTV and FMS logs. Temperature and spinner flowmeter surveys reveal several minor flowing fractures that are well oriented for normal slip, although over-all permeability in the well is quite low. These results indicate that well 27-15 is a viable candidate for EGS stimulation and complements research by other investigators including cuttings analysis, a reflection seismic survey, pressure transient and tracer testing, and micro-seismic monitoring.

  19. Peak-Flow Frequency Estimates Based on Data through Water Year 2001 for Selected Streamflow-Gaging Stations in South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Driscoll, Daniel G.; Parrett, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Numerous users, including the South Dakota Department of Transportation, have continuing needs for peak-flow information for the design of highway infrastructure and many other purposes. This report documents results from a cooperative study between the South Dakota Department of Transportation and the U.S. Geological Survey to provide an update of peak-flow frequency estimates for South Dakota. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals are reported for 272 streamflow-gaging stations, which include most gaging stations in South Dakota with 10 or more years of systematic peak-flow records through water year 2001. Recommended procedures described in Bulletin 17B were used as primary guidelines for developing peak-flow frequency estimates. The computer program PEAKFQ developed by the U.S. Geological Survey was used to run the frequency analyses. Flood frequencies for all stations were initially analyzed by using standard Bulletin 17B default procedures for fitting the log-Pearson III distribution. The resulting preliminary frequency curves were then plotted on a log-probability scale, and fits of the curves with systematic data were evaluated. In many cases, results of the default Bulletin 17B analyses were determined to be satisfactory. In other cases, however, the results could be improved by using various alternative procedures for frequency analysis. Alternative procedures for some stations included adjustments to skew coefficients or use of user-defined low-outlier criteria. Peak-flow records for many gaging stations are strongly influenced by low- or zero-flow values. This situation often results in a frequency curve that plots substantially above the systematic record data points at the upper end of the frequency curve. Adjustments to low-outlier criteria reduced the influence of very small peak flows and generally focused the analyses on the upper parts of the frequency curves (10- to 500-year

  20. Transition of dominant peak flow source from snowmelt to rainfall along the Colorado Front Range: Historical patterns, trends, and lessons from the 2013 Colorado Front Range floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Lefsky, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The Colorado Front Range has a large elevation gradient with deep seasonal snowpack in the mountains and limited snow accumulation in the foothills and plains. This study examines how the sources of annual peak flows (snowmelt, rainfall, mixed) change with the fraction of time snow persists on the ground, snow persistence (SP), and whether these sources have changed over time. Sources of peak flows for 20 gaging stations are estimated using a gridded rain and snow model forced with PRISM daily precipitation and both PRISM and TopoWx temperature. The mean snowmelt contribution to peak flow is highly correlated with SP (r2 = 0.86-0.90). Watersheds with SP < 0.3 (low snow, elevation <2000 m) are rainfall-dominated, and watersheds with SP > 0.7 (persistent snow, elevation >3100 m) are mostly snowmelt-dominated, with mixed sources between these thresholds. Rainfall runoff peak flows are possible at all elevations, but their likelihood declines with increasing SP. Rainfall runoff from an extreme storm in September 2013 produced the highest annual peaks at many stations, including some snowmelt-dominated watersheds. Regional Kendall trend tests indicate that the contributions of snowmelt to peak flows and total annual inputs have declined in the mixed source zone. These changes may affect hydrographs, as analyses confirm that snowmelt runoff generally produces more attenuated peaks than rainfall runoff. Discrimination of peak flow source is sensitive to input data and model structure for mixed rain and snowmelt events, and both observation and modeling research are needed to help understand potential runoff changes in these conditions.

  1. Discharge, gage height, and elevation of 100-year floods in the Hudson River basin, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archer, Roger J.

    1978-01-01

    The flood discharge that may be expected to be equaled or exceeded on the average of once in 100 years (100-year flood) was computed by the log-Pearson Type-III frequency relation for 72 stations in the Hudson River basin. These discharges and, where available, their corresponding gage height and elevation above mean sea level are presented in tabular form. A short explanation of computation methods is included. The data are to be used as part of a federally funded study of the water resources and related land resources of the Hudson River basin. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Serial Peak Expiratory Flow Rates in Patients Undergoing Upper Abdominal Surgeries Under General Anaesthesia and Thoracic Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rammoorthi; Ribeiro, Karl SA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaesthesia and upper abdominal surgeries alter lung compliance and functional residual capacity resulting from atelectasis. Upper abdominal surgeries also cause a decrease in peak expiratory flow rates, cough reflex due to pain limited inspiration. Aim This study aimed to study the effect of thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) on the peak expiratory flow rates in patients undergoing upper abdominal surgeries. Materials and Methods A total of 44 patients posted for elective surgery were enrolled. Group 1 patients received GA + 0.125% bupivacaine infusion TEA and Group 2 received GA + Inj. Diclofenac sodium 50 mg slow i.v. TID for Postoperative analgesia. Haemodynamics, VAS pain score, PEFR measurements were done at 60 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours and 4 days after surgery in both groups. ABG analysis was taken pre operatively and 24 hours after surgery. Results The SBP and DBP values obtained at 60 minutes (p<0.016) 24 and 48 hours (p<0.001) and day 4 (p<0.02) postoperative showed highly significant difference between the two groups which indicate better haemodynamic parameters in patients receiving epidural analgesia. Postoperatively the difference in PEFR values at 60 minutes, 24 hour, 48 hour and day 4 were very highly significant. (p<0.001). Group1 had a 10.739% deficit on day 4 from its pre operative baseline value while group 2 showed a 34.825 % deficit which was very highly significant (p<0.001). The difference in VAS scores recorded at 60 minutes, 24 hours, 48 hours and day 4 post op were very highly statistically significant (p < 0.001). The ABG taken at 24 hours shows statistically significant difference with patients in group 2 showing decreased values in pCO2 and pO2 reflecting poorer ventilation and oxygenation. Conclusion Thoracic epidural analgesia provides superior analgesia, better cough reflex as seen by better PEFR values, were haemodynamically more stable and their ABG values were better than the NSAID group. PMID:27042561

  3. The life and times of the LED - a 100-year history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    2007-04-01

    Many people believe that the LED was discovered by US researchers working in the 1960s. In fact, Henry Round at Marconi Labs noted the emission of light from a semiconductor diode 100 years ago and, independently, a forgotten Russian genius - Oleg Losev - discovered the LED.

  4. 100 Years of Cotton Production, Harvesting and Ginning Systems Engineering: 1907 - 2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE) celebrated its centennial year during 2007. As part of the ASABE centennial, the authors were asked to describe agricultural engineering accomplishments in U.S. cotton production, harvesting and ginning over the past 100 years. ...

  5. Innovation and Involvement: 100 Years of Community Work with Older People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasby, Jon

    2000-01-01

    Birmingham Settlement has provided services to British older adults for over 100 years, including such innovations as adult day centers, meals on wheels, and transportation services. The participation of the clientele in research helped flesh out the history of the settlement through narratives that demonstrate its impact on the life of the…

  6. What Would You Look Like If You Were 100 Years Old?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project inspired by the 100th day of school in which first-grade students created a self-portrait of themselves at 100 years old and wrote an accompanying essay. States that the students drew wrinkles on the faces, age-appropriate clothing, gray or white hair, and even glasses as a finishing touch. (CMK)

  7. Acute Effects of Asian Dust Events on Respiratory Symptoms and Peak Expiratory Flow in Children with Mild Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Young; Choung, Ji Tae; Yu, Jinho; Kim, Do Kyun

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible adverse effects of Asian dust events on respiratory health in asthmatic children. Fifty-two children with mild asthma were studied for eight consecutive weeks in the spring of 2004 (March 8 to May 2). During the study period, five Asian dust days were identified; we included a lag period of two days following each of the events. Subjects recorded their respiratory symptom diaries and peak expiratory flow (PEF) twice daily during the study period; and they underwent methacholine bronchial challenge tests. The subjects reported a significantly higher frequency of respiratory symptoms during the Asian dust days than during the control days. They showed significantly more reduced morning and evening PEF values, and more increased PEF variability (10.1%±3.5% vs. 5.5%±2.2%) during the Asian dust days than during the control days. Methacholine PC20 was not significantly different between before and after the study period (geometric mean: 2.82 mg/mL vs. 3.16 mg/mL). These results suggest that the short-term Asian dust events might be associated with increased acute respiratory symptoms and changes in PEF outcomes. However, there might be little long-term influence on airway hyperresponsiveness in children with mild asthma. PMID:18303201

  8. Comparison of circadian variations using FEV1 and peak expiratory flow rates among normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Troyanov, S.; Ghezzo, H.; Cartier, A.; Malo, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Most studies that describe circadian variations in asthma have used maximum rate of peak expiratory flow (PEF) rather than forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) to assess airway calibre. This study was designed to assess circadian variations in PEF and FEV1 measured simultaneously and to compare variations in these measurements in normal and asthmatic subjects in a stable clinical state. METHODS--Twenty nine subjects (nine asthmatic subjects on bronchodilators, 10 on inhaled steroids, and 10 normal controls) were asked to record their PEF and FEV1 with a new portable instrument every two hours during the day and once on waking at night for two weeks. Circadian variations were examined in different ways using arithmetical indices and cosinor analysis. RESULTS--78% of PEF values and 75% of FEV1 values were considered to be reproducible and were included in the analysis. Variations obtained using PEF did not differ from those obtained using FEV1. Significant cosinor variations were found in at least 50% of recording days for most of the subjects and showed the same features as for arithmetical indices. Daily variations in PEF and FEV1 were significantly correlated with airway calibre and PC20 methacholine (r approximately 0.5 to approximately 0.6). CONCLUSIONS--PEF is as satisfactory as FEV1 for describing circadian variations among normal subjects and stable asthmatic subjects. PMID:8091322

  9. Transient changes in the pulmonary function of welders: a cross sectional study of Monday peak expiratory flow.

    PubMed Central

    Donoghue, A M; Glass, W I; Herbison, G P

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--The aim was to compare the peak expiratory flow (PEF) of welders and non-welders over a 12 hour period from the start of work on Monday. METHODS--The two study groups consisted of 20 welders and 20 non-welders, all men who had essentially never smoked, with no significant difference in age, height, ethnicity, or baseline spirometry between the groups. The PEF was measured for each welder before the start of work and 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 1, 2, 4, 7, and 12 hours after the start of welding. The same method was applied to the non-welders, for whom a proxy time for the start of welding was used. RESULTS--The percentage change in baseline PEF was calculated for each subject at each of the recording times. The welder and non-welder group means for these results were significantly different at 15 minutes (p = 0.028). Also, the group mean for maximum fall in PEF (at any of the recording times during the 12 hour period) was significantly greater for the welders (p = 0.011). 50% of the welders (10/20), but only 5% of the non-welders (1/20), experienced a fall in PEF in excess of 5% (p = 0.0046). 25% of the welders (5/20) experienced drops of greater than 5% within the first 15 minutes. CONCLUSION--The results are suggestive of an immediate type reaction in welders, similar to that seen in some cases of occupational asthma, although not so severe. Studies to determine if these reactions reflect non-specific bronchial hyper-responsiveness would be useful. It is recommended that future studies also undertake breathing zone measurements to relate the response to particular constituents of the welding plume, especially the gases ozone and nitrogen dioxide. PMID:7951781

  10. Areas subject to inundation by the 100-year flood in Avra Valley, Pima County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeske, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Avra Valley in Pima County, Arizona, is sparsely populated and is used mainly for agriculture and cattle grazing; however, its proximity to Tucson makes it desirable for urban development. Administrators and planners concerned with future land development may use the map report to determine the approximate areas that are subject to inundation by the 100-year flood. Avra Valley is drained mainly by Brawley Wash; Blanco Wash drains the west side of the valley. Most of the natural drainage system consists of small braided channels bordered by narrow bands of dense vegetation, which cause floodwater to spread over wide areas of shallow depths. During the 100-year flood, the areas inundated by Brawley and Blanco Washes may join in several places. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Creating Long Term Income Streams for the 100 Year Starship Study Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvester, A. J.

    Development and execution of long term research projects are very dependent on a consistent application of funding to maximize the potential for success. The business structure for the 100 Year Starship Study project should allow for multiple income streams to cover the expenses of the research objectives. The following examples illustrate the range of potential avenues: 1) affiliation with a charitable foundation for creating a donation program to fund a long term endowment for research, 2) application for grants to fund initial research projects and establish the core expertise of the research entity, 3) development of intellectual property which can then be licensed for additional revenue, 4) creation of spinout companies with equity positions retained by the lab for funding the endowment, and 5) funded research which is dual use for the technology goals of the interstellar flight research objectives. With the establishment of a diversified stream of funding options, then the endowment can be funded at a level to permit dedicated research on the interstellar flight topics. This paper will focus on the strategy of creating spinout companies to create income streams which would fund the endowment of the 100 Year Starship Study effort. This technique is widely used by universities seeking to commercially develop and market technologies developed by university researchers. An approach will be outlined for applying this technique to potentially marketable technologies generated as a part of the 100 Year Starship Study effort.

  12. The Effect on the Flow Conditions of Chinese Sturgeons’ Spawning Sites in the Process of Peak Regulation between the Three Gorges Dam and Gezhou Dam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Guo; Minghai, Huang; Feng, Jin

    Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis Gray) is a kind of key protected fish in ChangJiang river. Recently the Three Gorges dam has run, the peak regulation process between the two dams has serious effect on the formed spawning sites. Based on the previous research results of suitable flow conditions about the spawning sites, this article builds a 2-D shallow water numerical model, calculates the flow conditions of the spawning sites in the process of peak regulation. The results show that the water depth and velocity are various and affect the spawning sites in one 24-hours process of peak regulation, as a whole, when the discharge is below 9000 m3/s and 7500 m3/s respectively, the two spawning sites will be affected seriously.

  13. Peak expiratory flow rate as a surrogate for forced expiratory volume in 1 second in COPD severity classification in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Pothirat, Chaicharn; Chaiwong, Warawut; Phetsuk, Nittaya; Liwsrisakun, Chalerm; Bumroongkit, Chaiwat; Deesomchok, Athavudh; Theerakittikul, Theerakorn; Limsukon, Atikun

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited studies directly comparing correlation and agreement between peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) for severity classification of COPD. However, clarifying the role of PEFR as a surrogate of COPD severity classification instead of FEV1 is essential in situations and areas where spirometry is not routinely available. Purpose To evaluate the agreement between FEV1 and PEFR using Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) severity classification criteria. Materials and methods This cross-sectional study included stable COPD patients. Both absolute values and % predicted FEV1 and % predicted PEFR were obtained from the same patients at a single visit. The severity of COPD was classified according to GOLD criteria. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationship between FEV1 and PEFR. The agreement of % predicted FEV1 and % predicted PEFR in assigning severity categories was calculated using Kappa statistic, and identification of the limits of agreement was by Bland–Altman analysis. Statistical significance was set at P-value <0.05. Results Three hundred stable COPD patients were enrolled; 195 (65.0%) male, mean age 70.4±9.4 years, and mean % predicted FEV1 51.4±20.1. Both correlations between the % predicted FEV1 and PEFR as well as the absolute values were strongly significant (r=0.76, P<0.001 and r=0.87, P<0.001, respectively). However, severity categories of airflow limitation based on % predicted FEV1 or PEFR intervals were concordant in only 179 patients (59.7%). The Kappa statistic for agreement was 0.41 (95% confidence interval, 0.34–0.48), suggesting unsatisfied agreement. The calculated limits of agreement were wide (+27.1% to −28.9%). Conclusion Although the correlation between FEV1 and PEFR measurements were strongly significant, the agreement between the two tests was unsatisfied and may influence inappropriate clinical decision making

  14. Influence of treatment on peak expiratory flow and its relation to airway hyperresponsiveness and symptoms. The Dutch CNSLD Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Kerstjens, H. A.; Brand, P. L.; de Jong, P. M.; Koëter, G. H.; Postma, D. S.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Despite effective treatments, the morbidity and mortality of obstructive airways disease (asthma and COPD) remains high. Home monitoring of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is increasingly being advocated as an aid to better management of obstructive airways disease. The few available studies describing effects of treatment on the level and variation of PEF have involved relatively small numbers of subjects and did not use control groups. METHODS--Patients aged 18-60 years were selected with PC20 < or = 8 mg/ml and FEV1 < 95% confidence interval of predicted normal. They were randomised to receive, in addition to a beta 2 agonist, either an inhaled corticosteroid (BA+CS), an anticholinergic (BA+AC), or a placebo (BA+PL). One hundred and forty one of these subjects with moderately severe obstructive airways disease completed seven periods of two weeks of morning and afternoon PEF measurements at home during 18 months of blind follow up. RESULTS--Improvements in PEF occurred within the first three months of treatment with BA+CS and was subsequently maintained: the mean (SE) increase in morning PEF was 51 (8) l/min in the BA+CS group compared with no change in the other two groups. Similarly, afternoon PEF increased by 22 (7) l/min. Diurnal variation in PEF (amplitude %mean) decreased from 18.0% to 10.2% in the first three months of treatment with BA+CS. Within-subject relations between changes in diurnal variation in PEF and changes in PC20 were found to be predominantly negative (median rho-0.40) but with a large scatter. Relations between diurnal variation in PEF and changes in symptom scores, FEV1, and bronchodilator response were even weaker. CONCLUSIONS--In patients with moderately severe obstructive airways disease, PEF rates and variation are greatly improved by inhaled corticosteroids. Since the relation of diurnal PEF variation with PC20, symptoms, FEV1, and bronchodilator response were all weak, these markers of disease severity may all provide

  15. Phosphorus and dissolved organic carbon export during peak flow periods in three small homogenous catchments in eastern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benning, R.; Schwärzel, K.; Feger, K. H.

    2012-04-01

    Regional climate change scenarios for Central Europe predict both an overall increase in temperature and alterations in annual precipitation regimes. For large parts of Central Europe, climate change is expected to result in an increase in winter precipitation and a decrease in summer precipitation. In addition, an increase in extreme conditions, such as heat waves, prolonged drought periods, and heavy rainfall events are predicted. This research examines the potential impacts of increased heavy rainfall events on matter export from small catchment areas, and how different vegetation cover and land management options effects these exports. In order to evaluate the export of matter from different land-use types in the Eastern Ore Mountains (Saxony, NE Germany, 50° 48'18.06" North, 13° 36'24.54" East), study sites were established in three small catchments with homogeneous land-use. These study areas are each sub-catchments of the Ammelsdorf catchment, which provides inflow to the Lehnmühle reservoir (a major water supply for the city of Dresden). Each sub catchment represents one of the three main land-use types in the catchment area of the reservoir: crops (winter oilseed rape, winter wheat), grasslands, and forests (primarily spruce). Since November 2009 the discharge from these sub catchments has been continuously measured and water quality was analyzed on a weekly basis. During peak flow events, discharge was collected using automatic water samplers, which allowed for high temporal resolution analysis of matter export during these periods to be made. During the 2010 and 2011 hydrological years, several heavy rainfall events occurred which have been evaluated. During a 110-hour long precipitation event (P = 170 mm) between 37 and 81 water samples per sub catchment were collected and analyzed. The resulting export of dissolved phosphorus (ortho-PO4-) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the sub catchments during this event is provided in the results. In

  16. Effects of urbanization on peak streamflows in four Connecticut communities, 1980-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiss, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    Ratios of peak flows in urban basins to peak flows in rural basins in Connecticut are about 1.5 to 6.1 for the 2-year flood and 1.1 to 4.3 for the 100-year flood. The lower ratios, in each case, apply where 30% of the area is served by storm sewers, and the higher ratios apply where 90% of the area is served by storm sewers. Peak flows for six small urban streams were determined from rainfall and runoff data collected from 1981 to 1984 and from a distributed-routing rainfall-runoff model that simulated storm runoff for the period 1951-80. Recurrence intervals of the peak flows for these streams and three other urban streams were estimated using the log-Pearson Type III method and compared with peak flows for rural streams that were computed from regression equations. A comparison of the ratios of urban to rural peak flows shows that basins where more than 50% of the area is served by storm sewers have urban to rural ratios that are outside the 95% confidence limits of the rural regression equations. Peak flows for such areas can be adjusted graphically for the effects of urbanization if the streams drain less than 10 sq mi and manmade storage is less than 4.5 million cu ft/sq mi. (USGS)

  17. Improving Peak Capacity in Fast On-Line Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography with Post First Dimension Flow-Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Filgueira, Marcelo R.; Huang, Yuan; Witt, Klaus; Castells, Cecilia; Carr, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    The use of flow splitters between the two dimensions in on-line comprehensive two dimensional liquid chromatography (LC×LC) has not received very much attention in comparison to their use in GC×GC where they are quite common. In principle, splitting the flow after the first dimension column and performing on-line LC×LC on this constant fraction of the first dimension effluent should allow the two dimensions to be optimized almost independently. When there is no flow splitting any change in the first dimension flow rate has an immediate impact on the second dimension. With a flow splitter one could for example double the flow rate into the first dimension column and do a 1:1 flow split without changing the sample loop size or the sampler’s collection time. Of course, the sensitivity would be diminished but this can be partially compensated by use of a larger injection; this will likely only amount to a small price to pay for this increased resolving power and system flexibility. Among other benefits, we found a 2-fold increase in the corrected 2D peak capacity and the number of observed peaks for a 15 min analysis time by using a post first dimension flow splitter. At a fixed analysis time this improvement results primarily from an increase in the gradient time resulting from the reduced system re-equilibration time and to a smaller extent it is due to the increased peak capacity achieved by full optimization of the first dimension. PMID:22017622

  18. 1,100 years after an earthquake: modification of the earthquake record by submergence, Puget Lowland, Washington State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcos, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Crustal faults may pose a complicated story for earthquake reconstruction. In some cases, regional tectonic strain overprints the record of coseismic land-level changes. This study looks at the record of earthquakes at two sites in the Puget Lowland, Gorst and the Skokomish delta, and how post-earthquake submergence modified the paleoseismic records. The Puget Lowland is the slowly subsiding forearc basin of the northern Cascadia subduction zone. A series of active thrust faults cross this lowland. Several of these faults generated large (M7+) earthquakes, about 1,100 years ago and both field sites have submerged at least 1.5 m since that time. This submergence masked the geomorphic record of uplift in some areas, resulting in a misreading of the zone of earthquake deformation and potential misinterpretation of the underlying fault structure. Earthquakes ~1,100 years ago uplifted both field localities and altered river dynamics. At Gorst, a tsunami and debris flow accompanied uplift of at least 3 m by the Seattle fault. The increased sediment load resulted in braided stream formation for a period after the earthquake. At the Skokomish delta, differential uplift trapped the river on the eastern side of the delta for the last 1,100 years resulting in an asymmetric intertidal zone, 2-km wider on one side of the delta than the other. The delta slope or submergence may contribute to high rates of flooding on the Skokomish River. Preliminary results show the millennial scale rates of submergence vary with the southern Puget Lowland submerging at a faster rate than the northern Puget Lowland. This submergence complicates the reconstruction of past earthquakes and renders assessment of future hazards difficult for those areas that are based on uplifted marine platforms and other coastal earthquake signatures in several ways. 1) Post-earthquake submergence reduces the apparent uplift of marine terraces. 2) Submergence makes zones of earthquake deformation appear narrower. 3

  19. 100 years since the discovery of cosmic rays. A brief history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiavassa, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    With the words "Cosmic Rays" we mean particles impinging on the earth atmosphere. The existence of these particles was discovered in 1912, i.e. exactly 100 years ago, by the Austrian physicist Victor Hesss. In this contribution I will describe the steps that lead to such a discovery: from the electroscope measurements, showing their spontaneous discharge, to the correct explanation of this results with the existence of charged particles arriving from outside of the atmosphere. Then I will discuss the first steps of experimental particle physics, obtained with experiments performed detecting cosmic rays, that allowed important discoveries as the detection of antimatter and of new subatominc particles as muons and pions.

  20. Morphological response of songbirds to 100 years of landscape change in North America.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, A

    2010-06-01

    Major landscape changes caused by humans may create strong selection pressures and induce rapid evolution in natural populations. In the last 100 years, eastern North America has experienced extensive clear-cutting in boreal areas, while afforestation has occurred in most temperate areas. Based on museum specimens, I show that wings of several boreal forest songbirds and temperate songbirds of non-forest habitats have become more pointed over the last 100 years. In contrast, wings of most temperate forest and early-successional boreal forests species have become less pointed over the same period. In contrast to wing shape, the bill length of most species did not change significantly through time. These results are consistent with the "habitat isolation hypothesis", i.e., songbirds evolved in response to recent changes in the amount of available habitat and associated implications for mobility. Rapid morphological evolution may mitigate, without necessarily preventing, negative consequences of habitat loss caused by humans through direct exploitation or climate change. PMID:20583699

  1. Solar wind variations in the 60-100 year period range: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feynman, J.

    1983-01-01

    The evidence for and against the reality of a solar wind variation in the period range of 60-100 years is reexamined. Six data sets are reviewed; sunspot numbers, geomagnetic variations, two auroral data sets and two (14)C data sets. These data are proxies for several different aspects of the solar wind and the presence or absence of 60-100 year cyclic behavior in a particular data set does not necessarily imply the presence or absence of this variation in other sets. It was concluded that two different analyses of proxy data for a particular characteristic of the heliospheric solar wind yielded conflicting results. This conflict can be resolved only by future research. It is also definitely confirmed that proxy data for the solar wind in the ecliptic at 1 A.U. undergo a periodic variation with a period of approximately 87 years. The average amplitude and phase of this variation as seen in eleven cycles of proxy data are presented.

  2. PERSISTENCE OF PEAK FLOW DECREMENT IN CHILDREN FOLLOWING OZONE EXPOSURES EXCEEDING THE NATIONAL AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spironmetric measurements of lung function were made on six or more occasions over a five week period in 1982 in 39 children attending a summer day camp in Mendham, N.J. Mean slopes of the linear regressions of FVC, FEV1, MMEF and PEFR vs. peak 1 hr 03 concentrations for the day ...

  3. The Reissner Canard: The first all-metal airplane 100 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Egon

    2012-10-01

    In 1912 Professor Hans Reissner of the Technical University Aachen built a canard-type aeroplane, the world-wide first completely out of metal: although the Reissner Canard initiated a new technology with the Junkers J1 the first to follow in 1915 and 1000 more until now, little is known about the very first steps way back in Aachen. This paper tries to recapture some details of the developments 100 years ago with the aid of early publications and photographs and shed some light on the first wing fabricated out of a corrugated aluminum sheet mounted at the tail of the braced-steel-pipe fuselage to earn its airworthiness in Berlin Johannisthal in 1912.

  4. A profile of Frank Harrison: a pioneering Sheffield dentist from 100 years ago.

    PubMed

    Figures, K; Smith, C

    2012-10-01

    A review of the personal papers relating to Frank Harrison and held by the School of Clinical Dentistry in Sheffield reveal what a dedicated clinician he was and the significance of his achievements from over 100 years ago, both locally and nationally for his chosen profession and also for the people of Sheffield. In addition to being one of the first dentists in the world to experiment with X-rays in dentistry, and the first to write up his findings in a dental journal, he designed and patented dental instruments, wrote books, lectured on fine art (particularly Venetian and Florentine art), and gave lectures to the public in the hope that they would heed his message on the importance of maintaining good oral health. A search of national archives and library resources has added further information about his family and professional accomplishments. PMID:23099699

  5. Sustainable Foods and Medicines Support Vitality, Sex and Longevity for a 100-Year Starship Expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. R.

    Extended space flight requires foods and medicines that sustain crew health and vitality. The health and therapeutic needs for the entire crew and their children for a 100-year space flight must be sustainable. The starship cannot depend on resupply or carry a large cargo of pharmaceuticals. Everything in the starship must be completely recyclable and reconstructable, including food, feed, textiles, building materials, pharmaceuticals, vaccines, and medicines. Smart microfarms will produce functional foods with superior nutrition and sensory attributes. These foods provide high-quality protein and nutralence (nutrient density), that avoids obesity, diabetes, and other Western diseases. The combination of functional foods, lifestyle actions, and medicines will support crew immunity, energy, vitality, sustained strong health, and longevity. Smart microfarms enable the production of fresh medicines in hours or days, eliminating the need for a large dispensary, which eliminates concern over drug shelf life. Smart microfarms are adaptable to the extreme growing area, resource, and environmental constraints associated with an extended starship expedition.

  6. PREFACE: Spanish Relativity Meeting (ERE 2014): almost 100 years after Einstein's revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdá-Durán, P.; Font, J. A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Lledó, M. A.; Navarro-Salas, J.; Olmo, G. J.

    2015-04-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the international scientific conference ''Spanish Relativity Meeting (ERE 2014): almost 100 years after Einstein's revolution''. The conference was devoted to discussing the current state-of-the-art of a wide variety of topics of research in the fields of Gravitation and General Relativity in the ''pre-centennial'' year of General Relativity. The name of the conference was chosen to highlight the importance of the upcoming one hundredth anniversary of Einstein's theory of General Relativity, officially established by the Internal Society on General Relativity and Gravitation in November 25th, 2015. In particular, the conference was organized along three main lines of present-day research and applications of the theory, namely, Relativistic Astrophysics, Mathematical Relativity, and the interface between Gravitation and Quantum Field Theory.

  7. 100 Years of British military neurosurgery: on the shoulders of giants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A G

    2015-01-01

    Death from head injuries has been a feature of conflicts throughout the world for centuries. The burden of mortality has been variously affected by the evolution in weaponry from war-hammers to explosive ordnance, the influence of armour on survivability and the changing likelihood of infection as a complicating factor. Surgery evolved from haphazard trephination to valiant, yet disjointed, neurosurgery by a variety of great historical surgeons until the Crimean War of 1853-1856. However, it was events initiated by the Great War of 1914-1918 that not only marked the development of modern neurosurgical techniques, but our approach to military surgery as a whole. Here the author describes how 100 years of conflict and the input and intertwining relationships between the 20th century's great neurosurgeons established neurosurgery in the United Kingdom and beyond. PMID:26292388

  8. 100-year DASCH Light Curves of Kepler Planet-Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sumin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Grindlay, Jonathan; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2013-07-01

    We present 100 year light curves of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from the Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) project. 261 out of 997 host stars have at least 10 good measurements on DASCH scans of the Harvard plates. 109 of them have at least 100 good measurements, including 70% (73 out of 104) of all host stars with g <= 13 mag, and 44% (100 out of 228) of all host stars with g <= 14 mag. Our typical photometric uncertainty is ~0.1-0.15 mag. No variation is found at 3σ level for these host stars, including 21 confirmed or candidate hot Jupiter systems which might be expected to show enhanced flares from magnetic interactions between dwarf primaries and their close and relatively massive planet companions.

  9. 100 years of Pb deposition and transport in soils in Champaign, Illinois, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In Illinois, atmospheric deposition is one major source of heavy metal inputs to agricultural land. The atmospheric Pb deposition and transport record in agricultural soils in Champaign, Illinois, was established by studying surface and subsurface soil samples collected during the past 100 years from the Morrow Plots on the campus of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The Pb content in the soil samples was measured and the Ph deposition fluxes were calculated. The Pb content in surface soils increased sharply in the first half of the 20th century, and stayed invariant since. The maximum Pb flux from the atmosphere was estimated to be 27 (??14) ??g cm-2 yr-1 around 1940. The major pollution source for this increase probably was residential coal burning. It was estimated that in 50 yr, more than 50% of the Pb input had been lost from the surface soils.

  10. Peak Expiratory Flow Rate In Healthy Rural School Going Children (5-16 Years) of Bellur Region For Construction of Nomogram

    PubMed Central

    CB, Manjunath; SC, Kotinatot; Babu, Manjunatha

    2013-01-01

    Background: Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) recording is an essential measure in the management and evaluation of asthmatic children.It is helpful in monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. The PEFR can be measured by a simple instrument—peak expiratory flow meter. Aims and Objectives: To construct nomogram of PEFR in healthy rural school going children from Mandya district of Karnataka state, India and to use these nomograms for comparison with that of children with obstructive lung diseases for this region. Material and Methods: The study was conducted on Healthy rural school going children, both boys and girls between the age group of 5-16 years. For the determination of PEFR we used Mini Wright Peak Flow Meter. At three time measurement, the highest value of PEFR was recorded. Formula for prediction of PEFR was estimated by linear regression analysis after the correlation of PEFR with age and height for both boys and girls. Results: PEFR was measured in 1028 children aged 5 to 16 years by using Wright’s mini peak flow meter. Prediction equations were derived for PEFR with height in boys and girls. Normograms were plotted based on the observed values of PEFR in the study population. Significant linear correlation was seen of PEFR with height in boys (p<0.001, r=0.7624) and in girls (p<0.001, r=0.8825). Prediction equation for PEFR are -317.43 + 4.40 x height (cm) in boys and – 321.21 + 4.25 x height (cm) in girls. Conclusion: Reference values of PEFR are affected by regional, environmental and anthropometric factors. Hence, it is necessary to have regional reference values for children. Among different factors affecting PEFR, height correlates better with PEFR than weight and sex. Hence nomograms constructed can be used for this region PMID:24551654

  11. Voluminous lava-like precursor to a major ash-flow tuff: Low-column pyroclastic eruption of the Pagosa Peak Dacite, San Juan volcanic field, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bachmann, Olivier; Dungan, M.A.; Lipman, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Pagosa Peak Dacite is an unusual pyroclastic deposit that immediately predated eruption of the enormous Fish Canyon Tuff (~5000 km3) from the La Garita caldera at 28 Ma. The Pagosa Peak Dacite is thick (to 1 km), voluminous (>200 km3), and has a high aspect ratio (1:50) similar to those of silicic lava flows. It contains a high proportion (40-60%) of juvenile clasts (to 3-4 m) emplaced as viscous magma that was less vesiculated than typical pumice. Accidental lithic fragments are absent above the basal 5-10% of the unit. Thick densely welded proximal deposits flowed rheomorphically due to gravitational spreading, despite the very high viscosity of the crystal-rich magma, resulting in a macroscopic appearance similar to flow-layered silicic lava. Although it is a separate depositional unit, the Pagosa Peak Dacite is indistinguishable from the overlying Fish Canyon Tuff in bulk-rock chemistry, phenocryst compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar age. The unusual characteristics of this deposit are interpreted as consequences of eruption by low-column pyroclastic fountaining and lateral transport as dense, poorly inflated pyroclastic flows. The inferred eruptive style may be in part related to synchronous disruption of the southern margin of the Fish Canyon magma chamber by block faulting. The Pagosa Peak eruptive sources are apparently buried in the southern La Garita caldera, where northerly extensions of observed syneruptive faults served as fissure vents. Cumulative vent cross-sections were large, leading to relatively low emission velocities for a given discharge rate. Many successive pyroclastic flows accumulated sufficiently rapidly to weld densely as a cooling unit up to 1000 m thick and to retain heat adequately to permit rheomorphic flow. Explosive potential of the magma may have been reduced by degassing during ascent through fissure conduits, leading to fracture-dominated magma fragmentation at low vesicularity. Subsequent collapse of the 75 x 35 km2 La Garita

  12. 100+ years of instrumental seismology: the example of the ISC-GEM Global Earthquake Instrumental Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storchak, Dmitry; Di Giacomo, Domenico

    2015-04-01

    Systematic seismological observations of earthquakes using seismic instruments on a global scale began more than 100 years ago. Since then seismologists made many discoveries about the Earth interior and the physics of the earthquakes, also thanks to major developments in the seismic instrumentation deployed around the world. Besides, since the establishment of the first global networks (Milne and Jesuit networks), seismologists around the world stored and exchanged the results of routine observations (e.g., picking of arrival times, amplitude-period measurements, etc.) or more sophisticated analyses (e.g., moment tensor inversion) in seismological bulletins/catalogues. With a project funded by the GEM Foundation (www.globalquakemodel.org), the ISC and the Team of International Experts released a new global earthquake catalogue, the ISC-GEM Global Instrumental Earthquake Catalogue (1900 2009) (www.isc.ac.uk/iscgem/index.php), which, differently from previous global seismic catalogues, has the unique feature of covering the entire period of instrumental seismology with locations and magnitude re-assessed using modern approaches for the global earthquakes selected for processing (in the current version approximately 21,000). During the 110 years covered by the ISC-GEM catalogue many seismological developments occurred in terms of instrumentation, seismological practice and knowledge of the physics of the earthquakes. In this contribution we give a brief overview of the major milestones characterizing the last 100+ years of instrumental seismology that were relevant for the production of the ISC-GEM catalogue and the major challenges we faced to obtain a catalogue as homogenous as possible.

  13. Annual peak discharges from small drainage areas in Montana through September 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, M.V.; Omang, R.J.; Hull, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Annual peak discharge from small drainage areas is tabulated for 336 sites in Montana. The 1976 additions included data collected at 206 sites. The program which investigates the magnitude and frequency of floods from small drainage areas in Montana, was begun July 1, 1955. Originally 45 crest-stage gaging stations were established. The purpose of the program is to collect sufficient peak-flow data, which through analysis could provide methods for estimating the magnitude and frequency of floods at any point in Montana. The ultimate objective is to provide methods for estimating the 100-year flood with the reliability needed for road design. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Persistence of peak flow decrement in children following ozone exposures exceeding the National Ambient Air Quality Standard

    SciTech Connect

    Lioy, P.J.; Vollmuth, T.A.; Lippmann, M.

    1985-01-01

    Spironmetric measurements of lung function were made on six or more occasions over a five week period in 1982 in 39 children attending a summer day camp in Mendham, N.J. Mean slopes of the linear regressions of FVC, FEV1, MMEF and PEFR vs. peak 1-hr O/sub 3/ concentrations for the day of the function measurements in the individual children were negative, with PEFR showing the strongest effect. There were no consistent associations with other environmental variables. Analysis of residuals from the regression lines for PEFR vs. daily 1-hr O/sub 3/ peak and -hr H/sup +/ and SO/sub 4/= exposures for each child showed large overestimates in PEFR during the second week of the study. There was a photochemical smog episode immediately preceding the second week, with successive daily - hr O/sub 3/ peaks of 143, 185, 165, 135 and 115 ppb, and this smog exposure appears to be the most-likely cause of the persistent second week depression in PEFR from the values expected on the basis of an overall regression from the five weeks of data.

  15. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling to quantify effects of peak-flow management on channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat in the Cedar River, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Christiana; Czuba, Jonathan A.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Magirl, Christopher S.

    2010-01-01

    The Cedar River in Washington State originates on the western slope of the Cascade Range and provides the City of Seattle with most of its drinking water, while also supporting a productive salmon habitat. Water-resource managers require detailed information on how best to manage high-flow releases from Chester Morse Lake, a large reservoir on the Cedar River, during periods of heavy precipitation to minimize flooding, while mitigating negative effects on fish populations. Instream flow-management practices include provisions for adaptive management to promote and maintain healthy aquatic habitat in the river system. The current study is designed to understand the linkages between peak flow characteristics, geomorphic processes, riverine habitat, and biological responses. Specifically, two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling is used to simulate and quantify the effects of the peak-flow magnitude, duration, and frequency on the channel morphology and salmon-spawning habitat. Two study reaches, representative of the typical geomorphic and ecologic characteristics of the Cedar River, were selected for the modeling. Detailed bathymetric data, collected with a real-time kinematic global positioning system and an acoustic Doppler current profiler, were combined with a LiDAR-derived digital elevation model in the overbank area to develop a computational mesh. The model is used to simulate water velocity, benthic shear stress, flood inundation, and morphologic changes in the gravel-bedded river under the current and alternative flood-release strategies. Simulations of morphologic change and salmon-redd scour by floods of differing magnitude and duration enable water-resource managers to incorporate model simulation results into adaptive management of peak flows in the Cedar River. PDF version of a presentation on hydrodynamic modelling in the Cedar River in Washington state. Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2010.

  16. Methods for estimating peak discharge and flood boundaries of streams in Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, B.E.; Lindskov, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    Equations for estimating 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year peak discharges and flood depths at ungaged sites in Utah were developed using multiple-regression techniques. Ratios of 500- to 100-year values also were determined. The peak discharge equations are applicable to unregulated streams and the flood depth equations are applicable to the unregulated flow in natural stream channels. The flood depth data can be used to approximate flood prone areas. Drainage area and mean basin elevation are the two basin characteristics needed to use these equations. The standard error of estimate ranges from 38% to 74% for the 100-year peak discharge and from 23% to 33% for the 100-year flood depth. Five different flood mapping methods are described. Streams are classified into four categories as a basis for selecting a flood mapping method. Procedures for transferring flood depths obtained from the regression equations to a flood boundary map are outlined. Also, previous detailed flood mapping by government agencies and consultants is summarized to assist the user in quality control and to minimize duplication of effort. Methods are described for transferring flood frequency data from gaged to ungaged sites on the same stream. Peak discharge and flood depth frequency relations and selected basin characteristics data, updated through the 1980 water year, are tabulated for more than 300 gaging stations in Utah and adjoining states. In addition, weighted estimates of peak discharge relations based on the station data and the regression estimates are provided for each gaging station used in the regression analysis. (Author 's abstract)

  17. [100 years of Draeger Medical Technology (1902 - 2002) -- working for the applicability of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Strätling, M; Schmucker, P

    2004-09-01

    This survey analyses the history of 100 years of Draeger Medical Technology. Between 1889 and 1902 a number of inventions on the field of pressure gas technology allowed to solve application problems, which until then proved major obstacles to the safe and efficient use of compressed gases such as oxygen, nitrous oxide or carbon dioxide for medical and industrial purposes. A special significance is to be awarded here to pressure reducing valves, but also reliable manometers, nozzles and valves for pressure tanks were not generally available until then. These were first successfully and on a really significant scale introduced into international medical and non-medical pressure-gas technology by Draeger Inc. (Luebeck/Germany), and proved particularly successful in anaesthesia and rescue-devices (e. g. in the "Roth-Draeger Anaesthesia Apparatus" (1902). Consequently, starting in 1902, Draeger Inc. increasingly put an emphasis on developing medical and rescue technology and -- by doing so -- gained an important influence on the history of the implementation of modern oxygen therapy and of inhalative anaesthesia. A survey of the historically most important Draeger-Developments is provided. PMID:15490342

  18. Flood risk management in the Thames Estuary looking ahead 100 years.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Sarah; Donovan, Bill

    2005-06-15

    The River Thames tidal defences have provided protection against the increasing threat of tidal flooding from the North Sea for more than 2000 years. The flood of 1953 was the catalyst for the construction of the current system of River Thames tidal defences, which includes the Thames Barrier, and has provided one of the best standards of flood defence in the UK for over 20 years. Substantial growth is planned through "Thames Gateway", a regeneration initiative of the United Kingdom government. These new developments will fundamentally change the developed footprint in the Thames Estuary flood-plain, and will be in place for at least the next 100 years. This presents a challenge of planning future defence against a background of uncertainty over climate and other environmental change, while ensuring that correct decisions are made concerning the nature and location of new building in the tidal flood-plain. Through its "Thames Estuary 2100" project, the Environment Agency is developing a long-term strategy for flood risk management in the estuary. Implementation of major construction works on the River Thames could commence from around 2015. Alternatively, it may be decided that minimum works are undertaken to provide security and major investment is delayed until uncertainties over climate change have abated. Whatever long-term option is chosen, this must be preceded by a period of collaboration with the Thames Gateway developments to ensure appropriate and sustainable flood defences are incorporated in new riverside construction. PMID:16191661

  19. From Smallpox to Big Data: The Next 100 Years of Epidemiologic Methods.

    PubMed

    Gange, Stephen J; Golub, Elizabeth T

    2016-03-01

    For more than a century, epidemiology has seen major shifts in both focus and methodology. Taking into consideration the explosion of "big data," the advent of more sophisticated data collection and analytical tools, and the increased interest in evidence-based solutions, we present a framework that summarizes 3 fundamental domains of epidemiologic methods that are relevant for the understanding of both historical contributions and future directions in public health. First, the manner in which populations and their follow-up are defined is expanding, with greater interest in online populations whose definition does not fit the usual classification by person, place, and time. Second, traditional data collection methods, such as population-based surveillance and individual interviews, have been supplemented with advances in measurement. From biomarkers to mobile health, innovations in the measurement of exposures and diseases enable refined accuracy of data collection. Lastly, the comparison of populations is at the heart of epidemiologic methodology. Risk factor epidemiology, prediction methods, and causal inference strategies are areas in which the field is continuing to make significant contributions to public health. The framework presented herein articulates the multifaceted ways in which epidemiologic methods make such contributions and can continue to do so as we embark upon the next 100 years. PMID:26443419

  20. Psychologists in medical schools and academic medical centers: over 100 years of growth, influence, and partnership.

    PubMed

    Robiner, William N; Dixon, Kim E; Miner, Jacob L; Hong, Barry A

    2014-04-01

    Psychologists have served on the faculties of medical schools for over 100 years. Psychologists serve in a number of different roles and make substantive contributions to medical schools' tripartite mission of research, education, and clinical service. This article provides an overview of the history of psychologists' involvement in medical schools, including their growing presence in and integration with diverse departments over time. We also report findings from a survey of medical school psychologists that explored their efforts in nonclinical areas (i.e., research, education, administration) as well as clinical endeavors (i.e., assessment, psychotherapy, consultation). As understanding of the linkage between behavioral and psychological factors and health status and treatment outcomes increases, the roles of psychologists in health care are likely to expand beyond mental health. An increasing focus on accountability-related to treatment outcomes and interprofessional research, education, and models of care delivery-will likely provide additional opportunities for psychologists within health care and professional education. The well-established alignment of psychologists' expertise and skills with the mission and complex organizational needs of medical schools augurs a partnership on course to grow stronger. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:24588315

  1. [Nutrient dynamics over the past 100 years and its restoration baseline in Dianshan Lake].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Hua; Dong, Xu-Hui; Dong, Zhi; Sun, Dun-Ping

    2012-10-01

    The restoration of eutrophic lakes requires a good knowledge on the history and baseline of nutrients in the lakes. This work conducted an analysis on 210Pb/137Cs, water content, loss-on-ignition, sedimentary total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), total organic carbon (TOC) and diatoms in the four sediment cores from Dianshan Lake (near Shanghai City). Good coherence in palaeoproxies between the cores indicates a relatively stable sedimentary environment. With increasing human impact, diatom communities shifted from oligo-trophic species Cyclotella bodanica, C. ocelata, Achnanthes minutissima, Cocconeis placentula var lineate, Cymbella sp. , Fragilaria pintata, F. brevistrata, F. construens var venter to recent eutrophic species including Cyclostephanos dubias, C. atomus, Stephanodiscus minitulus, S. hantzschi, Aulacoseria alpigena. The epilimnetic TP over the past 100 years reconstructed using an established diatom-TP transfer function matches well with the monitoring TP where exists. Based on the sedimentary nutrient characteristics and diatom-reconstructed nutrient dynamics, we proposed that the nutrient baseline for Dianshan Lake is 50-60 microg x L(-1), 500 mg x kg(-1) and 550 mg x kg(-1) for water TP concentration, sedimentary TP and TN, respectively. PMID:23233952

  2. Rainfall and drought in equatorial east Africa during the past 1,100 years.

    PubMed

    Verschuren, D; Laird, K R; Cumming, B F

    2000-01-27

    Knowledge of natural long-term rainfall variability is essential for water-resource and land-use management in sub-humid regions of the world. In tropical Africa, data relevant to determining this variability are scarce because of the lack of long instrumental climate records and the limited potential of standard high-resolution proxy records such as tree rings and ice cores. Here we present a decade-scale reconstruction of rainfall and drought in equatorial east Africa over the past 1,100 years, based on lake-level and salinity fluctuations of Lake Naivasha (Kenya) inferred from three different palaeolimnological proxies: sediment stratigraphy and the species compositions of fossil diatom and midge assemblages. Our data indicate that, over the past millennium, equatorial east Africa has alternated between contrasting climate conditions, with significantly drier climate than today during the 'Medieval Warm Period' (approximately AD 1000-1270) and a relatively wet climate during the 'Little Ice Age' (approximately AD 1270-1850) which was interrupted by three prolonged dry episodes. We also find strong chronological links between the reconstructed history of natural long-term rainfall variation and the pre-colonial cultural history of east Africa, highlighting the importance of a detailed knowledge of natural long-term rainfall fluctuations for sustainable socio-economic development. PMID:10667789

  3. Action Stations! 100 years of trauma care on maritime and amphibious operations in the Royal Navy.

    PubMed

    Osborne, M; Smith, J E

    2015-01-01

    Over the past century trauma care within the Royal Navy (RN) has evolved; wartime experiences and military medical research have combined to allow significant improvement in the care of casualties. This article describes the key maritime and amphibious operations that have seen the Royal Navy Medical Service (RNMS) deliver high levels of support to wherever the Naval Service has deployed in the last 100 years. Key advancements in which progress has led to improved outcomes for injured personnel are highlighted--the control and treatment of blood loss, wound care, and the prevention and management of organ failure with optimal resuscitation. Historians often point out how slowly military medicine progressed for the first few thousand years of its recorded history, and how quickly it has progressed in the last century. This reflective article will show how the RNMS has been an integral part of that story, and how the lessons learnt by our predecessors have shaped our modern day doctrine surrounding trauma care. PMID:26292385

  4. Migration and health in Southern Africa: 100 years and still circulating

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Mark N.; Williams, Brian G.

    2014-01-01

    Migration has deep historical roots in South and Southern Africa and to this day continues to be highly prevalent and a major factor shaping South African society and health. In this paper we examine the role of migration in the spread of two diseases nearly 100 years apart: tuberculosis following the discovery of gold in 1886 and HIV in the early 1990s. Both cases demonstrate the critical role played by human migration in the transmission and subsequent dissemination of these diseases to rural areas. In both cases, migration acts to assemble in one high-risk environment thousands of young men highly susceptible to new diseases. With poor living and working conditions, these migration destinations act as hot-spots for disease transmission. Migration of workers back to rural areas then serves as a highly efficient means of disseminating these diseases to rural populations. We conclude by raising some more recent questions examining the current role of migration in Southern Africa. PMID:24653964

  5. Comparison of the 2-, 25-, and 100-year recurrence interval floods computed from observed data with the 1995 urban flood-frequency estimating equations for Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Inman, Ernest J.

    1997-01-01

    Flood-frequency relations were computed for 28 urban stations, for 2-, 25-, and 100-year recurrence interval floods and the computations were compared to corresponding recurrence interval floods computed from the estimating equations from a 1995 investigation. Two stations were excluded from further comparisons or analyses because neither station had a significant flood during the period of observed record. The comparisons, based on the student's t-test statistics at the 0.05 level of significance, indicate that the mean residuals of the 25- and 100-year floods were negatively biased by 26.2 percent and 31.6 percent, respectively, at the 26 stations. However, the mean residuals of the 2-year floods were 2.5 percent lower than the mean of the 2-year floods computed from the equations, and were not significantly biased. The reason for this negative bias is that the period of observed record at the 26 stations was a relatively dry period. At 25 of the 26 stations, the two highest simulated peaks used to develop the estimating equations occurred many years before the observed record began. However, no attempt was made to adjust the estimating equations because higher peaks could occur after the period of observed record and an adjustment to the equations would cause an underestimation of design floods.

  6. Geochemical reconnaissance for uranium in middle tertiary ash-flow tuffs of the Morey Peak Quadrangle, northern Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K.C.

    1981-01-01

    Rock and water samples were collected from the Morey Peak 15' quadrangle in the northern Hot Creek Range, Nye County, Nevada. The water was analyzed for trace element content. The rock samples were analyzed for oxide composition, selected trace element composition, and K-U-Th content. Water sampled from springs, hot springs, and creeks had temperatures ranging between 8 and 60/sup 0/C, conductance between 100 and 1800 mhos, pH between 5.4 and 8.7, and Eh between -106 and -301 mv. Factor analysis of the sample set reveals a U-Li-Se association and also identifies oxidized galena in solution. This analysis suggests that water need only be analyzed for copper, lithium, selenium, uranium, and vanadium in an uranium exploration program. Oxide analyses of these samples show gross similarities to other volcanic suites in central Nevada. Correlation coefficients indicate that in this area uranium is independent of any of the tested variables. Factor analyses suggest that there is an association between beryllium and uranium, arsenic and uranium, and selenium and uranium. The K-U-Th analyses yielded a wide variance of measurements. Potassium content ranges between 0 and 7.66%, thorium between 0 and 39.09 ppM, and uranium between 0.04 and 1744 ppM. Disequilibrium plots suggest that the mineralization present in the Corral Canyon area is late.

  7. To Humbly Go: Guarding Against Perpetuating Models of Colonization in the 100-Year Starship Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, W. R.

    Past patterns of exploration, colonization and exploitation on Earth continue to provide the predominant paradigms that guide many space programs. Any project of crewed space exploration, especially of the magnitude envisioned by the 100-Year Starship Study, must guard against the hubris that may emerge among planners, crew, and others associated with the project, including those industries and bureaucracies that will emerge from the effort. Maintaining a non-exploitative approach may be difficult in consideration of the century of preparatory research and development and the likely multigenerational nature of the voyage itself. Starting now with mission dreamers and planners, the purpose of the voyage must be cast as one of respectful learning and humble discovery, not of conquest (either actual or metaphorical) or other inappropriate models, including military. At a minimum, the Study must actively build non-violence into the voyaging culture it is beginning to create today. References to exploitive colonization, conquest, destiny and other terms from especially American frontier mythology, while tempting in their propagandizing power, should be avoided as they limit creative thinking about alternative possible futures. Future voyagers must strive to adapt to new environments wherever possible and be assimilated by new worlds both biologically and behaviorally rather than to rely on attempts to recreate the Earth they have left. Adaptation should be strongly considered over terraforming. This paper provides an overview of previous work linking the language of colonization to space programs and challenges the extension of the myth of the American frontier to the Starship Study. It argues that such metaphors would be counter-productive at best and have the potential to doom long-term success and survival by planting seeds of social decay and self-destruction. Cautions and recommendations are suggested.

  8. Potential Hazards of Tsunami Waves along the Chinese coast in the next 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yuen, D. A.; Sevre, E. O.; Shi, Y.

    2007-12-01

    In the next 100 years the Chinese coast faces potentially non-negligible danger from tsunamogenic earthquakes originating at the neighboring subducting plate boundaries in the Phillipines and the Ryukyu Islands. There are significant differences in the bottom bathymetry between the South China Sea bordering the southern province of Guangdong and the East China Sea and Yellow Sea adjacent to the provinces of Zhejiang, Jiangsu, and Shandong. We have found that the linear shallow-water equations can be used to predict with good enough accuracy the travel time of tsunami waves in the South China Sea, but the nonlinear shallow-water equations must be used for the shallower seas next to the northern Chinese provinces. There are some differences in the travel time predictions between the linear and nonlinear theories for the Yellow Sea region. This difference is enough to make a difference in terms of warning. We will use our newly developed probability method, called the probabilistic forecast of tsunami hazards ( PFTH ) for predicting the danger of tsunami waves with a certain height of around 2 meters to impinge on the cities along the Chinese coast in the next century.We have used the Gutenberg-Richter relationship applied locally to each locale for evaluating the probability of the seismic risk for large earthquakes, greater than magnitude 7. We have only included the frequency of shallow large earthquakes to take place . For the southern cities of Hong Kong and Macau, we found that the probability of a 2 meter wave to hit these ports is around 10 % in the next century. Cities in Taiwan are less vulnerable than the large coastal cities on the Chinese mainland. The probability results for the northern cities of Shanghai and Qingdao are around a few per cent for smaller wave heights like one meter or so. But even these smaller waves can be damaging --

  9. The Archives of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism: Documenting 100 Years of Carnegie Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    The archives of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism (DTM) of the Carnegie Institution of Washington document more than a century of geophysical and astronomical investigations. Primary source materials available for historical research include field and laboratory notebooks, equipment designs, plans for observatories and research vessels, scientists' correspondence, and thousands of expedition and instrument photographs. Yet despite its history, DTM long lacked a systematic approach to managing its documentary heritage. A preliminary records survey conducted in 2001 identified more than 1,000 linear feet of historically-valuable records languishing in dusty, poorly-accessible storerooms. Intellectual control at that time was minimal. With support from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, the "Carnegie Legacy Project" was initiated in 2003 to preserve, organize, and facilitate access to DTM's archival records, as well as those of the Carnegie Institution's administrative headquarters and Geophysical Laboratory. Professional archivists were hired to process the 100-year backlog of records. Policies and procedures were established to ensure that all work conformed to national archival standards. Records were appraised, organized, and rehoused in acid-free containers, and finding aids were created for the project web site. Standardized descriptions of each collection were contributed to the WorldCat bibliographic database and the AIP International Catalog of Sources for History of Physics. Historic photographs and documents were digitized for online exhibitions to raise awareness of the archives among researchers and the general public. The success of the Legacy Project depended on collaboration between archivists, librarians, historians, data specialists, and scientists. This presentation will discuss key aspects (funding, staffing, preservation, access, outreach) of the Legacy Project and is aimed at personnel in observatories, research

  10. 100 years of California’s water rights system: patterns, trends and uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grantham, Theodore E.; Viers, Joshua H.

    2014-08-01

    For 100 years, California’s State Water Resources Control Board and its predecessors have been responsible for allocating available water supplies to beneficial uses, but inaccurate and incomplete accounting of water rights has made the state ill-equipped to satisfy growing societal demands for water supply reliability and healthy ecosystems. Here, we present the first comprehensive evaluation of appropriative water rights to identify where, and to what extent, water has been dedicated to human uses relative to natural supplies. The results show that water right allocations total 400 billion cubic meters, approximately five times the state’s mean annual runoff. In the state’s major river basins, water rights account for up to 1000% of natural surface water supplies, with the greatest degree of appropriation observed in tributaries to the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers and in coastal streams in southern California. Comparisons with water supplies and estimates of actual use indicate substantial uncertainty in how water rights are exercised. In arid regions such as California, over-allocation of surface water coupled with trends of decreasing supply suggest that new water demands will be met by re-allocation from existing uses. Without improvements to the water rights system, growing human and environmental demands portend an intensification of regional water scarcity and social conflict. California’s legal framework for managing its water resources is largely compatible with needed reforms, but additional public investment is required to enhance the capacity of the state’s water management institutions to effectively track and regulate water rights.

  11. Infrared survey of 50 buildings constructed during 100 years: thermal performances and damage conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1995-03-01

    Different building constructions and craftsmanship give rise to different thermal performance and damage conditions. The building stock of most industrial countries consists of buildings of various age, and constructions, from old historic buildings with heavy stone or wooden construction, to new buildings with heavy or light concrete construction, or modern steel or wooden construction. In this paper the result from a detailed infrared survey of 50 buildings from six Swedish military camps is presented. The presentation is limited to a comparison of thermal performance and damage conditions of buildings of various ages, functions, and constructions, of a building period of more than 100 years. The result is expected to be relevant even to civilian buildings. Infrared surveys were performed during 1992-1993, with airborne, and mobile short- and longwave infrared systems, out- and indoor thermography. Interpretation and analysis of infrared data was performed with interactive image and analyzing systems. Field inspections were carried out with fiber optics system, and by ocular inspections. Air-exchange rate was measured in order to quantify air leakages through the building envelope, indicated in thermograms. The objects studied were single-family houses, barracks, office-, service-, school- and exercise buildings, military hotels and restaurants, aircraft hangars, and ship factory buildings. The main conclusions from this study are that most buildings from 1880 - 1940 have a solid construction with a high quality of craftsmanship, relatively good thermal performance, due to extremely thick walls, and adding insulation at the attic floor. From about 1940 - 1960 the quality of construction, thermal performance and craftsmanship seem to vary a lot. Buildings constructed during the period of 1960 - 1990 have in general the best thermal performance due to a better insulation capacity, however, also one finds here the greatest variety of problems. The result from this

  12. Climatic and Hydrological Changes of Past 100 Years in Asian Arid Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhaodong; Salnikov, Vitaliy; Xu, Changchun

    2014-05-01

    The Asian Arid Zone (AAZ) is here defined to include the following regions: northwestern China, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Generally speaking, the AAZ has experienced a temperature rising during the past 100 years that was significantly faster than the global average (0.14 ºC per decade). Specifically, the rate was 0.39 ºC per decade in northwestern China (1950-2010), 0.26 ºC per decade in Kazakhstan (1936-2005), 0.22 ºC per decade in Mongolia (1940-2010), 0.29 ºC per decade in Uzbekistan (1950-2005), 0.18 ºC per decade in Turkmenistan (1961-1995). It should be noted that the mountainous parts of AAZ seems to have experienced a slower rate of temperature rising. For example, the rate was 0.10 ºC per decade in Tajikistan (1940-2005) and was 0.08 ºC per decade in Kyrgyzstan (1890-2005). Precipitation has a slight increasing trend in northwestern China, but it has fluctuated along a near-constant line in the rest of the AAZ. Hydrological data from high-elevation basin show that the runoff has been increasing primarily as a result of rising temperature that caused increases in ice melting. A natural decreasing trend of surface runoff in low-elevation basins is undeniable and the decreasing trend is attributable to intensified evaporation under warming conditions. It is true that the total amount of runoff in the Tianshan Mountains and the associated basins has been increased primarily as a result of temperature rising-resulted increases in ice melting. But, approaching to the turning point of glacier-melting supplies to runoff will pose a great threat to socio-economic sustainability and to ecological security. The turning point refers to the transition from increasing runoff to decreasing runoff within ice melting supplied watersheds under a warming climate.

  13. Current-wave spectra coupling project. Volume III. Cumulative distribution of forces on structures subjected to the combined action of currents and random waves for potential OTEC sites: (A) Keahole Point, Hawaii, 100 year hurricane; (B) Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico, 100 year hurricane; (C) New Orleans, Louisiana, 100 year hurricane; (D) West Coast of Florida, 100 year hurricane. [CUFOR code

    SciTech Connect

    Venezian, G.; Bretschneider, C.L.

    1980-08-01

    This volume details a new methodology to analyze statistically the forces experienced by a structure at sea. Conventionally a wave climate is defined using a spectral function. The wave climate is described using a joint distribution of wave heights and periods (wave lengths), characterizing actual sea conditions through some measured or estimated parameters like the significant wave height, maximum spectral density, etc. Random wave heights and periods satisfying the joint distribution are then generated. Wave kinetics are obtained using linear or non-linear theory. In the case of currents a linear wave-current interaction theory of Venezian (1979) is used. The peak force experienced by the structure for each individual wave is identified. Finally, the probability of exceedance of any given peak force on the structure may be obtained. A three-parameter Longuet-Higgins type joint distribution of wave heights and periods is discussed in detail. This joint distribution was used to model sea conditions at four potential OTEC locations. A uniform cylindrical pipe of 3 m diameter, extending to a depth of 550 m was used as a sample structure. Wave-current interactions were included and forces computed using Morison's equation. The drag and virtual mass coefficients were interpolated from published data. A Fortran program CUFOR was written to execute the above procedure. Tabulated and graphic results of peak forces experienced by the structure, for each location, are presented. A listing of CUFOR is included. Considerable flexibility of structural definition has been incorporated. The program can easily be modified in the case of an alternative joint distribution or for inclusion of effects like non-linearity of waves, transverse forces and diffraction.

  14. Erosion and Deposition Patterns of the Mississippi River as a Result of the "100-Year" Flood Event of April 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D.; Magnani, M.; McIntosh, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    Due to damming in the upper Mississippi River system, rates of sedimentation on the Mississippi River have decreased by more than half since the 1930s, which has resulted in the subsidence of the historic deltaic systems. In order to counteract this trend, the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) have diverted most of the Mississippi River sediment flow towards the current deltaic system, although there is concern that current sediment deposition rates may not be enough. Modern land loss along the Mississippi River deltaic plain is a function of many parameters, including the sediment storage and the sediment budget of the river. These parameters are poorly constrained for most rivers. This study explores the possibility of estimating the amount of sediment mobilization during the "100-Year" flood that took place in April 2011 in the portion of the Mississippi River flowing by Memphis, Tennessee. The opportunity to acquire high resolution seismic CHIRP data along the Mississippi River immediately after the flood allows us to compare the new data with similar data acquired in September 2009 in the same part of the river, to evaluate changes sedimentary structures and in the sediment removal/deposition due to the exceptional flooding event. The data were acquired in both cases using an Edgetech SB-512i CHIRP, a 0.7 - 1.2 kHz source pulse, and were recorded to a depth of 5 - 50 m sub-bottom. The compared segments were taken along the same 20 km track of river and comparisons were drawn between them at 9 intersection points. Two main observations can be made from the preliminary analysis of the two datasets: 1) the 2011 data show evidence of widespread erosion and limited deposition. Up to 6 m of alluvium appear to have been eroded from the river bottom. Where sediments have been newly deposited, they are characterized by massive appearance and lack of internal structure; 2) the wavelengths of the sandbars imaged in the post-flood data are 1.5 - 3 times longer than those

  15. Multimodel hydrologic ensemble predictions of peak flows: lessons learned from the real-time experiment in the upper Nysa Klodzka basin (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, Tomasz; Mizinski, Bartlomiej

    2015-04-01

    The novel system for issuing the real-time warnings against hydrologic hazards, known as HydroProg (research project no. 2011/01/D/ST10/04171 of the National Science Centre of Poland), has been implemented in the upper Nysa Klodzka basin (SW Poland). The system itself works like a bridge between automatic hydrometeorological observational networks and numerous hydrologic models. Its main objective is to automatically produce and publish flood warnings on a basis of prognoses of river stages calculated from dissimilar models and - most importantly - their multimodel ensembles which are computed in real time within HydroProg. The implementation in question for the upper Nysa Klodzka basin is abbreviated as HydroProg-Klodzko, and is feasible due to the partnership with Klodzko County which maintains the Local System for Flood Monitoring (Lokalny System Oslony Przeciwpowodziowej - LSOP). The HydroProg-Klodzko prototype is continuously, i.e. with 15-minute update, calculating multimodel hydrologic ensemble predictions and publishing them along with prognoses corresponding to individual ensemble members (www.klodzko.hydroprog.uni.wroc.pl). The real-time HydroProg-Klodzko experiment provided us with a valuable database of predictions as well as their errors and performance characteristics. At present, six hydrologic models participate in the experiment, however two of them (multi- and univariate autoregressive time series models) work uninterruptedly since the launch of the system in August 2013. The present study focuses on the detailed characterization of the real-time performance of the two models in predicting a few significant peak flows that occurred over the entire year of the experiment. In particular, we show how the two models can be weighted to produce skilful multimodel ensemble prognoses of river stages during peak flows. We identify phases of a peak flow in which, in order to improve the predictive skills, one should switch between individual models and

  16. ANNUS MIRABILIS. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS: Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity (5-8 April 2005)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.

    2005-06-01

    As part of the celebration of the World Year of Physics, the Conference "Geometry and Physics after 100 Years of Einstein's Relativity" was held in Golm, near Potsdam, Germany, on April 5-8, 2005. The Conference was organized by the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (also known as the Albert Einstein Institute), which is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2005. Conference participants discussed progress made in theoretical and experimental research during the 100 years since the publication of Einstein's famous papers in 1905, the year which has gone down in history as 'Albert Einstein's ANNUS MIRABILIS'.

  17. Improving calibration of two key parameters in Hydrologic Engineering Center hydrologic modelling system, and analysing the influence of initial loss on flood peak flows.

    PubMed

    Lin, Musheng; Chen, Xingwei; Chen, Ying; Yao, Huaxia

    2013-01-01

    Parameter calibration is a key and difficult issue for a hydrological model. Taking the Jinjiang Xixi watershed of south-east China as the study area, we proposed methods to improve the calibration of two very sensitive parameters, Muskingum K and initial loss, in the Hydrologic Engineering Center hydrologic modelling system (HEC-HMS) model. Twenty-three rainstorm flood events occurring from 1972 to 1977 were used to calibrate the model using a trial-and-error approach, and a relationship between initial loss and initial discharge for these flood events was established; seven rainstorm events occurring from 1978 to 1979 were used to validate the two parameters. The influence of initial loss change on different return-period floods was evaluated. A fixed Muskingum K value, which was calibrated by assuming a flow wave velocity at 3 m/s, could be used to simulate a flood hydrograph, and the empirical power-function relationship between initial loss and initial discharge made the model more applicable for flood forecasting. The influence of initial loss on peak floods was significant but not identical for different flood levels, and the change rate of peak floods caused by the same initial loss change was more remarkable when the return period increased. PMID:24355863

  18. Peak-flow frequency analyses and results based on data through water year 2011 for selected streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana: Chapter C in Montana StreamStats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2016-01-01

    Chapter C of this Scientific Investigations Report documents results from a study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Transportation and the Montana Department of Natural Resources, to provide an update of statewide peak-flow frequency analyses and results for Montana. The purpose of this report chapter is to present peak-flow frequency analyses and results for 725 streamflow-gaging stations in or near Montana based on data through water year 2011. The 725 streamflow-gaging stations included in this study represent nearly all streamflowgaging stations in Montana (plus some from adjacent states or Canadian Provinces) that have at least 10 years of peak-flow records through water year 2011. For 29 of the 725 streamflow-gaging stations, peak-flow frequency analyses and results are reported for both unregulated and regulated conditions. Thus, peak-flow frequency analyses and results are reported for a total of 754 analyses. Estimates of peak-flow magnitudes for 66.7-, 50-, 42.9-, 20-, 10-, 4-, 2-, 1-, 0.5-, and 0.2-percent annual exceedance probabilities are reported. These annual exceedance probabilities correspond to 1.5-, 2-, 2.33-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, 200-, and 500-year recurrence intervals.

  19. What's a Peak Flow Meter?

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... the meter reads (this is known as a reading). Repeat three times and note the highest recorded ...

  20. The Bee Disease Diagnostic Service - 100 Years and Growing at the USDA Bee Research laboratory, Beltsville, MD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article discusses the history of honey bee research in the Washington, D.C. area including the 100 year old bee disease diagnostic service available for beekeepers and apiary inspectors. This service provides the Bee Research Laboratory with first-hand knowledge of the problems facing the beek...

  1. Looking toward the Future: New Research Helps Black Sororities and Fraternities Consider New Governing Structures for the Next 100 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffins, Paul

    2004-01-01

    From a historical perspective, it's interesting to note that at their 100-year mark Black fraternities and sororities are facing some of the very same political criticisms encountered half a century ago. The Black Greeks' ability to be a greater force for social change is also constrained by the basic internal structures of the organizations…

  2. A 100-year average recurrence interval for the San Andreas fault at Wrightwood, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fumal, T.E.; Pezzopane, S.K.; Weldon, R.J., II; Schwartz, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Evidence for five large earthquakes during the past five centuries along the San Andreas fault zone 70 kilometers northeast of Los Angeles, California, indicates that the average recurrence interval and the temporal variability are significantly smaller than previously thought. Rapid sedimentation during the past 5000 years in a 150-meter-wide structural depression has produced a greater than 21-meter-thick sequence of debris flow and stream deposits interbedded with more than 50 datable peat layers. Fault scarps, colluvial wedges, fissure infills, upward termination of ruptures, and tilted and folded deposits above listric faults provide evidence for large earthquakes that occurred in A.D. 1857, 1812, and about 1700, 1610, and 1470.

  3. A 100-year average recurrence interval for the san andreas fault at wrightwood, california.

    PubMed

    Fumal, T E; Schwartz, D P; Pezzopane, S K; Weldon, R J

    1993-01-01

    Evidence for five large earthquakes during the past five centuries along the San Andreas fault zone 70 kilometers northeast of Los Angeles, California, indicates that the average recurrence interval and the temporal variability are significantly smaller than previously thought. Rapid sedimentation during the past 5000 years in a 150-meter-wide structural depression has produced a greater than 21-meter-thick sequence of debris flow and stream deposits interbedded with more than 50 datable peat layers. Fault scarps, colluvial wedges, fissure infills, upward termination of ruptures, and tilted and folded deposits above listric faults provide evidence for large earthquakes that occurred in A.D. 1857, 1812, and about 1700, 1610, and 1470. PMID:17790984

  4. A method of measuring the peak flow rate and the regurgitant volume of regurgitation based on the characteristics of turbulent free jets.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, M; Hirai, A; Seo, Y; Miyajima, Y; Uchibori, T

    1991-01-01

    The issuing flow rate of a jet, Q0, is given by Q0 = U0A, where U0 is the issuing velocity of the jet and A is the cross-sectional area of the orifice. However, measurement of A of a regurgitant jet in the cardiovascular system is difficult. On the assumption that the jet is 'free' and turbulent, the following relations apply between the diameter of the orifice D, the length of the core region of the jet L, the centerline velocity of the jet Uc(chi) at an arbitrary distance chi(greater than L) from the orifice, and U0:L = 6.8D and Uc(chi)/U0 = L/chi. From these equations we obtain Q0 = 0.017 (chi Uc(chi))2/U0. Pulsatile jets issuing into an aqueous glycerol bath through orifices with various diameters were studied. U0, chi and Uc(chi) were measured with a color Doppler system. There was a good linear correlation between the peak flow rates estimated from the above equation and those measured with a flowmeter irrespective of the diameter of orifices (y = 0.93 chi + 3.8, r = 0.95, SEE = 6.6 ml/s). Assuming that the flow rate waveform is similar to the issuing velocity waveform, we estimated the issuing volume per stroke by integrating the issuing velocity. There was a good linear correlation between the estimated issuing volume and the known stroke volume of the pump (y = 1.0 chi + 2.6, r = 0.92, SEE = 2.8 ml). PMID:1854673

  5. Ecological studies of polyploidy in the 100 years following its discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Justin; Ramsey, Tara S.

    2014-01-01

    Polyploidy is a mutation with profound phenotypic consequences and thus hypothesized to have transformative effects in plant ecology. This is most often considered in the context of geographical and environmental distributions—as achieved from divergence of physiological and life-history traits—but may also include species interactions and biological invasion. This paper presents a historical overview of hypotheses and empirical data regarding the ecology of polyploids. Early researchers of polyploidy (1910s–1930s) were geneticists by training but nonetheless savvy to its phenotypic effects, and speculated on the importance of genome duplication to adaptation and crop improvement. Cytogenetic studies in the 1930s–1950s indicated that polyploids are larger (sturdier foliage, thicker stems and taller stature) than diploids while cytogeographic surveys suggested that polyploids and diploids have allopatric or parapatric distributions. Although autopolyploidy was initially regarded as common, influential writings by North American botanists in the 1940s and 1950s argued for the principle role of allopolyploidy; according to this view, genome duplication was significant for providing a broader canvas for hybridization rather than for its phenotypic effects per se. The emphasis on allopolyploidy had a chilling effect on nascent ecological work, in part due to taxonomic challenges posed by interspecific hybridization. Nonetheless, biosystematic efforts over the next few decades (1950s–1970s) laid the foundation for ecological research by documenting cytotype distributions and identifying phenotypic correlates of polyploidy. Rigorous investigation of polyploid ecology was achieved in the 1980s and 1990s by population biologists who leveraged flow cytometry for comparative work in autopolyploid complexes. These efforts revealed multi-faceted ecological and phenotypic differences, some of which may be direct consequences of genome duplication. Several classical

  6. The 2010 explosive eruption of Java's Merapi volcano—A '100-year' event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surono; Jousset, Philippe; Pallister, John; Boichu, Marie; Buongiorno, M. Fabrizia; Budisantoso, Agus; Costa, Fidel; Andreastuti, Supriyati; Prata, Fred; Schneider, David; Clarisse, Lieven; Humaida, Hanik; Sumarti, Sri; Bignami, Christian; Griswold, Julie; Carn, Simon; Oppenheimer, Clive; Lavigne, Franck

    2012-10-01

    Merapi volcano (Indonesia) is one of the most active and hazardous volcanoes in the world. It is known for frequent small to moderate eruptions, pyroclastic flows produced by lava dome collapse, and the large population settled on and around the flanks of the volcano that is at risk. Its usual behavior for the last decades abruptly changed in late October and early November 2010, when the volcano produced its largest and most explosive eruptions in more than a century, displacing at least a third of a million people, and claiming nearly 400 lives. Despite the challenges involved in forecasting this 'hundred year eruption', we show that the magnitude of precursory signals (seismicity, ground deformation, gas emissions) was proportional to the large size and intensity of the eruption. In addition and for the first time, near-real-time satellite radar imagery played an equal role with seismic, geodetic, and gas observations in monitoring eruptive activity during a major volcanic crisis. The Indonesian Center of Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) issued timely forecasts of the magnitude of the eruption phases, saving 10,000-20,000 lives. In addition to reporting on aspects of the crisis management, we report the first synthesis of scientific observations of the eruption. Our monitoring and petrologic data show that the 2010 eruption was fed by rapid ascent of magma from depths ranging from 5 to 30 km. Magma reached the surface with variable gas content resulting in alternating explosive and rapid effusive eruptions, and released a total of ~ 0.44 Tg of SO2. The eruptive behavior seems also related to the seismicity along a tectonic fault more than 40 km from the volcano, highlighting both the complex stress pattern of the Merapi region of Java and the role of magmatic pressurization in activating regional faults. We suggest a dynamic triggering of the main explosions on 3 and 4 November by the passing seismic waves generated by regional earthquakes on

  7. Rapid elimination of CO through the lungs: coming full circle 100 years on

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Joseph A; Iscoe, Steve; Fedorko, Ludwik; Duffin, James

    2011-01-01

    At the start of the 20th century, CO poisoning was treated by administering a combination of CO2 and O2 (carbogen) to stimulate ventilation. This treatment was reported to be highly effective, even reversing the deep coma of severe CO poisoning before patients arrived at the hospital. The efficacy of carbogen in treating CO poisoning was initially attributed to the absorption of CO2; however, it was eventually realized that the increase in pulmonary ventilation was the predominant factor accelerating clearance of CO from the blood. The inhaled CO2 in the carbogen stimulated ventilation but prevented hypocapnia and the resulting reductions in cerebral blood flow. By then, however, carbogen treatment for CO poisoning had been abandoned in favour of hyperbaric O2. Now, a half-century later, there is accumulating evidence that hyperbaric O2 is not efficacious, most probably because of delays in initiating treatment. We now also know that increases in pulmonary ventilation with O2-enriched gas can clear CO from the blood as fast, or very nearly as fast, as hyperbaric O2. Compared with hyperbaric O2, the technology for accelerating pulmonary clearance of CO with hyperoxic gas is not only portable and inexpensive, but also may be far more effective because treatment can be initiated sooner. In addition, the technology can be distributed more widely, especially in developing countries where the prevalence of CO poisoning is highest. Finally, early pulmonary CO clearance does not delay or preclude any other treatment, including subsequent treatment with hyperbaric O2. PMID:21967899

  8. Towards a robust calving and melt-history for Helheim Glacier, SE Greenland, for the last 100 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T. J.; Ellegaard, M.; Markussen, T. N.

    2013-12-01

    Observations of increased ice-discharge from tidewater glaciers in Greenland in the early and mid 2000s has led to concern about a possible rapid loss of ice from the ice sheet in a scenario with increasing air and ocean water temperatures. In order to evaluate the strength and uniqueness of the observed increase a robust data-set on the temporal variation of calving and melt is strongly needed. The only reliable data prior to the period of aerial photographs and instrumental observations is the archive preserved at the seabed in the fjords and coastal waters off the ice sheet. Establishment of core-chronology is central in studies of these archives and is based on Pb-210 dating which will reach approx. 100 years back in time. Establishment of a detailed and accurate core-chronology by means of Pb-210 dating and Cs-137 peaks is by no means a trivial task in environments influenced by episodic deposition of ice-rafted debris (IRD). The deposition will have a relatively large component of random variability which could be mistaken for actual changes in sedimentation rate, especially so if only one or a few cores are analyzed. To increase the reliability of the calving reconstruction, a total of 13 cores have been sampled in this study in Sermilik Fjord in August 2012 at depths between approximately 700 to 900 m. Eleven of the cores are from within the central basin north of 66 degrees North and two are from the outer part of the fjord south of that line. CTD-profiles and measurements of floc size in situ indicate that the sedimentation is significantly influenced by deposition of IRD and temporal changes in sediment accumulation rates will therefore be examined for all the cores. The cores are also being analyzed for their content of dinoflagellate cysts and diatoms in order to examine possible temporal changes in ocean water temperature in the fjord. So far (August 2013) six cores have been studied and the total average accumulation rate for each year since 1925 has

  9. 32 Peak Nasal Inspiratory Flow Levels in Children With Allergic Rhinitis and Their Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL)

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraju, Major K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis impairs the quality of life children. There is paucity of data with regards to clinical profile and health related quality of life (HRQL) of children with Allergic rhinitis in India and hence we studied the clinical profile and measured Peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) of children with allergic rhinitis in an urban population, and assessed their Quality of life. Methods Children with moderate to severe persistent Allergic rhinitis, diagnosed as per Allergic Rhinitis and Impact on Asthma (ARIA) guidelines, in the age group of 6 to 18 years were included in this study. The quality of life questionnaire, pediatric and adolescent by Juniper et al was used. PNIF was measured by using ‘In- Check’ peak nasal inspiratory flow meter. Results Of the 100 children studied, 70 (70%) were in the age group of 6 to 11years and 30/100 (30%) were between 12 and 18 years of age. An equal distribution of sex was observed in 6 to 11 year age group, and in the 12 to 18 year age group there was a male preponderance (1.9:1). Majority (87%) of children in our study had Moderate Allergic rhinitis and 13% had severe Allergic rhinitis. Bronchial asthma, a commonly reported entity in Allergic rhinitis was seen in 19% of the cases. 66% of children in our study had PNIF values of the fifth to 50th percentile where as 24% were in the third to fifth percentile and 10% had their PNIF values less than third percentile. PNIF showed a linear correlation with severity of allergic rhinitis. HRQL assessment showed that children in the 6 to 11 year group had derangement in the activity and physical symptoms domain while children in the12 to 18 year group had predominately involvement of emotional and practical problem domains. Quality of life score worsened with decrease in PNIF. Conclusions PNIF is very useful tool to quantify the nasal obstruction in Allergic Rhinitis. PNIF is easy to administer, reproducible and correlates well with the severity of the disease. HRQL

  10. Feasibility study of respiratory questionnaire and peak flow recordings in autobody shop workers exposed to isocyanate-containing spray paint: observations and limitations.

    PubMed

    Cullen, M R; Redlich, C A; Beckett, W S; Weltmann, B; Sparer, J; Jackson, G; Ruff, T; Rubinstein, E; Holden, W

    1996-06-01

    Diisocyanates, highly reactive monomers which cross-link polyurethane, are the most widely recognized causes of occupational asthma. Many exposed workers are end-users, including autobody spray painters who form a large population at risk. Neither the factors which determine incidence rate nor strategies for control have been adequately studied in this setting. We have conducted a cross-sectional survey of 23 (about one in five) autobody shops in the New Haven area to determine the feasibility of clinical epidemiological studies in this population. Among 102 workers, there was a high rate of airway symptoms consistent with occupational asthma (19.6%). Symptoms were most prevalent among those with the greatest opportunity for exposure (dedicated spray painters) and least among office workers; part-time painters had intermediate rates. Atopy was not associated with risk while smoking seemed to correlate with symptoms. Regular use of air-supplied respirators appeared to be associated with lower risk among workers who painted part- or full-time. We were unable to validate the questionnaire responses with peak expiratory flow record data attempted on a 1/3 sample of the workers. Despite intensive training and effort, subject compliance was limited. Among those who provided adequate data (24 of 38), only two demonstrated unequivocal evidence of labile airways; two others demonstrated lesser changes consistent with an occupational effect on flow rates. There was no clear association between these findings and either questionnaire responses or exposure classification. Overall, the survey suggests that there is a high prevalence of airway symptoms among workers in autobody shops, at least in part due to work-related asthma. However, there is need for both methodological and substantive research in this setting to document rates of occupational asthma and to develop a scientific basis for its effective control. PMID:8695771