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Sample records for 10mv unflattened photon

  1. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-01-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques. PMID:25190997

  2. Neutron contamination of Varian Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, S.; Tursinah, R.; Rhani, M. F.; Soh, R. C. X.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-03-01

    High energy medical accelerators are commonly used in radiotherapy to increase the effectiveness of treatments. As we know neutrons can be emitted from a medical accelerator if there is an incident of X-ray that hits any of its materials. This issue becomes a point of view of many researchers. The neutron contamination has caused many problems such as image resolution and radiation protection for patients and radio oncologists. This study concerns the simulation of neutron contamination emitted from Varian Clinac iX 10 MV using Monte Carlo code system. As neutron production process is very complex, Monte Carlo simulation with MCNPX code system was carried out to study this contamination. The design of this medical accelerator was modelled based on the actual materials and geometry. The maximum energy of photons and neutron in the scoring plane was 10.5 and 2.239 MeV, respectively. The number and energy of the particles produced depend on the depth and distance from beam axis. From these results, it is pointed out that the neutron produced by linac 10 MV photon beam in a typical treatment is not negligible.

  3. A depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4-10 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    McCullough, E C; Gortney, J; Blackwell, C R

    1988-01-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15 degrees-60 degrees (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 X 10 cm2 with a source-skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at dmax (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor--that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at dmax--was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15 degrees and 30 degrees wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45 degrees with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at dmax, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth. PMID:3211057

  4. Depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4--10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, E.C.; Gortney, J.; Blackwell, C.R.

    1988-07-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15/sup 0/--60/sup 0/ (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ with a source--skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at d/sub max/ (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor: that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at d/sub max/ : was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/ wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45/sup 0/ with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at d/sub max/, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth.

  5. Improved Survival of Mice After Total Body Irradiation with 10 MV Photon, 2400 MU/min SRS Beam

    PubMed Central

    KALASH, RONNY; BERHANE, HEBIST; YANG, YONG; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; WANG, HONG; DIXON, TRACY; RHIEU, BYUNG; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.; HUQ, MOHAMMED SAIFUL

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim We evaluated the radiobiological effects of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) photon beams on survival of C57BL/6NTac mice following total body irradiation. Materials and Methods Survival of Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) cells was tested after irradiation using 6 MV: 300 MU/min or 1400 MU/min; or 10 MV: 300 MU/min or 2400 MU/min. Survival of C57BL/6NTac mice after a dose which is lethal to 50% of the mice in 30 days (LD50/30) (9.25 Gy) total body irradiation (TBI) and 21 Gy to orthotopic 3LL tumors was tested. We quantitated levels of organ-specific gene transcripts by Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Results While 3LL cell survival and inhibition of orthotopic tumor growth was uniform, 10 MV photons at 2400 MU/min TBI led to significantly greater survival (p=0.0218), with higher levels of intestinal (Sod2), (Gpx1), (Nrf2), and (NFκB) RNA transcripts. Conclusion Clinical 10 MV-2400 cGy/min SRS beams led to unexpected protection of mice on TBI and increased radioprotective gene transcripts. PMID:24425830

  6. Dosimetric dependences of bone heterogeneity and beam angle on the unflattened and flattened photon beams: A Monte Carlo comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, James C. L.; Owrangi, Amir M.

    2014-08-01

    The variations of depth and surface dose on the bone heterogeneity and beam angle were compared between unflattened and flattened photon beams using Monte Carlo simulations. Phase-space files of the 6 MV photon beams with field size of 10×10 cm2 were generated with and without the flattening filter based on a Varian TrueBeam linac. Depth and surface doses were calculated in a bone and water phantoms using Monte Carlo simulations (the EGSnrc-based code). Dose calculations were repeated with angles of the unflattened and flattened beams turned from 0° to 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75° and 90° in the bone and water phantoms. Monte Carlo results of depth doses showed that compared to the flattened beam the unflattened photon beam had a higher dose in the build-up region but lower dose beyond the depth of maximum dose. Dose ratios of the unflattened to flattened beams were calculated in the range of 1.6-2.6 with beam angle varying from 0° to 90° in water. Similar results were found in the bone phantom. In addition, higher surface doses of about 2.5 times were found with beam angles equal to 0° and 15° in the bone and water phantoms. However, surface dose deviation between the unflattened and flattened beams became smaller with increasing beam angle. Dose enhancements due to the bone backscatter were also found at the water-bone and bone-water interfaces for both the unflattened and flattened beams in the bone phantom. With Monte Carlo beams cross-calibrated to the monitor unit in simulations, variations of depth and surface dose on the bone heterogeneity and beam angle were investigated and compared using Monte Carlo simulations. For the unflattened and flattened photon beams, the surface dose and range of depth dose ratios (unflattened to flattened beam) decreased with increasing beam angle. The dosimetric comparison in this study is useful in understanding the characteristics of unflattened photon beam on the depth and surface dose with bone heterogeneity.

  7. Air cavity effects on the radition dose to the larynx using Co-60, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Niroomand-Rad, A.; Harter, K.W.; Thobejane, S.; Bertrand, K.

    1994-07-30

    The purpose was to determine the perturbation effect in the surface layers of lesions located in the air-tumor tissues interface of larynx using {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were embedded at 16 measurement locations in slab no. 8 of a humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed beams using standard 7 {times} 7 cm fields. Similarly, radiographic and radiochromic films were placed between slabs no. 7 and no. 8 of the humanoid phantom and exposed to two lateral-opposed radiation beams. The dosimeters were irradiated with {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, and 10 MV photon beams. Computer tomography (CT) treatment planning without inhomogeneity correction was performed. At the tissue-air interface, the average measured percentage dose (% dose{sub m}) is about (108.7 {+-} 4.8%) with TLD data, (96.8 {+-} 2.5%) with radiographic film data, and (100.8 {+-} 4.9%) with radiochromic film data. Similarly, in the central part of the cavity, the % dose{sub m} is (98.4 {+-} 3.1)% with TLD data, (94.3 {+-} 3.3)% with radiographic film data, and (91.7 {+-} 5.0)% with radiochromic film data. Using the CT-based generated dose distribution (without inhomogeneity correction), the average calculated percentage dose (% dose{sub c}) is (98.7 {+-} 1.0%) at the tissue-air interface and 98% in the central part of the air cavity. For the beam energies studied, the variation from the % dose {sub m} at the tissue-air interface for a given dosimetry technique is relatively small and therefore should not be significant in clinical settings. The variation from the % dose{sub m} at the tissue-air interface is more significant for lower energies. This variation is about 4.3% for 10 MV photon beam, therefore, while institutional practice favors lower energy ({sup 60}Co to 6 MV) for node-negative glottic cancers, physical/dosimetric evidence offers no disadvantage to the use of higher energy photons. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Determination of small field output factors in 6 and 10 MV flattening filter free photon beams using various detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masanga, W.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Khamfongkhruea, C.; Tannanonta, C.

    2016-03-01

    The study aimed to determine appropriate detectors for output factor measurement of small fields in 6 and 10 MV flattening filter free photon beams using five different detectors. Field sizes were varied between 0.6 × 0.6 and 4.0 × 4.0 cm2. An indirect method (daisy-chaining) was applied to normalize the output factors. For the smallest field size, the variations of output factors compared among the detectors were 13%. Exradin A16 had the lowest output factor and increasing in sequence with CC01, microDiamond, microLion and EDGE detectors, respectively, for both energies. The similarity between CC01 and microDiamond output factor values were within 1.6% and 1% for all field sizes of 6 and 10 MV FFF, respectively. EDGE and microLion presented the highest values while ExradinA16 gave lowest values. In conclusion, IBACC01, Exradin A16, microLion, microDiamond and EDGE detectors seem to be the detectors of choices for small field output factor measurement of FFF beams down to 1.6 × 1.6 cm2. However, we could not guarantee which detector is the most suitable for output factor measurement in small field less than 1.6 × 1.6 cm2 of FFF beams. Further studies are required to provide reference information for validation purposes.

  9. SU-E-T-142: Effect of the Bone Heterogeneity On the Unflattened and Flattened Photon Beam Dosimetry: A Monte Carlo Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, J; Owrangi, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study compared the dependence of depth dose on bone heterogeneity of unflattened photon beams to that of flattened beams. Monte Carlo simulations (the EGSnrc-based codes) were used to calculate depth doses in phantom with a bone layer in the buildup region of the 6 MV photon beams. Methods: Heterogeneous phantom containing a bone layer of 2 cm thick at a depth of 1 cm in water was irradiated by the unflattened and flattened 6 MV photon beams (field size = 10×10 cm{sup 2}). Phase-space files of the photon beams based on the Varian TrueBeam linac were generated by the Geant4 and BEAMnrc codes, and verified by measurements. Depth doses were calculated using the DOSXYZnrc code with beam angles set to 0° and 30°. For dosimetric comparison, the above simulations were repeated in a water phantom using the same beam geometry with the bone layer replaced by water. Results: Our results showed that the beam output of unflattened photon beams was about 2.1 times larger than the flattened beams in water. Comparing the water phantom to the bone phantom, larger doses were found in water above and below the bone layer for both the unflattened and flattened photon beams. When both beams were turned 30°, the deviation of depth dose between the bone and water phantom became larger compared to that with beam angle equal to 0°. Dose ratio of the unflattened and flattened photon beams showed that the unflattened beam has larger depth dose in the buildup region compared to the flattened beam. Conclusion: Although the unflattened photon beam had different beam output and quality compared to the flattened, dose enhancements due to the bone scatter were found similar. However, we discovered that depth dose deviation due to the presence of bone was sensitive to the beam obliquity.

  10. The thermoluminescence characteristics and the glow curves of Thulium doped silica fiber exposed to 10MV photon and 21MeV electron radiation.

    PubMed

    Alawiah, A; Alina, M S; Bauk, S; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Gieszczyk, W; Noramaliza, M N; Mahdiraji, G A; Tamchek, N; Zulkifli, M I; Bradley, D A; Marashdeh, M W

    2015-04-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves and kinetics parameters of Thulium (Tm) doped silica cylindrical fibers (CF) are presented. A linear accelerator (LINAC) was used to deliver high-energy radiation of 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The CFs were irradiated in the dose range of 0.2-10Gy. The experimental glow curve data was reconstructed by using WinREMS. The WinGCF software was used for the kinetic parameters evaluation. The TL sensitivity of Tm-doped silica CF is about 2 times higher as compared to pure silica CF. Tm-doped silica CF seems to be more sensitive to 21MeV electrons than to 10MV photons. Surprisingly, no supralinearity was displayed and a sub-linear response of Tm-doped silica CF was observed within the analyzed dose range for both 21MeV electrons and 10MV photons. The Tm-doped silica CF glow curve consists of 5 individual glow peaks. The Ea of peak 4 and peak 5 was highly dependent on dose when irradiated with photons. We also noticed that the electron radiation (21MeV) caused a shift of glow peak by 7-13°C to the higher temperature region compared with photons radiation (10MV). Our Tm-doped fibers seem to give high TL response after 21MeV electrons, which gives around 2 times higher peak integral as compared with 10MV photon radiation. We concluded that peak 4 is the first-order kinetic peak and can be used as the main dosimetric peak of Tm-doped silica CF. PMID:25644081

  11. Absorbed dose measurements in the build-up region of flattened versus unflattened megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    De Puysseleyr, Annemieke; Lechner, Wolfgang; De Neve, Wilfried; Georg, Dietmar; De Wagter, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated absorbed dose measurements in the build-up region of conventional (FF) versus flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams. The absorbed dose in the build-up region of static 6 and 10MV FF and FFF beams was measured using radiochromic film and extrapolation chamber dosimetry for single beams with a variety of field sizes, shapes and positions relative to the central axis. Removing the flattening filter generally resulted in slightly higher relative build-up doses. No considerable impact on the depth of maximum dose was found. PMID:27020966

  12. Surface dose measurements and comparison of unflattened and flattened photon beams.

    PubMed

    Sigamani, Ashokkumar; Nambiraj, Arunai; Yadav, Girigesh; Giribabu, Ananda; Srinivasan, Karthikeyan; Gurusamy, Venkadamanickam; Raman, Kothanda; Karunakaran, Kaviarasu; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the central axis dose in the build-up region and the surface dose of a 6 MV and 10 MV flattened photon beam (FB) and flattening filter free (FFF) therapeutic photon beam for different square field sizes (FSs) for a Varian Truebeam linear accelerator using parallel-plate ionization chamber and Gafchromic film. Knowledge of dosimetric characteristics in the build-up region and surface dose of the FFF is essential for clinical care. The dose measurements were also obtained empirically using two different commonly used dosimeters: a p-type photon semiconductor dosimeter and a cylindrical ionization chamber. Surface dose increased linearly with FS for both FB and FFF photon beams. The surface dose values of FFF were higher than the FB FSs. The measured surface dose clearly increases with increasing FS. The FFF beams have a modestly higher surface dose in the build-up region than the FB. The dependence of source to skin distance (SSD) is less significant in FFF beams when compared to the flattened beams at extended SSDs. PMID:27217619

  13. Surface dose measurements and comparison of unflattened and flattened photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Sigamani, Ashokkumar; Nambiraj, Arunai; Yadav, Girigesh; Giribabu, Ananda; Srinivasan, Karthikeyan; Gurusamy, Venkadamanickam; Raman, Kothanda; Karunakaran, Kaviarasu; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the central axis dose in the build-up region and the surface dose of a 6 MV and 10 MV flattened photon beam (FB) and flattening filter free (FFF) therapeutic photon beam for different square field sizes (FSs) for a Varian Truebeam linear accelerator using parallel-plate ionization chamber and Gafchromic film. Knowledge of dosimetric characteristics in the build-up region and surface dose of the FFF is essential for clinical care. The dose measurements were also obtained empirically using two different commonly used dosimeters: a p-type photon semiconductor dosimeter and a cylindrical ionization chamber. Surface dose increased linearly with FS for both FB and FFF photon beams. The surface dose values of FFF were higher than the FB FSs. The measured surface dose clearly increases with increasing FS. The FFF beams have a modestly higher surface dose in the build-up region than the FB. The dependence of source to skin distance (SSD) is less significant in FFF beams when compared to the flattened beams at extended SSDs. PMID:27217619

  14. Experimental investigation of the response of an a-Si EPID to an unflattened photon beam from an Elekta Precise linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Tyner, Elaine; McClean, Brendan; McCavana, Patrick; Wetterstedt, Sacha af

    2009-04-15

    The characteristics of an Elekta amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in response to a 6 MV photon beam generated without a flattening filter, an unflattened beam, have been determined. The characteristics were then compared to those for a conventional photon beam generated with a flattening filter in the beam, a flattened beam, in order to determine the suitability of an a-Si EPID for transit dosimetry. The response of the EPID to the unflattened beam increased by 7.3% compared to the flattened beam, and copper buildup of 3 mm reduces the variation in the EPID response over air gaps ranging from 60 to 40 cm to within 2.5%. The scattering properties of the EPID with changing field size for the unflattened beam agree with those measured for a flattened beam to within 2%. Due to the minimal variation in the energy spectrum of the unflattened beam with the distance from the central axis, it was expected and experimentally found that the profile shape of the unflattened beam changes minimally with increasing phantom thickness. For an unflattened beam, EPID measured profiles with and without a phantom in the beam agree to within 2% using confidence limits. The difference between EPID and ionization chamber profiles measured at a depth of 5 cm in water is reduced compared to a flattened beam and remains unchanged with increasing phantom thickness. A difference of 4% was found between EPID profiles and the corresponding profiles measured with an ionization chamber measured in water over a range of phantom thickness. A calibration procedure was developed to convert EPID images to the equivalent absolute dose in water, at the EPID plane. A gamma evaluation was performed comparing the calibrated EPID images to dose measured with an ionization chamber array for rectangular fields and an IMRT segment. The fields were situated on axis and at 5 cm off axis with and without a 25 cm thick phantom in the beam. The gamma evaluation criteria of 3% and 3 mm

  15. Experimental determination of beam quality factors, kQ, for two types of Farmer chamber in a 10 MV photon and a 175 MeV proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medin, Joakim; Ross, Carl K.; Klassen, Norman V.; Palmans, Hugo; Grusell, Erik; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2006-03-01

    Absorbed doses determined with a sealed water calorimeter operated at 4 °C are compared with the results obtained using ionization chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice in a 10 MV photon beam (TPR20,10 = 0.734) and a 175 MeV proton beam (at a depth corresponding to the residual range, Rres = 14.7 cm). Three NE 2571 and two FC65-G ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of absorbed-dose-to-water in 60Co at the Swedish secondary standard dosimetry laboratory, directly traceable to the BIPM. In the photon beam quality, calorimetry was found to agree with ionometry within 0.3%, confirming the kQ values tabulated in TRS-398. In contrast, a 1.8% deviation was found in the proton beam at 6 g cm-2 depth, suggesting that the TRS-398 tabulated kQ values for these two ionization chamber types are too high. Assuming no perturbation effect in the proton beam for the ionization chambers, a value for (wair/e)Q of 33.6 J C-1 ± 1.7% (k = 1) can be derived from these measurements. An analytical evaluation of the effect from non-elastic nuclear interactions in the ionization chamber wall indicates a perturbation effect of 0.6%. Including this estimated result in the proton beam would increase the determined (wair/e)Q value by the same amount.

  16. Experimental determination of beam quality factors, kQ, for two types of Farmer chamber in a 10 MV photon and a 175 MeV proton beam.

    PubMed

    Medin, Joakim; Ross, Carl K; Klassen, Norman V; Palmans, Hugo; Grusell, Erik; Grindborg, Jan-Erik

    2006-03-21

    Absorbed doses determined with a sealed water calorimeter operated at 4 degrees C are compared with the results obtained using ionization chambers and the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice in a 10 MV photon beam (TPR(20,10) = 0.734) and a 175 MeV proton beam (at a depth corresponding to the residual range, R(res) = 14.7 cm). Three NE 2571 and two FC65-G ionization chambers were calibrated in terms of absorbed-dose-to-water in (60)Co at the Swedish secondary standard dosimetry laboratory, directly traceable to the BIPM. In the photon beam quality, calorimetry was found to agree with ionometry within 0.3%, confirming the k(Q) values tabulated in TRS-398. In contrast, a 1.8% deviation was found in the proton beam at 6 g cm(-2) depth, suggesting that the TRS-398 tabulated k(Q) values for these two ionization chamber types are too high. Assuming no perturbation effect in the proton beam for the ionization chambers, a value for (w(air)/e)(Q) of 33.6 J C(-1) +/- 1.7% (k = 1) can be derived from these measurements. An analytical evaluation of the effect from non-elastic nuclear interactions in the ionization chamber wall indicates a perturbation effect of 0.6%. Including this estimated result in the proton beam would increase the determined (w(air)/e)(Q) value by the same amount. PMID:16510959

  17. Measurement and comparison of head scatter factor for 7 MV unflattened (FFF) and 6 MV flattened photon beam using indigenously designed columnar mini phantom

    PubMed Central

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambiraj, Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda; Bhushan, Manindra; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Aim To measure and compare the head scatter factor for 7 MV unflattened and 6 MV flattened photon beam using a home-made designed mini phantom. Background The head scatter factor (Sc) is one of the important parameters for MU calculation. There are multiple factors that influence the Sc values, like accelerator head, flattening filter, primary and secondary collimators. Materials and methods A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with high and low atomic number material for measurement of head scatter factors at 10 cm and dmax dose water equivalent thickness. Results The Sc values measured with high-Z are higher than the low-Z mini phantoms observed for both 6MV-FB and 7MV-UFB photon energies. Sc values of 7MV-UFB photon beams were smaller than those of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.6–2.2% (Primus), 0.2–1.4% (Artiste) and 0.6–3.7% (Clinac iX (2300CD))) for field sizes ranging from 10 cm × 10 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams. The presence of wedge filters influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effects showed that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FF and FFF. Conclusions There were significant differences in Sc values measured for 6MV-FB and unflattened 7MV-UFB photon beams over the range of field sizes from 10 cm × 10 cm to 40 cm × 04 cm. Different results were obtained for measurements performed with low-Z and high-Z mini phantoms. PMID:25949220

  18. The dosimetric significance of using 10 MV photons for volumetric modulated arc therapy for post-prostatectomy irradiation of the prostate bed

    PubMed Central

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to analyse the dosimetric differences when using 10 MV instead of 6 MV for VMAT treatment plans for post-prostatectomy irradiation of the prostate bed. Methods and materials Ten post-prostatectomy prostate bed irradiation cases previously treated using 6 MV with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were re-planned using 10 MV with VMAT. Prescription dose was 66.6 Gy with 1.8 Gy per fraction for 37 daily fractions. The same structure set, number of arcs, field sizes, and minimum dose to the Planning Target Volume (PTV) were used for both 6 MV and 10 MV plans. Results were collected for dose to Organs at Risk (OAR) constraints, dose to the target structures, number of monitor units for each arc, Body V5, Conformity Index, and Integral Dose. The mean values were used to compare the 6 MV and 10 MV results. To determine the statistical significance of the results, a paired Student t test and power analysis was performed. Results Statistically significant lower mean values were observed for the OAR dose constraints for the rectum, bladder-Clinical Target Volume (bladder-CTV), left femoral head, and right femoral head. Also, statistically significant lower mean values were observed for the Body V5, Conformity Index, and Integral Dose. Conclusions Several dosimetric benefits were observed when using 10 MV instead of 6 MV for VMAT based treatment plans. Benefits include sparing more dose from the OAR while still maintaining the same dose coverage to the PTV. Other benefits include lower Body V 5,Conformity Index, and Integral Dose. PMID:27247557

  19. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Frequently, three-dimensional (3D) conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. Methods A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT) plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI) treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI), which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN) which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI) which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD). Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Results Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p < 0.05). V5 and V20 show statistically significant improvement for the FFF-VMAT plans compared with 3D (p < 0.001). GI is improved for the FFF-VMAT and the non-coplanar VMAT plans (p < 0.01 and p

  20. Photon beam quality variations of a flattening filter free linear accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Georg, Dietmar; Kragl, Gabriele; Wetterstedt, Sacha af; McCavana, Patrick; McClean, Brendan; Knoeoes, Tommy

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, there has been an increasing interest in operating conventional linear accelerators without a flattening filter. The aim of this study was to determine beam quality variations as a function of off-axis ray angle for unflattened beams. In addition, a comparison was made with the off-axis energy variation in flattened beams. Methods: Two Elekta Precise linear accelerators were modified in order to enable radiation delivery with and without the flattening filter in the beam line. At the Medical University Vienna (Vienna, Austria), half value layer (HVL) measurements were performed for 6 and 10 MV with an in-house developed device that can be easily mounted on the gantry. At St. Luke's Hospital (Dublin, Ireland), measurements were performed at 6 MV in narrow beam geometry with the gantry tilted around 270 deg. with pinhole collimators, an attenuator, and the chamber positioned on the table. All attenuation measurements were performed with ionization chambers and a buildup cap (2 mm brass) or a PMMA mini phantom (diameter 3 cm, measurement depth 2.5 cm). Results: For flattened 6 and 10 MV photon beams from the Elekta linac the relative HVL({theta}) varies by about 11% for an off-axis ray angle {theta}=10 deg. These results agree within {+-}2% with a previously proposed generic off-axis energy correction. For unflattened beams, the variation was less than 5% in the whole range of off-axis ray angles up to 10 deg. The difference in relative HVL data was less than 1% for unflattened beams at 6 and 10 MV. Conclusions: Off-axis energy variation is rather small in unflattened beams and less than half the one for flattened beams. Thus, ignoring the effect of off-axis energy variation for dose calculations in unflattened beams can be clinically justified.

  1. Lowering Whole-Body Radiation Doses in Pediatric Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Through the Use of Unflattened Photon Beams;Flattening filter; Pediatric; Intensity-modulated radiotherapy; Second cancers; Radiation-induced malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Cashmore, Jason; Ramtohul, Mark; Ford, Dan

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been linked with an increased risk of secondary cancer induction due to the extra leakage radiation associated with delivery of these techniques. Removal of the flattening filter offers a simple way of reducing head leakage, and it may be possible to generate equivalent IMRT plans and to deliver these on a standard linear accelerator operating in unflattened mode. Methods and Materials: An Elekta Precise linear accelerator has been commissioned to operate in both conventional and unflattened modes (energy matched at 6 MV) and a direct comparison made between the treatment planning and delivery of pediatric intracranial treatments using both approaches. These plans have been evaluated and delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Results: Plans generated in unflattened mode are clinically identical to those for conventional IMRT but can be delivered with greatly reduced leakage radiation. Measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom at clinically relevant positions including the thyroid, lung, ovaries, and testes show an average reduction in peripheral doses of 23.7%, 29.9%, 64.9%, and 70.0%, respectively, for identical plan delivery compared to conventional IMRT. Conclusions: IMRT delivery in unflattened mode removes an unwanted and unnecessary source of scatter from the treatment head and lowers leakage doses by up to 70%, thereby reducing the risk of radiation-induced second cancers. Removal of the flattening filter is recommended for IMRT treatments.

  2. FEM design and simulation of a short, 10 MV, S-band Linac with Monte Carlo dose simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, Devin; Aubin, J. St.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Current commercial 10 MV Linac waveguides are 1.5 m. The authors’ current 6 MV linear accelerator–magnetic resonance imager (Linac–MR) system fits in typical radiotherapy vaults. To allow 10 MV treatments with the Linac–MR and still fit within typical vaults, the authors design a 10 MV Linac with an accelerator waveguide of the same length (27.5 cm) as current 6 MV Linacs. Methods: The first design stage is to design a cavity such that a specific experimental measurement for breakdown is applicable to the cavity. This is accomplished through the use of finite element method (FEM) simulations to match published shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength from an electric breakdown study. A full waveguide is then designed and tuned in FEM simulations based on this cavity design. Electron trajectories are computed through the resulting radio frequency fields, and the waveguide geometry is modified by shifting the first coupling cavity in order to optimize the electron beam properties until the energy spread and mean energy closely match values published for an emulated 10 MV Linac. Finally, Monte Carlo dose simulations are used to compare the resulting photon beam depth dose profile and penumbra with that produced by the emulated 10 MV Linac. Results: The shunt impedance, Q factor, and ratio of peak to mean-axial electric field strength are all matched to within 0.1%. A first coupling cavity shift of 1.45 mm produces an energy spectrum width of 0.347 MeV, very close to the published value for the emulated 10 MV of 0.315 MeV, and a mean energy of 10.53 MeV, nearly identical to the published 10.5 MeV for the emulated 10 MV Linac. The depth dose profile produced by their new Linac is within 1% of that produced by the emulated 10 MV spectrum for all depths greater than 1.5 cm. The penumbra produced is 11% narrower, as measured from 80% to 20% of the central axis dose. Conclusions: The authors have successfully

  3. The physical characteristics of the 15 MV Varian Clinac 2100C unflattened beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Spyrou, N. M.; Podolyák, Z.; Abolaban, F. A.

    2014-02-01

    A 15 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator operating with and without a flattening filter was simulated using the Monte Carlo code 'FLUKA' in order to calculate differences in their dosimetric properties. These include: the dose rate, the percentage depth dose on the central axis, the beam profile, the out-of-field dose, the surface dose on a 40×40×40 cm3 water phantom and the neutron contamination. The results obtained showed that the unflattened beam has a dose rate 4.86 times higher than the flattened one. The average out-of-field dose from the edge of the field to the edge of the phantom was reduced by 44%, the neutron fluence at the isocentre was reduced by 77% and the surface neutron dose-equivalent was reduced from 2.11±0.05 to 0.40±0.01 mSv(n) Gy-1(X) after normalising both beams to give the same dose at dmax (the depth of maximum dose). However, the photon surface dose of the unflattened beam increased by 13%. From this information, it can be concluded that the unflattened beam can lead to better treatment outcome and may reduce the beam-on time which may be required for specific cases.

  4. Dose enhancement close to platinum implants for the 4, 6, and 10 MV stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Joel Y.C.; Ng, Ben K.P.; Yu, K.N.

    2004-10-01

    Three photon interaction processes, namely, the photoelectric effect, Compton effect, and pair production, can occur when materials with high atomic numbers are irradiated by the high- and low-energy bremsstrahlung photons from a linear accelerator. A dose enhancement, due to the photoelectric effect and pair production, near targets with platinum implants (with a high atomic number) in radiosurgery cannot be predicted by the XKnife{sup reg} radiosurgery treatment planning system. In the present work, Monte Carlo simulations using PRESTA EGS4 were employed to investigate the resulting dose enhancements from 4, 6, and 10 MV energies commonly used in the stereotactic radiosurgery system. Dose enhancements from 32% to 68% were observed close to the platinum implant for the above energies when using a 12.5 mm collimator. Comparatively higher dose enhancements were observed when using smaller collimators. It was found that this dose enhancement increased with beam energy but decreased as beam size increased.

  5. Physical parameters of very small diameter 10 MV X-ray beams for linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, Edwin

    Physical aspects of very small diameter X-ray beams used for a linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery are presented in this thesis. A 10 MV linac was used as the radiation source. Very small 10 MV photon fields with diameters of 1.5 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm are produced by special collimators attached to the treatment head of the linac. The radiation beam data were measured with a small field diode detector as well as radiographic and radiochromic films. Measured beam parameters were compared with the same parameters calculated with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For very small photon fields with diameters on the order of the focal spot size, MC calculations show that both the percentage depth dose (PDD) distributions and dose profiles are sensitive to the focal spot size. A simple sliding slit technique was developed to measure the focal spot size and shape for accurate MC simulations of very small diameter beams. The measured focal spot of the 10 MV linac is elliptical in shape and fitted by a Gaussian distribution with full-widths-at-half-maximum (FWHMs) of 2.05 mm and 1.34 mm in the principal axes of the ellipse. A Gaussian circle equivalent in area to the experimentally determined focal spot ellipse was used in MC simulations. The resulting PDD and beam profile calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. Dynamic radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams was carried out using the 10 MV linac. Radiosurgical isodose distributions were measured with radiographic films in a spherical head phantom and calculated with the MC technique. A good agreement between the measured and MC-calculated isodose distributions for very small diameter fields is achieved. The displacement of the center of the measured isodose distributions relative to the laser-defined isocenter was on the order of 0.7 mm. All these results show the potential of linac-based radiosurgery with very small diameter photon beams for clinical use.

  6. TH-C-12A-08: New Compact 10 MV S-Band Linear Accelerator: 3D Finite-Element Design and Monte Carlo Dose Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Baillie, D; St Aubin, J; Fallone, B; Steciw, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To design a new compact S-band linac waveguide capable of producing a 10 MV x-ray beam, while maintaining the length (27.5 cm) of current 6 MV waveguides. This will allow higher x-ray energies to be used in our linac-MRI systems with the same footprint. Methods: Finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics was used to design an accelerator cavity matching one published in an experiment breakdown study, to ensure that our modeled cavities do not exceed the threshold electric fields published. This cavity was used as the basis for designing an accelerator waveguide, where each cavity of the full waveguide was tuned to resonate at 2.997 GHz by adjusting the cavity diameter. The RF field solution within the waveguide was calculated, and together with an electron-gun phase space generated using Opera3D/SCALA, were input into electron tracking software PARMELA to compute the electron phase space striking the x-ray target. This target phase space was then used in BEAM Monte Carlo simulations to generate percent depth doses curves for this new linac, which were then used to re-optimize the waveguide geometry. Results: The shunt impedance, Q-factor, and peak-to-mean electric field ratio were matched to those published for the breakdown study to within 0.1% error. After tuning the full waveguide, the peak surface fields are calculated to be 207 MV/m, 13% below the breakdown threshold, and a d-max depth of 2.42 cm, a D10/20 value of 1.59, compared to 2.45 cm and 1.59, respectively, for the simulated Varian 10 MV linac and brehmsstrahlung production efficiency 20% lower than a simulated Varian 10 MV linac. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the design of a functional 27.5 cm waveguide producing 10 MV photons with characteristics similar to a Varian 10 MV linac.

  7. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PMID:27167266

  8. Be aware of neutrons outside short mazes from 10-MV linear accelerators X-rays in radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Brockstedt, S; Holstein, H; Jakobsson, L; Tomaszewicz, A; Knöös, T

    2015-07-01

    During the radiation survey of a reinstalled 10-MV linear accelerator in an old radiation treatment facility, high dose rates of neutrons were observed. The area outside the maze entrance is used as a waiting room where patients, their relatives and staff other than those involved in the actual treatment can freely pass. High fluence rates of neutrons would cause an unnecessary high effective dose to the staff working in the vicinity of such a system, and it can be several orders higher than the doses received due to X-rays at the same location. However, the common knowledge appears to have been that the effect of neutrons at 10-MV X-ray linear accelerator facilities is negligible and shielding calculations models seldom mention neutrons for this operating energy level. Although data are scarce, reports regarding this phenomenon are now emerging. For the future, it is advocated that contributions from neutrons are considered already during the planning stage of new or modified facilities aimed for 10 MV and that estimated dose levels are verified. PMID:25802465

  9. Physical considerations in the treatment of advanced carcinomas of the larynx and pyriform sinuses using 10 MV x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Doppke, K.; Novack, D.; Wang, C.C.

    1980-09-01

    A technique for treating patients who have advanced tumors of the larynx and pyriform sinus was developed using isocentric anterior and posterior opposed fields with 10 MV x rays. This technique can be used to deliver a tumor dose of 45 Gray to the primary site and regional nodes and approximately 40 Gray to the spinal cord. The method eliminates problems of multi-field junctures and lowers the daily spinal cord dose when compared to the standard parallel opposed lateral portals and anterior neck fields.

  10. Amplitude gating for a coached breathing approach in respiratory gated 10 MV flattening filter-free VMAT delivery.

    PubMed

    Viel, Francis; Lee, Richard; Gete, Ermias; Duzenli, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate amplitude gating combined with a coached breathing strategy for 10 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on the Varian TrueBeam linac. Ten patient plans for VMAT SABR liver were created using the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). The verification plans were then transferred to a CT-scanned Quasar phantom and delivered on a TrueBeam linac using a 10 MV FFF beam and Varian's real-time position management (RPM) system for respiratory gating based on breathing amplitude. Breathing traces were acquired from ten patients using two kinds of breathing patterns: free breathing and an interrupted (~ 5 s pause) end of exhale coached breathing pattern. Ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were acquired for a gated delivery while the phantom moved under the described breathing patterns, as well as for a nongated stationary phantom delivery. The gate window was set to obtain a range of residual target motion from 2-5 mm. All gated deliveries on a moving phantom have been shown to be dosimetrically equivalent to the nongated deliveries on a static phantom, with differences in point dose measurements under 1% and average gamma 2%/2 mm agreement above 98.7%. Comparison with the treatment planning system also resulted in good agreement, with differences in point-dose measurements under 2.5% and average gamma 3%/3 mm agreement of 97%. The use of a coached breathing pattern significantly increases the duty cycle, compared with free breathing, and allows for shorter treatment times. Patients' free-breathing patterns contain considerable variability and, although dosimetric results for gated delivery may be acceptable, it is difficult to achieve efficient treatment delivery. A coached breathing pattern combined with a 5 mm amplitude gate, resulted in both high-quality dose distributions and overall shortest gated beam delivery times. PMID:26219000

  11. Comparison of air-cavity inhomogeneity effects for cobalt-60, 6-, and 10-MV x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, J.L.; Mendiondo, M.S.; Mendiondo, O.A.

    1987-01-01

    The inclusion of air-filled spaces in treatment fields creates a potential dosimetric problem due to the loss of charged particle equilibrium near the air--tissue interface. We have used a simulated larynx phantom and a small buildup/extrapolation chamber to compare the magnitude and spatial extent of underdosing and overdosing at the distal surface for two linear accelerators (10- and 6-MV x rays) and a cobalt-60 machine. Surface doses were compared to doses measured in a similar but homogeneous phantom to give observed/expected ratios (O/E), which were greater than 1.0 for large field sizes and less than 1.0 for small field sizes on all machines. The minimum field sizes which produce no surface underdosing for a simulated 2-cm-diam larynx are roughly 7 x 7 cm for 10-MV x rays, 6 x 6 cm for 6-MV x rays, and 5 x 5 cm for cobalt-60. In addition, the depth over which underdosing occurs is seen to increase with increasing energy.

  12. Measurement of the secondary neutron dose distribution from the LET spectrum of recoils using the CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector in 10 MV X-ray medical radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Kodaira, Satoshi; Sawaguchi, Fumiya; Abe, Yasuyuki; Obara, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Masae; Kawashima, Hajime; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kurano, Mieko; Uchihori, Yukio; Yasuda, Nakahiro; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Nakajima, Masaru; Kitamura, Nozomi; Sato, Tomoharu

    2015-04-01

    We measured the recoil charged particles from secondary neutrons produced by the photonuclear reaction in a water phantom from a 10-MV photon beam from medical linacs. The absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were evaluated from the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum of recoils using the CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) based on well-established methods in the field of space radiation dosimetry. The contributions and spatial distributions of these in the phantom on nominal photon exposures were verified as the secondary neutron dose and neutron dose equivalent. The neutron dose equivalent normalized to the photon-absorbed dose was 0.261 mSv/100 MU at source to chamber distance 90 cm. The dose equivalent at the surface gave the highest value, and was attenuated to less than 10% at 5 cm from the surface. The dose contribution of the high LET component of ⩾100 keV/μm increased with the depth in water, resulting in an increase of the quality factor. The CR-39 PNTD is a powerful tool that can be used to systematically measure secondary neutron dose distributions in a water phantom from an in-field to out-of-field high-intensity photon beam.

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of photon dose calculation under jaw and MLC shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Fogliata, A.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Nicolini, G.; Belosi, M. F.; Cozzi, L.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The accuracy of photon dose calculation algorithms in out-of-field regions is often neglected, despite its importance for organs at risk and peripheral dose evaluation. The present work has assessed this for the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and the Acuros-XB algorithms implemented in the Eclipse treatment planning system. Specifically, the regions shielded by the jaw, or the MLC, or both MLC and jaw for flattened and unflattened beams have been studied.Methods: The accuracy in out-of-field dose under different conditions was studied for two different algorithms. Measured depth doses out of the field, for different field sizes and various distances from the beam edge were compared with the corresponding AAA and Acuros-XB calculations in water. Four volumetric modulated arc therapy plans (in the RapidArc form) were optimized in a water equivalent phantom, PTW Octavius, to obtain a region always shielded by the MLC (or MLC and jaw) during the delivery. Doses to different points located in the shielded region and in a target-like structure were measured with an ion chamber, and results were compared with the AAA and Acuros-XB calculations. Photon beams of 6 and 10 MV, flattened and unflattened were used for the tests.Results: Good agreement between calculated and measured depth doses was found using both algorithms for all points measured at depth greater than 3 cm. The mean dose differences (±1SD) were −8%± 16%, −3%± 15%, −16%± 18%, and −9%± 16% for measurements vs AAA calculations and −10%± 14%, −5%± 12%, −19%± 17%, and −13%± 14% for Acuros-XB, for 6X, 6 flattening-filter free (FFF), 10X, and 10FFF beams, respectively. The same figures for dose differences relative to the open beam central axis dose were: −0.1%± 0.3%, 0.0%± 0.4%, −0.3%± 0.3%, and −0.1%± 0.3% for AAA and −0.2%± 0.4%, −0.1%± 0.4%, −0.5%± 0.5%, and −0.3%± 0.4% for Acuros-XB. Buildup dose was overestimated with AAA, while Acuros-XB gave

  14. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the surrounding lung

  15. [Measurement of peak correction factor of Farmer chamber for calibration of flattening filter free (FFF) clinical photon beams].

    PubMed

    Kontra, Gábor; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    Farmer-type ionization chambers are considered the most reliable detectors and for this reason they are most frequently used for the calibration of photon beams of medical linear accelerators. Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy. The dose profile of FFF beams is peaked in the center of the field and the dose distribution will be inhomogeneous along the axis of the 2.3 cm long measuring volume of the Farmer chamber. The peaked radiation field will result in volume averaging effects in the large Farmer chamber, therefore this chamber will underestimate the true central axis dose. Our objective was to determine the value of the peak correction factor (Kp) of Farmer-type chamber with measurements to avoid the underestimation of the central axis dose during the calibration of FFF radiation fields. Measurements were made with 6 MV and 10 MV flattened (6X and 10X) and FFF beams (6XFFF and 10XFFF) of a Varian TrueBeam medical linear accelerator in a solid water phantom at 10 cm depth. The source surface distance (SSD) was 100 cm, the field size was 10×10 cm and the dose rate was always 400 MU/min during the measurements. We delivered 100 MU in each measurement and the absorbed dose to water was calculated according to the IAEA TRS-398 dosimetry protocol. The measured signals of the ionization chambers were always corrected for the ion recombination loss. The ion recombination correction factors (Kr) were determined with the two-voltage method separately for the used ion chambers and for flattened and unflattened beams. First, we measured the dose to water with PTW TM30012 Farmer chamber in 6XFFF and 6X beams, then calculated the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams (R6,Farmer). Immediately after this we repeated the above measurements with PTW TM31010 Semiflex chamber and determined the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams again (R6,Semiflex). The length of the sensitive volume of the Semiflex

  16. The effect of photon energy on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Wonmo; Park, Jong Min; Choi, Chang Heon; Ha, Sung Whan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of common three photon energies (6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV) on intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans to treat prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with prostate cancer treated locally to 81.0 Gy were retrospectively studied. 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV IMRT plans for each patient were generated using suitable planning objectives, dose constraints, and 8-field setting. The plans were analyzed in terms of dose-volume histogram for the target coverage, dose conformity, organs at risk (OAR) sparing, and normal tissue integral dose. Results Regardless of the energies chosen at the plans, the target coverage, conformity, and homogeneity of the plans were similar. However, there was a significant dose increase in rectal wall and femoral heads for 6-MV compared to those for 10-MV and 15-MV. The V20 Gy of rectal wall with 6-MV, 10-MV, and 15-MV were 95.6%, 88.4%, and 89.4% while the mean dose to femoral heads were 31.7, 25.9, and 26.3 Gy, respectively. Integral doses to the normal tissues in higher energy (10-MV and 15-MV) plans were reduced by about 7%. Overall, integral doses in mid and low dose regions in 6-MV plans were increased by up to 13%. Conclusion In this study, 10-MV prostate IMRT plans showed better OAR sparing and less integral doses than the 6-MV. The biological and clinical significance of this finding remains to be determined afterward, considering neutron dose contribution. PMID:23120741

  17. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M; Menichelli, D; Friedl, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam.

  18. Investigation of photon beam models in heterogeneous media of modern radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ding, W; Johnston, P N; Wong, T P Y; Bubb, I F

    2004-06-01

    This study investigates the performance of photon beam models in dose calculations involving heterogeneous media in modern radiotherapy. Three dose calculation algorithms implemented in the CMS FOCUS treatment planning system have been assessed and validated using ionization chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and film. The algorithms include the multigrid superposition (MGS) algorithm, fast Fourier Transform Convolution (FFTC) algorithm and Clarkson algorithm. Heterogeneous phantoms used in the study consist of air cavities, lung analogue and an anthropomorphic phantom. Depth dose distributions along the central beam axis for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams with field sizes of 5 cm x 5 cm and 10 cm x 10 cm were measured in the air cavity phantoms and lung analogue phantom. Point dose measurements were performed in the anthropomorphic phantom. Calculated results with three dose calculation algorithms were compared with measured results. In the air cavity phantoms, the maximum dose differences between the algorithms and the measurements were found at the distal surface of the air cavity with a 10 MV photon beam and a 5 cm x 5 cm field size. The differences were 3.8%. 24.9% and 27.7% for the MGS. FFTC and Clarkson algorithms. respectively. Experimental measurements of secondary electron build-up range beyond the air cavity showed an increase with decreasing field size, increasing energy and increasing air cavity thickness. The maximum dose differences in the lung analogue with 5 cm x 5 cm field size were found to be 0.3%. 4.9% and 6.9% for the MGS. FFTC and Clarkson algorithms with a 6 MV photon beam and 0.4%. 6.3% and 9.1% with a 10 MV photon beam, respectively. In the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose differences between calculations using the MGS algorithm and measurements with TLD rods were less than +/-4.5% for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams with 10 cm x 10 cm field size and 6 MV photon beam with 5 cm x 5 cm field size, and within +/-7.5% for 10 MV with 5 cm

  19. On beam quality and flatness of radiotherapy megavoltage photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Murshed; Rhoades, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Ratio of percentage depth dose (PDD) at two depths, PDD at a depth of 10 cm (PDD10), and beam flatness are monitored regularly for radiotherapy beams for quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to understand the effects of changes in one of these parameters on the other. Is it possible to monitor only the beam flatness and not PDD? The investigation has two components. Naturally occurring i.e., unintended changes in PDD ratio and in-plane flatness for 6 and 10 MV photon beams for one particular Siemens Artiste Linac are monitored for a period of about 4 years. Secondly, deliberate changes in the beam parameters are induced by changing the bending magnet current (BMI). Relationships between various beam parameters for unintended changes as well as deliberate changes are characterized. Long term unintentional changes of PDD ratio are found to have no systematic trend. The flatness in the inplane direction for 6 and 10 MV beams show slow increase of 0.43% and 0.75% respectively in about 4 years while the changes in the PDD ratio show no such trend. Over 10% changes in BMI are required to induce changes in the beam quality indices at 2% level. PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam is found to be less sensitive, while the depth of maximum dose, dmax, is more sensitive to the changes in BMI compared to the 6 MV beam. Tolerances are more stringent for PDD10 than PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam. PDD ratio, PDD10, and flatness must be monitored independently. Furthermore, off axis ratio alone cannot be used to monitor flatness. The effect of beam quality change in the absolute dose is clinically insignificant. PMID:26634604

  20. Absorbed Dose to Water Determination Using IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU Protocols for 1.25 MeV Gamma Ray 6 MV and 10 MV X-Rays: An Intercomparison of Results when IAEA was taken as a Standard Protocol.

    PubMed

    Dolah, M T; Samat, S B; Kadni, T

    2000-01-01

    Absorbed dose to water was measured with ionisation chambers NE 2561 (#267), NE 2581 (#334), NE 2571 (#1028), using the IAEA standard water phantom. The ionisation chamber was inserted in the water phantom at a reference depth dependent on the type of the radiation quality used. Three radiation qualities were used namely 1.25 MeV gamma ray, 6 MV x-rays and 10 MV x-rays. The values of the absorbed dose to water were determined by the N(K)- and N(X)- based methods, i.e with the use of IAEA, HPA, NACP, AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols. The aim of this study was to make an intercomparison of the results, by taking the IAEA protocol as a standard. The largest deviation contributed by any of these protocols was recorded for each quality. It was found that AAPM, NCRP and ICRU protocols contributed 0.94% for 1.25 MeV gamma ray, NACP contributed 2.12% for the 6 MV x-rays, and NACP contributed 2.35% for 10 MV x-rays. Since the acceptable limit of deviation set by the IAEA for this absorbed dose work is ± 3%, it is clear that the overall deviations obtained were all satisfactory. PMID:22844215

  1. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  2. TH-C-12A-02: Comparison of Two RapidArc Delivery Strategies in Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Stage I and II Peripheral Lung Tumors with Unflattened Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, B; Lu, J; Chen, J; Chen, C; Lin, P; Kuang, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The full arcs strategy used in SBRT with RapidArc and unflattened (FFF) beams in large and heterogeneous peripheral non-smallcell lung cancer (NSCLC) appears to be suboptimal as it increases the disadvantageous dose to the contralateral lung, which potentially increases the toxicity to surrounding tissues. In this study, we investigated, for the first time, the dose delivery strategies using partial arcs (PA) and the fully rotational arcs with avoidance sectors (FAAS) for SBRT with FFF beams in peripheral NSCLC patients. Methods: Eighteen patients with NSCLC (stage I and II) were selected for this study. Nine patients with a GTV <= 10cc were designated as the small tumor group. The remaining nine patients with a GTV between 10 cc and 44 cc were assigned to the large tumor group. The treatment plans were generated in eighteen patients using PA and FAAS, respectively, and delivered with a Varian TrueBeam Linac. Dosimetry of the target and organs at risk (OAR), total MU, out-of-field dose, and delivery time were analyzed. Delta4 and Portal dosimetry were employed to evaluate the delivery accuracy. Results: or the small tumor group, the FAAS plans significantly achieved a better conformity index, the lower total MU and out-of-field dose, a shorter treatment time, and the reduced doses to cord, heart, and lung (p < 0.05). But the target doses were slightly higher than that delivered by PA plans. For the large tumor group, the PA plans significantly attained a better conformity index and a shorter treatment time (p < 0.05). Furthermore, all plans achieved a high pass rate, with all the gamma indices greater than 97% at the Γ{sub 3mm,} {sub 3%} threshold. Conclusion: This study suggests that FAAS strategy is more beneficial for small tumor patients undergoing lung SBRT with FFF beams. However, for large tumor patients, PA strategy is recommended. NIH/NIGMS grant U54 GM104944, Lincy Endowed Assistant Professorship.

  3. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  5. Comparison of the Effects of High-Energy Photon Beam Irradiation (10 and 18 MV) on 2 Types of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators

    SciTech Connect

    Hashii, Haruko; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Okawa, Ayako; Shida, Koichi; Isobe, Tomonori; Hanmura, Masahiro; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Sakae, Takeji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy for cancer may be required for patients with implantable cardiac devices. However, the influence of secondary neutrons or scattered irradiation from high-energy photons (≥10 MV) on implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) is unclear. This study was performed to examine this issue in 2 ICD models. Methods and Materials: ICDs were positioned around a water phantom under conditions simulating clinical radiation therapy. The ICDs were not irradiated directly. A control ICD was positioned 140 cm from the irradiation isocenter. Fractional irradiation was performed with 18-MV and 10-MV photon beams to give cumulative in-field doses of 600 Gy and 1600 Gy, respectively. Errors were checked after each fraction. Soft errors were defined as severe (change to safety back-up mode), moderate (memory interference, no changes in device parameters), and minor (slight memory change, undetectable by computer). Results: Hard errors were not observed. For the older ICD model, the incidences of severe, moderate, and minor soft errors at 18 MV were 0.75, 0.5, and 0.83/50 Gy at the isocenter. The corresponding data for 10 MV were 0.094, 0.063, and 0 /50 Gy. For the newer ICD model at 18 MV, these data were 0.083, 2.3, and 5.8 /50 Gy. Moderate and minor errors occurred at 18 MV in control ICDs placed 140 cm from the isocenter. The error incidences were 0, 1, and 0 /600 Gy at the isocenter for the newer model, and 0, 1, and 6 /600Gy for the older model. At 10 MV, no errors occurred in control ICDs. Conclusions: ICD errors occurred more frequently at 18 MV irradiation, which suggests that the errors were mainly caused by secondary neutrons. Soft errors of ICDs were observed with high energy photon beams, but most were not critical in the newer model. These errors may occur even when the device is far from the irradiation field.

  6. Ion recombination corrections of ionization chambers in flattening filter-free photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuenan; Easterling, Stephen B; Ting, Joseph Y

    2012-01-01

    The flattening filter free (FFF) X-rays can provide much higher dose rate at the treatment target compared to the conventional flattened X-rays. However, the substantial increase of dose rate for FFF beams may affect the ion recombination correction factor, which is required for accurate measurements using ionization chambers in clinical dosimetry. The purpose of this work is to investigate the ion recombination of three types of commonly used ion chambers (Farmer, PinPoint and plane-parallel) in the FFF photon radiation. Both 6 MV and 10 MV flattened and FFF beams were fully commissioned on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator. The ion recombination correction factor, P(ion), was determined using the two-voltage technique for a 0.6 cc Farmer chamber, a 0.015 cc PinPoint chamber, and a 0.02 cc parallel-plate chamber at different source-to-axis distances (SAD) in a solid water phantom or water tank phantom at a depth of 10 cm in a 10 × 10 cm(2) field. Good repeatability of measurements was demonstrated. Less than 1% difference in P(ion) between the flattened and FFF photons for all three ion chambers was observed. At a SAD of 100 cm and a depth of 10 cm for a 10 × 10 cm(2) field, P(ion) for the Farmer chamber was 1.004 and 1.008 for the 6 MV flattened and FFF beams, respectively. At the same setup using the Farmer chamber, P(ion) was 1.002 and 1.015 for the 10MV flattened and FFF beams, respectively. All P(ion) results for the Farmer, PinPoint, or parallel plate chamber in the 6 MV and 10 MV flattened and FFF beams were within 2% from the unity (1 ≤ P(ion) < 1.02). The P(ion) ratio of the FFF to flattened beams was 0.99~1.01 for both 6 MV and 10 MV photons. The ion recombination effect of the Farmer, PinPoint, and plane-parallel chamber in the FFF beams is not substantially different from that in the conventional flattened beams. PMID:22955642

  7. Study of the penumbra for high-energy photon beams with Gafchromic™ EBT2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Se An; Kang, Min Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon; Kim, Sung Kyu; Oh, Young Kee

    2012-06-01

    The penumbra has a major impact on obtaining uniformity of isodose distributions in radiation therapy. The penumbra phenomena of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques using multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) has an impact on the dose distributions in the border of the target volumes and the MLC. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of high photon energy (6 MV, 10 MV) on the penumbra for various depths and field sizes by using the Pencil Beam Convolution algorithms (eclipse 8.6) and self-developing Gafchromic™ EBT2 film. For dose calculations and EBT2 measurements, we used an acryl phantom with dimensions 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The 200 cGy dose was delivered to the central depth (10 cm) of the acryl phantom. The result of this study was that increased energy, field size and depth are rise to an increased penumbra (20% ˜ 80%) width. For a 6 MV photon energy, the penumbra widths (20%-80%) at 1.5 cm, 5 cm, and 10 cm depths were 4.2 mm, 4.4 mm, and 5.7 mm for the eclipse calculations and 2.9 mm, 4.1 mm, and 4.2 mm for the EBT2 film measurements for 10 × 10 cm2 field sizes, respectively. For a 10 MV photon energy, the penumbra widths were 4.5 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm for eclipse calculations and 4.1 mm, 4.6 mm, and 4.9 mm for EBT2 film measurements, respectively. As the field size was changed to 3 cm, 5 cm, 7 cm, 10 cm, and 15 cm, the penumbra widths changed to 5.1 mm, 5.3 mm, 5.6 mm, 5.9 mm, and 6.1 mm for eclipse calculations and 2.9 mm, 3.3 mm, 3.6 mm, 4.2 mm, and 5.1 mm for EBT2 measurements, respectively, for 10 cm depths for 6 MV photon energies. In this study, compared to the 10 MV photon energy, the 6 MV photon energy was preferred in treatments such as the 3D conformal radiation therapy and the IMRT for critical organs near the target volume.

  8. Photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Velchik, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the detection and treatment of osteoporosis. This paper is a review of the merits and limitations of the various noninvasive modalities currently available for the measurement of bone mineral density with special emphasis placed upon the nuclear medicine techniques of single-photon and dual-photon absorptiometry. The clinicians should come away with an understanding of the relative advantages and disadvantages of photon absorptiometry and its optimal clinical application. 49 references.

  9. Photon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J

    2002-10-07

    A photon collider interaction region has the possibility of expanding the physics reach of a future TeV scale electron-positron collider. A survey of ongoing efforts to design the required lasers and optics to create a photon collider is presented in this paper.

  10. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation.

    PubMed

    Entezam, A; Khandaker, M U; Amin, Y M; Ung, N M; Bradley, D A; Maah, J; Safari, M J; Moradi, F

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6-10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1-5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications. PMID:27149115

  11. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Entezam, A.; Khandaker, M. U.; Amin, Y. M.; Ung, N. M.; Bradley, D. A.; Maah, J.; Safari, M. J.; Moradi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6–10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1–5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications. PMID:27149115

  12. Photon spectral characteristics of dissimilar 6 MV linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Hinson, William H; Kearns, William T; deGuzman, Allan F; Bourland, J Daniel

    2008-05-01

    This work measures and compares the energy spectra of four dosimetrically matched 6 MV beams, generated from four physically different linear accelerators. The goal of this work is twofold. First, this study determines whether the spectra of dosimetrically matched beams are measurably different. This study also demonstrates that the spectra of clinical photon beams can be measured as a part of the beam data collection process for input to a three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning system. The spectra of 6 MV beams that are dosimetrically matched for clinical use were studied to determine if the beam spectra are similarly matched. Each of the four accelerators examined had a standing waveguide, but with different physical designs. The four accelerators were two Varian 2100C/Ds (one 6 MV/18 MV waveguide and one 6 MV/10 MV waveguide), one Varian 600 C with a vertically mounted waveguide and no bending magnet, and one Siemens MD 6740 with a 6 MV/10 MV waveguide. All four accelerators had percent depth dose curves for the 6 MV beam that were matched within 1.3%. Beam spectra were determined from narrow beam transmission measurements through successive thicknesses of pure aluminum along the central axis of the accelerator, made with a graphite Farmer ion chamber with a Lucite buildup cap. An iterative nonlinear fit using a Marquardt algorithm was used to find each spectrum. Reconstructed spectra show that all four beams have similar energy distributions with only subtle differences, despite the differences in accelerator design. The measured spectra of different 6 MV beams are similar regardless of accelerator design. The measured spectra show excellent agreement with those found by the auto-modeling algorithm in a commercial 3D treatment planning system that uses a convolution dose calculation algorithm. Thus, beam spectra can be acquired in a clinical setting at the time of commissioning as a part of the routine beam data collection. PMID:18561644

  13. Photon generator

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  14. Green photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-02-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas.

  15. Photons Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batic, Matej; Begalli, Marcia; Han, Min Cheol; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Han Sung; Grazia Pia, Maria; Saracco, Paolo; Weidenspointner, Georg

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review of methods and data for the Monte Carlo simulation of photon interactions is in progress: it concerns a wide set of theoretical modeling approaches and data libraries available for this purpose. Models and data libraries are assessed quantitatively with respect to an extensive collection of experimental measurements documented in the literature to determine their accuracy; this evaluation exploits rigorous statistical analysis methods. The computational performance of the associated modeling algorithms is evaluated as well. An overview of the assessment of photon interaction models and results of the experimental validation are presented.

  16. Correction factors for low perturbation in vivo diodes used in the determination of entrance doses in high energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Ralph; Philp, Amanda

    2008-01-15

    Purpose--Low perturbation diodes, with thin buildup caps, can be used to reduce perturbations to the delivered dose. The literature states that additional correction factors are required for low perturbation diodes, however, there are few reported studies into their use. This report measured the dose perturbations and correction factors for diodes with varying buildup cap thicknesses. Methods and materials--Scanditronix EDP15, EDD5, and EDD2 diodes were investigated. Dose perturbations and correction factors for field size, source-surface distance (SSD), obliquity, and wedge were measured in megavoltage photon beams. Results--EDP15 produces a 6% dose perturbation. EDD5 produces a perturbation between 1% and 2%. EDD2 perturbation is negligible. The variation of correction factors for the full buildup EDP15 diode is small and consistent with the literature. The low perturbation diode EDD2 has large correction factors. The field size correction factor varies from 1.38 to 0.87 for 10 MV. The SSD correction factor varies from 0.92 to 1.09 for 10 MV. At the maximum angle measured, the obliquity correction factor is 0.73 for 10 MV. Intermediate results were observed for the EDD5 diode. Conclusions--It is expected that it will be very difficult to achieve accurate in vivo dosimetry using the EDD2 diode. The EDD5 diode may represent a reasonable compromise between EDD2 and the full buildup EDP15. The EDD5 dose perturbation is small and the correction factors are not as large as for EDD2, so accurate in vivo dosimetry may be possible as long as the obliquity is below 45 degrees.

  17. Out-of-field neutron and leakage photon exposures and the associated risk of second cancers in high-energy photon radiotherapy: current status.

    PubMed

    Takam, R; Bezak, E; Marcu, L G; Yeoh, E

    2011-10-01

    Determination and understanding of out-of-field neutron and photon doses in accelerator-based radiotherapy is an important issue since linear accelerators operating at high energies (>10 MV) produce secondary radiations that irradiate parts of the patient's anatomy distal to the target region, potentially resulting in detrimental health effects. This paper provides a compilation of data (technical and clinical) reported in the literature on the measurement and Monte Carlo simulations of peripheral neutron and photon doses produced from high-energy medical linear accelerators and the reported risk and/or incidence of second primary cancer of tissues distal to the target volume. Information in the tables facilitates easier identification of (1) the various methods and measurement techniques used to determine the out-of-field neutron and photon radiations, (2) reported linac-dependent out-of-field doses, and (3) the risk/incidence of second cancers after radiotherapy due to classic and modern treatment methods. Regardless of the measurement technique and type of accelerator, the neutron dose equivalent per unit photon dose ranges from as low as 0.1 mSv/Gy to as high as 20.4 mSv/Gy. This radiation dose potentially contributes to the induction of second primary cancer in normal tissues outside the treated area. PMID:21756083

  18. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-11-03

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two.

  19. An analytical formalism to calculate phantom scatter factors for flattening filter free (FFF) mode photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Heeteak; Prado, Karl L.; Yi, Byong Yong

    2014-02-01

    Phantom Scatter Factors, Sp in the Khan formalism (Khan et al 1980 J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 6 745-51) describe medium-induced changes in photon-beam intensity as a function of size of the beam. According to the British Journal of Radiology, Supplement 25, megavoltage phantom scatter factors are invariant as a function of photon-beam energy. However, during the commissioning of an accelerator with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams (Varian TrueBeamTM 6-MV FFF and 10-MV FFF), differences were noted in phantom scatter between the filtered beams and FFF-mode beams. The purpose of this work was to evaluate this difference and provide an analytical formalism to explain the phantom scatter differences between FFF-mode and the filtered mode. An analytical formalism was devised to demonstrate the source of phantom scatter differences between the filtered and the FFF-mode beams. The reason for the differences in the phantom scatter factors between the filtered and the FFF-mode beams is hypothesized to be the non-uniform beam profiles of the FFF-mode beams. The analytical formalism proposed here is based on this idea, taking the product of the filtered phantom scatter factors and the ratio of the off-axis ratio between the FFF-mode and the filtered beams. All measurements were performed using a Varian TrueBeamTM linear accelerator with photon energies of 6-MV and 10-MV in both filtered and FFF-modes. For all measurements, a PTW Farmer type chamber and a Scanditronix CC04 cylindrical ionization were used. The in-water measurements were made at depth dose maximum and 100 cm source-to-axis distance. The in-air measurements were done at 100 cm source-to-axis distance with appropriate build-up cap. From these measurements, the phantom scatter factors were derived for the filtered beams and the FFF-mode beams for both energies to be evaluated against the phantoms scatter factors calculated using the proposed algorithm. For 6-MV, the difference between the measured and

  20. Polarity correction factor for flattening filter free photon beams in several cylindrical ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Masao; Tsudou, Shinji; Masutani, Takashi; Okayama, Takanobu

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the polarity correction factor in ionization chambers for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams and flattening filter (FF) beams. Measurements were performed with both 6 and 10 MV FFF and FF beams. Five commercial ionization chambers were evaluated: PTW TN30013; IBA Dosimetry CC01, CC04, and CC13; and Exradin A12S. Except for the CC01 ionization chamber, the other four chambers showed less than a 0.3 % difference in the polarity effect between the FFF and the FF beams. The CC01 chamber showed a strong field-size-dependence, unlike the other chambers. The polarity effect for all chambers with FFF beams did not change with the dose rate. Except in the case of the CC01 chamber, the difference in the polarity effect between FFF and FF beams was not significant. PMID:26873138

  1. An analytical formalism to calculate phantom scatter factors for flattening filter free (FFF) mode photon beams.

    PubMed

    Chung, Heeteak; Prado, Karl L; Yi, Byong Yong

    2014-02-21

    Phantom Scatter Factors, Sp in the Khan formalism (Khan et al 1980 J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 6 745-51) describe medium-induced changes in photon-beam intensity as a function of size of the beam. According to the British Journal of Radiology, Supplement 25, megavoltage phantom scatter factors are invariant as a function of photon-beam energy. However, during the commissioning of an accelerator with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams (Varian TrueBeam(TM) 6-MV FFF and 10-MV FFF), differences were noted in phantom scatter between the filtered beams and FFF-mode beams. The purpose of this work was to evaluate this difference and provide an analytical formalism to explain the phantom scatter differences between FFF-mode and the filtered mode. An analytical formalism was devised to demonstrate the source of phantom scatter differences between the filtered and the FFF-mode beams. The reason for the differences in the phantom scatter factors between the filtered and the FFF-mode beams is hypothesized to be the non-uniform beam profiles of the FFF-mode beams. The analytical formalism proposed here is based on this idea, taking the product of the filtered phantom scatter factors and the ratio of the off-axis ratio between the FFF-mode and the filtered beams. All measurements were performed using a Varian TrueBeam(TM) linear accelerator with photon energies of 6-MV and 10-MV in both filtered and FFF-modes. For all measurements, a PTW Farmer type chamber and a Scanditronix CC04 cylindrical ionization were used. The in-water measurements were made at depth dose maximum and 100 cm source-to-axis distance. The in-air measurements were done at 100 cm source-to-axis distance with appropriate build-up cap. From these measurements, the phantom scatter factors were derived for the filtered beams and the FFF-mode beams for both energies to be evaluated against the phantoms scatter factors calculated using the proposed algorithm. For 6-MV, the difference between the measured

  2. SU-E-J-09: A Monte Carlo Analysis of the Relationship Between Cherenkov Light Emission and Dose for Electrons, Protons, and X-Ray Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, A; Zhang, R; Gladstone, D; Pogue, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A number of recent studies have proposed that light emitted by the Cherenkov effect may be used for a number of radiation therapy dosimetry applications. Here we investigate the fundamental nature and accuracy of the technique for the first time by using a theoretical and Monte Carlo based analysis. Methods: Using the GEANT4 architecture for medically-oriented simulations (GAMOS) and BEAMnrc for phase space file generation, the light yield, material variability, field size and energy dependence, and overall agreement between the Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition for electron, proton, and flattened, unflattened, and parallel opposed x-ray photon beams was explored. Results: Due to the exponential attenuation of x-ray photons, Cherenkov light emission and dose deposition were identical for monoenergetic pencil beams. However, polyenergetic beams exhibited errors with depth due to beam hardening, with the error being inversely related to beam energy. For finite field sizes, the error with depth was inversely proportional to field size, and lateral errors in the umbra were greater for larger field sizes. For opposed beams, the technique was most accurate due to an averaging out of beam hardening in a single beam. The technique was found to be not suitable for measuring electron beams, except for relative dosimetry of a plane at a single depth. Due to a lack of light emission, the technique was found to be unsuitable for proton beams. Conclusions: The results from this exploratory study suggest that optical dosimetry by the Cherenkov effect may be most applicable to near monoenergetic x-ray photon beams (e.g. Co-60), dynamic IMRT and VMAT plans, as well as narrow beams used for SRT and SRS. For electron beams, the technique would be best suited for superficial dosimetry, and for protons the technique is not applicable due to a lack of light emission. NIH R01CA109558 and R21EB017559.

  3. On the determination of reference levels for quality assurance of flattening filter free photon beams in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Clivio, Alessandro; Belosi, Maria Francesca; Cozzi, Luca; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Fogliata, Antonella; Bolard, Grégory; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Krauss, Harald

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: New definitions for some dosimetric parameters for use in quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators have been suggested. The present study aims to validate these suggestions and to propose possible reference levels. Methods: The main characteristics of FFF photon beams were described in terms of: field size, penumbra, unflatness, slope, and peak-position parameters. Data were collected for 6 and 10 MV-FFF beams from three different Varian TrueBeam Linacs. Measurements were performed with a 2D-array (Starcheck system from PTW-Freiburg) and with the portal dosimetry method GLAaS utilizing the build-in portal imager of TrueBeam. Data were also compared to ion chamber measurements. A cross check validation has been performed on a FFF beam of 6 MV generated by a Varian Clinac-iX upgraded to FFF capability. Results : All the parameters suggested to characterize the FFF beams resulted easily measurable and little variation was observed among different Linacs. Referring to two reference field sizes of 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}, at SDD = 100 cm and d = dmax, from the portal dosimetry data, the following results (averaging X and Y profiles) were obtained. Field size: 9.95 ± 0.02 and 19.98 ± 0.03 cm for 6 MV-FFF (9.94 ± 0.02 and 19.98 ± 0.03 cm for 10 MV-FFF). Penumbra: 2.7 ± 0.3 and 2.9 ± 0.3 mm for 6 MV-FFF (3.1 ± 0.2 and 3.3 ± 0.3 for 10 MV-FFF). Unflatness: 1.11 ± 0.01 and 1.25 ± 0.01 for 6 MV-FFF (1.21 ± 0.01 and 1.50 ± 0.01 for 10 MV-FFF). Slope: 0.320 ± 0.020%/mm and 0.43 ± 0.015%/mm for 6 MV-FFF (0.657 ± 0.023%/mm and 0.795 ± 0.017%/mm for 10 MV-FFF). Peak Position −0.2 ± 0.2 and −0.4 ± 0.2 mm for 6 MV-FFF (−0.3 ± 0.2 and 0.7 ± 0.3 mm for 10 MV-FFF). Results would depend upon measurement depth. With thresholds set to at least 95% confidence level from the measured data and to account for possible variations between detectors and methods and experimental settings, a

  4. Integrated photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gondarenko, Alexander A.

    In 1958 the first integrated circuit was demonstrated to combine transistors, resistors, and capacitors [36]. To this date fabrication technology has been driven by the growing demand for monolithically constructed, densely packed electronic components. The exponentially shrinking device size decreased the feature dimensions from 10 microns to 32 nm and grew transistor count from 2,300 to over 2,000,000,000 in Intel's 4004 and Intel Kentsfield XE microprocessors. The benefits of micro- and nano-fabrication was not limited to just computer chips. MEMs, spintronic, microfluidics, and integrated photonics were all made possible by the ever expanding ability to form complex geometries, on a wide variety of materials, on a micron and submicron scale. This dissertation is part of an effort to design and fabricate novel integrated photonic devices compatible with standard electron beam and photo lithography and utilize a readily available material base. We aim to create devices with a decreased footprint on a chip and operate in the infrared, visible, and UV spectra. We present two general sections, the first is a theoretical effort to find the fundamental design geometries for a variety of optical problems. The second section is an experimental demonstration of techniques and devices for novel optical phenomena in an integrated package. In the theoretical section we develop and apply computational evolutionary algorithms to explore problems of light confinement, coupling, and guiding in two and three dimensional device geometries. Our general aim is to find a global limit to optimal device geometry and performance given a set of constrains. Experimentally, we demonstrate an efficient design and a fabrication process for a short development cycle of photonic devices. For the design part of the workflow, we develop a computational approach to explore device geometries with minimum initial assumptions for a variety of photonic problems. For the fabrication part of the

  5. Photonic Nanojets

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Alexander; Kong, Soon-Cheol; Sahakian, Alan V.; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the substantial body of literature emerging since 2004 concerning photonic nanojets. The photonic nanojet is a narrow, high-intensity, non-evanescent light beam that can propagate over a distance longer than the wavelength λ after emerging from the shadow-side surface of an illuminated lossless dielectric microcylinder or microsphere of diameter larger than λ. The nanojet’s minimum beamwidth can be smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in fact as small as ~λ/3 for microspheres. It is a nonresonant phenomenon appearing for a wide range of diameters of the microcylinder or microsphere if the refractive index contrast relative to the background is less than about 2:1. Importantly, inserting within a nanojet a nanoparticle of diameter dν perturbs the far-field backscattered power of the illuminated microsphere by an amount that varies as dν3 for a fixed λ. This perturbation is much slower than the dν6 dependence of Rayleigh scattering for the same nanoparticle, if isolated. This leads to a situation where, for example, the measured far-field backscattered power of a 3-μm diameter microsphere could double if a 30-nm diameter nanoparticle were inserted into the nanojet emerging from the microsphere, despite the nanoparticle having only 1/10,000th the cross-section area of the microsphere. In effect, the nanojet serves to project the presence of the nanoparticle to the far field. These properties combine to afford potentially important applications of photonic nanojets for detecting and manipulating nanoscale objects, subdiffraction-resolution nanopatterning and nanolithography, low-loss waveguiding, and ultrahigh-density optical storage. PMID:19946614

  6. Photon calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1988-04-22

    A photon calorimeter is provided that comprises a laminar substrate that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating, that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions, are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly. 4 figs.

  7. Photon Calorimeter

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Tze-Show

    1989-01-01

    A photon calorimeter (20, 40) is provided that comprises a laminar substrate (10, 22, 42) that is uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition. A plasma-sprayed coating (28, 48, 52), that is generally uniform in density and homogeneous in atomic composition within the proximity of planes that are parallel to the surfaces of the substrate, is applied to either one or both sides of the laminar substrate. The plasma-sprayed coatings may be very efficiently spectrally tailored in atomic number. Thermocouple measuring junctions (30, 50, 54) are positioned within the plasma-sprayed coatings. The calorimeter is rugged, inexpensive, and equilibrates in temperature very rapidly.

  8. Tevatron direct photon results.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1999-09-21

    Tevatron direct photon results since DIS98 are reviewed. Two new CDF measurements are discussed, the Run Ib inclusive photon cross section and the photon + Muon cross section. Comparisons with the latest NLO QCD calculations are presented.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  10. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  11. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the ..gamma gamma..* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Exclusive photon-photon processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    Exclusive gamma gamma right arrow hadron pairs are among the most fundamental processes in QCD, providing a detailed examination of Compton scattering in the crossed channel. In the high momentum transfer domain (s, t, large, Theta cm for t/s fixed), these processes can be computed from first principles in QCD, yielding important information on the nature of the QCD coupling data and the form of hadron distribution amplitudes. Similarly, the transition form factors gamma star gamma, gamma star gamma right arrow pi(o), Eta (0), Eta`, Eta(c)... provide rigorous tests of QCD and definitive determinations of the meson distribution amplitudes Phi H(x,Q). We show that the assumption of a frozen coupling at low momentum transfers can explain the observed scaling of two-photon exclusive processes.

  13. Photon-Photon Interactions via Rydberg Blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshkov, Alexey V.; Otterbach, Johannes; Fleischhauer, Michael; Pohl, Thomas; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2011-09-23

    We develop the theory of light propagation under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency in systems involving strongly interacting Rydberg states. Taking into account the quantum nature and the spatial propagation of light, we analyze interactions involving few-photon pulses. We show that this system can be used for the generation of nonclassical states of light including trains of single photons with an avoided volume between them, for implementing photon-photon gates, as well as for studying many-body phenomena with strongly correlated photons.

  14. Nuclear photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Habs, D.; Guenther, M. M.; Jentschel, M.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    With the planned new {gamma}-beam facilities like MEGa-ray at LLNL (USA) or ELI-NP at Bucharest (Romania) with 10{sup 13}{gamma}/s and a band width of {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -3}, a new era of {gamma} beams with energies up to 20MeV comes into operation, compared to the present world-leading HI{gamma}S facility at Duke University (USA) with 10{sup 8}{gamma}/s and {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup -2}. In the long run even a seeded quantum FEL for {gamma} beams may become possible, with much higher brilliance and spectral flux. At the same time new exciting possibilities open up for focused {gamma} beams. Here we describe a new experiment at the {gamma} beam of the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France), where we observed for the first time that the index of refraction for {gamma} beams is determined by virtual pair creation. Using a combination of refractive and reflective optics, efficient monochromators for {gamma} beams are being developed. Thus, we have to optimize the total system: the {gamma}-beam facility, the {gamma}-beam optics and {gamma} detectors. We can trade {gamma} intensity for band width, going down to {Delta}E{gamma}/E{gamma} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -6} and address individual nuclear levels. The term 'nuclear photonics' stresses the importance of nuclear applications. We can address with {gamma}-beams individual nuclear isotopes and not just elements like with X-ray beams. Compared to X rays, {gamma} beams can penetrate much deeper into big samples like radioactive waste barrels, motors or batteries. We can perform tomography and microscopy studies by focusing down to {mu}m resolution using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) for detection with eV resolution and high spatial resolution at the same time. We discuss the dominating M1 and E1 excitations like the scissors mode, two-phonon quadrupole octupole excitations, pygmy dipole excitations or giant dipole excitations under the new facet of

  15. Surface Dose Investigation of the Flattening Filter-Free Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuenan; Khan, Mohammad K.; Ting, Joseph Y.; Easterling, Stephen B.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Flattening filter-free (FFF) x-rays can provide more efficient use of photons and a significant increase of dose rate compared with conventional flattened x-rays, features that are especially beneficial for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The available data on the entrance doses of the FFF photon beams remain limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the entrance dose of FFF photons in the buildup region and to compare it with that of conventional flattened photons. Methods and Materials: A Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator has been in full clinical operation with 6-MV and 10-MV FFF and flattened x-ray photons. Entrance dose at the surface was measured using a parallel plate ionization chamber in a solid water phantom with buildup depth = 0{approx}15 mm for 6X and 0{approx}25 mm for 10X. Different field size (FS) patterns were created in the Eclipse Treatment Planning System by multileaf collimator (MLC) rather than jaws (FS = 2 Multiplication-Sign 2, 3 Multiplication-Sign 3, 4 Multiplication-Sign 4, 6 Multiplication-Sign 6, and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} by MLC and jaw size = 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 2.2, 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 3.2, 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 4.2, 6 Multiplication-Sign 6, and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2}). The smallest FS was about four times larger than the ion chamber dimension. All buildup dose measurements were normalized to FS = 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} at the depth of dose maximum (dmax). Results: Good repeatability was demonstrated and surface dose increased linearly with FS for both flattened and FFF photons. The entrance dose of the FFF photons was modestly larger than that of the corresponding flattened photons for both 6X and 10X for different FS ranging from 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 cm{sup 2} to 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2}. Conclusions: The FFF photons have a higher entrance dose than that of the corresponding flattened photons for FS

  16. Quantum Computing using Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhalawany, Ahmed; Leuenberger, Michael

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we propose a theoretical model of two-quantum bit gates for quantum computation using the polarization states of two photons in a microcavity. By letting the two photons interact non-resonantly with four quantum dots inside the cavity, we obtain an effective photon-photon interaction which we exploit for the implementation of an universal XOR gate. The two-photon Hamiltonian is written in terms of the photons' total angular momentum operators and their states are written using the Schwinger representation of the total angular momentum.

  17. Controllable photon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszetzky, Dániel; Nagy, Attila; Czitrovszky, Aladár

    2006-10-01

    We have developed our pervious experimental setup using correlated photon pairs (to the calibration of photo detectors) to realize a controllable photon source. For the generation of such photon pairs we use the non-linear process of parametric down conversion. When a photon of the pump beam is incident to a nonlinear crystal with phase matching condition, a pair of photons (signal and idler) is created at the same time with certain probability. We detect the photons in the signal beam with a single photon counting module (SPCM), while delaying those in the idler beam. Recently we have developed a fast electronic unit to control an optical shutter (a Pockels cell) placed to the optical output of the idler beam. When we detect a signal photon with the controlling electronic unit we are also able to open or close the fast optical shutter. Thus we can control which idler photons can propagate through the Pockels cell. So with this photon source we are able to program the number of photons in a certain time window. This controllable photon source that is able to generate a known number of photons with specified wavelength, direction, and polarization could be useful for applications in high-accuracy optical characterisation of photometric devices at the ultra-low intensities. This light source can also serve as a standard in testing of optical image intensifiers, night vision devices, and in the accurate measurement of spectral distribution of transmission and absorption in optical materials.

  18. High energy photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Zerwas, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  19. Photonic crystal and photonic wire device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rue, Richard; Sorel, Marc; Johnson, Nigel; Rahman, Faiz; Ironside, Charles; Cronin, Lee; Watson, Ian; Martin, Robert; Jin, Chongjun; Pottier, Pierre; Chong, Harold; Gnan, Marco; Jugessur, Aju; Camargo, Edilson; Erwin, Grant; Md Zain, Ahmad; Ntakis, Iraklis; Hobbs, Lois; Zhang, Hua; Armenise, Mario; Ciminelli, Caterina; Coquillat, Dominique

    2005-09-01

    Photonic devices that exploit photonic crystal (PhC) principles in a planar environment continue to provide a fertile field of research. 2D PhC based channel waveguides can provide both strong confinement and controlled dispersion behaviour. In conjunction with, for instance, various electro-optic, thermo-optic and other effects, a range of device functionality is accessible in very compact PhC channel-guide devices that offer the potential for high-density integration. Low enough propagation losses are now being obtained with photonic crystal channel-guide structures that their use in real applications has become plausible. Photonic wires (PhWs) can also provide strong confinement and low propagation losses. Bragg-gratings imposed on photonic wires can provide dispersion and frequency selection in device structures that are intrinsically simpler than 2D PhC channel guides--and can compete with them under realistic conditions.

  20. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  1. Photonic crystal light source

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Bur, James A.

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  2. Photon Irradiation Response on Ge and Al-Doped SiO{sub 2} Optical Fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakob, Nor Haliza; Wagiran, Husin; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Asni, Hazila; Ali, Hassan

    2010-07-07

    Recently, research groups have reported a number of radiation effects on the applications of SiO{sub 2} optical fibres with possible use as dosimeter material because these optical fibre provide a good basis for medical radiation dosimetry. The objective of this study is to investigate the thermoluminescence response and fading characteristic for germanium and aluminium doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibres with photon irradiation. These optical fibres are placed in solid phantom and irradiated to 6 and 10 MV photon beam at dose ranging from 0.06 Gy to 0.24 Gy using Primus MLC 3339 linear accelerator at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru. In fading studies, the TL measurements were continued up to 14 days period. The optical fibres will produce glow curves whereby the information is then analyzed. Al and Ge-doped optical fibres have a linear dose-TL signal relationship that is proportionality between the TL signal and the doses. Comparison for TL response between different linear accelerator showed a good agreement because these optical fibres also have a linear dose-TL signal relationship even using different equipments.

  3. Photon Irradiation Response on Ge and Al-Doped SiO2 Optical Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaakob, Nor Haliza; Wagiran, Husin; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Ali, Hassan; Asni, Hazila

    2010-07-01

    Recently, research groups have reported a number of radiation effects on the applications of SiO2 optical fibres with possible use as dosimeter material because these optical fibre provide a good basis for medical radiation dosimetry. The objective of this study is to investigate the thermoluminescence response and fading characteristic for germanium and aluminium doped SiO2 optical fibres with photon irradiation. These optical fibres are placed in solid phantom and irradiated to 6 and 10 MV photon beam at dose ranging from 0.06 Gy to 0.24 Gy using Primus MLC 3339 linear accelerator at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru. In fading studies, the TL measurements were continued up to 14 days period. The optical fibres will produce glow curves whereby the information is then analyzed. Al and Ge-doped optical fibres have a linear dose-TL signal relationship that is proportionality between the TL signal and the doses. Comparison for TL response between different linear accelerator showed a good agreement because these optical fibres also have a linear dose-TL signal relationship even using different equipments.

  4. Determination of ion recombination correction factors for a liquid ionization chamber in megavoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum-Bae; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Huh, Hyun Do

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ion recombination correction factor for a liquid ionization chamber in a high energy photon beam by using our experimental method. The ion recombination correction factors were determined by using our experimental method and were compared with theoretical and experimental methods proposed by using the theoretical method (Greening, Johansson) and the two-dose rate method in a cobalt beam and a high energy photon beam. In order to apply the liquid ionization chamber in a reference and small field dosimetry, we acquired the absorbed dose to water correction coefficient, the beam quality correction factor, and the influence quantities for the microLion chamber according to the TRS-398 protocol and applied the results to a high energy photon beam used in clinical fields. As a result, our experimental method for ion recombination in a cobalt beam agreed with the results from the heoretical method (Greening theory) better than it did with the results from the two-dose rate method. For high energy photon beams, the two-dose rate and our experimental methods were in good agreement, less than 2% deviation, while the theoretical general collection efficiency (Johansson et al.) deviated greatly from the experimental values. When we applied the factors for the absorbed dose to water measurement, the absorbed dose to water for the microLion chamber was in good agreement, within 1%, compared with the values for the PTW 30013 chamber in 6 and 10 MV Clinac iX and 6 and 15 MV Oncor impression. With these results, not only can the microLion ionization chamber be used to measure the absorbed dose to water in a reference condition, it can also be used to a the chamber for small, non-standard field dosimetry.

  5. A comparison of phantom scatter from flattened and flattening filter free high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Neil; Allen, Vince; Daniel, Jim; Dacey, Rob; Walker, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams have different dosimetric properties from those of flattened beams. The aim of this work was to characterize the collimator scatter (S{sub c}) and total scatter (S{sub cp}) from 3 FFF beams of differing quality indices and use the resulting mathematical fits to generate phantom scatter (S{sub p}) data. The similarities and differences between S{sub p} of flattened and FFF beams are described. S{sub c} and S{sub cp} data were measured for 3 flattened and 3 FFF high-energy photon beams (Varian 6 and 10 MV and Elekta 6 MV). These data were fitted to logarithmic power law functions with 4 numerical coefficients. The agreement between our experimentally determined flattened beam S{sub p} and published data was within ± 1.2% for all 3 beams investigated and all field sizes from 4 × 4 to 40 × 40 cm{sup 2}. For the FFF beams, S{sub p} was only within 1% of the same flattened beam published data for field sizes between 6 × 6 and 14 × 14 cm{sup 2}. Outside this range, the differences were much greater, reaching − 3.2%, − 4.5%, and − 4.3% for the fields of 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} for the Varian 6-MV, Varian 10-MV, and Elekta 6-MV FFF beams, respectively. The FFF beam S{sub p} increased more slowly with increasing field size than that of the published and measured flattened beam of a similar reference field size quality index, i.e., there is less Phantom Scatter than that found with flattened beams for a given field size. This difference can be explained when the fluence profiles of the flattened and FFF beams are considered. The FFF beam has greatly reduced fluence off axis, especially as field size increases, compared with the flattened beam profile; hence, less scatter is generated in the phantom reaching the central axis.

  6. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.

  7. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  8. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  9. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merritt, Scott; Krainak, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  10. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    SciTech Connect

    Dawoud, S. M. Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A.; Sykes, J. R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  11. Out-of-field photon and neutron dose equivalents from step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Salehpour, Mohammad . E-mail: msalehpour@mdanderson.org; Followill, David S.; Stovall, Marilyn; Kuban, Deborah A.; White, R. Allen; Rosen, Isaac I.

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To measure the photon and neutron out-of-treatment-field dose equivalents to various organs from different treatment strategies (conventional vs. intensity-modulated radiation therapy [IMRT]) at different treatment energies and delivered by different accelerators. Methods and Materials: Independent measurements were made of the photon and neutron out-of-field dose equivalents resulting from one conventional and six IMRT treatments for prostate cancer. The conventional treatment used an 18-MV beam from a Clinac 2100; the IMRT treatments used 6-MV, 10-MV, 15-MV, and 18-MV beams from a Varian Clinac 2100 accelerator and 6-MV and 15-MV beams from a Siemens Primus accelerator. Photon doses were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Rando phantom, and neutron fluence was measured with gold foils. Dose equivalents to the colon, liver, stomach, lung, esophagus, thyroid, and active bone marrow were determined for each treatment approach. Results: For each treatment approach, the relationship between dose equivalent per MU, distance from the treatment field, and depth in the patient was examined. Photon dose equivalents decreased approximately exponentially with distance from the treatment field. Neutron dose equivalents were independent of distance from the treatment field and decreased with increasing tissue depth. Neutrons were a significant contributor to the out-of field dose equivalent for beam energies {>=}15 MV. Conclusions: Out-of-field photon and neutron dose equivalents can be estimated to any point in a patient undergoing a similar treatment approach from the distance of that point to the central axis and from the tissue depth. This information is useful in determining the dose to critical structures and in evaluating the risk of associated carcinogenesis.

  12. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, Tuncer M.; Shu, Deming

    1995-01-01

    A photon beam position monitor for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade "shadowing". Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation.

  13. Photon beam position monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  14. Photonic layered media

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2002-01-01

    A new class of structured dielectric media which exhibit significant photonic bandstructure has been invented. The new structures, called photonic layered media, are easy to fabricate using existing layer-by-layer growth techniques, and offer the ability to significantly extend our practical ability to tailor the properties of such optical materials.

  15. A novel photonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, X. S.; Maleki, L.

    1995-01-01

    We report a novel oscillator for photonic RF systems. This oscillator is capable of generating high-frequency signals up to 70 GHz in both electrical and optical domains and is a special voltage-controlled oscillator with an optical output port. It can be used to make a phase-locked loop (PLL) and perform all functions that a PLL is capable of for photonic systems. It can be synchronized to a reference source by means of optical injection locking, electrical injection locking, and PLL. It can also be self-phase locked and self-injection locked to generate a high-stability photonic RF reference. Its applications include high-frequency reference regeneration and distribution, high-gain frequency multiplication, comb-frequecy and square-wave generation, carrier recovery, and clock recovery. We anticipate that such photonic voltage-controlled oscillators (VCOs) will be as important to photonic RF systems as electrical VCOs are to electrical RF systems.

  16. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  17. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O’Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  18. Indistinguishability of independent single photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, F. W.; Wong, C. W.

    2009-01-01

    The indistinguishability of independent single photons is presented by decomposing the single photon pulse into the mixed state of different transform-limited pulses. The entanglement between single photons and outer environment or other photons induces the distribution of the center frequencies of those transform-limited pulses and makes photons distinguishable. Only the single photons with the same transform-limited form are indistinguishable. In details, the indistinguishability of single photons from the solid-state quantum emitter and spontaneous parametric down-conversion is examined with two-photon Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. Moreover, experimental methods to enhance the indistinguishability are discussed, where the usage of spectral filter is highlighted.

  19. Definition of parameters for quality assurance of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fogliata, A.; Garcia, R.; Knoeoes, T.; Nicolini, G.; Clivio, A.; Vanetti, E.; Khamphan, C.; Cozzi, L.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams generated by medical linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy clinical practice. Such beams present fundamental differences with respect to the standard filter flattened (FF) beams, making the generally used dosimetric parameters and definitions not always viable. The present study will propose possible definitions and suggestions for some dosimetric parameters for use in quality assurance of FFF beams generated by medical linacs in radiotherapy. Methods: The main characteristics of the photon beams have been analyzed using specific data generated by a Varian TrueBeam linac having both FFF and FF beams of 6 and 10 MV energy, respectively. Results: Definitions for dose profile parameters are suggested starting from the renormalization of the FFF with respect to the corresponding FF beam. From this point the flatness concept has been translated into one of 'unflatness' and other definitions have been proposed, maintaining a strict parallelism between FFF and FF parameter concepts. Conclusions: Ideas for quality controls used in establishing a quality assurance program when introducing FFF beams into the clinical environment are given here, keeping them similar to those used for standard FF beams. By following the suggestions in this report, the authors foresee that the introduction of FFF beams into a clinical radiotherapy environment will be as safe and well controlled as standard beam modalities using the existing guidelines.

  20. Direct Photons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Gabor,D.

    2008-07-29

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range. The p+p measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high p{sub T} direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring 'almost real' virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  1. Performance analysis of the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A for photon-based radiotherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarco, J.J.; Solberg, T.D.; Wallace, R.E.; Smathers, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    The Los Alamos code MCNP4A (Monte Carlo M-Particle version 4A) is currently used to simulate a variety of problems ranging from nuclear reactor analysis to boron neutron capture therapy. This study is designed to evaluate MCNP4A as the dose calculation system for photon-based radiotherapy applications. A graphical user interface (MCNP Radiation Therapy) has been developed which automatically sets up the geometry and photon source requirements for three-dimensional simulations using Computed Tomography (CT) data. Preliminary results suggest the code is capable of calculating satisfactory dose distributions in a variety of simulated homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. The major drawback for this dosimetry system is the amount of time to obtain a statistically significant answer. MCNPRT allows the user to analyze the performance of MCNP4A as a function of material, geometry resolution and MCNP4A photon and electron physics parameters. A typical simulation geometry consists of a 10 MV photon point source incident on a 15 x 15 x 15 cm{sup 3} phantom composed of water voxels ranging in size from 10 x 10 x 10 mm{sup 3} to 2 x 2 x 2 mm{sup 3}. As the voxel size is decreased, a larger percentage of time is spent tracking photons through the voxelized geometry as opposed to the secondary electrons. A PRPR Patch file is under development that will optimize photon transport within the simulation phantom specifically for radiotherapy applications. MCNP4A also supports parallel processing capabilities via the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) message passing system. A dedicated network of five SUN SPARC2 processors produced a wall-clock speedup of 4.4 based on a simulation phantom containing 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} water voxels. The code was also tested on the 80 node IBM RS/6000 cluster at the Maui High Performance Computing Center (NHPCC). A non-dedicated system of 75 processors produces a wall clock speedup of 29 relative to one SUN SPARC2 computer.

  2. Photon collider Higgs factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, V. I.

    2014-09-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson (and still nothing else) have triggered appearance of many proposals of Higgs factories for precision measurement of the Higgs properties. Among them there are several projects of photon colliders (PC) without e+e- in addition to PLC based on e+e- linear colliders ILC and CLIC. In this paper, following a brief discussion of Higgs factories physics program I give an overview of photon colliders based on linear colliders ILC and CLIC, and of the recently proposed photon-collider Higgs factories with no e+e- collision option based on recirculation linacs in ring tunnels.

  3. Photonics: Technology project summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.

    1991-01-01

    Photonics involves the use of light (photons) in conjunction with electronics for applications in communications, computing, control, and sensing. Components used in photonic systems include lasers, optical detectors, optical wave guide devices, fiber optics, and traditional electronic devices. The goal of this program is to develop hybrid optoelectronic devices and systems for sensing, information processing, communications, and control. It is hoped that these new devices will yield at least an order of magnitude improvement in performance over existing technology. The objective of the program is to conduct research and development in the following areas: (1) materials and devices; (2) networking and computing; (3) optical processing/advanced pattern recognition; and (4) sensing.

  4. Photonic Maxwell's Demon.

    PubMed

    Vidrighin, Mihai D; Dahlsten, Oscar; Barbieri, Marco; Kim, M S; Vedral, Vlatko; Walmsley, Ian A

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental realization of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the few-photons level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of an equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics. PMID:26894692

  5. Photon detector system

    DOEpatents

    Ekstrom, Philip A.

    1981-01-01

    A photon detector includes a semiconductor device, such as a Schottky barrier diode, which has an avalanche breakdown characteristic. The diode is cooled to cryogenic temperatures to eliminate thermally generated charge carriers from the device. The diode is then biased to a voltage level exceeding the avalanche breakdown threshold level such that, upon receipt of a photon, avalanche breakdown occurs. This breakdown is detected by appropriate circuitry which thereafter reduces the diode bias potential to a level below the avalanche breakdown threshold level to terminate the avalanche condition. Subsequently, the bias potential is reapplied to the diode in preparation for detection of a subsequently received photon.

  6. Photonic Maxwell's Demon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidrighin, Mihai D.; Dahlsten, Oscar; Barbieri, Marco; Kim, M. S.; Vedral, Vlatko; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2016-02-01

    We report an experimental realization of Maxwell's demon in a photonic setup. We show that a measurement at the few-photons level followed by a feed-forward operation allows the extraction of work from intense thermal light into an electric circuit. The interpretation of the experiment stimulates the derivation of an equality relating work extraction to information acquired by measurement. We derive a bound using this relation and show that it is in agreement with the experimental results. Our work puts forward photonic systems as a platform for experiments related to information in thermodynamics.

  7. Dose reduction of scattered photons from concrete walls lined with lead: Implications for improvement in design of megavoltage radiation therapy facility mazes

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Affan, I. A. M. Hugtenburg, R. P.; Piliero, M.; Bari, D. S.; Al-Saleh, W. M.; Evans, S.; Al-Hasan, M.; Al-Zughul, B.; Al-Kharouf, S.; Ghaith, A.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: This study explores the possibility of using lead to cover part of the radiation therapy facility maze walls in order to absorb low energy photons and reduce the total dose at the maze entrance of radiation therapy rooms. Methods: Experiments and Monte Carlo simulations were utilized to establish the possibility of using high-Z materials to cover the concrete walls of the maze in order to reduce the dose of the scattered photons at the maze entrance. The dose of the backscattered photons from a concrete wall was measured for various scattering angles. The dose was also calculated by the FLUKA and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. The FLUKA code was also used to simulate an existing radiotherapy room to study the effect of multiple scattering when adding lead to cover the concrete walls of the maze. Monoenergetic photons were used to represent the main components of the x ray spectrum up to 10 MV. Results: It was observed that when the concrete wall was covered with just 2 mm of lead, the measured dose rate at all backscattering angles was reduced by 20% for photons of energy comparable to Co-60 emissions and 70% for Cs-137 emissions. The simulations with FLUKA and EGS showed that the reduction in the dose was potentially even higher when lead was added. One explanation for the reduction is the increased absorption of backscattered photons due to the photoelectric interaction in lead. The results also showed that adding 2 mm lead to the concrete walls and floor of the maze reduced the dose at the maze entrance by up to 90%. Conclusions: This novel proposal of covering part or the entire maze walls with a few millimeters of lead would have a direct implication for the design of radiation therapy facilities and would assist in upgrading the design of some mazes, especially those in facilities with limited space where the maze length cannot be extended to sufficiently reduce the dose.

  8. Microwave background constraints on mixing of photons with hidden photons

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Redondo, Javier; Sigl, Guenter E-mail: javier.redondo@desy.de

    2009-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of hidden photons kinetically mixing with the ordinary photon. This mixing leads to oscillations between photons and hidden photons, analogous to the observed oscillations between different neutrino flavors. In this context, we derive new bounds on the photon-hidden photon mixing parameters using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer instrument on board of the Cosmic Background Explorer. Requiring the distortions of the CMB induced by the photon-hidden photon mixing to be smaller than experimental upper limits, this leads to a bound on the mixing angle {chi}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup -7}-10{sup -5} for hidden photon masses between 10{sup -14} eV and 10{sup -7} eV. This low-mass and low-mixing region of the hidden photon parameter space was previously unconstrained.

  9. SU-E-T-625: Use and Choice of Ionization Chambers for the Commissioning of Flattened and Flattening-Filter-Free Photon Beams: Determination of Recombination Correction Factor (ks)

    SciTech Connect

    Stucchi, C; Mongioj, V; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Bonfantini, F; Bresolin, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the recombination effect for some ionization chambers to be used for linacs commissioning for Flattened Filter (FF) and Flattening Filter Free (FFF) photon beams. Methods: A Varian TrueBeam linac with five photon beams was used: 6, 10 and 15 MV FF and 6 and 10 MV FFF. Measurements were performed in a water tank and in a plastic water phantom with different chambers: a mini-ion chamber (IC CC01, IBA), a plane-parallel ion chamber (IC PPC05, IBA) and two Farmer chambers (NE2581 and FPC05-IBA). Measurement conditions were Source- Surface Distance of 100 cm, two field sizes (10x10 and 40x40 cm2) and five depths (1cm, maximum buildup, 5cm, 10cm and 20cm). The ion recombination factors (kS), obtained from the Jaffe's plots (voltage interval 50-400 V), were evaluated at the recommended operating voltage of +300V. Results: Dose Per Pulse (DPP) at dmax was 0.4 mGy/pulse for FF beams, 1.0 mGy/pulse and 1.9 mGy/pulse for 6MV and 10 MV FFF beams respectively. For all measurement conditions, kS ranged between 0.996 and 0.999 for IC PPC05, 0.997 and 1.008 for IC CC01. For the FPC05 IBA Farmer IC, kS varied from 1.001 to 1.011 for FF beams, from 1.004 to 1.015 for 6 MV FFF and from 1.009 to 1.025 for 10 MV FFF. Whereas, for NE2581 IC the values ranged from 1.002 to 1.009 for all energy beams and measurement conditions. Conclusion: kS depends on the chamber volume and the DPP, which in turn depends on energy beam but is independent of dose rate. Ion chambers with small active volume can be reliably used for dosimetry of FF and FFF beams even without kS correction. On the contrary, for absolute dosimetry of FFF beams by Farmer ICs it is necessary to evaluate and apply the kS correction. Partially supported by Lega Italiana Lotta contro i Tumori (LILT)

  10. Biophotonics: Circadian photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rea, Mark S.

    2011-05-01

    A growing body of medical evidence suggests that disrupting the body's biological clock can have adverse effects on health. Researchers are now creating the photonic tools to monitor, predict and influence the circadian rhythm.

  11. Photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M. |

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the theoretical and experimental efforts in obtaining a photonic band gap, a frequency band in three-dimensional dielectric structures in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, is presented.

  12. Smart packaging for photonics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.; Carson, R.F.; Sullivan, C.T.; McClellan, G.; Palmer, D.W.

    1997-09-01

    Unlike silicon microelectronics, photonics packaging has proven to be low yield and expensive. One approach to make photonics packaging practical for low cost applications is the use of {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} packages. {open_quotes}Smart{close_quotes} in this context means the ability of the package to actuate a mechanical change based on either a measurement taken by the package itself or by an input signal based on an external measurement. One avenue of smart photonics packaging, the use of polysilicon micromechanical devices integrated with photonic waveguides, was investigated in this research (LDRD 3505.340). The integration of optical components with polysilicon surface micromechanical actuation mechanisms shows significant promise for signal switching, fiber alignment, and optical sensing applications. The optical and stress properties of the oxides and nitrides considered for optical waveguides and how they are integrated with micromechanical devices were investigated.

  13. Photonics Explorer: revolutionizing photonics in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie; Cords, Nina; Fischer, Robert; Vlekken, Johan; Euler, Manfred; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-10-01

    The `Photonics Explorer' is a unique intra-curricular optics kit designed to engage, excite and educate secondary school students about the fascination of working with light - hands-on, in their own classrooms. Developed with a pan European collaboration of experts, the kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental material provided within a supporting didactic framework, distributed in conjunction with teacher training courses. The material has been specifically designed to integrate into European science curricula. Each kit contains robust and versatile components sufficient for a class of 25-30 students to work in groups of 2-3. The didactic content is based on guided inquiry-based learning (IBL) techniques with a strong emphasis on hands-on experiments, team work and relating abstract concepts to real world applications. The content has been developed in conjunction with over 30 teachers and experts in pedagogy to ensure high quality and ease of integration. It is currently available in 7 European languages. The Photonics Explorer allows students not only to hone their essential scientific skills but also to really work as scientists and engineers in the classroom. Thus, it aims to encourage more young people to pursue scientific careers and avert the imminent lack of scientific workforce in Europe. 50 Photonics Explorer kits have been successfully tested in 7 European countries with over 1500 secondary school students. The positive impact of the kit in the classroom has been qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated. A non-profit organisation, EYESTvzw [Excite Youth for Engineering Science and Technology], is responsible for the large scale distribution of the Photonics Explorer.

  14. Dispersion in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzens, Jeremy

    2005-11-01

    Investigations on the dispersive properties of photonic crystals, modified scattering in ring-resonators, monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers and advanced data processing techniques for the finite-difference time-domain method are presented. Photonic crystals are periodic mesoscopic arrays of scatterers that modify the propagation properties of electromagnetic waves in a similar way as "natural" crystals modify the properties of electrons in solid-state physics. In this thesis photonic crystals are implemented as planar photonic crystals, i.e., optically thin semiconductor films with periodic arrays of holes etched into them, with a hole-to-hole spacing of the order of the wavelength of light in the dielectric media. Photonic crystals can feature forbidden frequency ranges (the band-gaps) in which light cannot propagate. Even though most work on photonic crystals has focused on these band-gaps for application such as confinement and guiding of light, this thesis focuses on the allowed frequency regions (the photonic bands) and investigates how the propagation of light is modified by the crystal lattice. In particular the guiding of light in bulk photonic crystals in the absence of lattice defects (the self-collimation effect) and the angular steering of light in photonic crystals (the superprism effect) are investigated. The latter is used to design a planar lightwave circuit for frequency domain demultiplexion. Difficulties such as efficient insertion of light into the crystal are resolved and previously predicted limitations on the resolution are circumvented. The demultiplexer is also fabricated and characterized. Monolithic integration of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers by means of resonantly enhanced grating couplers is investigated. The grating coupler is designed to bend light through a ninety-degree angle and is characterized with the finite-difference time-domain method. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers are

  15. Ultrastable Multigigahertz Photonic Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Novel photonic oscillator developed to serve as ultrastable source of microwave and millimeter-wave signals. In system, oscillations generated photonically, then converted to electronic form. Includes self-mode-locked semiconductor laser producing stream of pulses, detected and fed back to laser as input. System also includes fiber-optic-delay-line discriminator, which detects fluctuations of self-mode-locking frequency and generates error signal used in negative-feedback loop to stabilize pulse-repetition frequency.

  16. Photonic quantum technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy

    2013-03-01

    Of the approaches to quantum computing, photons are appealing for their low-noise properties and ease of manipulation, and relevance to other quantum technologies, including communication, metrology and measurement. We report an integrated waveguide approach to photonic quantum circuits for high performance, miniaturization and scalability [6-10]. We address the challenges of scaling up quantum circuits using new insights into how controlled operations can be efficiently realised, demonstrating Shor's algorithm with consecutive CNOT gates and the iterative phase estimation algorithm. We have shown how quantum circuits can be reconfigured, using thermo-optic phase shifters to realise a highly reconfigurable quantum circuit, and electro-optic phase shifters in lithium niobate to rapidly manipulate the path and polarisation of telecomm wavelength single photons. We have addressed miniaturisation using multimode interference architectures to directly implement NxN Hadamard operations, and by using high refractive index contrast materials such as SiOxNy, in which we have implemented quantum walks of correlated photons, and Si, in which we have demonstrated generation of orbital angular momentum states of light. We have incorporated microfluidic channels for the delivery of samples to measure the concentration of a blood protein with entangled states of light. We have begun to address the integration of superconducting single photon detectors and diamond and non-linear single photon sources. Finally, we give an overview of recent work on fundamental aspects of quantum measurement, including a quantum version of Wheeler's delayed choice experiment.

  17. Photonic Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Stefanie

    2013-05-01

    Quantum physics has revolutionized our understanding of information processing and enables computational speed-ups that are unattainable using classical computers. In this talk I will present a series of experiments in the field of photonic quantum computing. The first experiment is in the field of photonic state engineering and realizes the generation of heralded polarization-entangled photon pairs. It overcomes the limited applicability of photon-based schemes for quantum information processing tasks, which arises from the probabilistic nature of photon generation. The second experiment uses polarization-entangled photonic qubits to implement ``blind quantum computing,'' a new concept in quantum computing. Blind quantum computing enables a nearly-classical client to access the resources of a more computationally-powerful quantum server without divulging the content of the requested computation. Finally, the concept of blind quantum computing is applied to the field of verification. A new method is developed and experimentally demonstrated, which verifies the entangling capabilities of a quantum computer based on a blind Bell test.

  18. Virtual and real photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenberg, Andrew, Jr.

    2011-09-01

    Maxwell did not believe in photons. However, his equations lead to electro-magnetic field structures that are considered to be photonic by Quantum ElectroDynamics (QED). They are complete, relativistically correct, and unchallenged after nearly 150 years. However, even though his far-field solution has been considered as the basis for photons, as they stand and are interpreted, they are better fitted to the concept of virtual rather than to real photons. Comparison between staticcharge fields, near-field coupling, and photonic radiation will be made and the distinctions identified. The question of similarities in, and differences between, the two will be addressed. Implied assumptions in Feynman's "Lectures" could lead one to believe that he had provided a general classical electrodynamics proof that an orbital electron must radiate. While his derivation is correct, two of the conditions defined do not always apply in this case. As a result, the potential for misinterpretation of his proof (as he himself did earlier) for this particular case has some interesting implications. He did not make the distinction between radiation from a bound electron driven by an external alternating field and one falling in a nuclear potential. Similar failures lead to misinterpreting the differences between virtual and real photons.

  19. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    PubMed Central

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  20. Photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect in photon-phonon interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Enbang; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Fang, Kejie; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect is one of the most intriguing phenomena in both classical and quantum physics, and associates with a number of important and fundamental issues in quantum mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm effects of charged particles have been experimentally demonstrated and found applications in various fields. Recently, attention has also focused on the Aharonov-Bohm effect for neutral particles, such as photons. Here we propose to utilize the photon-phonon interactions to demonstrate that photonic Aharonov-Bohm effects do exist for photons. By introducing nonreciprocal phases for photons, we observe experimentally a gauge potential for photons in the visible range based on the photon-phonon interactions in acousto-optic crystals, and demonstrate the photonic Aharonov-Bohm effect. The results presented here point to new possibilities to control and manipulate photons by designing an effective gauge potential. PMID:24476790

  1. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light. PMID:26214251

  2. Deterministic photon-emitter coupling in chiral photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söllner, Immo; Mahmoodian, Sahand; Hansen, Sofie Lindskov; Midolo, Leonardo; Javadi, Alisa; Kiršanskė, Gabija; Pregnolato, Tommaso; El-Ella, Haitham; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Jin Dong; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Engineering photon emission and scattering is central to modern photonics applications ranging from light harvesting to quantum-information processing. To this end, nanophotonic waveguides are well suited as they confine photons to a one-dimensional geometry and thereby increase the light-matter interaction. In a regular waveguide, a quantum emitter interacts equally with photons in either of the two propagation directions. This symmetry is violated in nanophotonic structures in which non-transversal local electric-field components imply that photon emission and scattering may become directional. Here we show that the helicity of the optical transition of a quantum emitter determines the direction of single-photon emission in a specially engineered photonic-crystal waveguide. We observe single-photon emission into the waveguide with a directionality that exceeds 90% under conditions in which practically all the emitted photons are coupled to the waveguide. The chiral light-matter interaction enables deterministic and highly directional photon emission for experimentally achievable on-chip non-reciprocal photonic elements. These may serve as key building blocks for single-photon optical diodes, transistors and deterministic quantum gates. Furthermore, chiral photonic circuits allow the dissipative preparation of entangled states of multiple emitters for experimentally achievable parameters, may lead to novel topological photon states and could be applied for directional steering of light.

  3. Two-photon interference with non-identical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbin; Zhou, Yu; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Hui; Li, Fu-li; Xu, Zhuo

    2015-11-01

    Two-photon interference with non-identical photons is studied based on the superposition principle in Feynman's path integral theory. The second-order temporal interference pattern is observed by superposing laser and pseudothermal light beams with different spectra. The reason why there is two-photon interference for photons of different spectra is that non-identical photons can be indistinguishable for the detection system when Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is taken into account. These studies are helpful to understand the second-order interference of light in the language of photons.

  4. Antigravity Acts on Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynjolfsson, Ari

    2002-04-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity assumes that photons don't change frequency as they move from Sun to Earth. This assumption is correct in classical physics. All experiments proving the general relativity are in the domain of classical physics. This include the tests by Pound et al. of the gravitational redshift of 14.4 keV photons; the rocket experiments by Vessot et al.; the Galileo solar redshift experiments by Krisher et al.; the gravitational deflection of light experiments by Riveros and Vucetich; and delay of echoes of radar signals passing close to Sun as observed by Shapiro et al. Bohr's correspondence principle assures that quantum mechanical theory of general relativity agrees with Einstein's classical theory when frequency and gravitational field gradient approach zero, or when photons cannot interact with the gravitational field. When we treat photons as quantum mechanical particles; we find that gravitational force on photons is reversed (antigravity). This modified theory contradicts the equivalence principle, but is consistent with all experiments. Solar lines and distant stars are redshifted in accordance with author's plasma redshift theory. These changes result in a beautiful consistent cosmology.

  5. The irreducible photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David L.

    2009-08-01

    In recent years it has become evident that the primary concept of the photon has multiple interpretations, with widely differing secondary connotations. Despite the all-pervasive nature of this concept in science, some of the ancillary properties with which the photon is attributed in certain areas of application sit uneasily alongside those invoked in other areas. Certainly the range of applications extends far beyond what was envisaged in the original conception, now entering subjects extending from elementary particle physics and cosmology through to spectroscopy, statistical mechanics and photochemistry. Addressing this diverse context invites the question: What is there, that it is possible to assert as incontrovertibly true about the photon? Which properties are non-controversial, if others are the subject of debate? This paper describes an attempt to answer these questions, establishing as far as possible an irreducible core of what can rightly be asserted about the photon, and setting aside some of what often is, but should never be so asserted. Some of the more bewildering difficulties and differences of interpretation owe their origin to careless descriptions, highlighting a need to guard semantic precision; although simplifications are frequently and naturally expedient for didactic purposes, they carry the risk of becoming indelible. Focusing on such issues, the aim is to identify how much or how little about the photon can be regarded as truly non-controversial.

  6. Photon Dynamics in Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törnkvist, O.

    2003-06-01

    In this talk, I present a recent calculation of one-loop vacuum polarization in a de-Sitter inflationary background. This provides possibly the first example of an analytical result from a calculation by hand of radiative corrections in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The model considered is massless, minimally coupled scalar QED. Gauge invariance remains manifest, but as a result of the photon coupling to the scalar, the conformal invariance of electromagnetism is broken. An effective photon field equation is obtained which, to leading order in the number of inflationary e-folds, is consistent with the existence of a dynamically generated photon mass. This work has been done in collaboration with Tomislav Prokopec at Heidelberg University and Richard Woodard at the University of Florida.

  7. Photon physics with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.

    1995-07-15

    In this Paper the author discusses briefly the physics motivation for extending measurements of particle production with high granularity and particle id capabilities to neutrals in PHENIX. The author then discusses the technique of direct photon measurement in the presence of copious background photons from {pi}{sup o} decays. The experiment will measure relatively low p{sub t} photons near y=0 in the lab frame. This new experimental environment of high multiplicity and low {gamma} momenta will affect both the techniques used and the type of analysis which can be performed. The Phenix Electromagnetic calorimeter is described and its capabilities illustrated with results from simulation and beam tests of the first production array.

  8. Photon physics with PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.

    1995-07-01

    In this Paper the author discusses briefly the physics motivation for extending measurements of particle production with high granularity and particle id capabilities to neutrals in PHENIX. He then discusses the technique of direct photon measurement in the presence of copious background photons from {pi}{sup o} decays. Relatively low p{sub t} photons will be measured near y=O in the lab frame. This new experimental environment of high multiplicity and low {gamma} momenta will affect both the techniques used and the type of analysis which can be performed. The Phenix Electromagnetic calorimeter is described and its capabilities illustrated with results from simulation and beam tests of the first production array.

  9. Photonic hydrogel sensors.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali K; Butt, Haider; Volpatti, Lisa R; Pavlichenko, Ida; Humar, Matjaž; Kwok, Sheldon J J; Koo, Heebeom; Kim, Ki Su; Naydenova, Izabela; Khademhosseini, Ali; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Analyte-sensitive hydrogels that incorporate optical structures have emerged as sensing platforms for point-of-care diagnostics. The optical properties of the hydrogel sensors can be rationally designed and fabricated through self-assembly, microfabrication or laser writing. The advantages of photonic hydrogel sensors over conventional assay formats include label-free, quantitative, reusable, and continuous measurement capability that can be integrated with equipment-free text or image display. This Review explains the operation principles of photonic hydrogel sensors, presents syntheses of stimuli-responsive polymers, and provides an overview of qualitative and quantitative readout technologies. Applications in clinical samples are discussed, and potential future directions are identified. PMID:26485407

  10. Photon storage cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1991-08-01

    A general analysis is presented of a photon storage cavity, coupled to free-electron laser (FEL) cavity. It is shown that if the coupling between the FEL cavity and the storage cavity is unidirectional (for example, a ring resonator storage cavity) then storage is possible, but that if the coupling is bi-directional then storage is not possible. Parameters are presented for an infra-red FEL storage cavity giving an order of magnitude increase in the instantaneous photon power within the storage cavity. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Electron-Photon Coincidence Calibration Of Photon Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Santosh K.

    1988-01-01

    Absolute and relative detector efficiencies measured. Apparatus uses coincidence-counting techniques to measure efficiency of ultraviolet or vacuum ultraviolet detector at very low radiation intensity. Crossed electron and atomic beams generate photons used to calibrate photon detector. Pulses from electron counter and photon detector(s) processed by standard coincidence-counting techniques. Used to calibrate other detectors or make absolute measurements of incident photon fluxes.

  12. Recent developments in the theory of photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky. S.J.

    1984-09-01

    Over the past few years the field of photon-photon collisions has emerged as one of the best testing grounds for QCD, particularly in the area of exclusive and inclusive hard scattering processes, exotic resonance production, and detailed tests of the coupling of real and virtual photons to the quark current. In this summary of contributed papers, I will briefly review recent theoretical progress in the analysis of two-photon reactions and possible directions for future work. 29 references.

  13. Photonic Crystal Nanocavity Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Axel

    2001-03-01

    Two- and three-dimensional microfabricated mirrors are generally referred to as photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals, and can be lithographically constructed to match a given frequency to confine light to very small volumes.1 For mirrors matching light emission at 1550nm, the lattice parameter a should correspond to 500nm, and the radius of the holes should be 180nm. By combining the slab waveguide design from microdisk lasers with the concept of microfabricating Bragg reflectors around a 2-D Fabry-Perot structure, we arrive at the design for ultra-small sub-3 optical nanocavity photonic crystal lasers. The mode volume in these laser cavities can be as small as 2.5 cubic half wavelengths or 0.03m3, and spontaneous emission in the cavity can be very efficiently coupled into the lasing mode. This efficient coupling in turn results in significant advantages of these nanocavity lasers over devices with larger mode volumes, as high modulation speed and very low threshold power light emission are expected. If the photonic crystal is designed appropriately and is not too porous, it is also possible to efficiently guide light within the perforated slab and to minimize diffraction losses. This waveguiding within a photonic crystal provides us with an opportunity to couple light from one cavity to another, or into connecting waveguides. By creating two-dimensional photonic crystals, which are microfabricated into InGaAsP slabs, we have recently defined the smallest lasers to date. When combined with high index contrast slabs in which light can be efficiently guided, microfabricated two-dimensional photonic bandgap mirrors provide the geometries needed to confine light into extremely small volumes with high Q.1,2,3,4 Two-dimensional Fabry-Perot resonators with microfabricated mirrors are formed when defects are introduced into the periodic photonic bandgap structure. It is then possible to tune these cavities lithographically by changing the precise geometry of the microstructures

  14. Optical coupling system for photon-photon coincidence experiments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, K. D.

    1973-01-01

    An efficient optical coupling system is presented that promises to be useful in experiments where it is necessary to collect a large fraction of emitted photons, as in photon-photon coincidence experiments. Narrow bandpass interference filters are an integral part of the proposed system.

  15. Comparison of photon-photon and photon-magnetic field pair production rates. [in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, M. L.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron stars were proposed as the site of gamma-ray burst activity and the copious supply of MeV photons admits the possibility of electron-positron pair production. If the neutron star magnetic field is sufficiently intense (10 to the 12th power G), both photon-photon (2 gamma) and photon-magnetic field (gamma) pair production should be important mechanisms. Rates for the two processes were calculated using a Maxwellian distribution for the photons. The ratio of 1 gamma to 2 gamma pair production rates was obtained as a function of photon temperature and magnetic field strength.

  16. Comparison of Photon-photon and Photon-magnetic Field Pair Production Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, M. L.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron stars were proposed as the site of gamma-ray burst activity and the copious supply of MeV photons admits the possibility of electron-positron pair production. If the neutron star magnetic field is sufficiently intense ( 10 to the 12th power G), both photon-photon (2 gamma) and photon-magnetic field ( gamma) pair production should be important mechanisms. Rates for the two processes were calculated using a Maxwellian distribution for the photons. The ratio of 1 gamma to 2 gamma pair production rates was obtained as a function of photon temperature and magnetic field strength.

  17. Studying 750 GeV di-photon resonance at photon-photon collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hayato; Moroi, Takeo; Takaesu, Yoshitaro

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by the recent LHC discovery of the di-photon excess at the invariant mass of ∼ 750 GeV, we study the prospect of investigating the scalar resonance at a future photon-photon collider. We show that, if the di-photon excess observed at the LHC is due to a new scalar boson coupled to the standard-model gauge bosons, such a scalar boson can be observed and studied at the photon-photon collider with the center-of-mass energy of ∼ 1 TeV in large fraction of parameter space.

  18. Why photonic systems for space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Norman P.; Brost, George A.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Hunter, James R.; Nichter, James E.; Payson, Paul M.; Repak, Paul L.

    2000-09-01

    Future space-based platforms can and will benefit from the implementation of photonics in both analog and digital subsystems. This paper will discuss potential applications and advantages to the platforms through the use of photonics.

  19. Photon collider at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Valery

    2001-10-01

    High energy photon colliders ( γγ, γe) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e +e - linear colliders. In this report, we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case, the γγ luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach about (1/3) Le +e -. Typical cross-sections of interesting processes in γγ collisions are higher than those in e +e - collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in γγ collisions will be more than that in e +e - collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is "an optical storage ring (optical trap)" with a diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based on the linear collider TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  20. Nanosilicon for Photonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, S. K.; Mohan, Devendra; Kassa, Tadesse Tenaw; Sharma, Sunita

    This presentation is a short review of some scientific insights on the possibilities of photonic applications of nanostructured silicon (NS-Si), porous Si (p-Si) and Si nanocrystals (NC-Si), one of the most interesting problems in nano-crystallite physics. The emission mechanism of a very bright photo-luminescence (PL) band and relatively weak electro-luminescence (EL) are presently the main issue. The basic question lies in whether the emission is an extrinsic or intrinsic property of nanocrystals. It is important from a fundamental physics viewpoint because of the potential application of Si wires and quantum dots in optoelectronic devices and information technology. Nanostructuring silicon is an effective way to turn silicon into a photonic material. It is observed that low-dimensional (one and two dimensions) silicon shows light amplification, photon confinement, photon trapping as well as non-linear optical effects. There is strong evidence of light localization and gas sensing properties of such nanostructures. Future nano-technology would replace electrical with optical interconnects, which has appealing potential for higher-speed performance and immunity to signal cross talk.

  1. Photonic Data Recording Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanning, J.; Chang, J.; Davis, P.; Holmgren, D.; Bruns, D.; Watson, D.; Lechner, M.; Graham, R.; Kemme, S.

    1989-02-01

    Steady advancement has been made in bringing photonic recorder technologies from a pure research and development stage to the practical laboratory and fielding environment. Streak camera-based systems have been incorporated into large data recording systems and have shown significant improvement in channel density and single-shot bandwidth. In particular, remote photonic sensing using fiber optic cables to transmit the information to the recorder has shown advantages over conventional coax cable methods. One streak camera-based recorder system has been designed into the underground test (UGT) data acquisition system. The design allowed for video rate readout, redundant digitized image storage, UGT system compatibility, and full real time system diagnostics. Another stand-alone streak camera-based recorder has been designed that incorporates an IEEE-488 interface and a unique software package. Operation of this photonic recorder system (PRS-1000), as either a streak imaging recorder or as a high-speed multi-channel data recorder (HSMCDR), has been greatly simplified through use of the icon-driven, window-based custom software. An overview of photonic recording methods will be presented along with the details of the PRS-1000 and the associated system software.

  2. Two-photon spectroscopy of excitons with entangled photons

    SciTech Connect

    Schlawin, Frank; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-12-28

    The utility of quantum light as a spectroscopic tool is demonstrated for frequency-dispersed pump-probe, integrated pump-probe, and two-photon fluorescence signals which show Ramsey fringes. Simulations of the frequency-dispersed transmission of a broadband pulse of entangled photons interacting with a three-level model of matter reveal how the non-classical time-bandwidth properties of entangled photons can be used to disentangle congested spectra, and reveal otherwise unresolved features. Quantum light effects are most pronounced at weak intensities when entangled photon pairs are well separated, and are gradually diminished at higher intensities when different photon pairs overlap.

  3. Improved photon counting efficiency calibration using superconducting single photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Haiyong; Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Sun, Ruoduan; Feng, Guojin; Wang, Yanfei; Ma, Chong; Lin, Yandong; Zhang, Labao; Kang, Lin; Chen, Jian; Wu, Peiheng

    2015-10-01

    The quantum efficiency of photon counters can be measured with standard uncertainty below 1% level using correlated photon pairs generated through spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. Normally a laser in UV, blue or green wavelength range with sufficient photon energy is applied to produce energy and momentum conserved photon pairs in two channels with desired wavelengths for calibration. One channel is used as the heralding trigger, and the other is used for the calibration of the detector under test. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector with advantages such as high photon counting speed (<20 MHz), low dark count rate (<50 counts per second), and wideband responsivity (UV to near infrared) is used as the trigger detector, enabling correlated photons calibration capabilities into shortwave visible range. For a 355nm single longitudinal mode pump laser, when a superconducting nanowire single photon detector is used as the trigger detector at 1064nm and 1560nm in the near infrared range, the photon counting efficiency calibration capabilities can be realized at 532nm and 460nm. The quantum efficiency measurement on photon counters such as photomultiplier tubes and avalanche photodiodes can be then further extended in a wide wavelength range (e.g. 400-1000nm) using a flat spectral photon flux source to meet the calibration demands in cutting edge low light applications such as time resolved fluorescence and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, super resolution microscopy, deep space observation, and so on.

  4. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  5. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, Stephen N.; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C.

    2013-01-22

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  6. Photonic-powered cable assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, Stephen N; Appel, Titus James; Wrye, IV, Walter C

    2014-06-24

    A photonic-cable assembly includes a power source cable connector ("PSCC") coupled to a power receive cable connector ("PRCC") via a fiber cable. The PSCC electrically connects to a first electronic device and houses a photonic power source and an optical data transmitter. The fiber cable includes an optical transmit data path coupled to the optical data transmitter, an optical power path coupled to the photonic power source, and an optical feedback path coupled to provide feedback control to the photonic power source. The PRCC electrically connects to a second electronic device and houses an optical data receiver coupled to the optical transmit data path, a feedback controller coupled to the optical feedback path to control the photonic power source, and a photonic power converter coupled to the optical power path to convert photonic energy received over the optical power path to electrical energy to power components of the PRCC.

  7. Optics of photonic quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardeny, Z. Valy; Nahata, Ajay; Agrawal, Amit

    2013-03-01

    The physics of periodic systems are of fundamental importance and result in various phenomena that govern wave transport and interference. However, deviations from periodicity may result in higher complexity and give rise to a number of surprising effects. One such deviation can be found in the field of optics in the realization of photonic quasicrystals, a class of structures made from building blocks that are arranged using well-designed patterns but lack translational symmetry. Nevertheless, these structures, which lie between periodic and disordered structures, still show sharp diffraction patterns that confirm the existence of wave interference resulting from their long-range order. In this Review, we discuss the beautiful physics unravelled in photonic quasicrystals of one, two and three dimensions, and describe how they can influence optical transmission and reflectivity, photoluminescence, light transport, plasmonics and laser action.

  8. Natural photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneron, Jean Pol; Simonis, Priscilla

    2012-10-01

    Photonic structures appeared in nature several hundred millions years ago. In the living world, color is used for communication and this important function strongly impacts the individual chances of survival as well as the chances to reproduce. This has a statistical influence on species populations. Therefore, because they are involved in evolution, natural color-generating structures are - from some point of view - highly optimized. In this short review, a survey is presented of the development of natural photonic crystal-type structures occurring in insects, spiders, birds, fishes and other marine animals, in plants and more, from the standpoint of light-waves propagation. One-, two-, and three-dimensional structures will be reviewed with selected examples.

  9. MCNP: Photon benchmark problems

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, D.J.; Hollowell, D.E.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    The recent widespread, markedly increased use of radiation transport codes has produced greater user and institutional demand for assurance that such codes give correct results. Responding to these pressing requirements for code validation, the general purpose Monte Carlo transport code MCNP has been tested on six different photon problem families. MCNP was used to simulate these six sets numerically. Results for each were compared to the set's analytical or experimental data. MCNP successfully predicted the analytical or experimental results of all six families within the statistical uncertainty inherent in the Monte Carlo method. From this we conclude that MCNP can accurately model a broad spectrum of photon transport problems. 8 refs., 30 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. PHOTON: A user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.

    1988-01-01

    PHOTON has proven very useful in the development of the X17 superconducting wiggler beamline. Its use has determined the shielding required from the wiggler device to the very end of the beamline in the hutches and angiography section. Doses calculated by this program have been compared with experimental results from conventional bending magnet beamline with great success. In each case the program consistently overestimated the dose by factors ranging from 2 to 10. The reason for this overestimation is understood and was not refined further in the program in order to maintain some level of safety in the shielding calculations. PHOTON should prove useful in the design of any beamline. Its ability to calculate power deposited and spectra transmitted through nearly arbitrary beamline configurations as well as the scattered radiation doses through shielding walls make it a very powerful tool.

  11. Photonics meet digital art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curticapean, Dan; Israel, Kai

    2014-09-01

    The paper focuses on the work of an interdisciplinary project between photonics and digital art. The result is a poster collection dedicated to the International Year of Light 2015. In addition, an internet platform was created that presents the project. It can be accessed at http://www.magic-of-light.org/iyl2015/index.htm. From the idea to the final realization, milestones with tasks and steps will be presented in the paper. As an interdisciplinary project, students from technological degree programs were involved as well as art program students. The 2015 Anniversaries: Alhazen (1015), De Caus (1615), Fresnel (1815), Maxwell (1865), Einstein (1905), Penzias Wilson, Kao (1965) and their milestone contributions in optics and photonics will be highlighted.

  12. Tunable electrochromic photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuai, Su-Lan; Bader, Georges; Ashrit, P. V.

    2005-05-01

    Photonic crystals based on the electrochromic phenomenon have been fabricated and proposed for band gap tuning. Electrochromic tungsten trioxide (WO3) inverse opals have been fabricated by polystyrene colloidal crystal templating. The WO3 matrix was obtained through a dip-infiltrating sol-gel process, with subsequent removal of the polymer microspheres by calcination. Scanning electron micrographs confirm the ordering of the hexagonal macroporous structure. The reflection spectra show two pronounced Bragg diffraction peaks. By inserting lithium into the crystals, the first reflection peak shifts gradually toward shorter wavelength for 36 nm, while the second reflection peak shifts toward longer wavelength for about 28 nm. This should be of great interest for photonic device applications.

  13. Slotted photonic crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scullion, Mark Gerard

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them result in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This thesis presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which engender higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the peak of optical mode within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. High sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than most competing devices in the literature. Initial tests with cellular material for real applications was also performed, and shown to be of promise. In addition, groundwork to make an integrated device that includes the spectrometer function was also carried out showing that slotted photonic crystals themselves can be used for on-chip wavelength specific filtering and spectroscopy, whilst gas-free microvalves for automation were also developed. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study.

  14. Hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Birks, T A; Loh, W H

    2011-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). A chemical surface treatment for making PCFs hydrophobic is introduced. This repels water from the holes of PCFs, so that their optical properties remain unchanged even when they are immersed in water. The combination of a hollow core and a water-repellent inner surface of the hydrophobic PCF provides an ultracompact dissolved-gas sensor element, which is demonstrated for the sensing of dissolved ammonia gas. PMID:22139276

  15. Charmonium production in photon-photon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R. E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A. R.; Barnett, B. A.; Bauer, D. A.; Bay, A.; Bengtsson, H.-U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Buchanan, C. D.; Buijs, A.; Caldwell, D. O.; Chao, H.-Y.; Chun, S.-B.; Clark, A. R.; Cowan, G. D.; Crane, D. A.; Dahl, O. I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K. A.; Eastman, J. J.; Eberhard, P. H.; Edberg, T. K.; Eisner, A. M.; Enomoto, R.; Erné, F. C.; Fairfield, K. H.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H. S.; Kenney, R. W.; Khacheryan, S.; Kofler, R. R.; Langeveld, W. G.; Layter, J. G.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Loken, S. C.; Lu, A.; Lynch, G. R.; Madaras, R. J.; Magnuson, B. D.; Masek, G. E.; Mathis, L. G.; Matthews, J. A.; Maxfield, S. J.; Miller, E. S.; Moses, W.; Nygren, D. R.; Oddone, P. J.; Paar, H. P.; Park, S. K.; Pellett, D. E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M. T.; Ross, R. R.; Rouse, F. R.; Schwitkis, K. A.; Sens, J. C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B. C.; Slater, W. E.; Smith, J. R.; Steinman, J. S.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stork, D. H.; Strauss, M. G.; Sullivan, M. K.; Takahashi, T.; Toutounchi, S.; van Tyen, R.; Vandalen, G. J.; Vernon, W.; Wagner, W.; Wang, E. M.; Wang, Y.-X.; Wenzel, W. A.; Wolf, Z. R.; Yamamoto, H.; Yellin, S. J.; Zeitlin, C.

    1988-06-01

    We have searched for the two-photon production of the ηc, χ0, and χ2 charmonium states at the SLAC e+e- collider PEP in the channels γγ-->K+/-K0Sπ-/+, γγ-->K+K-π+π-, γγ-->π+π-π+π-, and γγ-->K+K-K+K-. We identify four ηc candidates in the K+K-K+K- channel on a negligible background; the one φφ event among them implies a 95%-confidence-level lower limit for Γγγ(ηc) of 1.7 keV. In the other channels we find no evidence for any of the three states. We establish 95%-C.L. upper limits Γγγ(ηc)<15.5 keV, Γγγ(χ0)<17.0 keV, and Γγγ(χ2)<4.2 keV. From all channels combined, we obtain the value Γγγ(ηc)<6.4+/-5.03.4 keV.

  16. Micromechanical uncooled photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datskos, Panos G.

    2000-04-01

    Recent advances in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of uncooled IR detectors operate as micromechanical thermal detectors or micromechanical quantum detectors. We report on a new method for photon detection using electronic stresses in semiconductor microstructures. Photo-induced stress in semiconductor microstructures, is caused by changes in the charge carrier density in the conduction band and photon detection results from the measurement of the photon-induced bending of semiconductor microstructures. Small changes in position of microstructures are routinely measured in atomic force microscopy where atomic imaging of surfaces relies on the measurement of small changes in the bending of microcantilevers. Changes in the conduction band charge carrier density can result either from direct photo- generation of free charge carriers or from photoelectrons emitted from thin metal film surface in contact with a semiconductor microstructure which forms a Schottky barrier. In our studies we investigated three systems: (i) Si microstructures, (ii) InSb microstructures and (iii) Si microstructures coated with a thin excess electron-hole- pairs while for InSb photo-induced stress causes the crystal lattice to expand. We will present our results and discuss our findings.

  17. Super Photon Counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John

    1999-01-01

    The perfect photon detector would measure the arrival time, the energy, the polarization, and the position of every arriving quantum, but that is easier said than done. Two groups have now succeeded in doing time-resolved spectroscopy on the Crab Nebula pulsar, measuring everything but the polarization, with reports from Romani et al. at Stanford and from Perryman et al. at ESTEC. Both groups use superconducting detectors to gain the necessary speed and sensitivity. The photon can heat the electrons in a superconductor biased in the middle of its resistive transition, or break bound superconducting electron-hole pairs, which can then be collected. Three years ago, Peacock et al. reported that they had detected single optical photons with a superconducting tunnel junction (STJ), and Paresce wrote a News and Views article. A tunnel junction uses two pieces of conductive material, separated by a tiny gap of insulating material or even vacuum. If the gap is thin enough, electrons can tunnel across anyway, and if the conductors are superconductors, the junction displays very useful quantum mechanical properties and electrical nonlinearities. Amplifiers, detectors, oscillators, and computer circuits can all be made from them. Their special advantage is that they operate at very low temperatures, dissipate very little power, operate very fast, and are very small.

  18. Slotted photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Mark G; Krauss, Thomas F; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  19. Photon-activation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Photon Activation Therapy (PAT) is a technique in which radiation dose to tumor is enhanced via introduction of stable /sup 127/I in the form of iodinated deoxyuridine (IdUrd). Stimulation of cytotoxic effects from IdUrd is accomplished by activation with external (or implanted) radiation sources. Thus, accumulations of this nucleoside in actively competing cellpools do not preclude therapy in so far as such tissues can be excluded from the radiation field. Calculations show that 5% replacement of thymidine (Tyd) in tumor DNA should enhance the biological effectiveness of a given photon radiotherapy dose by a factor of approx. 3. Proportionally higher gains would result from higher replacements of Tyd and IdUrd. In addition, biological response is enhanced by chemical sensitization with IdUrd. The data indicate that damage from photon activation as well as chemical sensitization does not repair. Thus, at low dose rates, a further increase in therapeutic gain should accrue as normal tissues are allowed to repair and regenerate. A samarium-145 source has been developed for PAT, with activating x-ray energies of from 38 to 45 keV. Favorable clinical results can be expected through the use of IdUrd and protracted irradiations with low energy x-rays. In particular, PAT may provide unique advantages at selected sites such as brain, or head and neck tumors. (ERB)

  20. Slotted Photonic Crystal Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Di Falco, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Optical biosensors are increasingly being considered for lab-on-a-chip applications due to their benefits such as small size, biocompatibility, passive behaviour and lack of the need for fluorescent labels. The light guiding mechanisms used by many of them results in poor overlap of the optical field with the target molecules, reducing the maximum sensitivity achievable. This review article presents a new platform for optical biosensors, namely slotted photonic crystals, which provide higher sensitivities due to their ability to confine, spatially and temporally, the optical mode peak within the analyte itself. Loss measurements showed values comparable to standard photonic crystals, confirming their ability to be used in real devices. A novel resonant coupler was designed, simulated, and experimentally tested, and was found to perform better than other solutions within the literature. Combining with cavities, microfluidics and biological functionalization allowed proof-of-principle demonstrations of protein binding to be carried out. Higher sensitivities were observed in smaller structures than possible with most competing devices reported in the literature. This body of work presents slotted photonic crystals as a realistic platform for complete on-chip biosensing; addressing key design, performance and application issues, whilst also opening up exciting new ideas for future study. PMID:23503295

  1. Photonics Explorer Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Amrita; Debaes, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    The Photonics Explorer is an intra-curricular educational kit developed in a European project with a pan-European collaboration of over 35 teachers and science education professors. Unlike conventional educational outreach kits, the Photonics Explorer is specifically designed to integrate seamlessly in school curricula and enhance and complement the teaching and learning of science and optics in the classroom. The kit equips teachers with class sets of experimental components, provided within a supporting didactic framework and is designed for lower and upper secondary students (12-18 years). The kit is provided completely free of charge to teachers in conjunction with teacher training courses. The workshop will provide an overview of the Photonics Explorer intra-curricular kit and give teachers the opportunity to work hands-on with the material and didactic content of two modules, `Light Signals' (lower secondary) and `Diffraction and Interference'(upper secondary). We also aim to receive feedback regarding the content, components and didactic framework from teachers from non- European countries, to understand the relevance of the kit for their teaching and the ability for such a kit to integrate into non-EU curricula.

  2. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  3. Photonic Crystal Laser Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-05-21

    Photonic crystals have great potential for use as laser-driven accelerator structures. A photonic crystal is a dielectric structure arranged in a periodic geometry. Like a crystalline solid with its electronic band structure, the modes of a photonic crystal lie in a set of allowed photonic bands. Similarly, it is possible for a photonic crystal to exhibit one or more photonic band gaps, with frequencies in the gap unable to propagate in the crystal. Thus photonic crystals can confine an optical mode in an all-dielectric structure, eliminating the need for metals and their characteristic losses at optical frequencies. We discuss several geometries of photonic crystal accelerator structures. Photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) are optical fibers which can confine a speed-of-light optical mode in vacuum. Planar structures, both two- and three-dimensional, can also confine such a mode, and have the additional advantage that they can be manufactured using common microfabrication techniques such as those used for integrated circuits. This allows for a variety of possible materials, so that dielectrics with desirable optical and radiation-hardness properties can be chosen. We discuss examples of simulated photonic crystal structures to demonstrate the scaling laws and trade-offs involved, and touch on potential fabrication processes.

  4. Synthetic Landau levels for photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock–Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen–Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons.

  5. Synthetic Landau levels for photons.

    PubMed

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-06-30

    Synthetic photonic materials are an emerging platform for exploring the interface between microscopic quantum dynamics and macroscopic material properties. Photons experiencing a Lorentz force develop handedness, providing opportunities to study quantum Hall physics and topological quantum science. Here we present an experimental realization of a magnetic field for continuum photons. We trap optical photons in a multimode ring resonator to make a two-dimensional gas of massive bosons, and then employ a non-planar geometry to induce an image rotation on each round-trip. This results in photonic Coriolis/Lorentz and centrifugal forces and so realizes the Fock–Darwin Hamiltonian for photons in a magnetic field and harmonic trap. Using spatial- and energy-resolved spectroscopy, we track the resulting photonic eigenstates as radial trapping is reduced, finally observing a photonic Landau level at degeneracy. To circumvent the challenge of trap instability at the centrifugal limit, we constrain the photons to move on a cone. Spectroscopic probes demonstrate flat space (zero curvature) away from the cone tip. At the cone tip, we observe that spatial curvature increases the local density of states, and we measure fractional state number excess consistent with the Wen–Zee theory, providing an experimental test of this theory of electrons in both a magnetic field and curved space. This work opens the door to exploration of the interplay of geometry and topology, and in conjunction with Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, enables studies of photonic fractional quantum Hall fluids and direct detection of anyons. PMID:27281214

  6. Optics of globular photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, V S

    2007-05-31

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the optical properties of globular photonic crystals - new physical objects having a crystal structure with the lattice period exceeding considerably the atomic size, are presented. As globular photonic crystals, artificial opal matrices consisting of close-packed silica globules of diameter {approx}200 nm were used. The reflection spectra of these objects characterising the parameters of photonic bands existing in these crystals in the visible spectral region are presented. The idealised models of the energy band structure of photonic crystals investigated in the review give analytic dispersion dependences for the group velocity and the effective photon mass in a globular photonic crystal. The characteristics of secondary emission excited in globular photonic crystals by monochromatic and broadband radiation are presented. The results of investigations of single-photon-excited delayed scattering of light observed in globular photonic crystals exposed to cw UV radiation and radiation from a repetitively pulsed copper vapour laser are presented. The possibilities of using globular photonic crystals as active media for lasing in different spectral regions are considered. It is proposed to use globular photonic crystals as sensitive sensors in optoelectronic devices for molecular analysis of organic and inorganic materials by the modern methods of laser spectroscopy. The results of experimental studies of spontaneous and stimulated globular scattering of light are discussed. The conditions for observing resonance and two-photon-excited delayed scattering of light are found. The possibility of accumulation and localisation of the laser radiation energy inside a globular photonic crystal is reported. (review)

  7. Charmonium production in photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R.E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A.R.; Barnett, B.A.; Bauer, D.A.; Bengtsson, H.U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bolognese, T.S.; Bross, A.D.; Buchanan, C.D.; Buijs, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chao, H.Y.; Chun, S.B.; Clark, A.R.; Cowan, G.D.; Crane, D.A.; Dahl, O.I.; Daoudi, M.; Derby, K.A.; Eastman, J.J.; Eberhard, P.H.; Edberg, T.K.; Eisner, A.M.; Enomoto, R.; Erne, F.C.; Fujii, T.; Gary, J.W.; Gorn, W.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hofmann, W.; Hylen, J.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H.S.; Kees, K.H.; Kenney, R.W.; Winston, K.; Kofler, R.R.; Lander, R.L.; Langeveld, W.G.J.; Layter, J.G.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Loken, S.C.; Lu, A.; Lu, X.Q.; Lynch, G.R.; Madaras, R.J.; Maeshima, K.; Magnuson, B.D.; Masek, G.E.; Mathis, L.G.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Miller, E.S.; Moses, W.; McNeil, R.R.; Nygren, D.R.; Oddone, P.R.; Paar, H.P.; Park, S.K.; Pellett, D.E.; Pripstein, M.; Ronan, M.T.; Ross, R.R.; Rouse, F.R.; Schwitkis, K.A.; Sens, J.C.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.C.; Slater, W.E.; Smit

    1987-01-01

    We have searched for the two-photon production of the /eta//sub c/, /chi//sub 0/ and /chi//sub 2/ charmonium states at the e/sup +/e/sup -/ collider PEP in the channels /gamma//gamma/ /yields/ K/sup +-/K/sub S//sup 0//pi//sup -+/, /gamma//gamma/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup -//pi//sup +//pi//sup -/, /gamma//gamma/ /yields/ /pi//sup +//pi//sup -//pi//sup +//pi//sup -/ and /gamma//gamma/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup -/K/sup +/K/sup -/. We identify four /eta//sub c/ candidates in the K/sup +/K/sup -/K/sup +/K/sup -/ channel, on a negligible background; this leads to a preliminary 95% C.L. lower limit for /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/eta//sup c/) of 1.6 keV. In the other channels we find no evidence for any of the three states and establish preliminary 95% C.L. upper limits /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/eta//sub c/) < 15 keV, /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/chi//sub 0/)< 14 keV and /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/chi//sub 2/) < 4.0 keV. Combining the results on the /eta//sub c/ from all channels we obtain the value /Gamma//sub /gamma//gamma//(/eta//sub c/) = 4.5/sub -3.6///sup -5.5 keV. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Topological photonics: an observation of Landau levels for optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    Creating photonic materials with nontrivial topological characteristics has seen burgeoning interest in recent years; however, a major route to topology, a magnetic field for continuum photons, has remained elusive. We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We will discuss the conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids. This work was supported by DOE, DARPA, and AFOSR.

  9. Possibility to measure elastic photon-photon scattering in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Daniel; Brodin, Gert; Stenflo, Lennart; Marklund, Mattias

    2004-07-01

    Photon-photon scattering in vacuum due to the interaction with virtual electron-positron pairs is a consequence of quantum electrodynamics. A way for detecting this phenomenon has been devised based on interacting modes generated in microwave wave guides or cavities [G. Brodin, M. Marklund, and L. Stenflo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 171801 (2001)]. Here we materialize these ideas, suggest a concrete cavity geometry, make quantitative estimates and propose experimental details. It is found that detection of photon-photon scattering can be within the reach of present day technology.

  10. Photon-photon collisions at the next linear collider: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1993-08-01

    The collisions of photons at a high energy electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions, and extensions of the standard model. It is expected that by using back-scattered laser beams that the effective luminosity and energy of photon-photon collisions will be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this talk, I will focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs boson, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup {minus}} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkable background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. I also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

  11. Programmable atom-photon quantum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurz, Christoph; Eich, Pascal; Schug, Michael; Müller, Philipp; Eschner, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We present the implementation of a programmable atom-photon quantum interface, employing a single trapped +40Ca ion and single photons. Depending on its mode of operation, the interface serves as a bidirectional atom-photon quantum-state converter, as a source of entangled atom-photon states, or as a quantum frequency converter of single photons. The interface lends itself particularly to interfacing ions with spontaneous parametric down-conversion-based single-photon or entangled-photon-pair sources.

  12. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  13. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  14. Nonlinear interaction between single photons.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, T; Martin, A; Sanguinetti, B; Pelc, J S; Langrock, C; Fejer, M M; Gisin, N; Zbinden, H; Sangouard, N; Thew, R T

    2014-10-24

    Harnessing nonlinearities strong enough to allow single photons to interact with one another is not only a fascinating challenge but also central to numerous advanced applications in quantum information science. Here we report the nonlinear interaction between two single photons. Each photon is generated in independent parametric down-conversion sources. They are subsequently combined in a nonlinear waveguide where they are converted into a single photon of higher energy by the process of sum-frequency generation. Our approach results in the direct generation of photon triplets. More generally, it highlights the potential for quantum nonlinear optics with integrated devices and, as the photons are at telecom wavelengths, it opens the way towards novel applications in quantum communication such as device-independent quantum key distribution. PMID:25379916

  15. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  16. Single-photon quadratic optomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jie-Qiao; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    We present exact analytical solutions to study the coherent interaction between a single photon and the mechanical motion of a membrane in quadratic optomechanics. We consider single-photon emission and scattering when the photon is initially inside the cavity and in the fields outside the cavity, respectively. Using our solutions, we calculate the single-photon emission and scattering spectra, and find relations between the spectral features and the system's inherent parameters, such as: the optomechanical coupling strength, the mechanical frequency, and the cavity-field decay rate. In particular, we clarify the conditions for the phonon sidebands to be visible. We also study the photon-phonon entanglement for the long-time emission and scattering states. The linear entropy is employed to characterize this entanglement by treating it as a bipartite one between a single mode of phonons and a single photon. PMID:25200128

  17. Silicon applications in photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  18. Robust Photon Locking

    SciTech Connect

    Bayer, T.; Wollenhaupt, M.; Sarpe-Tudoran, C.; Baumert, T.

    2009-01-16

    We experimentally demonstrate a strong-field coherent control mechanism that combines the advantages of photon locking (PL) and rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). Unlike earlier implementations of PL and RAP by pulse sequences or chirped pulses, we use shaped pulses generated by phase modulation of the spectrum of a femtosecond laser pulse with a generalized phase discontinuity. The novel control scenario is characterized by a high degree of robustness achieved via adiabatic preparation of a state of maximum coherence. Subsequent phase control allows for efficient switching among different target states. We investigate both properties by photoelectron spectroscopy on potassium atoms interacting with the intense shaped light field.

  19. Spaceborne Photonics Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venable, D. D.; Farrukh, U. O.; Han, K. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Jalufka, N. W.; Lowe, C. W.; Tabibi, B. M.; Lee, C. J.; Lyons, D.; Maclin, A.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes in chronological detail the development of the Spaceborne Photonics Institute as a sustained research effort at Hampton University in the area of optical physics. This provided the research expertise to initiate a PhD program in Physics. Research was carried out in the areas of: (1) modelling of spaceborne solid state laser systems; (2) amplified spontaneous emission in solar pumped iodine lasers; (3) closely simulated AM0 CW solar pumped iodine laser and repeatedly short pulsed iodine laser oscillator; (4) a materials spectroscopy and growth program; and (5) laser induced fluorescence and atomic and molecular spectroscopy.

  20. Generalized Fibonacci photon sieves.

    PubMed

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong

    2015-08-20

    We successfully extend the standard Fibonacci zone plates with two on-axis foci to the generalized Fibonacci photon sieves (GFiPS) with multiple on-axis foci. We also propose the direct and inverse design methods based on the characteristic roots of the recursion relation of the generalized Fibonacci sequences. By switching the transparent and opaque zones, according to the generalized Fibonacci sequences, we not only realize adjustable multifocal distances but also fulfill the adjustable compression ratio of focal spots in different directions. PMID:26368763

  1. Photonic crystal microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhokhov, A. A.; Masalov, V. M.; Sukhinina, N. S.; Matveev, D. V.; Dolganov, P. V.; Dolganov, V. K.; Emelchenko, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spherical samples of photonic crystals formed by colloidal SiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized. Synthesis of microspheres from 160 nm, 200 nm and 430 nm diameter colloidal nanoparticles was performed over a wide size range, from 5 μm to 50 μm. The mechanism of formation of void microparticles exceeding 50 μm is discussed. The spectral measurements verified the association of the spectra with the peaks of selective reflection from the cubic lattice planes. The microparticle morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  2. Silicon photonic heater-modulator

    DOEpatents

    Zortman, William A.; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-07-14

    Photonic modulators, methods of forming photonic modulators and methods of modulating an input optical signal are provided. A photonic modulator includes a disk resonator having a central axis extending along a thickness direction of the disk resonator. The disk resonator includes a modulator portion and a heater portion. The modulator portion extends in an arc around the central axis. A PN junction of the modulator portion is substantially normal to the central axis.

  3. The Photon Collider at Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badelek, B.; Blöchinger, C.; Blümlein, J.; Boos, E.; Brinkmann, R.; Burkhardt, H.; Bussey, P.; Carimalo, C.; Chyla, J.; Çiftçi, A. K.; Decking, W.; de Roeck, A.; Fadin, V.; Ferrario, M.; Finch, A.; Fraas, H.; Franke, F.; Galynskii, M.; Gamp, A.; Ginzburg, I.; Godbole, R.; Gorbunov, D. S.; Gounaris, G.; Hagiwara, K.; Han, L.; Heuer, R.-D.; Heusch, C.; Illana, J.; Ilyin, V.; Jankowski, P.; Jiang, Y.; Jikia, G.; Jönsson, L.; Kalachnikow, M.; Kapusta, F.; Klanner, R.; Klassen, M.; Kobayashi, K.; Kon, T.; Kotkin, G.; Krämer, M.; Krawczyk, M.; Kuang, Y. P.; Kuraev, E.; Kwiecinski, J.; Leenen, M.; Levchuk, M.; Ma, W. F.; Martyn, H.; Mayer, T.; Melles, M.; Miller, D. J.; Mtingwa, S.; Mühlleitner, M.; Muryn, B.; Nickles, P. V.; Orava, R.; Pancheri, G.; Penin, A.; Potylitsyn, A.; Poulose, P.; Quast, T.; Raimondi, P.; Redlin, H.; Richard, F.; Rindani, S. D.; Rizzo, T.; Saldin, E.; Sandner, W.; Schönnagel, H.; Schneidmiller, E.; Schreiber, H. J.; Schreiber, S.; Schüler, K. P.; Serbo, V.; Seryi, A.; Shanidze, R.; da Silva, W.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Spira, M.; Stasto, A. M.; Sultansoy, S.; Takahashi, T.; Telnov, V.; Tkabladze, A.; Trines, D.; Undrus, A.; Wagner, A.; Walker, N.; Watanabe, I.; Wengler, T.; Will, I.; Wipf, S.; Yavaş, Ö.; Yokoya, K.; Yurkov, M.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zerwas, P.; Zomer, F.

    High energy photon colliders (γγ,γe) are based on e-e- linear colliders where high energy photons are produced using Compton scattering of laser light on high energy electrons just before the interaction point. This paper is a part of the Technical Design Report of the linear collider TESLA.1 Physics program, possible parameters and some technical aspects of the photon collider at TESLA are discussed.

  4. Photonic crystals--a step towards integrated circuits for photonics.

    PubMed

    Thylén, Lars; Qiu, Min; Anand, Srinivasan

    2004-09-20

    The field of photonic crystals has, over the past few years, received dramatically increased attention. Photonic crystals are artificially engineered structures that exhibit a periodic variation in one, two, or three dimensions of the dielectric constant, with a period of the order of the pertinent light wavelength. Such structures in three dimensions should exhibit properties similar to solid-state electronic crystals, such as bandgaps, in other words wavelength regions where light cannot propagate in any direction. By introducing defects into the periodic arrangement, the photonic crystals exhibit properties analogous to those of solid-state crystals. The basic feature of a photonic bandgap was indeed experimentally demonstrated in the beginning of the 1990s, and sparked a large interest in, and in many ways revitalized, photonics research. There are several reasons for this attention. One is that photonic crystals, in their own right, offer a proliferation of challenging research tasks, involving a multitude of disciplines, such as electromagnetic theory, nanofabrication, semi-conductor technology, materials science, biotechnology, to name a few. Another reason is given by the somewhat more down-to-earth expectations that photonics crystals will create unique opportunities for novel devices and applications, and contribute to solving some of the issues that have plagued photonics such as large physical sizes, comparatively low functionality, and high costs. Herein, we will treat some basics of photonic crystal structures and discuss the state-of-the-art in fabrication as well give some examples of devices with unique properties, due to the use of photonic crystals. We will also point out some of the problems that still remain to be solved, and give a view on where photonic crystals currently stand. PMID:15499844

  5. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  6. The ubiquitous photonic wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Andrea; Banzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    A circularly polarized electromagnetic plane wave carries an electric field that rotates clockwise or counterclockwise around the propagation direction of the wave. According to the handedness of this rotation, its longitudinal spin angular momentum (AM) density is either parallel or antiparallel to the propagation of light. However, there are also light waves that are not simply plane and carry an electric field that rotates around an axis perpendicular to the propagation direction, thus yielding transverse spin AM density. Electric field configurations of this kind have been suggestively dubbed ‘photonic wheels’. It has been recently shown that photonic wheels are commonplace in optics as they occur in electromagnetic fields confined by waveguides, in strongly focused beams, in plasmonic and evanescent waves. In this work we establish a general theory of electromagnetic waves propagating along a well defined direction, and carrying transverse spin AM density. We show that depending on the shape of these waves, the spin density may be either perpendicular to the mean linear momentum (globally transverse spin) or to the linear momentum density (locally transverse spin). We find that the latter case generically occurs only for non-diffracting beams, such as the Bessel beams. Moreover, we introduce the concept of meridional Stokes parameters to operationally quantify the transverse spin density. To illustrate our theory, we apply it to the exemplary cases of Bessel beams and evanescent waves. These results open a new and accessible route to the understanding, generation and manipulation of optical beams with transverse spin AM density.

  7. A photon thermal diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Wong, Carlaton; Lubner, Sean; Yee, Shannon; Miller, John; Jang, Wanyoung; Hardin, Corey; Fong, Anthony; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2014-01-01

    A thermal diode is a two-terminal nonlinear device that rectifies energy carriers (for example, photons, phonons and electrons) in the thermal domain, the heat transfer analogue to the familiar electrical diode. Effective thermal rectifiers could have an impact on diverse applications ranging from heat engines to refrigeration, thermal regulation of buildings and thermal logic. However, experimental demonstrations have lagged far behind theoretical proposals. Here we present the first experimental results for a photon thermal diode. The device is based on asymmetric scattering of ballistic energy carriers by pyramidal reflectors. Recent theoretical work has predicted that this ballistic mechanism also requires a nonlinearity in order to yield asymmetric thermal transport, a requirement of all thermal diodes arising from the second Law of Thermodynamics, and realized here using an 'inelastic thermal collimator' element. Experiments confirm both effects: with pyramids and collimator the thermal rectification is 10.9 ± 0.8%, while without the collimator no rectification is detectable (<0.3%). PMID:25399761

  8. Smart photonic carbon brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Kuznetsov, Artem A.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Sakhabutdinov, Airat Z.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Artemev, Vadim I.

    2016-03-01

    Aspects of the paper relate to a wear monitoring system for smart photonic carbon brush. There are many applications in which regular inspection is not feasible because of a number of factors including, for example, time, labor, cost and disruptions due to down time. Thus, there is a need for a system that can monitor the wear of a component while the component is in operation or without having to remove the component from its operational position. We propose a new smart photonic method for characterization of carbon brush wear. It is based on the usage of advantages of the multiplicative response of FBG and LPFG sensors and its double-frequency probing. Additional measuring parameters are the wear rate, the brush temperature, the engine rotation speed, the hangs control, and rotor speed. Sensor is embedded in brush. Firstly the change of sensor length is used to measure wear value and its central wavelength shift for temperature ones. The results of modeling and experiments are presented.

  9. Photon Molecules in Atomic Gases Trapped Near Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, James S.; Caneva, Tommaso; Chang, Darrick E.

    2016-07-01

    Realizing systems that support robust, controlled interactions between individual photons is an exciting frontier of nonlinear optics. To this end, one approach that has emerged recently is to leverage atomic interactions to create strong and spatially nonlocal interactions between photons. In particular, effective photonic interactions have been successfully created via interactions between atoms excited to Rydberg levels. Here, we investigate an alternative approach, in which atomic interactions arise via their common coupling to photonic crystal waveguides. This technique takes advantage of the ability to separately tailor the strength and range of interactions via the dispersion engineering of the structure itself, which can lead to qualitatively new types of phenomena. For example, much of the work on photon-photon interactions relies on the linear optical effect of electromagnetically induced transparency, in combination with the use of interactions to shift optical pulses into or out of the associated transparency window. Here, we identify a large new class of "correlated transparency windows," in which photonic states of a certain number and shape selectively propagate through the system. Through this technique, we show that molecular bound states of photon pairs can be created.

  10. Analysis of photon recycling using metallic photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sung; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Chang, Allan S. P.; Lee, Jae-Hwang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2007-09-01

    We investigate a photon recycling scheme using two-dimensional metallic photonic crystals made of silver to improve the energy efficiency of an incandescent light source. A theoretical framework is presented to analyze the resultant photon-recycled lighting system. Calculation results show that the system can reach a maximum luminous efficiency of 125 lm/W, which is 8 times higher than that of a bare blackbody radiation at 2800 K. The color temperature of the system is calculated to be around 3500 K or below, while the color rendering index is between 68 and 90. These results suggest that a photon-recycled incandescent light source using metallic photonic crystals can be a viable alternative future lighting solution.

  11. Detecting photon-photon interactions in a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Li-Jing; Houzet, Manuel; Meyer, Julia S.; Baranger, Harold U.; Hekking, Frank W. J.

    2015-10-01

    A local interaction between photons can be engineered by coupling a nonlinear system to a transmission line. The required transmission line can be conveniently formed from a chain of Josephson junctions. The nonlinearity is generated by side-coupling this chain to a Cooper pair box. We propose to probe the resulting photon-photon interactions via their effect on the current-voltage characteristic of a voltage-biased Josephson junction connected to the transmission line. Considering the Cooper pair box to be in the weakly anharmonic regime, we find that the dc current through the probe junction yields features around the voltages 2 e V =n ℏ ωs , where ωs is the plasma frequency of the superconducting circuit. The features at n ≥2 are a direct signature of the photon-photon interaction in the system.

  12. Photonic module: An on-demand resource for photonic entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Devitt, Simon J.; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Ionicioiu, Radu; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Munro, William J.

    2007-11-15

    Photonic entanglement has a wide range of applications in quantum computation and communication. Here we introduce a device: the photonic module, which allows for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled photon states. The module is an application independent, ''plug and play'' device, with sufficient flexibility to prepare entanglement for all major quantum computation and communication applications in a completely deterministic fashion without number-discriminated photon detection. We present two alternative constructions for the module, one using free-space components and one in a photonic band-gap structure. The natural operation of the module is to generate states within the stabilizer formalism and we present an analysis on the cavity requirements to experimentally realize this device.

  13. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons.

  14. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber

    PubMed Central

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  15. Broadband photon-photon interactions mediated by cold atoms in a photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Litinskaya, Marina; Tignone, Edoardo; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that photon-photon attraction can be engineered in the continuum of scattering states for pairs of photons propagating in a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with cold atoms. The atoms are regularly spaced in an optical lattice configuration and the photons are resonantly tuned to an internal atomic transition. We show that the hard-core repulsion resulting from saturation of the atomic transitions induces bunching in the photonic component of the collective atom-photon modes (polaritons). Bunching is obtained in a frequency range as large as tens of GHz, and can be controlled by the inter-atomic separation. We provide a fully analytical explanation for this phenomenon by proving that correlations result from a mismatch of the quantization volumes for atomic excitations and photons in the continuum. Even stronger correlations can be observed for in-gap two-polariton bound states. Our theoretical results use parameters relevant for current experiments and suggest a simple and feasible way to induce interactions between photons. PMID:27170160

  16. Progress in 2D photonic crystal Fano resonance photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weidong; Zhao, Deyin; Shuai, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hongjun; Chuwongin, Santhad; Chadha, Arvinder; Seo, Jung-Hun; Wang, Ken X.; Liu, Victor; Ma, Zhenqiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional symmetric Lorentzian resonance, Fano resonance is predominantly used to describe asymmetric-shaped resonances, which arise from the constructive and destructive interference of discrete resonance states with broadband continuum states. This phenomenon and the underlying mechanisms, being common and ubiquitous in many realms of physical sciences, can be found in a wide variety of nanophotonic structures and quantum systems, such as quantum dots, photonic crystals, plasmonics, and metamaterials. The asymmetric and steep dispersion of the Fano resonance profile promises applications for a wide range of photonic devices, such as optical filters, switches, sensors, broadband reflectors, lasers, detectors, slow-light and non-linear devices, etc. With advances in nanotechnology, impressive progress has been made in the emerging field of nanophotonic structures. One of the most attractive nanophotonic structures for integrated photonics is the two-dimensional photonic crystal slab (2D PCS), which can be integrated into a wide range of photonic devices. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an in depth review of the progress made in the general area of Fano resonance photonics, focusing on the photonic devices based on 2D PCS structures. General discussions are provided on the origins and characteristics of Fano resonances in 2D PCSs. A nanomembrane transfer printing fabrication technique is also reviewed, which is critical for the heterogeneous integrated Fano resonance photonics. The majority of the remaining sections review progress made on various photonic devices and structures, such as high quality factor filters, membrane reflectors, membrane lasers, detectors and sensors, as well as structures and phenomena related to Fano resonance slow light effect, nonlinearity, and optical forces in coupled PCSs. It is expected that further advances in the field will lead to more significant advances towards 3D integrated photonics, flat

  17. EDITORIAL: Photonic terahertz technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisauskas, Alvydas; Löffler, Torsten; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, when reading newspapers and journals or watching TV, one has been able to find feature presentations dealing with the prospects of terahertz (THz) technology and its potential impact on market applications. THz technology aims to fill the THz gap in the electro-magnetic spectrum in order to make the THz frequency regime, which spans the two orders of magnitude from 100 GHz to 10 THz, accessible for applications. From the lower-frequency side, electronics keeps pushing upwards, while photonic approaches gradually improve our technological options at higher frequencies. The popular interest reflects the considerable advances in research in the THz field, and it is mainly advances in the photonic branch, with the highlight being the development of the THz quantum cascade laser, which in recent years have caught the imagination of the public, and of potential users and investors. This special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology provides an overview of key scientific developments which currently represent the cutting edge of THz photonic technology. In order to be clear about the implications, we should define exactly what we mean by 'THz photonic technology', or synonymously 'THz photonics'. It is characterized by the way in which THz radiation (or a guided THz wave) is generated, namely by the use of lasers. This may be done in one of two fundamentally different schemes: (i) by laser action in the terahertz frequency range itself (THz lasers), or (ii) by down-conversion processes (photomixing) involving the radiation of lasers which operate in the visible, near-infrared or infrared spectral ranges, either in pulsed or continuous-wave mode. The field of THz photonics has grown so considerably that it is out of the question to cover all its aspects in a single special issue of a journal. We have elected, instead, to focus our attention on two types of development with a potentially strong impact on the THz field: first, on significant advances

  18. The SIAM Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Pairsuwan, Weerapong

    2007-01-19

    A short history of the SIAM Photon Source in Thailand is described. The facility is based on the 1 GeV storage ring obtained from the SORTEC consortium in Japan. After a redesign to include insertion straight sections it produced the first light in December 2001 and the first beam line became operational in early 2002. Special difficulties appear when a synchrotron light facility is obtained by donation, which have mostly to do with the absence of human resource development that elsewhere is commonly accomplished during design and construction. Additional problems arise by the distance of a developing country like Thailand from the origin of technical parts of the donation. A donation does not provide time to generate local capabilities or include in the technical design locally obtainable parts. This makes future developments, repairs and maintenance more time consuming, difficult and expensive than it should be. In other cases, parts of components are proprietary or obsolete or both which requires redesign and engineering at a time when the replacement part should be available to prevent stoppage of operation.The build-up of a user community is very difficult, especially when the radiation spectrum is confined to the VUV regime. Most of scientific interest these days is focused on the x-ray regime. Due to its low beam energy, the SIAM storage ring did not produce useful x-ray intensities and we are therefore in the midst of an upgrade to produce harder radiation. The first step has been achieved with a 20% increase of energy to 1.2 GeV. This step shifts the critical photon energy of bending magnet radiation from 800 eV to 1.4 keV providing useful radiation up to 7 keV. A XAS-beam line has been completed in 2005 and experimentation is very active by now. The next step is to install a 6.4 T wavelength shifter by the end of 2006 resulting in a critical photon energy of 6.15 keV. Further upgrades are planed for the comming years.

  19. XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 8 XCOM: Photon Cross Sections Database (Web, free access)   A web database is provided which can be used to calculate photon cross sections for scattering, photoelectric absorption and pair production, as well as total attenuation coefficients, for any element, compound or mixture (Z <= 100) at energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV.

  20. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Barbour, R.L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image. 6 figs.

  1. Collimator-free photon tomography

    DOEpatents

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Barbour, Randall L.

    1998-10-06

    A method of uncollimated single photon emission computed tomography includes administering a radioisotope to a patient for producing gamma ray photons from a source inside the patient. Emissivity of the photons is measured externally of the patient with an uncollimated gamma camera at a plurality of measurement positions surrounding the patient for obtaining corresponding energy spectrums thereat. Photon emissivity at the plurality of measurement positions is predicted using an initial prediction of an image of the source. The predicted and measured photon emissivities are compared to obtain differences therebetween. Prediction and comparison is iterated by updating the image prediction until the differences are below a threshold for obtaining a final prediction of the source image.

  2. Imaging by terahertz photon counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikushima, Kenji; Komiyama, Susumu

    2010-08-01

    Photon counting method is indispensable in visible/near-infrared optical measurements for detecting extremely weak radiation. The method, however, has been inaccessible in terahertz region, where the photon energies are more than 100 times smaller and catching individual photons is difficult. Here we review photon counting measurements of terahertz waves, by incorporating a semiconductor quantum-dot terahertz-photon detector into a scanning terahertz microscope. By using a quantum Hall effect detector as well, measurements cover the intensity dynamic range more than six orders of magnitude. Applying the measurement system to the study of semiconductor quantum Hall effect devices, we image extremely weak cyclotron radiation emitted by nonequilibrium electrons. Owing to the unprecedented sensitivity, a variety of new features of electron kinetics are unveiled. Besides semiconductor electric devices studied here, the experimental method will find application in diverse areas of molecular dynamics, microthermography, and cell activities.

  3. Photon detectors with gaseous amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1996-08-01

    Gaseous photon detectors, including very large 4{pi}-devices such as those incorporated in SLD and DELPHI, are finally delivering physics after many years of hard work. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photoelectrons. Among detector builders, there is hardly anybody who did not make mistakes in this area, and who does not have a healthy respect for the problems involved. This point is stressed in this paper, and it is suggested that only a very small operating phase space is available for running gaseous photon detectors in a very large system with good efficiency and few problems. In this paper the authors discuss what was done correctly or incorrectly in first generation photon detectors, and what would be their recommendations for second generation detectors. 56 refs., 11 figs.

  4. Advances in DNA photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckman, Emily M.; Aga, Roberto S.; Fehrman Cory, Emily M.; Ouchen, Fahima; Lesko, Alyssa; Telek, Brian; Lombardi, Jack; Bartsch, Carrie M.; Grote, James G.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we present our current research in exploring a DNA biopolymer for photonics applications. A new processing technique has been adopted that employs a modified soxhlet-dialysis (SD) rinsing technique to completely remove excess ionic contaminants from the DNA biopolymer, resulting in a material with greater mechanical stability and enhanced performance reproducibility. This newly processed material has been shown to be an excellent material for cladding layers in poled polymer electro-optic (EO) waveguide modulator applications. Thin film poling results are reported for materials using the DNA biopolymer as a cladding layer, as are results for beam steering devices also using the DNA biopolymer. Finally, progress on fabrication of a Mach Zehnder EO modulator with DNA biopolymer claddings using nanoimprint lithography techniques is reported.

  5. The Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Galayda, John N.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 7-GeV third-generation synchrotron radiation storage ring and full-energy positron injector. Construction project funding began in 1989, and ground breaking took place on 5 May 1990. Construction of all accelerator facilities was completed in January 1995 and storage ring commissioning is underway. First observation of x-rays from a bending magnet source took place on 26 March 1995. Nearly all performance specifications of the injector have been reached, and first observations indicate that the reliability, dynamic aperture, emittance, and orbit stability in the storage ring are satisfactory. Observation of radiation from the first of 20 insertion device beamlines is scheduled for October 1995. Start of regular operations is expected to take place well before the APS Project target date of December 1996.

  6. Bio-photonics workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan; Dam, Jeppe S.; Palima, Darwin Z.

    2007-01-01

    We outline the specifications of a portable Bio-photonics Workstation we have developed that utilizes just a single spatial light modulator to generate an array of up to 100 reconfigurable laser-traps with adjustable power ratios making 3D real-time optical manipulation possible with the click of a laptop mouse. We employ a simple patented optical mapping approach from a fast spatial light modulator to obtain reconfigurable intensity patterns corresponding to two independently addressable regions relayed to the sample volume where the optical manipulation of a plurality of nano-featured micro-objects takes place. The stand-alone Biophotonics Workstation is currently being tested by external partners with micro-biologic and chemistry expertise.

  7. Photonic Crystal Nanolaser Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shota; Otsuka, Shota; Hachuda, Shoji; Endo, Tatsuro; Imai, Yasunori; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Misawa, Hiroaki; Baba, Toshihiko

    High-performance and low-cost sensors are critical devices for high-throughput analyses of bio-samples in medical diagnoses and life sciences. In this paper, we demonstrate photonic crystal nanolaser sensor, which detects the adsorption of biomolecules from the lasing wavelength shift. It is a promising device, which balances a high sensitivity, high resolution, small size, easy integration, simple setup and low cost. In particular with a nanoslot structure, it achieves a super-sensitivity in protein sensing whose detection limit is three orders of magnitude lower than that of standard surface-plasmon-resonance sensors. Our investigations indicate that the nanoslot acts as a protein condenser powered by the optical gradient force, which arises from the strong localization of laser mode in the nanoslot.

  8. Regenerative photonic therapy: Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salansky, Natasha; Salansky, Norman

    2012-09-01

    After four decades of research of photobiomodulation phenomena in mammals in vitro and in vivo, a solid foundation is created for the use of photobiomodulation in regenerative medicine. Significant accomplishments are achieved in animal models that demonstrate opportunities for photo-regeneration of injured or pathological tissues: skin, muscles and nerves. However, the use of photobiomodulation in clinical studies leads to controversial results while negative or marginal clinical efficacy is reported along with positive findings. A thor ough analysis of requirements to the optical parameters (dosimetry) for high efficacy in photobimodulation led us to the conclusion that there are several misconceptions in the clinical applications of low level laser therapy (LLLT). We present a novel appr oach of regenerative photonic therapy (RPT) for tissue healing and regeneration that overcomes major drawbacks of LLLT. Encouraging clinical results on RPT efficacy are presented. Requirements for RPT approach and vision for its future development for tissue regeneration is discussed.

  9. Ferrofluid Photonic Dipole Contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Michael; Frederick, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Understanding magnetic fields is important to facilitate magnetic applications in diverse fields in industry, commerce, and space exploration to name a few. Large electromagnets can move heavy loads of metal. Magnetic materials attached to credit cards allow for fast, accurate business transactions. And the Earth's magnetic field gives us the colorful auroras observed near the north and south poles. Magnetic fields are not visible, and therefore often hard to understand or characterize. This investigation describes and demonstrates a novel technique for the visualization of magnetic fields. Two ferrofluid Hele-Shaw cells have been constructed to facilitate the imaging of magnetic field lines [1,2,3,4]. We deduce that magnetically induced photonic band gap arrays similar to electrostatic liquid crystal operation are responsible for the photographed images and seek to mathematically prove the images are of exact dipole nature. We also note by comparison that our photographs are very similar to solar magnetic Heliosphere photographs.

  10. Perovskite photonic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Brandon R.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-05-01

    The field of solution-processed semiconductors has made great strides; however, it has yet to enable electrically driven lasers. To achieve this goal, improved materials are required that combine efficient (>50% quantum yield) radiative recombination under high injection, large and balanced charge-carrier mobilities in excess of 10 cm2 V-1 s-1, free-carrier densities greater than 1017 cm-3 and gain coefficients exceeding 104 cm-1. Solid-state perovskites are -- in addition to galvanizing the field of solar electricity -- showing great promise in photonic sources, and may be the answer to realizing solution-cast laser diodes. Here, we discuss the properties of perovskites that benefit light emission, review recent progress in perovskite electroluminescent diodes and optically pumped lasers, and examine the remaining challenges in achieving continuous-wave and electrically driven lasing.

  11. Photon counting digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoli, Nazif; Skenderović, Hrvoje; Stipčević, Mario; Pavičić, Mladen

    2016-05-01

    Digital holography uses electronic sensors for hologram recording and numerical method for hologram reconstruction enabling thus the development of advanced holography applications. However, in some cases, the useful information is concealed in a very wide dynamic range of illumination intensities and successful recording requires an appropriate dynamic range of the sensor. An effective solution to this problem is the use of a photon-counting detector. Such detectors possess counting rates of the order of tens to hundreds of millions counts per second, but conditions of recording holograms have to be investigated in greater detail. Here, we summarize our main findings on this problem. First, conditions for optimum recording of digital holograms for detecting a signal significantly below detector's noise are analyzed in terms of the most important holographic measures. Second, for time-averaged digital holograms, optimum recordings were investigated for exposures shorter than the vibration cycle. In both cases, these conditions are studied by simulations and experiments.

  12. Photon enhanced thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Schwede, Jared; Melosh, Nicholas; Shen, Zhixun

    2014-10-07

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) is exploited to provide improved efficiency for radiant energy conversion. A hot (greater than 200.degree. C.) semiconductor cathode is illuminated such that it emits electrons. Because the cathode is hot, significantly more electrons are emitted than would be emitted from a room temperature (or colder) cathode under the same illumination conditions. As a result of this increased electron emission, the energy conversion efficiency can be significantly increased relative to a conventional photovoltaic device. In PETE, the cathode electrons can be (and typically are) thermalized with respect to the cathode. As a result, PETE does not rely on emission of non-thermalized electrons, and is significantly easier to implement than hot-carrier emission approaches.

  13. Photon-efficient imaging with a single-photon camera.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongeek; Xu, Feihu; Venkatraman, Dheera; Lussana, Rudi; Villa, Federica; Zappa, Franco; Goyal, Vivek K; Wong, Franco N C; Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing a scene's 3D structure and reflectivity accurately with an active imaging system operating in low-light-level conditions has wide-ranging applications, spanning biological imaging to remote sensing. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a depth and reflectivity imaging system with a single-photon camera that generates high-quality images from ∼1 detected signal photon per pixel. Previous achievements of similar photon efficiency have been with conventional raster-scanning data collection using single-pixel photon counters capable of ∼10-ps time tagging. In contrast, our camera's detector array requires highly parallelized time-to-digital conversions with photon time-tagging accuracy limited to ∼ns. Thus, we develop an array-specific algorithm that converts coarsely time-binned photon detections to highly accurate scene depth and reflectivity by exploiting both the transverse smoothness and longitudinal sparsity of natural scenes. By overcoming the coarse time resolution of the array, our framework uniquely achieves high photon efficiency in a relatively short acquisition time. PMID:27338821

  14. Topological photonics: an observation of Landau levels for optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids. This work was supported by DOE, DARPA, and AFOSR.

  15. Nonlocal hyperconcentration on entangled photons using photonic module system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cong; Wang, Tie-Jun; Mi, Si-Chen; Zhang, Ru; Wang, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    Entanglement distribution will inevitably be affected by the channel and environment noise. Thus distillation of maximal entanglement nonlocally becomes a crucial goal in quantum information. Here we illustrate that maximal hyperentanglement on nonlocal photons could be distilled using the photonic module and cavity quantum electrodynamics, where the photons are simultaneously entangled in polarization and spatial-mode degrees of freedom. The construction of the photonic module in a photonic band-gap structure is presented, and the operation of the module is utilized to implement the photonic nondestructive parity checks on the two degrees of freedom. We first propose a hyperconcentration protocol using two identical partially hyperentangled initial states with unknown coefficients to distill a maximally hyperentangled state probabilistically, and further propose a protocol by the assistance of an ancillary single photon prepared according to the known coefficients of the initial state. In the two protocols, the total success probability can be improved greatly by introducing the iteration mechanism, and only one of the remote parties is required to perform the parity checks in each round of iteration. Estimates on the system requirements and recent experimental results indicate that our proposal is realizable with existing or near-further technologies.

  16. Photon-efficient imaging with a single-photon camera

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dongeek; Xu, Feihu; Venkatraman, Dheera; Lussana, Rudi; Villa, Federica; Zappa, Franco; Goyal, Vivek K.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing a scene's 3D structure and reflectivity accurately with an active imaging system operating in low-light-level conditions has wide-ranging applications, spanning biological imaging to remote sensing. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a depth and reflectivity imaging system with a single-photon camera that generates high-quality images from ∼1 detected signal photon per pixel. Previous achievements of similar photon efficiency have been with conventional raster-scanning data collection using single-pixel photon counters capable of ∼10-ps time tagging. In contrast, our camera's detector array requires highly parallelized time-to-digital conversions with photon time-tagging accuracy limited to ∼ns. Thus, we develop an array-specific algorithm that converts coarsely time-binned photon detections to highly accurate scene depth and reflectivity by exploiting both the transverse smoothness and longitudinal sparsity of natural scenes. By overcoming the coarse time resolution of the array, our framework uniquely achieves high photon efficiency in a relatively short acquisition time. PMID:27338821

  17. Photon-efficient imaging with a single-photon camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dongeek; Xu, Feihu; Venkatraman, Dheera; Lussana, Rudi; Villa, Federica; Zappa, Franco; Goyal, Vivek K.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-06-01

    Reconstructing a scene's 3D structure and reflectivity accurately with an active imaging system operating in low-light-level conditions has wide-ranging applications, spanning biological imaging to remote sensing. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a depth and reflectivity imaging system with a single-photon camera that generates high-quality images from ~1 detected signal photon per pixel. Previous achievements of similar photon efficiency have been with conventional raster-scanning data collection using single-pixel photon counters capable of ~10-ps time tagging. In contrast, our camera's detector array requires highly parallelized time-to-digital conversions with photon time-tagging accuracy limited to ~ns. Thus, we develop an array-specific algorithm that converts coarsely time-binned photon detections to highly accurate scene depth and reflectivity by exploiting both the transverse smoothness and longitudinal sparsity of natural scenes. By overcoming the coarse time resolution of the array, our framework uniquely achieves high photon efficiency in a relatively short acquisition time.

  18. Photonic quantum information: science and technology.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological progress in the generation, manipulation and detection of individual single photons has opened a new scientific field of photonic quantum information. This progress includes the realization of single photon switches, photonic quantum circuits with specific functions, and the application of novel photonic states to novel optical metrology beyond the limits of standard optics. In this review article, the recent developments and current status of photonic quantum information technology are overviewed based on the author's past and recent works. PMID:26755398

  19. Two-photon interferences with degenerate and nondegenerate paired photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Chen, J. F.; Zhang, Shanchao; Zhou, Shuyu; Kim, Yoon-Ho; Loy, M. M. T.; Wong, G. K. L.; Du, Shengwang

    2012-02-01

    We generate narrow-band frequency-tunable entangled photon pairs from spontaneous four-wave mixing in three-level cold atoms and study their two-photon quantum interference after a beam splitter. We find that the path-exchange symmetry plays a more important role in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference than the temporal or frequency indistinguishability, and observe coalescence interference for both degenerate and nondegenerate photons. We also observe a quantum beat in the same experimental setup using either slow or fast detectors.

  20. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  1. Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D. E.

    2014-11-01

    Version 00 The Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections, EPICS, provides the atomic data needed to perform coupled Electron-Photon transport calculations, to produce accurate macroscopic results, such as energy deposit and dose. Atomic data is provided for elements, Z = 1 to 100, over the energy range 10 eV to 100 GeV; note that nuclear data, such as photo-nuclear, and data for compounds, are not included. All data is in a simple computer independent text format that is standard and presented to a high precision that can be easily read by computer codes written in any computer language, e.g., C, C++, and FORTRAN. EPICS includes four separate data bases that are designed to be used in combination, these include, • The Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), to describe the interaction of electrons with matter. • The Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL), to describe the interaction of photons with matter. • The Evaluated Atomic Data Library (EADL), to describe the emission of electrons and photons back to neutrality following an ionizing event, caused by either electron or photon interactions. • The Evaluated Excitation Data Library (EXDL), to describe the excitation of atoms due to photon interaction. All of these are available in the Extended ENDL format (ENDLX) in which the evaluations were originally performed. The first three are also available in the ENDF format; as yet ENDF does not include formats to handle excitation data (EXDL).

  2. Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-01

    Version 00 The Electron Photon Interaction Cross Sections, EPICS, provides the atomic data needed to perform coupled Electron-Photon transport calculations, to produce accurate macroscopic results, such as energy deposit and dose. Atomic data is provided for elements, Z = 1 to 100, over the energy range 10 eV to 100 GeV; note that nuclear data, such as photo-nuclear, and data for compounds, are not included. All data is in a simple computer independent text formatmore » that is standard and presented to a high precision that can be easily read by computer codes written in any computer language, e.g., C, C++, and FORTRAN. EPICS includes four separate data bases that are designed to be used in combination, these include, • The Evaluated Electron Data Library (EEDL), to describe the interaction of electrons with matter. • The Evaluated Photon Data Library (EPDL), to describe the interaction of photons with matter. • The Evaluated Atomic Data Library (EADL), to describe the emission of electrons and photons back to neutrality following an ionizing event, caused by either electron or photon interactions. • The Evaluated Excitation Data Library (EXDL), to describe the excitation of atoms due to photon interaction. All of these are available in the Extended ENDL format (ENDLX) in which the evaluations were originally performed. The first three are also available in the ENDF format; as yet ENDF does not include formats to handle excitation data (EXDL).« less

  3. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Colloidal photonic crystals (PhCs), periodically arranged monodisperse nanoparticles, have emerged as one of the most promising materials for light manipulation because of their photonic band gaps (PBGs), which affect photons in a manner similar to the effect of semiconductor energy band gaps on electrons. The PBGs arise due to the periodic modulation of the refractive index between the building nanoparticles and the surrounding medium in space with subwavelength period. This leads to light with certain wavelengths or frequencies located in the PBG being prohibited from propagating. Because of this special property, the fabrication and application of colloidal PhCs have attracted increasing interest from researchers. The most simple and economical method for fabrication of colloidal PhCs is the bottom-up approach of nanoparticle self-assembly. Common colloidal PhCs from this approach in nature are gem opals, which are made from the ordered assembly and deposition of spherical silica nanoparticles after years of siliceous sedimentation and compression. Besides naturally occurring opals, a variety of manmade colloidal PhCs with thin film or bulk morphology have also been developed. In principle, because of the effect of Bragg diffraction, these PhC materials show different structural colors when observed from different angles, resulting in brilliant colors and important applications. However, this angle dependence is disadvantageous for the construction of some optical materials and devices in which wide viewing angles are desired. Recently, a series of colloidal PhC materials with spherical macroscopic morphology have been created. Because of their spherical symmetry, the PBGs of spherical colloidal PhCs are independent of rotation under illumination of the surface at a fixed incident angle of the light, broadening the perspective of their applications. Based on droplet templates containing colloidal nanoparticles, these spherical colloidal PhCs can be

  4. Photon energy tunability of advanced photon source undulators

    SciTech Connect

    Viccaro, P.J.; Shenoy, G.K.

    1987-08-01

    At a fixed storage ring energy, the energy of the harmonics of an undulator can be shifted or ''tuned'' by changing the magnet gap of the device. The possible photon energy interval spanned in this way depends on the undulator period, minimum closed gap, minimum acceptable photon intensity and storage ring energy. The minimum magnet gap depends directly on the stay clear particle beam aperture required for storage ring operation. The tunability of undulators planned for the Advanced Photon Source with first harmonic photon energies in the range of 5 to 20 keV are discussed. The results of an analysis used to optimize the APS ring energy is presented and tunability contours and intensity parameters are presented for two typical classes of devices.

  5. Slow Images and Entangled Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Swordy, Simon

    2007-06-20

    I will discuss some recent experiments using slow light and entangled photons. We recently showed that it was possible to map a two dimensional image onto very low light level signals, slow them down in a hot atomic vapor while preserving the amplitude and phase of the images. If time remains, I will discuss some of our recent work with time-energy entangled photons for quantum cryptography. We were able to show that we could have a measurable state space of over 1000 states for a single pair of entangled photons in fiber.

  6. High background photon counting lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lentz, W. J.

    1992-01-01

    Photon counting with lidar returns is usually limited to low light levels, while wide dynamic range is achieved by counting for long times. The broad emission spectrum of inexpensive high-power semiconductor lasers makes receiver filters pass too much background light for traditional photon counting in daylight. Very high speed photon counting is possible, however, at more than 500 MHz which allows the construction of eyesafe lidar operating in the presence of bright clouds. Detector improvements are possible to count to 20 GHz producing a single shot dynamic range of ten decades.

  7. Heralded amplification of photonic qubits.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Natalia; Pini, Vittorio; Martin, Anthony; Verma, Varun B; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard; Lita, Adriana; Marsili, Francesco; Korzh, Boris; Bussières, Félix; Sangouard, Nicolas; Zbinden, Hugo; Gisin, Nicolas; Thew, Rob

    2016-01-11

    We demonstrate postselection free heralded qubit amplification for Time-Bin qubits and single photon states in an all-fibre, telecom-wavelength, scheme that highlights the simplicity, stability and potential for fully integrated photonic solutions. Exploiting high-efficiency superconducting detectors, the gain, fidelity and the performance of the amplifier are studied as a function of loss. We also demonstrate the first heralded single photon amplifier with independent sources. This provides a significant advance towards demonstrating device-independent quantum key distribution as well as fundamental tests of quantum mechanics over extended distances. PMID:26832244

  8. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  9. Manufacturing method of photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In Sung; Lee, Tae Ho; Ahn, Jin Ho; Biswas, Rana; Constant, Kristen P.; Ho, Kai-Ming; Lee, Jae-Hwang

    2013-01-29

    A manufacturing method of a photonic crystal is provided. In the method, a high-refractive-index material is conformally deposited on an exposed portion of a periodic template composed of a low-refractive-index material by an atomic layer deposition process so that a difference in refractive indices or dielectric constants between the template and adjacent air becomes greater, which makes it possible to form a three-dimensional photonic crystal having a superior photonic bandgap. Herein, the three-dimensional structure may be prepared by a layer-by-layer method.

  10. Multicolor photonic crystal laser array

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jeremy B; Brener, Igal; Subramania, Ganapathi S; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2015-04-28

    A multicolor photonic crystal laser array comprises pixels of monolithically grown gain sections each with a different emission center wavelength. As an example, two-dimensional surface-emitting photonic crystal lasers comprising broad gain-bandwidth III-nitride multiple quantum well axial heterostructures were fabricated using a novel top-down nanowire fabrication method. Single-mode lasing was obtained in the blue-violet spectral region with 60 nm of tuning (or 16% of the nominal center wavelength) that was determined purely by the photonic crystal geometry. This approach can be extended to cover the entire visible spectrum.

  11. Configurable silicon photonic crystal waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prorok, Stefan; Petrov, Alexander; Eich, Manfred; Luo, Jingdong; Jen, Alex K.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we demonstrate that the mode cut off of a photonic crystal waveguide can be trimmed with high accuracy by electron beam bleaching of a chromophore doped polymer cladding. Using this method, configurable waveguides are realized, which allow for spatially resolved changes of the photonic crystal's effective lattice constant as small as 7.6 pm. We show three different examples how to take advantage of configurable photonic crystal waveguides: Shifting of the complete transmission spectrum, definition of cavities with high quality factor, and tuning of existing cavities.

  12. Summary of Lepton Photon 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2012-03-14

    In this lecture, I summarize developments presented at the Lepton Photon 2011 conference and give my perspective on the current situation in high-energy physics. I am grateful to the organizers of Lepton Photon 2011 for providing us a very pleasant and simulating week in Mumbai. This year's Lepton Photon conference has covered the full range of subjects that fall within the scope of high-energy physics, including connections to cosmology, nuclear physics, and atomic physics. The experiments that were discussed detect particles ranging in energy from radio frequencies to EeV.

  13. Vector-vector production in photon-photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronan, Micheal T.

    1989-04-01

    Measurements of exclusive untagged ρ0ρ0,ρφ,K*K¯*, and ρω production and tagged ρ0ρ0 production in photon-photon interactions by the TPC/Two-Gamma experiment are reviewed. Comparisons to the results of other experiments and to models of vector-vector production are made. Fits to the data following a four quark model prescription for vector meson pair production are also presented.

  14. Photon-number-resolved detection of photon-subtracted thermal light.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanhua; Becerra, Francisco E; Glebov, Boris L; Wen, Jianming; Lita, Adriana E; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Fan, Jingyun; Nam, Sae Woo; Migdall, Alan

    2013-07-01

    We examine the photon statistics of photon-subtracted thermal light using photon-number-resolved detection. We demonstrate experimentally that the photon number distribution transforms from a Bose-Einstein distribution to a Poisson distribution as the number of subtracted photons increases. We also show that second- and higher-order photon correlation functions can be directly determined from the photon-number-resolved detection measurements of a single optical beam. PMID:23811867

  15. PHOTON PBL: problem-based learning in photonics technology education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Nicholas; Audet, Richard; Donnelly, Judith; Hanes, Fenna; Kehrhahn, Marijke

    2007-06-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational approach whereby students learn course content by actively and collaboratively solving real-world problems presented in a context similar to that in which the learning is to be applied. Research shows that PBL improves student learning and retention, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to skillfully apply knowledge to new situations - skills deemed critical to lifelong learning. Used extensively in medical education since the 1970's, and widely adopted in other fields including business, law, and education, PBL is emerging as an alternative to traditional lecture-based courses in engineering and technology education. In today's ever-changing global economy where photonics technicians are required to work productively in teams to solve complex problems across disciplines as well as cultures, PBL represents an exciting alternative to traditional lecture-based photonics education. In this paper we present the PHOTON PBL project, a National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education (NSF-ATE) project aimed at creating, in partnership with the photonics industry and university research labs from across the US, a comprehensive series of multimedia-based PBL instructional resource materials and offering faculty professional development in the use of PBL in photonics technology education. Quantitative and qualitative research will be conducted on the effectiveness of PBL in photonics technician education.

  16. Pushing the Photon Limit: Nanoantennas Increase Maximal Photon Stream and Total Photon Number

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanoantennas are well-known for their effective role in fluorescence enhancement, both in excitation and emission. Enhancements of 3–4 orders of magnitude have been reported. Yet in practice, the photon emission is limited by saturation due to the time that a molecule spends in singlet and especially triplet excited states. The maximal photon stream restricts the attainable enhancement. Furthermore, the total number of photons emitted is limited by photobleaching. The limited brightness and observation time are a drawback for applications, especially in biology. Here we challenge this photon limit, showing that nanoantennas can actually increase both saturation intensity and photostability. So far, this limit-shifting role of nanoantennas has hardly been explored. Specifically, we demonstrate that single light-harvesting complexes, under saturating excitation conditions, show over a 50-fold antenna-enhanced photon emission stream, with 10-fold more total photons, up to 108 detected photons, before photobleaching. This work shows yet another facet of the great potential of nanoantennas in the world of single-molecule biology. PMID:27082249

  17. The Photon Underproduction Crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Weinberg, David H.; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Haardt, Francesco; Katz, Neal; Davé, Romeel; Fardal, Mark; Madau, Piero; Danforth, Charles; Ford, Amanda B.; Peeples, Molly S.; McEwen, Joseph

    2014-07-01

    We examine the statistics of the low-redshift Lyα forest from smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations in light of recent improvements in the estimated evolution of the cosmic ultraviolet background (UVB) and recent observations from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). We find that the value of the metagalactic photoionization rate (ΓHI) required by our simulations to match the observed properties of the low-redshift Lyα forest is a factor of five larger than the value predicted by state-of-the art models for the evolution of this quantity. This mismatch in ΓHI results in the mean flux decrement of the Lyα forest being overpredicted by at least a factor of two (a 10σ discrepancy with observations) and a column density distribution of Lyα forest absorbers systematically and significantly elevated compared to observations over nearly two decades in column density. We examine potential resolutions to this mismatch and find that either conventional sources of ionizing photons (galaxies and quasars) must contribute considerably more than current observational estimates or our theoretical understanding of the low-redshift universe is in need of substantial revision.

  18. Holographic Solar Photon Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Matloff, Greg

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to incorporate holographic optical elements into solar photon thrusters (SPTs). First suggested in 1990, SPTs would be systems of multiple reflective, emissive, and absorptive surfaces (solar sails) that would be attached to spacecraft orbiting the Earth to derive small propulsive forces from radiation pressures. An SPT according to the proposal would include, among other things, a main sail. One side of the sail would be highly emissive and would normally face away from the Earth. The other side would be reflective and would be covered by white-light holographic images that would alternately become reflective, transmissive, and absorptive with small changes in the viewing angle. When the spacecraft was at a favorable orbital position, the main sail would be oriented to reflect sunlight in a direction to maximize the solar thrust; when not in a favorable position, the main sail would be oriented to present a substantially absorptive/emissive aspect to minimize the solar drag. By turning the main sail slightly to alternate between the reflective and absorptive/ emissive extremes, one could achieve nearly a doubling or halving of the radiational momentum transfer and, hence, of the solar thrust.

  19. Photon-Refracting Aerogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    A threshold aerogel Cherenkov detector is being constructed at CUA to allow for the study of kaons in experiments at the Jefferson Laboratory. These subatomic particles move faster than light through the aerogel material, emitting Cherenkov radiation. Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs) convert the photons from the Cherenkov radiation into electrons and multiply the electrons sufficiently to get a readable electronic signal, which can be analyzed. An important part of a threshold aerogel Cherenkov detector is its use of aerogel material of several refractive indices to cover the full dynamic range over which one wants to detect the particles of interest (in this case the kaon). Uniform coverage in refractive index is important as the location of the incoming particle will not be constant throughout the testing. In addition to testing for uniform coverage, we must also verify these refractive indices to ensure that the particles we are detecting are in fact kaons. The last test on the aerogel that needs to be performed is the measurement of transparency. Although aerogel is highly transparent, it is still necessary to find the amount of light being absorbed, reflected, or scattered versus how much will actually be measured by the PMTs used.

  20. THE PHOTON UNDERPRODUCTION CRISIS

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Juna A.; Weinberg, David H.; McEwen, Joseph; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Danforth, Charles; Haardt, Francesco; Katz, Neal; Fardal, Mark; Davé, Romeel; Madau, Piero; Ford, Amanda B.; Peeples, Molly S.

    2014-07-10

    We examine the statistics of the low-redshift Lyα forest from smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations in light of recent improvements in the estimated evolution of the cosmic ultraviolet background (UVB) and recent observations from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). We find that the value of the metagalactic photoionization rate (Γ{sub HI}) required by our simulations to match the observed properties of the low-redshift Lyα forest is a factor of five larger than the value predicted by state-of-the art models for the evolution of this quantity. This mismatch in Γ{sub HI} results in the mean flux decrement of the Lyα forest being overpredicted by at least a factor of two (a 10σ discrepancy with observations) and a column density distribution of Lyα forest absorbers systematically and significantly elevated compared to observations over nearly two decades in column density. We examine potential resolutions to this mismatch and find that either conventional sources of ionizing photons (galaxies and quasars) must contribute considerably more than current observational estimates or our theoretical understanding of the low-redshift universe is in need of substantial revision.

  1. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  2. Femtosecond Photon-Counting Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Rambo, Timothy M.; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Numata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An optical correlation receiver is described that provides ultra-precise distance and/or time-pulse-width measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. A new type of optical correlation receiver uses a fourth-order (intensity) interferometer to provide micron distance measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. The optical correlator uses a low-noise-integrating detector that can resolve photon number. The correlation (range as a function of path delay) is calculated from the variance of the photon number of the difference of the optical signals on the two detectors. Our preliminary proof-of principle data (using a short-pulse diode laser transmitter) demonstrates tens of microns precision.

  3. Femtosecond Photon-Counting Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Rambo, Timothy M.; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Numata, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    An optical correlation receiver is described that provides ultra-precise distance and/or time/pulse-width measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. A new type of optical correlation receiver uses a fourth-order (intensity) interferometer to provide micron distance measurements even for weak (single photons) and short (femtosecond) optical signals. The optical correlator uses a low-noise-integrating detector that can resolve photon number. The correlation (range as a function of path delay) is calculated from the variance of the photon number of the difference of the optical signals on the two detectors. Our preliminary proof-of principle data (using a short-pulse diode laser transmitter) demonstrates tens of microns precision.

  4. Topological states in photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ling; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-01

    Optics played a key role in the discovery of geometric phase. It now joins the journey of exploring topological physics, bringing bosonic topological states that equip us with the ability to make perfect photonic devices using imperfect interfaces.

  5. Apparatus for photon excited catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for increasing the yield of photonically excited gas phase reactions by extracting excess energy from unstable, excited species by contacting the species with the surface of a finely divided solid.

  6. Diamond based photonic crystal microcavities.

    PubMed

    Tomljenovic-Hanic, S; Steel, M J; de Sterke, C Martijn; Salzman, J

    2006-04-17

    Diamond based technologies offer a material platform for the implementation of qubits for quantum computing. The photonic crystal architecture provides the route for a scalable and controllable implementation of high quality factor (Q) nanocavities, operating in the strong coupling regime for cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we compute the photonic band structures and quality factors of microcavities in photonic crystal slabs in diamond, and compare the results with those of the more commonly-used silicon platform. We find that, in spite of the lower index contrast, diamond based photonic crystal microcavities can exhibit quality factors of Q=3.0x10(4), sufficient for proof of principle demonstrations in the quantum regime. PMID:19516502

  7. The photon and its measurability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdye, Edward H., Jr.

    2005-08-01

    ly, the photon is looked at in Euclidean Space Geometry, this time strictly under the electrodynamics of Galilean Transformations of Velocities c'=c+/-v, where the velocity c refers to that velocity with which the photon is emitted from its moving primary source which moves with velocity v relative to the laboratory frame. A non-interfering hypothetical observer, not of the real world, would note from the laboratory frame that the interference free photon moves with velocity c'. Since any measurement by a real world observer involves interference, the window, lens or mirror of the observers measuring apparatus. This paper will demonstrate that the problems in Modern Physics, involving both electro-magnetism and gravitation, have their pure classical solutions under the electrodynamics of Galilean Transformations of Velocities, while abiding strictly by the urles of Galilean Transformations and employing the classical assumptions of the rectilinear behavior of both the photon and the graviton in Euclidean Space.

  8. Photon Counting - One More Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, Richard H.

    2012-05-01

    Photon counting has been around for more than 60 years, and has been available to amateurs for most of that time. In most cases single photons are detected using photomultiplier tubes, "old technology" that became available after the Second World War. But over the last couple of decades the perfection of CCD devices has given amateurs the ability to perform accurate photometry with modest telescopes. Is there any reason to still count photons? This paper discusses some of the strengths of current photon counting technology, particularly relating to the search for fast optical transients. Technology advances in counters and photomultiplier modules are briefly mentioned. Illustrative data are presented including FFT analysis of bright star photometry and a technique for finding optical pulses in a large file of noisy data. This latter technique is shown to enable the discovery of a possible optical flare on the polar variable AM Her.

  9. Photon Physics Potential at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, Hisayuki

    2009-10-01

    The ALICE detector has been designed to study the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In heavy-ion collisions, it is very critical to measure thermal photons, which are known to carry the temperature information of hot created matter. The thermal photon measurements at RHIC are suggesting the systematic study with better photon detectors at LHC. Furthermore, the suppression of high pT hadrons has provided the first strong signature of hot and dense partonic matter created in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. Therefore, the suppression behavior of various particle species, including photons, up to LHC energy, is a key observable for the study of the hot matter dynamics. The ALICE PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS) consists of 17920 PWO crystals and Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) covering a rapidity range of ±0.3 and an azimuthal range of 100^o. The fine segment structure and small Moliere radius allow to separate two photons from 0̂ decay at pT=30GeV/c with about 100% efficiency and at even higher pT with smaller efficiency. The decay photons from lower pT 0̂ is the largest background in measuring the thermal photons and can be tagged in a very efficient way with a good energy resolution (3%/√E(GeV)). The ALICE EMCAL consists of shashlik lead-scintillator sampling units covering a rapidity range of ±0.7 and an azimuthal range of 110^ o and sits in the opposite coverage azimuthally to PHOS. The jet measurements by EMCAL and other tracking detectors, especially when tagged by a direct photon in the opposite PHOS detector, represent a key probe for investigating jet quenching effects. In this presentation, physics potential with photon detectors at ALICE during the first physics run of LHC will be discussed. The construction and installation status of the photon detectors as well as their expected physics will be presented.

  10. New nanomaterials for photonic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, Le Quoc; Anh, Tran Kim; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Mien, Vu Doan

    2012-06-01

    A brief survey of the development of new nanomaterials for photonic application will be presented. Based on the photoresponsive sol gel nanohybrid of polymethamethyl acrylate, silica, and zirconia (ASZ) or titania (AST) have been fabricated some planar light guiding structures and devices. The lanthanide containing nanosphere with core/shell structures have been synthesized in using a modified solgel process. The opal like photonic crystal structures have been fabricated by self assembling technique.