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Sample records for 10th grade benchmark

  1. Predicting 10th Grade FCAT Success. Research Brief. Volume 0401

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Terry; Bayne, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Florida law requires that students achieve a passing score on the Grade 10 Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) to qualify for a standard high school diploma (Section 1008.22(3)(c)5, Florida Statutes). Students who were administered the Grade 10 FCAT for the first time during the 2002 administrations or later must earn a developmental…

  2. Indiana's Academic Standards: 10th Grade English/Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    This booklet of academic standards spells out what students should know and be able to do in Grade 10 English/Language Arts. The booklet gives examples to help students understand what is required to meet the standards and provides a list of 10 things parents can do to help their child get a good education. It outlines the following seven…

  3. Changes in Math Proficiency between 8th and 10th Grades. Statistics in Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Don; And Others

    Between 8th and 10th grades, many students are asked to make curriculum-related decisions that may ultimately influence their achievement in core academic subjects such as mathematics. While past achievement often limits the level of courses available to a student, aspirations for postsecondary education ultimately determine the level of…

  4. The School Compositional Effect of Single Parenthood on 10th-Grade Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pong, Suet-ling

    1998-01-01

    Uses data from the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS) to reveal a detrimental contextual effect on 10th-grade mathematics and reading achievement associated with attending a school with a high concentration of children from single-parent homes. Maintains this effect is evident even when individual demographic characteristics and family…

  5. Classroom Achievement Goal Structure, School Engagement, and Substance Use among 10th Grade Students in Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diseth, Åge; Samdal, Oddrun

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the relationships between students' perceived classroom achievement goals, school engagement and substance use in terms of smoking and drinking, and at investigating gender differences regarding these issues in a sample of 1,239 Norwegian 10th grade students. A multivariate analysis showed that…

  6. Predicting 3rd Grade and 10th Grade FCAT Success for 2006-07. Research Brief. Volume 0601

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Terry; Rubiera, Vilma

    2006-01-01

    For the past few years the Florida School Code has set the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) performance requirements for promotion of 3rd graders and graduation for 10th graders. Grade 3 students who do not score at level 2 or higher on the FCAT SSS Reading must be retained unless exempted for special circumstances. Grade 10 students…

  7. The Implementation of Effective Teaching Practices in English Classroom for Grades 8th, 9th, and 10th.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.; And Others

    This study explored teachers' behavior as related to effective teaching practices in 8th, 9th, and 10th grade English classrooms in Jordan. The study also examined some variables that could predict teachers' implementation of effective teaching practices and aimed at finding an estimate of the percentage of students in 8th, 9th, and 10th grades…

  8. The Effect of Case-Based Instruction on 10th Grade Students' Understanding of Gas Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalçinkaya, Eylem; Boz, Yezdan

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of case-based instruction on remedying 10th grade students' alternative conceptions related to gas concepts. 128 tenth grade students from two high schools participated in this study. In each school, one of the classes was randomly assigned as the experimental group and the…

  9. Does STES-Oriented Science Education Promote 10th-Grade Students' Decision-Making Capability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy Nahum, Tami; Ben-Chaim, David; Azaiza, Ibtesam; Herskovitz, Orit; Zoller, Uri

    2010-07-01

    Today's society is continuously coping with sustainability-related complex issues in the Science-Technology-Environment-Society (STES) interfaces. In those contexts, the need and relevance of the development of students' higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS) such as question-asking, critical-thinking, problem-solving and decision-making capabilities within science teaching have been argued by several science educators for decades. Three main objectives guided this study: (1) to establish "base lines" for HOCS capabilities of 10th grade students (n = 264) in the Israeli educational system; (2) to delineate within this population, two different groups with respect to their decision-making capability, science-oriented (n = 142) and non-science (n = 122) students, Groups A and B, respectively; and (3) to assess the pre-post development/change of students' decision-making capabilities via STES-oriented HOCS-promoting curricular modules entitled Science, Technology and Environment in Modern Society (STEMS). A specially developed and validated decision-making questionnaire was used for obtaining a research-based response to the guiding research questions. Our findings suggest that a long-term persistent application of purposed decision-making, promoting teaching strategies, is needed in order to succeed in affecting, positively, high-school students' decision-making ability. The need for science teachers' involvement in the development of their students' HOCS capabilities is thus apparent.

  10. Attitudes towards Science Learning among 10th-Grade Students: A qualitative look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raved, Lena; Ben Zvi Assaraf, Orit

    2011-06-01

    The twenty-first century is characterized by multiple, frequent and remarkable scientific advancements, which have a major effect on the decisions that govern everyday life. It is therefore vital to give proper comprehensive scientific education to the population and provide it with the right tools for decision-making. This in turn requires that we foster a positive attitude among students towards science studies and encourage them to choose sciences as their major subjects. The following study examines 10th-grade high school students in an attempt to understand and document the influential factors underlying their attitudes towards science studies. The study is conducted through a qualitative research methodology, gathering data based on interviews. This methodology exposes the students' feelings, views and beliefs, and explores the characteristics of the factors influencing students' attitudes. Of these factors, we found the most significant for high school students to be interpersonal interaction between teacher and student, the relevance and authenticity of the topics being studied, and the diversity of the teaching methods. We therefore suggest that these three elements should be given particular emphasis by teachers and teacher educators.

  11. Examining General and Specific Factors in the Dimensionality of Oral Language and Reading in 4th-10th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov; Mitchell, Alison; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore dimensions of oral language and reading and their influence on reading comprehension in a relatively understudied population--adolescent readers in 4th through 10th grades. The current study employed latent variable modeling of decoding fluency, vocabulary, syntax, and reading comprehension so as to…

  12. Investigating the Effects of a DNA Fingerprinting Workshop on 10th Grade Students' Self Efficacy and Attitudes toward Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonmez, Duygu; Simcox, Amanda

    The purpose of this study was investigate the effects of a DNA Fingerprinting Workshop on 10th grade students' self efficacy and attitudes toward science. The content of the workshop based on high school science curriculum and includes multimedia instruction, laboratory experiment and participation of undergraduate students as mentors. N=93…

  13. Influence of V-Diagrams on 10th Grade Turkish Students' Achievement in the Subject of Mechanical Waves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekes, Hanife; Gonen, Selahattin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how the use of V-diagrams one of the learning techniques used in laboratory studies in experiments conducted regarding the 10th grade lesson unit of "waves" influenced students' achievements. In the study, a quasi-experimental design with a pretest and posttest control group was used. The study was…

  14. Progression in Complexity: Contextualizing Sustainable Marine Resources Management in a 10th Grade Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Torija, Beatriz; Jiménez-Aleixandre, María-Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable management of marine resources raises great challenges. Working with this socio-scientific issue in the classroom requires students to apply complex models about energy flow and trophic pyramids in order to understand that food chains represent transfer of energy, to construct meanings for sustainable resources management through discourse, and to connect them to actions and decisions in a real-life context. In this paper we examine the process of elaboration of plans for resources management in a marine ecosystem by 10th grade students (15-16 year) in the context of solving an authentic task. A complete class ( N = 14) worked in a sequence about ecosystems. Working in small groups, the students made models of energy flow and trophic pyramids, and used them to solve the problem of feeding a small community for a long time. Data collection included videotaping and audiotaping of all of the sessions, and collecting the students' written productions. The research objective is to examine the process of designing a plan for sustainable resources management in terms of the discursive moves of the students across stages in contextualizing practices, or different degrees of complexity (Jiménez-Aleixandre & Reigosa International Journal of Science Education, 14(1): 51-61 2006), understood as transformations from theoretical statements to decisions about the plan. The analysis of students' discursive moves shows how the groups progressed through stages of connecting different models, between them and with the context, in order to solve the task. The challenges related to taking this sustainability issue to the classroom are discussed.

  15. The Earlier the Better? Taking the AP® in 10th Grade. Research Report No. 2012-10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Awilda; McKillip, Mary E. M.; Niu, Sunny X.

    2013-01-01

    In this report, the authors examine the impact of scoring a 1 or 2 on an AP® Exam in 10th grade on later AP Exam participation and performance. As access to AP courses increases within and across schools, a growing number of students are taking AP courses and exams in the earlier grades of high school. Using a matched sample of AP and no-AP…

  16. Changes in Educational Expectations between 10th and 12th Grades across Cohorts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sueuk; Wells, Ryan; Bills, David

    2015-01-01

    The mean levels of educational expectations of American high school students have increased over the past generation; individual educational expectations change as students mature. Using the National Education Longitudinal Study and the Education Longitudinal Study, we examined simultaneously the changes in individuals' expectations from 10th to…

  17. Factors Associated with the Persistence of Bullying Victimization From 10th grade to 13th Grade: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Lars; Welander-Vatn, Audun

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bullying among adolescents represents a major public health challenge. The aim of this study was to map the stability of bullying victimization across the transitional phase from lower to upper secondary school, and to describe the sociodemographic, academic and health-related characteristics of those bullied during the transition. Method: 3674 Norwegian adolescents were followed longitudinally from the age of 15/16 until the age of 18/19, answering questionnaires about health, academic achievements, life events, lifestyle and sociodemography. The 337 participants reporting exposure to bullying victimization at age 15/16 were the target group, as we made comparisons between those reporting victimization only at the age of 15/16 (n=289) with the participants for whom the bullying had continued into later adolescence (n = 48). Results: 14% of those victimized at age 15/16, reported continuation of bullying victimization into upper secondary school. These adolescents were significantly more likely to report having divorced parents, low parental educational level, poor self-perceived economy, muscle and skeletal pain, symptoms of mental distress, lower school marks in Norwegian and higher body-mass index (BMI) when group differences at age 18/19 were assessed through basic inferential statistical tests. However, the multivariate logistic regression analyses only revealed statistically significantly increased adjusted odds ratios for the variables mental distress and school-marks in Norwegian. Conclusion: The persistence of exposure to bullying from 10th grade to 13th grade is associated with mental health complaints and poor school performance. Preventive measures to take care of students being continuously bullied should be in place in secondary schools. PMID:24367391

  18. Evaluation of the 10th Grade Computerized Mathematics Curriculum from the Perspective of the Teachers and Educational Supervisors in the Southern Region in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Tarawneh, Sabri Hassan; Al-Qadi, Haitham Mamdouh

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the 10th grade computerized mathematics curriculum from the perspective of the teachers and supervisors in the southern region in Jordan. The study population consisted of all the teachers who teach the 10th grade in the southern region, with the total of (309) teachers and (20) supervisors. The sample consisted of…

  19. Substance use and youth violence. A study among 6th to 10th grade Israeli school children.

    PubMed

    Molcho, Michal; Harel, Yossi; Dina, Lache O

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the co-morbidity of substance use and violence among a representative sample of 8,394 6th-10th grade Israeli students. A representative national self report sample of 8,394 students in 6th through 10th grade. Measures included smoking, alcohol consumption, and illicit drug use, predicting involvement in bullying, injury during a fight and weapon-carrying in the past 30 days. We found across all grades, genders and ethnicities, daily smoking, use of hard drugs, history of drunkenness and binge drinking were the best predictors of violent behavior. Involvement in such behaviors put girls in higher risk for violent behaviors compared with boys. We concluded that use of substances immensely increased the odds of involvement in violent behavior, and this association was extremely strong for Arab girls. The study suggested that although girls were less frequently involved in substance use, the girls who did were at much higher risk for involvement in youth violence. PMID:15551841

  20. Water: How Good is Good Enough? Teacher's Guide. Science Module (9th-10th Grade Chemistry).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Coll. of Education.

    This is a teacher's guide for a module designed to integrate environmental education into ninth- and tenth-grade chemistry classes. The module, pilot tested in Gwinnett County, Georgia in classes of students, many of whom had learning disabilities, emphasizes activity learning and considerable review. The module is divided into four parts. Part…

  1. Pre-Vocational Curriculum (Career Education) for 9th and 10th Grade Levels. (Teacher Guide).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arman, Ruby L.; Arman, Mohammad R.

    This curriculum guide consists of 17 units of study for use in a prevocational career education course geared toward ninth and tenth grade students. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: assessing personal characteristics, completing a personal aptitude inventory, assessing personal interests, using the Dictionary of…

  2. Predicting 3rd Grade and 10th Grade FCAT Success for 2007-08. Research Brief. Volume 0702

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froman, Terry; Rubiera, Vilma

    2008-01-01

    For the past few years the Florida School Code has set the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) performance requirements for promotion of 3rd graders and graduation for 10 graders. Grade 3 students who do not score at level 2 or higher on the FCAT SSS Reading must be retained unless exempted for special circumstances. Grade 10 students…

  3. Examining General and Specific Factors in the Dimensionality of Oral Language and Reading in 4th–10th Grades

    PubMed Central

    Foorman, Barbara R.; Koon, Sharon; Petscher, Yaacov; Mitchell, Alison; Truckenmiller, Adrea

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore dimensions of oral language and reading and their influence on reading comprehension in a relatively understudied population—adolescent readers in 4th through 10th grades. The current study employed latent variable modeling of decoding fluency, vocabulary, syntax, and reading comprehension so as to represent these constructs with minimal error and to examine whether residual variance unaccounted for by oral language can be captured by specific factors of syntax and vocabulary. A 1-, 3-, 4-, and bifactor model were tested with 1,792 students in 18 schools in 2 large urban districts in the Southeast. Students were individually administered measures of expressive and receptive vocabulary, syntax, and decoding fluency in mid-year. At the end of the year students took the state reading test as well as a group-administered, norm-referenced test of reading comprehension. The bifactor model fit the data best in all 7 grades and explained 72% to 99% of the variance in reading comprehension. The specific factors of syntax and vocabulary explained significant unique variance in reading comprehension in 1 grade each. The decoding fluency factor was significantly correlated with the reading comprehension and oral language factors in all grades, but, in the presence of the oral language factor, was not significantly associated with the reading comprehension factor. Results support a bifactor model of lexical knowledge rather than the 3-factor model of the Simple View of Reading, with the vast amount of variance in reading comprehension explained by a general oral language factor. PMID:26346839

  4. Energy-drink consumption and its relationship with substance use and sensation seeking among 10th grade students in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Evren, Bilge

    2015-06-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of energy-drink (ED) consumption among 10th grade students in Istanbul/Turkey. Cross-sectional online self-report survey conducted in 45 schools from the 15 districts in Istanbul. The questionnaire included sections about demographic data, self-destructive behavior and use of substances including tobacco, alcohol and drugs. Also Psychological Screening Test for Adolescents (PSTA) was used. The analyses were conducted based on the 4957 subjects. Rate of those reported a ED consumption once within last year was 62.0% (n=3072), whereas rate of those reported ED consumption at least once in a month was 31.1%. There were consistent, statistically significant associations between genders, lifetime substance use (tobacco, alcohol and drug use), measures of sensation seeking, psychological problems (depression, anxiety, anger, impulsivity) and self-destructive behavior (self-harming behavior and suicidal thoughts) with ED consumption. In logistic regression models male gender, sensation seeking, life-time tobacco, alcohol and drug use predicted all frequencies of ED consumption. In addition to these predictors, anger and self-harming behavior also predicted ED consumption at least once in a month. There were no interactions between the associations of lifetime tobacco, alcohol and drug use with ED consumption. The findings suggest that the ED consumption of male students is related with three clusters of substances (tobacco, alcohol and drug) through sensation seeking and these relationships do not interact with each other. PMID:26006774

  5. Investigating the intrinsic and extrinsic work values of 10th grade students in science-oriented charter schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Ozgur

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent gender, achievement level, and income level predict the intrinsic and extrinsic work values of 10th grade students. The study explored whether group differences were good predictors of scores in work values. The research was a descriptive, cross-sectional study conducted on 131 10th graders who attended science-oriented charter schools. Students took Super's Work Values Instrument, a Likert-type test that links to 15 work values, which can be categorized as intrinsic and extrinsic values (Super, 1970). Multiple regression analysis was employed as the main analysis followed by ANCOVA. Multiple regression analysis results indicated that there is evidence that 8.9% of the variance in intrinsic work values and 10.2% of the variance in extrinsic work values can be explained by the independent variables ( p < .05). Achievement Level and Income Level may help predict intrinsic work value scores; Achievement Level may also help predict extrinsic work values. Achievement Level was the covariate in ANCOVA. Results indicated that males (M = .174) in this sample have a higher mean of extrinsic work values than that of females (M = -.279). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the intrinsic work values by gender. One possible interpretation of this might be school choice; students in these science-oriented charter schools may have higher intrinsic work values regardless of gender. Results indicated that there was no statistically significant difference among the means of extrinsic work values by income level (p < .05). However, free lunch students (M = .268) have a higher mean of intrinsic work values than that of paid lunch students ( M = -.279). A possible interpretation of this might be that lower income students benefit greatly from the intrinsic work values in overcoming obstacles. Further research is needed in each of these areas. The study produced statistically significant results

  6. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume II. Bulletin 1690-II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the second volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Four instructional areas are profiled in this volume: environmental protection, career information, energy conservation, and agricultural mechanics. The environmental protection unit covers safe use of…

  7. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume I. Bulletin 1690-I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This document is the first volume of a state curriculum guide on vocational agriculture for use in the 9th and 10th grades in Louisiana. Three instructional areas are profiled in this volume: orientation to vocational agriculture, agricultural leadership, and soil science. The three units of the orientation area cover introducing beginning…

  8. Perceptions of 9th and 10th Grade Students on How Their Environment, Cognition, and Behavior Motivate Them in Algebra and Geometry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harootunian, Alen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, relationships were examined between students' perception of their cognition, behavior, environment, and motivation. The purpose of the research study was to explore the extent to which 9th and 10th grade students' perception of environment, cognition, and behavior can predict their motivation in Algebra and Geometry…

  9. A Comparison of 9th and 10th Grade Boys' and Girls' Bullying Behaviors in Two States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isernhagen, Jody; Harris, Sandy

    This study examined the incidences of bullying behaviors among male and female 9th and 10th graders in rural Nebraska and suburban Texas schools. Nebraska students were predominantly Caucasion, and Texas students were African American, Hispanic American, and Caucasion. Student surveys examined such issues as how often bullying occurred, where it…

  10. A Descriptive Guide to the 10th Grade ISTEP+ and High School Graduation Qualifying Exam for Indiana Parents and Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Indianapolis.

    This booklet provides parents and students with answers to their questions about ISTEP+ (Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus), which measures tenth-grade student achievement in English/language arts and mathematics. After a letter from Suellen Reed, Indiana's Superintendent of Public Instruction, the booklet discusses what…

  11. Water: How Good is Good Enough? Student Book. Science Module (9th-10th Grade Chemistry). Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Coll. of Education.

    This learning module is designed to integrate environmental education into ninth- and tenth-grade chemistry classes. This module and a companion social studies module were pilot tested in Gwinnett County, Georgia in classes of students, many of whom had learning disabilities. It emphasizes activity learning. The module is divided into four parts.…

  12. Pre-Vocational Curriculum (Career Education) for 9th and 10th Grade Levels. (Student Study Guide).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arman, Ruby L.; Arman, Mohammad R.

    This student guide consists of 17 units of study for use in a prevocational career education course geared toward ninth and tenth grade students. Covered in the individual lessons are the following topics: assessing personal interests, using the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, identifying occupational choices, identifying vocational and…

  13. Teachers' and Students' Perceptions Regarding Technology-Assisted Instruction in 10th-Grade Mathematics Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Martha Jean Ware

    2012-01-01

    Tenth grade students in a high school in the southern United States were not meeting minimum mathematics competencies. Educators, families, and students needed more information on ways to enhance mathematics understanding and performance. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine students' and teachers' perceptions…

  14. Growth: How Much is Too Much? Student Book. Social Studies Module (9th-10th Grade Social Studies). Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Coll. of Education.

    This learning module is designed to integrate environmental education into ninth- and tenth-grade social studies courses. The module and a parallel module designed for chemistry classes were pilot tested in Gwinnett County, Georgia in 1975-76. The module is divided into four parts. The first part alerts students to the serious problems that growth…

  15. A Typology of Chemistry Classroom Environments: Exploring the Relationships between 10th Grade Students' Perceptions, Attitudes and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giallousi, M.; Gialamas, V.; Pavlatou, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was the first in Greece in which educational effectiveness theory constituted a knowledge base for investigating the impact of chemistry classroom environment in 10 Grade students' enjoyment of class. An interpretive heuristic schema was developed and utilised in order to incorporate two factors of teacher behaviour at…

  16. Growth: How Much is Too Much? Student Book. Science Module (9th-10th Grade Biology). Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Coll. of Education.

    This learning module is designed to integrate environmental education into ninth- and tenth-grade chemistry classes. This module and a companion social studies module were pilot tested in Gwinnett County, Georgia in 1975-76. The module is divided into four parts. Part one provides a broad overview of unit content and proposes questions to…

  17. It takes a village: the effects of 10th grade college-going expectations of students, parents, and teachers four years later.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Anne; Huang, Francis

    2013-09-01

    Adolescents are surrounded by people who have expectations about their college-going potential. Yet, few studies have examined the link between these multiple sources of college-going expectations and the actual status of students in postsecondary education years later. The study draws on data collected in the 2002-2006 Educational Longitudinal Study and employs an underutilized statistical technique (cross-classified multilevel modeling) to account for teacher reports on overlapping groups of students (typical of high school research). Results showed that positive expectations of students, parents, English, and mathematics teachers in the 10th grade each uniquely predicted postsecondary status 4 years later. As a group, the four sources of expectations explained greater variance in postsecondary education than student characteristics such as socioeconomic status and academic performance. This suggests positive expectations are additive and promotive for students regardless of their risk status. Teacher expectations were also found to be protective for low income students. Implications for future expectancy research and equity-focused interventions are discussed. PMID:23564059

  18. Mountain Dew[R] or Mountain Don't?: A Pilot Investigation of Caffeine Use Parameters and Relations to Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in 5th- and 10th-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Bell, Debora J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Caffeine, the only licit psychoactive drug available to minors, may have a harmful impact on students' health and adjustment, yet little is known about its use or effects on students, especially from a developmental perspective. Caffeine use in 5th- and 10th-grade students was examined in a cross-sectional design, and relations and…

  19. Implementation and Evaluation of Web-Based Learning Activities on Bonding and the Structure of Matter for 10-th Grade Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frailich, Marcel

    This study deals with the development, implementation, and evaluation of web-based activities associated with the topic of chemical bonding , as taught in 10th grade chemistry. A website was developed entitled: "Chemistry and the Chemical Industry in the Service of Mankind", its URL is: http://stwww.weizmann.ac.il/g-chem/learnchem (Kesner, Frailich, & Hofstein, 2003). The main goal of this study was to assess the educational effectiveness of website activities dealing with the chemical bonding concept. These activities include visualization tools, as well as topics relevant to daily life and industrial applications. The study investigated the effectiveness of a web-based learning environment regarding the understanding of chemical bonding concepts, students' perceptions of the classroom learning environment, their attitudes regarding the relevance of learning chemistry to everyday life, and their interest in chemistry studies. As mentioned before, in the present study we focused on activities (from the website), all of which deal with chemical bonding concept. The following are the reasons for the decision to focus on this topic: (1) Chemical bonding is a key concept that is taught in 10th grade chemistry in high school. It provides the basis for many other chemistry topics that are taught later, and (2) Chemical bonding is a difficult for students using existing tools (e. g., static models in books, ball-and- stick models), which are insufficient to demonstrate the abstract nature phenomena associated with this topic. The four activities developed for this study are (1) models of the atomic structure, (2) metals -- structure and properties, (3) ionic substances in everyday life and in industry, and (4) molecular substances -- structure, properties, and uses. The study analyzed both quantitative and qualitative research. The quantitative tools of the study included: A Semantic Differential questionnaire and a Chemistry Classroom Web-Based Learning Environment

  20. The impact of high-stakes, state-mandated student performance assessment on 10th grade English, mathematics, and science teachers' instructional practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Kenneth E.

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the public release of student results on high-stakes, state-mandated performance assessments influence instructional practices, and if so in what manner. The research focused on changes in teachers' instructional practices and factors that may have influenced such changes since the public release of high-stakes, state-mandated student performance assessment scores. The data for this study were obtained from a 54-question survey instrument given to a stratified random sample of teachers teaching at least one section of 10th grade English, mathematics, or science in an academic public high school within Massachusetts. Two hundred and fifty-seven (257) teachers, or 62% of the total sample, completed the survey instrument. An analysis of the data found that teachers are making changes in their instructional practices. The data show notable increases in the use of open-response questions, creative/critical thinking questions, problem-solving activities, use of rubrics or scoring guides, writing assignments, and inquiry/investigation. Teachers also have decreased the use of multiple-choice and true-false questions, textbook-based assignments, and lecturing. Also, the data show that teachers felt that changes made in their instructional practices were most influenced by an "interest in helping my students attain MCAS assessment scores that will allow them to graduate high school" and by an "interest in helping my school improve student (MCAS) assessment scores," Finally, mathematics teachers and teachers with 13--19 years of experience report making significantly more changes than did others. It may be interpreted from the data that the use of state-mandated student performance assessments and the high-stakes attached to this type of testing program contributed to changes in teachers' instructional practices. The changes in teachers' instructional practices have included increases in the use of instructional practices deemed

  1. Affective decision-making deficits, linked to a dysfunctional ventromedial prefrontal cortex, revealed in 10th grade Chinese adolescent binge drinkers.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C Anderson; Xiao, Lin; Palmer, Paula; Sun, Ping; Wang, Qiong; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Grenard, Jerry L; Stacy, Alan W; Bechara, Antoine

    2008-01-31

    The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that adolescent binge drinkers, but not lighter drinkers, would show signs of impairment on tasks of affective decision-making as measured by the Iowa Gambling Test (IGT), when compared to adolescents who never drank. We tested 207 10th grade adolescents in Chengdu City, China, using two versions of the IGT, the original and a variant, in which the reward/punishment contingencies were reversed. This enables one to distinguish among different possibilities of impaired decision-making, such as insensitivity to long-term consequences, or hypersensitivity to reward. Furthermore, we tested working memory capacity using the Self-ordered Pointing Test (SOPT). Paper and pencil questionnaires were used to assess drinking behaviors and school academic performance. Results indicated that relative to never-drinkers, adolescent binge drinkers, but not other (ever, past 30-day) drinkers, showed significantly lower net scores on the original version of the IGT especially in the latter trials. Furthermore, the profiles of behavioral performance from the original and variant versions of the IGT were consistent with a decision-making impairment attributed to hypersensitivity to reward. In addition, working memory and school academic performance revealed no differences between drinkers (at all levels) and never-drinkers. Logistic regression analysis showed that after controlling for demographic variables, working memory, and school academic performance, the IGT significantly predicted binge-drinking. These findings suggest that a "myopia" for future consequences linked to hypersensitivity to reward is a key characteristic of adolescents with binge-drinking behavior, and that underlying neural mechanisms for this "myopia" for future consequences may serve as a predisposing factor that renders some adolescents more susceptible to future addictive behaviors. PMID:17996909

  2. Effect of cooperative learning strategies on student verbal interactions and achievement during conceptual change instruction in 10th grade general science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonning, Robert A.

    This study evaluated the effects of cooperative learning on students' verbal interaction patterns and achievement in a conceptual change instructional model in secondary science. Current conceptual change instructional models recognize the importance of student-student verbal interactions, but lack specific strategies to encourage these interactions. Cooperative learning may provide the necessary strategies. Two sections of low-ability 10th-grade students were designated the experimental and control groups. Students in both sections received identical content instruction on the particle model of matter using conceptual change teaching strategies. Students worked in teacher-assigned small groups on in-class assignments. The experimental section used cooperative learning strategies involving instruction in collaborative skills and group evaluation of assignments. The control section received no collaborative skills training and students were evaluated individually on group work. Gains on achievement were assessed using pre- and posttreatment administrations of an investigator-designed short-answer essay test. The assessment strategies used in this study represent an attempt to measure conceptual change. Achievement was related to students' ability to correctly use appropriate scientific explanations of events and phenomena and to discard use of naive conceptions. Verbal interaction patterns of students working in groups were recorded on videotape and analyzed using an investigator-designed verbal interaction scheme. The targeted verbalizations used in the interaction scheme were derived from the social learning theories of Piaget and Vygotsky. It was found that students using cooperative learning strategies showed greater achievement gains as defined above and made greater use of specific verbal patterns believed to be related to increased learning. The results of the study demonstrated that cooperative learning strategies enhance conceptual change instruction. More

  3. Affective decision-making deficits, linked to a dysfunctional ventromedial prefrontal cortex, revealed in 10th-grade Chinese adolescent smokers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Cen, Steven; Grenard, Jerry L; Stacy, Alan W; Gallaher, Peggy; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Anderson Johnson, C

    2008-06-01

    This study addressed the question of whether poor decision making would be associated with adolescent past 7-day smoking. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 208 10th-grade adolescents in Chengdu City, China. We used the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to assess decision-making, and the Self-ordered Pointing Task (SOPT) to assess working memory capacity. Paper and pencil questionnaires assessed the school academic performance (SAP) and smoking variables. The results showed that a significantly higher proportion of past 7-day smokers (91.7%) were susceptible to future smoking and cigarette offers from best friends compared to other levels of smokers (never, ever and past 30-day smokers). Consistent with these behavioral data, the neuropsychological assessments revealed that relative to never smokers, past 7-day adolescent smokers (but not ever smokers or past 30-day smokers) demonstrated significantly lower scores on the IGT. Moreover, a higher proportion of past 7-day smokers (91.7%) performed poorly (no more than an overall net score of 10) on the IGT than nonsmokers and irregular (ever or past 30-day) smokers (about 65.3%). There were no differences on working memory performance for smokers (at any level) compared to never smokers after adjusting for school-type. In addition, logistic regression showed that the IGT significantly predicted past 7-day smoking after controlling for the working memory, school academic performance and demographic variables. These results suggest that poor affective decision making might predispose some adolescents to smoking in the future or in the social situations where their peers are smoking. Intervention targeting affective decision making might hold promise for reducing adolescents' risks for substance use. PMID:18584472

  4. Affective decision-making deficits, linked to a dysfunctional ventromedial prefrontal cortex, revealed in 10th-grade Chinese adolescent smokers

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Cen, Steven; Grenard, Jerry L.; Stacy, Alan W.; Gallaher, Peggy; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Johnson, C. Anderson

    2008-01-01

    This study addressed the question of whether poor decision making would be associated with adolescent past 7-day smoking. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 208 10th-grade adolescents in Chengdu City, China. We used the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to assess decision-making, and the Self-ordered Pointing Task (SOPT) to assess working memory capacity. Paper and pencil questionnaires assessed the school academic performance (SAP) and smoking variables. The results showed that a significantly higher proportion of past 7-day smokers (91.7%) were susceptible to future smoking and cigarette offers from best friends compared to other levels of smokers (never, ever and past 30-day smokers). Consistent with these behavioral data, the neuropsychological assessments revealed that relative to never smokers, past 7-day adolescent smokers (but not ever smokers or past 30-day smokers) demonstrated significantly lower scores on the IGT. Moreover, a higher proportion of past 7-day smokers (91.7%) performed poorly (no more than an overall net score of 10) on the IGT than nonsmokers and irregular (ever or past 30-day) smokers (about 65.3%). There were no differences on working memory performance for smokers (at any level) compared to never smokers after adjusting for school-type. In addition, logistic regression showed that the IGT significantly predicted past 7-day smoking after controlling for the working memory, school academic performance and demographic variables. These results suggest that poor affective decision making might predispose some adolescents to smoking in the future or in the social situations where their peers are smoking. Intervention targeting affective decision making might hold promise for reducing adolescents’ risks for substance use. PMID:18584472

  5. Trends in Substance Use among 6th-to 10th-Grade Students from 1998 to 2010: Findings from a National Probability Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Farhat, Tilda; Haynie, Denise; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Of the handful of national studies tracking trends in adolescent substance use in the United States, only the Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study collects data from 6th through 10th graders. The purpose of this study was to examine trends from 1998 to 2010 (four time points) in the prevalence of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana use…

  6. REPORT FOR COMMERCIAL GRADE NICKEL CHARACTERIZATION AND BENCHMARKING

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-20

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, has completed the collection, sample analysis, and review of analytical results to benchmark the concentrations of gross alpha-emitting radionuclides, gross beta-emitting radionuclides, and technetium-99 in commercial grade nickel. This report presents methods, change management, observations, and statistical analysis of materials procured from sellers representing nine countries on four continents. The data suggest there is a low probability of detecting alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides in commercial nickel. Technetium-99 was not detected in any samples, thus suggesting it is not present in commercial nickel.

  7. The Basic Program of Vocational Agriculture in Louisiana. Ag I and Ag II (9th and 10th Grades). Volume III. Bulletin 1690-III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide, the third volume of the series, outlines the basic program of vocational agriculture for Louisiana students in the ninth and tenth grades. Covered in the five units on plant science are growth processes of plants, cultural practices for plants, insects affecting plants, seed and plant selection, and diseases that affect…

  8. The Impact of Internet Virtual Physics Laboratory Instruction on the Achievement in Physics, Science Process Skills and Computer Attitudes of 10th-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Kun-Yuan; Heh, Jia-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the impact of Internet Virtual Physics Laboratory (IVPL) instruction with traditional laboratory instruction in physics academic achievement, performance of science process skills, and computer attitudes of tenth grade students. One-hundred and fifty students from four classes at one private…

  9. Trends in Bullying, Physical Fighting, and Weapon Carrying Among 6th- Through 10th-Grade Students From 1998 to 2010: Findings From a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Brooks-Russell, Ashley; Wang, Jing; Iannotti, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined trends from 1998 to 2010 in bullying, bullying victimization, physical fighting, and weapon carrying and variations by gender, grade level, and race/ethnicity among US adolescents. Methods. The Health Behavior in School-Aged Children surveys of nationally representative samples of students in grades 6 through 10 were completed in 1998 (n = 15 686), 2002 (n = 14 818), 2006 (n = 9229), and 2010 (n = 10 926). We assessed frequency of bullying behaviors, physical fighting, and weapon carrying as well as weapon type and subtypes of bullying. We conducted logistic regression analyses, accounting for the complex sampling design, to identify trends and variations by demographic factors. Results. Bullying perpetration, bullying victimization, and physical fighting declined from 1998 to 2010. Weapon carrying increased for White students only. Declines in bullying perpetration and victimization were greater for boys than for girls. Declines in bullying perpetration and physical fighting were greater for middle-school students than for high-school students. Conclusions. Declines in most violent behaviors are encouraging; however, lack of decline in weapon carrying merits further attention. PMID:24825213

  10. Rates of Substance Use of American Indian Students in 8th, 10th, and 12th Grades Living on or Near Reservations: Update, 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Harness, Susan D.; Swaim, Randall C.; Beauvais, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Understanding the similarities and differences between substance use rates for American Indian (AI) young people and young people nationally can better inform prevention and treatment efforts. We compared substance use rates for a large sample of AI students living on or near reservations for the years 2009–2012 with national prevalence rates from Monitoring the Future (MTF). Methods We identified and sampled schools on or near AI reservations by region; 1,399 students in sampled schools were administered the American Drug and Alcohol Survey. We computed lifetime, annual, and last-month prevalence measures by grade and compared them with MTF results for the same time period. Results Prevalence rates for AI students were significantly higher than national rates for nearly all substances, especially for 8th graders. Rates of marijuana use were very high, with lifetime use higher than 50% for all grade groups. Other findings of interest included higher binge drinking rates and OxyContin® use for AI students. Conclusions The results from this study demonstrate that adolescent substance use is still a major problem among reservation-based AI adolescent students, especially 8th graders, where prevalence rates were sometimes dramatically higher than MTF rates. Given the high rates of substance use-related problems on reservations, such as academic failure, delinquency, violent criminal behavior, suicidality, and alcohol-related mortality, the costs to members of this population and to society will continue to be much too high until a comprehensive understanding of the root causes of substance use are established. PMID:24587550

  11. Effects of a novel science curriculum versus traditional science curriculum on problem solving skills and attitudes for 10th grade students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauchat, Carrie

    This study utilized both quantitative and qualitative methods in investigating how a novel science curriculum, geared towards the 21 st century student, affected skills and attitudes towards science for tenth grade students. The quantitative portion of the study was a quasi-experimental design since random groups were not possible. This portion of the study used a pretest/posttest design to measure any improvement in science skills, and a Likert scale survey to measure any improvements in students' attitudes. Statistical tests revealed no significant differences between students who received the novel curriculum versus those students who received a traditional curriculum. Both groups showed significant improvements in all skill areas. Qualitatively, the researcher used informal teacher interviews and student surveys to identify the most relevant and effective curriculum components for the 21st century student. The findings suggest that the task of creating a meaningful and relevant curriculum based on the necessary skills of this century is not an easy task. There is much more work to be done in this area, but according to the qualitative findings integrated design and student technology are promising.

  12. Teachers' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Benchmark Assessment Data to Predict Student Math Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lawanna M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this correlational quantitative study was to examine the extent to which teachers perceive the use of benchmark assessment data as effective; the extent to which the time spent teaching mathematics is associated with students' mathematics grades, and the extent to which the results of math benchmark assessment influence teachers'…

  13. Writing Instructional Intervention Supplement (Benchmarks, Informal Assessments, Strategies), Grades 4-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson.

    This Writing Instructional Intervention Supplement from the Mississippi Department of Education contains benchmarks, informal assessments, and suggested teaching strategies for the fourth through eighth grades. Benchmarks outline what students should know and be able to do to meet mandated competencies. Informal and observational assessments…

  14. Establishing Benchmarks of Progress for Middle Grades Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Schools that become part of the "Making Middle Grades Work" network are expected to use the middle grades comprehensive improvement framework to show progress in changing school and classroom practices in ways that advance student achievement. True school reform is not a quick process. It is a continuous effort to make purposeful and planned…

  15. Social Studies: Standards, End of Grade Cluster Benchmarks, Performance Indicators. Grades 9-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    This Delaware state content standards booklet for teaching grades 9-12 social studies in Delaware begins with a one page chart outlining information for the disciplines of civics, economics, geography, and U.S. history. The booklet addresses standards for civics, lists end of cluster expectations for the end of grade 11, and cites grade-by-grade…

  16. Social Studies: Standards, End of Grade Cluster Benchmarks, Performance Indicators. Grades 6-8. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    This Delaware state content standards booklet for teaching grades 6-8 social studies in Delaware public schools begins with a one page chart outlining information for the disciplines of civics, economics, geography, and U.S. history. The booklet addresses standards for civics, lists end of cluster expectations for the end of grade eight, and cites…

  17. Social Studies: Standards, End of Grade Cluster Benchmarks, Performance Indicators. Grades K-5. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaware State Dept. of Public Instruction, Dover.

    This Delaware state content standards booklet for teaching grades K-5 social studies in Delaware public schools begins with a one page chart outlining information for the disciplines of civics, economics, geography, and U.S. history. The booklet addresses standards for civics, lists end of cluster expectations for the end of grade three and the…

  18. Analysis of Weapons-Grade MOX VVER-1000 Benchmarks with HELIOS and KENO

    SciTech Connect

    Dourougie, C.; Emmett, M.B.; Gehin, J.C.; Lillie, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    Calculations of computational benchmark problems for the disposition of weapons-grade mixed-oxide fuel in VVER-1000 reactors have been performed with the HELIOS fuel assembly analysis code. The benchmarks cover pin cell, single fuel assembly, and multiassembly structures with several different fuel types, moderator densities, and boron content for operational and off-normal conditions. Fuel depletion is performed to a burnup of 60 MWd/kg. The detailed results have been tabulated for multiplication factors, macroscopic and microscopic cross sections, reaction rates, fuel isotopics, and fission distributions. Additional results are given for a preliminary analysis of a multiassembly variant using the KENO Monte Carlo code with cross sections from HELIOS.

  19. Accounting Clerk Guide, Learner Packet--Part II. A Spec Unit for the 10th, 11th, or 12th Grade. A Career Education Unit (An Edited Developmental Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Brian; And Others

    The learner packet is part of an eight volume unit for grades 10, 11, and 12, designed for individualized progression in preparing the student for entry into the occupation of accounting clerk. Intended to be used on an individual basis at the student's own speed, the learner packet contains vocabulary, suggested lesson time, self-check keys, and…

  20. Accounting Clerk Guide, Instructor Packet--Part II. A Spec Unit for the 10th, 11th, or 12th Grade. A Career Education Unit (An Edited Developmental Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Brian; And Others

    The instructor packet is part of an eight volume unit for grades 10, 11, and 12, designed for individualized progression in preparing students for entry into the occupation of accounting clerk. The instructor packet lists performance objectives, vocabulary, learning tasks, and supplemental activities for lessons 12 through 21. Pretest and…

  1. Accounting Clerk Guide, Instructor Packet--Part I. A Spec Unit for the 10th, 11th, or 12th Grade. A Career Education Unit (An Edited Developmental Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Brian; And Others

    The instructor packet is part of an eight volume unit for grades 10, 11, and 12, designed for individualized progression in preparing students for entry into the occupation of accounting clerk. The instructor packet lists performance objectives, vocabulary, learning tasks, and supplemental activities for lessons 1 through 11. It also includes…

  2. Accounting Clerk Guide, Learner Packet--Part I. A Spec Unit for the 10th, 11th, or 12th Grade. A Career Education Unit (An Edited Developmental Draft).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Brian; And Others

    The learner packet is part of an eight volume unit for grades 10, 11, and 12, designed for individualized progression in preparing students for entry into the occupation of accounting clerk. Intended to be used on an individual basis at the student's own speed, the learner packet contains vocabulary, suggested lesson time, self-check keys, and…

  3. Columbines 10th Anniversary Finds Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.

    2009-01-01

    When school administrators hear that the 10th anniversary of the Columbine High School attack is approaching, most shake their heads in disbelief. They are amazed that 10 years have passed since this watershed event, which changed the landscape of K-12 school safety. In this article, the author reflects on the lessons learned from the Columbine…

  4. PREFACE: 10th Joint Conference on Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    The 10th Joint Conference on Chemistry is an international conference organized by 4 chemistry departments of 4 universities in central Java, Indonesia. The universities are Sebelas Maret University, Diponegoro University, Semarang State University and Soedirman University. The venue was at Solo, Indonesia, at September 8-9, 2015. The total conference participants are 133 including the invited speakers. The conference emphasized the multidisciplinary chemical issue and impact of today's sustainable chemistry which covering the following topics: • Material innovation for sustainable goals • Development of renewable and sustainable energy based on chemistry • New drug design, experimental and theoretical methods • Green synthesis and characterization of material (from molecule to functionalized materials) • Catalysis as core technology in industry • Natural product isolation and optimization

  5. Analyses of Weapons-Grade MOX VVER-1000 Neutronics Benchmarks: Pin-Cell Calculations with SCALE/SAS2H

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.J.

    2001-01-11

    A series of unit pin-cell benchmark problems have been analyzed related to irradiation of mixed oxide fuel in VVER-1000s (water-water energetic reactors). One-dimensional, discrete-ordinates eigenvalue calculations of these benchmarks were performed at ORNL using the SAS2H control sequence module of the SCALE-4.3 computational code system, as part of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) of the US DOE. Calculations were also performed using the SCALE module CSAS to confirm the results. The 238 neutron energy group SCALE nuclear data library 238GROUPNDF5 (based on ENDF/B-V) was used for all calculations. The VVER-1000 pin-cell benchmark cases modeled with SAS2H included zero-burnup calculations for eight fuel material variants (from LEU UO{sub 2} to weapons-grade MOX) at five different reactor states, and three fuel depletion cases up to high burnup. Results of the SAS2H analyses of the VVER-1000 neutronics benchmarks are presented in this report. Good general agreement was obtained between the SAS2H results, the ORNL results using HELIOS-1.4 with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data, and the results from several Russian benchmark studies using the codes TVS-M, MCU-RFFI/A, and WIMS-ABBN. This SAS2H benchmark study is useful for the verification of HELIOS calculations, the HELIOS code being the principal computational tool at ORNL for physics studies of assembly design for weapons-grade plutonium disposition in Russian reactors.

  6. 10th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 10th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Sixty-eight teams, representing high schools and colleges from all over the United States, and Puerto Rico, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team. In this photograph, racers from C-1 High School in Lafayette County, Missouri, get ready to tackle the course. The team pedaled its way to victory over 29 other teams to take first place honors. It was the second year in a row a team from the school has placed first in the high school division. (NASA/MSFC)

  7. 10th Arnual Great Moonbuggy Race

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 10th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Sixty-eight teams, representing high schools and colleges from all over the United States, and Puerto Rico, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team. In this photograph, Team No. 1 from North Dakota State University in Fargo conquers one of several obstacles on their way to victory. The team captured first place honors in the college level competition.

  8. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    large mission in Europe, and a potential comprehensive technology development program followed by a number one selection in the 2020 Decadal Survey in the U.S. The selection of L2 was combined with the selection of L3 and the newly formed eLISA consortium submitted an updated NGO concept under the name eLISA, or Evolved LISA, to the competition. It was widely believed that the launch date of 2028 for L2, would be seen by the selection committee as providing sufficient time to retire any remaining technological risks for LISA. However, the committee selected the 'Hot and Energetic Universe', an X-ray mission, as the science theme for L2 and the 'Gravitational Universe', the eLISA science theme, for L3. Although very disappointed, it was not a surprising decision. LPF did experience further delays just prior to and during the selection process, which may have influenced the decision. The strong technology program in the U.S. never materialized because WFIRST, the highest priority large mission in the 2010 Decadal following JWST, not only moved ahead but was also up-scoped significantly. The L3 selection, the WFIRST schedule, and the missing comprehensive technology development in the U.S. will make a launch of a GW mission in the 2020s very difficult. Although many in the LISA community, including ourselves, did not want to accept this harsh reality, this was the situation just prior to the 10th LISA symposium. However, despite all of this, the LISA team is now hopeful! In May of 2014 the LISA community gathered at the University of Florida in Gainesville to discuss progress in both the science and technology of LISA. The most notable plenary and contributed sessions included updates on the progress of LISA Pathfinder, which remains on track for launch in the second half of 2015(!), the science of LISA which ranges from super-massive black hole mergers and cosmology to the study of compact binaries within our own galaxy, and updates from other programs that share some of

  9. A Chemistry Course for High Ability 8th, 9th, and 10th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilker, Richard, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a chemistry course designed, in cooperation with local public school districts, to intellectually challenge a group of 8th, 9th, and 10th grade students. Organic chemistry and biochemistry are integrated into the course (titled Chemistry and Everyday Life) to emphasize practical applications of chemistry. The course syllabus is included.…

  10. Self-Perception and Achievement of Black Urban 10th Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reglin, Gary

    Explores the following five dimensions of self-perception held by black urban male 10th-grade students in North Carolina: (1) scholastic competence; (2) athletic competence; (3) physical appearance; (4) behavioral conduct; and (5) job competence. Investigates differences in these aspects of self-concept for 30 students scoring above and 30 scoring…

  11. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    large mission in Europe, and a potential comprehensive technology development program followed by a number one selection in the 2020 Decadal Survey in the U.S. The selection of L2 was combined with the selection of L3 and the newly formed eLISA consortium submitted an updated NGO concept under the name eLISA, or Evolved LISA, to the competition. It was widely believed that the launch date of 2028 for L2, would be seen by the selection committee as providing sufficient time to retire any remaining technological risks for LISA. However, the committee selected the 'Hot and Energetic Universe', an X-ray mission, as the science theme for L2 and the 'Gravitational Universe', the eLISA science theme, for L3. Although very disappointed, it was not a surprising decision. LPF did experience further delays just prior to and during the selection process, which may have influenced the decision. The strong technology program in the U.S. never materialized because WFIRST, the highest priority large mission in the 2010 Decadal following JWST, not only moved ahead but was also up-scoped significantly. The L3 selection, the WFIRST schedule, and the missing comprehensive technology development in the U.S. will make a launch of a GW mission in the 2020s very difficult. Although many in the LISA community, including ourselves, did not want to accept this harsh reality, this was the situation just prior to the 10th LISA symposium. However, despite all of this, the LISA team is now hopeful! In May of 2014 the LISA community gathered at the University of Florida in Gainesville to discuss progress in both the science and technology of LISA. The most notable plenary and contributed sessions included updates on the progress of LISA Pathfinder, which remains on track for launch in the second half of 2015(!), the science of LISA which ranges from super-massive black hole mergers and cosmology to the study of compact binaries within our own galaxy, and updates from other programs that share some of

  12. What Your 9th, 10th, and 11th Grader Should Know about Reading, Writing, and Math [and] Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    Three guides provide sample problems like the ones students would solve on the Colorado Student Assessment Program tests. For each question, the pertinent Colorado state standard is identified. The ninth grade guide contains questions in reading, writing and mathematics; the guide to the 10th grade examination also contains questions related to…

  13. EDITORIAL: 10th anniversary of attosecond pulses 10th anniversary of attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienberger, Reinhard; Chang, Zenghu; Nam, Chang Hee

    2012-04-01

    times in atoms and molecules, such as Auger decay time and autoionization lifetime, have been measured directly as compared to indirect spectroscopic measurements normally done using synchrotron light sources. The reconstruction of molecular orbital wave functions has been demonstrated by developing the molecular tomography method. Ultrafast phenomena in condensed matter and in nanostructures have been tackled also. The successful development of attosecond light sources has thus opened up a variety of new research activities in ultrafast optical science; it will be continued and accelerated further in coming years with intensive research investments by more groups joining the field of attosecond science. In this special issue celebrating the 10th year of attosecond pulse generation 6 review articles and 16 regular articles are included. Although it does not cover all active research areas, we sincerely hope it gives a glimpse of active research activities in attosecond science throughout the world.

  14. EDITORIAL: STAM celebrates its 10th anniversary STAM celebrates its 10th anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushioda, Sukekatsu

    2010-02-01

    I would like to extend my warmest greetings to the readers and staff of Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM), on the occasion of its 10th anniversary. Launched in 2000, STAM marks this year an important milestone in its history. This is a great occasion to celebrate. STAM was founded by Tsuyoshi Masumoto in collaboration with Teruo Kishi and Toyonobu Yoshida as a world-class resource for the materials science community. It was initially supported by several materials research societies and was published as a regular peer-reviewed journal. Significant changes occurred in 2008, when the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) became solely responsible for all the costs of maintaining the journal. STAM was transformed into an open-access journal published by NIMS in partnership with IOP Publishing. As a result, the publication charges were waived and the entire STAM content, including all back issues, became freely accessible through the IOP Publishing website. The transition has made STAM more competitive and successful in global publication communities, with innovative ideas and approaches. The journal has also changed its publication strategy, aiming to publish a limited number of high-quality articles covering the frontiers of materials science. Special emphasis has been placed on reviews and focus issues, providing recent summaries of hot materials science topics. Publication has become electronic only; however, selected issues are printed and freely distributed at major international scientific events. The Editorial Board has been expanded to include leading experts from all over the world and, together with the Editorial Office, the board members are doing their best to transform STAM into a leading materials science journal. These efforts are paying off, as shown by the rapidly increasing number of article downloads and citations in 2009. I believe that the STAM audience can not only deepen their knowledge in their own specialties but

  15. Nineth Rib Syndrome after 10th Rib Resection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yu Sub; Lee, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The 12th rib syndrome is a disease that causes pain between the upper abdomen and the lower chest. It is assumed that the impinging on the nerves between the ribs causes pain in the lower chest, upper abdomen, and flank. A 74-year-old female patient visited a pain clinic complaining of pain in her back, and left chest wall at a 7 on the 0-10 Numeric Rating scale (NRS). She had a lateral fixation at T12-L2, 6 years earlier. After the operation, she had multiple osteoporotic compression fractures. When the spine was bent, the patient complained about a sharp pain in the left mid-axillary line and radiating pain toward the abdomen. On physical examination, the 10th rib was not felt, and an image of the rib-cage confirmed that the left 10th rib was severed. When applying pressure from the legs to the 9th rib of the patient, pain was reproduced. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with 9th rib syndrome, and ultrasound-guided 9th and 10th intercostal nerve blocks were performed around the tips of the severed 10th rib. In addition, local anesthetics with triamcinolone were administered into the muscles beneath the 9th rib at the point of the greatest tenderness. The patient's pain was reduced to NRS 2 point. In this case, it is suspected that the patient had a partial resection of the left 10th rib in the past, and subsequent compression fractures at T8 and T9 led to the deformation of the rib cage, causing the tip of the remaining 10th rib to impinge on the 9th intercostal nerves, causing pain. PMID:27413484

  16. Factors Related to Alcohol Use among 6th through 10th Graders: The Sarasota County Demonstration Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Danice K.; Forthofer, Melinda S.; Zapata, Lauren B.; Brown, Kelli R. McCormack; Bryant, Carol A.; Reynolds, Sherri T.; McDermott, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Alcohol consumption by youth can produce negative health outcomes. This study identified correlates of lifetime alcohol use, recent alcohol use, and binge drinking among youth in sixth through 10th grade (n = 2,004) in Sarasota County, Fla. Results from a closed-ended, quantitative survey acknowledged a range of personal, social and environmental…

  17. NADEOSA 10th Anniversary Conference Formal Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South African Journal of Higher Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    NADEOSA held its 10th anniversary conference during August 2006 on the theme "Celebrating 10 years of NADEOSA. Exploring the role of ICTs in addressing educational needs: Identifying the myths and miracles." The conference evaluation strategy consisted of a number of consciously planned processes, a dialogical and reflective account which had been…

  18. Beyond Discipline: From Compliance to Community. 10th Anniversary Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Alfie

    2006-01-01

    In this 10th anniversary edition of an Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) best seller, the author reflects on his revolutionary ideas in the context of today's emphasis on school accountability and high-stakes testing. The author relates how his innovative approach--where teachers learn to work with students, rather than…

  19. Nevada Foreign Language Standards: Content Standards for Grades Kindergarten, 3, 5, 8, 1st Year High School Study, 2nd Year High School Study, and 4th Year High School Study [and] Performance Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada State Dept. of Education, Carson City.

    These standards offer a vision of excellence for K-12 foreign language education in Nevada. They are designed to provide guidance for school districts as they develop high quality foreign language programs through Nevada schools. The standards are benchmarked for the following grades: kindergarten, 3rd, 5th, 8th, 9th, 10th, and 12th. For each…

  20. How Many Letters Should Preschoolers in Public Programs Know? The Diagnostic Efficiency of Various Preschool Letter-Naming Benchmarks for Predicting First-Grade Literacy Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Petscher, Yaacov; Justice, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Review of current federal and state standards indicates little consensus or empirical justification regarding appropriate goals, often referred to as benchmarks, for preschool letter-name learning. The present study investigated the diagnostic efficiency of various letter-naming benchmarks using a longitudinal database of 371 children who attended publicly funded preschools. Children’s uppercase and lowercase letter-naming abilities were assessed at the end of preschool, and their literacy achievement on 3 standardized measures was assessed at the end of 1st grade. Diagnostic indices (sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive power) were generated to examine the extent to which attainment of various preschool letter-naming benchmarks was associated with later risk for literacy difficulties. Results indicated generally high negative predictive power for benchmarks requiring children to know 10 or more letter names by the end of preschool. Balancing across all diagnostic indices, optimal benchmarks of 18 uppercase and 15 lowercase letter names were identified. These findings are discussed in terms of educational implications, limitations, and future directions. PMID:26346643

  1. [Treat Princes in Cordoue (9th-10th centuries)].

    PubMed

    Ricordel, Joëlle

    2016-03-01

    It is proposed, through biographic notes and historical reports, to observe the physicians/power relationships in one hand, and power/medical institutions relationships on the other, in Cordoue, during omeyades' emirate and caliphate, between the 9th and 10th centuries. The gathered information allows to describe the social position of physicians who received marks of favor from princes, but also served the power in place for various responsabilities. These documents are also able to make an evaluation of the role of princes for the development of medico-pharmaceutical subjects and give indications on the health of great figures, on their diseases and the conditions of their death. PMID:27281934

  2. Prevalence and Patterns of Polysubstance Use in a Nationally Representative Sample of 10th Graders in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Kevin P.; Vullo, Genevieve C.; Nichter, Brandon; Wang, Jing; Compton, Wilson M.; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The current study examines the prevalence and demographic correlates of self-reported substance use and identifies subgroups of polysubstance users among a cohort of US 10th grade students. Methods A nationally representative school-based cohort of US 10th grade students completed the NEXT Generation Health Study baseline survey in the spring of 2010 (N = 2,524). Results Past-year use of marijuana was most common among illicit drugs (26%), followed by misuse of medication (9%) and use of other illicit drugs (8%). During the past month, alcohol use was reported by more than one-third (35%), binge drinking by 27%, and cigarette smoking by 19%. Results further show that substance use varied somewhat by demographic characteristics. Results from the latent class analysis of polysubstance use indicated a 4-class solution as the best-fitting model; Class 1 (59%) included the ‘non-user’ group; Class 2 (23%) comprised the ‘predominant alcohol user’ group; Class 3 (11%) formed the ‘predominant marijuana user’ group; Class 4 (8%) was characterized as the ‘predominant polysubstance user’ group. Somatic and depressive symptoms varied significantly by class membership, with predominant polysubstance users reporting elevated levels of somatic and depressive symptoms. Conclusions The findings from this national study of 10th-grade students indicate high rates of substance and polysubstance use. The high level of depressive and somatic symptoms among polysubstance users indicates the need for mental health screening and referral. PMID:23465320

  3. The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database's 10th year anniversary: update 2015

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Allan Peter; Grondin, Cynthia J.; Lennon-Hopkins, Kelley; Saraceni-Richards, Cynthia; Sciaky, Daniela; King, Benjamin L.; Wiegers, Thomas C.; Mattingly, Carolyn J.

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) was developed out of a need to formalize, harmonize and centralize the information on numerous genes and proteins responding to environmental toxic agents across diverse species. CTD's initial approach was to facilitate comparisons of nucleotide and protein sequences of toxicologically significant genes by curating these sequences and electronically annotating them with chemical terms from their associated references. Since then, however, CTD has vastly expanded its scope to robustly represent a triad of chemical–gene, chemical–disease and gene–disease interactions that are manually curated from the scientific literature by professional biocurators using controlled vocabularies, ontologies and structured notation. Today, CTD includes 24 million toxicogenomic connections relating chemicals/drugs, genes/proteins, diseases, taxa, phenotypes, Gene Ontology annotations, pathways and interaction modules. In this 10th year anniversary update, we outline the evolution of CTD, including our increased data content, new ‘Pathway View’ visualization tool, enhanced curation practices, pilot chemical–phenotype results and impending exposure data set. The prototype database originally described in our first report has transformed into a sophisticated resource used actively today to help scientists develop and test hypotheses about the etiologies of environmentally influenced diseases. PMID:25326323

  4. The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database's 10th year anniversary: update 2015.

    PubMed

    Davis, Allan Peter; Grondin, Cynthia J; Lennon-Hopkins, Kelley; Saraceni-Richards, Cynthia; Sciaky, Daniela; King, Benjamin L; Wiegers, Thomas C; Mattingly, Carolyn J

    2015-01-01

    Ten years ago, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) was developed out of a need to formalize, harmonize and centralize the information on numerous genes and proteins responding to environmental toxic agents across diverse species. CTD's initial approach was to facilitate comparisons of nucleotide and protein sequences of toxicologically significant genes by curating these sequences and electronically annotating them with chemical terms from their associated references. Since then, however, CTD has vastly expanded its scope to robustly represent a triad of chemical-gene, chemical-disease and gene-disease interactions that are manually curated from the scientific literature by professional biocurators using controlled vocabularies, ontologies and structured notation. Today, CTD includes 24 million toxicogenomic connections relating chemicals/drugs, genes/proteins, diseases, taxa, phenotypes, Gene Ontology annotations, pathways and interaction modules. In this 10th year anniversary update, we outline the evolution of CTD, including our increased data content, new 'Pathway View' visualization tool, enhanced curation practices, pilot chemical-phenotype results and impending exposure data set. The prototype database originally described in our first report has transformed into a sophisticated resource used actively today to help scientists develop and test hypotheses about the etiologies of environmentally influenced diseases. PMID:25326323

  5. Supracostal Approach for PCNL: Is 10th and 11th Intercostal Space Safe According to Clavien Classification System?

    PubMed

    Kara, Cengiz; Değirmenci, Tansu; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Koras, Omer; Minareci, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success and morbidity of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal space. Between March 2005 and February 2012, 612 patients underwent PCNL, 243 of whom had a supracostal access. The interspace between the 11th and 12th rib was used in 204 cases (group 1) and between the 10th and 11th interspaces in 39 cases (group 2). PCNL was performed using standard supracostal technique in all patients. The operative time, success rate, hospital stay, and complications according to the modified Clavien classification were compared between group 1 and group 2. The stone-free rate was 86.8% in group 1 and 84.6% in group 2 after one session of PCNL. Auxiliary procedures consisting of ureterorenoscopy (URS) and shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) were required in 5 and 7 patients, respectively, in group 1; and in 1 patient each in group 2 . After the auxiliary procedures, stone-free rates increased to 92.6% in group 1 and 89.7% in group 2. A total of 74 (30.4%) complications were documented in the 2 groups according to modified Clavien classification. Grade-I complications were recorded in 20 (8.2%), grade-II in 38 (15.6%), grade-IIIa in 13 (5.3%), and grade-IIIb in 2 (0.8%) patients; grade-IVa was recorded in 1 (0.4%) patient. There were no grade-IVb or grade-V complications. Overall complication rate was 30.9% in group 1 and 28.2% in group 2. Supracostal PCNL in selected cases is effective and safe with acceptable complications. The modified Clavien system provides a standardized grading system for complications of PCNL. PMID:25437600

  6. School Composition and Context Factors that Moderate and Predict 10th-Grade Science Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogrebe, Mark C.; Tate, William F., IV

    2010-01-01

    Background: Performance in high school science is a critical indicator of science literacy and regional competitiveness. Factors that influence science proficiency have been studied using national databases, but these do not answer all questions about variable relationships at the state level. School context factors and opportunities to learn…

  7. Interests of 5th through 10th Grade Students toward Human Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erten, Sinan

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the middle and high school students' interests towards the subjects of human biology, specifically, "Human Health and Nutrition" and "Human Body and Organs." The study also investigated sources of their interests and factors that impact their interests, namely people that they interact and courses that they take about…

  8. Does STES-Oriented Science Education Promote 10th-Grade Students' Decision-Making Capability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy Nahum, Tami; Ben-Chaim, David; Azaiza, Ibtesam; Herskovitz, Orit; Zoller, Uri

    2010-01-01

    Today's society is continuously coping with sustainability-related complex issues in the Science-Technology-Environment-Society (STES) interfaces. In those contexts, the need and relevance of the development of students' higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS) such as question-asking, critical-thinking, problem-solving and decision-making…

  9. Interests of 5th through 10th Grade Students Regarding Enviromental Protection Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erten, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the extent of interest among middle and high school students in environmental protection issues along with the sources of their interests and factors that impact their interests, namely people with whom they interact and courses that they take related to the environment, science and technology. In addition, it is confirmed…

  10. Progression in Complexity: Contextualizing Sustainable Marine Resources Management in a 10th Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bravo-Torija, Beatriz; Jimenez-Aleixandre, Maria-Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable management of marine resources raises great challenges. Working with this socio-scientific issue in the classroom requires students to apply complex models about energy flow and trophic pyramids in order to understand that food chains represent transfer of energy, to construct meanings for sustainable resources management through…

  11. Vocational Agriculture II Curriculum Guide, 10th Grade. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education: Basic Core Curriculum II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburg State Univ., KS. Kansas Vocational Curriculum and Research Center.

    This basic core curriculum for vocational agriculture education contains 35 units of instruction in five content areas: agricultural chemicals (1 unit), leadership (2 units), farm management (5 units), plant and soil science (10 units), animal science (8 units), and farm mechanics (9 units). Each unit follows a typical format that includes…

  12. General Shop Competencies in Vocational Agriculture for 9th and 10th Grade Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotny, Ronald; And Others

    The document presents unit plans which offer list of experiences and competencies to be learned for general shop occupations in vocational agriculture. The units include: (1) arc welding, (2) oxy-acetylene welding, (3) flat concrete, (4) concrete block, (5) lumber patterns and wood building materials, (6) metal fasteners, (7) wood adhesives, (8)…

  13. Using Diagrams versus Text for Spaced Restudy: Effects on Learning in 10th Grade Biology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergey, Bradley W.; Cromley, Jennifer G.; Kirchgessner, Mandy L.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Spaced restudy has been typically tested with written learning materials, but restudy with visual representations in actual classrooms is under-researched. We compared the effects of two spaced restudy interventions: A Diagram-Based Restudy (DBR) warm-up condition and a business-as-usual Text-Based Restudy (TBR) warm-up…

  14. An analysis of women's ways of knowing in a 10th grade integrated science classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochheiser, Karen Lynn

    All students can learn science, but how they learn science may differ. This study is about learning science and its relationship to gender. Women need to develop and establish connections with the objects that they are learning and be able to establish a voice in a science classroom. Unfortunately, traditional science classrooms still view science as a male domain and tend to discourage women from pursuing higher levels of science or science related careers. The ways that women learn science are a very complex set of interactions. In order to describe these interactions, this study explored how women's ways of knowing are represented in a high school science classroom. Nine women from an enriched integrated biology and earth science class contributed to this study. The women contributed to this study by participating in individual and group interviews, questionnaires, journals, observations and participant review of the interviews. The ways that these women learn science were described in terms of Belenky, Clinchy, Goldberger, and Tarule's Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind (1997). The women's ways of learning in this classroom tended to be situational with the women fitting different categories of knowing depending on the situation. Most of the women demonstrated periods of time where they wanted to be heard or tried to establish a voice in the classroom. The study helps to provide a theory for how women make choices in their learning of science and the struggle to be successful in a male dominated discipline. The women participating in this study gained an awareness of how they learn science and how that can be used to make them even more successful in the classroom. The awareness of how women learn science will also be of great benefit to other teachers and educators as the work for science reform continues to make science a 'science for all'.

  15. 76 FR 33639 - Safety Zone; New York Water Taxi 10th Anniversary Fireworks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; New York Water Taxi 10th Anniversary... to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of New York Water Taxi. The fireworks will commence at 9 p.m. on... CFR Part 165 Harbors, Marine safety, Navigation (water), Reporting and recordkeeping...

  16. Research and Education: The Foundations for Rehabilitation Service Delivery--10th Annual National Rehabilitation Educators Conference April 6th-10th, 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Chih Chin

    2010-01-01

    The theme of the 10th annual National Rehabilitation Educators conference emphasized research and teaching ideals in the areas of clinical supervision, evidence-based practice in rehabilitation, rehabilitation counseling process, effective rehabilitation counseling training strategies, accreditation and licensure, rehabilitation ethics, and…

  17. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 10th, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Joseph Hill, Photographer August 10th, 1936 (Copied from small photo taken by survey members) OLD APARTMENT HOUSE - Jansonist Colony, Old Apartment House, Main Street, Bishop Hill, Henry County, IL

  18. 16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. NORTHEAST CORNER VIEW OF 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CORNER SHOWS THE DIAGONALLY FLUTED SPIRAL DESIGN OF THE RELIEF COLUMN. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  19. Benchmarking HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Donald J.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses benchmarking, the continuous process of measuring one's products, services, and practices against those recognized as leaders in that field to identify areas for improvement. Examines ways in which benchmarking can benefit human resources functions. (JOW)

  20. How Many Letters Should Preschoolers in Public Programs Know? The Diagnostic Efficiency of Various Preschool Letter-Naming Benchmarks for Predicting First-Grade Literacy Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Petscher, Yaacov; Justice, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Review of current federal and state standards indicates little consensus or empirical justification regarding appropriate goals, often referred to as benchmarks, for preschool letter-name learning. The present study investigated the diagnostic efficiency of various letter-naming benchmarks using a longitudinal database of 371 children who attended…

  1. Predictors of intent to pursue a college health science education among high achieving minority 10th graders

    PubMed Central

    Zebrak, Katarzyna A.; Le, Daisy; Boekeloo, Bradley O.; Wang, Min Qi

    2014-01-01

    Minority populations are underrepresented in fields of science, perhaps limiting scientific perspectives. Informed by recent studies using Social Cognitive Career Theory, this study examined whether three conceptual constructs: self-efficacy, perceived adult support, and perceptions of barriers, as well as several discrete and immutable variables, were associated with intent to pursue college science education in a sample (N = 134) of minority youth (70.1% female and 67.2% African American). A paper-and-pencil survey about pursuit of college science was administered to 10th graders with a B- or better grade point average from six high schools in an underserved community. Results indicated that the three conceptual constructs were bivariate correlates of intent to pursue college science education. Only perceived adult support and knowing whether a parent received college education were significant predictors in multivariate modeling. These results build on previous research and provide further insight into youth decision-making regarding pursuit of college science. PMID:25598654

  2. County Data Book, 2000: Kentucky Kids Count. 10th Annual Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Danielle; Hall, Douglas; Mellick, Donna; Miller, Debra; Town, Jackie

    This 10th annual Kids Count data book reports on trends in the well-being of Kentucky's children. The statistical portrait is based on indicators in the areas of well being, child risk factors, and demography. The indicators are as follows: (1) healthy births, including birth weights and prenatal care; (2) maternal risk characteristics, including…

  3. MedlinePlus en español marks its 10th anniversary

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/spanishanniversary.html MedlinePlus en español Marks its 10 th Anniversary To use the sharing features ... Spanish greatly expands NIH's ability to carry out its mission to communicate with the public.” MedlinePlus en ...

  4. Mental Retardation: Definition, Classification, and Systems of Supports. 10th Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckasson, Ruth; Borthwick-Duffy, Sharon; Buntinx, Wil H. E.; Coulter, David L.; Craig, Ellis M.; Reeve, Alya; Schalock, Robert L.; Snell, Martha E.; Spitalnik, Deborah M.; Spreat, Scott; Tasse, Marc J.

    This manual, the 10th edition of a regularly published definition and classification work on mental retardation, presents five key assumptions upon which the definition of mental retardation is based and a theoretical model of five essential dimensions that explain mental retardation and how to use the companion system. These dimensions include…

  5. Limitations of Community College Benchmarking and Benchmarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy H.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter distinguishes between benchmarks and benchmarking, describes a number of data and cultural limitations to benchmarking projects, and suggests that external demands for accountability are the dominant reason for growing interest in benchmarking among community colleges.

  6. 14. CLOSEUP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CLOSE-UP VIEW OF THE 10TH AND 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. WINDOWS HAVE WHITE TERRA COTTA SILLS, HEADS AND MULLIONS. ARCHES ARE OF TERRA COTTA INCLUDING ORNAMENTATION ABOVE THE 11TH FLOOR WINDOWS. CIRCULAR ORNAMENTATIONS BETWEEN ARCHES ARE TERRA COTTA PAINTED IN BRONZE COLOR. LOUVERS ON THE WINDOWS ARE NOT PART OF THE ORIGINAL DESIGN. THIS IS THE FRONT ELEVATION. - Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, 1519 Franklin Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  7. From the corner of N. 10th St. and W. O'Neill ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    From the corner of N. 10th St. and W. O'Neill Ave. Looking west. Housing # 157-162 are on the right, building 156 is straight ahead, and buildings 153, 152, 116, and 115 are to the left. The golf course is directly west of these buildings. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. The Relationship of Grade Span in 9th Grade to Math Achievement in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, John; Miller, Mary Lou; Myers, Jim; Norton, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose, Scope, and Method of Study: The purpose of this study was to determine if a correlation exists between grade span for ninth grade and gains in math achievement test scores in 10th grade and 12th grade. A quantitative, longitudinal, correlational research design was employed to investigate the research questions. The population was high…

  9. From the corner of E. Mccloskey Ave. and N. 10th ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    From the corner of E. Mccloskey Ave. and N. 10th St., looking west with building 135 (gas station) on the left. Beyond it is building 119 and to the right of 119 is the gable end of the north side of 120. Beyond and perpendicular to building 120 are 118 and 117. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Bounded by East Colfax to south, Peoria Street to west, Denver City/County & Adams County Line to north, & U.S. Route 255 to east, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. 'Global avionics in the future' report from the 10th annual battery conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oman, Henry

    1995-04-01

    In the 10th Annual Battery Conference on Applications and Advances, over 300 came to witness 13 technical sessions on subjects ranging from 'green' batteries to spacecraft batteries, and from batteries for notebook computers to batteries for supplying Alaskan villages with peak power. The utilities will use batteries for energy storage, resource conservation, power-quality involvement, and a substitute for spinning reserve. Those who have attended were electrical engineers who wanted to learn about batteries and electrochemist who wanted to learn how a battery is used and controlled.

  11. Final Report 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    2013-11-03

    The 10th Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics was held in LaJolla, California on May 26 to May 31, 2009. The Conference Proceedings are published by the American Institute of Physics in Volume 1182 of the AIP Conference Proceedings (ISBN: 978-0-7354-0723-7). The Proceedings include papers from each of the Conference Presenters and a detailed schedule of talks at the Conference. The Table of Contents of the Conference Proceedings is available at http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/proceeding/aipcp/1182. Support by the U.S. Department of Energy and by DOE Laboratories was essential to the success of the Conference.

  12. Characterisation of decorations on Iranian (10th-13th century) lustreware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgia, I.; Brunetti, B.; Giulivi, A.; Sgamellotti, A.; Shokouhi, F.; Oliaiy, P.; Rahighi, J.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Mellini, M.; Viti, C.

    It has been recently shown that lustre decoration of Medieval and Renaissance pottery consists of silver and copper nanoparticles, dispersed within the glassy matrix of the ceramic glaze. Lustre surfaces show peculiar optical effects, such as metallic reflection and iridescence. Here we report the findings of a study on lustred glazes of several shards belonging to Iranian pottery of the 10th and 13th centuries, decorated on both sides. Two different glazes, depending on the side of the sample, have been identified. Different lustre chromatic effects are characterised by the relative presence of silver- and copper-metal nanoparticles dispersed in the glassy matrix.

  13. EDITORIAL: The 10th International Symposium on Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII 2011) The 10th International Symposium on Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Woo

    2012-05-01

    Measurement and instrumentation have long played an important role in production engineering, through supporting both the traditional field of manufacturing and the new field of micro/nanotechnology. Papers published in this special feature were selected and updated from those presented at The 10th International Symposium on Measurement Technology and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII 2011) held at KAIST, Daejeon, South Korea, on 29 June-2 July 2011. ISMTII 2011 was organized by ICMI (The International Committee on Measurements and Instrumentation), Korean Society for Precision Engineering (KSPE), Japan Society for Precision Engineering (JSPE), Chinese Society for Measurement (CSM) and KAIST. The Symposium was also supported by the Korea BK21 Valufacture Institute of Mechanical Engineering at KAIST. A total of 225 papers, including four keynote papers, were presented at ISMTII 2011, covering a wide range of topics, including micro/nanometrology, precision measurement, online & in-process measurement, surface metrology, optical metrology & image processing, biomeasurement, sensor technology, intelligent measurement & instrumentation, uncertainty, traceability & calibration, and signal processing algorithms. The organizing members recommended publication of updated versions of some of the best ISMTII 2011 papers in this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology. As guest editor, I believe that this special feature presents the newest information on advances in measurement technology and intelligent instruments from basic research to applied systems for production engineering. I would like to thank all the authors for their great contributions to this special feature and the referees for their careful reviews of the papers. I would also like to express our thanks and appreciation to the publishing staff of MST for their dedicated efforts that have made this special feature possible.

  14. Under Construction: Benchmark Assessments and Common Core Math Implementation in Grades K-8. Formative Evaluation Cycle Report for the Math in Common Initiative, Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaherty, John, Jr.; Sobolew-Shubin, Alexandria; Heredia, Alberto; Chen-Gaddini, Min; Klarin, Becca; Finkelstein, Neal D.

    2014-01-01

    Math in Common® (MiC) is a five-year initiative that supports a formal network of 10 California school districts as they implement the Common Core State Standards in mathematics (CCSS-M) across grades K-8. As the MiC initiative moves into its second year, one of the central activities that each of the districts is undergoing to support CCSS…

  15. Successes with Reversing the Negative Student Attitudes Developed in Typical Biology Classes for 8th and 10th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacieminoglu, Esme; Ali, Mohamed Moustafa; Oztas, Fulya; Yager, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare changes in attitudes of students about their study of biology in the classes thought by five biology teachers who experienced an Iowa Chautauqua workshop with and two non-Chautauqua teachers who had no experience with any professional development program. The results indicated that there are significant…

  16. The Effectiveness of Teaching 10th-Grade Students STOP, AIMS, and DARE for Planning and Drafting Persuasive Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiuhara, Sharlene A.; O'Neill, Robert E.; Hawken, Leanne S.; Graham, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Explicitly and systematically teaching strategies for planning and drafting specific types of text has improved the writing of elementary and middle school students with disabilities in previous studies. In this investigation, we examined the effect of teaching a planning and drafting strategy for persuasive writing to high school students with…

  17. The Insertion of Local Wisdom into Instructional Materials of Bahasa Indonesia for 10th Grade Students in Senior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anggraini, Purwati; Kusniarti, Tuti

    2015-01-01

    This current study aimed at investigating Bahasa Indonesia textbooks with regards to local wisdom issues. The preliminary study was utilized as the basis for developing instructional materials of Bahasa Indonesia that are rich of characters. Bahasa Indonesia instructional materials containing local wisdoms not only equip students with broad…

  18. A Learning Progression for Deepening Students' Understandings of Modern Genetics across the 5th-10th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Ravit Golan; Rogat, Aaron D.; Yarden, Anat

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been a tremendous growth in our understanding of genetic phenomena and the intricate and complicated mechanisms that mediate genetic effects. Given the complexity of content in modern genetics and the inadequacy of current instructional methods and materials it seems that a more coherent and extensive…

  19. Exploring the Relationship between Virtual Learning Environment Preference, Use, and Learning Outcomes in 10th Grade Earth Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Ming-Chao; Tutwiler, M. Shane; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the use of a three-dimensional Virtual Reality Learning Environment for Field Trip (3DVLE[subscript (ft)]) system and the achievement levels of senior high school earth science students. The 3DVLE[subscript (ft)] system was presented in two separate formats: Teacher Demonstrated Based and Student…

  20. Implications of John Dewey's and Lev Vygotsky's Theoretical Frameworks for the Teaching and Learning of 10th Grade Geometric Proofs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavilis, Bob

    The life work of both John Dewey and Lev Vygotsky and the implications for pedagogy that each of the theorist's work has generated is well known in the field of education. However, it is seldom that the theorists' works are juxtaposed for pedagogical considerations for specific subject matter. This is for at least three reasons: first, Dewey, of…

  1. A Cross-Analysis of the Mathematics Teacher's Activity: An Example in a French 10th-Grade Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert, Aline; Rogalski, Janine

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the debate about how to tackle the issue of "the teacher in the teaching/learning process", and to propose a methodology for analysing the teacher's activity in the classroom, based on concepts used in the fields of the didactics of mathematics as well as in cognitive ergonomics. This methodology…

  2. The Impact of the Early College High School Model on Core 9th and 10th Grade Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Bernstein, Lawrence; Unlu, Fatih; Glennie, Elizabeth; Arshavsky, Nina

    2011-01-01

    To address concerns about low graduation rates and a lack of workforce readiness, states and districts have been experimenting with different models of high school reform. One of the most popular models has been the Early College High School (ECHS) model, small schools that blur the line between high school and college. Since 2002, over 200 ECHSs…

  3. Space Commerce 1994 Forum: The 10th National Space Symposium. Proceedings report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipskin, Beth Ann (Editor); Patterson, Sara (Editor); Aragon, Larry (Editor); Brescia, David A. (Editor); Flannery, Jack (Editor); Mossey, Roberty (Editor); Regan, Christopher (Editor); Steeby, Kurt (Editor); Suhr, Stacy (Editor); Zimkas, Chuck (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The theme of the 10th National Space Symposium was 'New Windows of Opportunity'. These proceedings cover the following: Business Trends in High Tech Commercialization; How to Succeed in Space Technology Business -- Making Dollars and Sense; Obstacles and Opportunities to Success in Technology Commercialization NASA's Commercial Technology Mission -- a New Way of Doing Business: Policy and Practices; Field Center Practices; Practices in Action -- A New Way: Implementation and Business Opportunities; Space Commerce Review; Windows of Opportunity; the International Space Station; Space Support Forum; Spacelift Update; Competitive Launch Capabilities; Supporting Life on Planet Earth; National Security Space Issues; NASA in the Balance; Earth and Space Observations -- Did We Have Cousins on Mars?; NASA: A New Vision for Science; and Space Technology Hall of Fame.

  4. 10th World IHEA and ECHE Joint Congress: health economics in the age of longevity.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Mihajlo B; Getzen, Thomas E; Torbica, Aleksandra; Anegawa, Tomofumi

    2014-12-01

    The 10th consecutive World Health Economics conference was organized jointly by International Health Economics Association and European Conference on Health Economics Association and took place at The Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland in July 2014. It has attracted broad participation from the global professional community devoted to health economics teaching,research and policy applications. It has provided a forum for lively discussion on hot contemporary issues such as health expenditure projections, reimbursement regulations,health technology assessment, universal insurance coverage, demand and supply of hospital services, prosperity diseases, population aging and many others. The high-profile debate fostered by this meeting is likely to inspire further methodological advances worldwide and spreading of evidence-based policy practice from OECD towards emerging markets. PMID:25301000

  5. Collaborating to Move Research Forward: Proceedings of the 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Ashish M.; Agarwal, Piyush; Bivalacqua, Trinity; Chisolm, Stephanie; Daneshmand, Sia; Doroshow, James H.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Galsky, Matthew; Iyer, Gopa; Kassouf, Wassim; Shah, Jay; Taylor, John; Williams, Stephen B.; Quale, Diane Zipursky; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.

    2016-01-01

    The 10th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank was hosted by the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network and brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, representatives and Industry to advance bladder cancer research efforts. Think Tank expert panels, group discussions, and networking opportunities helped generate ideas and strengthen collaborations between researchers and physicians across disciplines and between institutions. Interactive panel discussions addressed a variety of timely issues: 1) data sharing, privacy and social media; 2) improving patient navigation through therapy; 3) promising developments in immunotherapy; 4) and moving bladder cancer research from bench to bedside. Lastly, early career researchers presented their bladder cancer studies and had opportunities to network with leading experts. PMID:27376139

  6. Sequenced Benchmarks for K-8 Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, John S.; DeFrees, Keri L.; Richardson, Amy

    This document describes science benchmarks for grades K-8 in Earth and Space Science, Life Science, and Physical Science. Each subject area is divided into topics followed by a short content description and grade level information. Source documents for this paper included science content guides from California, Ohio, South Carolina, and South…

  7. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  8. FOREWORD: 10th Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhémery, Alain; Saffari, Nader

    2012-03-01

    The Anglo-French Physical Acoustics Conference (AFPAC) had its 10th annual meeting in Villa Clythia, Fréjus, France, from 19-21 January 2011. This series of meetings is a collaboration between the Physical Acoustics Group (PAG) of the Institute of Physics and the Groupe d'Acoustique Physique, Sous-marine et UltraSonore (GAPSUS) of the Société Française d'Acoustique. The conference has its loyal supporters whom we wish to thank. It is their loyalty that has made this conference a success. AFPAC alternates between the UK and France and its format has been designed to ensure that it remains a friendly meeting of very high scientific quality, offering a broad spectrum of subjects, welcoming young researchers and PhD students and giving them the opportunity to give their first presentations in an 'international' conference, but with limited pressure. For the third consecutive year AFPAC is followed by the publication of its proceedings in the form of 18 peer-reviewed papers, which cover the most recent research developments in the field of Physical Acoustics in the UK and France. Alain Lhémery CEA, France Nader Saffari UCL, United Kingdom

  9. Updating the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks. ACT Research Report Series 2013 (6)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are the ACT® College Readiness Assessment scores associated with a 50% chance of earning a B or higher grade in typical first-year credit-bearing college courses. The Benchmarks also correspond to an approximate 75% chance of earning a C or higher grade in these courses. There are four Benchmarks, corresponding…

  10. Report: Combustion Byproducts and Their Health Effects: Summary of the 10th International Congress

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Barry; D'Alessio, Antonio; D'Anna, Andrea; Ciajolo, Anna; Gullett, Brian; Henry, Heather; Keener, Mel; Lighty, JoAnn; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Lucas, Donald; Oberdörster, Günter; Pitea, Demetrio; Suk, William; Sarofim, Adel; Smith, Kirk R.; Stoeger, Tobias; Tolbert, Paige; Wyzga, Ron; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The 10th International Congress on Combustion Byproducts and their Health Effects was held in Ischia, Italy, from June 17–20, 2007. It is sponsored by the US NIEHS, NSF, Coalition for Responsible Waste Incineration (CRWI), and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The congress focused on: the origin, characterization, and health impacts of combustion-generated fine and ultrafine particles; emissions of mercury and dioxins, and the development/application of novel analytical/diagnostic tools. The consensus of the discussion was that particle-associated organics, metals, and persistent free radicals (PFRs) produced by combustion sources are the likely source of the observed health impacts of airborne PM rather than simple physical irritation of the particles. Ultrafine particle-induced oxidative stress is a likely progenitor of the observed health impacts, but important biological and chemical details and possible catalytic cycles remain unresolved. Other key conclusions were: (1) In urban settings, 70% of airborne fine particles are a result of combustion emissions and 50% are due to primary emissions from combustion sources, (2) In addition to soot, combustion produces one, possibly two, classes of nanoparticles with mean diameters of ~10 nm and ~1 nm. (3) The most common metrics used to describe particle toxicity, viz. surface area, sulfate concentration, total carbon, and organic carbon, cannot fully explain observed health impacts, (4) Metals contained in combustion-generated ultrafine and fine particles mediate formation of toxic air pollutants such as PCDD/F and PFRs. (5) The combination of metal-containing nanoparticles, organic carbon compounds, and PFRs can lead to a cycle generating oxidative stress in exposed organisms. PMID:22476005

  11. 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2011-03-01

    The 10th annual meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society covered numerous topics of educational and practical research interest. Biopolymers - the theme of the keynote address - were presented as essential components of medical devices, diagnostic tools, biosensors, human tissue engineering and pharmaceutical formulations for optimized drug delivery. Toxicology and SP investigators - the topic of the Distinguished Service Award Lecture - were encouraged to collaborate in the development of SP technologies and protocols applicable to toxicology studies. Pharmaceutical companies, originally organizations bearing all risks for developing their portfolios, are increasingly moving towards fully integrated networks which outsource core activities (including SP studies) to large contract research organizations. Future nonclinical data are now expected to be of such high quality and predictability power that they may obviate the need for certain expensive and time-consuming clinical investigations. In this context, SP is called upon to extend its risk assessment purview to areas which currently are not systematically covered, such as drug-induced QRS interval prolongation, negative emotions and feelings (e.g., depression), and minor chronic cardiovascular and metabolic changes (e.g., as produced by drugs for type 2 diabetes) which can be responsible for delayed morbidity and mortality. The recently approved ICH S9 guidance relaxes the traditional regulatory SP package in order to accelerate the clinical access to anticancer drugs for patients with advanced malignancies. The novel FDA 'Animal Rule' guidance proposes that for clinical candidates with well-understood toxicities, marketing approval may be granted exclusively on efficacy data generated in animal studies as human clinical investigations for these types of drugs are either unfeasible or unethical. In conclusion, the core messages of this meeting are that SP should consistently operate according to the 'fit

  12. Eruption Mechanism of the 10th Century Eruption in Baitoushan Volcano, China/North Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimano, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Ban, M.; Maeno, F.; Nishimoto, J.; Jien, X.; Taniguchi, H.

    2005-12-01

    Baitoushan volcano, China/North Korea, is one of the most active volcanoes in Northeastern Asia, and the 10th century eruption was the most voluminous eruption in the world in recent 2000 years. The sequence of the eruption reconstructed recently consists mainly of 6 units of deposits (Miyamoto et al., 2004); plinian airfall (unit B), large pyroclastic flow (unit C), plinian airfall with some intra- plinian pyroclastic flows (unit D), sub-plinian airfall (unit E), and large pyroclastic flow (unit F) with base surge (unit G) in ascending order. The magma erupted during steady eruption in earlier phase was comendite (unit B-C; Phase 1), whereas the magma during fluctuating eruptions in later phase is characterized by trachyte to trachyandesite with various amount of comendite (unit D-G; Phase 2). The wide variety in composition and occurrence of banded pumices strongly indicate mixing or mingling of the two magmas just prior to or during the eruption. The initial water contents had been determined for comendite by melt inclusion analyses (ca. 5.2 wt.%; Horn and Schmincke, 2000). Although the initial water content of the trachytic magma has not been correctly determined yet, the reported water contents of trachytic melt inclusions are lower (3-4 wt.%) than those of comenditic melt (Horn and Schmincke, 2000). We investigated juvenile materials of the eruption sequentially in terms of vesicularity, H2O content in matrix glass and textural characteristics. The vesicularity of pumices are generally high (>0.75) for all units. The residual water contents of the comenditic pumices during Phase 1 are relatively uniform (1.6 wt.%), whereas those of the trachytic scoria during Phase 2 and gray pumices during Phase 1 are low (ca. 0.7-1.3 wt.%). These facts may indicate that the difference in the initial water content, rather than the ascent mechanism of magma, controls the steadiness or fluctuation in eruption styles and the mass flux during the eruption.

  13. Benchmarking in Student Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosier, Robert E.; Schwarzmueller, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of benchmarking in student affairs, focusing on issues related to student housing. Provides examples of how benchmarking has influenced administrative practice at many institutions. (EV)

  14. 10th Annual Comparative Analysis of the Racine Unified School District: Demographics, Attendance, Finances, Student Engagement, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Jeffrey C.; Dickman, Anneliese; Schmidt, Jeffrey K.

    2007-01-01

    This is the 10th annual report on conditions affecting the Racine Unified School District RUSD). Analysis continues to focus on the long-term historical trends in RUSD, comparing RUSD to nine peer school districts and the State of Wisconsin. RUSD peer districts are Wisconsin's largest (Milwaukee Public Schools are not included) and their…

  15. Proceedings of the International Conference on Mobile Learning 2014. (10th, Madrid, Spain, February 28-March 2, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 10th International Conference on Mobile Learning 2014, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Madrid, Spain, February 28-March 2, 2014. The Mobile Learning 2014 International Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and…

  16. Graduate Students Lend Their Voices: Reflections on the 10th Seminar in Health and Environmental Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Joshua; White, Peta; Fook, Tanya Chung Tiam; Kayira, Jean; Muller, Susanne; Oakley, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Graduate students were invited by their faculty advisors to attend the 10th Seminar in Health and Environmental Education Research. Afterward, they were encouraged to comment on their experiences, involvement, and positioning. Two main authors developed survey questions and retrieved, analyzed, and synthesized the responses of four other graduate…

  17. Risk Communication and Public Education in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada on the 10th Anniversary of the "Black Friday" Tornado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard-Boehm, R. Denise; Cook, M. Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    In July 1997, on the 10th anniversary of the great "Black Friday" Tornado, city officials of Edmonton, the print and broadcast media, agencies dealing in emergency management, and the national weather organisation recounted stories of the 1987, F5 tornado that struck Edmonton on a holiday weekend. The information campaign also presented…

  18. Selected Papers from the International Conference on College Teaching and Learning (10th, Jacksonville, Florida, April 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Jack A., Ed.

    These 20 papers were selected from those presented at the 10th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning. Papers have the following titles and authors: (1) "Case It! A Project to Integrate Collaborative Case-Based Learning into International Undergraduate Biology Curricula" (Bergland, Klyczek, Lundeberg, Mogen, Johnson); (2) "The…

  19. Students' Transition Experience in the 10th Year of Schooling: Perceptions That Contribute to Improving the Quality of Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Ana Cristina; Mouraz, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The study followed students in their 10th year of schooling that entered a new secondary education school in order to examine their perceptions of their previous schools' work and of its relationship with the difficulties they experience when in the transition. The analysis of 155 completed questionnaires of previous students of nine basic…

  20. Benchmarking and Performance Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Town, J. Stephen

    This paper defines benchmarking and its relationship to quality management, describes a project which applied the technique in a library context, and explores the relationship between performance measurement and benchmarking. Numerous benchmarking methods contain similar elements: deciding what to benchmark; identifying partners; gathering…

  1. Molecular target-based treatment of human cancer: summary of the 10th international conference on differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zelent, Arthur; Petrie, Kevin; Chen, Zhu; Lotan, Reuben; Lübbert, Michael; Tallman, Martin S; Ohno, Ryuzo; Degos, Laurent; Waxman, Samuel

    2005-02-15

    The 10th International Conference on Differentiation Therapy was held between April 29 and May 3, 2004, in Shanghai, China. In the tradition of previous conferences from this series, which have been held biannually since the first meeting organized 20 years ago by Samuel Waxman and Giovanni Rossi in Sardinia, the organizers of the 10th International Conference on Differentiation Therapy aimed to gather basic and clinical cancer investigators in a setting of plenary sessions, workshops, and poster presentations to maximize the effective exchange of information and foster the establishment of collaborative interactions. Approximately 300 scientists attended the meeting with a mission to discuss targeted approaches to cancer treatment, which stem from our understanding of basic biological processes and the mechanisms of their deregulation during tumorigenesis. PMID:15734991

  2. The NAS parallel benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David (Editor); Barton, John (Editor); Lasinski, Thomas (Editor); Simon, Horst (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A new set of benchmarks was developed for the performance evaluation of highly parallel supercomputers. These benchmarks consist of a set of kernels, the 'Parallel Kernels,' and a simulated application benchmark. Together they mimic the computation and data movement characteristics of large scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. The principal distinguishing feature of these benchmarks is their 'pencil and paper' specification - all details of these benchmarks are specified only algorithmically. In this way many of the difficulties associated with conventional benchmarking approaches on highly parallel systems are avoided.

  3. Evaluating the Ability of Drama-Based Instruction To Influence the Socialization of Tenth Grade English Students Labeled as "Low Ability."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Trygve R.

    A study investigated the effect of drama-based instruction on the learning of social skills by student labeled as "low ability" in a 10th-grade required English class in a rural high school. Two separate classes of "low ability" 10th-grade English students in Janesville, Wisconsin, were presented with social skills training utilizing role playing,…

  4. Benchmarking for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Norman, Ed.; Lund, Helen, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection explore the concept of benchmarking as it is being used and developed in higher education (HE). Case studies and reviews show how universities in the United Kingdom are using benchmarking to aid in self-regulation and self-improvement. The chapters are: (1) "Introduction to Benchmarking" (Norman Jackson and Helen…

  5. Is the 10th and 11th Intercostal Space a Safe Approach for Percutaneous Nephrostomy and Nephrolithotomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Muzrakchi, Ahmed Al; Szmigielski, W. Omar, Ahmed J.S.; Younes, Nagy M.

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the rate of complications in percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) and nephrolithotomy (PCNL) performed through the 11th and 10th intercostal spaces using our monitoring technique and to discuss the safety of the procedure. Out of 398 PCNs and PCNLs carried out during a 3-year period, 56 patients had 57 such procedures performed using an intercostal approach. The 11th intercostal route was used in 42 and the 10th in 15 cases. One patient had two separate nephrostomies performed through the 10th and 11th intercostal spaces. The technique utilizes bi-planar fluoroscopy with a combination of a conventional angiographic machine to provide anterior-posterior fluoroscopy and a C-arm mobile fluoroscopy machine to give a lateral view, displayed on two separate monitors. None of the patients had clinically significant thoracic or abdominal complications. Two patients had minor chest complications. Only one developed changes (plate atelectasis, elevation of the hemi-diaphragm) directly related to the nephrostomy (2%). The second patient had bilateral plate atelectasis and unilateral congestive lung changes after PCNL. These changes were not necessarily related to the procedure but rather to general anesthesia during nephrolithotomy. The authors consider PCN or PCNL through the intercostal approach a safe procedure with a negligible complication rate, provided that it is performed under bi-planar fluoroscopy, which allows determination of the skin entry point just below the level of pleural reflection and provides three-dimensional monitoring of advancement of the puncturing needle toward the target entry point.

  6. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics (1/10th scale model test results). Volume 1: Technical discussion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. L.; Tegart, J. R.; Demchak, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Space shuttle propellant dynamics during ET/Orbiter separation in the RTLS (return to launch site) mission abort sequence were investigated in a test program conducted in the NASA KC-135 "Zero G" aircraft using a 1/10th-scale model of the ET LOX Tank. Low-g parabolas were flown from which thirty tests were selected for evaluation. Data on the nature of low-g propellant reorientation in the ET LOX tank, and measurements of the forces exerted on the tank by the moving propellent will provide a basis for correlation with an analytical model of the slosh phenomenon.

  7. Evaluation of the 10th External Quality Assessment Scheme results in clinical microbiology laboratories in Tehran and districts.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, M; Rahbar, M; Hekmat Yazdi, S; Rashed Marandi, F; Sabourian, R; Saremi, M

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of microbiology laboratories in the 10th run of the external quality assessment scheme (EQAS) in Tehran and districts. Each laboratory was sent 2 species of bacteria for identification. Of the 487 laboratories that participated, 437 returned their findings. While 77.0% and 69.9% correctly identified Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Citrobacter freundii respectively, only 29.8% correctly identified Acinetobacter baumanii, 25.3% identified Enterococcus faecalis and 35.6% identified Enterobacter agglomerans. However 78.7% and 79.5% of the laboratories reported correct -results for susceptibility testing for S. saprophyticus and C. freundii respectively. PMID:17037699

  8. Research Reactor Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Ravnik, Matjaz; Jeraj, Robert

    2003-09-15

    A criticality benchmark experiment performed at the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II research reactor is described. This experiment and its evaluation are given as examples of benchmark experiments at research reactors. For this reason the differences and possible problems compared to other benchmark experiments are particularly emphasized. General guidelines for performing criticality benchmarks in research reactors are given. The criticality benchmark experiment was performed in a normal operating reactor core using commercially available fresh 20% enriched fuel elements containing 12 wt% uranium in uranium-zirconium hydride fuel material. Experimental conditions to minimize experimental errors and to enhance computer modeling accuracy are described. Uncertainties in multiplication factor due to fuel composition and geometry data are analyzed by sensitivity analysis. The simplifications in the benchmark model compared to the actual geometry are evaluated. Sample benchmark calculations with the MCNP and KENO Monte Carlo codes are given.

  9. The Nature and Predictive Validity of a Benchmark Assessment Program in an American Indian School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Beverly J. R.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored the nature of a benchmark assessment program and how well the benchmark assessments predicted End-of-Grade (EOG) and End-of-Course (EOC) test scores in an American Indian school district. Five major themes were identified and used to develop a Dimensions of Benchmark Assessment Program Effectiveness model:…

  10. Fortified Settlements of the 9th and 10th Centuries ad in Central Europe: Structure, Function and Symbolism

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Hajnalka

    2012-01-01

    THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION(S) and symbolism of early medieval (9th–10th centuries ad) fortified settlements from central Europe, in particular today’s Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic and Slovakia, are examined in this paper. It offers an overview of the current state of research together with new insights based on analysis of the site of Gars-Thunau in Lower Austria. Special emphasis is given to the position of the fortified sites in the landscape, to the elements of the built environment and their spatial organisation, as well as to graves within the fortified area. The region under study was situated on the SE border of the Carolingian (and later the Ottonian) Empire, with some of the discussed sites lying in the territory of the ‘Great Moravian Empire’ in the 9th and 10th centuries. These sites can therefore provide important comparative data for researchers working in other parts of the Carolingian Empire and neighbouring regions. PMID:23564981

  11. Contributions from the 10th International Conference on Gas in Marine Sediments, Listvyanka (Russia), 6-11 September 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Batist, Marc; Khlystov, Oleg

    2012-12-01

    The 10th International Conference on Gas in Marine Sediments (GIMS10) took place from 6 to 11 September 2010 in Listvyanka (Russia), on the shores of Lake Baikal. The conference was organized as a double jubilee, celebrating both the fact that it was the 10th event in this series and the 20th anniversary of the series. A total of 72 oral and 47 poster presentations were given in eight thematic sessions and the presentations were discussed by 126 participants from academic, governmental and commercial institutions from 19 countries, consisting of geologists, biologists, microbiologists, geophysicists, geochemists, oceanographers and limnologists. Volume 32(5/6) of Geo-Marine Letters is a double issue containing 16 selected papers from GIMS10, and has been guest edited by M. De Batist and O. Khlystov. The papers reflect the broad-spectrum disciplines represented at the conference and cover a wide range of aspects of gas in marine sediments from many parts of the world, but with a special emphasis on the gas seeps, gas hydrates and mud volcanoes of Lake Baikal.

  12. Examining students' views on the nature of science: Results from Korean 6th, 8th, and 10th graders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sukjin; Scharmann, Lawrence C.; Noh, Taehee

    2005-03-01

    In this study, students' views on the nature of science (NOS) were investigated with the use of a large-scale survey. An empirically derived multiple-choice format questionnaire was administered to 1702 Korean 6th, 8th, and 10th graders. The questionnaire consisted of five items that respectively examined students' views on five constructs concerning the NOS: purpose of science, definition of scientific theory, nature of models, tentativeness of scientific theory, and origin of scientific theory. Students were also asked to respond to an accompanying open-ended section for each item in order to collect information about the rationale(s) for their choices. The results indicated that the majority of Korean students possessed an absolutist/empiricist perspective about the NOS. It was also found that, on the whole, there were no clear differences in the distributions of 6th, 8th, and 10th graders' views on the NOS. In some questions, distinct differences between Korean students and those of Western countries were found. Educational implications are discussed.

  13. Predicting Long-Term College Success through Degree Completion Using ACT[R] Composite Score, ACT Benchmarks, and High School Grade Point Average. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (5)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radunzel, Justine; Noble, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of ACT[R] Composite score and high school grade point average (HSGPA) for predicting long-term college success. Outcomes included annual progress towards a degree (based on cumulative credit-bearing hours earned), degree completion, and cumulative grade point average (GPA) at 150% of normal time to degree…

  14. Report on the 10th European Fusion Physics Workshop (Vaals, The Netherlands, 9-11 December 2002)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.; Borba, D.; Bucalossi, J.; Moreau, D.; Sauter, O.; Stober, J.; Vayakis, G.

    2003-06-01

    The 10th European Fusion Physics Workshop took place in December 2002 at Vaals in The Netherlands, hosted by the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC: Associations EURATOM-ERM/KMS, FZJ and FOM), and sponsored by the European Commission and the Foundation SOFT. Within an overall theme of `Operational limits in toroidal devices, with particular reference to steady-state operation', four topics of importance to the future development of magnetically confined fusion were discussed in detail. In addition, a review of the JET scientific and technical programme under EFDA and an assessment of ITER's measurement requirements and diagnostic development programme were presented. The main issues discussed and the areas identified as requiring further study are summarized here.

  15. The Interpretations and Applications of Boethius's Introduction to the Arithmetic II,1 at the End of the 10th Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otisk, Marek

    This paper deals with comments and glosses to the first chapter of the second book of Boethius's Introduction to Arithmetic from the last quarter of the 10th century. Those texts were written by Gerbert of Aurillac (Scholium ad Boethii Arithmeticam Institutionem l. II, c. 1), Abbo of Fleury (commentary on the Calculus by Victorius of Aquitaine, the so-called De numero, mensura et pondere), Notker of Liège (De superparticularibus) and by the anonymous author (De arithmetica Boetii). The main aim of this paper is to show that Boethius's statements about the converting numerical sequences to equality from this work could be interpreted minimally in two different ways. This paper discussed also the application of this topic in other liberal arts (like astronomy, music, grammar etc.) and in playing game called rithmomachia, the medieval philosophers' game.

  16. Optical and microphysical properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol observed over Warsaw on 10th July 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicka, Lucja; Stachlewska, Iwona; Veselovskii, Igor; Baars, Holger

    2016-04-01

    Biomass burning aerosol originating from Canadian forest fires was widely observed over Europe in July 2013. Favorable weather conditions caused long-term westward flow of smoke from Canada to Western and Central Europe. During this period, PollyXT lidar of the University of Warsaw took wavelength dependent measurements in Warsaw. On July 10th short event of simultaneous advection of Canadian smoke and Saharan dust was observed at different altitudes over Warsaw. Different origination of both air masses was indicated by backward trajectories from HYSPLIT model. Lidar measurements performed with various wavelength (1064, 532, 355 nm), using also Raman and depolarization channels for VIS and UV allowed for distinguishing physical differences of this two types of aerosols. Optical properties acted as input for retrieval of microphysical properties. Comparisons of microphysical and optical properties of biomass burning aerosols and mineral dust observed will be presented.

  17. Making Benchmark Testing Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Joan L.; Baker, Eva L.

    2005-01-01

    Many schools are moving to develop benchmark tests to monitor their students' progress toward state standards throughout the academic year. Benchmark tests can provide the ongoing information that schools need to guide instructional programs and to address student learning problems. The authors discuss six criteria that educators can use to…

  18. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  19. Verification and validation benchmarks.

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2007-02-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of computational simulations. V&V methods and procedures have fundamentally improved the credibility of simulations in several high-consequence fields, such as nuclear reactor safety, underground nuclear waste storage, and nuclear weapon safety. Although the terminology is not uniform across engineering disciplines, code verification deals with assessing the reliability of the software coding, and solution verification deals with assessing the numerical accuracy of the solution to a computational model. Validation addresses the physics modeling accuracy of a computational simulation by comparing the computational results with experimental data. Code verification benchmarks and validation benchmarks have been constructed for a number of years in every field of computational simulation. However, no comprehensive guidelines have been proposed for the construction and use of V&V benchmarks. For example, the field of nuclear reactor safety has not focused on code verification benchmarks, but it has placed great emphasis on developing validation benchmarks. Many of these validation benchmarks are closely related to the operations of actual reactors at near-safety-critical conditions, as opposed to being more fundamental-physics benchmarks. This paper presents recommendations for the effective design and use of code verification benchmarks based on manufactured solutions, classical analytical solutions, and highly accurate numerical solutions. In addition, this paper presents recommendations for the design and use of validation benchmarks, highlighting the careful design of building-block experiments, the estimation of experimental measurement uncertainty for both inputs and outputs to the code, validation metrics, and the role of model calibration in validation. It is argued that the understanding of predictive capability of a computational model is built on the level of

  20. A performance geodynamo benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Heien, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    In the last ten years, a number of numerical dynamo models have successfully represented basic characteristics of the geomagnetic field. However, to approach the parameters regime of the Earth's outer core, we need massively parallel computational environment for extremely large spatial resolutions. Local methods are expected to be more suitable for massively parallel computation because the local methods needs less data communication than the spherical harmonics expansion, but only a few groups have reported results of the dynamo benchmark using local methods (Harder and Hansen, 2005; Matsui and Okuda, 2005; Chan et al., 2007) because of the difficulty treating magnetic boundary conditions based on the local methods. On the other hand, some numerical dynamo models using spherical harmonics expansion has performed successfully with thousands of processes. We perform benchmark tests to asses various numerical methods to asses the next generation of geodynamo simulations. The purpose of the present benchmark test is to assess numerical geodynamo models on a massively parallel computational platform. To compare among many numerical methods as possible, we consider the model with the insulated magnetic boundary by Christensen et al. (2001) and with the pseudo vacuum magnetic boundary, because the pseudo vacuum boundaries are implemented easier by using the local method than the magnetic insulated boundaries. In the present study, we consider two kinds of benchmarks, so-called accuracy benchmark and performance benchmark. In the present study, we will report the results of the performance benchmark. We perform the participated dynamo models under the same computational environment (XSEDE TACC Stampede), and investigate computational performance. To simplify the problem, we choose the same model and parameter regime as the accuracy benchmark test, but perform the simulations with much finer spatial resolutions as possible to investigate computational capability (e

  1. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red-tailed hawk

  2. Benchmarking expert system tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary

    1988-01-01

    As part of its evaluation of new technologies, the Artificial Intelligence Section of the Mission Planning and Analysis Div. at NASA-Johnson has made timing tests of several expert system building tools. Among the production systems tested were Automated Reasoning Tool, several versions of OPS5, and CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System), an expert system builder developed by the AI section. Also included in the test were a Zetalisp version of the benchmark along with four versions of the benchmark written in Knowledge Engineering Environment, an object oriented, frame based expert system tool. The benchmarks used for testing are studied.

  3. Effects of Lecture, Teacher Demonstrations, Discussion and Practical Work on 10th Graders' Attitudes to Chemistry and Understanding of Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jerome; Soyibo, Kola

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated: (a) whether the use of the combination of lecture, teacher demonstrations, class discussion and student practical work in small groups significantly improved the experimental subjects' attitudes to chemistry and understanding of electrolysis more than their control group counterparts who were not exposed to practical work; and (b) whether there were statistically significant differences in their performance on electrolysis linked to their treatment, gender and post-test attitudes to chemistry. The sample was comprised of 138 Jamaican 10th graders in two high schools in St Catherine. The Attitudes to Chemistry Questionnaire and an Understanding of Electrolysis Test (UET) were used for data collection. The results showed that the experimental subjects' post-test attitudes to chemistry were statistically significantly better than those of their control group counterparts; the experimental groups' post-test mean scores on the multiple and structured items on the UET were statistically significantly better than those of the control groups; there was a positive, statistically significant but weak relationship between the experimental subjects' treatment and performance on the multiple and structured items, while the relationship between the control subjects' treatment and performance on both items was not significant.

  4. XAFS study of copper and silver nanoparticles in glazes of medieval middle-east lustreware (10th-13th century)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, S.; Puzzovio, D.; Sada, C.; Mazzoldi, P.; Borgia, I.; Sgamellotti, A.; Brunetti, B. G.; Cartechini, L.; D'Acapito, F.; Maurizio, C.; Shokoui, F.; Oliaiy, P.; Rahighi, J.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.; Pantos, E.

    2006-06-01

    It has recently been shown that lustre decoration of medieval and Renaissance pottery consists of silver and copper nanoparticles dispersed in the glassy matrix of the ceramic glaze. Here the findings of an X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) study on lustred glazes of shards belonging to 10th and 13rd century pottery from the National Museum of Iran are reported. Absorption spectra in the visible range have been also measured in order to investigate the relations between colour and glaze composition. Gold colour is mainly due to Ag nanoparticles, though Ag+, Cu+ and Cu2+ ions can be also dispersed within the glassy matrix, with different ratios. Red colour is mainly due to Cu nanoparticles, although some Ag nanoparticles, Ag+ and Cu+ ions can be present. The achievement of metallic Cu and the absence of Cu2+ indicate a higher reduction of copper in red lustre. These findings are in substantial agreement with previous results on Italian Renaissance pottery. In spite of the large heterogeneity of cases, the presence of copper and silver ions in the glaze confirms that lustre formation is mediated by a copper- and silver-alkali ion exchange, followed by nucleation and growth of metal nanoparticles.

  5. [Thoracopagus symmetricus. On the separation of Siamese twins in the 10th century A. D. by Byzantine physicians].

    PubMed

    Geroulanos, S; Jaggi, F; Wydler, J; Lachat, M; Cakmakci, M

    1993-01-01

    The byzantine author, Leon Diakonos, mentions in 974/975 A.D. a pair of "siamese twins", e.g., a thoracopagus symmetricus. He had seen them personally several times in Asia Minor when they were about 30 years old. This pair is possibly the same that was "successfully" surgically separated after the death of one of the twins in the second half of the 10th century in Constantinople. This operation is mentioned by two historiographs, Leon Grammatikos and Theodoros Daphnopates. Although the second twin survived the operation, he died three days later. In spite of its lethal outcome, the operation left a long-lasting impression on the historians of that time and was even mentioned 150 years later by Johannes Skylitzes. Furthermore, the manuscript of Skylitzes, now in the library of Madrid, contains a miniature illuminating this operation. This is likely to be the earliest written report of a separation of siamese twins illustrating the high standard of byzantine medicine of that time. PMID:8307391

  6. BENCHMARKING SUSTAINABILITY ENGINEERING EDUCATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of this project are to develop and apply a methodology for benchmarking curricula in sustainability engineering and to identify individuals active in sustainability engineering education.

  7. Diagnostic Algorithm Benchmarking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poll, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A poster for the NASA Aviation Safety Program Annual Technical Meeting. It describes empirical benchmarking on diagnostic algorithms using data from the ADAPT Electrical Power System testbed and a diagnostic software framework.

  8. TWODANT benchmark. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung

    1994-01-11

    TWODANT (Two-Dimensional, Diffusion-Accelerated, Neutral-Particle Transport) code has been benchmarked against 6 critical experiments (Jezebel plutonium critical assembly) and their k effective values compared with those of KENO and MCNP codes.

  9. A Comparison Study of AVID and GEAR UP 10th-Grade Students in Two High Schools in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Karen M.; Huerta, Jeffery; Lozano, Aliber

    2007-01-01

    This study examines 4 groups of high school students enrolled in 2 college preparatory programs, AVID and GEAR UP. Differences in student educational aspirations, expectations and anticipations, knowledge of college entrance requirements, knowledge of financial aid, and academic achievement in mathematics were examined. Adelman's (1999)…

  10. The Enlightenment Music Contract. 10th Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Freda

    The "philosophes" of the Enlightenment Period were a group of free (different) thinkers who offered commentary on societal issues. Often, they were like one of today's social commentators suggesting reforms for the political system. Since the United States during the era of the Revolutionary War was seeking reform of what they considered English…

  11. The Effects of Game-Based Learning and Anticipation of a Test on the Learning Outcomes of 10th Grade Geology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chia-Li Debra; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines whether a Role Play Game (RPG) with embedded geological contents and students' anticipation of an upcoming posttest significantly affect high school students' achievements of and attitudes toward geology. The participants of the study were comprised of 202 high school students, 103 males and 99 females. The students were…

  12. Differential Effects on Student Demographic Groups of Using ACT® College Readiness Assessment Composite Score, Act Benchmarks, and High School Grade Point Average for Predicting Long-Term College Success through Degree Completion. ACT Research Report Series, 2013 (5)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radunzel, Justine; Noble, Julie

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the differential effects on racial/ethnic, family income, and gender groups of using ACT® College Readiness Assessment Composite score and high school grade point average (HSGPA) for predicting long-term college success. Outcomes included annual progress towards a degree (based on cumulative credit-bearing hours…

  13. The KMAT: Benchmarking Knowledge Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jager, Martha

    Provides an overview of knowledge management and benchmarking, including the benefits and methods of benchmarking (e.g., competitive, cooperative, collaborative, and internal benchmarking). Arthur Andersen's KMAT (Knowledge Management Assessment Tool) is described. The KMAT is a collaborative benchmarking tool, designed to help organizations make…

  14. What Do 2nd and 10th Graders Have in Common? Worms and Technology: Using Technology to Collaborate across Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culver, Patti; Culbert, Angie; McEntyre, Judy; Clifton, Patrick; Herring, Donna F.; Notar, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    The article is about the collaboration between two classrooms that enabled a second grade class to participate in a high school biology class. Through the use of modern video conferencing equipment, Mrs. Culbert, with the help of the Dalton State College Educational Technology Training Center (ETTC), set up a live, two way video and audio feed of…

  15. PNNL Information Technology Benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    DD Hostetler

    1999-09-08

    Benchmarking is a methodology for searching out industry best practices that lead to superior performance. It is exchanging information, not just with any organization, but with organizations known to be the best within PNNL, in industry, or in dissimilar industries with equivalent functions. It is used as a continuous improvement tool for business and technical processes, products, and services. Information technology--comprising all computer and electronic communication products and services--underpins the development and/or delivery of many PNNL products and services. This document describes the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) approach to information technology (IT) benchmarking. The purpose is to engage other organizations in the collaborative process of benchmarking in order to improve the value of IT services provided to customers. TM document's intended audience consists of other US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and their IT staff. Although the individual participants must define the scope of collaborative benchmarking, an outline of IT service areas for possible benchmarking is described.

  16. The FTIO Benchmark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagerstrom, Frederick C.; Kuszmaul, Christopher L.; Woo, Alex C. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a new benchmark for measuring the performance of parallel input/ouput. This benchmark has flexible initialization. size. and scaling properties that allows it to satisfy seven criteria for practical parallel I/O benchmarks. We obtained performance results while running on the a SGI Origin2OOO computer with various numbers of processors: with 4 processors. the performance was 68.9 Mflop/s with 0.52 of the time spent on I/O, with 8 processors the performance was 139.3 Mflop/s with 0.50 of the time spent on I/O, with 16 processors the performance was 173.6 Mflop/s with 0.43 of the time spent on I/O. and with 32 processors the performance was 259.1 Mflop/s with 0.47 of the time spent on I/O.

  17. Benchmarking. It's the future.

    PubMed

    Fazzi, Robert A; Agoglia, Robert V; Harlow, Lynn

    2002-11-01

    You can't go to a state conference, read a home care publication or log on to an Internet listserv ... without hearing or reading someone ... talk about benchmarking. What are your average case mix weights? How many visits are your nurses averaging per day? What is your average caseload for full time nurses in the field? What is your profit or loss per episode? The benchmark systems now available in home care potentially can serve as an early warning and partial protection for agencies. Agencies can collect data, analyze the outcomes, and through comparative benchmarking, determine where they are competitive and where they need to improve. These systems clearly provide agencies with the opportunity to be more proactive. PMID:12436898

  18. Accelerated randomized benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granade, Christopher; Ferrie, Christopher; Cory, D. G.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing offers promising advances for a wide range of fields and applications, provided that we can efficiently assess the performance of the control applied in candidate systems. That is, we must be able to determine whether we have implemented a desired gate, and refine accordingly. Randomized benchmarking reduces the difficulty of this task by exploiting symmetries in quantum operations. Here, we bound the resources required for benchmarking and show that, with prior information, we can achieve several orders of magnitude better accuracy than in traditional approaches to benchmarking. Moreover, by building on state-of-the-art classical algorithms, we reach these accuracies with near-optimal resources. Our approach requires an order of magnitude less data to achieve the same accuracies and to provide online estimates of the errors in the reported fidelities. We also show that our approach is useful for physical devices by comparing to simulations.

  19. Advances in Classification Research. Volume 10. Proceedings of the ASIS SIG/CR Classification Research Workshop (10th, Washington, DC, November 1-5, 1999). ASIST Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrechtsen, Hanne, Ed.; Mai, Jens-Erik, Ed.

    This volume is a compilation of the papers presented at the 10th ASIS (American Society for Information Science) workshop on classification research. Major themes include the social and cultural informatics of classification and coding systems, subject access and indexing theory, genre analysis and the agency of documents in the ordering of…

  20. Carpenter, Tractors and Microbes for the Development of Logical-Mathematical Thinking--The Way 10th Graders and Pre-Service Teachers Solve Thinking Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazit, Avikam

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this case study was to investigate the ability of 10th graders and pre-service teachers to solve logical-mathematical thinking challenges. The challenges do not require mathematical knowledge beyond that of primary school but rather an informed use of the problem representation. The percentage of correct answers given by the 10th…

  1. Creating Cultures of Peace: Pedagogical Thought and Practice. Selected Papers from the 10th Triennial World Conference (September 10-15, 2001, Madrid, Spain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Jean E., Ed.; Swami, Piyush, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    The 10th Triennial World Conference of the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI) was held September 10-15, 2001 in Madrid, Spain. The theme of the conference was "Cultures of Peace." Thirty-four papers and presentations are divided into nine sections. Part I, Tributes to the Founders of WCCI, includes: (1) Tribute to Alice Miel…

  2. 21st Century Curriculum: Does Auto-Grading Writing Actually Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The West Virginia Department of Education's auto grading initiative dates back to 2004--a time when school districts were making their first forays into automation. The Charleston based WVDE had instituted a statewide writing assessment in 1984 for students in fourth, seventh, and 10th grades and was looking to expand that program without…

  3. First Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for first grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, first grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  4. Third Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for third grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, third grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  5. Second Grade Level Science Sample Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    This document presents a sample of the Arkansas science curriculum and identifies the content standards for physical science systems, life science systems, and Earth science/space science systems for second grade students. Each content standard is explained and includes student learning expectations, second grade benchmarks, assessments, and…

  6. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subhash, Saini; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a pencil and paper fashion i.e. the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: Cray C90, Cray T'90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: Cray T3D, IBM SP2 and IBM SP-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); (c) Symmetric Multiprocessing Processors: Convex Exemplar SPP1000, Cray J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL. We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention NAS future plans of NPB.

  7. Benchmarks: WICHE Region 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Benchmarks: WICHE Region 2012 presents information on the West's progress in improving access to, success in, and financing of higher education. The information is updated annually to monitor change over time and encourage its use as a tool for informed discussion in policy and education communities. To establish a general context for the…

  8. Python/Lua Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, L.

    2014-08-01

    This is an adaptation of the pre-existing Scimark benchmark code to a variety of Python and Lua implementations. It also measures performance of the Fparser expression parser and C and C++ code on a variety of simple scientific expressions.

  9. Changes in Benchmarked Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassi, Laurie J.; Cheney, Scott

    1996-01-01

    Comparisons of the training practices of large companies confirm that the delivery and financing of training is changing rapidly. Companies in the American Society for Training and Development Benchmarking Forum are delivering less training with permanent staff and more with strategic use of technology, contract staff, and external providers,…

  10. Monte Carlo Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-10-20

    The "Monte Carlo Benchmark" (MCB) is intended to model the computatiional performance of Monte Carlo algorithms on parallel architectures. It models the solution of a simple heuristic transport equation using a Monte Carlo technique. The MCB employs typical features of Monte Carlo algorithms such as particle creation, particle tracking, tallying particle information, and particle destruction. Particles are also traded among processors using MPI calls.

  11. Benchmarks Momentum on Increase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2008-01-01

    No longer content with the patchwork quilt of assessments used to measure states' K-12 performance, top policy groups are pushing states toward international benchmarking as a way to better prepare students for a competitive global economy. The National Governors Association, the Council of Chief State School Officers, and the standards-advocacy…

  12. Benchmarking the World's Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Marc S.

    2012-01-01

    A century ago, the United States was a world leader in industrial benchmarking. However, after World War II, once no one could compete with the U.S., it became complacent. Many industrialized countries now have higher student achievement and more equitable and efficient education systems. A higher proportion of young people in their workforces…

  13. The Effect of Benchmark Selection on the Assessed Quality of Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popp, Sharon E. Osborn; Ryan, Joseph M.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the selection of benchmark writing samples influences the assessment of students' writing quality. More than 300 grade 3 writing samples were scored in two separate rating sessions. Within each scoring session, raters used a different set of benchmark writing samples. Raw ratings were analyzed…

  14. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  15. Radiography benchmark 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Jaenisch, G.-R. Deresch, A. Bellon, C.; Schumm, A.; Lucet-Sanchez, F.; Guerin, P.

    2015-03-31

    The purpose of the 2014 WFNDEC RT benchmark study was to compare predictions of various models of radiographic techniques, in particular those that predict the contribution of scattered radiation. All calculations were carried out for homogenous materials and a mono-energetic X-ray point source in the energy range between 100 keV and 10 MeV. The calculations were to include the best physics approach available considering electron binding effects. Secondary effects like X-ray fluorescence and bremsstrahlung production were to be taken into account if possible. The problem to be considered had two parts. Part I examined the spectrum and the spatial distribution of radiation behind a single iron plate. Part II considered two equally sized plates, made of iron and aluminum respectively, only evaluating the spatial distribution. Here we present the results of above benchmark study, comparing them to MCNP as the assumed reference model. The possible origins of the observed deviations are discussed.

  16. Radiography benchmark 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, G.-R.; Deresch, A.; Bellon, C.; Schumm, A.; Lucet-Sanchez, F.; Guerin, P.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the 2014 WFNDEC RT benchmark study was to compare predictions of various models of radiographic techniques, in particular those that predict the contribution of scattered radiation. All calculations were carried out for homogenous materials and a mono-energetic X-ray point source in the energy range between 100 keV and 10 MeV. The calculations were to include the best physics approach available considering electron binding effects. Secondary effects like X-ray fluorescence and bremsstrahlung production were to be taken into account if possible. The problem to be considered had two parts. Part I examined the spectrum and the spatial distribution of radiation behind a single iron plate. Part II considered two equally sized plates, made of iron and aluminum respectively, only evaluating the spatial distribution. Here we present the results of above benchmark study, comparing them to MCNP as the assumed reference model. The possible origins of the observed deviations are discussed.

  17. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deWit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure, This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  18. Sequoia Messaging Rate Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Friedley, Andrew

    2008-01-22

    The purpose of this benchmark is to measure the maximal message rate of a single compute node. The first num_cores ranks are expected to reside on the 'core' compute node for which message rate is being tested. After that, the next num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the first core rank, the next set of num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the second core rank, and so on. For example, testing an 8-core node (num_cores = 8) with 4 neighbors (num_nbors = 4) requires 8 + 8 * 4 - 40 ranks. The first 8 of those 40 ranks are expected to be on the 'core' node being benchmarked, while the rest of the ranks are on separate nodes.

  19. Sequoia Messaging Rate Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-22

    The purpose of this benchmark is to measure the maximal message rate of a single compute node. The first num_cores ranks are expected to reside on the 'core' compute node for which message rate is being tested. After that, the next num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the first core rank, the next set of num_nbors ranks are neighbors for the second core rank, and so on. For example, testing an 8-core node (num_cores = 8)more » with 4 neighbors (num_nbors = 4) requires 8 + 8 * 4 - 40 ranks. The first 8 of those 40 ranks are expected to be on the 'core' node being benchmarked, while the rest of the ranks are on separate nodes.« less

  20. Report of the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand Congress (Organising Chair and Scientific Chair).

    PubMed

    A, Roohi Sharifah; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2016-10-01

    A report on the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for the Surgery of the Hand and 6(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Hand Therapists is submitted detailing the numbers of attendees participating, papers presented and support received as well the some of the challenges faced and how best to overcome them from the local conference chair and scientific chair point of view. PMID:27595972

  1. MPI Multicore Linktest Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-25

    The MPI Multicore Linktest (LinkTest) measures the aggregate bandwidth from/to a multicore node in a parallel system. It allows the user to specify a variety of different node layout and communication routine variations and reports the maximal observed bandwidth across all specified options. In particular, this benchmark is able to vary the number of tasks on the root node and thereby allows users to study the impact of multicore architectures on MPI communication performance.

  2. Benchmarking the billing office.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Elizabeth W; Williams, A Scott; Browne, Robert C; King, Gerald

    2002-09-01

    Benchmarking data related to human and financial resources in the billing process allows an organization to allocate its resources more effectively. Analyzing human resources used in the billing process helps determine cost-effective staffing. The deployment of human resources in a billing office affects timeliness of payment and ability to maximize revenue potential. Analyzing financial resource helps an organization allocate those resources more effectively. PMID:12235973

  3. Algebraic Multigrid Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    2013-05-06

    AMG2013 is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. It has been derived directly from the Boomer AMG solver in the hypre library, a large linear solvers library that is being developed in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at LLNL. The driver provided in the benchmark can build various test problems. The default problem is a Laplace type problem on an unstructured domain with various jumps and an anisotropy in one part.

  4. Grade Retention: What are the Costs and Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eide, Eric R.; Goldhaber, Dan D.

    2005-01-01

    Grade retention is a common practice used when students fail to meet required benchmarks. Therefore, it is important that we understand the relative benefits and costs associated with students repeating a grade. In this article we analyze the costs and benefits of grade retention. In our examination of retention, we obtain our calculations of the…

  5. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.

    2009-11-15

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are a suite of parallel computer performance benchmarks. They were originally developed at the NASA Ames Research Center in 1991 to assess high-end parallel supercomputers. Although they are no longer used as widely as they once were for comparing high-end system performance, they continue to be studied and analyzed a great deal in the high-performance computing community. The acronym 'NAS' originally stood for the Numerical Aeronautical Simulation Program at NASA Ames. The name of this organization was subsequently changed to the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Program, and more recently to the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Center, although the acronym remains 'NAS.' The developers of the original NPB suite were David H. Bailey, Eric Barszcz, John Barton, David Browning, Russell Carter, LeoDagum, Rod Fatoohi, Samuel Fineberg, Paul Frederickson, Thomas Lasinski, Rob Schreiber, Horst Simon, V. Venkatakrishnan and Sisira Weeratunga. The original NAS Parallel Benchmarks consisted of eight individual benchmark problems, each of which focused on some aspect of scientific computing. The principal focus was in computational aerophysics, although most of these benchmarks have much broader relevance, since in a much larger sense they are typical of many real-world scientific computing applications. The NPB suite grew out of the need for a more rational procedure to select new supercomputers for acquisition by NASA. The emergence of commercially available highly parallel computer systems in the late 1980s offered an attractive alternative to parallel vector supercomputers that had been the mainstay of high-end scientific computing. However, the introduction of highly parallel systems was accompanied by a regrettable level of hype, not only on the part of the commercial vendors but even, in some cases, by scientists using the systems. As a result, it was difficult to discern whether the new systems offered any fundamental performance advantage

  6. Self-benchmarking Guide for Data Centers: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul; Ganguly, Srirupa; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in data centers. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing data centers - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, data center designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior data center benchmarking studies supported by the California Energy Commission. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the LBNL data center benchmarking database that was developed from these studies. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including facility designers and energy managers. This guide also builds on recent research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Save Energy Now program.

  7. Benchmark on outdoor scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hairong; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Yiping; Jia, Fukai; Li, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Depth super-resolution is becoming popular in computer vision, and most of test data is based on indoor data sets with ground-truth measurements such as Middlebury. However, indoor data sets mainly are acquired from structured light techniques under ideal conditions, which cannot represent the objective world with nature light. Unlike indoor scenes, the uncontrolled outdoor environment is much more complicated and is rich both in visual and depth texture. For that reason, we develop a more challenging and meaningful outdoor benchmark for depth super-resolution using the state-of-the-art active laser scanning system.

  8. Algebraic Multigrid Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-05-06

    AMG2013 is a parallel algebraic multigrid solver for linear systems arising from problems on unstructured grids. It has been derived directly from the Boomer AMG solver in the hypre library, a large linear solvers library that is being developed in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at LLNL. The driver provided in the benchmark can build various test problems. The default problem is a Laplace type problem on an unstructured domain with various jumpsmore » and an anisotropy in one part.« less

  9. Benchmarking emerging logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonov, Dmitri

    2014-03-01

    As complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (CMOS FET) are being scaled to ever smaller sizes by the semiconductor industry, the demand is growing for emerging logic devices to supplement CMOS in various special functions. Research directions and concepts of such devices are overviewed. They include tunneling, graphene based, spintronic devices etc. The methodology to estimate future performance of emerging (beyond CMOS) devices and simple logic circuits based on them is explained. Results of benchmarking are used to identify more promising concepts and to map pathways for improvement of beyond CMOS computing.

  10. Benchmarking Using Basic DBMS Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crolotte, Alain; Ghazal, Ahmad

    The TPC-H benchmark proved to be successful in the decision support area. Many commercial database vendors and their related hardware vendors used these benchmarks to show the superiority and competitive edge of their products. However, over time, the TPC-H became less representative of industry trends as vendors keep tuning their database to this benchmark-specific workload. In this paper, we present XMarq, a simple benchmark framework that can be used to compare various software/hardware combinations. Our benchmark model is currently composed of 25 queries that measure the performance of basic operations such as scans, aggregations, joins and index access. This benchmark model is based on the TPC-H data model due to its maturity and well-understood data generation capability. We also propose metrics to evaluate single-system performance and compare two systems. Finally we illustrate the effectiveness of this model by showing experimental results comparing two systems under different conditions.

  11. Core Benchmarks Descriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-05-24

    Actual regulations while designing of new fuel cycles for nuclear power installations comprise a calculational justification to be performed by certified computer codes. It guarantees that obtained calculational results will be within the limits of declared uncertainties that are indicated in a certificate issued by Gosatomnadzor of Russian Federation (GAN) and concerning a corresponding computer code. A formal justification of declared uncertainties is the comparison of calculational results obtained by a commercial code with the results of experiments or of calculational tests that are calculated with an uncertainty defined by certified precision codes of MCU type or of other one. The actual level of international cooperation provides an enlarging of the bank of experimental and calculational benchmarks acceptable for a certification of commercial codes that are being used for a design of fuel loadings with MOX fuel. In particular, the work is practically finished on the forming of calculational benchmarks list for a certification of code TVS-M as applied to MOX fuel assembly calculations. The results on these activities are presented.

  12. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul; Greenberg, Steve; Sartor, Dale

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  13. Self-benchmarking Guide for Cleanrooms: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William

    2009-07-13

    This guide describes energy efficiency metrics and benchmarks that can be used to track the performance of and identify potential opportunities to reduce energy use in laboratory buildings. This guide is primarily intended for personnel who have responsibility for managing energy use in existing laboratory facilities - including facilities managers, energy managers, and their engineering consultants. Additionally, laboratory planners and designers may also use the metrics and benchmarks described in this guide for goal-setting in new construction or major renovation. This guide provides the following information: (1) A step-by-step outline of the benchmarking process. (2) A set of performance metrics for the whole building as well as individual systems. For each metric, the guide provides a definition, performance benchmarks, and potential actions that can be inferred from evaluating this metric. (3) A list and descriptions of the data required for computing the metrics. This guide is complemented by spreadsheet templates for data collection and for computing the benchmarking metrics. This guide builds on prior research supported by the national Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Much of the benchmarking data are drawn from the Labs21 benchmarking database and technical guides. Additional benchmark data were obtained from engineering experts including laboratory designers and energy managers.

  14. Change and Continuity in Student Achievement from Grades 3 to 5: A Policy Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Mary; Burross, Heidi Legg; Good, Thomas L.

    2005-01-01

    In this article we examine student performance on mandated tests in grades 3, 4, and 5 in one state. We focus on this interval, which w e term "the fourth grade window," based on our hypothesis that students in grade four are particularly vulnerable to decrements in achievement. The national focus on the third grade as the critical benchmark in…

  15. Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  16. Internal Benchmarking for Institutional Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronco, Sharron L.

    2012-01-01

    Internal benchmarking is an established practice in business and industry for identifying best in-house practices and disseminating the knowledge about those practices to other groups in the organization. Internal benchmarking can be done with structures, processes, outcomes, or even individuals. In colleges or universities with multicampuses or a…

  17. Benchmarking. A Guide for Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Sue

    This book offers strategies for enhancing a school's teaching and learning by using benchmarking, a team-research and data-driven process for increasing school effectiveness. Benchmarking enables professionals to study and know their systems and continually improve their practices. The book is designed to lead a team step by step through the…

  18. [Congresses of the Croatian Medical Association regarding unpublished proceedings of the 10th congress in Zadar on September 25-28, 1996].

    PubMed

    Drazancić, Ante

    2011-01-01

    The first annual meeting of Croatian physicians, with characteristics of a congress, was held in 1899 at the 25th anniversary of the Croatian Medical Association. From 1954 to 1996, during almost 60 years of existence of the Croatian Medical Association, ten congresses of the Association were held. The congresses were during the development of modern medicine devoted to different medical questions, including some problems of national pathology, of the structure and restructuring of health care. The work and the content of congresses were published in the proceedings except for the 8th Congress in 1987 and the 10th in 1996. By reading main lectures, invited lectures and free papers the knowledge of that period can be gained. Many papers are even today actual, even today it could be learned from them. With more details, using published proceedings the 9th congress and the 10th congress are described on the basis preserved program, of a brief report in home journal and ample preserved correspondence. The national medical congres dedicated to technology advancement and to numerous problems of national pathology may be actual even today. They could help to solve many problems of health care, contribute to its improvement and convey consensus on its further development. PMID:22329299

  19. Applications of Integral Benchmark Data

    SciTech Connect

    Giuseppe Palmiotti; Teruhiko Kugo; Fitz Trumble; Albert C. Kahler; Dale Lancaster

    2014-10-09

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) provide evaluated integral benchmark data that may be used for validation of reactor physics / nuclear criticality safety analytical methods and data, nuclear data testing, advanced modeling and simulation, and safety analysis licensing activities. The handbooks produced by these programs are used in over 30 countries. Five example applications are presented in this paper: (1) Use of IRPhEP Data in Uncertainty Analyses and Cross Section Adjustment, (2) Uncertainty Evaluation Methods for Reactor Core Design at JAEA Using Reactor Physics Experimental Data, (3) Application of Benchmarking Data to a Broad Range of Criticality Safety Problems, (4) Cross Section Data Testing with ICSBEP Benchmarks, and (5) Use of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments to Support the Power Industry.

  20. FireHose Streaming Benchmarks

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-01-27

    The FireHose Streaming Benchmarks are a suite of stream-processing benchmarks defined to enable comparison of streaming software and hardware, both quantitatively vis-a-vis the rate at which they can process data, and qualitatively by judging the effort involved to implement and run the benchmarks. Each benchmark has two parts. The first is a generator which produces and outputs datums at a high rate in a specific format. The second is an analytic which reads the streammore » of datums and is required to perform a well-defined calculation on the collection of datums, typically to find anomalous datums that have been created in the stream by the generator. The FireHose suite provides code for the generators, sample code for the analytics (which users are free to re-implement in their own custom frameworks), and a precise definition of each benchmark calculation.« less

  1. FireHose Streaming Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Karl Anderson, Steve Plimpton

    2015-01-27

    The FireHose Streaming Benchmarks are a suite of stream-processing benchmarks defined to enable comparison of streaming software and hardware, both quantitatively vis-a-vis the rate at which they can process data, and qualitatively by judging the effort involved to implement and run the benchmarks. Each benchmark has two parts. The first is a generator which produces and outputs datums at a high rate in a specific format. The second is an analytic which reads the stream of datums and is required to perform a well-defined calculation on the collection of datums, typically to find anomalous datums that have been created in the stream by the generator. The FireHose suite provides code for the generators, sample code for the analytics (which users are free to re-implement in their own custom frameworks), and a precise definition of each benchmark calculation.

  2. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. PMID:22237134

  3. HLA typing with monoclonal antibodies: evaluation of 356 HLA monoclonal antibodies including 181 studied during the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop.

    PubMed

    Colombani, J; Lepage, V; Raffoux, C; Colombani, M

    1989-08-01

    During the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop (10th WS), 181 HLA MoAbs were studied using lymphocytotoxicity micro-technique (LCT) and/or enzyme immuno-assay (EIA), and their capacity to serve as typing reagents was evaluated. 129 MoAbs were tested by both techniques. Results obtained with 92 class I and 86 class II polymorphic MoAbs (10th WS) were compared to published data concerning 180 class I and 176 class II polymorphic MoAbs, listed in an HLA-MoAbs Register maintained in our laboratory. The following conclusions can be proposed: 1/HLA-A, B typing by LCT with MoAbs is possible for about 14 specificities. Some specificities are clearly recognized (HLA-A3, B8, B13, Bw4, Bw6), others are recognized as cross-reacting groups (B7+27+w22+40), others are not currently recognized by any MoAb with restricted specificity (B5, B15). Several MoAbs confirmed the existence of shared epitopes between products from a single locus (A2-A28, A25-A32), or from A and B loci (A2-B17, Bw4-A9-A32). A single HLA-Cw MoAb has been described. 2/HLA class II typing by LCT with MoAbs is more difficult than class I typing. DR2, DR3, DR4, DR5 and DR7 as well as DRw52 and DRw53 are well defined; other DR specificities are poorly or not at all defined. Particular associations (DR1+DR4, DR3+DRw6, all DR except DR7) are recognized by several MoAbs. All DQw specificities are well recognized, including new specificities defined only by MoAbs: WA (DQw4), TA10 (DQw7), 2B3 (DQw6+w8+w9). Only two HLA-DP MoAbs have been described. 3/Satisfactory results, similar to those of LCT, were obtained with EIA using lymphoid cell lines as targets. 4/Human MoAbs (12 in the Register) are satisfactory typing reagents. They could represent in the future a significant contribution to HLA typing with MoAbs. PMID:2609328

  4. Correlational effect size benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Frank A; Aguinis, Herman; Singh, Kulraj; Field, James G; Pierce, Charles A

    2015-03-01

    Effect size information is essential for the scientific enterprise and plays an increasingly central role in the scientific process. We extracted 147,328 correlations and developed a hierarchical taxonomy of variables reported in Journal of Applied Psychology and Personnel Psychology from 1980 to 2010 to produce empirical effect size benchmarks at the omnibus level, for 20 common research domains, and for an even finer grained level of generality. Results indicate that the usual interpretation and classification of effect sizes as small, medium, and large bear almost no resemblance to findings in the field, because distributions of effect sizes exhibit tertile partitions at values approximately one-half to one-third those intuited by Cohen (1988). Our results offer information that can be used for research planning and design purposes, such as producing better informed non-nil hypotheses and estimating statistical power and planning sample size accordingly. We also offer information useful for understanding the relative importance of the effect sizes found in a particular study in relationship to others and which research domains have advanced more or less, given that larger effect sizes indicate a better understanding of a phenomenon. Also, our study offers information about research domains for which the investigation of moderating effects may be more fruitful and provide information that is likely to facilitate the implementation of Bayesian analysis. Finally, our study offers information that practitioners can use to evaluate the relative effectiveness of various types of interventions. PMID:25314367

  5. Virtual machine performance benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Langer, Steve G; French, Todd

    2011-10-01

    The attractions of virtual computing are many: reduced costs, reduced resources and simplified maintenance. Any one of these would be compelling for a medical imaging professional attempting to support a complex practice on limited resources in an era of ever tightened reimbursement. In particular, the ability to run multiple operating systems optimized for different tasks (computational image processing on Linux versus office tasks on Microsoft operating systems) on a single physical machine is compelling. However, there are also potential drawbacks. High performance requirements need to be carefully considered if they are to be executed in an environment where the running software has to execute through multiple layers of device drivers before reaching the real disk or network interface. Our lab has attempted to gain insight into the impact of virtualization on performance by benchmarking the following metrics on both physical and virtual platforms: local memory and disk bandwidth, network bandwidth, and integer and floating point performance. The virtual performance metrics are compared to baseline performance on "bare metal." The results are complex, and indeed somewhat surprising. PMID:21207096

  6. Phase-covariant quantum benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Calsamiglia, J.; Aspachs, M.; Munoz-Tapia, R.; Bagan, E.

    2009-05-15

    We give a quantum benchmark for teleportation and quantum storage experiments suited for pure and mixed test states. The benchmark is based on the average fidelity over a family of phase-covariant states and certifies that an experiment cannot be emulated by a classical setup, i.e., by a measure-and-prepare scheme. We give an analytical solution for qubits, which shows important differences with standard state estimation approach, and compute the value of the benchmark for coherent and squeezed states, both pure and mixed.

  7. Issues in Benchmark Metric Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crolotte, Alain

    It is true that a metric can influence a benchmark but will esoteric metrics create more problems than they will solve? We answer this question affirmatively by examining the case of the TPC-D metric which used the much debated geometric mean for the single-stream test. We will show how a simple choice influenced the benchmark and its conduct and, to some extent, DBMS development. After examining other alternatives our conclusion is that the “real” measure for a decision-support benchmark is the arithmetic mean.

  8. A Heterogeneous Medium Analytical Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.D.

    1999-09-27

    A benchmark, called benchmark BLUE, has been developed for one-group neutral particle (neutron or photon) transport in a one-dimensional sub-critical heterogeneous plane parallel medium with surface illumination. General anisotropic scattering is accommodated through the Green's Function Method (GFM). Numerical Fourier transform inversion is used to generate the required Green's functions which are kernels to coupled integral equations that give the exiting angular fluxes. The interior scalar flux is then obtained through quadrature. A compound iterative procedure for quadrature order and slab surface source convergence provides highly accurate benchmark qualities (4- to 5- places of accuracy) results.

  9. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the identities of building owners might be revealed and

  10. Taking Dual Enrollment Deeper: Supports for the "Forgotten Middle" in a Tenth Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Jack

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research case study examined the supports required for 31 academically average 10th grade students to succeed on three dual enrollment college courses. Conceptually, support was a team effort, with contributions considered from administrators, faculty, parents and students. The paper documents support contributions from all four…

  11. Variables Distinguishing Between Effective and Ineffective Writers in the Tenth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donelson, Kenneth L.

    1967-01-01

    To provide data for examining the variables that distinguish effective writers from ineffective ones, 1821 mid-west 10th-grade students wrote three themes at 3-week intervals. From a first reading of these papers, the sets of three themes from 432 pupils, which were judged strong or weak in effective writing, were submitted to four judges for…

  12. State Summary Grade 10: Spring 1989 High School Proficiency Test, New Jersey Statewide Testing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton.

    The New Jersey High School Proficiency Test (HSPT) consists of reading, writing, and mathematics sections and must be passed as one of the requirements for a high school diploma. This report includes a series of tables summarizing grade 10 test results statewide for April 11-13, 1989. The results for 6,352 10th graders are given separately for…

  13. A New Way of Testing Large Thin Membrane, Optical Modal Testing of the 1/10th Scale Model of the NASA NAGT Sunshield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brian

    1999-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope design includes a deployed sunshield to thermally insulate the telescope, keeping vital detector temperatures below 60 degrees Kelvin. The sunshield consists of four struts supporting four thin film membranes. Since it would be very difficult to test the full-scale sunshield on the ground due to its size and the 1-g environment, it is important to have accurate analytical models of the sunshield to analyze its affect on the observatory. A 1/10th-scale model of the sunshield has been manufactured in order to test the analytical modeling techniques used to predict the dynamic behavior of such large, lightweight structures. A modal survey test of the scale model has been performed in a vacuum environment, using a laser vibrometer to measure the mode shapes of the membranes. The presentation describes the setup and test procedures related to these tests and presents some of the experimental results obtained and the lessons learned.

  14. Langerhans cell histiocytosis or tuberculosis on a medieval child (Oppidum de la Granède, Millau, France - 10th-11th centuries AD).

    PubMed

    Colombo, Antony; Saint-Pierre, Christophe; Naji, Stephan; Panuel, Michel; Coqueugniot, Hélène; Dutour, Olivier

    2015-06-01

    In 2008, a skeleton of a 1 - 2.5-year-old child radiocarbon dated from the 10th - 11th century AD was discovered on the oppidum of La Granède (Millau, France). It presents multiple cranial osteolytic lesions having punched-out or geographical map-like aspects associated with sequestrum and costal osteitis. A multi 3D digital approach (CT, μCT and virtual reconstruction) enabled us to refine the description and identify the diploic origin of the lytic process. Furthermore, precise observation of the extent of the lesions and associated reorganization of the skeletal micro-structure were possible. From these convergent pieces of evidence, the differential diagnosis led to three possibilities: Langerhans cell histiocytosis, tuberculosis, or Langerhans cell histiocytosis and tuberculosis. PMID:25747815

  15. Current Use of Biomarkers in Acute Kidney Injury: Report and Summary of Recommendations from the 10th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick T.; Mehta, Ravindra L.; Shaw, Andrew; Ronco, Claudio; Endre, Zoltan; Kellum, John A.; Chawla, Lakhmir; Cruz, Dinna; Ince, Can; Okusa, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade there has been considerable progress in the discovery and development of biomarkers of kidney disease, and several have now been evaluated in different clinical settings. While there is a growing literature on the performance of various biomarkers in clinical studies, there is limited information on how these biomarkers would be utilized by clinicians to manage patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Recognizing this gap in knowledge, we convened the 10th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) meeting to review the literature on biomarkers in AKI and their application in clinical practice. We asked an international group of experts to assess four broad areas for biomarker utilization for AKI: risk assessment, diagnosis and staging; differential diagnosis; prognosis and management and novel physiological techniques including imaging. This article provides a summary of the key findings and recommendations of the group, to equip clinicians to effectively use biomarkers in AKI. PMID:24107851

  16. Perceptions of High Achieving African American/Black 10th Graders from a Low Socioeconomic Community Regarding Health Scientists and Desired Careers

    PubMed Central

    Boekeloo, Bradley; Randolph, Suzanne; Timmons-Brown, Stephanie; Wang, Min Qi

    2014-01-01

    Measures are needed to assess youth perceptions about health science careers to facilitate research aimed at facilitating youth pursuit of health science. Although the Indiana Instrument provides an established measure of perceptions regarding nursing and ideal careers, we were interested in learning how high achieving 10th graders from relatively low socioeconomic areas who identify as Black/African American (Black) perceive health science and ideal careers. The Indiana Instrument was modified, administered to 90 youth of interest, and psychometrically analyzed. Reliable subscales were identified that may facilitate parsimonious, theoretical, and reliable study of youth decision-making regarding health science careers. Such research may help to develop and evaluate strategies for increasing the number of minority health scientists. PMID:25194058

  17. Incorporating Ninth-Grade PSAT/NMSQT® Scores into AP Potential™ Predictions for AP® European History and AP World History. Statistical Report 2014-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiuyuan; Patel, Priyank; Ewing, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Historically, AP Potential™ correlations and expectancy tables have been based on 10th-and 11th-grade PSAT/NMSQT® examinees and 11th-and 12th-grade AP® examinees for all subjects (Zhang, Patel, & Ewing,2014; Ewing, Camara, & Millsap, 2006; Camara & Millsap, 1998). However, a large number of students take AP European History and AP…

  18. Benchmarking hypercube hardware and software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunwald, Dirk C.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1986-01-01

    It was long a truism in computer systems design that balanced systems achieve the best performance. Message passing parallel processors are no different. To quantify the balance of a hypercube design, an experimental methodology was developed and the associated suite of benchmarks was applied to several existing hypercubes. The benchmark suite includes tests of both processor speed in the absence of internode communication and message transmission speed as a function of communication patterns.

  19. Data-Intensive Benchmarking Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-11-26

    The Data-Intensive Benchmark Suite is a set of programs written for the study of data-or storage-intensive science and engineering problems, The benchmark sets cover: general graph searching (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce breadth-first search), genome sequence searching, HTTP request classification (basic and Hadoop Map/Reduce), low-level data communication, and storage device micro-beachmarking

  20. Relationship between Grade Span Configuration and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dove, Mary Jane; Pearson, L. Carolyn; Hooper, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between grade span configuration and academic achievement of 6th-grade students as measured by the Arkansas Benchmark Examination, which is the approved NCLB criterion-referenced annual assessment, was examined. The results of a one-between two-within analysis of variance for the 3-year state-wide study of 6th graders' combined…

  1. Research on computer systems benchmarking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alan Jay (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    This grant addresses the topic of research on computer systems benchmarking and is more generally concerned with performance issues in computer systems. This report reviews work in those areas during the period of NASA support under this grant. The bulk of the work performed concerned benchmarking and analysis of CPUs, compilers, caches, and benchmark programs. The first part of this work concerned the issue of benchmark performance prediction. A new approach to benchmarking and machine characterization was reported, using a machine characterizer that measures the performance of a given system in terms of a Fortran abstract machine. Another report focused on analyzing compiler performance. The performance impact of optimization in the context of our methodology for CPU performance characterization was based on the abstract machine model. Benchmark programs are analyzed in another paper. A machine-independent model of program execution was developed to characterize both machine performance and program execution. By merging these machine and program characterizations, execution time can be estimated for arbitrary machine/program combinations. The work was continued into the domain of parallel and vector machines, including the issue of caches in vector processors and multiprocessors. All of the afore-mentioned accomplishments are more specifically summarized in this report, as well as those smaller in magnitude supported by this grant.

  2. Benchmarks for GADRAS performance validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Mattingly, John K.; Mitchell, Dean James; Rhykerd, Charles L., Jr.

    2009-09-01

    The performance of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) was validated by comparing GADRAS model results to experimental measurements for a series of benchmark sources. Sources for the benchmark include a plutonium metal sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, plutonium oxide in cans, a highly enriched uranium sphere, bare and shielded in polyethylene, a depleted uranium shell and spheres, and a natural uranium sphere. The benchmark experimental data were previously acquired and consist of careful collection of background and calibration source spectra along with the source spectra. The calibration data were fit with GADRAS to determine response functions for the detector in each experiment. A one-dimensional model (pie chart) was constructed for each source based on the dimensions of the benchmark source. The GADRAS code made a forward calculation from each model to predict the radiation spectrum for the detector used in the benchmark experiment. The comparisons between the GADRAS calculation and the experimental measurements are excellent, validating that GADRAS can correctly predict the radiation spectra for these well-defined benchmark sources.

  3. Benchmarking for the Learning and Skills Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jane

    This document is designed to introduce practitioners in the United Kingdom's learning and skills sector to the principles and practice of benchmarking. The first section defines benchmarking and differentiates metric, diagnostic, and process benchmarking. The remainder of the booklet details the following steps of the benchmarking process: (1) get…

  4. NHT-1 I/O Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Russell; Ciotti, Bob; Fineberg, Sam; Nitzbert, Bill

    1992-01-01

    The NHT-1 benchmarks am a set of three scalable I/0 benchmarks suitable for evaluating the I/0 subsystems of high performance distributed memory computer systems. The benchmarks test application I/0, maximum sustained disk I/0, and maximum sustained network I/0. Sample codes are available which implement the benchmarks.

  5. How to avoid 'death by benchmarking'.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Dave; Libby, Darin

    2015-08-01

    Hospitals and health systems should adopt four key principles and practices when applying benchmarks to determine physician compensation: Acknowledge that a lower percentile may be appropriate. Use the median as the all-in benchmark. Use peer benchmarks when available. Use alternative benchmarks. PMID:26548140

  6. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Terrence C.; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of “minimal” simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  7. Closed-Loop Neuromorphic Benchmarks.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Terrence C; DeWolf, Travis; Kleinhans, Ashley; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the effectiveness and performance of neuromorphic hardware is difficult. It is even more difficult when the task of interest is a closed-loop task; that is, a task where the output from the neuromorphic hardware affects some environment, which then in turn affects the hardware's future input. However, closed-loop situations are one of the primary potential uses of neuromorphic hardware. To address this, we present a methodology for generating closed-loop benchmarks that makes use of a hybrid of real physical embodiment and a type of "minimal" simulation. Minimal simulation has been shown to lead to robust real-world performance, while still maintaining the practical advantages of simulation, such as making it easy for the same benchmark to be used by many researchers. This method is flexible enough to allow researchers to explicitly modify the benchmarks to identify specific task domains where particular hardware excels. To demonstrate the method, we present a set of novel benchmarks that focus on motor control for an arbitrary system with unknown external forces. Using these benchmarks, we show that an error-driven learning rule can consistently improve motor control performance across a randomly generated family of closed-loop simulations, even when there are up to 15 interacting joints to be controlled. PMID:26696820

  8. Using ACT Assessment Scores to Set Benchmarks for College Readiness. ACT Research Report Series, 2005-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jeff; Sconing, Jim

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we establish benchmarks of readiness for four common first-year college courses: English Composition, College Algebra, Social Science, and Biology. Using grade data from a large sample of colleges, we modeled the probability of success in these courses as a function of ACT test scores. Success was defined as a course grade of B or…

  9. FLOWTRAN-TF code benchmarking

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.P.

    1990-12-01

    FLOWTRAN-TF is a two-component (air-water), two-phase thermal-hydraulics code designed for performing accident analyses of SRS reactor fuel assemblies during the Emergency Cooling System (ECS) phase of a Double Ended Guillotine Break (DEGB) Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA). A description of the code is given by Flach et al. (1990). This report provides benchmarking results for the version of FLOWTRAN-TF used to compute the Recommended K-Reactor Restart ECS Power Limit (Smith et al., 1990a; 1990b). Individual constitutive relations are benchmarked in Sections 2 through 5 while in Sections 6 and 7 integral code benchmarking results are presented. An overall assessment of FLOWTRAN-TF for its intended use in computing the ECS power limit completes the document.

  10. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  11. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in Italy: highlights of the 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cuocolo, A

    2011-06-01

    The 10th National Congress of the Italian Association of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (AIMN) took place in Rimini on March 18-21, 2011 under the chairmanship of Professor Stefano Fanti. The program was of excellent quality and put a further step for the settlement of the standardized AIMN congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success with more than 1100 total participants and more than 360 abstracts received. Of these, 40 abstracts were accepted for oral and 285 for poster presentations. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, with particular focus on advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, and infection and inflammation. Noteworthy, several presentations at this congress, focusing on quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and patient management and further demonstrated that nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in the contemporary medical scenario. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress abstract book, published as volume 55, supplement 1 of the Q J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in April 2011. PMID:21532541

  12. The Royal Book by Haly Abbas from the 10th century: one of the earliest illustrations of the surgical approach to skull fractures.

    PubMed

    Aciduman, Ahmet; Arda, Berna; Kahya, Esin; Belen, Deniz

    2010-12-01

    Haly Abbas was one of the pioneering physicians and surgeons of the Eastern world in the 10th century who influenced the Western world by his monumental work, The Royal Book. The book was first partly translated into Latin by Constantinus Africanus in the 11th century without citing the author's name. Haly Abbas was recognized in Europe after full translation of The Royal Book by Stephen of Antioch in 1127. The Royal Book has been accepted as an early source of jerrah-names (surgical books) in the Eastern world. The chapters regarding cranial fractures in Haly Abbas' work include unique management strategies for his period with essential quotations from Paul of Aegina's work Epitome. Both authors preferred free bone flap craniotomy in cranial fractures. Although Paul of Aegina, a Byzantine physician and surgeon, was a connection between ancient traditions and Islamic interpretation, Haly Abbas seemed to play a bridging role between the Roman-Byzantine and the School of Salerno in Europe. PMID:21107177

  13. Evaluation of elemental status of ancient human bone samples from Northeastern Hungary dated to the 10th century AD by XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    János, I.; Szathmáry, L.; Nádas, E.; Béni, A.; Dinya, Z.; Máthé, E.

    2011-11-01

    The present study is a multielemental analysis of bone samples belonging to skeletal individuals originating from two contemporaneous (10th century AD) cemeteries (Tiszavasvári Nagy-Gyepáros and Nagycserkesz-Nádasibokor sites) in Northeastern Hungary, using the XRF analytical technique. Emitted X-rays were detected in order to determine the elemental composition of bones and to appreciate the possible influence of the burial environment on the elemental content of the human skeletal remains. Lumbar vertebral bodies were used for analysis. Applying the ED(P)XRF technique concentration of the following elements were determined: P, Ca, K, Na, Mg, Al, Cl, Mn, Fe, Zn, Br and Sr. The results indicated post mortem mineral exchange between the burial environment (soil) and bones (e.g. the enhanced levels of Fe and Mn) and referred to diagenetic alteration processes during burials. However, other elements such as Zn, Sr and Br seemed to be accumulated during the past life. On the basis of statistical analysis, clear separation could not be observed between the two excavation sites in their bone elemental concentrations which denoted similar diagenetic influences, environmental conditions. The enhanced levels of Sr might be connected with the past dietary habits, especially consumption of plant food.

  14. Urban and rural infant-feeding practices and health in early medieval Central Europe (9th-10th Century, Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Kaupová, Sylva; Herrscher, Estelle; Velemínský, Petr; Cabut, Sandrine; Poláček, Lumír; Brůžek, Jaroslav

    2014-12-01

    In the Central European context, the 9th and 10th centuries are well known for rapid cultural and societal changes concerning the development of the economic and political structures of states as well as the adoption of Christianity. A bioarchaeological study based on a subadult skeletal series was conducted to tackle the impact of these changes on infant and young child feeding practices and, consequently, their health in both urban and rural populations. Data on growth and frequency of nonspecific stress indicators of a subadult group aged 0-6 years were analyzed. A subsample of 41 individuals was selected for nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses, applying an intra-individual sampling strategy (bone vs. tooth). The isotopic results attest to a mosaic of food behaviors. In the urban sample, some children may have been weaned during their second year of life, while some others may have still been consuming breast milk substantially up to 4-5 years of age. By contrast, data from the rural sample show more homogeneity, with a gradual cessation of breastfeeding starting after the age of 2 years. Several factors are suggested which may have been responsible for applied weaning strategies. There is no evidence that observed weaning strategies affected the level of biological stress which the urban subadult population had to face compared with the rural subadult population. PMID:25256815

  15. Imaging in the Age of Precision Medicine: Summary of the Proceedings of the 10th Biannual Symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Herold, Christian J; Lewin, Jonathan S; Wibmer, Andreas G; Thrall, James H; Krestin, Gabriel P; Dixon, Adrian K; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Geckle, Rena J; Muellner, Ada; Hricak, Hedvig

    2016-04-01

    During the past decade, with its breakthroughs in systems biology, precision medicine (PM) has emerged as a novel health-care paradigm. Challenging reductionism and broad-based approaches in medicine, PM is an approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle. It involves integrating information from multiple sources in a holistic manner to achieve a definitive diagnosis, focused treatment, and adequate response assessment. Biomedical imaging and imaging-guided interventions, which provide multiparametric morphologic and functional information and enable focused, minimally invasive treatments, are key elements in the infrastructure needed for PM. The emerging discipline of radiogenomics, which links genotypic information to phenotypic disease manifestations at imaging, should also greatly contribute to patient-tailored care. Because of the growing volume and complexity of imaging data, decision-support algorithms will be required to help physicians apply the most essential patient data for optimal management. These innovations will challenge traditional concepts of health care and business models. Reimbursement policies and quality assurance measures will have to be reconsidered and adapted. In their 10th biannual symposium, which was held in August 2013, the members of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology discussed the opportunities and challenges arising for the imaging community with the transition to PM. This article summarizes the discussions and central messages of the symposium. PMID:26465058

  16. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  17. Developing Financial Benchmarks for Critical Access Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Pink, George H.; Holmes, George M.; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Thompson, Roger E.

    2009-01-01

    This study developed and applied benchmarks for five indicators included in the CAH Financial Indicators Report, an annual, hospital-specific report distributed to all critical access hospitals (CAHs). An online survey of Chief Executive Officers and Chief Financial Officers was used to establish benchmarks. Indicator values for 2004, 2005, and 2006 were calculated for 421 CAHs and hospital performance was compared to the benchmarks. Although many hospitals performed better than benchmark on one indicator in 1 year, very few performed better than benchmark on all five indicators in all 3 years. The probability of performing better than benchmark differed among peer groups. PMID:19544935

  18. Effect of a Counseling Intervention Program on Tenth Grade Students' Attendance, Discipline Referrals, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Dorothy Deona Martin

    2013-01-01

    Poor student achievement, high discipline referrals, and student absenteeism were issues in a rural school with a population of approximately 400 students. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of Effective Teens training on the attendance, discipline referrals, and academic achievement of 10th grade students. The theoretical…

  19. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  20. Austin Community College Benchmarking Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Community Coll., TX. Office of Institutional Effectiveness.

    Austin Community College contracted with MGT of America, Inc. in spring 1999 to develop a peer and benchmark (best) practices analysis on key indicators. These indicators were updated in spring 2002 using data from eight Texas community colleges and four non-Texas institutions that represent large, comprehensive, urban community colleges, similar…

  1. Processor Emulator with Benchmark Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, G. Scott; Pearce, Roger; Gokhale, Maya

    2015-11-13

    A processor emulator and a suite of benchmark applications have been developed to assist in characterizing the performance of data-centric workloads on current and future computer architectures. Some of the applications have been collected from other open source projects. For more details on the emulator and an example of its usage, see reference [1].

  2. PyMPI Dynamic Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-02-16

    Pynamic is a benchmark designed to test a system's ability to handle the Dynamic Linking and Loading (DLL) requirements of Python-based scientific applications. This benchmark is developed to add a workload to our testing environment, a workload that represents a newly emerging class of DLL behaviors. Pynamic buildins on pyMPI, and MPI extension to Python C-extension dummy codes and a glue layer that facilitates linking and loading of the generated dynamic modules into the resultingmore » pyMPI. Pynamic is configurable, enabling modeling the static properties of a specific code as described in section 5. It does not, however, model any significant computationss of the target and hence, it is not subjected to the same level of control as the target code. In fact, HPC computer vendors and tool developers will be encouraged to add it to their tesitn suite once the code release is completed. an ability to produce and run this benchmark is an effective test for valifating the capability of a compiler and linker/loader as well as an OS kernel and other runtime system of HPC computer vendors. In addition, the benchmark is designed as a test case for stressing code development tools. Though Python has recently gained popularity in the HPC community, it heavy DLL operations have hindered certain HPC code development tools, notably parallel debuggers, from performing optimally.« less

  3. Real-Time Benchmark Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-01-17

    This software provides a portable benchmark suite for real time kernels. It tests the performance of many of the system calls, as well as the interrupt response time and task response time to interrupts. These numbers provide a baseline for comparing various real-time kernels and hardware platforms.

  4. Benchmarking short sequence mapping tools

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of next-generation sequencing instruments has led to the generation of millions of short sequences in a single run. The process of aligning these reads to a reference genome is time consuming and demands the development of fast and accurate alignment tools. However, the current proposed tools make different compromises between the accuracy and the speed of mapping. Moreover, many important aspects are overlooked while comparing the performance of a newly developed tool to the state of the art. Therefore, there is a need for an objective evaluation method that covers all the aspects. In this work, we introduce a benchmarking suite to extensively analyze sequencing tools with respect to various aspects and provide an objective comparison. Results We applied our benchmarking tests on 9 well known mapping tools, namely, Bowtie, Bowtie2, BWA, SOAP2, MAQ, RMAP, GSNAP, Novoalign, and mrsFAST (mrFAST) using synthetic data and real RNA-Seq data. MAQ and RMAP are based on building hash tables for the reads, whereas the remaining tools are based on indexing the reference genome. The benchmarking tests reveal the strengths and weaknesses of each tool. The results show that no single tool outperforms all others in all metrics. However, Bowtie maintained the best throughput for most of the tests while BWA performed better for longer read lengths. The benchmarking tests are not restricted to the mentioned tools and can be further applied to others. Conclusion The mapping process is still a hard problem that is affected by many factors. In this work, we provided a benchmarking suite that reveals and evaluates the different factors affecting the mapping process. Still, there is no tool that outperforms all of the others in all the tests. Therefore, the end user should clearly specify his needs in order to choose the tool that provides the best results. PMID:23758764

  5. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  6. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  7. The Growth of Benchmarking in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schofield, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Benchmarking is used in higher education to improve performance by comparison with other institutions. Types used include internal, external competitive, external collaborative, external transindustry, and implicit. Methods include ideal type (or gold) standard, activity-based benchmarking, vertical and horizontal benchmarking, and comparative…

  8. How Benchmarking and Higher Education Came Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Gary D.; Ronco, Sharron L.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter introduces the concept of benchmarking and how higher education institutions began to use benchmarking for a variety of purposes. Here, benchmarking is defined as a strategic and structured approach whereby an organization compares aspects of its processes and/or outcomes to those of another organization or set of organizations to…

  9. The Internet Time Lag: Anticipating the Long-Term Consequences of the Information Revolution. A Report of the Annual Aspen Institute Roundtable on Information Technology (10th, Aspen, Colorado, August 2-5, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Evan I.

    This is a report of the 10th annual Aspen Institute Roundtable on Information Technology (Aspen, Colorado, August 2-5, 2001). Participants were also polled after the events of September 11, and these comments have been integrated into the report. The mission of this report is to take a wide-ranging look at the trends that are defining the next new…

  10. New NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Saphir, William; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Woo, Alex; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NPB2 (NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks 2) is an implementation, based on Fortran and the MPI (message passing interface) message passing standard, of the original NAS Parallel Benchmark specifications. NPB2 programs are run with little or no tuning, in contrast to NPB vendor implementations, which are highly optimized for specific architectures. NPB2 results complement, rather than replace, NPB results. Because they have not been optimized by vendors, NPB2 implementations approximate the performance a typical user can expect for a portable parallel program on distributed memory parallel computers. Together these results provide an insightful comparison of the real-world performance of high-performance computers. New NPB2 features: New implementation (CG), new workstation class problem sizes, new serial sample versions, more performance statistics.

  11. Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-17

    A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.

  12. Benchmarking neuromorphic systems with Nengo

    PubMed Central

    Bekolay, Trevor; Stewart, Terrence C.; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Nengo is a software package for designing and simulating large-scale neural models. Nengo is architected such that the same Nengo model can be simulated on any of several Nengo backends with few to no modifications. Backends translate a model to specific platforms, which include GPUs and neuromorphic hardware. Nengo also contains a large test suite that can be run with any backend and focuses primarily on functional performance. We propose that Nengo's large test suite can be used to benchmark neuromorphic hardware's functional performance and simulation speed in an efficient, unbiased, and future-proof manner. We implement four benchmark models and show that Nengo can collect metrics across five different backends that identify situations in which some backends perform more accurately or quickly. PMID:26539076

  13. HS06 Benchmark for an ARM Server

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluth, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    We benchmarked an ARM cortex-A9 based server system with a four-core CPU running at 1.1 GHz. The system used Ubuntu 12.04 as operating system and the HEPSPEC 2006 (HS06) benchmarking suite was compiled natively with gcc-4.4 on the system. The benchmark was run for various settings of the relevant gcc compiler options. We did not find significant influence from the compiler options on the benchmark result. The final HS06 benchmark result is 10.4.

  14. MPI Multicore Torus Communication Benchmark

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-02-05

    The MPI Multicore Torus Communications Benchmark (TorusTest) measues the aggegate bandwidth across all six links from/to any multicore node in a logical torus. It can run in wo modi: using a static or a random mapping of tasks to torus locations. The former can be used to achieve optimal mappings and aggregate bandwidths that can be achieved with varying node mappings.

  15. Restaurant Energy Use Benchmarking Guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, R.; Smith, V.; Field, K.

    2011-07-01

    A significant operational challenge for food service operators is defining energy use benchmark metrics to compare against the performance of individual stores. Without metrics, multiunit operators and managers have difficulty identifying which stores in their portfolios require extra attention to bring their energy performance in line with expectations. This report presents a method whereby multiunit operators may use their own utility data to create suitable metrics for evaluating their operations.

  16. IBC's 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 2-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H J; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K; Thorpe, Philip E; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M; Weiner, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www

  17. New archeointensity data from French Early Medieval pottery production (6th-10th century AD). Tracing 1500 years of geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevey, Agnès; Gallet, Yves; Jesset, Sébastien; Thébault, Erwan; Bouillon, Jérôme; Lefèvre, Annie; Le Goff, Maxime

    2016-08-01

    Nineteen new archeointensity results were obtained from the analysis of groups of French pottery fragments dated to the Early Middle Ages (6th to 10th centuries AD). They are from several medieval ceramic production sites, excavated mainly in Saran (Central France), and their precise dating was established based on typo-chronological characteristics. Intensity measurements were performed using the Triaxe protocol, which takes into account the effects on the intensity determinations of both thermoremanent magnetization anisotropy and cooling rate. Intensity analyses were also carried out on modern pottery produced at Saran during an experimental firing. The results show very good agreement with the geomagnetic field intensity directly measured inside and around the kiln, thus reasserting the reliability of the Triaxe protocol and the relevance of the quality criteria used. They further demonstrate the potential of the Saran pottery production for archeomagnetism. The new archeointensity results allow a precise and coherent description of the geomagnetic field intensity variations in Western Europe during the Early Medieval period, which was until now poorly documented. They show a significant increase in intensity during the 6th century AD, high intensity values from the 7th to the 9th century, with a minimum of small amplitude at the transition between the 7th and the 8th centuries and finally an important decrease until the beginning of the 11th century. Together with published intensity results available within a radius of 700 km around Paris, the new data were used to compute a master curve of the Western European geomagnetic intensity variations over the past 1500 years. This curve clearly exhibits five intensity maxima: at the transition between the 6th and 7th century AD, at the middle of the 9th century, during the 12th century, in the second part of the 14th century and at the very beginning of the 17th century AD. Some of these peaks are smoothed, or

  18. IBC’s 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H.J.; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S.; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www

  19. Standing adult human phantoms based on 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of male and female Caucasian populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassola, V. F.; Milian, F. M.; Kramer, R.; de Oliveira Lira, C. A. B.; Khoury, H. J.

    2011-07-01

    Computational anthropomorphic human phantoms are useful tools developed for the calculation of absorbed or equivalent dose to radiosensitive organs and tissues of the human body. The problem is, however, that, strictly speaking, the results can be applied only to a person who has the same anatomy as the phantom, while for a person with different body mass and/or standing height the data could be wrong. In order to improve this situation for many areas in radiological protection, this study developed 18 anthropometric standing adult human phantoms, nine models per gender, as a function of the 10th, 50th and 90th mass and height percentiles of Caucasian populations. The anthropometric target parameters for body mass, standing height and other body measures were extracted from PeopleSize, a well-known software package used in the area of ergonomics. The phantoms were developed based on the assumption of a constant body-mass index for a given mass percentile and for different heights. For a given height, increase or decrease of body mass was considered to reflect mainly the change of subcutaneous adipose tissue mass, i.e. that organ masses were not changed. Organ mass scaling as a function of height was based on information extracted from autopsy data. The methods used here were compared with those used in other studies, anatomically as well as dosimetrically. For external exposure, the results show that equivalent dose decreases with increasing body mass for organs and tissues located below the subcutaneous adipose tissue layer, such as liver, colon, stomach, etc, while for organs located at the surface, such as breasts, testes and skin, the equivalent dose increases or remains constant with increasing body mass due to weak attenuation and more scatter radiation caused by the increasing adipose tissue mass. Changes of standing height have little influence on the equivalent dose to organs and tissues from external exposure. Specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) have also

  20. RISKIND verification and benchmark comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Biwer, B.M.; Arnish, J.J.; Chen, S.Y.; Kamboj, S.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents verification calculations and benchmark comparisons for RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials. Spreadsheet calculations were performed to verify the proper operation of the major options and calculational steps in RISKIND. The program is unique in that it combines a variety of well-established models into a comprehensive treatment for assessing risks from the transportation of radioactive materials. Benchmark comparisons with other validated codes that incorporate similar models were also performed. For instance, the external gamma and neutron dose rate curves for a shipping package estimated by RISKIND were compared with those estimated by using the RADTRAN 4 code and NUREG-0170 methodology. Atmospheric dispersion of released material and dose estimates from the GENII and CAP88-PC codes. Verification results have shown the program to be performing its intended function correctly. The benchmark results indicate that the predictions made by RISKIND are within acceptable limits when compared with predictions from similar existing models.

  1. An introduction to benchmarking in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Benson, H R

    1994-01-01

    Benchmarking--the process of establishing a standard of excellence and comparing a business function or activity, a product, or an enterprise as a whole with that standard--will be used increasingly by healthcare institutions to reduce expenses and simultaneously improve product and service quality. As a component of total quality management, benchmarking is a continuous process by which an organization can measure and compare its own processes with those of organizations that are leaders in a particular area. Benchmarking should be viewed as a part of quality management programs, not as a replacement. There are four kinds of benchmarking: internal, competitive, functional and generic. With internal benchmarking, functions within an organization are compared with each other. Competitive benchmarking partners do business in the same market and provide a direct comparison of products or services. Functional and generic benchmarking are performed with organizations which may have a specific similar function, such as payroll or purchasing, but which otherwise are in a different business. Benchmarking must be a team process because the outcome will involve changing current practices, with effects felt throughout the organization. The team should include members who have subject knowledge; communications and computer proficiency; skills as facilitators and outside contacts; and sponsorship of senior management. Benchmarking requires quantitative measurement of the subject. The process or activity that you are attempting to benchmark will determine the types of measurements used. Benchmarking metrics usually can be classified in one of four categories: productivity, quality, time and cost-related. PMID:10139084

  2. Risk factors for bulk milk somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts in smallholder dairy farms in the 10th region of Chile.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, G; Green, L E; Guzmán, D; Esparza, H; Tadich, N

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the principal management factors that influenced bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) and total bacterial count (TBC) of smallholder dairy farms in the 10th region of Chile. One hundred and fifty smallholder milk producers were selected randomly from 42 milk collection centres (MCCs). In April and May of 2002, all farms were visited and a detailed interview questionnaire on dairy-cow management related to milk quality was conducted. In addition, the BMSCC and TBC results from the previous 2 months' fortnightly tests were obtained from the MCCs. The mean BMSCC and TBC were used as the dependent variables in the analyses and were normalised by a natural-logarithm transformation (LN). All independent management variables were categorised into binary outcomes and present (=1) was compared with absent (=0). Biserial correlations were calculated between the LNBMSCC or LNTBC and the management factors of the smallholder farms. Management factors with correlations with P0.05) factors. A random MCC effect was included in the models to investigate the importance of clustering of herds within MCC. In the null model for mean LNTBC, the random effect of MCCs was highly significant. It was explained by: milk collected once a day or less compared with collection twice a day, not cleaning the bucket after milking mastitic cows versus cleaning the bucket and cooling milk in a vat of water versus not cooling milk or using ice or a bulk tank to cool milk. Other factors that increased the LNTBC were a waiting yard with a soil or gravel floor versus concrete, use of plastic buckets for milking instead of metal, not feeding California mastitis test (CMT)-positive milk to calves and cows of dual-purpose breed. The final model explained 35% of the variance. The model predicted that a herd that complied with all the management practices had a mean

  3. Gaia FGK benchmark stars: Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jofré, P.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Worley, C. C.; Pancino, E.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Magrini, L.; Bergemann, M.; González Hernández, J. I.; Hill, V.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lind, K.; Masseron, T.; Montes, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Nordlander, T.; Recio Blanco, A.; Sobeck, J.; Sordo, R.; Sousa, S. G.; Tabernero, H.; Vallenari, A.; Van Eck, S.

    2014-04-01

    Context. To calibrate automatic pipelines that determine atmospheric parameters of stars, one needs a sample of stars, or "benchmark stars", with well-defined parameters to be used as a reference. Aims: We provide detailed documentation of the iron abundance determination of the 34 FGK-type benchmark stars that are selected to be the pillars for calibration of the one billion Gaia stars. They cover a wide range of temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. Methods: Up to seven different methods were used to analyze an observed spectral library of high resolutions and high signal-to-noise ratios. The metallicity was determined by assuming a value of effective temperature and surface gravity obtained from fundamental relations; that is, these parameters were known a priori and independently from the spectra. Results: We present a set of metallicity values obtained in a homogeneous way for our sample of benchmark stars. In addition to this value, we provide detailed documentation of the associated uncertainties. Finally, we report a value of the metallicity of the cool giant ψ Phe for the first time. Based on NARVAL and HARPS data obtained within the Gaia DPAC (Data Processing and Analysis Consortium) and coordinated by the GBOG (Ground-Based Observations for Gaia) working group and on data retrieved from the ESO-ADP database.Tables 6-76 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A133

  4. Impacts of Parental Education on Substance Use: Differences among White, African-American, and Hispanic Students in 8th, 10th, and 12th Grades (1999-2008). Monitoring the Future Occasional Paper Series. Paper No. 70

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jerald G.; O'Malley, Patrick M.; Johnston, Lloyd D.; Schulenberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    The Monitoring the Future (MTF) project reports annually on levels and trends in self-reported substance use by secondary school students (e.g., Johnston, O'Malley, Bachman, & Schulenberg, 2009). The reports include subgroup comparisons, and these have revealed substantial differences among race/ethnicity groups, as well as some differences linked…

  5. Mock Tribunal in Action: Mock International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. 10th Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fix, Terrance

    In this lesson, students role-play as members of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia that will bring to trial "Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of International Humanitarian Law." Students represent the following groups: International Criminal Tribunal; Prosecution; Defense; Serbians; Croatians; Bosnian Muslims;…

  6. Kauffman Teen Survey. An Annual Report on Teen Health Behaviors: Use of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs among 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-Grade Students in Greater Kansas City, 1991-92 to 2000-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation began surveying Kansas City area teens during the 1984-85 school year. The Kauffman Teen Survey now addresses two sets of issues for teens. Teen Health Behaviors, addressed in this report, have been a focus of the survey since its inception. The report focuses on teen use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in…

  7. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Sally; Rarick, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking was very interesting and provided a wealth of information (1) We did see potential solutions to some of our "top 10" issues (2) We have an assessment of where NASA stands with relation to other aerospace/defense groups We formed new contacts and potential collaborations (1) Several organizations sent us examples of their templates, processes (2) Many of the organizations were interested in future collaboration: sharing of training, metrics, Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) appraisers, instructors, etc. We received feedback from some of our contractors/ partners (1) Desires to participate in our training; provide feedback on procedures (2) Welcomed opportunity to provide feedback on working with NASA

  8. Two-dimensional benchmark calculations for PNL-30 through PNL-35

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Interest in critical experiments with lattices of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pins has been revived by the possibility that light water reactors will be used for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium. A series of six experiments with MOX lattices, designated PNL-30 through PNL-35, was performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratories in 1975 and 1976, and a set of benchmark specifications for these experiments subsequently was adopted by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). Although there appear to be some problems with these experiments, they remain the only CSEWG benchmarks for MOX lattices.

  9. Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 101 NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Computational Chemistry Comparison and Benchmark Database is a collection of experimental and ab initio thermochemical properties for a selected set of molecules. The goals are to provide a benchmark set of molecules for the evaluation of ab initio computational methods and allow the comparison between different ab initio computational methods for the prediction of thermochemical properties.

  10. Benchmarking for Excellence and the Nursing Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleboda, Claire

    1999-01-01

    Nursing is a service profession. The services provided are essential to life and welfare. Therefore, setting the benchmark for high quality care is fundamental. Exploring the definition of a benchmark value will help to determine a best practice approach. A benchmark is the descriptive statement of a desired level of performance against which quality can be judged. It must be sufficiently well understood by managers and personnel in order that it may serve as a standard against which to measure value.

  11. The Turn of the Century. Tenth Grade Lesson. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartels, Dede

    In this 10th grade social studies and language arts interdisciplinary unit, students research and report on historical figures from the turn of the 20th century. Students are required to work in pairs to learn about famous and common individuals, including Andrew Carnegie, Samuel Gompers, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Edison, Theodore Roosevelt, Booker…

  12. easyCBM Beginning Reading Measures: Grades K-1 Alternate Form Reliability and Criterion Validity with the SAT-10. Technical Report #1403

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Kraig; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Sáez, Leilani; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of an alternate form reliability and criterion validity study of kindergarten and grade 1 (N = 84-199) reading measures from the easyCBM© assessment system and Stanford Early School Achievement Test/Stanford Achievement Test, 10th edition (SESAT/SAT-­10) across 5 time points. The alternate form reliabilities ranged from…

  13. Improving Grading Consistency through Grade Lift Reporting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millet, Ido

    2010-01-01

    We define Grade Lift as the difference between average class grade and average cumulative class GPA. This metric provides an assessment of how lenient the grading was for a given course. In 2006, we started providing faculty members individualized Grade Lift reports reflecting their position relative to an anonymously plotted school-wide…

  14. Pynamic: the Python Dynamic Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G L; Ahn, D H; de Supinksi, B R; Gyllenhaal, J C; Miller, P J

    2007-07-10

    Python is widely used in scientific computing to facilitate application development and to support features such as computational steering. Making full use of some of Python's popular features, which improve programmer productivity, leads to applications that access extremely high numbers of dynamically linked libraries (DLLs). As a result, some important Python-based applications severely stress a system's dynamic linking and loading capabilities and also cause significant difficulties for most development environment tools, such as debuggers. Furthermore, using the Python paradigm for large scale MPI-based applications can create significant file IO and further stress tools and operating systems. In this paper, we present Pynamic, the first benchmark program to support configurable emulation of a wide-range of the DLL usage of Python-based applications for large scale systems. Pynamic has already accurately reproduced system software and tool issues encountered by important large Python-based scientific applications on our supercomputers. Pynamic provided insight for our system software and tool vendors, and our application developers, into the impact of several design decisions. As we describe the Pynamic benchmark, we will highlight some of the issues discovered in our large scale system software and tools using Pynamic.

  15. Benchmarking image fusion algorithm performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Christopher L.

    2012-06-01

    Registering two images produced by two separate imaging sensors having different detector sizes and fields of view requires one of the images to undergo transformation operations that may cause its overall quality to degrade with regards to visual task performance. This possible change in image quality could add to an already existing difference in measured task performance. Ideally, a fusion algorithm would take as input unaltered outputs from each respective sensor used in the process. Therefore, quantifying how well an image fusion algorithm performs should be base lined to whether the fusion algorithm retained the performance benefit achievable by each independent spectral band being fused. This study investigates an identification perception experiment using a simple and intuitive process for discriminating between image fusion algorithm performances. The results from a classification experiment using information theory based image metrics is presented and compared to perception test results. The results show an effective performance benchmark for image fusion algorithms can be established using human perception test data. Additionally, image metrics have been identified that either agree with or surpass the performance benchmark established.

  16. TRENDS: Compendium of Benchmark Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Erica J.; Crepp, Justin R.; Bechter, Eric; Johnson, John A.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Howard, Andrew; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard T.

    2016-01-01

    The physical properties of faint stellar and substellar objects are highly uncertain. For example, the masses of brown dwarfs are usually inferred using theoretical models, which are age dependent and have yet to be properly tested. With the goal of identifying new benchmark objects through observations with NIRC2 at Keck, we have carried out a comprehensive adaptive-optics survey as part of the TRENDS (TaRgetting bENchmark-objects with Doppler Spectroscopy) high-contrast imaging program. TRENDS targets nearby (d < 100 pc), Sun-like stars showing long-term radial velocity accelerations. We present the discovery of 28 confirmed, co-moving companions as well as 19 strong candidate companions to F-, G-, and K-stars with well-determined parallaxes and metallicities. Benchmark objects of this nature lend themselves to a three dimensional orbit determination that will ultimately yield a precise dynamical mass. Unambiguous mass measurements of very low mass companions, which straddle the hydrogen-burning boundary, will allow our compendium of objects to serve as excellent testbeds to substantiate theoretical evolutionary and atmospheric models in regimes where they currently breakdown (low temperature, low mass, and old age).

  17. Behavioral and Psychosocial Effects of Two Middle School Sexual Health Education Programs at Tenth-Grade Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Christine M.; Peskin, Melissa F.; Shegog, Ross; Baumler, Elizabeth R.; Addy, Robert C.; Thiel, Melanie; Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Robin, Leah; Tortolero, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose An earlier randomized controlled trial found that two middle school sexual education programsda risk avoidance (RA) program and a risk reduction (RR) programddelayed initiation of sexual intercourse (oral, vaginal, or anal sex) and reduced other sexual risk behaviors in ninth grade. We examined whether these effects extended into 10th grade. Methods Fifteen middle schools were randomly assigned to RA, RR, or control conditions. Follow-up surveys were conducted with participating students in 10th grade (n = 1,187; 29.2% attrition). Results Participants were 60% female, 50% Hispanic, and 39% black; seventh grade mean age was 12.6 years. In 10th grade, compared with the control condition, both programs significantly delayed anal sex initiation in the total sample (RA: adjusted odds ratio [AOR], .64, 95% confidence interval [CI], .42–.99; RR: AOR, .65, 95% CI, .50–.84) and among Hispanics (RA: AOR, .53, 95% CI, .31–.91; RR: AOR, .82, 95% CI, .74–.93). Risk avoidance students were less likely to report unprotected vaginal sex, either by using a condom or by abstaining from sex (AOR: .61, 95% CI, .45–.85); RR students were less likely to report recent unprotected anal sex (AOR: .34, 95% CI, .20–.56). Both programs sustained positive impact on some psychosocial outcomes. Conclusions Although both programs delayed anal sex initiation into 10th grade, effects on the delayed initiation of oral and vaginal sex were not sustained. Additional high school sexual education may help to further delay sexual initiation and reduce other sexual risk behaviors in later high school years. PMID:24445180

  18. Characterizing universal gate sets via dihedral benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan-Dugas, Arnaud; Wallman, Joel J.; Emerson, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    We describe a practical experimental protocol for robustly characterizing the error rates of non-Clifford gates associated with dihedral groups, including small single-qubit rotations. Our dihedral benchmarking protocol is a generalization of randomized benchmarking that relaxes the usual unitary 2-design condition. Combining this protocol with existing randomized benchmarking schemes enables practical universal gate sets for quantum information processing to be characterized in a way that is robust against state-preparation and measurement errors. In particular, our protocol enables direct benchmarking of the π /8 gate even under the gate-dependent error model that is expected in leading approaches to fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  19. Benchmarks for acute stroke care delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Ruth E.; Khan, Ferhana; Bayley, Mark T.; Asllani, Eriola; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D.; O'Callaghan, Christina; Silver, Frank L.; Kapral, Moira K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite widespread interest in many jurisdictions in monitoring and improving the quality of stroke care delivery, benchmarks for most stroke performance indicators have not been established. The objective of this study was to develop data-derived benchmarks for acute stroke quality indicators. Design Nine key acute stroke quality indicators were selected from the Canadian Stroke Best Practice Performance Measures Manual. Participants A population-based retrospective sample of patients discharged from 142 hospitals in Ontario, Canada, between 1 April 2008 and 31 March 2009 (N = 3191) was used to calculate hospital rates of performance and benchmarks. Intervention The Achievable Benchmark of Care (ABC™) methodology was used to create benchmarks based on the performance of the upper 15% of patients in the top-performing hospitals. Main Outcome Measures Benchmarks were calculated for rates of neuroimaging, carotid imaging, stroke unit admission, dysphasia screening and administration of stroke-related medications. Results The following benchmarks were derived: neuroimaging within 24 h, 98%; admission to a stroke unit, 77%; thrombolysis among patients arriving within 2.5 h, 59%; carotid imaging, 93%; dysphagia screening, 88%; antithrombotic therapy, 98%; anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, 94%; antihypertensive therapy, 92% and lipid-lowering therapy, 77%. ABC™ acute stroke care benchmarks achieve or exceed the consensus-based targets required by Accreditation Canada, with the exception of dysphagia screening. Conclusions Benchmarks for nine hospital-based acute stroke care quality indicators have been established. These can be used in the development of standards for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:24141011

  20. Method and system for benchmarking computers

    DOEpatents

    Gustafson, John L.

    1993-09-14

    A testing system and method for benchmarking computer systems. The system includes a store containing a scalable set of tasks to be performed to produce a solution in ever-increasing degrees of resolution as a larger number of the tasks are performed. A timing and control module allots to each computer a fixed benchmarking interval in which to perform the stored tasks. Means are provided for determining, after completion of the benchmarking interval, the degree of progress through the scalable set of tasks and for producing a benchmarking rating relating to the degree of progress for each computer.

  1. The Zoo, Benchmarks & You: How To Reach the Oregon State Benchmarks with Zoo Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document aligns Oregon state educational benchmarks and standards with Oregon Zoo resources. Benchmark areas examined include English, mathematics, science, social studies, and career and life roles. Brief descriptions of the programs offered by the zoo are presented. (SOE)

  2. Implementing Guided Reading Strategies with Kindergarten and First Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Lindsey; Dornbush, Abby; Giddings, Anne; Thomas, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In the action research project report, the teacher researchers found that many kindergarten and first-grade students did not have the reading readiness skills to be reading at their benchmark target. The purpose of the project was to improve the students overall reading ability. The dates of the project began on September 8 through December 20,…

  3. Language Arts Curriculum Framework: Sample Curriculum Model, Grade 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Based on the 1998 Arkansas State Language Arts Framework, this sample curriculum model for grade one language arts is divided into sections focusing on writing; listening, speaking, and viewing; and reading. Each section lists standards; benchmarks; assessments; and strategies/activities. The reading section itself is divided into print awareness;…

  4. HPC Analytics Support. Requirements for Uncertainty Quantification Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Purohit, Sumit; Rodriguez, Luke R.

    2015-05-01

    This report outlines techniques for extending benchmark generation products so they support uncertainty quantification by benchmarked systems. We describe how uncertainty quantification requirements can be presented to candidate analytical tools supporting SPARQL. We describe benchmark data sets for evaluating uncertainty quantification, as well as an approach for using our benchmark generator to produce data sets for generating benchmark data sets.

  5. Benchmarking ICRF simulations for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    R. V. Budny, L. Berry, R. Bilato, P. Bonoli, M. Brambilla, R.J. Dumont, A. Fukuyama, R. Harvey, E.F. Jaeger, E. Lerche, C.K. Phillips, V. Vdovin, J. Wright, and members of the ITPA-IOS

    2010-09-28

    Abstract Benchmarking of full-wave solvers for ICRF simulations is performed using plasma profiles and equilibria obtained from integrated self-consistent modeling predictions of four ITER plasmas. One is for a high performance baseline (5.3 T, 15 MA) DT H-mode plasma. The others are for half-field, half-current plasmas of interest for the pre-activation phase with bulk plasma ion species being either hydrogen or He4. The predicted profiles are used by seven groups to predict the ICRF electromagnetic fields and heating profiles. Approximate agreement is achieved for the predicted heating power partitions for the DT and He4 cases. Profiles of the heating powers and electromagnetic fields are compared.

  6. Benchmarking Multipacting Simulations in VORPAL

    SciTech Connect

    C. Nieter, C. Roark, P. Stoltz, K. Tian

    2009-05-01

    We will present the results of benchmarking simulations run to test the ability of VORPAL to model multipacting processes in Superconducting Radio Frequency structures. VORPAL is an electromagnetic (FDTD) particle-in-cell simulation code originally developed for applications in plasma and beam physics. The addition of conformal boundaries and algorithms for secondary electron emission allow VORPAL to be applied to multipacting processes. We start with simulations of multipacting between parallel plates where there are well understood theoretical predictions for the frequency bands where multipacting is expected to occur. We reproduce the predicted multipacting bands and demonstrate departures from the theoretical predictions when a more sophisticated model of secondary emission is used. Simulations of existing cavity structures developed at Jefferson National Laboratories will also be presented where we compare results from VORPAL to experimental data.

  7. COG validation: SINBAD Benchmark Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lent, E M; Sale, K E; Buck, R M; Descalle, M

    2004-02-23

    We validated COG, a 3D Monte Carlo radiation transport code, against experimental data and MNCP4C simulations from the Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive Database (SINBAD) compiled by RSICC. We modeled three experiments: the Osaka Nickel and Aluminum sphere experiments conducted at the OKTAVIAN facility, and the liquid oxygen experiment conducted at the FNS facility. COG results are in good agreement with experimental data and generally within a few % of MCNP results. There are several possible sources of discrepancy between MCNP and COG results: (1) the cross-section database versions are different, MCNP uses ENDFB VI 1.1 while COG uses ENDFB VIR7, (2) the code implementations are different, and (3) the models may differ slightly. We also limited the use of variance reduction methods when running the COG version of the problems.

  8. Beyond Benchmarking: Value-Adding Metrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitz-enz, Jac

    2007-01-01

    HR metrics has grown up a bit over the past two decades, moving away from simple benchmarking practices and toward a more inclusive approach to measuring institutional performance and progress. In this article, the acknowledged "father" of human capital performance benchmarking provides an overview of several aspects of today's HR metrics…

  9. Sequenced Benchmarks for Geography and History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, John S.; Richardson, Amy T.; Ryan, Susan E.

    2005-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reference documents designed to assist those who are directly involved in the revision and improvement of content standards, as well as teachers who use standards and benchmarks to guide everyday instruction. Reports in the series provide information about how benchmarks might best appear in a sequence of…

  10. Benchmarking Learning and Teaching: Developing a Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson-Smart, Cheryl; Winning, Tracey; Gerzina, Tania; King, Shalinie; Hyde, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for benchmarking teaching and learning in response to an institutional need to validate a new program in Dentistry at the University of Sydney, Australia. Design/methodology/approach: After a collaborative partner, University of Adelaide, was identified, the areas of teaching and learning to be benchmarked, PBL…

  11. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rarick, Heather L.; Godfrey, Sara H.; Kelly, John C.; Crumbley, Robert T.; Wifl, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    To identify best practices for the improvement of software engineering on projects, NASA's Offices of Chief Engineer (OCE) and Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) formed a team led by Heather Rarick and Sally Godfrey to conduct this benchmarking study. The primary goals of the study are to identify best practices that: Improve the management and technical development of software intensive systems; Have a track record of successful deployment by aerospace industries, universities [including research and development (R&D) laboratories], and defense services, as well as NASA's own component Centers; and Identify candidate solutions for NASA's software issues. Beginning in the late fall of 2010, focus topics were chosen and interview questions were developed, based on the NASA top software challenges. Between February 2011 and November 2011, the Benchmark Team interviewed a total of 18 organizations, consisting of five NASA Centers, five industry organizations, four defense services organizations, and four university or university R and D laboratory organizations. A software assurance representative also participated in each of the interviews to focus on assurance and software safety best practices. Interviewees provided a wealth of information on each topic area that included: software policy, software acquisition, software assurance, testing, training, maintaining rigor in small projects, metrics, and use of the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) framework, as well as a number of special topics that came up in the discussions. NASA's software engineering practices compared favorably with the external organizations in most benchmark areas, but in every topic, there were ways in which NASA could improve its practices. Compared to defense services organizations and some of the industry organizations, one of NASA's notable weaknesses involved communication with contractors regarding its policies and requirements for acquired software. One of NASA's strengths

  12. A Seafloor Benchmark for 3-dimensional Geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwell, C. D.; Webb, S. C.; Nooner, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed an inexpensive, permanent seafloor benchmark to increase the longevity of seafloor geodetic measurements. The benchmark provides a physical tie to the sea floor lasting for decades (perhaps longer) on which geodetic sensors can be repeatedly placed and removed with millimeter resolution. Global coordinates estimated with seafloor geodetic techniques will remain attached to the benchmark allowing for the interchange of sensors as they fail or become obsolete, or for the sensors to be removed and used elsewhere, all the while maintaining a coherent series of positions referenced to the benchmark. The benchmark has been designed to free fall from the sea surface with transponders attached. The transponder can be recalled via an acoustic command sent from the surface to release from the benchmark and freely float to the sea surface for recovery. The duration of the sensor attachment to the benchmark will last from a few days to a few years depending on the specific needs of the experiment. The recovered sensors are then available to be reused at other locations, or again at the same site in the future. Three pins on the sensor frame mate precisely and unambiguously with three grooves on the benchmark. To reoccupy a benchmark a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) uses its manipulator arm to place the sensor pins into the benchmark grooves. In June 2014 we deployed four benchmarks offshore central Oregon. We used the ROV Jason to successfully demonstrate the removal and replacement of packages onto the benchmark. We will show the benchmark design and its operational capabilities. Presently models of megathrust slip within the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) are mostly constrained by the sub-aerial GPS vectors from the Plate Boundary Observatory, a part of Earthscope. More long-lived seafloor geodetic measures are needed to better understand the earthquake and tsunami risk associated with a large rupture of the thrust fault within the Cascadia subduction zone

  13. A performance benchmark test for geodynamo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, H.; Heien, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years, a number of numerical dynamo models have successfully represented basic characteristics of the geomagnetic field. As new models and numerical methods continue to be developed, it is important to update and extend benchmarks for testing these models. The first dynamo benchmark of Christensen et al. (2001) was applied to models based on spherical harmonic expansion methods. However, only a few groups have reported results of the dynamo benchmark using local methods (Harder and Hansen, 2005; Matsui and Okuda, 2005; Chan et al., 2007) because of the difficulty treating magnetic boundary conditions based on the local methods. On the other hand, spherical harmonics expansion methods perform poorly on massively parallel computers because global data communications are required for the spherical harmonics expansions to evaluate nonlinear terms. We perform benchmark tests to asses various numerical methods for the next generation of geodynamo simulations. The purpose of this benchmark test is to assess numerical geodynamo models on a massively parallel computational platform. To compare among many numerical methods as possible, we consider the model with the insulated magnetic boundary by Christensen et al. (2001) and with the pseudo vacuum magnetic boundary, because the pseudo vacuum boundaries are implemented easier by using the local method than the magnetic insulated boundaries. In the present study, we consider two kinds of benchmarks, so-called accuracy benchmark and performance benchmark. In the accuracy benchmark, we compare the dynamo models by using modest Ekman and Rayleigh numbers proposed by Christensen et. al. (2001). We investigate a required spatial resolution for each dynamo code to obtain less than 1% difference from the suggested solution of the benchmark test using the two magnetic boundary conditions. In the performance benchmark, we investigate computational performance under the same computational environment. We perform these

  14. Grading More Accurately

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2011-01-01

    Grades matter. College grading systems, however, are often ad hoc and prone to mistakes. This essay focuses on one factor that contributes to high-quality grading systems: grading accuracy (or "efficiency"). I proceed in several steps. First, I discuss the elements of "efficient" (i.e., accurate) grading. Next, I present analytical results…

  15. Benchmarking--Measuring and Comparing for Continuous Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henczel, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of benchmarking focuses on the use of internal and external benchmarking by special librarians. Highlights include defining types of benchmarking; historical development; benefits, including efficiency, improved performance, increased competitiveness, and better decision making; problems, including inappropriate adaptation; developing a…

  16. Consistency and Magnitude of Differences in Reading Curriculum-Based Measurement Slopes in Benchmark versus Strategic Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Sterett H.; Keller-Margulis, Milena A.

    2015-01-01

    Differences in oral reading curriculum-based measurement (R-CBM) slopes based on two commonly used progress monitoring practices in field-based data were compared in this study. Semester-specific R-CBM slopes were calculated for 150 Grade 1 and 2 students who completed benchmark (i.e., 3 R-CBM probes collected 3 times per year) and strategic…

  17. ICSBEP Benchmarks For Nuclear Data Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, J. Blair

    2005-05-01

    The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) — Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Serbia and Montenegro (formerly Yugoslavia), Kazakhstan, Spain, Israel, Brazil, Poland, and the Czech Republic are now participating. South Africa, India, China, and Germany are considering participation. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled "International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments." The 2004 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark specifications for 3331 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for use in validation efforts and for testing basic nuclear data. New to the 2004 Edition of the Handbook is a draft criticality alarm / shielding type benchmark that should be finalized in 2005 along with two other similar benchmarks. The Handbook is being used extensively for nuclear data testing and is expected to be a valuable resource for code and data validation and improvement efforts for decades to come. Specific benchmarks that are useful for testing structural materials such as iron, chromium, nickel, and manganese; beryllium; lead; thorium; and 238U are highlighted.

  18. Effective File I/O Bandwidth Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenseifner, R.; Koniges, A.E.

    2000-02-15

    The effective I/O bandwidth benchmark (b{_}eff{_}io) covers two goals: (1) to achieve a characteristic average number for the I/O bandwidth achievable with parallel MPI-I/O applications, and (2) to get detailed information about several access patterns and buffer lengths. The benchmark examines ''first write'', ''rewrite'' and ''read'' access, strided (individual and shared pointers) and segmented collective patterns on one file per application and non-collective access to one file per process. The number of parallel accessing processes is also varied and well-formed I/O is compared with non-well formed. On systems, meeting the rule that the total memory can be written to disk in 10 minutes, the benchmark should not need more than 15 minutes for a first pass of all patterns. The benchmark is designed analogously to the effective bandwidth benchmark for message passing (b{_}eff) that characterizes the message passing capabilities of a system in a few minutes. First results of the b{_}eff{_}io benchmark are given for IBM SP and Cray T3E systems and compared with existing benchmarks based on parallel Posix-I/O.

  19. Clinically meaningful performance benchmarks in MS

    PubMed Central

    Motl, Robert W.; Scagnelli, John; Pula, John H.; Sosnoff, Jacob J.; Cadavid, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Identify and validate clinically meaningful Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW) performance benchmarks in individuals living with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Cross-sectional study of 159 MS patients first identified candidate T25FW benchmarks. To characterize the clinical meaningfulness of T25FW benchmarks, we ascertained their relationships to real-life anchors, functional independence, and physiologic measurements of gait and disease progression. Candidate T25FW benchmarks were then prospectively validated in 95 subjects using 13 measures of ambulation and cognition, patient-reported outcomes, and optical coherence tomography. Results: T25FW of 6 to 7.99 seconds was associated with a change in occupation due to MS, occupational disability, walking with a cane, and needing “some help” with instrumental activities of daily living; T25FW ≥8 seconds was associated with collecting Supplemental Security Income and government health care, walking with a walker, and inability to do instrumental activities of daily living. During prospective benchmark validation, we trichotomized data by T25FW benchmarks (<6 seconds, 6–7.99 seconds, and ≥8 seconds) and found group main effects on 12 of 13 objective and subjective measures (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Using a cross-sectional design, we identified 2 clinically meaningful T25FW benchmarks of ≥6 seconds (6–7.99) and ≥8 seconds. Longitudinal and larger studies are needed to confirm the clinical utility and relevance of these proposed T25FW benchmarks and to parse out whether there are additional benchmarks in the lower (<6 seconds) and higher (>10 seconds) ranges of performance. PMID:24174581

  20. Developing integrated benchmarks for DOE performance measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, Jr. H.C.

    1992-09-30

    The objectives of this task were to describe and evaluate selected existing sources of information on occupational safety and health with emphasis on hazard and exposure assessment, abatement, training, reporting, and control identifying for exposure and outcome in preparation for developing DOE performance benchmarks. Existing resources and methodologies were assessed for their potential use as practical performance benchmarks. Strengths and limitations of current data resources were identified. Guidelines were outlined for developing new or improved performance factors, which then could become the basis for selecting performance benchmarks. Data bases for non-DOE comparison populations were identified so that DOE performance could be assessed relative to non-DOE occupational and industrial groups. Systems approaches were described which can be used to link hazards and exposure, event occurrence, and adverse outcome factors, as needed to generate valid, reliable, and predictive performance benchmarks. Data bases were identified which contain information relevant to one or more performance assessment categories . A list of 72 potential performance benchmarks was prepared to illustrate the kinds of information that can be produced through a benchmark development program. Current information resources which may be used to develop potential performance benchmarks are limited. There is need to develop an occupational safety and health information and data system in DOE, which is capable of incorporating demonstrated and documented performance benchmarks prior to, or concurrent with the development of hardware and software. A key to the success of this systems approach is rigorous development and demonstration of performance benchmark equivalents to users of such data before system hardware and software commitments are institutionalized.

  1. EDITORIAL: Selected papers from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010) Selected papers from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaerts, Dominiek; Vullers, Ruud

    2011-10-01

    This special section of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering features papers selected from the 10th International Workshop on Micro and Nanotechnology for Power Generation and Energy Conversion Applications (PowerMEMS 2010). The workshop was organized in Leuven, Belgium from 30 November to 3 December 2010 by Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and the imec/Holst Centre. This was a special PowerMEMS Workshop, for several reasons. First of all, we celebrated the 10th anniversary of the workshop: the first PowerMEMS meeting was organized in Sendai, Japan in 2000. None of the organizers or participants of this first meeting could have predicted the impact of the workshop over the next decade. The second reason was that, for the first time, the conference organization spanned two countries: Belgium and the Netherlands. Thanks to the advances in information technology, teams from Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium) and the imec/Holst Centre in Eindhoven (the Netherlands) have been able to work together seamlessly as one team. The objective of the PowerMEMS Workshop is to stimulate innovation in micro and nanotechnology for power generation and energy conversion applications. Its scope ranges from integrated microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) for power generation, dissipation, harvesting, and management, to novel nanostructures and materials for energy-related applications. True to the objective of the PowerMEMSWorkshop, the 2010 technical program covered a broad range of energy related research, ranging from the nanometer to the millimeter scale, discussed in 5 invited and 52 oral presentations, and 112 posters. This special section includes 14 papers covering vibration energy harvesters, thermal applications and micro power systems. Finally, we wish to express sincere appreciation to the members of the International Steering Committee, the Technical Program Committee and last but not least the Local Organizing Committee. This special issue was edited in

  2. ASIS healthcare security benchmarking study.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Effective security has aligned itself into the everyday operations of a healthcare organization. This is evident in every regional market segment, regardless of size, location, and provider clinical expertise or organizational growth. This research addresses key security issues from an acute care provider to freestanding facilities, from rural hospitals and community hospitals to large urban teaching hospitals. Security issues and concerns are identified and addressed daily by senior and middle management. As provider campuses become larger and more diverse, the hospitals surveyed have identified critical changes and improvements that are proposed or pending. Mitigating liabilities and improving patient, visitor, and/or employee safety are consequential to the performance and viability of all healthcare providers. Healthcare organizations have identified the requirement to compete for patient volume and revenue. The facility that can deliver high-quality healthcare in a comfortable, safe, secure, and efficient atmosphere will have a significant competitive advantage over a facility where patient or visitor security and safety is deficient. Continuing changes in healthcare organizations' operating structure and healthcare geographic layout mean changes in leadership and direction. These changes have led to higher levels of corporate responsibility. As a result, each organization participating in this benchmark study has added value and will derive value for the overall benefit of the healthcare providers throughout the nation. This study provides a better understanding of how the fundamental security needs of security in healthcare organizations are being addressed and its solutions identified and implemented. PMID:11602980

  3. Benchmark problems in computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter-Locklear, Freda

    1994-01-01

    A recent directive at NASA Langley is aimed at numerically predicting principal noise sources. During my summer stay, I worked with high-order ENO code, developed by Dr. Harold Atkins, for solving the unsteady compressible Navier-Stokes equations, as it applies to computational aeroacoustics (CAA). A CAA workshop, composed of six categories of benchmark problems, has been organized to test various numerical properties of code. My task was to determine the robustness of Atkins' code for these test problems. In one category, we tested the nonlinear wave propagation of the code for the one-dimensional Euler equations, with initial pressure, density, and velocity conditions. Using freestream boundary conditions, our results were plausible. In another category, we solved the linearized two-dimensional Euler equations to test the effectiveness of radiation boundary conditions. Here we utilized MAPLE to compute eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Jacobian given variable and flux vectors. We experienced a minor problem with inflow and outflow boundary conditions. Next, we solved the quasi one dimensional unsteady flow equations with an incoming acoustic wave of amplitude 10(exp -6). The small amplitude sound wave was incident on a convergent-divergent nozzle. After finding a steady-state solution and then marching forward, our solution indicated that after 30 periods the acoustic wave had dissipated (a period is time required for sound wave to traverse one end of nozzle to other end).

  4. Benchmarking for Bayesian Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Damien; Couëtoux, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    In the Bayesian Reinforcement Learning (BRL) setting, agents try to maximise the collected rewards while interacting with their environment while using some prior knowledge that is accessed beforehand. Many BRL algorithms have already been proposed, but the benchmarks used to compare them are only relevant for specific cases. The paper addresses this problem, and provides a new BRL comparison methodology along with the corresponding open source library. In this methodology, a comparison criterion that measures the performance of algorithms on large sets of Markov Decision Processes (MDPs) drawn from some probability distributions is defined. In order to enable the comparison of non-anytime algorithms, our methodology also includes a detailed analysis of the computation time requirement of each algorithm. Our library is released with all source code and documentation: it includes three test problems, each of which has two different prior distributions, and seven state-of-the-art RL algorithms. Finally, our library is illustrated by comparing all the available algorithms and the results are discussed. PMID:27304891

  5. Metrics and Benchmarks for Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uselton, Samuel P.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    What is a "good" visualization? How can the quality of a visualization be measured? How can one tell whether one visualization is "better" than another? I claim that the true quality of a visualization can only be measured in the context of a particular purpose. The same image generated from the same data may be excellent for one purpose and abysmal for another. A good measure of visualization quality will correspond to the performance of users in accomplishing the intended purpose, so the "gold standard" is user testing. As a user of visualization software (or at least a consultant to such users) I don't expect visualization software to have been tested in this way for every possible use. In fact, scientific visualization (as distinct from more "production oriented" uses of visualization) will continually encounter new data, new questions and new purposes; user testing can never keep up. User need software they can trust, and advice on appropriate visualizations of particular purposes. Considering the following four processes, and their impact on visualization trustworthiness, reveals important work needed to create worthwhile metrics and benchmarks for visualization. These four processes are (1) complete system testing (user-in-loop), (2) software testing, (3) software design and (4) information dissemination. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. The Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS).

    PubMed

    Menze, Bjoern H; Jakab, Andras; Bauer, Stefan; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Farahani, Keyvan; Kirby, Justin; Burren, Yuliya; Porz, Nicole; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Lanczi, Levente; Gerstner, Elizabeth; Weber, Marc-André; Arbel, Tal; Avants, Brian B; Ayache, Nicholas; Buendia, Patricia; Collins, D Louis; Cordier, Nicolas; Corso, Jason J; Criminisi, Antonio; Das, Tilak; Delingette, Hervé; Demiralp, Çağatay; Durst, Christopher R; Dojat, Michel; Doyle, Senan; Festa, Joana; Forbes, Florence; Geremia, Ezequiel; Glocker, Ben; Golland, Polina; Guo, Xiaotao; Hamamci, Andac; Iftekharuddin, Khan M; Jena, Raj; John, Nigel M; Konukoglu, Ender; Lashkari, Danial; Mariz, José Antonió; Meier, Raphael; Pereira, Sérgio; Precup, Doina; Price, Stephen J; Raviv, Tammy Riklin; Reza, Syed M S; Ryan, Michael; Sarikaya, Duygu; Schwartz, Lawrence; Shin, Hoo-Chang; Shotton, Jamie; Silva, Carlos A; Sousa, Nuno; Subbanna, Nagesh K; Szekely, Gabor; Taylor, Thomas J; Thomas, Owen M; Tustison, Nicholas J; Unal, Gozde; Vasseur, Flor; Wintermark, Max; Ye, Dong Hye; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Binsheng; Zikic, Darko; Prastawa, Marcel; Reyes, Mauricio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we report the set-up and results of the Multimodal Brain Tumor Image Segmentation Benchmark (BRATS) organized in conjunction with the MICCAI 2012 and 2013 conferences. Twenty state-of-the-art tumor segmentation algorithms were applied to a set of 65 multi-contrast MR scans of low- and high-grade glioma patients-manually annotated by up to four raters-and to 65 comparable scans generated using tumor image simulation software. Quantitative evaluations revealed considerable disagreement between the human raters in segmenting various tumor sub-regions (Dice scores in the range 74%-85%), illustrating the difficulty of this task. We found that different algorithms worked best for different sub-regions (reaching performance comparable to human inter-rater variability), but that no single algorithm ranked in the top for all sub-regions simultaneously. Fusing several good algorithms using a hierarchical majority vote yielded segmentations that consistently ranked above all individual algorithms, indicating remaining opportunities for further methodological improvements. The BRATS image data and manual annotations continue to be publicly available through an online evaluation system as an ongoing benchmarking resource. PMID:25494501

  7. Updates to the integrated protein-protein interaction benchmarks: Docking benchmark version 5 and affinity benchmark version 2

    PubMed Central

    Vreven, Thom; Moal, Iain H.; Vangone, Anna; Pierce, Brian G.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.; Torchala, Mieczyslaw; Chaleil, Raphael; Jiménez-García, Brian; Bates, Paul A.; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Weng, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    We present an updated and integrated version of our widely used protein-protein docking and binding affinity benchmarks. The benchmarks consist of non-redundant, high quality structures of protein-protein complexes along with the unbound structures of their components. Fifty-five new complexes were added to the docking benchmark, 35 of which have experimentally-measured binding affinities. These updated docking and affinity benchmarks now contain 230 and 179 entries, respectively. In particular, the number of antibody-antigen complexes has increased significantly, by 67% and 74% in the docking and affinity benchmarks, respectively. We tested previously developed docking and affinity prediction algorithms on the new cases. Considering only the top ten docking predictions per benchmark case, a prediction accuracy of 38% is achieved on all 55 cases, and up to 50% for the 32 rigid-body cases only. Predicted affinity scores are found to correlate with experimental binding energies up to r=0.52 overall, and r=0.72 for the rigid complexes. PMID:26231283

  8. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment benchmarking: Recommendations for Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (P2OAs) are an important first step in any pollution prevention program. While P2OAs have been and are being conducted at Hanford, there exists no standard guidance, training, tracking, or systematic approach to identifying and addressing the most important waste streams. The purpose of this paper then is to serve as a guide to the Pollution Prevention group at Westinghouse Hanford in developing and implementing P2OAs at Hanford. By searching the literature and benchmarks other sites and agencies, the best elements from those programs can be incorporated and pitfalls more easily avoided. This search began with the 1988 document that introduces P2OAs (then called Process Waste Assessments, PWAS) by the Environmental Protection Agency. This important document presented the basic framework of P20A features which appeared in almost all later programs. Major Department of Energy programs were also examined, with particular attention to the Defense Programs P20A method of a graded approach, as presented at the Kansas City Plant. The graded approach is a system of conducting P2OAs of varying levels of detail depending on the size and importance of the waste stream. Finally, private industry programs were examined briefly. While all the benchmarked programs had excellent features, it was determined that the size and mission of Hanford precluded lifting any one program for use. Thus, a series of recommendations were made, based on the literature review, in order to begin an extensive program of P2OAs at Hanford. These recommendations are in the areas of: facility Pollution Prevention teams, P20A scope and methodology, guidance documents, training for facilities (and management), technical and informational support, tracking and measuring success, and incentives.

  9. NAS Grid Benchmarks. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob; Frumkin, Michael; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We provide a paper-and-pencil specification of a benchmark suite for computational grids. It is based on the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB). NGB problems are presented as data flow graphs encapsulating an instance of a slightly modified NPB task in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. Like NPB, NGB specifies several different classes (problem sizes). In this report we describe classes S, W, and A, and provide verification values for each. The implementor has the freedom to choose any language, grid environment, security model, fault tolerance/error correction mechanism, etc., as long as the resulting implementation passes the verification test and reports the turnaround time of the benchmark.

  10. Benchmarking ENDF/B-VII.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marck, Steven C.

    2006-12-01

    The new major release VII.0 of the ENDF/B nuclear data library has been tested extensively using benchmark calculations. These were based upon MCNP-4C3 continuous-energy Monte Carlo neutronics simulations, together with nuclear data processed using the code NJOY. Three types of benchmarks were used, viz., criticality safety benchmarks, (fusion) shielding benchmarks, and reference systems for which the effective delayed neutron fraction is reported. For criticality safety, more than 700 benchmarks from the International Handbook of Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments were used. Benchmarks from all categories were used, ranging from low-enriched uranium, compound fuel, thermal spectrum ones (LEU-COMP-THERM), to mixed uranium-plutonium, metallic fuel, fast spectrum ones (MIX-MET-FAST). For fusion shielding many benchmarks were based on IAEA specifications for the Oktavian experiments (for Al, Co, Cr, Cu, LiF, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, W, Zr), Fusion Neutronics Source in Japan (for Be, C, N, O, Fe, Pb), and Pulsed Sphere experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (for 6Li, 7Li, Be, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Ti, Fe, Pb, D 2O, H 2O, concrete, polyethylene and teflon). For testing delayed neutron data more than thirty measurements in widely varying systems were used. Among these were measurements in the Tank Critical Assembly (TCA in Japan) and IPEN/MB-01 (Brazil), both with a thermal spectrum, and two cores in Masurca (France) and three cores in the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA, Japan), all with fast spectra. In criticality safety, many benchmarks were chosen from the category with a thermal spectrum, low-enriched uranium, compound fuel (LEU-COMP-THERM), because this is typical of most current-day reactors, and because these benchmarks were previously underpredicted by as much as 0.5% by most nuclear data libraries (such as ENDF/B-VI.8, JEFF-3.0). The calculated results presented here show that this underprediction is no longer there for ENDF/B-VII.0. The average over 257

  11. Benchmark calculations from summarized data: an example

    SciTech Connect

    Crump, K. S.; Teeguarden, Justin G.

    2009-03-01

    Benchmark calculations often are made from data extracted from publications. Such datamay not be in a formmost appropriate for benchmark analysis, and, as a result, suboptimal and/or non-standard benchmark analyses are often applied. This problem can be mitigated in some cases using Monte Carlo computational methods that allow the likelihood of the published data to be calculated while still using an appropriate benchmark dose (BMD) definition. Such an approach is illustrated herein using data from a study of workers exposed to styrene, in which a hybrid BMD calculation is implemented from dose response data reported only as means and standard deviations of ratios of scores on neuropsychological tests from exposed subjects to corresponding scores from matched controls. The likelihood of the data is computed using a combination of analytic and Monte Carlo integration methods.

  12. DOE Commercial Building Benchmark Models: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Torcelini, P.; Deru, M.; Griffith, B.; Benne, K.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Crawley, D. B.

    2008-07-01

    To provide a consistent baseline of comparison and save time conducting such simulations, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a set of standard benchmark building models. This paper will provide an executive summary overview of these benchmark buildings, and how they can save building analysts valuable time. Fully documented and implemented to use with the EnergyPlus energy simulation program, the benchmark models are publicly available and new versions will be created to maintain compatibility with new releases of EnergyPlus. The benchmark buildings will form the basis for research on specific building technologies, energy code development, appliance standards, and measurement of progress toward DOE energy goals. Having a common starting point allows us to better share and compare research results and move forward to make more energy efficient buildings.

  13. Toward Scalable Benchmarks for Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ethan L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents guidelines for the design of a mass storage system benchmark suite, along with preliminary suggestions for programs to be included. The benchmarks will measure both peak and sustained performance of the system as well as predicting both short- and long-term behavior. These benchmarks should be both portable and scalable so they may be used on storage systems from tens of gigabytes to petabytes or more. By developing a standard set of benchmarks that reflect real user workload, we hope to encourage system designers and users to publish performance figures that can be compared with those of other systems. This will allow users to choose the system that best meets their needs and give designers a tool with which they can measure the performance effects of improvements to their systems.

  14. XWeB: The XML Warehouse Benchmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahboubi, Hadj; Darmont, Jérôme

    With the emergence of XML as a standard for representing business data, new decision support applications are being developed. These XML data warehouses aim at supporting On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) operations that manipulate irregular XML data. To ensure feasibility of these new tools, important performance issues must be addressed. Performance is customarily assessed with the help of benchmarks. However, decision support benchmarks do not currently support XML features. In this paper, we introduce the XML Warehouse Benchmark (XWeB), which aims at filling this gap. XWeB derives from the relational decision support benchmark TPC-H. It is mainly composed of a test data warehouse that is based on a unified reference model for XML warehouses and that features XML-specific structures, and its associate XQuery decision support workload. XWeB's usage is illustrated by experiments on several XML database management systems.

  15. Benchmarking of optical dimerizer systems.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Gopal P; Strickland, Devin; Vrana, Justin D; Tucker, Chandra L

    2014-11-21

    Optical dimerizers are a powerful new class of optogenetic tools that allow light-inducible control of protein-protein interactions. Such tools have been useful for regulating cellular pathways and processes with high spatiotemporal resolution in live cells, and a growing number of dimerizer systems are available. As these systems have been characterized by different groups using different methods, it has been difficult for users to compare their properties. Here, we set about to systematically benchmark the properties of four optical dimerizer systems, CRY2/CIB1, TULIPs, phyB/PIF3, and phyB/PIF6. Using a yeast transcriptional assay, we find significant differences in light sensitivity and fold-activation levels between the red light regulated systems but similar responses between the CRY2/CIB and TULIP systems. Further comparison of the ability of the CRY2/CIB1 and TULIP systems to regulate a yeast MAPK signaling pathway also showed similar responses, with slightly less background activity in the dark observed with CRY2/CIB. In the process of developing this work, we also generated an improved blue-light-regulated transcriptional system using CRY2/CIB in yeast. In addition, we demonstrate successful application of the CRY2/CIB dimerizers using a membrane-tethered CRY2, which may allow for better local control of protein interactions. Taken together, this work allows for a better understanding of the capacities of these different dimerization systems and demonstrates new uses of these dimerizers to control signaling and transcription in yeast. PMID:25350266

  16. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models

  17. Implementation of NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Schultz, Matthew; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Yan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    A number of features make Java an attractive but a debatable choice for High Performance Computing (HPC). In order to gauge the applicability of Java to the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) we have implemented NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java. The performance and scalability of the benchmarks point out the areas where improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation would move Java closer to Fortran in the competition for CFD applications.

  18. Benchmarking in healthcare organizations: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Miles, E

    1994-09-01

    Business survival is increasingly difficult in the contemporary world. In order to survive, organizations need a commitment to excellence and a means of measuring that commitment and its results. Benchmarking provides one method for doing this. As the author describes, benchmarking is a performance improvement method that has been used for centuries. Recently, it has begun to be used in the healthcare industry where it has the potential to improve significantly the efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and quality of healthcare services. PMID:10146064

  19. Simple Benchmark Specifications for Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, Robert C. Jr.; Aghara, Sukesh K.

    2013-01-01

    This report defines space radiation benchmark specifications. This specification starts with simple, monoenergetic, mono-directional particles on slabs and progresses to human models in spacecraft. This report specifies the models and sources needed to what the team performing the benchmark needs to produce in a report. Also included are brief descriptions of how OLTARIS, the NASA Langley website for space radiation analysis, performs its analysis.

  20. Asterisk Grade Study Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokorsky, Eileen A.

    A study was conducted at Passaic County Community College (PCCC) to investigate the operation of a grading system which utilized an asterisk (*) grade to indicate progress in a course until a letter grade was assigned. The study sought to determine the persistence of students receiving the "*" grade, the incidence of cases of students receiving…

  1. Grading. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2006-01-01

    What do grades mean? Is there a commonly understood and acceptable definition for what a grade stands? The current grading system is approximately 100 years old. In the 1700s, students were given feedback but not grades. In 1780, Yale University began using a 4.0 system that is similar to the current system. In the 1830s, Harvard University…

  2. Plus and Minus Grading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farland, Ronnald; Cepeda, Rita

    The current official policy of the California community colleges on grading prohibits the use of plus and minus symbols to modify a standard letter grade. Plus and minus grades may influence a student's grade point average (GPA) either through statistical effects or psychological effects on teachers and students. At its fall 1985 session, and…

  3. Machine characterization and benchmark performance prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saavedra-Barrera, Rafael H.

    1988-01-01

    From runs of standard benchmarks or benchmark suites, it is not possible to characterize the machine nor to predict the run time of other benchmarks which have not been run. A new approach to benchmarking and machine characterization is reported. The creation and use of a machine analyzer is described, which measures the performance of a given machine on FORTRAN source language constructs. The machine analyzer yields a set of parameters which characterize the machine and spotlight its strong and weak points. Also described is a program analyzer, which analyzes FORTRAN programs and determines the frequency of execution of each of the same set of source language operations. It is then shown that by combining a machine characterization and a program characterization, we are able to predict with good accuracy the run time of a given benchmark on a given machine. Characterizations are provided for the Cray-X-MP/48, Cyber 205, IBM 3090/200, Amdahl 5840, Convex C-1, VAX 8600, VAX 11/785, VAX 11/780, SUN 3/50, and IBM RT-PC/125, and for the following benchmark programs or suites: Los Alamos (BMK8A1), Baskett, Linpack, Livermore Loops, Madelbrot Set, NAS Kernels, Shell Sort, Smith, Whetstone and Sieve of Erathostenes.

  4. Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Concepts and Tools

    SciTech Connect

    California Energy Commission; Mathew, Paul; Mills, Evan; Mathew, Paul; Piette, Mary Ann; Bourassa, Norman; Brook, Martha

    2008-02-13

    Most energy benchmarking tools provide static feedback on how one building compares to a larger set of loosely similar buildings, without providing information at the end-use level or on what can be done to reduce consumption, cost, or emissions. In this article--Part 1 of a two-part series--we describe an 'action-oriented benchmarking' approach, which extends whole-building energy benchmarking to include analysis of system and component energy use metrics and features. Action-oriented benchmarking thereby allows users to generate more meaningful metrics and to identify, screen and prioritize potential efficiency improvements. This opportunity assessment process can then be used to inform and optimize a full-scale audit or commissioning process. We introduce a new web-based action-oriented benchmarking system and associated software tool-EnergyIQ. The benchmarking methods, visualizations, and user interface design are informed by an end-user needs assessment survey and best-practice guidelines from ASHRAE.

  5. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. Results We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. Conclusion We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption. PMID:24568600

  6. Benchmarking for Cost Improvement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) conducted the Benchmarking for Cost Improvement initiative with three objectives: Pilot test benchmarking as an EM cost improvement tool; identify areas for cost improvement and recommend actions to address these areas; provide a framework for future cost improvement. The benchmarking initiative featured the use of four principal methods (program classification, nationwide cost improvement survey, paired cost comparison and component benchmarking). Interested parties contributed during both the design and execution phases. The benchmarking initiative was conducted on an accelerated basis. Of necessity, it considered only a limited set of data that may not be fully representative of the diverse and complex conditions found at the many DOE installations. The initiative generated preliminary data about cost differences and it found a high degree of convergence on several issues. Based on this convergence, the report recommends cost improvement strategies and actions. This report describes the steps taken as part of the benchmarking initiative and discusses the findings and recommended actions for achieving cost improvement. The results and summary recommendations, reported below, are organized by the study objectives.

  7. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section 440.330 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.330 Benchmark health benefits coverage. Benchmark coverage is...

  8. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section 440.330 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.330 Benchmark health benefits coverage. Benchmark coverage is...

  9. 42 CFR 440.330 - Benchmark health benefits coverage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Benchmark health benefits coverage. 440.330 Section 440.330 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Benchmark-Equivalent Coverage § 440.330 Benchmark health benefits coverage. Benchmark coverage is...

  10. Memorization techniques: Using mnemonics to learn fifth grade science terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Juan O.

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether mnemonic instruction could assist students in learning fifth-grade science terminology more effectively than traditional-study methods of recall currently in practice The task was to examine if fifth-grade students were able to learn a mnemonic and then use it to understand science vocabulary; subsequently, to determine if students were able to remember the science terms after a period of time. The problem is that in general, elementary school students are not being successful in science achievement at the fifth grade level. In view of this problem, if science performance is increased at the elementary level, then it is likely that students will be successful when tested at the 8th and 10th grade in science with the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) in the future. Two research questions were posited: (1) Is there a difference in recall achievement when a mnemonic such as method of loci, pegword method, or keyword method is used in learning fifth-grade science vocabulary as compared to the traditional-study method? (2) If using a mnemonic in learning fifth-grade science vocabulary was effective on recall achievement, would this achievement be maintained over a span of time? The need for this study was to assist students in learning science terms and concepts for state accountability purposes. The first assumption was that memorization techniques are not commonly applied in fifth-grade science classes in elementary schools. A second assumption was that mnemonic devices could be used successfully in learning science terms and increase long term retention. The first limitation was that the study was conducted on one campus in one school district in South Texas which limited the generalization of the study. The second limitation was that it included random assigned intact groups as opposed to random student assignment to fifth-grade classroom groups.

  11. Storage-Intensive Supercomputing Benchmark Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J; Dossa, D; Gokhale, M; Hysom, D; May, J; Pearce, R; Yoo, A

    2007-10-30

    Critical data science applications requiring frequent access to storage perform poorly on today's computing architectures. This project addresses efficient computation of data-intensive problems in national security and basic science by exploring, advancing, and applying a new form of computing called storage-intensive supercomputing (SISC). Our goal is to enable applications that simply cannot run on current systems, and, for a broad range of data-intensive problems, to deliver an order of magnitude improvement in price/performance over today's data-intensive architectures. This technical report documents much of the work done under LDRD 07-ERD-063 Storage Intensive Supercomputing during the period 05/07-09/07. The following chapters describe: (1) a new file I/O monitoring tool iotrace developed to capture the dynamic I/O profiles of Linux processes; (2) an out-of-core graph benchmark for level-set expansion of scale-free graphs; (3) an entity extraction benchmark consisting of a pipeline of eight components; and (4) an image resampling benchmark drawn from the SWarp program in the LSST data processing pipeline. The performance of the graph and entity extraction benchmarks was measured in three different scenarios: data sets residing on the NFS file server and accessed over the network; data sets stored on local disk; and data sets stored on the Fusion I/O parallel NAND Flash array. The image resampling benchmark compared performance of software-only to GPU-accelerated. In addition to the work reported here, an additional text processing application was developed that used an FPGA to accelerate n-gram profiling for language classification. The n-gram application will be presented at SC07 at the High Performance Reconfigurable Computing Technologies and Applications Workshop. The graph and entity extraction benchmarks were run on a Supermicro server housing the NAND Flash 40GB parallel disk array, the Fusion-io. The Fusion system specs are as follows: SuperMicro X7

  12. Experts discuss how benchmarking improves the healthcare industry. Roundtable discussion.

    PubMed

    Capozzalo, G L; Hlywak, J W; Kenny, B; Krivenko, C A

    1994-09-01

    Healthcare Financial Management engaged four benchmarking experts in a discussion about benchmarking and its role in the healthcare industry. The experts agree that benchmarking by itself does not create change unless it is part of a larger continuous quality improvement program; that benchmarking works best when senior management supports it enthusiastically and when the "appropriate" people are involved; and that benchmarking, when implemented correctly, is one of the best tools available to help healthcare organizations improve their internal processes. PMID:10146069

  13. Benchmark 2 - Springback of a draw / re-draw panel: Part C: Benchmark analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carsley, John E.; Xia, Cedric; Yang, Lianxiang; Stoughton, Thomas B.; Xu, Siguang; Hartfield-Wünsch, Susan E.; Li, Jingjing

    2013-12-01

    Benchmark analysis is summarized for DP600 and AA 5182-O. Nine simulation results submitted for this benchmark study are compared to the physical measurement results. The details on the codes, friction parameters, mesh technology, CPU, and material models are also summarized at the end of this report with the participant information details.

  14. Benchmarking local healthcare-associated infections: available benchmarks and interpretation challenges.

    PubMed

    El-Saed, Aiman; Balkhy, Hanan H; Weber, David J

    2013-10-01

    Growing numbers of healthcare facilities are routinely collecting standardized data on healthcare-associated infection (HAI), which can be used not only to track internal performance but also to compare local data to national and international benchmarks. Benchmarking overall (crude) HAI surveillance metrics without accounting or adjusting for potential confounders can result in misleading conclusions. Methods commonly used to provide risk-adjusted metrics include multivariate logistic regression analysis, stratification, indirect standardization, and restrictions. The characteristics of recognized benchmarks worldwide, including the advantages and limitations are described. The choice of the right benchmark for the data from the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states is challenging. The chosen benchmark should have similar data collection and presentation methods. Additionally, differences in surveillance environments including regulations should be taken into consideration when considering such a benchmark. The GCC center for infection control took some steps to unify HAI surveillance systems in the region. GCC hospitals still need to overcome legislative and logistic difficulties in sharing data to create their own benchmark. The availability of a regional GCC benchmark may better enable health care workers and researchers to obtain more accurate and realistic comparisons. PMID:23999329

  15. Test Nationally, Benchmark Locally: Using Local DIBELS Benchmarks to Predict Performance on the Pssa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferchalk, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) benchmarks are frequently used to make important decision regarding student performance. More information, however, is needed to understand if the nationally-derived benchmarks created by the DIBELS system provide the most accurate criterion for evaluating reading proficiency. The…

  16. Action-Oriented Benchmarking: Using the CEUS Database to Benchmark Commercial Buildings in California

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul; Mills, Evan; Bourassa, Norman; Brook, Martha

    2008-02-01

    The 2006 Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS) database developed by the California Energy Commission is a far richer source of energy end-use data for non-residential buildings than has previously been available and opens the possibility of creating new and more powerful energy benchmarking processes and tools. In this article--Part 2 of a two-part series--we describe the methodology and selected results from an action-oriented benchmarking approach using the new CEUS database. This approach goes beyond whole-building energy benchmarking to more advanced end-use and component-level benchmarking that enables users to identify and prioritize specific energy efficiency opportunities - an improvement on benchmarking tools typically in use today.

  17. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  18. Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Bernadette Lugue; Grove, Robert E; Kodeli, I.; Sartori, Enrico; Gulliford, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Shielding Integral Benchmark Archive and Database (SINBAD) collection of benchmarks was initiated in the early 1990 s. SINBAD is an international collaboration between the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development s Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank (OECD/NEADB) and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SINBAD is a major attempt to compile experiments and corresponding computational models with the goal of preserving institutional knowledge and expertise that need to be handed down to future scientists. SINBAD is also a learning tool for university students and scientists who need to design experiments or gain expertise in modeling and simulation. The SINBAD database is currently divided into three categories fission, fusion, and accelerator benchmarks. Where possible, each experiment is described and analyzed using deterministic or probabilistic (Monte Carlo) radiation transport software.

  19. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. F.; Sale, K.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J. H.; Preston, C. C.

    1991-06-01

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry.

  20. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  1. NAS Parallel Benchmarks, Multi-Zone Versions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Haopiang, Jin

    2003-01-01

    We describe an extension of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) suite that involves solving the application benchmarks LU, BT and SP on collections of loosely coupled discretization meshes. The solutions on the meshes are updated independently, but after each time step they exchange boundary value information. This strategy, which is common among structured-mesh production flow solver codes in use at NASA Ames and elsewhere, provides relatively easily exploitable coarse-grain parallelism between meshes. Since the individual application benchmarks also allow fine-grain parallelism themselves, this NPB extension, named NPB Multi-Zone (NPB-MZ), is a good candidate for testing hybrid and multi-level parallelization tools and strategies.

  2. Analysis of ANS LWR physics benchmark problems.

    SciTech Connect

    Taiwo, T. A.

    1998-07-29

    Various Monte Carlo and deterministic solutions to the three PWR Lattice Benchmark Problems recently defined by the ANS Ad Hoc Committee on Reactor Physics Benchmarks are presented. These solutions were obtained using the VIM continuous-energy Monte Carlo code and the DIF3D/WIMS-D4M code package implemented at the Argonne National Laboratory. The code results for the K{sub eff} and relative pin power distribution are compared to measured values. Additionally, code results for the three benchmark-prescribed infinite lattice configurations are also intercompared. The results demonstrate that the codes produce very good estimates of both the K{sub eff} and power distribution for the critical core and the lattice parameters of the infinite lattice configuration.

  3. Energy benchmarking of South Australian WWTPs.

    PubMed

    Krampe, J

    2013-01-01

    Optimising the energy consumption and energy generation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is a topic with increasing importance for water utilities in times of rising energy costs and pressures to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Assessing the energy efficiency and energy optimisation of a WWTP are difficult tasks as most plants vary greatly in size, process layout and other influencing factors. To overcome these limits it is necessary to compare energy efficiency with a statistically relevant base to identify shortfalls and optimisation potential. Such energy benchmarks have been successfully developed and used in central Europe over the last two decades. This paper demonstrates how the latest available energy benchmarks from Germany have been applied to 24 WWTPs in South Australia. It shows how energy benchmarking can be used to identify shortfalls in current performance, prioritise detailed energy assessments and help inform decisions on capital investment. PMID:23656950

  4. New Test Set for Video Quality Benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raventos, Joaquin

    A new test set design and benchmarking approach (US Patent pending) allows a "standard observer" to assess the end-to-end image quality characteristics of video imaging systems operating in day time or low-light conditions. It uses randomized targets based on extensive application of Photometry, Geometrical Optics, and Digital Media. The benchmarking takes into account the target's contrast sensitivity, its color characteristics, and several aspects of human vision such as visual acuity and dynamic response. The standard observer is part of the "extended video imaging system" (EVIS). The new test set allows image quality benchmarking by a panel of standard observers at the same time. The new approach shows that an unbiased assessment can be guaranteed. Manufacturers, system integrators, and end users will assess end-to-end performance by simulating a choice of different colors, luminance levels, and dynamic conditions in the laboratory or in permanent video systems installations.

  5. Standardized benchmarking in the quest for orthologs.

    PubMed

    Altenhoff, Adrian M; Boeckmann, Brigitte; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Dalquen, Daniel A; DeLuca, Todd; Forslund, Kristoffer; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Linard, Benjamin; Pereira, Cécile; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Schreiber, Fabian; da Silva, Alan Sousa; Szklarczyk, Damian; Train, Clément-Marie; Bork, Peer; Lecompte, Odile; von Mering, Christian; Xenarios, Ioannis; Sjölander, Kimmen; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Martin, Maria J; Muffato, Matthieu; Gabaldón, Toni; Lewis, Suzanna E; Thomas, Paul D; Sonnhammer, Erik; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Achieving high accuracy in orthology inference is essential for many comparative, evolutionary and functional genomic analyses, yet the true evolutionary history of genes is generally unknown and orthologs are used for very different applications across phyla, requiring different precision-recall trade-offs. As a result, it is difficult to assess the performance of orthology inference methods. Here, we present a community effort to establish standards and an automated web-based service to facilitate orthology benchmarking. Using this service, we characterize 15 well-established inference methods and resources on a battery of 20 different benchmarks. Standardized benchmarking provides a way for users to identify the most effective methods for the problem at hand, sets a minimum requirement for new tools and resources, and guides the development of more accurate orthology inference methods. PMID:27043882

  6. Gleason grading system

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000920.htm Gleason grading system To use the sharing features on this page, ... score of between 5 and 7. Gleason Grading System Sometimes, it can be hard to predict how ...

  7. Two-dimensional benchmark calculations for PNL-30 through PNL-35

    SciTech Connect

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1997-09-01

    Interest in critical experiments with lattices of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pins has been revived by the possibility that light water reactors will be used for disposition of weapons-grade plutonium. A series of six experiments with MOX lattices, designated PNL-30 through PNL-35, was performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratories in 1975 and 1976, and a set of benchmark specifications for these experiments subsequently was adopted by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). Although there appear to be some problems with these experiments, they remain the only CSEWG benchmarks for MOX lattices. The number of fuel pins in these experiments is relatively low, corresponding to fewer than 4 typical pressurized-water-reactor fuel assemblies. Accordingly, they are more appropriate as benchmarks for lattice-physics codes than for reactor-core simulator codes. Unfortunately, the CSEWG specifications retain the full three-dimensional (3D) detail of the experiments, while lattice-physics codes almost universally are limited to two dimensions (2D). This paper proposes an extension of the benchmark specifications to include a 2D model, and it justifies that extension by comparing results from the MCNP Monte Carlo code for the 2D and 3D specifications.

  8. Highlights of 10th plasma chemistry meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Hozumi, K.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical structure is given of a film formed by plasma polymerization from pyridine monomers. The film has a hydrophilic chemical structure, its molecular weight is 900, and the molecular system is C55H50N10O3. The electrical characteristics of a plasma polymerized film are described. The film has good insulating properties and was successfully applied as video disc coating. Etching resistance properties make it possible to use the film as a resist in etching. The characteristics of plasma polymer formed from monomers containing tetramethyltin are discussed. The polymer is in film form, displays good adhesiveness, is similar to UV film UV 35 in light absorption and is highly insulating.

  9. Part C Updates. 10th Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goode, Sue; Lazara, Alex; Danaher, Joan

    2008-01-01

    "Part C Updates" is a compilation of information on various aspects of the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This is the tenth volume in a series of compilations, which included two editions of Part H Updates, the former name of the program.…

  10. 10th Annual School Construction Report, 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul

    2005-01-01

    School construction in the United States dipped below $20 billion in 2003, the first time that had happened in the 21st Century, setting off alarm bells that the school construction boom might be fading. That concern appears to be unfounded. In 2004, school districts in the United States once again completed more than $20 billion worth of…

  11. Win That Job! 10th Anniversary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Paul

    This book provides practical information on obtaining a job. Though it is published in Australia, 11 chapters introduce a universal range of job search methods, presenting: the importance of goals and self-knowledge; the resume; preparing job search correspondence; the interview; self-promotion; job search tips and unusual strategies; networking;…

  12. 10th Anniversary P.S.

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    John Adams parle de la préhistoire du P.S. avec présentation des dias. Le DG B.Gregory prend la parole. Les organisateurs présentent sous la direction du "Prof.Ocktette"(?) un sketch très humoristique (p.e.existence de Quark etc.....)

  13. Benchmarks for the point kinetics equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapol, B.; Picca, P.; Previti, A.; Mostacci, D.

    2013-07-01

    A new numerical algorithm is presented for the solution to the point kinetics equations (PKEs), whose accurate solution has been sought for over 60 years. The method couples the simplest of finite difference methods, a backward Euler, with Richardsons extrapolation, also called an acceleration. From this coupling, a series of benchmarks have emerged. These include cases from the literature as well as several new ones. The novelty of this presentation lies in the breadth of reactivity insertions considered, covering both prescribed and feedback reactivities, and the extreme 8- to 9- digit accuracy achievable. The benchmarks presented are to provide guidance to those who wish to develop further numerical improvements. (authors)

  14. Benchmark testing of {sup 233}U evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R.Q.; Leal, L.C.

    1997-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the adequacy of available {sup 233}U cross-section data (ENDF/B-VI and JENDL-3) for calculation of critical experiments. An ad hoc revised {sup 233}U evaluation is also tested and appears to give results which are improved relative to those obtained with either ENDF/B-VI or JENDL-3 cross sections. Calculations of k{sub eff} were performed for ten fast benchmarks and six thermal benchmarks using the three cross-section sets. Central reaction-rate-ratio calculations were also performed.

  15. Benchmarking: implementing the process in practice.

    PubMed

    Stark, Sheila; MacHale, Anita; Lennon, Eileen; Shaw, Lynne

    Government guidance and policy promotes the use of benchmarks as measures against which practice and care can be measured. This provides the motivation for practitioners to make changes to improve patient care. Adopting a systematic approach, practitioners can implement changes in practice quickly. The process requires motivation and communication between professionals of all disciplines. It provides a forum for sharing good practice and developing a support network. In this article the authors outline the initial steps taken by three PCGs in implementing the benchmarking process as they move towards primary care trust status. PMID:12212335

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory computer benchmarking 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    Evaluating the performance of computing machinery is a continual effort of the Computer Research and Applications Group of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This report summarizes the results of the group's benchmarking activities performed between October 1981 and September 1982, presenting compilation and execution times as well as megaflop rates for a set of benchmark codes. Tests were performed on the following computers: Cray Research, Inc. (CRI) Cray-1S; Control Data Corporation (CDC) 7600, 6600, Cyber 73, Cyber 825, Cyber 835, Cyber 855, and Cyber 205; Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX 11/780 and VAX 11/782; and Apollo Computer, Inc., Apollo.

  17. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Sample, B.E.; Opresko, D.M.; Suter, G.W., II

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets.

  18. Benchmark 4 - Wrinkling during cup drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Robert; Cardoso, Rui; Paulino, Mariana; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2013-12-01

    Benchmark-4 is designed to predict wrinkling during cup drawing. Two different punch geometries have been selected in order to investigate the changes of wrinkling amplitude and wave. To study the effect of material on wrinkling, two distinct materials including AA 5042 and AKDQ steel are also considered in the benchmark. Problem description, material properties, and simulation reports with experimental data are summarized. At the request of the author, and Proceedings Editor, a corrected and updated version of this paper was published on January 2, 2014. The Corrigendum attached to the updated article PDF contains a list of the changes made to the original published version.

  19. Grade-A Perfect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Despite the wealth of information available, there is no consensus on best practices for grading. In this article, the author identifies four key philosophical questions that should guide the development of a teacher's grading system and provides tips that can help principals guide teachers in developing a grading system. (Contains 1 figure.)

  20. General Graded Response Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    This paper describes the graded response model. The graded response model represents a family of mathematical models that deal with ordered polytomous categories, such as: (1) letter grading; (2) an attitude survey with "strongly disagree, disagree, agree, and strongly agree" choices; (3) partial credit given in accord with an individual's degree…

  1. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system. PMID:27393141

  2. Bias in Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malouff, John

    2008-01-01

    Bias in grading can be conscious or unconscious. The author describes different types of bias, such as those based on student attractiveness or performance in prior courses, and a variety of methods of reducing bias, including keeping students anonymous during grading and using detailed criteria for subjective grading.

  3. Redesigning Grading--Districtwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsley, Matt

    2014-01-01

    In the first years of his career as a high school math teacher, Matt Townsley was bothered by the fact that his grades penalized students for not learning content quickly. A student could master every standard, but low quiz grades and homework assignments they didn't complete because they didn't understand would lower their final grade,…

  4. Overview of TPC Benchmark E: The Next Generation of OLTP Benchmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Trish

    Set to replace the aging TPC-C, the TPC Benchmark E is the next generation OLTP benchmark, which more accurately models client database usage. TPC-E addresses the shortcomings of TPC-C. It has a much more complex workload, requires the use of RAID-protected storage, generates much less I/O, and is much cheaper and easier to set up, run, and audit. After a period of overlap, it is expected that TPC-E will become the de facto OLTP benchmark.

  5. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results 3-95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Bailey, David H.; Walter, Howard (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a "pencil and paper" fashion, i.e., the complete details of the problem are given in a NAS technical document. Except for a few restrictions, benchmark implementors are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: CRAY C90, CRAY T90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: CRAY T3D, IBM SP2-WN (Wide Nodes), and IBM SP2-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); and (c) Symmetric Multiprocessors: Convex Exemplar SPPIOOO, CRAY J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL (75 MHz). We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention future NAS plans for the NPB.

  6. Benchmarking 2011: Trends in Education Philanthropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantmakers for Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The analysis in "Benchmarking 2011" is based on data from an unduplicated sample of 184 education grantmaking organizations--approximately two-thirds of Grantmakers for Education's (GFE's) network of grantmakers--who responded to an online survey consisting of fixed-choice and open-ended questions. Because a different subset of funders elects to…

  7. Benchmarking 2010: Trends in Education Philanthropy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearman, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    "Benchmarking 2010" offers insights into the current priorities, practices and concerns of education grantmakers. The report is divided into five sections: (1) Mapping the Education Grantmaking Landscape; (2) 2010 Funding Priorities; (3) Strategies for Leveraging Greater Impact; (4) Identifying Significant Trends in Education Funding; and (5)…

  8. Benchmarking Year Five Students' Reading Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Chang Kuan; Eng, Lin Siew; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Reading and understanding a written text is one of the most important skills in English learning.This study attempts to benchmark Year Five students' reading abilities of fifteen rural schools in a district in Malaysia. The objectives of this study are to develop a set of standardised written reading comprehension and a set of indicators to inform…

  9. Benchmark Generation using Domain Specific Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, Ngoc B.; Zhu, Liming; Gorton, Ian; Liu, Yan

    2007-08-01

    Performance benchmarks are domain specific applications that are specialized to a certain set of technologies and platforms. The development of a benchmark application requires mapping the performance specific domain concepts to an implementation and producing complex technology and platform specific code. Domain Specific Modeling (DSM) promises to bridge the gap between application domains and implementations by allowing designers to specify solutions in domain-specific abstractions and semantics through Domain Specific Languages (DSL). This allows generation of a final implementation automatically from high level models. The modeling and task automation benefits obtained from this approach usually justify the upfront cost involved. This paper employs a DSM based approach to invent a new DSL, DSLBench, for benchmark generation. DSLBench and its associated code generation facilities allow the design and generation of a completely deployable benchmark application for performance testing from a high level model. DSLBench is implemented using Microsoft Domain Specific Language toolkit. It is integrated with the Visual Studio 2005 Team Suite as a plug-in to provide extra modeling capabilities for performance testing. We illustrate the approach using a case study based on .Net and C#.

  10. Benchmarking: A New Approach to Space Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Ira

    1999-01-01

    Questions some fundamental assumptions of historical methods of space guidelines in college facility planning, and offers an alternative approach to space projections based on a new benchmarking method. The method, currently in use at several institutions, uses space per faculty member as the basis for prediction of need and space allocation. (MSE)

  11. Issues in Benchmarking and Assessing Institutional Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furco, Andrew; Miller, William

    2009-01-01

    The process of assessing and benchmarking community engagement can take many forms. To date, more than two dozen assessment tools for measuring community engagement institutionalization have been published. These tools vary substantially in purpose, level of complexity, scope, process, structure, and focus. While some instruments are designed to…

  12. Benchmarking Peer Production Mechanisms, Processes & Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Thomas; Kretschmer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This deliverable identifies key approaches for quality management in peer production by benchmarking peer production practices and processes in other areas. (Contains 29 footnotes, 13 figures and 2 tables.)[This report has been authored with contributions of: Kaisa Honkonen-Ratinen, Matti Auvinen, David Riley, Jose Pinzon, Thomas Fischer, Thomas…

  13. Cleanroom Energy Efficiency: Metrics and Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    International SEMATECH Manufacturing Initiative; Mathew, Paul A.; Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Beasley, James

    2010-07-07

    Cleanrooms are among the most energy-intensive types of facilities. This is primarily due to the cleanliness requirements that result in high airflow rates and system static pressures, as well as process requirements that result in high cooling loads. Various studies have shown that there is a wide range of cleanroom energy efficiencies and that facility managers may not be aware of how energy efficient their cleanroom facility can be relative to other cleanroom facilities with the same cleanliness requirements. Metrics and benchmarks are an effective way to compare one facility to another and to track the performance of a given facility over time. This article presents the key metrics and benchmarks that facility managers can use to assess, track, and manage their cleanroom energy efficiency or to set energy efficiency targets for new construction. These include system-level metrics such as air change rates, air handling W/cfm, and filter pressure drops. Operational data are presented from over 20 different cleanrooms that were benchmarked with these metrics and that are part of the cleanroom benchmark dataset maintained by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Overall production efficiency metrics for cleanrooms in 28 semiconductor manufacturing facilities in the United States and recorded in the Fabs21 database are also presented.

  14. Closed benchmarks for network community structure characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Marín, Ignacio

    2012-02-01

    Characterizing the community structure of complex networks is a key challenge in many scientific fields. Very diverse algorithms and methods have been proposed to this end, many working reasonably well in specific situations. However, no consensus has emerged on which of these methods is the best to use in practice. In part, this is due to the fact that testing their performance requires the generation of a comprehensive, standard set of synthetic benchmarks, a goal not yet fully achieved. Here, we present a type of benchmark that we call “closed,” in which an initial network of known community structure is progressively converted into a second network whose communities are also known. This approach differs from all previously published ones, in which networks evolve toward randomness. The use of this type of benchmark allows us to monitor the transformation of the community structure of a network. Moreover, we can predict the optimal behavior of the variation of information, a measure of the quality of the partitions obtained, at any moment of the process. This enables us in many cases to determine the best partition among those suggested by different algorithms. Also, since any network can be used as a starting point, extensive studies and comparisons can be performed using a heterogeneous set of structures, including random ones. These properties make our benchmarks a general standard for comparing community detection algorithms.

  15. Benchmark graphs for testing community detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancichinetti, Andrea; Fortunato, Santo; Radicchi, Filippo

    2008-10-01

    Community structure is one of the most important features of real networks and reveals the internal organization of the nodes. Many algorithms have been proposed but the crucial issue of testing, i.e., the question of how good an algorithm is, with respect to others, is still open. Standard tests include the analysis of simple artificial graphs with a built-in community structure, that the algorithm has to recover. However, the special graphs adopted in actual tests have a structure that does not reflect the real properties of nodes and communities found in real networks. Here we introduce a class of benchmark graphs, that account for the heterogeneity in the distributions of node degrees and of community sizes. We use this benchmark to test two popular methods of community detection, modularity optimization, and Potts model clustering. The results show that the benchmark poses a much more severe test to algorithms than standard benchmarks, revealing limits that may not be apparent at a first analysis.

  16. A MULTIMODEL APPROACH FOR CALCULATING BENCHMARK DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory


    A Multimodel Approach for Calculating Benchmark Dose
    Ramon I. Garcia and R. Woodrow Setzer

    In the assessment of dose response, a number of plausible dose- response models may give fits that are consistent with the data. If no dose response formulation had been speci...

  17. MHEC Survey Establishes Midwest Property Insurance Benchmarks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midwestern Higher Education Commission Risk Management Institute Research Bulletin, 1994

    1994-01-01

    This publication presents the results of a survey of over 200 midwestern colleges and universities on their property insurance programs and establishes benchmarks to help these institutions evaluate their insurance programs. Findings included the following: (1) 51 percent of respondents currently purchase their property insurance as part of a…

  18. What Is the Impact of Subject Benchmarking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pidcock, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of subject benchmarking led to fears of increased external intervention in the activities of universities and a more restrictive view of institutional autonomy, accompanied by an undermining of the academic profession, particularly through the perceived threat of the introduction of a national curriculum for higher education. For…

  19. Benchmark Problems for Spacecraft Formation Flying Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Leitner, Jesse A.; Burns, Richard D.; Folta, David C.

    2003-01-01

    To provide high-level focus to distributed space system flight dynamics and control research, several benchmark problems are suggested. These problems are not specific to any current or proposed mission, but instead are intended to capture high-level features that would be generic to many similar missions.

  20. The Relationship of Error Rate and Comprehension in Second and Third Grade Oral Reading Fluency

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Mary; Wills, Howard; Miller, Angela; Kaufman, Journ

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relationships of oral reading speed and error rate on comprehension with second and third grade students with identified reading risk. The study included 920 2nd graders and 974 3rd graders. Participants were assessed using Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS) and the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test (WRMT) Passage Comprehension subtest. Results from this study further illuminate the significant relationships between error rate, oral reading fluency, and reading comprehension performance, and grade-specific guidelines for appropriate error rate levels. Low oral reading fluency and high error rates predict the level of passage comprehension performance. For second grade students below benchmark, a fall assessment error rate of 28% predicts that student comprehension performance will be below average. For third grade students below benchmark, the fall assessment cut point is 14%. Instructional implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:24319307

  1. Finding a benchmark for monitoring hospital cleanliness.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, D; Redding, P; Robertson, C; Woodall, C; Kingsmore, P; Bedwell, D; Dancer, S J

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated three methods for monitoring hospital cleanliness. The aim was to find a benchmark that could indicate risk to patients from a contaminated environment. We performed visual monitoring, ATP bioluminescence and microbiological screening of five clinical surfaces before and after detergent-based cleaning on two wards over a four-week period. Five additional sites that were not featured in the routine domestic specification were also sampled. Measurements from all three methods were integrated and compared in order to choose appropriate levels for routine monitoring. We found that visual assessment did not reflect ATP values nor environmental contamination with microbial flora including Staphylococcus aureus and meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). There was a relationship between microbial growth categories and the proportion of ATP values exceeding a chosen benchmark but neither reliably predicted the presence of S. aureus or MRSA. ATP values were occasionally diverse. Detergent-based cleaning reduced levels of organic soil by 32% (95% confidence interval: 16-44%; P<0.001) but did not necessarily eliminate indicator staphylococci, some of which survived the cleaning process. An ATP benchmark value of 100 relative light units offered the closest correlation with microbial growth levels <2.5 cfu/cm(2) (receiver operating characteristic ROC curve sensitivity: 57%; specificity: 57%). In conclusion, microbiological and ATP monitoring confirmed environmental contamination, persistence of hospital pathogens and measured the effect on the environment from current cleaning practices. This study has provided provisional benchmarks to assist with future assessment of hospital cleanliness. Further work is required to refine practical sampling strategy and choice of benchmarks. PMID:21129820

  2. Using Benchmarking To Influence Tuition and Fee Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbell, Loren W. Loomis; Massa, Robert J.; Lapovsky, Lucie

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the use of benchmarking in managing enrollment. Using a case study, illustrates how benchmarking can help administrators develop strategies for planning and implementing admissions and pricing practices. (EV)

  3. Results Oriented Benchmarking: The Evolution of Benchmarking at NASA from Competitive Comparisons to World Class Space Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Informal benchmarking using personal or professional networks has taken place for many years at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recognized early on, the need to formalize the benchmarking process for better utilization of resources and improved benchmarking performance. The need to compete in a faster, better, cheaper environment has been the catalyst for formalizing these efforts. A pioneering benchmarking consortium was chartered at KSC in January 1994. The consortium known as the Kennedy Benchmarking Clearinghouse (KBC), is a collaborative effort of NASA and all major KSC contractors. The charter of this consortium is to facilitate effective benchmarking, and leverage the resulting quality improvements across KSC. The KBC acts as a resource with experienced facilitators and a proven process. One of the initial actions of the KBC was to develop a holistic methodology for Center-wide benchmarking. This approach to Benchmarking integrates the best features of proven benchmarking models (i.e., Camp, Spendolini, Watson, and Balm). This cost-effective alternative to conventional Benchmarking approaches has provided a foundation for consistent benchmarking at KSC through the development of common terminology, tools, and techniques. Through these efforts a foundation and infrastructure has been built which allows short duration benchmarking studies yielding results gleaned from world class partners that can be readily implemented. The KBC has been recognized with the Silver Medal Award (in the applied research category) from the International Benchmarking Clearinghouse.

  4. Success by Eight Evaluation: Benchmarks for Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolcott, Deborah; Sockwell, Recardo; Blum, Holly; Hansborough, Ann; Fowler, Dorothy; Farley, Muriel; Wald, Penelope

    Success by Eight is a pilot program of the Fairfax County (Virginia) Public Schools for students in kindergarten through grade 2. The initiative is designed to provide a group of six pilot schools with training and additional resources in implementing a specific set of components to prepare students for the third grade. These components are: (1)…

  5. A Simple Alternative to Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Glenda

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author investigates whether an alternative grading system (contract grading) would yield the same final grades as traditional grading (letter grading), and whether or not it would be accepted by students. The author states that this study demonstrated that contract grading was widely, and for the most part, enthusiastically…

  6. Relationship between the TCAP and the Pearson Benchmark Assessment in Elementary Students' Reading and Math Performance in a Northeastern Tennessee School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugger-Roberts, Cherith A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine if there was a relationship between the TCAP test and Pearson Benchmark assessment in elementary students' reading and language arts and math performance in a northeastern Tennessee school district. This study involved 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th grade students. The study focused on the following…

  7. 42 CFR 414.1255 - Benchmarks for cost measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Benchmarks for cost measures. 414.1255 Section 414... Payment Modifier Under the Physician Fee Schedule § 414.1255 Benchmarks for cost measures. The benchmark for each cost measure is the national mean of the performance rates calculated among all groups...

  8. 42 CFR 414.1255 - Benchmarks for cost measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Benchmarks for cost measures. 414.1255 Section 414... Payment Modifier Under the Physician Fee Schedule § 414.1255 Benchmarks for cost measures. (a) For the CY 2015 payment adjustment period, the benchmark for each cost measure is the national mean of...

  9. Taking Stock of Corporate Benchmarking Practices: Panacea or Pandora's Box?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleisher, Craig S.; Burton, Sara

    1995-01-01

    Discusses why corporate communications/public relations (cc/pr) should be benchmarked (an approach used by cc/pr managers to demonstrate the value of their activities to skeptical organizational executives). Discusses myths about cc/pr benchmarking; types, targets, and focus of cc/pr benchmarking; a process model; and critical decisions about…

  10. Discovering and Implementing Best Practices to Strengthen SEAs: Collaborative Benchmarking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Building State Capacity and Productivity Center, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper is written for state educational agency (SEA) leaders who are considering the benefits of collaborative benchmarking, and it addresses the following questions: (1) What does benchmarking of best practices entail?; (2) How does "collaborative benchmarking" enhance the process?; (3) How do SEAs control the process so that "their" needs…

  11. 42 CFR 422.258 - Calculation of benchmarks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of benchmarks. 422.258 Section 422.258... and Plan Approval § 422.258 Calculation of benchmarks. (a) The term “MA area-specific non-drug monthly... the plan bids. (c) Calculation of MA regional non-drug benchmark amount. CMS calculates the...

  12. Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Mavriplis, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    We present a complete specification of a new benchmark for measuring the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. It complements the existing NAS Parallel Benchmark suite. The benchmark involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem in a cubic domain, discretized on an adaptively refined, unstructured mesh.

  13. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 2. Technical Report #1209

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  14. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 8. Technical Report #1215

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  15. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 3. Technical Report #1210

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  16. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 7. Technical Report #1214

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  17. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 4. Technical Report #1211

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  18. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 6. Technical Report # 1213

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  19. The Development of CBM Vocabulary Measures: Grade 5. Technical Report #1212

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Anderson, Daniel; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development and piloting of a series of vocabulary assessments intended for use with students in grades two through eight. These measures, available as part of easyCBM[TM], an online progress monitoring and benchmark/screening assessment system, were developed in 2010 and administered to approximately 1200…

  20. Student Performance on the 2013 Assessment Program in Primary Reading (Kindergarten to Grade 2). Memorandum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Geoffrey T.

    2013-01-01

    This evaluation report provides details for school year 2013 on the percentage of primary students who met or exceeded grade-level reading benchmarks on the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools' (MCPS) Assessment Program in Primary Reading (AP-PR). The percentage remained above 90% for kindergarten students and showed a small decrease for…

  1. Florida Course Descriptions: Exceptional Student Education, Grades 9-12, 1999 Revisions. Suggested Course Performance Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Bureau of Instructional Support and Community Services.

    This document presents the full revised course descriptions for Florida exceptional student education in grades 9-12. Courses incorporate the Florida standards for a special diploma. Requirements include a list of related benchmarks from the state standards for each level of functioning: independent, supported, and participatory. Introductory…

  2. Aiming High and Falling Short: California's Eighth-Grade Algebra-for-All Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domina, Thurston; McEachin, Andrew; Penner, Andrew; Penner, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of an effort to intensify middle school mathematics curricula by enrolling more 8th graders in Algebra. California is at the forefront of this effort, and in 2008, the state moved to make Algebra the accountability benchmark test for 8th-grade mathematics. This article takes advantage of this unevenly implemented…

  3. Why 12th Grade Must Be Redesigned Now--and How

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Joel

    2015-01-01

    This first report in a new series by Jobs For the Future (JFF) provides the rationale for restructuring 12th grade and tying it more tightly to the first year of college through new high school and college partnerships. The paper proposes a new common benchmark of readiness that high schools and colleges can work together to meet to ensure…

  4. OCTALIS benchmarking: comparison of four watermarking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piron, Laurent; Arnold, Michael; Kutter, Martin; Funk, Wolfgang; Boucqueau, Jean M.; Craven, Fiona

    1999-04-01

    In this paper, benchmarking results of watermarking techniques are presented. The benchmark includes evaluation of the watermark robustness and the subjective visual image quality. Four different algorithms are compared, and exhaustively tested. One goal of these tests is to evaluate the feasibility of a Common Functional Model (CFM) developed in the European Project OCTALIS and determine parameters of this model, such as the length of one watermark. This model solves the problem of image trading over an insecure network, such as Internet, and employs hybrid watermarking. Another goal is to evaluate the resistance of the watermarking techniques when subjected to a set of attacks. Results show that the tested techniques do not have the same behavior and that no tested methods has optimal characteristics. A last conclusion is that, as for the evaluation of compression techniques, clear guidelines are necessary to evaluate and compare watermarking techniques.

  5. Specification for the VERA Depletion Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kang Seog

    2015-12-17

    CASL-X-2015-1014-000 iii Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The CASL neutronics simulator MPACT is under development for the neutronics and T-H coupled simulation for the pressurized water reactor. MPACT includes the ORIGEN-API and internal depletion module to perform depletion calculations based upon neutron-material reaction and radioactive decay. It is a challenge to validate the depletion capability because of the insufficient measured data. One of the detoured methods to validate it is to perform a code-to-code comparison for benchmark problems. In this study a depletion benchmark suite has been developed and a detailed guideline has been provided to obtain meaningful computational outcomes which can be used in the validation of the MPACT depletion capability.

  6. Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1994-08-15

    The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41[degree] API < 0.34 wt % sulfur crude is gathered in West Texas and moved to Cushing, Okla., for distribution. The WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing.

  7. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 55 chemicals on six representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, white-footed mouse, cottontail ink, red fox, and whitetail deer) and eight avian wildlife species (American robin, woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, Cooper`s hawk, and redtailed hawk) (scientific names are presented in Appendix C). These species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The benchmarks presented in this report are values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species.

  8. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Tatiana; Laville, Cedric; Dyrda, James; Mennerdahl, Dennis; Golovko, Yury; Raskach, Kirill; Tsiboulia, Anatoly; Lee, Gil Soo; Woo, Sweng-Woong; Bidaud, Adrien; Patel, Amrit; Bledsoe, Keith C; Rearden, Bradley T; Gulliford, J.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  9. TsunaFLASH Benchmark and Its Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranowo, Widodo; Behrens, Joern

    2010-05-01

    In the end of year 2008 TsunAWI (Tsunami unstructured mesh finite element model developed at Alfred Wegener Institute) by Behrens et al. (2006 - 2008) [Behrens, 2008], had been launched as an operational model in the German - Indonesian Tsunami EarlyWarning System (GITEWS) framework. This model has been benchmarked and verified with 2004 Sumatra-Andaman mega tsunami event [Harig et al., 2008]. A new development uses adaptive mesh refinement to improve computational efficiency and accuracy, this approach is called TsunaFLASH [Pranowo et al., 2008]. After the initial development and verification phase with stabilization efforts, and study of refinement criteria, the code is now mature enough to be validated with data. This presentation will demonstrate results of TsunaFLASH for the experiments with diverse mesh refinement criteria, and benchmarks; in particular the problem set-1 of IWLRM, and field data of the Sumatra-Andaman 2004 event.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL BENCHMARKING OF THE MAGNETIZED FRICTION FORCE.

    SciTech Connect

    FEDOTOV, A.V.; GALNANDER, B.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; LOFNES, T.; SIDORIN, A.O.; SMIRNOV, A.V.; ZIEMANN, V.

    2005-09-18

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  11. Reactor calculation benchmark PCA blind test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, F.B.K.; Stallmann, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    Further improvement in calculational procedures or a combination of calculations and measurements is necessary to attain 10 to 15% (1 sigma) accuracy for neutron exposure parameters (flux greater than 0.1 MeV, flux greater than 1.0 MeV, and dpa). The calculational modeling of power reactors should be benchmarked in an actual LWR plant to provide final uncertainty estimates for end-of-life predictions and limitations for plant operations. 26 references, 14 figures, 6 tables.

  12. Collection of Neutronic VVER Reactor Benchmarks.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-01-30

    Version 00 A system of computational neutronic benchmarks has been developed. In this CD-ROM report, the data generated in the course of the project are reproduced in their integrity with minor corrections. The editing that was performed on the various documents comprising this report was primarily meant to facilitate the production of the CD-ROM and to enable electronic retrieval of the information. The files are electronically navigable.

  13. Experimental Benchmarking of the Magnetized Friction Force

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Galnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-20

    High-energy electron cooling, presently considered as essential tool for several applications in high-energy and nuclear physics, requires accurate description of the friction force. A series of measurements were performed at CELSIUS with the goal to provide accurate data needed for the benchmarking of theories and simulations. Some results of accurate comparison of experimental data with the friction force formulas are presented.

  14. Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment: Subsonic Fixed Wing Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florance, Jennifer P.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Wieseman, Carol D.

    2010-01-01

    The fundamental technical challenge in computational aeroelasticity is the accurate prediction of unsteady aerodynamic phenomena and the effect on the aeroelastic response of a vehicle. Currently, a benchmarking standard for use in validating the accuracy of computational aeroelasticity codes does not exist. Many aeroelastic data sets have been obtained in wind-tunnel and flight testing throughout the world; however, none have been globally presented or accepted as an ideal data set. There are numerous reasons for this. One reason is that often, such aeroelastic data sets focus on the aeroelastic phenomena alone (flutter, for example) and do not contain associated information such as unsteady pressures and time-correlated structural dynamic deflections. Other available data sets focus solely on the unsteady pressures and do not address the aeroelastic phenomena. Other discrepancies can include omission of relevant data, such as flutter frequency and / or the acquisition of only qualitative deflection data. In addition to these content deficiencies, all of the available data sets present both experimental and computational technical challenges. Experimental issues include facility influences, nonlinearities beyond those being modeled, and data processing. From the computational perspective, technical challenges include modeling geometric complexities, coupling between the flow and the structure, grid issues, and boundary conditions. The Aeroelasticity Benchmark Assessment task seeks to examine the existing potential experimental data sets and ultimately choose the one that is viewed as the most suitable for computational benchmarking. An initial computational evaluation of that configuration will then be performed using the Langley-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FUN3D1 as part of its code validation process. In addition to the benchmarking activity, this task also includes an examination of future research directions. Researchers within the

  15. Benchmarking Global Food Safety Performances: The Era of Risk Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Valleé, Jean-Charles Le; Charlebois, Sylvain

    2015-10-01

    Food safety data segmentation and limitations hamper the world's ability to select, build up, monitor, and evaluate food safety performance. Currently, there is no metric that captures the entire food safety system, and performance data are not collected strategically on a global scale. Therefore, food safety benchmarking is essential not only to help monitor ongoing performance but also to inform continued food safety system design, adoption, and implementation toward more efficient and effective food safety preparedness, responsiveness, and accountability. This comparative study identifies and evaluates common elements among global food safety systems. It provides an overall world ranking of food safety performance for 17 Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) countries, illustrated by 10 indicators organized across three food safety risk governance domains: risk assessment (chemical risks, microbial risks, and national reporting on food consumption), risk management (national food safety capacities, food recalls, food traceability, and radionuclides standards), and risk communication (allergenic risks, labeling, and public trust). Results show all countries have very high food safety standards, but Canada and Ireland, followed by France, earned excellent grades relative to their peers. However, any subsequent global ranking study should consider the development of survey instruments to gather adequate and comparable national evidence on food safety. PMID:26408141

  16. Benchmarking and accounting for the (private) cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belleman, J.; Schwickerath, U.

    2015-12-01

    During the past two years large parts of the CERN batch farm have been moved to virtual machines running on the CERN internal cloud. During this process a large fraction of the resources, which had previously been used as physical batch worker nodes, were converted into hypervisors. Due to the large spread of the per-core performance in the farm, caused by its heterogenous nature, it is necessary to have a good knowledge of the performance of the virtual machines. This information is used both for scheduling in the batch system and for accounting. While in the previous setup worker nodes were classified and benchmarked based on the purchase order number, for virtual batch worker nodes this is no longer possible; the information is now either hidden or hard to retrieve. Therefore we developed a new scheme to classify worker nodes according to their performance. The new scheme is flexible enough to be usable both for virtual and physical machines in the batch farm. With the new classification it is possible to have an estimation of the performance of worker nodes also in a very dynamic farm with worker nodes coming and going at a high rate, without the need to benchmark each new node again. An extension to public cloud resources is possible if all conditions under which the benchmark numbers have been obtained are fulfilled.

  17. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  18. Introduction to the HPC Challenge Benchmark Suite

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczek, Piotr; Dongarra, Jack J.; Koester, David; Rabenseifner,Rolf; Lucas, Bob; Kepner, Jeremy; McCalpin, John; Bailey, David; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2005-04-25

    The HPC Challenge benchmark suite has been released by the DARPA HPCS program to help define the performance boundaries of future Petascale computing systems. HPC Challenge is a suite of tests that examine the performance of HPC architectures using kernels with memory access patterns more challenging than those of the High Performance Linpack (HPL) benchmark used in the Top500 list. Thus, the suite is designed to augment the Top500 list, providing benchmarks that bound the performance of many real applications as a function of memory access characteristics e.g., spatial and temporal locality, and providing a framework for including additional tests. In particular, the suite is composed of several well known computational kernels (STREAM, HPL, matrix multiply--DGEMM, parallel matrix transpose--PTRANS, FFT, RandomAccess, and bandwidth/latency tests--b{sub eff}) that attempt to span high and low spatial and temporal locality space. By design, the HPC Challenge tests are scalable with the size of data sets being a function of the largest HPL matrix for the tested system.

  19. Beef grading by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Reflections in ultrasonic A-scan signatures of beef carcasses indicate USDA grade. Since reflections from within muscle are determined primarily by fat/muscle interface, richness of signals is direct indication of degree of marbling and quality. Method replaces subjective sight and feel tests by individual graders and is applicable to grade analysis of live cattle.

  20. Grain Grading and Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  1. Classroom: Efficient Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, David D.; Pease, Leonard F., III.

    2014-01-01

    Grading can be accelerated to make time for more effective instruction. This article presents specific time management strategies selected to decrease administrative time required of faculty and teaching assistants, including a multiple answer multiple choice interface for exams, a three-tier grading system for open ended problem solving, and a…

  2. Controlling Grade Inflation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanoyevitch, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    In this article concerning grade inflation, the author restricts his attention to the college and university level, although many of the tools and ideas developed here should be useful for high schools as well. The author considers the relationships between grades instructors assign and scores they receive on end-of-the semester student…

  3. Are Math Grades Cyclical?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gerald J.; Dial, Micah

    1998-01-01

    The cyclical nature of mathematics grades was studied for a cohort of elementary school students from a large metropolitan school district in Texas over six years (average cohort size of 8495). The study used an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. Results indicate that grades do exhibit a significant cyclical pattern. (SLD)

  4. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  5. Grading Exceptional Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Lee Ann; Guskey, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers often grapple with the challenge of giving report card grades to students with learning disabilities and English language learners. The authors offer a five-step model that "offers a fair, accurate, and legal way to adapt the grading process for exceptional learners." The model begins with a high-quality reporting system for all students…

  6. Third Grade Reading Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In 2012, 14 states passed legislation geared toward improving 3rd-grade literacy through identification, intervention, and/or retention initiatives. Today, a total of 32 states and the District of Columbia have policies in statute aimed at improving 3rd-grade reading proficiency. The majority of these states require early assessment and…

  7. Making Grading Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotto, Edward; Smith, Bruce

    Two teachers have developed a procedure for grading student compositions that seems fairer to both them and their students. The students are given a choice of which papers they wish to submit for grading, and when they do submit work, the papers are identified by a number only (chosen by the student and indexed in a class card file). Each teacher…

  8. Determining Faculty Grading Variation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demerjian, Marlene D.

    A study was undertaken at the College of the Canyons, in California, to assess the variation of grades given by mathematics instructors teaching intermediate algebra. A sample was drawn from all instructors who taught Math 070 repeatedly from fall 1990 to fall 1994, resulting in the examination of the grades of at least 200 students from classes…

  9. Grades out, Badges in

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Grades are broken. Students grub for them, pick classes where good ones come easily, and otherwise hustle to win the highest scores for the least learning. As a result, college grades are inflated to the point of meaninglessness--especially to employers who want to know which diploma-holder is best qualified for their jobs. An alternative is to…

  10. The Grades Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleenor, Andy; Lamb, Sarah; Anton, Jennifer; Stinson, Todd; Donen, Tony

    2011-01-01

    It can be quite alarming (and eye-opening) to see exactly how many of the grades students receive are based on their behaviors rather than their learning. Students should be assessed on what they know and can use rather than on their behavior. The reality, unfortunately, is that the opposite is often the case. Grades for students who work hard are…

  11. Are Grades Undermining Motivation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliner, David; Casanova, Ursula

    1988-01-01

    A study of fifth and sixth grade public school students in Israel suggests that grades and other norm-referenced methods are less effective than task-involving evaluation methods in enhancing student performance, interest, and motivation. This article consists of two commentaries on the findings, with suggestions for implementing task-involving…

  12. Five Obstacles to Grading Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Educators seeking to reform grading must combat five long-held traditions that stand as formidable obstacles to change: (1) Grades should provide the basis for differentiating students; (2) grade distributions should resemble a bell-shaped curve; (3) grades should be based on students' standing among classmates; (4) poor grades prompt students to…

  13. Paperless Grades and Faculty Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, James C.; Jones, Dennis; Turner, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Provides overview of process of switching from paper-based grade reporting to computer-based grading. Authors found that paperless grading decreased number of errors, made student access more immediate, and reduced costs incurred by purchasing and storing grade-scanning sheets. Authors also argue that direct entry grading encourages faculty to…

  14. Guidebook for Using the Tool BEST Cement: Benchmarking and Energy Savings Tool for the Cement Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Zhou, Nan; Fuqiu , Zhou; Huawen, Xiong; Xuemin, Zeng; Lan, Wang

    2008-07-30

    ) the amount of production of cement by type and grade (in tonnes per year); (6) the electricity generated onsite; and, (7) the energy used by fuel type; and, the amount (in RMB per year) spent on energy. The tool offers the user the opportunity to do a quick assessment or a more detailed assessment--this choice will determine the level of detail of the energy input. The detailed assessment will require energy data for each stage of production while the quick assessment will require only total energy used at the entire facility (see Section 6 for more details on quick versus detailed assessments). The benchmarking tool provides two benchmarks--one for Chinese best practices and one for international best practices. Section 2 describes the differences between these two and how each benchmark was calculated. The tool also asks for a target input by the user for the user to set goals for the facility.

  15. IBC's 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 3-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H J; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3-6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3-5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4-5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society's special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5-6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  16. [Grading of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Bohle, R M; Schnabel, P A

    2016-07-01

    In comparison with other tumor entities there is no common generally accepted grading system for lung cancer with clearly defined criteria and clinical relevance. In the recent fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification from 2015 of tumors of the lungs, pleura, thymus and heart, there is no generally applicable grading for pulmonary adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas or rarer forms of carcinoma. Since the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of adenocarcinomas published in 2011, 5 different subtypes with significantly different prognosis are proposed. This results in an architectural (histologic) grading, which is usually applied to resection specimens. For squamous cell carcinoma the number of different histological subtypes in the new WHO classification was reduced compared to earlier versions but without a common grading system. In recent publications nesting and budding were proposed as the main (histologic) criteria for a grading of squamous cell carcinomas. The grading of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the lungs in comparison with NET in other organs is presented in a separate article in this issue. Certain rare tumor types are high grade per definition: small cell, large cell and pleomorphic carcinomas, carcinosarcomas and pulmonary blastomas. In the future it is to be expected that these developments will be further refined, e. g. by adding further subtypes for adenocarcinomas and cytologic and/or nuclear criteria for adenocarcinoma and/or squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27356985

  17. Functionally graded boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; McClellan, K.J.; Kise, C.D.; Hoover, R.C.; Scarborough, W.K.

    1998-12-31

    Lightweight body armor is important for the protection of US soldiers in the field. Here, fabrication techniques were developed for producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C, and for producing aluminum-B{sub 4}C and epoxy-B{sub 4}C functionally graded materials. The key fabrication aspect was obtaining the graded porosity B{sub 4}C. The feasibility of producing graded porosity B{sub 4}C using a grading of carbon densification aid produced from a gradient of furfuryl alcohol carbon precursor was demonstrated. This approach is quite promising, but it was not optimized in the present investigation. Graded porosity B{sub 4}C materials were produced by a layering approach using different size distributions of B{sub 4}C powders in the green state, and then densifying the layered assembly by hot pressing at 1,900 C. The hardness of uninfiltrated graded B{sub 4}C, aluminum infiltrated B{sub 4}C, and epoxy infiltrated B{sub 4}C was observed to be similar.

  18. Nebraska Science Standards: Grades K-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the Nebraska Science Standards for Grades K-12. The standards are presented according to the following grades: (1) Grades K-2; (2) Grades 3-5; (3) Grades 6-8; and (4) Grades 9-12.

  19. Benchmarking NSP Reactors with CORETRAN-01

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, Donald D.; Grow, Rodney L.; Agee, Lance J

    2004-10-15

    As part of an overall verification and validation effort, the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRIs) CORETRAN-01 has been benchmarked against Northern States Power's Prairie Island and Monticello reactors through 12 cycles of operation. The two Prairie Island reactors are Westinghouse 2-loop units with 121 asymmetric 14 x 14 lattice assemblies utilizing up to 8 wt% gadolinium while Monticello is a General Electric 484 bundle boiling water reactor. All reactor cases were executed in full core utilizing 24 axial nodes per assembly in the fuel with 1 additional reflector node above, below, and around the perimeter of the core. Cross-section sets used in this benchmark effort were generated by EPRI's CPM-3 as well as Studsvik's CASMO-3 and CASMO-4 to allow for separation of the lattice calculation effect from the nodal simulation method. These cases exercised the depletion-shuffle-depletion sequence through four cycles for each unit using plant data to follow actual operations. Flux map calculations were performed for comparison to corresponding measurement statepoints. Additionally, start-up physics testing cases were used to predict cycle physics parameters for comparison to existing plant methods and measurements.These benchmark results agreed well with both current analysis methods and plant measurements, indicating that CORETRAN-01 may be appropriate for steady-state physics calculations of both the Prairie Island and Monticello reactors. However, only the Prairie Island results are discussed in this paper since Monticello results were of similar quality and agreement. No attempt was made in this work to investigate CORETRAN-01 kinetics capability by analyzing plant transients, but these steady-state results form a good foundation for moving in that direction.

  20. Towards Systematic Benchmarking of Climate Model Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleckler, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    The process by which climate models are evaluated has evolved substantially over the past decade, with the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) serving as a centralizing activity for coordinating model experimentation and enabling research. Scientists with a broad spectrum of expertise have contributed to the CMIP model evaluation process, resulting in many hundreds of publications that have served as a key resource for the IPCC process. For several reasons, efforts are now underway to further systematize some aspects of the model evaluation process. First, some model evaluation can now be considered routine and should not require "re-inventing the wheel" or a journal publication simply to update results with newer models. Second, the benefit of CMIP research to model development has not been optimal because the publication of results generally takes several years and is usually not reproducible for benchmarking newer model versions. And third, there are now hundreds of model versions and many thousands of simulations, but there is no community-based mechanism for routinely monitoring model performance changes. An important change in the design of CMIP6 can help address these limitations. CMIP6 will include a small set standardized experiments as an ongoing exercise (CMIP "DECK": ongoing Diagnostic, Evaluation and Characterization of Klima), so that modeling groups can submit them at any time and not be overly constrained by deadlines. In this presentation, efforts to establish routine benchmarking of existing and future CMIP simulations will be described. To date, some benchmarking tools have been made available to all CMIP modeling groups to enable them to readily compare with CMIP5 simulations during the model development process. A natural extension of this effort is to make results from all CMIP simulations widely available, including the results from newer models as soon as the simulations become available for research. Making the results from routine

  1. A Uranium Bioremediation Reactive Transport Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Sengor, Sevinc; Fang, Yilin

    2015-06-01

    A reactive transport benchmark problem set has been developed based on in situ uranium bio-immobilization experiments that have been performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, USA. Acetate-amended groundwater stimulates indigenous microorganisms to catalyze the reduction of U(VI) to a sparingly soluble U(IV) mineral. The interplay between the flow, acetate loading periods and rates, microbially-mediated and geochemical reactions leads to dynamic behavior in metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria, pH, alkalinity, and reactive mineral surfaces. The benchmark is based on an 8.5 m long one-dimensional model domain with constant saturated flow and uniform porosity. The 159-day simulation introduces acetate and bromide through the upgradient boundary in 14-day and 85-day pulses separated by a 10 day interruption. Acetate loading is tripled during the second pulse, which is followed by a 50 day recovery period. Terminal electron accepting processes for goethite, phyllosilicate Fe(III), U(VI), and sulfate are modeled using Monod-type rate laws. Major ion geochemistry modeled includes mineral reactions, as well as aqueous and surface complexation reactions for UO2++, Fe++, and H+. In addition to the dynamics imparted by the transport of the acetate pulses, U(VI) behavior involves the interplay between bioreduction, which is dependent on acetate availability, and speciation-controlled surface complexation, which is dependent on pH, alkalinity and available surface complexation sites. The general difficulty of this benchmark is the large number of reactions (74), multiple rate law formulations, a multisite uranium surface complexation model, and the strong interdependency and sensitivity of the reaction processes. Results are presented for three simulators: HYDROGEOCHEM, PHT3D, and PHREEQC.

  2. Strategy of DIN-PACS benchmark testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Gary S.; Lyche, David K.; Richardson, Nancy E.; Thomas, Jerry A.; Romlein, John R.; Cawthon, Michael A.; Lawrence, David P.; Shelton, Philip D.; Parr, Laurence F.; Richardson, Ronald R., Jr.; Johnson, Steven L.

    1998-07-01

    The Digital Imaging Network -- Picture Archive and Communication System (DIN-PACS) procurement is the Department of Defense's (DoD) effort to bring military medical treatment facilities into the twenty-first century with nearly filmless digital radiology departments. The DIN-PACS procurement is unique from most of the previous PACS acquisitions in that the Request for Proposals (RFP) required extensive benchmark testing prior to contract award. The strategy for benchmark testing was a reflection of the DoD's previous PACS and teleradiology experiences. The DIN-PACS Technical Evaluation Panel (TEP) consisted of DoD and civilian radiology professionals with unique clinical and technical PACS expertise. The TEP considered nine items, key functional requirements to the DIN-PACS acquisition: (1) DICOM Conformance, (2) System Storage and Archive, (3) Workstation Performance, (4) Network Performance, (5) Radiology Information System (RIS) functionality, (6) Hospital Information System (HIS)/RIS Interface, (7) Teleradiology, (8) Quality Control, and (9) System Reliability. The development of a benchmark test to properly evaluate these key requirements would require the TEP to make technical, operational, and functional decisions that had not been part of a previous PACS acquisition. Developing test procedures and scenarios that simulated inputs from radiology modalities and outputs to soft copy workstations, film processors, and film printers would be a major undertaking. The goals of the TEP were to fairly assess each vendor's proposed system and to provide an accurate evaluation of each system's capabilities to the source selection authority, so the DoD could purchase a PACS that met the requirements in the RFP.

  3. Benchmark simulations of ICRF antenna coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Van Compernolle, B.; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2007-09-01

    The paper reports on ongoing benchmark numerical simulations of antenna input impedance parameters in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with different coupling codes: CST Microwave Studio, TOPICA and ANTITER 2. In particular we study the validity of the approximation of a magnetized plasma slab by a dielectric medium of suitably chosen permittivity. Different antenna models are considered: a single-strap antenna, a 4-strap antenna and the 24-strap ITER antenna array. Whilst the diagonal impedances are mostly in good agreement, some differences between the mutual terms predicted by Microwave Studio and TOPICA have yet to be resolved.

  4. Benchmark simulations of ICRF antenna coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Louche, F.; Lamalle, P. U.; Messiaen, A. M.; Compernolle, B. van; Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2007-09-28

    The paper reports on ongoing benchmark numerical simulations of antenna input impedance parameters in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with different coupling codes: CST Microwave Studio, TOPICA and ANTITER 2. In particular we study the validity of the approximation of a magnetized plasma slab by a dielectric medium of suitably chosen permittivity. Different antenna models are considered: a single-strap antenna, a 4-strap antenna and the 24-strap ITER antenna array. Whilst the diagonal impedances are mostly in good agreement, some differences between the mutual terms predicted by Microwave Studio and TOPICA have yet to be resolved.

  5. NAS Parallel Benchmarks. 2.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new problem size, called Class D, for the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB), whose MPI source code implementation is being released as NPB 2.4. A brief rationale is given for how the new class is derived. We also describe the modifications made to the MPI (Message Passing Interface) implementation to allow the new class to be run on systems with 32-bit integers, and with moderate amounts of memory. Finally, we give the verification values for the new problem size.

  6. Benchmarking East Tennessee`s economic capacity

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-20

    This presentation is comprised of viewgraphs delineating major economic factors operating in 15 counties in East Tennessee. The purpose of the information presented is to provide a benchmark analysis of economic conditions for use in guiding economic growth in the region. The emphasis of the presentation is economic infrastructure, which is classified into six categories: human resources, technology, financial resources, physical infrastructure, quality of life, and tax and regulation. Data for analysis of key indicators in each of the categories are presented. Preliminary analyses, in the form of strengths and weaknesses and comparison to reference groups, are given.

  7. Benchmark Problems for Space Mission Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Leitner, Jesse A.; Folta, David C.; Burns, Richard

    2003-01-01

    To provide a high-level focus to distributed space system flight dynamics and control research, several benchmark problems are suggested for space mission formation flying. The problems cover formation flying in low altitude, near-circular Earth orbit, high altitude, highly elliptical Earth orbits, and large amplitude lissajous trajectories about co-linear libration points of the Sun-Earth/Moon system. These problems are not specific to any current or proposed mission, but instead are intended to capture high-level features that would be generic to many similar missions that are of interest to various agencies.

  8. Correlation of Parental Involvement on Students' Benchmarks among Urban Fourth-Grade Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Erika L.

    2013-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 raised awareness of the educational quality gap between European Americans and minorities, especially in reading. This gap underscores the importance that students master basic reading skills in order to achieve higher levels of reading proficiency. The purpose of this quantitative quasi-experimental study was…

  9. Development of a California commercial building benchmarking database

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2002-05-17

    Building energy benchmarking is a useful starting point for commercial building owners and operators to target energy savings opportunities. There are a number of tools and methods for benchmarking energy use. Benchmarking based on regional data can provides more relevant information for California buildings than national tools such as Energy Star. This paper discusses issues related to benchmarking commercial building energy use and the development of Cal-Arch, a building energy benchmarking database for California. Currently Cal-Arch uses existing survey data from California's Commercial End Use Survey (CEUS), a largely underutilized wealth of information collected by California's major utilities. Doe's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is used by a similar tool, Arch, and by a number of other benchmarking tools. Future versions of Arch/Cal-Arch will utilize additional data sources including modeled data and individual buildings to expand the database.

  10. Learning Through Benchmarking: Developing a Relational, Prospective Approach to Benchmarking ICT in Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Robert A.; Moore, Roger R.

    2006-01-01

    This study discusses benchmarking the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in teaching and learning between two universities with different missions: one an Australian campus-based metropolitan university and the other a British distance-education provider. It argues that the differences notwithstanding, it is possible to…

  11. Using the Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB) to Benchmark College Programs/Courses and Language Proficiency Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Lucy; Stawychny, Mary

    2001-01-01

    Describes a process developed by the Language Training Centre at Red River College (RRC) to use the Canadian language benchmarks in analyzing the language levels used in programs and courses at RRC to identify appropriate entry-level language proficiency and the levels that second language students need in order to meet college or university…

  12. Assigning Grades More Fairly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheshier, Stephen R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a simplified method for converting raw scores to standard scores and transforming them to "T-scores" for easy comparison of performance. Obtaining letter grades from T-scores is discussed. A reading list is included. (GH)

  13. Rethinking Science and Technology Education To Meet the Demands of Future Generations in a Changing World. International Organization for Science and Technology Education (IOSTE) Symposium Proceedings (10th, Foz do Iguacu, Parana, Brazil, July 28-August 2, 2002). Volumes I [and] II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizzo, Nelio, Ed.; Kawasaki, Clarice Sumi, Ed.; Ferracioli, Laercio, Ed.; Leyser da Rosa, Vivian, Ed.

    This document is the proceedings of the 10th annual meeting of the International Organization for Science and Technology Education (IOSTE). Papers include: (1) "Liberal Education, Information Assessment and Argumentation in Science-LIA" (Andreas Quale, Anders Isnes, Terje Kristensen, and Ketil Mathiassen); (2) "Placing the History and the…

  14. PIALA 2000: Libraries and Archives--Where Information and Language Literacy Begin [and] Engaged Readers and Writers in Multicultural Island Communities. Selected Papers from the 10th Pacific Islands Association of Libraries and Archives Conference Joint with the 13th Annual Regional Language Arts Conference (Tumon, Guam, November 9-11, 2000)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arlene, Ed.; Quan, Clarisa G., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This proceedings combines presentations from the jointly held 10th Annual PIALA 2000 Conference and the 13th Annual Regional Language Arts Conference. The volume begins with the welcoming remarks of Mary L. Silk, Christine Ku Scott-Smith, Antonio R. Umpingco, Delia Munoz Rosal, Lawrence Kasperbauer, Rosie Tainatongo, Richard S. Tom, Mary L.…

  15. News Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-01-01

    Conference: Brecon hosts 10th teacher's conference Summer school: Science summer school heads to Crete Award: The Corti Science Prize Radioactivity: Scottish beach is no beta off Workshop: Heureka project promotes teaching Experiments: Spanish project proves that learning science can be exciting Lecture: IOP schools lecture journeys from x-rays to antimatter Correction to the news item 'Delegates experience universality' Forthcoming events

  16. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks 2.1 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saphir, William; Woo, Alex; Yarrow, Maurice

    1996-01-01

    We present performance results for version 2.1 of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) on the following architectures: IBM SP2/66 MHz; SGI Power Challenge Array/90 MHz; Cray Research T3D; and Intel Paragon. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks are a widely-recognized suite of benchmarks originally designed to compare the performance of highly parallel computers with that of traditional supercomputers.

  17. Experimentally Relevant Benchmarks for Gyrokinetic Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravenec, Ronald

    2010-11-01

    Although benchmarking of gyrokinetic codes has been performed in the past, e.g., The Numerical Tokamak, The Cyclone Project, The Plasma Microturbulence Project, and various informal activities, these efforts have typically employed simple plasma models. For example, the Cyclone ``base case'' assumed shifted-circle flux surfaces, no magnetic transport, adiabatic electrons, no collisions nor impurities, ρi << a (ρi the ion gyroradius and a the minor radius), and no ExB flow shear. This work presents comparisons of linear frequencies and nonlinear fluxes from GYRO and GS2 with none of the above approximations except ρi << a and no ExB flow shear. The comparisons are performed at two radii of a DIII-D plasma, one in the confinement region (r/a = 0.5) and the other closer to the edge (r/a = 0.7). Many of the plasma parameters differ by a factor of two between these two locations. Good agreement between GYRO and GS2 is found when neglecting collisions. However, differences are found when including e-i collisions (Lorentz model). The sources of the discrepancy are unknown as of yet. Nevertheless, two collisionless benchmarks have been formulated with considerably different plasma parameters. Acknowledgements to J. Candy, E. Belli, and M. Barnes.

  18. REVISED STREAM CODE AND WASP5 BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K

    2005-05-01

    STREAM is an emergency response code that predicts downstream pollutant concentrations for releases from the SRS area to the Savannah River. The STREAM code uses an algebraic equation to approximate the solution of the one dimensional advective transport differential equation. This approach generates spurious oscillations in the concentration profile when modeling long duration releases. To improve the capability of the STREAM code to model long-term releases, its calculation module was replaced by the WASP5 code. WASP5 is a US EPA water quality analysis program that simulates one-dimensional pollutant transport through surface water. Test cases were performed to compare the revised version of STREAM with the existing version. For continuous releases, results predicted by the revised STREAM code agree with physical expectations. The WASP5 code was benchmarked with the US EPA 1990 and 1991 dye tracer studies, in which the transport of the dye was measured from its release at the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam downstream to Savannah. The peak concentrations predicted by the WASP5 agreed with the measurements within {+-}20.0%. The transport times of the dye concentration peak predicted by the WASP5 agreed with the measurements within {+-}3.6%. These benchmarking results demonstrate that STREAM should be capable of accurately modeling releases from SRS outfalls.

  19. Direct data access protocols benchmarking on DPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furano, Fabrizio; Devresse, Adrien; Keeble, Oliver; Mancinelli, Valentina

    2015-12-01

    The Disk Pool Manager is an example of a multi-protocol, multi-VO system for data access on the Grid that went though a considerable technical evolution in the last years. Among other features, its architecture offers the opportunity of testing its different data access frontends under exactly the same conditions, including hardware and backend software. This characteristic inspired the idea of collecting monitoring information from various testbeds in order to benchmark the behaviour of the HTTP and Xrootd protocols for the use case of data analysis, batch or interactive. A source of information is the set of continuous tests that are run towards the worldwide endpoints belonging to the DPM Collaboration, which accumulated relevant statistics in its first year of activity. On top of that, the DPM releases are based on multiple levels of automated testing that include performance benchmarks of various kinds, executed regularly every day. At the same time, the recent releases of DPM can report monitoring information about any data access protocol to the same monitoring infrastructure that is used to monitor the Xrootd deployments. Our goal is to evaluate under which circumstances the HTTP-based protocols can be good enough for batch or interactive data access. In this contribution we show and discuss the results that our test systems have collected under the circumstances that include ROOT analyses using TTreeCache and stress tests on the metadata performance.

  20. Parallel Ada benchmarks for the SVMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, Philippe E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of parallel processing paradigm to design and develop faster and more reliable computers appear to clearly mark the future of information processing. NASA started the development of such an architecture: the Spaceborne VHSIC Multi-processor System (SVMS). Ada will be one of the languages used to program the SVMS. One of the unique characteristics of Ada is that it supports parallel processing at the language level through the tasking constructs. It is important for the SVMS project team to assess how efficiently the SVMS architecture will be implemented, as well as how efficiently Ada environment will be ported to the SVMS. AUTOCLASS II, a Bayesian classifier written in Common Lisp, was selected as one of the benchmarks for SVMS configurations. The purpose of the R and D effort was to provide the SVMS project team with the version of AUTOCLASS II, written in Ada, that would make use of Ada tasking constructs as much as possible so as to constitute a suitable benchmark. Additionally, a set of programs was developed that would measure Ada tasking efficiency on parallel architectures as well as determine the critical parameters influencing tasking efficiency. All this was designed to provide the SVMS project team with a set of suitable tools in the development of the SVMS architecture.

  1. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Neil F; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another - from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a 'lone wolf'; identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds. PMID:24322528

  2. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Neil F.; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S.; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another - from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a `lone wolf' identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds.

  3. EVA Health and Human Performance Benchmarking Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, A. F.; Norcross, J.; Jarvis, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple HRP Risks and Gaps require detailed characterization of human health and performance during exploration extravehicular activity (EVA) tasks; however, a rigorous and comprehensive methodology for characterizing and comparing the health and human performance implications of current and future EVA spacesuit designs does not exist. This study will identify and implement functional tasks and metrics, both objective and subjective, that are relevant to health and human performance, such as metabolic expenditure, suit fit, discomfort, suited postural stability, cognitive performance, and potentially biochemical responses for humans working inside different EVA suits doing functional tasks under the appropriate simulated reduced gravity environments. This study will provide health and human performance benchmark data for humans working in current EVA suits (EMU, Mark III, and Z2) as well as shirtsleeves using a standard set of tasks and metrics with quantified reliability. Results and methodologies developed during this test will provide benchmark data against which future EVA suits, and different suit configurations (eg, varied pressure, mass, CG) may be reliably compared in subsequent tests. Results will also inform fitness for duty standards as well as design requirements and operations concepts for future EVA suits and other exploration systems.

  4. Revised STREAM code and WASP5 benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.

    1995-05-01

    STREAM is an emergency response code that predicts downstream pollutant concentrations for releases from the SRS area to the Savannah River. The STREAM code uses an algebraic equation to approximate the solution of the one dimensional advective transport differential equation. This approach generates spurious oscillations in the concentration profile when modeling long duration releases. To improve the capability of the STREAM code to model long-term releases, its calculation module was replaced by the WASP5 code. WASP5 is a US EPA water quality analysis program that simulates one-dimensional pollutant transport through surface water. Test cases were performed to compare the revised version of STREAM with the existing version. For continuous releases, results predicted by the revised STREAM code agree with physical expectations. The WASP5 code was benchmarked with the US EPA 1990 and 1991 dye tracer studies, in which the transport of the dye was measured from its release at the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam downstream to Savannah. The peak concentrations predicted by the WASP5 agreed with the measurements within {+-} 20.0%. The transport times of the dye concentration peak predicted by the WASP5 agreed with the measurements within {+-} 3.6%. These benchmarking results demonstrate that STREAM should be capable of accurately modeling releases from SRS outfalls.

  5. Benchmarking longwave multiple scattering in cirrus environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C.; Feldman, D.; Yang, P.; Flanner, M.; Huang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Many global climate models currently assume that longwave photons are non-scattering in clouds, and also have overly simplistic treatments of surface emissivity. Multiple scattering of longwave radiation and non-unit emissivity could lead to substantial discrepancies between the actual Earth's radiation budget and its parameterized representation in the infrared, especially at wavelengths longer than 15 µm. The evaluation of the parameterization of longwave spectral multiple scattering in radiative transfer codes for global climate models is critical and will require benchmarking across a wide range atmospheric conditions with more accurate, though computationally more expensive, multiple scattering models. We therefore present a line-by-line radiative transfer solver that includes scattering, run on a supercomputer from the National Energy Research Scientific Computing that exploits the embarrassingly parallel nature of 1-D radiative transfer solutions with high effective throughput. When paired with an advanced ice-particle optical property database with spectral values ranging from the 0.2 to 100 μm, a particle size and habit distribution derived from MODIS Collection 6, and a database for surface emissivity which extends to 100 μm, this benchmarking result can densely sample the thermodynamic and condensate parameter-space, and therefore accelerate the development of an advanced infrared radiative parameterization for climate models, which could help disentangle forcings and feedbacks in CMIP6.

  6. The Medical Library Association Benchmarking Network: results*

    PubMed Central

    Dudden, Rosalind Farnam; Corcoran, Kate; Kaplan, Janice; Magouirk, Jeff; Rand, Debra C.; Smith, Bernie Todd

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article presents some limited results from the Medical Library Association (MLA) Benchmarking Network survey conducted in 2002. Other uses of the data are also presented. Methods: After several years of development and testing, a Web-based survey opened for data input in December 2001. Three hundred eighty-five MLA members entered data on the size of their institutions and the activities of their libraries. The data from 344 hospital libraries were edited and selected for reporting in aggregate tables and on an interactive site in the Members-Only area of MLANET. The data represent a 16% to 23% return rate and have a 95% confidence level. Results: Specific questions can be answered using the reports. The data can be used to review internal processes, perform outcomes benchmarking, retest a hypothesis, refute a previous survey findings, or develop library standards. The data can be used to compare to current surveys or look for trends by comparing the data to past surveys. Conclusions: The impact of this project on MLA will reach into areas of research and advocacy. The data will be useful in the everyday working of small health sciences libraries as well as provide concrete data on the current practices of health sciences libraries. PMID:16636703

  7. Benchmarking database performance for genomic data.

    PubMed

    Khushi, Matloob

    2015-06-01

    Genomic regions represent features such as gene annotations, transcription factor binding sites and epigenetic modifications. Performing various genomic operations such as identifying overlapping/non-overlapping regions or nearest gene annotations are common research needs. The data can be saved in a database system for easy management, however, there is no comprehensive database built-in algorithm at present to identify overlapping regions. Therefore I have developed a novel region-mapping (RegMap) SQL-based algorithm to perform genomic operations and have benchmarked the performance of different databases. Benchmarking identified that PostgreSQL extracts overlapping regions much faster than MySQL. Insertion and data uploads in PostgreSQL were also better, although general searching capability of both databases was almost equivalent. In addition, using the algorithm pair-wise, overlaps of >1000 datasets of transcription factor binding sites and histone marks, collected from previous publications, were reported and it was found that HNF4G significantly co-locates with cohesin subunit STAG1 (SA1).Inc. PMID:25560631

  8. Recommendations for Benchmarking Preclinical Studies of Nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Dawidczyk, Charlene M; Russell, Luisa M; Searson, Peter C

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticle-based delivery systems provide new opportunities to overcome the limitations associated with traditional small-molecule drug therapy for cancer and to achieve both therapeutic and diagnostic functions in the same platform. Preclinical trials are generally designed to assess therapeutic potential and not to optimize the design of the delivery platform. Consequently, progress in developing design rules for cancer nanomedicines has been slow, hindering progress in the field. Despite the large number of preclinical trials, several factors restrict comparison and benchmarking of different platforms, including variability in experimental design, reporting of results, and the lack of quantitative data. To solve this problem, we review the variables involved in the design of preclinical trials and propose a protocol for benchmarking that we recommend be included in in vivo preclinical studies of drug-delivery platforms for cancer therapy. This strategy will contribute to building the scientific knowledge base that enables development of design rules and accelerates the translation of new technologies. PMID:26249177

  9. Simple mathematical law benchmarks human confrontations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Neil F.; Medina, Pablo; Zhao, Guannan; Messinger, Daniel S.; Horgan, John; Gill, Paul; Bohorquez, Juan Camilo; Mattson, Whitney; Gangi, Devon; Qi, Hong; Manrique, Pedro; Velasquez, Nicolas; Morgenstern, Ana; Restrepo, Elvira; Johnson, Nicholas; Spagat, Michael; Zarama, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Many high-profile societal problems involve an individual or group repeatedly attacking another – from child-parent disputes, sexual violence against women, civil unrest, violent conflicts and acts of terror, to current cyber-attacks on national infrastructure and ultrafast cyber-trades attacking stockholders. There is an urgent need to quantify the likely severity and timing of such future acts, shed light on likely perpetrators, and identify intervention strategies. Here we present a combined analysis of multiple datasets across all these domains which account for >100,000 events, and show that a simple mathematical law can benchmark them all. We derive this benchmark and interpret it, using a minimal mechanistic model grounded by state-of-the-art fieldwork. Our findings provide quantitative predictions concerning future attacks; a tool to help detect common perpetrators and abnormal behaviors; insight into the trajectory of a ‘lone wolf'; identification of a critical threshold for spreading a message or idea among perpetrators; an intervention strategy to erode the most lethal clusters; and more broadly, a quantitative starting point for cross-disciplinary theorizing about human aggression at the individual and group level, in both real and online worlds. PMID:24322528

  10. Computational Thermochemistry and Benchmarking of Reliable Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Feller, David F.; Dixon, David A.; Dunning, Thom H.; Dupuis, Michel; McClemore, Doug; Peterson, Kirk A.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Bernholdt, David E.; Windus, Theresa L.; Chalasinski, Grzegorz; Fosada, Rubicelia; Olguim, Jorge; Dobbs, Kerwin D.; Frurip, Donald; Stevens, Walter J.; Rondan, Nelson; Chase, Jared M.; Nichols, Jeffrey A.

    2006-06-20

    During the first and second years of the Computational Thermochemistry and Benchmarking of Reliable Methods project, we completed several studies using the parallel computing capabilities of the NWChem software and Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF), including large-scale density functional theory (DFT), second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory, and CCSD(T) calculations. During the third year, we continued to pursue the computational thermodynamic and benchmarking studies outlined in our proposal. With the issues affecting the robustness of the coupled cluster part of NWChem resolved, we pursued studies of the heats-of-formation of compounds containing 5 to 7 first- and/or second-row elements and approximately 10 to 14 hydrogens. The size of these systems, when combined with the large basis sets (cc-pVQZ and aug-cc-pVQZ) that are necessary for extrapolating to the complete basis set limit, creates a formidable computational challenge, for which NWChem on NWMPP1 is well suited.

  11. Improving Mass Balance Modeling of Benchmark Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beusekom, A. E.; March, R. S.; O'Neel, S.

    2009-12-01

    The USGS monitors long-term glacier mass balance at three benchmark glaciers in different climate regimes. The coastal and continental glaciers are represented by Wolverine and Gulkana Glaciers in Alaska, respectively. Field measurements began in 1966 and continue. We have reanalyzed the published balance time series with more modern methods and recomputed reference surface and conventional balances. Addition of the most recent data shows a continuing trend of mass loss. We compare the updated balances to the previously accepted balances and discuss differences. Not all balance quantities can be determined from the field measurements. For surface processes, we model missing information with an improved degree-day model. Degree-day models predict ablation from the sum of daily mean temperatures and an empirical degree-day factor. We modernize the traditional degree-day model as well as derive new degree-day factors in an effort to closer match the balance time series and thus better predict the future state of the benchmark glaciers. For subsurface processes, we model the refreezing of meltwater for internal accumulation. We examine the sensitivity of the balance time series to the subsurface process of internal accumulation, with the goal of determining the best way to include internal accumulation into balance estimates.

  12. Performance Evaluation of Supercomputers using HPCC and IMB Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Ciotti, Robert; Gunney, Brian T. N.; Spelce, Thomas E.; Koniges, Alice; Dossa, Don; Adamidis, Panagiotis; Rabenseifner, Rolf; Tiyyagura, Sunil R.; Mueller, Matthias; Fatoohi, Rod

    2006-01-01

    The HPC Challenge (HPCC) benchmark suite and the Intel MPI Benchmark (IMB) are used to compare and evaluate the combined performance of processor, memory subsystem and interconnect fabric of five leading supercomputers - SGI Altix BX2, Cray XI, Cray Opteron Cluster, Dell Xeon cluster, and NEC SX-8. These five systems use five different networks (SGI NUMALINK4, Cray network, Myrinet, InfiniBand, and NEC IXS). The complete set of HPCC benchmarks are run on each of these systems. Additionally, we present Intel MPI Benchmarks (IMB) results to study the performance of 11 MPI communication functions on these systems.

  13. Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance - Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.

    2009-09-08

    This document describes an energy benchmarking framework for hospitals. The document is organized as follows. The introduction provides a brief primer on benchmarking and its application to hospitals. The next two sections discuss special considerations including the identification of normalizing factors. The presentation of metrics is preceded by a description of the overall framework and the rationale for the grouping of metrics. Following the presentation of metrics, a high-level protocol is provided. The next section presents draft benchmarks for some metrics; benchmarks are not available for many metrics owing to a lack of data. This document ends with a list of research needs for further development.

  14. A Suite of Criticality Benchmarks for Validating Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie C. Frankle

    1999-04-01

    The continuous-energy neutron data library ENDF60 for use with MCNP{trademark} was released in the fall of 1994, and was based on ENDF/B-Vl evaluations through Release 2. As part of the data validation process for this library, a number of criticality benchmark calculations were performed. The original suite of nine criticality benchmarks used to test ENDF60 has now been expanded to 86 benchmarks. This report documents the specifications for the suite of 86 criticality benchmarks that have been developed for validating nuclear data.

  15. Using benchmarks for radiation testing of microprocessors and FPGAs

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather; Robinson, William H.; Rech, Paolo; Aguirre, Miguel; Barnard, Arno; Desogus, Marco; Entrena, Luis; Garcia-Valderas, Mario; Guertin, Steven M.; Kaeli, David; Kastensmidt, Fernanda Lima; Kiddie, Bradley T.; Sanchez-Clemente, Antonio; Reorda, Matteo Sonza; Sterpone, Luca; Wirthlin, Michael

    2015-12-17

    Performance benchmarks have been used over the years to compare different systems. These benchmarks can be useful for researchers trying to determine how changes to the technology, architecture, or compiler affect the system's performance. No such standard exists for systems deployed into high radiation environments, making it difficult to assess whether changes in the fabrication process, circuitry, architecture, or software affect reliability or radiation sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a benchmark suite for high-reliability systems that is designed for field-programmable gate arrays and microprocessors. As a result, we describe the development process and report neutron test data for the hardware and software benchmarks.

  16. Determination of IgG and IgM levels in sera of newborn calves until the 10th day of life by ELISA and description of their correlation to total plasma protein concentration and GGT activity.

    PubMed

    Bender, Petra; Bostedt, Hartwig

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of IgG and IgM concentrations in sera of 15 vital and healthy calves from the day of birth to the 10th day of life using two ELISAs exclusively developed for this purpose. We investigated if and to which extent the sera profiles were correlated with antibody levels in the colostral milk administered, with GGT activity and with total plasma protein content. Due to the assays' high sensitivity, traces of IgG and IgM in calf sera could be determined prior to the first uptake of the foremilk. Throughout the colostrum administration period until the 12th living hour, IgG and IgM levels remarkably increased (P < 0.0001).The correlation between IgG concentrations in sera determined 24 h post natum and the IgG content of the colostrum administered was highly significant (P < 0.001; r = 0.851), while the correlation of seral IgM levels 24 h post natum and the IgM content of the foremilk was significant (P = 0.009; r = 0.651). The sum of the IgG and IgM concentrations in calf serum 24 h post natum was significantly correlated with the neonatal plasma protein level (P = 0.01; r = 0.642). With P = 0.012; r = 0.629 and P = 0.029; r = 0.561 respectively, there was also a significant correlation between the subjects' IgG and IgM concentrations at 24 h post natum and the GGT activity in calf serum. By looking at individual cases, it became evident that the administration of colostrum containing maximum or minimum immunoglobulin concentrations does not necessarily result in the respective sera immunoglobulin concentrations. From these findings, as well as from the fact that numerous subjects displayed their highest IgG and IgM sera concentrations well after the gut closure, we conclude that individually diverse resorption patterns are in place which cannot be characterized by immunoglobulin measurements only. The determination of the total plasma protein content or GGT activity in calf serum at 24 h post natum only give a rough idea about

  17. The Meaning of College Grades in Three Grading Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiszler, Charles F.

    1983-01-01

    To determine if college students (n=345) attribute different meanings to specific grades (depending on the nature of the grading system used), three grading systems were compared: competitive, mastery, and growth. In addition, students were asked to rate the meaning of a specific grade ("A,""B," or "C") in the context of one of the three grading…

  18. 7 CFR 810.105 - Grades and grade requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN General Provisions Grades, Grade Requirements, and Grade Designations § 810.105 Grades and...

  19. 7 CFR 810.105 - Grades and grade requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) GRAIN INSPECTION, PACKERS AND STOCKYARD ADMINISTRATION (FEDERAL GRAIN INSPECTION SERVICE), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OFFICIAL UNITED STATES STANDARDS FOR GRAIN General Provisions Grades, Grade Requirements, and Grade Designations § 810.105 Grades and...

  20. How Consistent Are Course Grades? An Examination of Differential Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauschenberg, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Differential grading occurs when students in courses with the same content and curriculum receive inconsistent grades across teachers, schools, or districts. It may be due to many factors, including differences in teacher grading standards, district grading policies, student behavior, teacher stereotypes, teacher quality, and curriculum adherence.…