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Sample records for 110k-calmodulin complex brush

  1. A Modified Tactile Brush Algorithm for Complex Touch Gestures

    SciTech Connect

    Ragan, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have investigated phantom tactile sensation (i.e., the perception of a nonexistent actuator between two real actuators) and apparent tactile motion (i.e., the perception of a moving actuator due to time delays between onsets of multiple actuations). Prior work has focused primarily on determining appropriate Durations of Stimulation (DOS) and Stimulus Onset Asynchronies (SOA) for simple touch gestures, such as a single finger stroke. To expand upon this knowledge, we investigated complex touch gestures involving multiple, simultaneous points of contact, such as a whole hand touching the arm. To implement complex touch gestures, we modified the Tactile Brush algorithm to support rectangular areas of tactile stimulation.

  2. Polymer brushes infiltrated by nanoparticles and applications to the nuclear pore complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opferman, Michael G.

    Systems of grafted polymers in the presence of additives are useful in a variety of contexts including industrial applications, solar cells, organic electronics, drug delivery, and nucleocytoplasmic transport. In this thesis, we will consider the morphologies that polymer brushes attain when exposed to a solution of additives (which we generically term "nanoparticles"), particularly when those nanparticles interact attractively with the polymers. We find that nanoparticles of this type can have a dramatic effect on the height of the polymer chains above the grafting surface, and they can induce highly non-uniform morphologies, including ones in which a dense layer of nanoparticles and monomers forms near the grafting surface. We consider especially the relevance of the system to several experiments performed on biopolymers in the nuclear pore complex when they interact attractively with transport factors that regulate nucleocytoplasmic transport. We find that, although these experiments appear to give inconsistent results, the inconsistencies can be reconciled through two simple models: the Alexander-de Gennes polymer brush, and the Milner-Witten-Cates polymer brush. Our findings should contribute to the understanding of the nuclear pore complex in that experiments can be better understood in the context of their relevant control parameters.

  3. Nuclear Pore Complex Protein Sequences Determine Overall Copolymer Brush Structure and Function?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, David; Kim, Yongwoon; Zandi, Roya; Colvin, Michael; Rexach, Michael; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Disordered proteins are an interesting class of unfolded protein biopolymers which are functionally versatile. Their sequences are unconstrained by a sequence-structure relationship, and allow for a wide range of chemical and physical polymer properties. The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) contains over one hundred of such proteins (FG nups), which collectively function to regulate the exchange of all materials between the nucleus and cytoplasm. We perform coarse grained simulations of both individual FG nups and grafted rings of nups mimicking the in vivo geometry of the NPC, supplemented with polymer brush modeling. Our results indicate that different regions or ``blocks'' of an individual FG nup can have distinctly different forms of disorder, and that this property appears to be a conserved feature across eukarya. Furthermore, this block structure at the individual protein level is critical to the formation of a unique higher-order polymer brush architecture. Because the interactions between FG nups may be modulated by certain forms of transport factors, our results indicate that transitions between brush morphologies could play an important role in regulating transport across the NPC, suggesting novel forms of gated transport across membrane pores with wide biomimetic applicability.

  4. A protein complex in the brush-border membrane explains a Hartnup disorder allele.

    PubMed

    Kowalczuk, Sonja; Bröer, Angelika; Tietze, Nadine; Vanslambrouck, Jessica M; Rasko, John E J; Bröer, Stefan

    2008-08-01

    Protein absorption in the intestine is mediated by proteases and brush-border peptidases together with peptide and amino acid transporters. Neutral amino acids are generated by a variety of aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases and are subsequently taken up by the amino acid transporter B(0)AT1 (SLC6A19), which is mutated in Hartnup disorder. Coexpression of B(0)AT1 together with the brush-border carboxypeptidase angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in Xenopus laevis oocytes led to a dramatic increase of transporter expression at the oocyte surface. Other members of the SLC6 family were not stimulated by coexpression with ACE2. Addition of a peptide containing a carboxyterminal leucine residue to ACE2- and B(0)AT1-coexpressing oocytes caused inward currents due to Na(+)-leucine cotransport, demonstrating the formation of a metabolic complex. Coexpression of the Hartnup disorder causing mutation B(0)AT1(R240Q) showed reduced interaction with ACE2 and its renal paralogue collectrin. This would result in reduced surface expression in both kidney and intestine, thereby explaining the onset of the disorder in individuals carrying this mutation. PMID:18424768

  5. Complex microstructures of ABC triblock copolymer thin films directed by polymer brushes based on self-consistent field theory.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhibin; Xu, Chang; Qiu, Yu Dong; Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhou, Dongshan; Xue, Gi

    2014-01-01

    The morphology and the phase diagram of ABC triblock copolymer thin film directed by polymer brushes are investigated by the self-consistent field theory in three dimensions. The polymer brushes coated on the substrate can be used as a good soft template to tailor the morphology of the block copolymer thin films compared with those on the hard substrates. The polymer brush is identical with the middle block B. By continuously changing the composition of the block copolymer, the phase diagrams are constructed for three cases with the fixed film thickness and the brush density: identical interaction parameters, frustrated and non-frustrated cases. Some ordered complex morphologies are observed: parallel lamellar phase with hexagonally packed pores at surfaces (LAM3 (ll) -HFs), perpendicular lamellar phase with cylinders at the interface (LAM(⊥)-CI), and perpendicular hexagonally packed cylinders phase with rings at the interface (C2 (⊥)-RI). A desired direction (perpendicular or parallel to the coated surfaces) of lamellar phases or cylindrical phases can be obtained by varying the composition and the interactions between different blocks. The phase diagram of ABC triblock copolymer thin film wetted between the polymer brush-coated surfaces is very useful in designing the directed pattern of ABC triblock copolymer thin film. PMID:25114650

  6. Mechanistic Basis of Organization of the Harmonin/USH1C-Mediated Brush Border Microvilli Tip-Link Complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianchao; He, Yunyun; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-01-25

    Brush border microvilli are actin-based protrusions lining the apical surface of epithelial cells in intestines and proximal tubules of kidneys. While brush border microvilli resemble the relatively well-characterized stereocilia of hair cells, the mechanistic basis of tip-link complex organization in microvilli is poorly understood. Here, we have biochemically and structurally characterized the following pairs of interactions: protocadherin 24 and Harmonin (also known as USH1C or AIE-75), Harmonin and myosin VIIb (MYO7B), Harmonin and ANKS4B, and ANKS4B and MYO7B. We show that Harmonin, ANKS4B, and MYO7B form a stable ternary complex for anchoring microvilli tip-link cadherins. Despite having only Harmonin in common, the microvilli and the stereocilia tip-link complexes are formed via strikingly similar interaction modes. These results not only provide insight into the mechanistic bases of brush border microvilli formation and maintenance but may also be valuable for understanding some gut and/or kidney diseases caused by perturbations of brush border microvilli structures. PMID:26812017

  7. Proper Brushing

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 teeth using a vibrating back & forth rolling motion. A rolling motion is when the brush makes contact with the ... gumline. Gently brush using back, forth, and rolling motion along all of the inner tooth surfaces. Tilt ...

  8. Ureteral retrograde brush biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - brush - urinary tract; Retrograde ureteral brush biopsy cytology; Cytology - ureteral retrograde brush biopsy ... to be biopsied is rubbed with the brush. Biopsy forceps may be used instead to collect a ...

  9. Stretching a polymer brush by making in situ cyclodextrin inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Julie; Dreiss, Cécile A; Cosgrove, Terence

    2008-09-16

    The interaction between poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) chains grafted onto polystyrene latex particles and alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins (CD) was studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The particles were contrast-matched to the solvent in order that only the scattering from the polymer layers was detected. The signal from the layers was fitted to a double-exponential volume fraction profile. The effects of adding cyclodextrin on the polymer profile are shown as a function of cyclodextrin concentration. The polymer layers are seen to extend on addition of CD, which is consistent with a complexation between the grafted PEO and the CD molecules. The effect is the strongest with alpha-CD. PMID:18712892

  10. Brushing your infant's teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000769.htm Brushing Your Child’s Teeth To use the sharing features on this page, ... how to brush their teeth on their own. Tooth and Gum Care for Young Children You should ...

  11. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-07-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  12. Brush seal numerical simulation: Concepts and advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.

    1994-01-01

    The development of the brush seal is considered to be most promising among the advanced type seals that are presently in use in the high speed turbomachinery. The brush is usually mounted on the stationary portions of the engine and has direct contact with the rotating element, in the process of limiting the 'unwanted' leakage flows between stages, or various engine cavities. This type of sealing technology is providing high (in comparison with conventional seals) pressure drops due mainly to the high packing density (around 100 bristles/sq mm), and brush compliance with the rotor motions. In the design of modern aerospace turbomachinery leakage flows between the stages must be minimal, thus contributing to the higher efficiency of the engine. Use of the brush seal instead of the labyrinth seal reduces the leakage flow by one order of magnitude. Brush seals also have been found to enhance dynamic performance, cost less, and are lighter than labyrinth seals. Even though industrial brush seals have been successfully developed through extensive experimentation, there is no comprehensive numerical methodology for the design or prediction of their performance. The existing analytical/numerical approaches are based on bulk flow models and do not allow the investigation of the effects of brush morphology (bristle arrangement), or brushes arrangement (number of brushes, spacing between them), on the pressure drops and flow leakage. An increase in the brush seal efficiency is clearly a complex problem that is closely related to the brush geometry and arrangement, and can be solved most likely only by means of a numerically distributed model.

  13. Brush-Wheel Samplers for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivellini, Tommaso

    2003-01-01

    A report proposes brush-wheel mechanisms for acquiring samples of soils from remote planets. In simplest terms, such a mechanism would contain brush wheels that would be counter-rotated at relatively high speed. The mechanism would be lowered to the ground from a spacecraft or other exploratory vehicle. Upon contact with the ground, the counter-rotating brush wheels would kick soil up into a collection chamber. Thus, in form and function, the mechanism would partly resemble traditional street and carpet sweepers. The main advantage of using of brush wheels (in contradistinction to cutting wheels or other, more complex mechanisms) is that upon encountering soil harder than expected, the brushes could simply deflect and the motor(s) could continue to turn. That is, sufficiently flexible brushes would afford resistance to jamming and to overloading of the motors used to rotate the brushes, and so the motors could be made correspondingly lighter and less power hungry. Of course, one could select the brush stiffnesses and motor torques and speeds for greatest effectiveness in sampling soil of a specific anticipated degree of hardness.

  14. Ceramic brush seals development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, Harold

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this viewgraph presentation: ceramic brush seals, research and development, manufacturing, brazed assembly development, controlling braze flow, fiber selection, and braze results.

  15. Zwitterionic poly(amino acid methacrylate) brushes.

    PubMed

    Alswieleh, Abdullah M; Cheng, Nan; Canton, Irene; Ustbas, Burcin; Xue, Xuan; Ladmiral, Vincent; Xia, Sijing; Ducker, Robert E; El Zubir, Osama; Cartron, Michael L; Hunter, C Neil; Leggett, Graham J; Armes, Steven P

    2014-07-01

    A new cysteine-based methacrylic monomer (CysMA) was conveniently synthesized via selective thia-Michael addition of a commercially available methacrylate-acrylate precursor in aqueous solution without recourse to protecting group chemistry. Poly(cysteine methacrylate) (PCysMA) brushes were grown from the surface of silicon wafers by atom-transfer radical polymerization. Brush thicknesses of ca. 27 nm were achieved within 270 min at 20 °C. Each CysMA residue comprises a primary amine and a carboxylic acid. Surface zeta potential and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the pH-responsive PCysMA brushes confirm that they are highly extended either below pH 2 or above pH 9.5, since they possess either cationic or anionic character, respectively. At intermediate pH, PCysMA brushes are zwitterionic. At physiological pH, they exhibit excellent resistance to biofouling and negligible cytotoxicity. PCysMA brushes undergo photodegradation: AFM topographical imaging indicates significant mass loss from the brush layer, while XPS studies confirm that exposure to UV radiation produces surface aldehyde sites that can be subsequently derivatized with amines. UV exposure using a photomask yielded sharp, well-defined micropatterned PCysMA brushes functionalized with aldehyde groups that enable conjugation to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Nanopatterned PCysMA brushes were obtained using interference lithography, and confocal microscopy again confirmed the selective conjugation of GFP. Finally, PCysMA undergoes complex base-catalyzed degradation in alkaline solution, leading to the elimination of several small molecules. However, good long-term chemical stability was observed when PCysMA brushes were immersed in aqueous solution at physiological pH. PMID:24884533

  16. Zwitterionic Poly(amino acid methacrylate) Brushes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new cysteine-based methacrylic monomer (CysMA) was conveniently synthesized via selective thia-Michael addition of a commercially available methacrylate-acrylate precursor in aqueous solution without recourse to protecting group chemistry. Poly(cysteine methacrylate) (PCysMA) brushes were grown from the surface of silicon wafers by atom-transfer radical polymerization. Brush thicknesses of ca. 27 nm were achieved within 270 min at 20 °C. Each CysMA residue comprises a primary amine and a carboxylic acid. Surface zeta potential and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the pH-responsive PCysMA brushes confirm that they are highly extended either below pH 2 or above pH 9.5, since they possess either cationic or anionic character, respectively. At intermediate pH, PCysMA brushes are zwitterionic. At physiological pH, they exhibit excellent resistance to biofouling and negligible cytotoxicity. PCysMA brushes undergo photodegradation: AFM topographical imaging indicates significant mass loss from the brush layer, while XPS studies confirm that exposure to UV radiation produces surface aldehyde sites that can be subsequently derivatized with amines. UV exposure using a photomask yielded sharp, well-defined micropatterned PCysMA brushes functionalized with aldehyde groups that enable conjugation to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Nanopatterned PCysMA brushes were obtained using interference lithography, and confocal microscopy again confirmed the selective conjugation of GFP. Finally, PCysMA undergoes complex base-catalyzed degradation in alkaline solution, leading to the elimination of several small molecules. However, good long-term chemical stability was observed when PCysMA brushes were immersed in aqueous solution at physiological pH. PMID:24884533

  17. Rotating Brush Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, S. B.; Braun, M. J.; Choy. F. K.; Hendricks, R. C.; Steinetz, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    The proven technology of brush seals has been extended to the mitigation of problems arising from friction and wear at the bristle-rotor interface at high surface speeds. In prototype testing, the brush is mounted on, and free to rotate with the shaft, thus providing a complaint primary seal. A face seal positioned between the backing plate of the brush seal and the housing provides a secondary seal. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the interaction between the brush bristles and the shaft at high surface speeds as well as introduce a numerical model to simulate the bristle behavior. A test facility was constructed to study the effects of centrifugal forces on bristle deflection in a single rotating brush seal. The bristle-rotor interface was observed through a video camera, which utilized a high magnification borescope and a high frequency strobe light source. Rotational speeds of the rotor and the brush seal were measured by a magnetic and optical speed sensor, respectively. Preliminary results with speeds up to 11,000 rpm show no speed differential between the brush seal and rotor, or any instability problems associated with the brush seal. Bristle liftoff from the rotor is successfully captured on video.

  18. Flow visualization in a simulated brush seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Canacci, V.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    A method to visualize and characterize the complex flow fields in simulated brush seals is presented. The brush seal configuration was tested in a water and then in an oil tunnel. The visualization procedure revealed typical regions that are rivering, jetting, vortical or lateral flows and exist upstream, downstream or within the seal. Such flows are engendered by variations in fiber void that are spatial and temporal and affect changes in seal leakage and stability. While the effects of interface motion for linear or cylindrical configurations have not been considered herein, it is believed that the observed flow fields characterize flow phenomenology in both circular and linear brush seals. The axial pressure profiles upstream, across and downstream of the brush in the oil tunnel have been measured under a variety of inlet pressure conditions and the ensuing pressure maps are presented and discussed.

  19. Nanotribology of charged polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Jacob

    Polymers at surfaces, whose modern understanding may be traced back to early work by Sam Edwards1, have become a paradigm for modification of surface properties, both as steric stabilizers and as remarkable boundary lubricants2. Charged polymer brushes are of particular interest, with both technological implications and especially biological relevance where most macromolecules are charged. In the context of biolubrication, relevant in areas from dry eye syndrome to osteoarthritis, charged polymer surface phases and their complexes with other macromolecules may play a central role. The hydration lubrication paradigm, where tenaciously-held yet fluid hydration shells surrounding ions or zwitterions serve as highly-efficient friction-reducing elements, has been invoked to understand the excellent lubrication provided both by ionized3 and by zwitterionic4 brushes. In this talk we describe recent advances in our understanding of the nanotribology of such charged brush systems. We consider interactions between charged end-grafted polymers, and how one may disentangle the steric from the electrostatic surface forces5. We examine the limits of lubrication by ionized brushes, both synthetic and of biological origins, and how highly-hydrated zwitterionic chains may provide extremely effective boundary lubrication6. Finally we describe how the lubrication of articular cartilage in the major joints, a tribosystem presenting some of the greatest challenges and opportunities, may be understood in terms of a supramolecular synergy between charged surface-attached polymers and zwitterionic groups7. Work supported by European Research Council (HydrationLube), Israel Science Foundation (ISF), Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical Society, ISF-NSF China Joint Program.

  20. Comb and brush acne.

    PubMed

    Petrozzi, J W

    1980-12-01

    Frequent combing or brushing of the hair may result in an exacerbation of existing acne or be the cause of localized acne. Because of today's hair styling habits and methods, this type of acne is commonly encountered but poorly appreciated by physicians. Patient education is the most important factor in the management of this condition. Comb and brush acne is another external factor to be added to the list of causes of "acne mechanica." PMID:6449356

  1. Almond brush module cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Zohns, M.A.; Jenkins, B.M.; Mehlschau, J.J.; Morrison, D.

    1983-06-01

    This paper addresses the design, construction, and evaluation of an almond brush module cutter. The module cutter is one link in a system which processes tree prunings for fuel and fiber. This system includes a modified cotton module builder, a module mover, the cutter, and a tub grinder. An economic analysis of the cutter is presented along with the problems involved in cutting brush modules.

  2. Lubrication by glycoprotein brushes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappone, Bruno; Ruths, Marina; Greene, George W.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-03-01

    Grafted polyelectrolyte brushes show excellent lubricating properties under water and have been proposed as a model to study boundary lubrication in biological system. Lubricin, a glycoprotein of the synovial fluid, is considered the major boundary lubricant of articular joints. Using the Surface Force Apparatus, we have measured normal and friction forces between model surfaces (negatively charged mica, positively charged poly-lysine and aminothiol, hydrophobic alkanethiol) bearing adsorbed layers of lubricin. Lubricin layers acts like a versatile anti-adhesive, adsorbing on all the surfaces considered and creating a repulsion similar to the force between end-grafted polymer brushes. Analogies with polymer brushes also appear from bridging experiment, where proteins molecules are end-adsorbed on two opposing surfaces at the same time. Lubricin `brushes' show good lubricating ability at low applied pressures (P<0.5MPa), especially on negatively charged surfaces like mica. At higher load, the adsorbed layers wears and fails lubricating the surfaces, while still protecting the underlying substrate from wearing. Lubricin might thus be a first example of biological polyelectrolytes providing `brush-like' lubrication and wear-protection.

  3. Bidirectional Brush Seals: Post-Test Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Wilson, Jack; Wu, Tom Y.; Flower, Ralph; Mullen, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    A post-test analysis of a set of inside-diameter/outside-diameter (ID/OD) bidirectional brush seals used in three-port wave rotor tests was undertaken to determine brush bristle and configuration wear, pullout, and rotor coating wear. The results suggest that sharp changes in the pressure profiles were not well reflected in bristle tip configuration patterns or wear. Also, positive-to-negative changes in axial pressure gradients appeared to have little effect on the backing plates. Although the brushes had similar porosities, they had very different unpacked arrays. This difference could explain the departure of experimental data from computational fluid dynamics flow predictions for well-packed arrays at higher pressure drops. The rotor wear led to "car-track" scars (upper and lower wear bands) with a whipped surface between the bands. Those bands may have resulted from bristle stiffening at the fence and gap plates during alternate portions of the rotor cycle. Within the bristle response range the wear surface reflected the pressure distribution effect on bristle motion. No sacrificial metallurgical data were taken. The bristles did wear, with correspondingly more wear on the ID brush configurations than on the OD configurations; the complexity in constructing the ID brush was a factor.

  4. Bidirectional Brush Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Wilson, Jack; Wu, Tom; Flower, Ralph

    1997-01-01

    Presented is a study of the use of a set of I.D./O.D. bidirectional press seals to reduce the leakage losses in a wave rotor. Relative to the baseline configuration, data indicate the use of brush seals enhanced wave rotor efficiency from 36 to 45 percent at low leakages (small rotor endwall gap spacings) and from 15 to 33 percent at high leakages (larger endwall gap spacings). These brush seals are capable of sealing positive or negative pressure drops with respect to the axial direction. Surface tribology for these tests suggested little evidence of grooving although the bristles appeared polished.

  5. A Brush-Creeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Se-yuen; Wong, Siu-ling

    2006-01-01

    In this note, we introduce a simple homemade toy called the brush-creeper, which can glide forward with no propellers, limbs, wheels, and seemingly no movement of any kind that can push forward against the ground. The toy arouses pupils' interest and their incentive to ask "Why?" in lessons related to friction.

  6. Brush potential curve tracer

    DOEpatents

    Finch, H.A.

    1985-06-21

    A device for analyzing commutating characteristics of a motor or generator includes a holder for supporting a plurality of probes adjacent a brush of the motor or generator. Measurements of electrical current characteristics of the probes provides information useful in analyzing operation of the machine. Methods for employing a device in accordance with the invention are also disclosed.

  7. Smart photonic carbon brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Oleg G.; Kuznetsov, Artem A.; Morozov, Gennady A.; Nureev, Ilnur I.; Sakhabutdinov, Airat Z.; Faskhutdinov, Lenar M.; Artemev, Vadim I.

    2016-03-01

    Aspects of the paper relate to a wear monitoring system for smart photonic carbon brush. There are many applications in which regular inspection is not feasible because of a number of factors including, for example, time, labor, cost and disruptions due to down time. Thus, there is a need for a system that can monitor the wear of a component while the component is in operation or without having to remove the component from its operational position. We propose a new smart photonic method for characterization of carbon brush wear. It is based on the usage of advantages of the multiplicative response of FBG and LPFG sensors and its double-frequency probing. Additional measuring parameters are the wear rate, the brush temperature, the engine rotation speed, the hangs control, and rotor speed. Sensor is embedded in brush. Firstly the change of sensor length is used to measure wear value and its central wavelength shift for temperature ones. The results of modeling and experiments are presented.

  8. Temperature responsive behavior of polymer brush/polyelectrolyte multilayer composites.

    PubMed

    Micciulla, Samantha; Soltwedel, Olaf; Löhmann, Oliver; von Klitzing, Regine

    2016-01-28

    The complex interaction of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) physisorbed onto end-grafted polymer brushes with focus on the temperature-responsive behavior of the system is addressed in this work. The investigated brush/multilayer composite consists of a poly(styrene sulfonate)/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PSS/PDADMAC) multilayer deposited onto the poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-b-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) P(NIPAM-b-DMAEMA) brush. Ellipsometry and neutron reflectometry were used to monitor the brush collapse with the thickness decrease as a function of temperature and the change in the monomer distribution perpendicular to the substrate at temperatures below, across and above the phase transition, respectively. It was found that the adsorption of PEMs onto polymer brushes had a hydrophobization effect on PDMAEMA, inducing the shift of its phase transition to lower temperatures, but without suppressing its temperature-responsiveness. Moreover, the diffusion of the free polyelectrolyte chains inside the charged brush was proved by comparing the neutron scattering length density profile of pure and the corresponding PEM-capped brushes, eased by the enhanced contrast between hydrogenated brushes and deuterated PSS chains. The results presented herein demonstrate the possibility of combining a temperature-responsive brush with polyelectrolyte multilayers without quenching the responsive behavior, even though significant interpolyelectrolyte interactions are present. This is of importance for the design of multicompartment coatings, where the brush can be used as a reservoir for the controlled release of substances and the multilayer on the top as a membrane to control the diffusion in/out by applying different stimuli. PMID:26612742

  9. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  10. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, R.A.

    1995-09-19

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

  11. Wire brush fastening device

    SciTech Connect

    Meigs, R.A.

    1993-08-31

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  12. Interpenetrations in polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Nelson, Peter; Toral, Raúl

    1994-01-01

    We carry out Monte Carlo simulations in both lattice and off-lattice geometry, to study the configurational properties of a system of two polymer-coated plates. We compare our results with numerical and analytical self-consistent-field theories. For the short chain-lengths considered here, we find both compression and interpenetration of the polymer brushes as the plate separation is decreased, instead of the ``classical-limit'' picture of compression with no interpenetration.

  13. Brush seals for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    1994-07-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents test results of brush seals for cryogenic applications. Leakage for a single brush seal was two to three times less than for a 12-tooth labyrinth seal. The maximum temperature rise for a single brush seal was less than 50 R and occurred at 25 psid across the seal and 35,000 rpm. A static blowout test demonstrated sealing capability up to 550 psid. The seal limit was not obtained. The power loss for a single brush at 35,000 rpm and 175 psid was 2.45 hp. Two brushes far apart leak less than two brushes tight packed. Rotor wear was approximately 0.00075 mils and bristle wear was 1-3 mils after 4-1/2 hours.

  14. Brush seals for cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    1994-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation presents test results of brush seals for cryogenic applications. Leakage for a single brush seal was two to three times less than for a 12-tooth labyrinth seal. The maximum temperature rise for a single brush seal was less than 50 R and occurred at 25 psid across the seal and 35,000 rpm. A static blowout test demonstrated sealing capability up to 550 psid. The seal limit was not obtained. The power loss for a single brush at 35,000 rpm and 175 psid was 2.45 hp. Two brushes far apart leak less than two brushes tight packed. Rotor wear was approximately 0.00075 mils and bristle wear was 1-3 mils after 4-1/2 hours.

  15. Isolation of renal brush borders.

    PubMed

    Morré, D James; Hammond, Timothy

    2007-03-01

    Methods are described to isolate intact brush borders and brush border membranes from renal cell homogenates. A rapid method yields sealed vesicles that reconstitute renal brush border transport. In one variation of this protocol, 10 to 20 mM CaCl2 or MgCl2 is added to aggregate non-brush border structures for subsequent removal by centrifugation. For analytical studies, guidance is provided for subsequent purification steps including preparative free-flow and aqueous two-phase partition. Marker enzymes and morphological parameters are included for assessment of yield and fraction purity. PMID:18228514

  16. Electrostatically anchored branched brush layers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Dedinaite, Andra; Rutland, Mark; Thormann, Esben; Visnevskij, Ceslav; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2012-11-01

    A novel type of block copolymer has been synthesized. It consists of a linear cationic block and an uncharged bottle-brush block. The nonionic bottle-brush block contains 45 units long poly(ethylene oxide) side chains. This polymer was synthesized with the intention of creating branched brush layers firmly physisorbed to negatively charged surfaces via the cationic block, mimicking the architecture (but not the chemistry) of bottle-brush molecules suggested to be present on the cartilage surface, and contributing to the efficient lubrication of synovial joints. The adsorption properties of the diblock copolymer as well as of the two blocks separately were studied on silica surfaces using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and optical reflectometry. The adsorption kinetics data highlight that the diblock copolymers initially adsorb preferentially parallel to the surface with both the cationic block and the uncharged bottle-brush block in contact with the surface. However, as the adsorption proceeds, a structural change occurs within the layer, and the PEO bottle-brush block extends toward solution, forming a surface-anchored branched brush layer. As the adsorption plateau is reached, the diblock copolymer layer is 46-48 nm thick, and the water content in the layer is above 90 wt %. The combination of strong electrostatic anchoring and highly hydrated branched brush structures provide strong steric repulsion, low friction forces, and high load bearing capacity. The strong electrostatic anchoring also provides high stability of preadsorbed layers under different ionic strength conditions. PMID:23046176

  17. Spontaneous Curvature of Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; da Silva, Marcelo; Shirvaniants, David; Rodrigues, Carlos; Beers, Kathryn; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Potemkin, Igor; Moeller, Martin

    2003-03-01

    Experimental studies of cylindrical brushes on surfaces revealed peculiar shape of brush molecules with a curved backbone. According to scaling analysis, spontaneous bending of the backbone can be driven by entropic elasticity of the side chains: smaller extension of the chains is attained due to their asymmetric distribution with respect to the backbone. An equilibrium, i.e. spontaneous curvature results from the balance of the elasticity of the side chains and the elasticity of the interface. The curvature is predicted to increase with the side chain length. The system is of general interest because cylindrical brushes confined to a flat surface represent a two-dimensional cross-section of a planar brush grafted on both sides. Here we present systematic studies of cylindrical brushes with different length of the side chains. The curvature of cylindrical brushes confined to a flat substrate was investigated by atomic force microscopy. The method allowed visualization of individual molecules and quantitative analysis of their conformation. In agreement with theory, adsorbed brushes demonstrated spontaneous curvature, however the curvature was shown to decrease with the side chain length.

  18. Current developments in brush seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenthal, Bob

    1994-07-01

    The objective of the brush seal development program is to develop a comprehensive design methodology for brush seals using application requirements from engine manufacturers and experimental characterization of seal design and tribological pairs. The goals are to substantially lower leakage compared to labyrinth seals, seal life consistent with man-rated mission requirements, to investigate single and multiple staged brush seals, temperature up to 1200 F and surface speed up to 900 fps, and pressure drop across the seal of 50 psid. Test results are presented in viewgraph format.

  19. Transcription rates in DNA brushes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Safran, S A

    2015-04-21

    We theoretically predict the rate of transcription (TX) in DNA brushes by introducing the concept of TX dipoles that takes into account the unidirectional motion of enzymes (RNAP) along DNA during transcription as correlated pairs of sources and sinks in the relevant diffusion equation. Our theory predicts that the TX rates dramatically change upon the inversion of the orientation of the TX dipoles relative to the substrate because TX dipoles modulate the concentrations of RNAP in the solution. Comparing our theory with experiments suggests that, in some cases, DNA chain segments are relatively uniformly distributed in the brush, in contrast to the parabolic profile expected for flexible polymer brushes. PMID:25736601

  20. Stimuli Response of Cationic Polymer Brush Prepared by ATRP: Application in Peptide Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Scott, Colleen; Mitrovic, Bojan; Eastwood, Stephanie; Kinsel, Gary

    2014-08-01

    Random cationic copolymer brushes composed of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) were synthesized using the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. The effects of varying the monomer feed ratios (30:70 and 70:30 DMAEMA:NIPAAm) and polymerization times on the film height, morphology and stimuli response to pH of the brush were evaluated. While the polymerization time was found to have little influence on the properties of the brushes, the monomer feed ratios had a great impact. The 70 % DMAEMA polymer brush had similar height as the 30 % DMAEMA brush after 45 min; however, it had a greater response to pH and morphological change compared to the 30 % DMAEMA. The 70 % DMAEMA brush was used to demonstrate an efficient approach to alleviate the ion suppression effect in MALDI analysis of complex mixtures by effectively fractionating a binary mixture of peptides prior to MALDI-MS analysis. PMID:25253913

  1. Stimuli Response of Cationic Polymer Brush Prepared by ATRP: Application in Peptide Fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Colleen; Mitrovic, Bojan; Eastwood, Stephanie; Kinsel, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Random cationic copolymer brushes composed of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) were synthesized using the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. The effects of varying the monomer feed ratios (30:70 and 70:30 DMAEMA:NIPAAm) and polymerization times on the film height, morphology and stimuli response to pH of the brush were evaluated. While the polymerization time was found to have little influence on the properties of the brushes, the monomer feed ratios had a great impact. The 70 % DMAEMA polymer brush had similar height as the 30 % DMAEMA brush after 45 min; however, it had a greater response to pH and morphological change compared to the 30 % DMAEMA. The 70 % DMAEMA brush was used to demonstrate an efficient approach to alleviate the ion suppression effect in MALDI analysis of complex mixtures by effectively fractionating a binary mixture of peptides prior to MALDI-MS analysis. PMID:25253913

  2. Osmotic and Salted Brush Phase of Polyelectrolyte Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helm, Christane A.; Ahrens, Heiko; Förster, Stephan

    2004-03-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers consisting of a fluid hydrophobic Poly(ethyletylene) (PEE), and a Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS) part form monolayers at the air/water interface. With x-ray reflectivity it is shown that the hydrophobic blocks of PEE_114PSS_83 and PEE_144PSS_136 constitute a nm-thick melt, while the polyelectrolyte forms an osmotically swollen brush with counterion incorporation. A slight thickness increase on monolayer compression is found which can be explained by the strong stretching of the brushes. Only at high salt conditions (above 0.1 M), the brush shrinks and the thickness scales with the molecular area (exponent -1/3), and with the salt concentration (exponent ca. -1/5). With Grazing Incidence Diffraction, the lateral order of the polyelectrolyte chains can be detected.

  3. Cryogenic Brush Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant, contact seals that have long-life, low-leakage characteristics desirable for use in rocket engine turbopumps. 50.8-mm (2.0 inch) diameter brush seals with a nominal initial radial interference of 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) were tested in liquid nitrogen at shaft speeds up to 35,000 rpm and differential pressure loads up to 1.21 MPa (175 psi) per brush. The measured leakage rate of a single brush was 2-3 times less than that measured for a 12-tooth, 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) radial clearance labyrinth seal used as a baseline. Stage effects were studied and it was found that two brush seals with a large separation distance leaked less than two brushes tightly packed together. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor was 25.4 (mu)m (0.001 inch) after 4.31 hours of shaft rotation. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25.4-76.2 (mu)m (0.001-0.003 inch) under the same conditions. Three seal runner coatings, chromium carbide, Teflon impregnated chromium, and zirconium oxide, were tested in liquid hydrogen at 35,000 and 65,000 rpm with separate 50.8 mm diameter brush seals made of Haynes-25 bristles and having a nominal initial radial interference of 129 rpm. Two bare Inconel-718 rotors were also tested as a baseline. The test results revealed significant differences between the wear characteristics of the uncoated and coated seal runners. At both speeds the brush seal with the bare Inconel-718 seal runner exhibited significant bristle wear with excessive material transferring to the runner surface. In contrast, the coated seal runners inhibited the transfer and deposit of bristle material. The chromium carbide coating showed only small quantities of bristle material transferring to its surface. The Teflon impregnated chromium coating also inhibited material transfer and provided some lubrication. This coating, however, is self-sacrificing. The Teflon remained present on the low speed runner, but it was completely removed from the

  4. Swelling of polyelectrolyte and polyzwitterion brushes by humid vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzer, Jan; Galvin, Casey; Dimitriou, Michael; Satija, Sushil

    2015-03-01

    Swelling behavior of polyelectrolyte and polyzwitterion brushes derived from poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) in water vapor is investigated using a combination of neutron and X-ray reflectivity and spectroscopic ellipsometry over a wide range of relative humidity (RH) levels. The extent of swelling depends strongly on the nature of the side-chain chemistry. For parent PDMAEMA, there is an apparent enrichment of vapor at the polymer/air interface. Despite extensive swelling at high humidity level, no evidence of charge repulsion is found in weak or strong polyelectrolyte brushes. Polyzwitterionic brushes swell to a greater extent than the quaternized brushes studied. However, for RH levels beyond 70%, the polyzwitterionic brushes start to exclude water molecules, leading to a decline in water volume fraction from the maximum of 0.30 down to 0.10. Using a gradient in polymer chain grafting density, we provide evidence that this behavior stems from the formation of inter- and intramolecular zwitterionic complexes.

  5. Mesoscale modeling of polyelectrolyte brushes with salt.

    PubMed

    Ibergay, Cyrille; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2010-06-01

    We report dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of a polyelectrolyte brush under athermal solvent conditions. The electrostatic interactions are calculated using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) method with charges distributed over the particles. The polymer beads, counterions, co-ions, and solvent particles are modeled explicitly. The DPD simulations show a dependence of the brush height on the grafting density and the charge fraction that is typical of the nonlinear osmotic brush regime. We report the effect of the addition of salt on the structural properties of the brush. In the case of a polyelectrolyte brush with a high surface coverage, the simulations reproduce the transition between the nonlinear osmotic brush regime where the thickness of the brush is independent of the salt concentration and the salted regime where the brush height decreases weakly with the salt concentration. PMID:20455593

  6. Effective Antisense Gene Regulation via Noncationic, Polyethylene Glycol Brushes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xueguang; Jia, Fei; Tan, Xuyu; Wang, Dali; Cao, Xueyan; Zheng, Jiamin; Zhang, Ke

    2016-07-27

    Negatively charged nucleic acids are often complexed with polycationic transfection agents before delivery. Herein, we demonstrate that a noncationic, biocompatible polymer, polyethylene glycol, can be used as a transfection vector by forming a brush polymer-DNA conjugate. The brush architecture provides embedded DNA strands with enhanced nuclease stability and improved cell uptake. Because of the biologically benign nature of the polymer component, no cytotoxicity was observed. This approach has the potential to address several long-lasting challenges in oligonucleotide therapeutics. PMID:27420413

  7. Brush seals for cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    1993-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant, contacting seals and have significantly lower leakage than labyrinth seals in gas turbine applications. Their characteristics of long life and low leakage make them candidates for use in rocket engine turbopumps. Two-inch diameter brush seals with a nominal 0.005 inch radial interference were tested in liquid nitrogen at shaft speeds up to 35,000 rpm and pressure drops up to 175 psid per seal. A labyrinth seal was also tested to provide a baseline. Performance, staging effects, and wear results are presented.

  8. Brush seals for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    1993-11-01

    Brush seals are compliant, contacting seals and have significantly lower leakage than labyrinth seals in gas turbine applications. Their characteristics of long life and low leakage make them candidates for use in rocket engine turbopumps. Two-inch diameter brush seals with a nominal 0.005 inch radial interference were tested in liquid nitrogen at shaft speeds up to 35,000 rpm and pressure drops up to 175 psid per seal. A labyrinth seal was also tested to provide a baseline. Performance, staging effects, and wear results are presented.

  9. Charge transferred in brush discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talarek, M.; Kacprzyk, R.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic discharges from surfaces of plastic materials can be a source of ignition, when appear in explosive atmospheres. Incendivity of electrostatic discharges can be estimated using the transferred charge test. In the case of brush discharges not all the energy stored at the tested sample is released and the effective surface charge density (or surface potential) crater is observed after the discharge. Simplified model, enabling calculation of a charge transferred during electrostatic brush discharge, was presented. Comparison of the results obtained from the simplified model and from direct measurements of transferred charge are presented in the paper.

  10. Brush/Fin Thermal Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Timothy R.; Seaman, Christopher L.; Ellman, Brett M.

    2004-01-01

    Brush/fin thermal interfaces are being developed to increase heat-transfer efficiency and thereby enhance the thermal management of orbital replaceable units (ORUs) of electronic and other equipment aboard the International Space Station. Brush/fin thermal interfaces could also be used to increase heat-transfer efficiency in terrestrial electronic and power systems. In a typical application according to conventional practice, a replaceable heat-generating unit includes a mounting surface with black-anodized metal fins that mesh with the matching fins of a heat sink or radiator on which the unit is mounted. The fins do not contact each other, but transfer heat via radiation exchange. A brush/fin interface also includes intermeshing fins, the difference being that the gaps between the fins are filled with brushes made of carbon or other fibers. The fibers span the gap between intermeshed fins, allowing heat transfer by conduction through the fibers. The fibers are attached to the metal surfaces as velvet-like coats in the manner of the carbon fiber brush heat exchangers described in the preceding article. The fiber brushes provide both mechanical compliance and thermal contact, thereby ensuring low contact thermal resistance. A certain amount of force is required to intermesh the fins due to sliding friction of the brush s fiber tips against the fins. This force increases linearly with penetration distance, reaching 1 psi (6.9 kPa) for full 2-in. (5.1 cm) penetration for the conventional radiant fin interface. Removal forces can be greater due to fiber buckling upon reversing the sliding direction. This buckling force can be greatly reduced by biasing the fibers at an angle perpendicularly to the sliding direction. Means of containing potentially harmful carbon fiber debris, which is electrically conductive, have been developed. Small prototype brush/fin thermal interfaces have been tested and found to exhibit temperature drops about onesixth of that of conventional

  11. Teach children to brush (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child's overall good health. Without proper dental care tooth decay and gum disease can lead to serious problems such as cavities and gingivitis, swollen and bleeding gums. Regular visits to the dentist, brushing twice each day, and flossing, are ways to ...

  12. Wear of metal fiber brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lloyd Perryman, Jr.

    The goal of this dissertation was determining the wear mechanism of metal fiber brushes on commutators and slip rings with the goal of achieving the lowest possible wear rate. To this end, metal fiber brushes were operated, while conducting direct current, on gold-plated copper rotors with and without unfilled gaps to simulate slip rings and commutators, respectively. Wear rates on unfilled-groove commutators were found to be only modestly higher than on slip ring style rotors. Three possible causes for enhanced metal fiber brush wear on commutators were considered: (i) accelerated "adhesive" wear controlled by contact spots, (ii) fatigue induced wear and (iii) "fiber chopping". Similarly, SEM analysis of fiber tips and wear particles produced scant, if any, evidence of fiber chopping, which would occur as, again, fiber tips extend elastically into the commutator grooves and small slices of them would be "chopped" off by oncoming edges of commutator bars. Finally considered was "modified chopping", wherein fiber tips would be dragged over groove edges, resulting in tensile fracture and chopping. Only a single fiber fragment showed damage that might be compatible with that mechanism. Moreover, the fact that it was exemplified by a single tenuous case, rules it out as significant. The same conclusion also follows from comparing commutator wear rates with that on slip rings. These show good correlation in terms of effective brush pressure, which on commutators is increased because only bars conduct current and gaps do not support load. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  13. Polymer brushes for molecular transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Huilin

    Polymer brushes and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are used as solid-state, 2-dimensional transport media to confine molecular diffusion. Microcontact printing and photolithography combined with surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) are the major techniques to construct patterned polymer brushes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is used to determine diffusion coefficients of fluorescent dye, Prodan, in the polymer brushes and SAMs. Similar diffusion coefficients of Prodan are found for the SAMs formed by chlorotrimethyl silane (CTS) and silanated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). No fluorescence recovery is observed on the octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) SAM or on the clean silica surface. Patterned poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) brushes were fabricated on silica substrates by surface-initiated ATRP of N-isopropylacrylamide from a micropatterned initiator. Variable temperature ellipsometry indicated that the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the hydrated PNIPAAm brush was broad, occurring over the range of 20-35°C. FRAP results of Prodan in PNIPAAm layers indicate that bulk translational diffusion is very slow relative to other diffusion mechanisms. Poly(oligoethylene glycol acrylate) (POEGA) chains are grafted onto silica substrates by surface-initiated ATRP. The diffusion of Prodan in dry POEGA is very fast, which is attributable to the low glass transition temperature of POEGA. The diffusion of Prodan in POEGA under variable humidity can be described reasonably well using WLF equation. Patterned POEGA brushes are not able to confine Prodan to diffuse exclusively inside the polymer regions, and possible explanations are rotational diffusion and a combination of fast surface diffusion and slow bulk diffusion. PNIPAAm chains are tethered onto silica particles via surface-initiated polymerization. Thermal annealing slightly improved the crystallinity of the colloidal assembly. Video microscopy of the two

  14. Turbine-Driven Pipe-Cleaning Brush

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Rowell, David E.

    1994-01-01

    Simple pipe-cleaning device includes small turbine wheel axially connected, by standoff, to circular brush. Turbine wheel turns on hub bearing attached to end of upstream cable. Turbine-and-brush assembly inserted in pipe with cable trailing upstream and brush facing downstream. Water or cleaning solution pumped through pipe. Cable held at upstream end, so it holds turbine and brush in pipe at location to be cleaned. Flow in pipe turns turbine, which turns wheel, producing desired cleaning action. In addition to brushing action, device provides even mixing of cleaning solution in pipe.

  15. Supramolecular Magnetic Brushes: The Impact of Dipolar Interactions on the Equilibrium Structure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium structure of supramolecular magnetic filament brushes is analyzed at two different scales. First, we study the density and height distributions for brushes with various grafting densities and chain lengths. We use Langevin dynamics simulations with a bead–spring model that takes into account the cross-links between the surface of the ferromagnetic particles, whose magnetization is characterized by a point dipole. Magnetic filament brushes are shown to be more compact near the substrate than nonmagnetic ones, with a bimodal height distribution for large grafting densities. This latter feature makes them also different from brushes with electric dipoles. Next, in order to explain the observed behavior at the filament scale, we introduce a graph theory analysis to elucidate for the first time the structure of the brush at the scale of individual beads. It turns out that, in contrast to nonmagnetic brushes, in which the internal structure is determined by random density fluctuations, magnetic forces introduce a certain order in the system. Because of their highly directional nature, magnetic dipolar interactions prevent some of the random connections to be formed. On the other hand, they favor a higher connectivity of the chains’ free and grafted ends. We show that this complex dipolar brush microstructure has a strong impact on the magnetic response of the brush, as any weak applied field has to compete with the dipole–dipole interactions within the crowded environment. PMID:26538768

  16. Planar dipolar polymer brush: field theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, Jyoti; Kumar, Rajeev; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    Physical properties of polymer brushes bearing monomers with permanent dipole moments and immersed in a polar solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory (SCFT). It is found that mismatch between the permanent dipole moments of the monomer and the solvent plays a significant role in determining the height of the polymer brush. Sign as well as magnitude of the mismatch determines the extent of collapse of the polymer brush. The mismatch in the dipole moments also affects the force-distance relations and interpenetration of polymers in opposing planar brushes. In particular, an attractive force between the opposing dipolar brushes is predicted for stronger mismatch parameter. Furthermore, effects of added monovalent salt on the structure of dipolar brushes will also be presented. This investigation highlights the significance of dipolar interactions in affecting the physical properties of polymer brushes. Csmd division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  17. Brush Seals for Improved Steam Turbine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnquist, Norman; Chupp, Ray; Baily, Fred; Burnett, Mark; Rivas, Flor; Bowsher, Aaron; Crudgington, Peter

    2006-01-01

    GE Energy has retrofitted brush seals into more than 19 operating steam turbines. Brush seals offer superior leakage control compared to labyrinth seals, owing to their compliant nature and ability to maintain very tight clearances to the rotating shaft. Seal designs have been established for steam turbines ranging in size from 12 MW to over 1200 MW, including fossil, nuclear, combined-cycle and industrial applications. Steam turbines present unique design challenges that must be addressed to ensure that the potential performance benefits of brush seals are realized. Brush seals can have important effects on the overall turbine system that must be taken into account to assure reliable operation. Subscale rig tests are instrumental to understanding seal behavior under simulated steam-turbine operating conditions, prior to installing brush seals in the field. This presentation discusses the technical challenges of designing brush seals for steam turbines; subscale testing; performance benefits of brush seals; overall system effects; and field applications.

  18. Loop polymer brushes from polymer single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tian; Li, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Loop polymer brushes represent a category of polymer brushes with both chain ends being tethered to a surface or interface with sufficiently high density. Due to this morphological difference, loop brushes exhibit distinct properties compared with traditional polymer brushes with single chain end being tethered. In our study, α, ω-functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) single crystals were prepared as templates for polymer brush synthesis. By carefully controlling crystallization condition and immobilization, looped polymer brushes were successfully prepared. Comprehensive studies on the morphology and physical properties of these polymer brushes were carried out using Atomic Force Microscopy and FTIR. Advantages of using this method include exclusive loop morphology, high grafting density, controlled tethering sites and tunable loop size.

  19. Explicit Solvent Simulations of Friction between Brush Layers of Charged and Neutral Bottle-Brush Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W Michael; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    We study friction between charged and neutral brush layers of bottle-brush macromolecules using molecular dynamics simulations. In our simulations the solvent molecules were treated explicitly. The deformation of the bottle-brush macromolecules under the shear were studied as a function of the substrate separation and shear stress. For charged bottle-brush layers we study effect of the added salt on the brush lubricating properties to elucidate factors responsible for energy dissipation in charged and neutral brush systems. Our simulations have shown that for both charged and neutral brush systems the main deformation mode of the bottle-brush macromolecule is associated with the backbone deformation. This deformation mode manifests itself in the backbone deformation ratio, , and shear viscosity, , to be universal functions of the Weissenberg number W. The value of the friction coefficient, , and viscosity, , are larger for the charged bottle-brush coatings in comparison with those for neutral brushes at the same separation distance, D, between substrates. The additional energy dissipation generated by brush sliding in charged bottle-brush systems is due to electrostatic coupling between bottle-brush and counterion motion. This coupling weakens as salt concentration, cs, increases resulting in values of the viscosity, , and friction coefficient, , approaching corresponding values obtained for neutral brush systems.

  20. Polyelectrolyte brushes: theory, modelling, synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Das, Siddhartha; Banik, Meneka; Chen, Guang; Sinha, Shayandev; Mukherjee, Rabibrata

    2015-11-28

    Polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes are a special class of polymer brushes (PBs) containing charges. Polymer chains attain "brush"-like configuration when they are grafted or get localized at an interface (solid-fluid or liquid-fluid) with sufficiently close proximity between two-adjacent grafted polymer chains - such a proximity triggers a particular nature of interaction between the adjacent polymer molecules forcing them to stretch orthogonally to the grafting interface, instead of random-coil arrangement. In this review, we discuss the theory, synthesis, and applications of PE brushes. The theoretical discussion starts with the standard scaling concepts for polymer and PE brushes; following that, we shed light on the state of the art in continuum modelling approaches for polymer and PE brushes directed towards analysis beyond the scaling calculations. A special emphasis is laid in pinpointing the cases for which the PE electrostatic effects can be de-coupled from the PE entropic and excluded volume effects; such de-coupling is necessary to appropriately probe the complicated electrostatic effects arising from pH-dependent charging of the PE brushes and the use of these effects for driving liquid and ion transport at the interfaces covered with PE brushes. We also discuss the atomistic simulation approaches for polymer and PE brushes. Next we provide a detailed review of the existing approaches for the synthesis of polymer and PE brushes on interfaces, nanoparticles, and nanochannels, including mixed brushes and patterned brushes. Finally, we discuss some of the possible applications and future developments of polymer and PE brushes grafted on a variety of interfaces. PMID:26399305

  1. Positron annihilation spectroscopy: a new frontier for understanding nanoparticle-loaded polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzarasa, Guido; Aghion, Stefano; Soliveri, Guido; Consolati, Giovanni; Ferragut, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle-loaded polymer brushes are powerful tools for the development of innovative devices. However, their characterization is challenging and arrays of different techniques are typically required to gain sufficient insight. Here we demonstrate for the first time the suitability of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) to investigate, with unprecedented detail and without making the least damage to samples, the physico-chemical changes experienced by pH-responsive polymer brushes after protonation and after loading of silver nanoparticles. One of the most important findings is the depth profiling of silver nanoparticles inside the brushes. These results open up a completely new way to understand the structure and behavior of such complex systems.

  2. Macroion Interaction at Polyelectrolyte Brush Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chen

    2015-03-01

    The effect of macroions, including synthetic polyelectrolytes, DNA and proteins, on the structure and surface properties of charged polymer thin films remains inadequately understood partially due to the complexity involving the hydrophobic effect and the conformational change of polymeric macroions. In this work, we explore a group of inorganic nanocluster based macroions, hydrophilic polyoxometalates (POMs) of robust nanocluster structure and carrying high surface charges (~ 2-42 negative charges) to investigate their interaction with surface tethered poly-2-vinylpyridine (P2VP) brush-like thin films immersed in aqueous solution. We observe the collapse of swollen P2VP chains by adding POM macroions of increased concentration by AFM, QCM and contact goniometer measurements, in sharp contrast to the increased chain stretching by adding monovalent salts. A careful comparison is made between distinct POMs based on their charge, size and chemical nature. These findings serve as a good reference for theoretical model modification and design of new mesoporous composite membranes.

  3. Brush seals for turbine engine fuel conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Mike

    1994-07-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate brush seals for replacing labyrinth seals in turboprop engines. The approach taken was to design and procure brush seals with assistance from Sealol, modify and instrument an existing T407 low pressure turbine test rig, replace inner balance piston and outer balance piston labyrinth seals with brush seals, conduct cyclic tests to evaluate seal leakage at operating pressures and temperatures, and evaluate effect of seal pack width and rotor eccentricity. Results are presented in viewgraph format and show that brush seals offer performance advantages over labyrinth seals.

  4. Brush seals for turbine engine fuel conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sousa, Mike

    1994-01-01

    The program objective is to demonstrate brush seals for replacing labyrinth seals in turboprop engines. The approach taken was to design and procure brush seals with assistance from Sealol, modify and instrument an existing T407 low pressure turbine test rig, replace inner balance piston and outer balance piston labyrinth seals with brush seals, conduct cyclic tests to evaluate seal leakage at operating pressures and temperatures, and evaluate effect of seal pack width and rotor eccentricity. Results are presented in viewgraph format and show that brush seals offer performance advantages over labyrinth seals.

  5. Nanopatterned polymer brushes: conformation, fabrication and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qian; Ista, Linnea K.; Gu, Renpeng; Zauscher, Stefan; López, Gabriel P.

    2015-12-01

    Surfaces with end-grafted, nanopatterned polymer brushes that exhibit well-defined feature dimensions and controlled chemical and physical properties provide versatile platforms not only for investigation of nanoscale phenomena at biointerfaces, but also for the development of advanced devices relevant to biotechnology and electronics applications. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of scaling behavior of nanopatterned polymer brushes and then summarize recent progress in fabrication and application of nanopatterned polymer brushes. Specifically, we highlight applications of nanopatterned stimuli-responsive polymer brushes in the areas of biomedicine and biotechnology.

  6. Nanopatterned polymer brushes: conformation, fabrication and applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Ista, Linnea K; Gu, Renpeng; Zauscher, Stefan; López, Gabriel P

    2016-01-14

    Surfaces with end-grafted, nanopatterned polymer brushes that exhibit well-defined feature dimensions and controlled chemical and physical properties provide versatile platforms not only for investigation of nanoscale phenomena at biointerfaces, but also for the development of advanced devices relevant to biotechnology and electronics applications. In this review, we first give a brief introduction of scaling behavior of nanopatterned polymer brushes and then summarize recent progress in fabrication and application of nanopatterned polymer brushes. Specifically, we highlight applications of nanopatterned stimuli-responsive polymer brushes in the areas of biomedicine and biotechnology. PMID:26648412

  7. Development of a Brush Seals Program Leading to Ceramic Brush Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Flower, Ralph; Howe, Harold

    1994-01-01

    Some events of a U.S. Army/NASA Lewis Research Center brush seals program are reviewed, and the development of ceramic brush seals is described. Some preliminary room-temperature flow data are given, and the results of testing metallic brushes in cryogenic nitrogen are discussed.

  8. Arbitrary and Parallel Nanofabrication of 3D Metal Structures with Polymer Brush Resists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaojian; Xie, Zhuang; Wei, Xiaoling; Zheng, Zijian

    2015-12-01

    3D polymer brushes are reported for the first time as ideal resists for the alignment-free nanofabrication of complex 3D metal structures with sub-100 nm lateral resolution and sub-10 nm vertical resolution. Since 3D polymer brushes can be serially fabricated in parallel, this method is effective to generate arbitrary 3D metal structures over a large area at a high throughput. PMID:26439441

  9. Controlled Synthesis of Polymer Brushes via Polymer Single Crystal Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tian

    A novel synthetic method of polymer brushes using polymer single crystals (PSCs) as solid-state templates is introduced in this study. PSC has a quasi-2D lamellae structure with polymer chains fold back-and-forth perpendicular to the lamellae surfaces. During crystallization, the chain ends are excluded from the unit cell onto the lamellae surfaces, which makes the material extremely versatile in its functionality. Such structure holds the unique capability to harvest nanoparticles, or being immobilized onto macroscopic flat surfaces. After dissolving PSCs in good solvent, polymer brushes are chemically tethered on either nanoparticles or flat macroscopic surfaces. Because the chain-folding structure can be conveniently tailored by changing the molecular weight of polymer and the crystallization temperature, the thickness, grafting density and morphology of resulted polymer brushes can be precisely controlled. As a model system, poly(?-caprolactone) with thiol or alkoxysilane terminal groups was used, and polymer brushes were successfully prepared on both nanoparticles and glass/Au flat surfaces. The structure-property relationships of the as-prepared polymer brushes were studied in detail using multiple characterization techniques. First of all, when functionalizing nanoparticles, by engineering the chain-folding structure of the PSCs, interesting complex nanostructures can be formed by nanoparticles including Janus nanoparticles and nanoparticle dimers. These unique structures render hybrid nanoparticles very interesting responsive behavior which have been studied in detail in this dissertation. When grafted onto a flat surface on the other hand, not only the molecular weight and grafting density can be precisely controlled, the tethering points of a single polymer chain can also be conveniently tailored, resulting polymer brushes with either tail or loop structures. Such difference in brush structure can significantly alter the properties of functional surface

  10. Compression induced phase transition of nematic brush: A mean-field theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Xinghua; Yan, Dadong

    2015-11-01

    Responsive behavior of polymer brush to the external compression is one of the most important characters for its application. For the flexible polymer brush, in the case of low grafting density, which is widely studied by the Gaussian chain model based theory, the compression leads to a uniform deformation of the chain. However, in the case of high grafting density, the brush becomes anisotropic and the nematic phase will be formed. The normal compression tends to destroy the nematic order, which leads to a complex responsive behaviors. Under weak compression, chains in the nematic brush are buckled, and the bending energy and Onsager interaction give rise to the elasticity. Under deep compression, the responsive behaviors of the nematic polymer brush depend on the chain rigidity. For the compressed rigid polymer brush, the chains incline to re-orientate randomly to maximize the orientational entropy and its nematic order is destroyed. For the compressed flexible polymer brush, the chains incline to fold back to keep the nematic order. A buckling-folding transition takes place during the compressing process. For the compressed semiflexible brush, the chains are collectively tilted to a certain direction, which leads to the breaking of the rotational symmetry in the lateral plane. These responsive behaviors of nematic brush relate to the properties of highly frustrated worm-like chain, which is hard to be studied by the traditional self-consistent field theory due to the difficulty to solve the modified diffusion equation. To overcome this difficulty, a single chain in mean-field theory incorporating Monte Carlo simulation and mean-field theory for the worm-like chain model is developed in present work. This method shows high performance for entire region of chain rigidity in the confined condition.

  11. Compression induced phase transition of nematic brush: A mean-field theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Xinghua; Yan, Dadong

    2015-11-28

    Responsive behavior of polymer brush to the external compression is one of the most important characters for its application. For the flexible polymer brush, in the case of low grafting density, which is widely studied by the Gaussian chain model based theory, the compression leads to a uniform deformation of the chain. However, in the case of high grafting density, the brush becomes anisotropic and the nematic phase will be formed. The normal compression tends to destroy the nematic order, which leads to a complex responsive behaviors. Under weak compression, chains in the nematic brush are buckled, and the bending energy and Onsager interaction give rise to the elasticity. Under deep compression, the responsive behaviors of the nematic polymer brush depend on the chain rigidity. For the compressed rigid polymer brush, the chains incline to re-orientate randomly to maximize the orientational entropy and its nematic order is destroyed. For the compressed flexible polymer brush, the chains incline to fold back to keep the nematic order. A buckling-folding transition takes place during the compressing process. For the compressed semiflexible brush, the chains are collectively tilted to a certain direction, which leads to the breaking of the rotational symmetry in the lateral plane. These responsive behaviors of nematic brush relate to the properties of highly frustrated worm-like chain, which is hard to be studied by the traditional self-consistent field theory due to the difficulty to solve the modified diffusion equation. To overcome this difficulty, a single chain in mean-field theory incorporating Monte Carlo simulation and mean-field theory for the worm-like chain model is developed in present work. This method shows high performance for entire region of chain rigidity in the confined condition.

  12. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Diagnostic Devices § 884.1100 Endometrial brush. (a) Identification....

  13. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Diagnostic Devices § 884.1100 Endometrial brush. (a) Identification....

  14. Dual wound dc brush motor gearhead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, Barrie W.

    1986-01-01

    The design requirements, the design, development tests and problems, the qualification and life test and the findings of the strip examination of a dual wound DC brushed motor gearhead are described. It is the only space qualified dual wound dc brushed motor gearhead in Europe.

  15. 21 CFR 886.1090 - Haidinger brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Haidinger brush. 886.1090 Section 886.1090 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1090 Haidinger brush. (a) Identification. A...

  16. A Brush Seals Program Modeling and Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Flower, Ralph; Howe, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Some events of a U.S. Army/NASA Lewis Research Center brush seals program are reviewed, and the development of ceramic brush seals is described. Some preliminary room-temperature flow data are modeled and compare favorably to the results of Ergun.

  17. Effectiveness of oscillatory gutter brushes in removing street sweeping waste.

    PubMed

    Vanegas-Useche, Libardo V; Abdel-Wahab, Magd M; Parker, Graham A

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the novel concept of oscillatory gutter brushes of road sweepers is studied experimentally. Their effectiveness in removing different debris types is studied by means of a brushing test rig. The debris types dealt with are medium-size gravel, small and fine particles, wet thin debris, and compacted debris. The performance of two types of brushes, cutting and F128, under diverse operating conditions is investigated. The purpose of the tests is to ascertain whether brush oscillations superimposed onto brush rotation improve sweeping effectiveness. According to the results, brush oscillations seem to be useful for increasing brushing effectiveness in the case of bonded particles and wet thin debris, especially for bonded debris, but they seem to be of no value for other loosed debris. Also, appropriate values of brush penetration, sweeper speed, brush angle of attack, rotational speed, and frequency of brush speed oscillations, for the debris types studied are provided. PMID:26026947

  18. Semiflexible polymer brushes and the brush-mushroom crossover.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Sergei A; Hsu, Hsiao-Ping; Milchev, Andrey; Binder, Kurt

    2015-04-01

    Semiflexible polymers end-grafted to a repulsive planar substrate under good solvent conditions are studied by scaling arguments, computer simulations, and self-consistent field theory. Varying the chain length N, persistence length lp, and grafting density σg, the chain linear dimensions and distribution functions of all monomers and of the free chain ends are studied. Particular attention is paid to the limit of very small σg, where the grafted chains behave as "mushrooms" no longer interacting with each other. Unlike a flexible mushroom, which has a self-similar structure from the size (a) of an effective monomer up to the mushroom height (h/a ∝ N(v), ν ≈ 3/5), a semiflexible mushroom (like a free semiflexible chain) exhibits three different scaling regimes, h/a ∝ N for contour length L = Na < lp, a Gaussian regime, h/a ∝ (Llp)(1/2)/a for lp ≪ L ≪ R* ∝ (lp(2)/a), and a regime controlled by excluded volume, h/a ∝ (lp/a)(1/5)N(ν). The semiflexible brush is predicted to scale as h/a ∝ (lpaσg)(1/3)N in the excluded volume regime, and h/a ∝ (lpa(3)σ(2))(1/4)N in the Gaussian regime. Since in the volume taken by a semiflexible mushroom excluded-volume interactions are much weaker in comparison to a flexible mushroom, there occurs an additional regime where semiflexible mushrooms overlap without significant chain stretching. Moreover, since the size of a semiflexible mushroom is much larger than the size of a flexible mushroom with the same N, the crossover from mushroom to brush behavior is predicted to take place at much smaller densities than for fully flexible chains. The numerical results, however, confirm the scaling predictions only qualitatively; for chain lengths that are relevant for experiments, often intermediate effective exponents are observed due to extended crossovers. PMID:25687784

  19. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs. PMID:25994486

  20. 3D-patterned polymer brush surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xuechang; Liu, Xuqing; Xie, Zhuang; Zheng, Zijian

    2011-12-01

    Polymer brush-based three-dimensional (3D) structures are emerging as a powerful platform to engineer a surface by providing abundant spatially distributed chemical and physical properties. In this feature article, we aim to give a summary of the recent progress on the fabrication of 3D structures with polymer brushes, with a particular focus on the micro- and nanoscale. We start with a brief introduction on polymer brushes and the challenges to prepare their 3D structures. Then, we highlight the recent advances of the fabrication approaches on the basis of traditional polymerization time and grafting density strategies, and a recently developed feature density strategy. Finally, we provide some perspective outlooks on the future directions of engineering the 3D structures with polymer brushes.

  1. Brushing Your Child’s Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... the toothpaste rather than swallowing it. For children under age 3, use just a small amount of toothpaste ... floss and brush your teeth every day. Children under age 6 may be able to handle a toothbrush ...

  2. Three-Wheel Brush-Wheel Sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duckworth, Geoffrey A.; Liu, Jun; Brown, Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    A new sampler is similar to a common snow blower, but is robust and effective in sample collection. The brush wheels are arranged in a triangle shape, each driven by a brushless DC motor and planetary gearhead embedded in the wheel shaft. Its speed can be varied from 800 - 2,000 rpm, depending on the surface regolith resistance. The sample-collecting flow path, and internal features, are designed based on flow dynamics, and the sample-collecting rates have consistently exceeded the requirement under various conditions that span the range of expected surface properties. The brush-wheel sampler (BWS) is designed so that the flow channel is the main body of the apparatus, and links the brush-wheel assembly to the sample canister. The combination of the three brush wheels, the sample flow path, and the canister location make sample collection, storage, and transfer an easier task.

  3. Water driven turbine/brush pipe cleaner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.

    1995-04-01

    Assemblies are disclosed for cleaning the inside walls of pipes and tubes. A first embodiment includes a small turbine with angled blades axially mounted on one end of a standoff support. An O-ring for stabilizing the assembly within the pipe is mounted in a groove within the outer ring. A replaceable circular brush is fixedly mounted on the opposite end of the standoff support and can be used for cleaning tubes and pipes of various diameters, lengths and configurations. The turbine, standoff support, and brush spin in unison relative to a hub bearing that is fixedly attached to a wire upstream of the assembly. The nonrotating wire is for retaining the assembly in tension and enabling return of the assembly to the pipe entrance. The assembly is initially placed in the pipe or tube to be cleaned. A pressurized water or solution source is provided at a required flow-rate to propel the assembly through the pipe or tube. The upstream water pressure propels and spins the turbine, standoff support and brush. The rotating brush combined with the solution cleans the inside of the pipe. The solution flows out of the other end of the pipe with the brush rotation controlled by the flow-rate. A second embodiment is similar to the first embodiment but instead includes a circular shaped brush with ring backing mounted in the groove of the exterior ring of the turbine, and also reduces the size of the standoff support or eliminates the standoff support.

  4. Water driven turbine/brush pipe cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Assemblies are disclosed for cleaning the inside walls of pipes and tubes. A first embodiment includes a small turbine with angled blades axially mounted on one end of a standoff support. An O-ring for stabilizing the assembly within the pipe is mounted in a groove within the outer ring. A replaceable circular brush is fixedly mounted on the opposite end of the standoff support and can be used for cleaning tubes and pipes of various diameters, lengths and configurations. The turbine, standoff support, and brush spin in unison relative to a hub bearing that is fixedly attached to a wire upstream of the assembly. The nonrotating wire is for retaining the assembly in tension and enabling return of the assembly to the pipe entrance. The assembly is initially placed in the pipe or tube to be cleaned. A pressurized water or solution source is provided at a required flow-rate to propel the assembly through the pipe or tube. The upstream water pressure propels and spins the turbine, standoff support and brush. The rotating brush combined with the solution cleans the inside of the pipe. The solution flows out of the other end of the pipe with the brush rotation controlled by the flow-rate. A second embodiment is similar to the first embodiment but instead includes a circular shaped brush with ring backing mounted in the groove of the exterior ring of the turbine, and also reduces the size of the standoff support or eliminates the standoff support.

  5. Rotating Intershaft Brush Seal Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krawiecki, Stephen; Mehta, Jayesh; Holloway, Gary

    2006-01-01

    The pursuit of high Mach number flight presents several challenges to the airframe and engine design engineers. Most obvious is the resulting high temperatures encountered as the aircraft approaches Mach 3 and above. The encountered high temperatures and shaft speeds of engines require rethinking in the areas of material selections, component design and component operating life. In the area of sump compartment sealing, one of the most difficult sealing applications is the sealing of an engine s rear sump. Normally this sump will need some method of sealing between two rotating shafts. This sealing operation is done with an intershaft seal. The aft sump region also presents an additional design requirement for the intershaft seal. This region has to absorb the engine s thermal growth, which means that in the seal area, axial movement, on the order of 0.30 in., between the rotating shafts must be tolerated. A new concept or new technology of sealing an intershaft sump configuration is being developed. This concept, called a rotating intershaft brush seal has key attributes that will allow this seal to perform better, in the demanding environment of sealing an aft sump with two rotating shafts, when compared to today s sealing technology of labyrinth and carbon sea

  6. Thermoresponsive PDMAEMA Brushes: Effect of Gold Nanoparticle Deposition.

    PubMed

    Yenice, Zuleyha; Schön, Sebastian; Bildirir, Hakan; Genzer, Jan; von Klitzing, Regine

    2015-08-13

    The paper addresses the effect of gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) deposition on the thermoresponsive volume phase transition of the weak polyelectrolyte poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes. PDMAEMA brushes were synthesized via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The PDMAEMA/Au-NP composite brushes were fabricated by immersing the brush modified wafer in the Au-NP suspension. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been employed to characterize the neat PDMAEMA brushes and PDMAEMA/Au-NP composite brushes. All neat PDMAEMA brushes swelled below the volume phase transition temperature and collapsed with increasing temperature over a broad temperature range independent of the initial brush thickness. Water uptake of the brushes is also independent of initial brush thickness. The adsorption of the charged Au-NPs significantly affects the degree of swelling and the thermoresponsive properties of the brushes. PDMAEMA/Au-NP composite brushes do not exhibit any noticeable phase transition at the experimental temperature range irrespective of the initial brush thickness. The reason for this behavior is attributed to a combination of the following: the decreased conformational entropy of the Au-NP adsorbed polymer chains, the increased hydrophilicity of the system due to the charged Au-NPs, and the ≈13 nm diameter Au-NPs causing steric hindrance. We have also shown that the AFM full-indentation method can be successfully applied to determine the polymer brush thicknesses. PMID:26132296

  7. Cold plasma brush generated at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Yixiang; Huang, C.; Yu, Q. S.

    2007-01-15

    A cold plasma brush is generated at atmospheric pressure with low power consumption in the level of several watts (as low as 4 W) up to tens of watts (up to 45 W). The plasma can be ignited and sustained in both continuous and pulsed modes with different plasma gases such as argon or helium, but argon was selected as a primary gas for use in this work. The brush-shaped plasma is formed and extended outside of the discharge chamber with typical dimension of 10-15 mm in width and less than 1.0 mm in thickness, which are adjustable by changing the discharge chamber design and operating conditions. The brush-shaped plasma provides some unique features and distinct nonequilibrium plasma characteristics. Temperature measurements using a thermocouple thermometer showed that the gas phase temperatures of the plasma brush are close to room temperature (as low as 42 deg. C) when running with a relatively high gas flow rate of about 3500 ml/min. For an argon plasma brush, the operating voltage from less than 500 V to about 2500 V was tested, with an argon gas flow rate varied from less than 1000 to 3500 ml/min. The cold plasma brush can most efficiently use the discharge power as well as the plasma gas for material and surface treatment. The very low power consumption of such an atmospheric argon plasma brush provides many unique advantages in practical applications including battery-powered operation and use in large-scale applications. Several polymer film samples were tested for surface treatment with the newly developed device, and successful changes of the wettability property from hydrophobic to hydrophilic were achieved within a few seconds.

  8. Performance characteristics of brush seals for limited-life engines

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, R.E. ); Dowler, C.A. )

    1993-04-01

    Brush seals are potential replacements for air-to-air labyrinth seals in gas turbine engines. An investigation has been conducted to determine the performance characteristics of brush seals for application in limited-life gas turbine engines. An elevated temperature, rotating test rig was designed and built to test labyrinth and brush seals in simulated subsonic and supersonic engine conditions. Results from initial tests for subsonic applications demonstrated that brush seals exhibit appreciably lower leakage compared to labyrinth seals, and thus offer significant engine performance improvements. Performance results have been obtained showing the effect of various brush seal parameters, including: initial interference, backplate gap, and multiple brush seals in series.

  9. Regression modeling and prediction of road sweeping brush load characteristics from finite element analysis and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Sun, Qun; Wahab, Magd Abdel; Zhang, Xingyu; Xu, Limin

    2015-09-01

    Rotary cup brushes mounted on each side of a road sweeper undertake heavy debris removal tasks but the characteristics have not been well known until recently. A Finite Element (FE) model that can analyze brush deformation and predict brush characteristics have been developed to investigate the sweeping efficiency and to assist the controller design. However, the FE model requires large amount of CPU time to simulate each brush design and operating scenario, which may affect its applications in a real-time system. This study develops a mathematical regression model to summarize the FE modeled results. The complex brush load characteristic curves were statistically analyzed to quantify the effects of cross-section, length, mounting angle, displacement and rotational speed etc. The data were then fitted by a multiple variable regression model using the maximum likelihood method. The fitted results showed good agreement with the FE analysis results and experimental results, suggesting that the mathematical regression model may be directly used in a real-time system to predict characteristics of different brushes under varying operating conditions. The methodology may also be used in the design and optimization of rotary brush tools. PMID:26123978

  10. Motor Brush Testing for Mars and Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noon, Don E.

    1999-01-01

    Brush motors have been qualified and flown successfully on Mars missions, but upcoming missions require longer life and higher power. A test program was therefore undertaken to identify the best brush material for operation in the Mars atmosphere. Six different brush materials were used in 18 identical motors and operated under various load conditions for a period of four weeks in low-pressure CO2. All motors performed acceptably, with accumulated motor revolutions between 98 and 144 million revolutions, depending on load. A proprietary silver-graphite material from Superior Carbon (SG54-27) appears to be the best choice for long life, but even the stock copper-graphite brushes performed reliably with acceptable wear. The motors from the CO2 test were then cleaned and run in vacuum for 2 weeks. The difference in results was dramatic, with 5 motors failing catastrophically and wear rates increasing by orders of magnitude for the SG54-27 material. Three brush materials survived the test with no failures: SG54-27 with a proprietary Ball Aerospace impregnation, a silver-graphite-molybdenum disulfide material from Superior Carbon (SG59), and a copper sulfide-graphite material also from Superior Carbon (BG91).

  11. Two-stage eutectic metal brushes

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-07-14

    A two-stage eutectic metal brush assembly having a slip ring rigidly coupled to a shaft, the slip ring being electrically coupled to first voltage polarity. At least one brush is rigidly coupled to a second ring and slidingly engaged to the slip ring. Eutectic metal at least partially fills an annulus between the second ring and a stationary ring. At least one conductor is rigidly coupled to the stationary ring and electrically coupled to a second voltage polarity. Electrical continuity is maintained between the first voltage polarity and the second voltage polarity. Periodic rotational motion is present between the stationary ring and the second ring. Periodic rotational motion is also present between the brush and the slip ring.

  12. Discriminatory bio-adhesion over nano-patterned polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gon, Saugata

    Surfaces functionalized with bio-molecular targeting agents are conventionally used for highly-specific protein and cell adhesion. This thesis explores an alternative approach: Small non-biological adhesive elements are placed on a surface randomly, with the rest of the surface rendered repulsive towards biomolecules and cells. While the adhesive elements themselves, for instance in solution, typically exhibit no selectivity for various compounds within an analyte suspension, selective adhesion of targeted objects or molecules results from their placement on the repulsive surface. The mechanism of selectivity relies on recognition of length scales of the surface distribution of adhesive elements relative to species in the analyte solution, along with the competition between attractions and repulsions between various species in the suspension and different parts of the collecting surface. The resulting binding selectivity can be exquisitely sharp; however, complex mixtures generally require the use of multiple surfaces to isolate the various species: Different components will be adhered, sharply, with changes in collector composition. The key feature of these surface designs is their lack of reliance on biomolecular fragments for specificity, focusing entirely on physicochemical principles at the lengthscales from 1 - 100 nm. This, along with a lack of formal patterning, provides the advantages of simplicity and cost effectiveness. This PhD thesis demonstrates these principles using a system in which cationic poly-L-lysine (PLL) patches (10 nm) are deposited randomly on a silica substrate and the remaining surface is passivated with a bio-compatible PEG brush. TIRF microscopy revealed that the patches were randomly arranged, not clustered. By precisely controlling the number of patches per unit area, the interfaces provide sharp selectivity for adhesion of proteins and bacterial cells. For instance, it was found that a critical density of patches (on the order of

  13. Plasticity of the brush border - the yin and yang of intestinal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Delacour, Delphine; Salomon, Julie; Robine, Sylvie; Louvard, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The brush border on the apical surface of enterocytes is a highly specialized structure well-adapted for efficient digestion and nutrient transport, whilst at the same time providing a protective barrier for the intestinal mucosa. The brush border is constituted of a densely ordered array of microvilli, protrusions of the plasma membrane, which are supported by actin-based microfilaments and interacting proteins and anchored in an apical network of actomyosin and intermediate filaments, the so-called terminal web. The highly dynamic, specialized apical domain is both an essential partner for the gut microbiota and an efficient signalling platform that enables adaptation to physiological stimuli from the external and internal milieu. Nevertheless, genetic alterations or various pathological stresses, such as infection, inflammation, and mechanical or nutritional alterations, can jeopardize this equilibrium and compromise intestinal functions. Long-time neglected, the intestinal brush-border shall be enlightening again as the central actor of the complex but essential intestinal homeostasis. Here, we review the processes and components involved in brush border organization and discuss pathological mechanisms that can induce brush border defects and their physiological consequences. PMID:26837713

  14. Improved molybdenum disulfide-silver motor brushes have extended life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, J. C.; King, H. M.

    1964-01-01

    Motor brushes of proper quantities of molybdenum disulfide and copper or silver are manufactured by sintering techniques. Graphite molds are used. These brushes operate satisfactorily for long periods in normal atmosphere or in a high-vacuum environment.

  15. "Long life" DC brush motor for use on the Mars surveyor program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, David; Noon, Don

    1998-01-01

    DC brush motors have several qualities which make them very attractive for space flight applications. Their mechanical commutation is simple and lightweight, requiring no external sensing and control in order to function properly. They are extremely efficient in converting electrical energy into mechanical energy. Efficiencies over 80% are not uncommon, resulting in high power throughput to weight ratios. However, the inherent unreliability and short life of sliding electrical contacts, especially in vacuum, have driven previous programs to utilize complex brushless DC or the less efficient stepper motors. The Mars Surveyor Program (MSP'98) and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) have developed a reliable "long life" brush type DC motor for operation in low temperature, low pressure CO2 and N2, utilizing silver-graphite brushes. The original intent was to utilize this same motor for SRTM's space operation, but the results thus far have been unsatisfactory in vacuum. This paper describes the design, test, and results of this development.

  16. Synthesis and antibacterial properties of ZnO brush pens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Rong; Li, Yilin; Weng, Yuan; Liang, Weiquan; Zhang, Wenfeng; Zheng, Weitao; Hu, Haimei

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, ZnO with a novel hierarchical nanostructure has been synthesized by a new solution method. The novel hierarchical structure is named a ‘brush pen’. The biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of ZnO brush pens have been evaluated. The results demonstrate that ZnO brush pens show good antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

  17. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... perforation, or a recent cesarean section, and (3) Design and testing: (i) The sampling component is covered... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  18. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... perforation, or a recent cesarean section, and (3) Design and testing: (i) The sampling component is covered... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  19. 21 CFR 884.1100 - Endometrial brush.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... perforation, or a recent cesarean section, and (3) Design and testing: (i) The sampling component is covered... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endometrial brush. 884.1100 Section 884.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  20. Multifunctional brushes made from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Anyuan; Veedu, Vinod P.; Li, Xuesong; Yao, Zhaoling; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2005-07-01

    Brushes are common tools for use in industry and our daily life, performing a variety of tasks such as cleaning, scraping, applying and electrical contacts. Typical materials for constructing brush bristles include animal hairs, synthetic polymer fibres and metal wires (see, for example, ref. 1). The performance of these bristles has been limited by the oxidation and degradation of metal wires, poor strength of natural hairs, and low thermal stability of synthetic fibres. Carbon nanotubes, having a typical one-dimensional nanostructure, have excellent mechanical properties, such as high modulus and strength, high elasticity and resilience, thermal conductivity and large surface area (50-200 m2 g-1). Here we construct multifunctional, conductive brushes with carbon nanotube bristles grafted on fibre handles, and demonstrate their several unique tasks such as cleaning of nanoparticles from narrow spaces, coating of the inside of holes, selective chemical adsorption, and as movable electromechanical brush contacts and switches. The nanotube bristles can also be chemically functionalized for selective removal of heavy metal ions.

  1. Charge Transport Properties in Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moog, Mark; Tsui, Frank; Vonwald, Ian; You, Wei

    Electrical transport properties in poly(3-methyl)thiophene (P3MT) brushes have been studied. The P3MT brushes correspond to a new type of surface-tethered, vertically oriented conjugated molecular wires, sandwiched between two metallic electrodes to form the electrode-molecule-electrode (EME) devices. P3MT is a highly conjugated polymer, a ''workhorse'' material for organic electronics and photonics. The P3MT brushes were grown on ITO surfaces with controlled length (between 2 and 100 nm). The top electrodes were transfer-printed Au films with lateral dimensions between 200 nm and 50 μm. I-V and differential conductance measurements were performed using conductive AFM and 4-terminal techniques. Tunneling and field-emission measurements in EME devices with molecular lengths < 5 nm show HOMO mediated direct hole tunneling with energy barriers of 0.3 and 0.5 eV at the respective interfaces with ITO and Au. The transport properties in longer brushes are indicative of the two quasi-Ohmic interfaces with a characteristic offset in the conductance minimum of 0.12 V biased toward the ITO. Temperature dependent parameters have been examined at various molecular lengths. The drift mobility and the interplay between intra- and intermolecular transport have been investigated.

  2. Improvement of rotating brushes for surface cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, E. S.

    The general design, operation, and performance characteristics of the currently used aircraft-washing machines are briefly reviewed, and areas that need improvement are identified. In particular, specific recommendations are given concerning the improvement of the design of rotating brushes as one of the possible ways of improving the efficiency of mechanized washing.

  3. Phototriggered functionalization of hierarchically structured polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    de los Santos Pereira, Andres; Kostina, Nina Yu; Bruns, Michael; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    The precise design of bioactive surfaces, essential for the advancement of many biomedical applications, depends on achieving control of the surface architecture as well as on the ability to attach bioreceptors to antifouling surfaces. Herein, we report a facile avenue toward hierarchically structured antifouling polymer brushes of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylates via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) presenting photoactive tetrazole moieties, which permitted their functionalization via nitrile imine-mediated tetrazole-ene cyclocloaddition (NITEC). A maleimide-functional ATRP initiator was photoclicked to the side chains of a brush enabling a subsequent polymerization of carboxybetaine acrylamide to generate a micropatterned graft-on-graft polymer architecture as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Furthermore, the spatially resolved biofunctionalization of the tetrazole-presenting brushes was accessed by the photoligation of biotin-maleimide and subsequent binding of streptavidin. The functionalized brushes bearing streptavidin were able to resist the fouling from blood plasma (90% reduction with respect to bare gold). Moreover, they were employed to demonstrate a model biosensor by immobilization of a biotinylated antibody and subsequent capture of an antigen as monitored in real time by surface plasmon resonance. PMID:25961109

  4. Chinese Brush Calligraphy Character Retrieval and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhuang, Yueting; Zhang, Xiafen; Lu, Weiming; Wu, Fei

    2007-01-01

    Chinese brush calligraphy is a valuable civilization legacy and a high art of scholarship. It is still popular in Chinese banners, newspaper mastheads, university names, and celebration gifts. There are Web sites that try to help people enjoy and learn Chinese calligraphy. However, there lacks advanced services such as content-based retrieval or…

  5. Scaling Relationships for Spherical Polymer Brushes Revisited.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Li, Hao; Das, Siddhartha

    2016-06-16

    In this short paper, we revisit the scaling relationships for spherical polymer brushes (SPBs), i.e., polymer brushes grafted to rigid, spherical particles. Considering that the brushes can be described to be encased in a series of hypothetical spherical blobs, we identify significant physical discrepancies in the model of Daoud and Cotton (Journal of Physics, 1982), which is considered to be the state of the art in scaling modeling of SPBs. We establish that the "brush" configuration of the polymer molecules forming the SPBs is possible only if the swelling ratio (which is the ratio of the end-to-end length of the blob-encased polymer segment to the corresponding coil-like polymer segment) is always less than unity-a notion that has been erroneously overlooked in the model of Daoud and Cotton. We also provide new scaling arguments that (a) establish this swelling (or more appropriately shrinking) ratio as a constant (less than unity) for the case of "good" solvent, (b) recover the scaling predictions for blob dimension and monomer number and monomer concentration distributions within the blob, and PMID:27232497

  6. Degrafting of polymer brushes from substrates enables insight about the brush structure and facilitates surface patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Rohan; Turgman-Cohen, Salomon; Srogl, Jiri; Kiserow, Douglas; Genzer, Jan

    Polymers end-grafted to surfaces or interfaces, commonly referred to as polymer brushes, enable tailoring physico-chemical properties of material surfaces. Many applications of polymer brushes require information about the molecular weight (MW) and grafting density (GD) of polymer brushes. For brushes synthesized by surface initiated polymerization (SIP) determining these attributes was always a challenge. We have developed a simple method of measuring MW and GD of these systems by degrafting SIP from silica-based surfaces by using tetrabutyl ammonium fluoride (TBAF), which attacks selectively Si-O bonds and enables complete degrafting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes from silica based substrates without damaging the backbone. The rate of PMMA degrafting decreases with reaction time and depends on the concentration of TBAF, temperature, and the initial GD of the system. The molecular weight distribution of the degrafted PMMA was measured using size exclusion chromatography. The GD was calculated from known MW and dry thickness of the PMMA brush. Spatial patterns of degrafted regions on the substrate can be prepared by either localizing the TBAF to certain regions or by gradually immersing homogeneous samples into TBAF solution.

  7. Adhesion and friction properties of polymer brushes: fluoro versus nonfluoro polymer brushes at varying thickness.

    PubMed

    Bhairamadgi, Nagendra S; Pujari, Sidharam P; Leermakers, Frans A M; van Rijn, Cees J M; Zuilhof, Han

    2014-03-01

    A series of different thicknesses of fluoro poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) and its analogous nonfluoro poly(ethyl methacrylate) polymer brushes were prepared via surface-initiated ATRP (SI-ATRP) on Si(111) surfaces. The thiol-yne click reaction was used to immobilize the SI-ATRP initiator with a high surface coverage, in order to achieve denser polymer brushes (grafting density from ~0.1 to 0.8 chains/nm(2)). All polymer brushes were characterized by static water contact angle measurements, infrared absorption reflection spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Adhesion and friction force measurements were conducted with silica colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM) under ambient and dry (argon) conditions. The fluoro poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) polymer showed a decrease in adhesion and friction with increasing thickness. The analogous nonfluoro poly(ethyl methacrylate) polymer brushes showed high adhesion and friction under ambient conditions. Friction coefficients down to 0.0057 (ambient conditions) and 0.0031 (dry argon) were obtained for poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate) polymer brushes with 140 nm thickness, which are the lowest among these types of polymer brushes. PMID:24555721

  8. Nonlinearity in the rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothmayer, Mark; Dultz, Wolfgang; Frins, Erna; Zhan, Qiwen; Tierney, Dennis; Schmitzer, Heidrun

    2007-10-01

    Haidinger's brushes are an entoptic effect of the human visual system that enables us to detect polarized light. However, individual perceptions of Haidinger's brushes can vary significantly. We find that the birefringence of the cornea influences the rotational motion and the contrast of Haidinger's brushes and may offer an explanation for individual differences. We have devised an experimental setup to simulate various phase shifts of the cornea and found a switching effect in the rotational dynamics of Haidinger's brushes. In addition, age related macular degeneration reduces the polarization effect of the macula and thus also leads to changes in the brush pattern.

  9. Numerical self-consistent field theory study of the response of strong polyelectrolyte brushes to external electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Chaohui

    2015-08-07

    The response of strong polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes grafted on an electrode to electric fields generated by opposite surface charges on the PE-grafted electrode and a second parallel electrode has been numerically investigated by self-consistent field theory. The influences of grafting density, average charge fraction, salt concentration, and mobile ion size on the variation of the brush height against an applied voltage bias were investigated. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulation results, a higher grafting density requires a larger magnitude of voltage bias to achieve the same amount of relative change in the brush height. In the experimentally relevant parameter regime of the applied voltage, the brush height becomes insensitive to the voltage bias when the grafting density is high. Including the contribution of surface charges on the grafting electrode, overall charge neutrality inside the PE brushes is generally maintained, especially for PE brushes with high grafting density and high average charge fraction. Our numerical study further reveals that the electric field across the two electrodes is highly non-uniform because of the complex interplay between the surface charges on the electrodes, the charges on the grafted PE chains, and counterions.

  10. New Development of Monte Carlo Techniques for Studying Bottle-brush Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Ping

    Due to the complex characteristics of bottle-brush polymers, it became a challenge to develop an e_cient algorithm for studying such macromolecules under various solvent conditions or some constraints in the space by using computer simulations. In the limit of a bottle-brush polymer with a rather sti_ backbone (straight rigid backbone), we generalize the variant of the biased chain growth algorithm, the pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method, for simulating polymers with complex architecture, from star polymers to bottle-brush polymers, on the simple cubic lattice. With the high statistics of our Monte Carlo results, we check the theoretical predictions of side chain behavior and radial monomer density profile. For the comparison of the experimental data for bottle-brush polymers with a flexible backbone and flexible side chains, based on the bond fluctuation model we propose another fast Monte Carlo algorithm combining the local moves, the pivot move, and an adjustable simulation lattice box. By monitoring the autocorrelation functions of gyration radii for the side chains and for the backbone, we see that for fixed side chain length there is no change in the behavior of these two functions as the backbone length increases. Our extensive results cover the range which is accessible for the comparison to experimental data and for the checking of the theoretically predicted scaling laws.

  11. Effect of brushing on fluoride release from 3 bracket adhesives.

    PubMed

    Staley, Robert N; Mack, Steven J; Wefel, James S; Vargas, Marcos A; Jakobsen, Jane R

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare fluoride ion release from 3 orthodontic bracket adhesives with and without brushing the bracketed teeth with a fluoridated dentifrice. The bracket adhesives included a light-cured composite resin (Transbond; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif), a fluoride-releasing composite resin (Advance; L D Caulk Division, Dentsply International, Milford, Del), and a resin-modified glass ionomer (Fuji Ortho LC; GC America, Alsip, Ill). The teeth in the control group were not bonded with brackets. Sixty extracted human teeth were randomly assigned to 6 groups of 10 each: (1) Transbond, brushed; (2) Advance, brushed; (3) Advance, not brushed; (4) Fuji, brushed; (5) Fuji, not brushed; and (6) control, brushed. After bonding, each tooth was placed in a sealed plastic test tube containing 4 ml of deionized water. The toothpaste used in brushing contained 0.15% weight per volume sodium fluoride, 1500 parts per million parts fluoride (Winter-fresh gel; Colgate-Palmolive Co., New York, NY). Brushing began 24 hours after the teeth were bonded and placed in deionized water. After brushing, the teeth were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water and returned to a sealed test tube. Fluoride measurements were taken before brushing began, at intervals of 72 hours for 22 days, and 90 and 93 days after bonding. Findings included: (1) brushing significantly increased the release of fluoride ions from the teeth in the composite resin and control groups, (2) the enamel crowns of the unbonded control teeth absorbed and re-released a substantial amount of fluoride ions obtained from the toothpaste, (3) the brushed group of teeth bonded with the fluoride-releasing composite resin released significantly more fluoride on the last 4 days that measurements were taken after brushing than the nonbrushed group bonded with the same adhesive, (4) the brushed group of teeth bonded with the resin-modified glass ionomer released significantly more fluoride on the last 4

  12. Formation of gold nanoparticle assemblies in responsive polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christau, Stephanie; von Klitzing, Regine; Genzer, Jan

    2014-03-01

    The modification of surfaces by means of polymer brushes has become an active area of research during the past few years due to numerous potential applications of such systems in nano- and biotechnology. The structure and conformation of a brush depends on external stimuli such as pH, temperature or solvent type and can be manipulated by varying these attributes. This stimulus-response can be exploited for the development of smart surfaces and for sensor applications. Furthermore, brushes can be used as 3D matrices for immobilization of nanoparticles. In this study, responsive brushes are used as a matrix for the attachment of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs); this hybrid system exhibits intriguing optical properties due to the surface plasmon resonance of the AuNPs. We address the effect of some system parameters such as synthetic procedure, brush thickness, brush grafting density, particle size and particle incubation time on the characteristics of the resultant particle-impregnated brushes. We also discuss the spatial distribution of the AuNPs inside the brush with regard to the particle size, brush density and brush molecular weight.

  13. Mechanisms for nano particle removal in brush scrubber cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yating; Guo, Dan; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the nano particle (<100 nm) removal behavior in brush scrubber cleaning is presented based on experiment results and theoretical analysis. The forces on the particles in different situations are analyzed and discussed. The adhesion forces of the van der Waals force, the electrostatic force, the brush load and the static friction between the particle and the wafer are calculated. The contact elastic force, hydrodynamic drag force and friction between the brush and the particle are considered as removal forces and are evaluated. The porous structure and roughness surface of brush material are considered in the hydrodynamic model to describe the brush deformation and the flow field in the cleaning process. The porous structure will result in decrease of hydrodynamic drag force. There are four situations of the particles relative to the brush roughness asperities for which the forces on the particle are different. When the particle is in contact with a brush asperity or on the wafer surface and in a semi-infinite fluid flow field, the particle may be removed by hydrodynamic force and elastic force in the presence of surfactant. When the particle is embedded in the brush asperity, the remove will realized when the friction caused by adhesion between the brush and the particle overcome the adhesion force between particle and wafer surface. The removed particles will be in the flow field or adhered on the brush surface and may redeposit on the wafer surface.

  14. Vision, healing brush, and fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Todor

    2005-03-01

    The Healing Brush is a tool introduced for the first time in Adobe Photoshop (2002) that removes defects in images by seamless cloning (gradient domain fusion). The Healing Brush algorithms are built on a new mathematical approach that uses Fibre Bundles and Connections to model the representation of images in the visual system. Our mathematical results are derived from first principles of human vision, related to adaptation transforms of von Kries type and Retinex theory. In this paper we present the new result of Healing in arbitrary color space. In addition to supporting image repair and seamless cloning, our approach also produces the exact solution to the problem of high dynamic range compression of17 and can be applied to other image processing algorithms.

  15. Conductive Nanowires Templated by Molecular Brushes.

    PubMed

    Raguzin, Ivan; Stamm, Manfred; Ionov, Leonid

    2015-10-21

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of conductive nanowires using polymer bottle brushes as templates. In our approach, we synthesized poly(2-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate methyl iodide quaternary salt brushes by two-step atom transfer radical polymerization, loaded them with palladium salt, and reduced them in order to form metallic nanowires with average lengths and widths of 300 and 20 nm, respectively. The obtained nanowires were deposited between conductive gold pads and were connected to them by sputtering of additional pads to form an electric circuit. We connected the nanowires in an electric circuit and demonstrated that the conductivity of these nanowires is around 100 S·m(-1). PMID:26418290

  16. Application of amorphous brush-plated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Zhu, Y.; Zheng, Z.

    1994-02-01

    The results obtained during industrial trials have shown that the service life of hot work dies can be increased by 33 to 180% using the brush plating technique to prepare amorphous coatings. The coatings possess a much higher hardness, lower friction coefficient at room and elevated temperatures, good scale resistance in addition to higher surface finish, compared to uncoated dies, and thus improve the tribological performance of the dies. In this work, a study of the crystallization process, its kinetics, and the hardness variations of the coatings has been made. According to the data obtained, it can be considered that the main reason for the success of amorphous brush-plated coatings is that, during the operation, crystallization and precipitation takes place instantaneously, which results in a strong secondary hardening effect, thus leading to an increase in the red hardness of the surface layers of dies, therefore ensuring higher thermal wear resistance of the dies.

  17. Transparent Aluminium Oxide Coatings of Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Micciulla, Samantha; Duan, XiaoFei; Strebe, Julia; Löhmann, Oliver; Lamb, Robert N; von Klitzing, Regine

    2016-04-11

    A novel method for the preparation of transparent Al2 O3 coatings of polymers is presented. An environmental-friendly sol-gel method is employed, which implies mild conditions and low costs. A thermoresponsive brush is chosen as a model surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to characterize the samples during the conversion of the precursor Al(OH)3 into oxide and to prove the mildness of the protocol. The study evidences a relation between lateral homogeneity of alumina and the wettability of the polymer surface by the precursor solution, while morphology and elasticity are dominated by the polymer properties. The study of the swelling behavior of the underneath brush reveals the absence of water uptake, proving the impermeability of the alumina layer. The broad chemical and structural variety of polymers, combined with the robustness of transparent alumina films, makes these composites promising as biomedical implants, protective sheets and components for electric and optical devices. PMID:26991543

  18. Nanoscale contact mechanics of biocompatible polyzwitterionic brushes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Morse, Andrew J; Armes, Steven P; Lewis, Andrew L; Geoghegan, Mark; Leggett, Graham J

    2013-08-27

    Friction force microscopy has been used to demonstrate that biocompatible, lubricious poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethylphosphorylcholine) (PMPC) brushes exhibit different frictional properties depending on the medium (methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and water; the latter also with different quantities of added salt). The chemical functionalization of the probe (amine-, carboxylic acid-, and methyl-terminated probes were used) is not as important as the medium in determining the contact mechanics. For solvents such as methanol, where the adhesion between AFM probe and PMPC brushes is negligible, a linear friction-load relationship is observed. In contrast, the friction-load plot is nonlinear in ethanol or water, media in which stronger adhesion is measured. For ethanol, the data indicate Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) mechanics, whereas the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov (DMT) model provided a good fit for the data acquired in water. Contact mechanics on zwitterionic PMPC brushes immersed in aqueous solutions of varying ionic strength followed the same trend, with high adhesion energies being correlated with a nonlinear friction-load relationship. These results can be rationalized by treating the friction force as the sum of a load-dependent term, attributed to molecular plowing, and an area-dependent shear term. In a good solvent for PMPC such as methanol, the shear term is negligible and the sliding interaction is dominated by molecular plowing. However, the adhesion energy is significantly larger in water and ethanol and the shear term is no longer negligible. PMID:23855771

  19. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing. PMID:26868954

  20. Steric interactions between two grafted polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Li, Buqiang

    1997-07-01

    A lattice model and a generator-matrix method are employed to calculate the interaction force profile between two grafted polymer brushes. The correlation between neighboring bonds and the interdigitation between the two brushes are taken into account. The calculations show that the effect of incorporating the bond correlations is equivalent to an increase in the value of the polymer-solvent interaction parameter when the bond correlations are ignored. The interdigitation between the two brushes decreases the free energy of the system and consequently results in a smaller steric repulsion. A complete interdigitation occurs at a separation close to half the separation between the two plates for which the interaction force is zero. The model is compared with the experimental interaction force profiles for ten systems which involve poly(2-vinylpyridine)-polyisoprene (PVP-PI), poly(2-vinylpyridine)-polystyrene (PVP-PS) block copolymers as well as end-functionalized polystyrenes (PS-X). For most of the systems, the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experiment. In addition, the present results are compared with the equations proposed by de Gennes, based on the assumption of a step distribution function for the segment density, and by Milner et al., based on the parabolic distribution of the segment density. Both equations neglected interdigitation. It is shown in this paper that the interdigitation is not negligible and that it can decrease by an order of magnitude the repulsive force.

  1. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing.

  2. Antifouling Polymer Brushes Displaying Antithrombogenic Surface Properties.

    PubMed

    de Los Santos Pereira, Andres; Sheikh, Sonia; Blaszykowski, Christophe; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Fedorov, Kiril; Thompson, Michael; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar

    2016-03-14

    The contact of blood with artificial materials generally leads to immediate protein adsorption (fouling), which mediates subsequent biological processes such as platelet adhesion and activation leading to thrombosis. Recent progress in the preparation of surfaces able to prevent protein fouling offers a potential avenue to mitigate this undesirable effect. In the present contribution, we have prepared several types of state-of-the-art antifouling polymer brushes on polycarbonate plastic substrate, and investigated their ability to prevent platelet adhesion and thrombus formation under dynamic flow conditions using human blood. Moreover, we compared the ability of such brushes-grafted on quartz via an adlayer analogous to that used on polycarbonate-to prevent protein adsorption from human blood plasma, assessed for the first time by means of an ultrahigh frequency acoustic wave sensor. Results show that the prevention of such a phenomenon constitutes one promising route toward enhanced resistance to thrombus formation, and suggest that antifouling polymer brushes could be of service in biomedical applications requiring extensive blood-material surface contact. PMID:26882214

  3. Polymer-brush lubrication: a review of recent theoretical advances.

    PubMed

    Kreer, T

    2016-04-13

    This review compiles recent theoretical advances to describe compressive and shear forces of polymer-brush bilayers, which consist of two opposing brushes in contact. Such model systems for polymer-brush lubrication are frequently used as a benchmark to gain insight into biological problems, e.g., synovial joint lubrication. Based on scaling theory, I derive conformational and collective properties of polymer-brush bilayers in equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium situations, such as shear forces in the linear and nonlinear response regimes of stationary shear and under non-stationary shear. Furthermore, I discuss the influence of macromolecular inclusions and electrostatic interactions on polymer-brush lubrication. Comparisons to alternative analytical approaches, experiments and numerical results are performed. Special emphasis is given to methods for simulating polymer-brush bilayers using molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:27029521

  4. Electrolyte-induced collapse of a polyelectrolyte brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesalski, M.; Johannsmann, D.; Rühe, J.

    2004-05-01

    We have investigated the electrolyte-induced collapse of a polyelectrolyte brush covalently attached to a planar solid surface. Positively charged poly-4-vinyl [N-methyl-pyridinium] (MePVP) brushes were prepared in situ at the surface by free radical chain polymerization using a surface-immobilized initiator monolayer ("grafting from" technique) and 4-vinylpyridine as the monomer, followed by a polymer-analogous quaternization reaction. The height of the brushes was measured as a function of the external salt concentration via multiple-angle null ellipsometry. As predicted by mean-field theory, the height of the MePVP brushes remains unaffected by the addition of low amounts of external salt. At higher salt concentrations the brush height decreases. The extent to which the brush shrinks strongly depends on the nature of the salt present in the environment. MePVP brushes collapse to almost the dry layer thickness upon the addition of potassium iodide to a contacting aqueous medium. In contrast, the collapse of MePVP brushes having bromide or chloride counterions is much less pronounced. These brushes remain in a highly swollen state even after large amounts of salt have been added to the solution.

  5. Entanglements of End Grafted Polymer Brushes in a Polymeric Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.; Hoy, Robert S.

    2007-03-01

    The entanglement of a polymer brush immersed in a melt of mobile polymer chains is studied by molecular dynamics simulations. A primitive path analysis (PPA) is carried out to identify the brush/brush, brush/melt and melt/melt entanglements as a function of distance from the substrate. The PPA characterizes the microscopic state of conformations of the polymer chain and is ideally suited to identify chain/chain entanglements. We use a new thin-chain PPA technique to eliminate spurious non-entangled inter chain contacts arising from excluded volume. As the grafting density of the brush increases we find that the entanglements of the brush with the melt decrease as the system crosses over from the wet to dry brush regime. Results are compared to brush/brush entanglements in an implicit solvent of varying solvent quality. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Antifouling Properties of Fluoropolymer Brushes toward Organic Polymers: The Influence of Composition, Thickness, Brush Architecture, and Annealing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhua; Zuilhof, Han

    2016-07-01

    Fluoropolymer brushes are widely used to prevent nonspecific adsorption of commercial polymeric or biological materials due to their strongly hydrophobic character. Herein, a series of fluoropolymer brushes with different compositions, thicknesses and molecular architectures was prepared via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Subsequently, the antifouling properties of these fluoropolymer brushes against organic polymers were studied in detail using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements and polystyrene as a representative fouling polymer. Among all of the molecular architectures studied, homopolymerized methacrylate-based fluoropolymer brushes (PMAF17) show the best antifouling properties. Annealing the fluoropolymer brushes improves the antifouling property dramatically due to the reregulated surface composition. These fluoropolymer brushes can be combined with, e.g., micro- and nanostructuring and other advanced materials properties to yield even better long-term antifouling behavior under harsh environments. PMID:27332543

  7. Effect of Frequency of Brushing Teeth on Plaque and Calculus Accumulation, and Gingivitis in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Colin; Serfilippi, Laurie; Barnvos, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of brushing the teeth of beagle dogs in a randomized, controlled, blinded study design using a clearly-defined brushing technique was evaluated for 4 brushing frequencies: brushing daily, brushing every other day, brushing weekly and brushing every other week, compared with no brushing in a control group of dogs. All dogs were fed a standard dry kibble diet during the study. Standard plaque, calculus, and gingivitis indices were used to score the teeth. A 'clean tooth' model was used. No gingival or non-gingival lacerations or other signs of injury to oral tissues were found at the end of the 28 day trial period. Brushing more frequently had greater effectiveness in retarding accumulation of plaque and calculus, and reducing the severity of pre-existing gingivitis. Brushing daily or every other day produced statistically significant improved results compared with brushing weekly or every other week. Based on the results of this study, daily brushing is recommended. PMID:26197686

  8. Brush cells in the human duodenojejunal junction: an ultrastructural study

    PubMed Central

    Morroni, Manrico; Cangiotti, Angela Maria; Cinti, Saverio

    2007-01-01

    Brush cells have been identified in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract mucosa of many mammalian species. In humans they are found in the respiratory tract and the gastrointestinal apparatus, in both the stomach and the gallbladder. The function of brush cells is unknown, and most morphological data have been obtained in rodents. To extend our knowledge of human brush cells, we performed an ultrastructural investigation of human small intestine brush cells. Six brush cells identified in five out of more than 300 small intestine biopsies performed for gastrointestinal tract disorders were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Five brush cells were located on the surface epithelium and one in a crypt. The five surface brush cells were characterized by a narrow apical pole from which emerged microvilli that were longer and thicker than those of enterocytes. The filamentous core extended far into the cell body without forming the terminal web. Caveolae were abundant. Filaments were in the form of microfilaments and intermediate filaments. Cytoplasmic projections containing filaments were found on the basolateral surface of brush cells. In a single cell, axons containing vesicles and dense core granules were in close contact both with the basal and the lateral surface of the cell. The crypt brush cell appeared less mature. We concluded that human small intestine brush cells share a similar ultrastructural biology with those of other mammals. They are polarized and well-differentiated cells endowed with a distinctive cytoskeleton. The observation of nerve fibres closely associated with brush cells, never previously described in humans, lends support to the hypothesis of a receptor role for these cells. PMID:17509089

  9. Conformational properties of bottle-brush polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denesyuk, N. A.

    2003-05-01

    General and renormalized perturbation theories are used to study the conformational properties of a bottle-brush molecule, composed of multiarmed polymer stars grafted regularly onto a flexible backbone. The end-to-end distances of the backbone and of an arm of the middle star are calculated within the first order of perturbation theory. For the high grafting densities of stars, the calculated expressions are generalized with the help of the scaling arguments to give the equivalent power laws. According to these laws, the molecule may adopt a sequence of three different conformations (star-rod-coil) as the length of the backbone grows.

  10. Conformational properties of bottle-brush polymers.

    PubMed

    Denesyuk, N A

    2003-05-01

    General and renormalized perturbation theories are used to study the conformational properties of a bottle-brush molecule, composed of multiarmed polymer stars grafted regularly onto a flexible backbone. The end-to-end distances of the backbone and of an arm of the middle star are calculated within the first order of perturbation theory. For the high grafting densities of stars, the calculated expressions are generalized with the help of the scaling arguments to give the equivalent power laws. According to these laws, the molecule may adopt a sequence of three different conformations (star-rod-coil) as the length of the backbone grows. PMID:12786171

  11. Flows in Pinned Arrays Simulating Brush Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R.C.; Kudriavtsev, V. V.; Braun, M. J.; Athavale, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    Flows through idealized pin arrays were investigated using an unstructured grid finite difference model and the simplified Ergun model to predict leakage flows and pressure drops in brush seals. The models are in good agreement in the laminar region with departures in the laminar-turbulent transition region defined by the simplified Ergun model. No local disturbances in the velocity or pressure fields, symptomatic of turbulence were found in the numerical results. The simplified model failed to predict the pressure drop of a 32-pin anisotropic array. Transitional and anisotropic behavior requires

  12. An all-aqueous route to polymer brush-modified membranes with remarkable permeabilites and protein capture rates

    PubMed Central

    Anuraj, Nishotha; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Geiger, James H.; Baker, Gregory L.; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2011-01-01

    Microporous membranes are attractive for protein purification because convection rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. However, the low binding capacity of such membranes limits their applications. This work reports a rapid, aqueous procedure to create highly permeable, polymer brush-modified membranes that bind large amounts of protein. The synthetic method includes a 10-min adsorption of a macroinitiator in a hydroxylated nylon membrane and a subsequent 5-min aqueous atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl succinate from the immobilized initiator to form poly(acid) brushes. This procedure likely leads to more swollen, less dense brushes than polymerization from silane initiators, and thus requires less polymer to achieve the same binding capacity. The hydraulic permeability of the poly(acid) membranes is 4-fold higher than that of similar membranes prepared by growing brushes from immobilized silane initiators. These brush-containing nylon membranes bind 120 mg/cm3 of lysozyme using solution residence times as short as 35 ms, and when functionalized with nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-Ni2+ complexes, they capture 85 mg/cm3 of histidine6-tagged (His-tagged) Ubiquitin. Additionally the NTA-Ni2+-functionalized membranes isolate His-tagged myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase directly from cell extracts and show >90% recovery of His-tagged proteins. PMID:22287817

  13. A Critique of the Brushing for Life Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downer, Martin C.; Drugan, Caroline S.; Blinkhorn, Anthony S.

    2006-01-01

    Background and objective: Brushing for Life is intended to promote regular brushing of children's teeth with fluoride toothpaste. The programme is delivered by health visitors who provide toothbrushes, toothpaste and dental health education material at children's 8, 18 and 36 month development checks. The purpose of the present paper was to…

  14. Effects of material choices on brush seal performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, Edward; Bristol, Brent

    1992-09-01

    This paper discusses some of the initial hot and cold material testing undertaken in a brush seal development program. It describes the effects of material selection on relative wear and leakage of brush seals. Criteria for ranking wear couples are addressed.

  15. Instability of Liquids in Flexible Fiber Brushes under Applied Pressure.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Meng, Qingan; Liu, Huan; Jiang, Lei; Doi, Masao

    2016-04-01

    We theoretically predict the stability of liquid in a model brush made of flexible fibers for cases in which liquid is supplied from an ink reservoir. The volume of the liquid in the brush increases with increasing applied pressure by the reservoir, and the liquid shows instability at a critical pressure. When the fibers are shorter than a critical length, the end of the brush opens continuously with increasing applied pressure. The volume of the liquid that hangs from the open end of the brush increases with increasing applied pressure, and the liquid drops from the brush at the critical pressure, where the weight of the liquid becomes larger than the surface tension. In contrast, when the fibers are longer than the critical length, the end of the brush opens discontinuously to the maximal extent at the critical pressure. The discontinuous unbuckling is driven by the instability arising from the fact that the bending stiffness of the water surface, which bends together with the flexible fibers, decreases as the end of the brush opens, and it is thus a unique feature of brushes of flexible fibers. PMID:26967664

  16. 75 FR 18237 - Natural Bristle Paint Brushes From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... party group response to its notice of institution (74 FR 56666, November 2, 2009) was adequate and that... COMMISSION Natural Bristle Paint Brushes From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... duty order on natural bristle paint brushes from China. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brushing Device 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610—Brushing Device ER25MR08.006...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brushing Device 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610—Brushing Device ER25MR08.006...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brushing Device 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610—Brushing Device ER25MR08.006...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  2. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  3. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brushing Device 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610—Brushing Device ER25MR08.006...

  4. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt. 1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 7 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brushing Device 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 7 Figure 7 to Part 1610—Brushing Device ER25MR08.006...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 9 to Part 1610 - Brushing Device Template

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brushing Device Template 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 9 Figure 9 to Part 1610—Brushing...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 8 to Part 1610 - Brush

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brush 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES Pt.1610, Fig. 8 Figure 8 to Part 1610—Brush ER25MR08.007...

  12. The Effects of a Brushing Procedure on Stereotypical Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Tonya N.; Durand, Shannon; Chan, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the effects of a brushing protocol on stereotyped behavior of a young boy with autism. First, a functional analysis was conducted which showed that the participant's stereotypy was maintained by automatic reinforcement. Next, the Wilbarger Protocol, a brushing intervention, was implemented. An ABA design was implemented…

  13. Surface friction of hydrogels with well-defined polyelectrolyte brushes.

    PubMed

    Ohsedo, Yutaka; Takashina, Rikiya; Gong, Jian Ping; Osada, Yoshihito

    2004-08-01

    Hydrogels of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) with well-defined polyelectrolyte brushes of poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PNaSS) of various molecular weights were synthesized, keeping the distance between the polymer brushes constant at ca. 20 nm. The effect of polyelectrolyte brush length on the sliding friction against a glass plate, an electrorepulsive solid substrate, was investigated in water in a velocity range of 7.5 x 10(-5) to 7.5 x 10(-2) m/s. It is found that the presence of polymer brush can dramatically reduce the friction when the polymer brushes are short. With an increase in the length of the polymer brush, this drag reduction effect only works at a low sliding velocity, and the gel with long polymer brushes even shows a higher friction than that of a normal network gel at a high sliding velocity. The strong polymer length and sliding velocity dependence indicate a dynamic mechanism of the polymer brush effect. PMID:15274553

  14. Nanopatterned polymer brushes by reactive writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawroth, Jonas F.; Neisser, Claudia; Erbe, Artur; Jordan, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Polymer brush patterns were prepared by a combination of electron beam induced damage in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), creating a stable carbonaceous deposit, and consecutive self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SIPGP). This newly applied technique, reactive writing (RW), is investigated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane SAM (PF-SAM) on silicon oxide, which, when modified by RW, can be selectively functionalized by SIPGP. With the monomer N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), we demonstrate the straightforward formation of polymer brush gradients and single polymer lines of sub-100 nm lateral dimensions, with high contrast to the PF-SAM background. The lithography parameters acceleration voltage, irradiation dose, beam current and dwell time were systematically varied to identify the optimal conditions for the maximum conversion of the SAM into a carbonaceous deposit. The results of this approach were compared to patterns prepared by carbon templating (CT) under analogous conditions, revealing a dwell time dependency, which differs from earlier reports. This new technique expands the range of CT by giving the opportunity to not only vary the chemistry of the created polymer patterns with monomer choice but also vary the chemistry of the surrounding substrate.

  15. Nanopatterned polymer brushes by reactive writing.

    PubMed

    Nawroth, Jonas F; Neisser, Claudia; Erbe, Artur; Jordan, Rainer

    2016-03-31

    Polymer brush patterns were prepared by a combination of electron beam induced damage in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), creating a stable carbonaceous deposit, and consecutive self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization (SIPGP). This newly applied technique, reactive writing (RW), is investigated with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane SAM (PF-SAM) on silicon oxide, which, when modified by RW, can be selectively functionalized by SIPGP. With the monomer N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), we demonstrate the straightforward formation of polymer brush gradients and single polymer lines of sub-100 nm lateral dimensions, with high contrast to the PF-SAM background. The lithography parameters acceleration voltage, irradiation dose, beam current and dwell time were systematically varied to identify the optimal conditions for the maximum conversion of the SAM into a carbonaceous deposit. The results of this approach were compared to patterns prepared by carbon templating (CT) under analogous conditions, revealing a dwell time dependency, which differs from earlier reports. This new technique expands the range of CT by giving the opportunity to not only vary the chemistry of the created polymer patterns with monomer choice but also vary the chemistry of the surrounding substrate. PMID:26902916

  16. Simple effective thickness model for circular brush seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowler, Constance A.; Chupp, Raymond E.; Holle, Glenn F.

    1992-07-01

    Brush seals are being investigated as replacements for some of the labyrinth seals in gas turbine engines. A relatively simple flow model approach has been presented to generalize brush seal leakage throughout the range of test and application environments. The model uses a single parameter, effective brush thickness, to correlate flow through the seal. A revision to the flow model is presented in this paper to account for seal curvature, which is especially important for smaller diameter brush seals. The revised model has been applied to leakage flow data from five sources. The results demonstrate the utility of the flow model approach in correlating the performance of brush seals having different design geometries. The revised model is shown to effectively account for the effect of seal curvature.

  17. Applications of Polymer Brushes in Protein Analysis and Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Parul; Baker, Gregory L.; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2009-07-01

    This review examines the application of polymer brush-modified flat surfaces, membranes, and beads for protein immobilization and isolation. Modification of porous substrates with brushes yields membranes that selectively bind tagged proteins to give 99% pure protein at capacities as high as 100 mg of protein per cubic centimeter of membrane. Moreover, enrichment of phosphopeptides on brush-modified matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) plates allows detection and characterization of femtomole levels of phosphopeptides by MALDI mass spectrometry. Because swollen hydrophilic brushes can resist nonspecific protein adsorption while immobilizing a high density of proteins, they are attractive as substrates for protein microarrays. This review highlights the advantages of polymer brush-modified surfaces over self-assembled monolayers and identifies some research needs in this area.

  18. Polyelectrolyte brushes: a novel stable lubrication system in aqueous conditions.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Terada, Masami; Takahara, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Surface-initiated controlled radical copolymerizations of 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC), 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride) (MTAC), and 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt (SPMK) were carried out on a silicon wafer and glass ball to prepare polyelectrolyte brushes with excellent water wettability. The frictional coefficient of the polymer brushes was recorded on a ball-on-plate type tribometer by linear reciprocating motion of the brush specimen at a selected velocity of 1.5 x 10(-3) m s-1 under a normal load of 0.49 N applied to the stationary glass ball (d = 10 mm) at 298 K. The poly(DMAEMA-co-MPC) brush partially cross-linked by bis(2-iodoethoxy)ethane maintained a relatively low friction coefficient around 0.13 under humid air (RH > 75%) even after 200 friction cycles. The poly(SPMK) brush revealed an extremely low friction coefficient around 0.01 even after 450 friction cycles. We supposed that the abrasion of the brush was prevented owing to the good affinity of the poly(SPMK) brush for water forming a water lubrication layer, and electrostatic repulsive interactions among the brushes bearing sulfonic acid groups. Furthermore, the poly(SPMK-co-MTAC) brush with a chemically cross-linked structure showed a stable low friction coefficient in water even after 1400 friction cycles under a normal load of 139 MPa, indicating that the cross-linking structure improved the wear resistance of the brush layer. PMID:23285641

  19. Computer Simulations of Bottle Brushes: From Melts to Soft Networks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cao, Zhen; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Sheiko, Sergei S.; Dobrynin, Andrey V.

    2015-07-13

    We use a combination of Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical calculations, and study dens bottle-brush systems in a melt and network State. Analysis of our simulation results shows that bottle-brush macromolecules in melt behave as ideal chains with effective Kuhn length bK. Simulations show that the bottle-brush-induced bending rigidity is due to an entropy decrease caused by redistribution of the side chains upon backbone bending. The Kuhn length of the bottle:brushes increases with increasing the side-chain degree of polymerization nsc as bK proportional to nsc0.46. Moreover, this model of bottle brush macromolecules is extended to describe mechanical properties of bottlemore » brush networks in linear and nonlinear deformation regimes. In the linear deformation regime, the network shear modulus scales with the degree of polymerization of the side chains as G0 proportional to (nsc + 1)-1 as long as the ratio of the Kuhn length, bK, to the size of the fully extended bottle-brush backbone between cross-links, R-max, is smaller than unity, bK/Rmax << 1. Bottle-brush networks With bK/Rmax proportional to 1 demonstrate behavior similar to that of networks Of semiflexible chains with G0 proportional to nsc-0.5. Finally, in the nonlinear network deformation regime, the deformation-dependent shear modulus is a universal function of the first strain invariant I1 and bottle-brush backbone deformation ratio beta describing stretching ability of the bottle-brush backbone between cross-links.« less

  20. Computer Simulations of Bottle Brushes: From Melts to Soft Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Zhen; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Sheiko, Sergei S.; Dobrynin, Andrey V.

    2015-07-13

    We use a combination of Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical calculations, and study dens bottle-brush systems in a melt and network State. Analysis of our simulation results shows that bottle-brush macromolecules in melt behave as ideal chains with effective Kuhn length bK. Simulations show that the bottle-brush-induced bending rigidity is due to an entropy decrease caused by redistribution of the side chains upon backbone bending. The Kuhn length of the bottle:brushes increases with increasing the side-chain degree of polymerization nsc as bK proportional to nsc0.46. Moreover, this model of bottle brush macromolecules is extended to describe mechanical properties of bottle brush networks in linear and nonlinear deformation regimes. In the linear deformation regime, the network shear modulus scales with the degree of polymerization of the side chains as G0 proportional to (nsc + 1)-1 as long as the ratio of the Kuhn length, bK, to the size of the fully extended bottle-brush backbone between cross-links, R-max, is smaller than unity, bK/Rmax << 1. Bottle-brush networks With bK/Rmax proportional to 1 demonstrate behavior similar to that of networks Of semiflexible chains with G0 proportional to nsc-0.5. Finally, in the nonlinear network deformation regime, the deformation-dependent shear modulus is a universal function of the first strain invariant I1 and bottle-brush backbone deformation ratio beta describing stretching ability of the bottle-brush backbone between cross-links.

  1. Physicochemical Properties of 'Particle Brush'-Based Materials: Using Polymer Graft Modification to Tailor Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Michael D.

    The advent of surface-initiated controlled radical polymerization techniques has allowed a new class of hybrid polymer-grafted nanoparticles, known as eparticle brushes,f to be realized. By grafting polymers from the surface, interactions between particles can be tuned using the precise control over graft architecture (i.e. chain length, dispersity, particle size, and grafting density) afforded by controlled radical polymerizations. Previously, a transition from particle-like to polymer-like interactions in small particles with increasing graft length has been observed. In the limit of long graft lengths, the polymer chains impart new interactions between particles, such as entanglements. These results outline a rich, but largely unexplored parameter space. The present thesis further elucidates the extent to which polymer graft modification facilitates new interaction types between particles and the dependence of those interactions on chain conformation. Specifically, the mechanical properties, processability, phase separation, and vibrational modes of particle brushes are examined. A dependence of the mechanical properties of particle brush assemblies on particle size is accurately captured by accounting for differences in chain conformation between particles of different sizes using a simple scaling model. Further tailoring of mechanical characteristics in weak particle brush assemblies can be achieved using appropriate homopolymer additives to form two-component systems. Improved mechanical properties are accompanied by a significant enhancement in particle processability that allows application of previously unusable processing methods. Considering more complex systems, mesoscale phase separation of nanoparticles is demonstrated for the first time by blending of particle brushes with different graft polymers. Polymer graft modification is seen to not only strengthen and introduce new interactions, but also tune particle properties. Vibrational modes of

  2. 75 FR 13489 - Natural Bristle Paint Brushes and Brush Heads from the People's Republic of China: Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... (``Sunset'') Review, 74 FR 56593 (November 2, 2009) (``Sunset Initiation''); see also Antidumping Duty Order; Natural Bristle Paint Brushes and Brush Heads From the People's Republic of China, 51 FR 5580 (February 14...'s Republic of China, 51 FR 8342 (March 11, 1986) (``Order''). Based on the notice of intent...

  3. 75 FR 44939 - Natural Bristle Paint Brushes and Brush Heads from the People's Republic of China: Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-30

    ... FR 5580 (February 14, 1986) and Amended Antidumping Duty Order; Natural Bristle Paint Brushes and Brush Heads From the People's Republic of China, 51 FR 8342 (March 11, 1986) (``Order''). On May 7, 2010... Order, 75 FR 34097 (June 16, 2010) (``Initiation and Preliminary Results''). As noted above, we...

  4. 75 FR 34097 - Natural Bristle Paint Brushes and Brush Heads From the People's Republic of China: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... China, 51 FR 8342 (March 11, 1986) (``Order''). The domestic industry submitted a letter to the... Brushes and Paint Brush Heads from the People's Republic of China, 51 FR 5580 (Feb. 14, 1986) and Amended... Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order, 75 FR...

  5. Effectiveness of gutter brushes in removing street sweeping waste.

    PubMed

    Vanegas Useche, Libardo V; Wahab, Magd M Abdel; Parker, Graham A

    2010-02-01

    Litter on roadways has to be removed for hygiene and to reduce pollution, amongst other reasons. Therefore, the effective operation of street sweepers is important in the collection of solid waste. In this article, the effectiveness of gutter brushes of street sweepers in removing different debris types, namely medium-size gravel, small and fine particles, and wet thin debris is studied by means of sweeping tests using a brushing test rig. Two types of gutter brushes, cutting and F128, are tested under a variety of operating conditions. The experimental tests provide a means of identifying suitable ranges of brush penetration for the different debris types under defined operating parameters such as brush angle of attack, brush rotational speed, and sweeper velocity. These ranges may provide sufficiently high removal forces and avoid the occurrence of sweeping problems such as backward sweeping and inappropriate bristle-surface contact. Optimum operating parameters for the three debris types studied, as well as a mixture of all of them, are determined. Lastly, the results indicate that, as far as the sweeping effectiveness is concerned, the F128 brush is the preferred one for the cases studied. PMID:19879125

  6. pH- and Electro-Responsive Properties of Poly(acrylic acid) and Poly(acrylic acid)-block-poly(acrylic acid-grad-styrene) Brushes Studied by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Borisova, O V; Billon, L; Richter, R P; Reimhult, E; Borisov, O V

    2015-07-14

    We report on the synthesis of novel pH- and electro-responsive polyelectrolyte brushes from a gold substrate by direct one-step nitroxide-mediated polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) or copolymerization of AA and styrene (S). In the latter case, amphiphilic brushes of block-gradient copolymers PAA-b-(PAA-grad-PS) comprising one PAA block and one block with the gradient sequence of AA and S were obtained. The block-gradient copolymers are initiated from the surface by the start of the PAA block. The brushes were characterized by XPS and ellipsometry. (1)H NMR confirmed the gradient sequence of the PAA-grad-PS copolymer block. The pH- and electro-responsive properties of the brushes were studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) in combination with electrochemistry. This method provides evidence of swelling of the PAA brushes proportional to the contour length of the chains at elevated pH, whereas the response functions of the block-gradient copolymers are more complex and point to intermolecular aggregation in the brush at low pH. Monitoring of the changes in resonance frequency and dissipation of the QCM-D also demonstrates that application of negative voltage to the substrate leads to swelling of the brush; application of a positive voltage provokes only a transient collapse of the brush in proportion to the applied voltage. PMID:26070329

  7. Sterilization effects of atmospheric cold plasma brush

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Q.S.; Huang, C.; Hsieh, F.-H.; Huff, H.; Duan Yixiang

    2006-01-02

    This study investigated the sterilization effects of a brush-shaped plasma created at one atmospheric pressure. A population of 1.0x10{sup 4}-1.0x10{sup 5} Escherichia coli or Micrococcus luteus bacteria was seeded in filter paper media and then subjected to Ar and/or Ar+O{sub 2} plasmas. A complete kill of the Micrococcus luteus required about 3 min argon plasma exposures. With oxygen addition into the argon plasma gas streams, a complete kill of the bacteria needed only less than 1 min plasma exposure for Micrococcus luteus and about 2 min exposure for Escherichia coli. The plasma treatment effects on the different bacteria cell structures were examined using scanning electron microscopy.

  8. Nanoparticle organization in sandwiched polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Curk, Tine; Martinez-Veracoechea, Francisco J; Frenkel, Daan; Dobnikar, Jure

    2014-05-14

    The organization of nanoparticles inside grafted polymer layers is governed by the interplay of polymer-induced entropic interactions and the action of externally applied fields. Earlier work had shown that strong external forces can drive the formation of colloidal structures in polymer brushes. Here we show that external fields are not essential to obtain such colloidal patterns: we report Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations that demonstrate that ordered structures can be achieved by compressing a "sandwich" of two grafted polymer layers, or by squeezing a coated nanotube, with nanoparticles in between. We show that the pattern formation can be efficiently controlled by the applied pressure, while the characteristic length-scale, that is, the typical width of the patterns, is sensitive to the length of the polymers. Based on the results of the simulations, we derive an approximate equation of state for nanosandwiches. PMID:24707901

  9. Sterilization effects of atmospheric cold plasma brush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q. S.; Huang, C.; Hsieh, F.-H.; Huff, H.; Duan, Yixiang

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the sterilization effects of a brush-shaped plasma created at one atmospheric pressure. A population of 1.0×104-1.0×105 Escherichia coli or Micrococcus luteus bacteria was seeded in filter paper media and then subjected to Ar and/or Ar +O2 plasmas. A complete kill of the Micrococcus luteus required about 3 min argon plasma exposures. With oxygen addition into the argon plasma gas streams, a complete kill of the bacteria needed only less than 1 min plasma exposure for Micrococcus luteus and about 2 min exposure for Escherichia coli. The plasma treatment effects on the different bacteria cell structures were examined using scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Brush Lettering II; Commercial and Advertising Art--Intermediate: 9185.01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This course outline has been prepared as a guide to help the student gain mastery in the proper brush techniques required for proficiency in brush lettering. The skills of Brush Lettering 1 are a prerequisite. Consisting of 135 clock hours, the course prepares the student to understand brush lettering for poster production and advertising layout.…

  11. Ionic Surfactant Binding to pH-Responsive Polyelectrolyte Brush-Grafted Nanoparticles in Suspension and on Charged Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Riley, John K; An, Junxue; Tilton, Robert D

    2015-12-29

    The interactions between silica nanoparticles grafted with a brush of cationic poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (SiO2-g-PDMAEMA) and anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is investigated by dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy. SiO2-g-PDMAEMA exhibits pH-dependent charge and size properties which enable the SDS binding to be probed over a range of electrostatic conditions and brush conformations. SDS monomers bind irreversibly to SiO2-g-PDMAEMA at low surfactant concentrations (∼10(-4) M) while exhibiting a pH-dependent threshold above which cooperative, partially reversible SDS binding occurs. At pH 5, SDS binding induces collapse of the highly charged and swollen brush as observed in the bulk by DLS and on surfaces by QCM-D. Similar experiments at pH 9 suggest that SDS binds to the periphery of the weakly charged and deswollen brush and produces SiO2-g-PDMAEMA/SDS complexes with a net negative charge. SiO2-g-PDMAEMA brush collapse and charge neutralization is further confirmed by colloidal probe AFM measurements, where reduced electrosteric repulsions and bridging adhesion are attributed to effects of the bound SDS. Additionally, sequential adsorption schemes with SDS and SiO2-g-PDMAEMA are used to enhance deposition relative to SiO2-g-PDMAEMA direct adsorption on silica. This work shows that the polyelectrolyte brush configuration responds in a more dramatic fashion to SDS than to pH-induced changes in ionization, and this can be exploited to manipulate the structure of adsorbed layers and the corresponding forces of compression and friction between opposing surfaces. PMID:26649483

  12. Flow reduction in microchannels coated with a polymer brush.

    PubMed

    Lanotte, Luca; Guido, Stefano; Misbah, Chaouqi; Peyla, Philippe; Bureau, Lionel

    2012-09-25

    We report on the design of microchannels made of glass capillary coated with polymer brushes elaborated by the so-called "grafting-from" technique. We present measurements of velocity profiles for pressure-driven flows of water in such "hairy" capillaries. We show that the flow reduction induced by the presence of the brush is unexpectedly greater than what could be anticipated from simple geometric arguments on the reduction of the effective capillary diameter or from predictions by models describing the brush layer as a poro-elastic boundary. PMID:22935030

  13. High-Temperature, Flexible, Pressure-Assisted Brush Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Sirocky, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic-fibers brush and integral spring clip block hot, engine flows. High-temperature, pressure-assisted brush seal installed in movable panel in advanced hypersonic engine. Seal prevents flow of hot engine gas from penetrating gap between movable panel and adjacent stationary panel. Potential applications include sealing gaps in variable-geometry two-dimensional turbojet exhaust nozzles or sealing control surface gaps of hypersonic vehicles. Ceramic brush seals also used as structural seals in high-temperature furnaces or advanced ceramic heat exchangers.

  14. Brush/gold nanoparticle hybrids: effect of grafting density on the particle uptake and distribution within weak polyelectrolyte brushes.

    PubMed

    Christau, Stephanie; Möller, Tim; Yenice, Zuleyha; Genzer, Jan; von Klitzing, Regine

    2014-11-01

    The effect of the brush grafting density on the loading of 13 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into stimuli-responsive poly(N,N-(dimethylamino ethyl) methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes anchored to flat impenetrable substrates is reported. Atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) is used to grow polymer brushes via a "grafting from" approach from a 2-bromo-2-methyl-N-(3-(triethoxysilyl) propyl) propanamide (BTPAm)-covered silicon substrate. The grafting density is varied by using mixtures of initiator and a "dummy" molecule that is not able to initiate polymerization. A systematic study is carried out by varying the brush grafting density while keeping all of the other parameters constant. X-ray reflectivity is a suitable tool for investigating the spatial structure of the hybrid, and it is combined with scanning electron microscopy and UV/vis spectroscopy to study the particle loading and interpenetration of the particles within the polymer brush matrix. The particle uptake increases with decreasing grafting density and is highest for an intermediate grafting density because more space between the polymer chains is available. For very low grafting densities of PDMAEMA brushes, the particle uptake decreases because of a lack of the polymer matrix for the attachment of particles. The structure of the surface-grafted polymer chains changes after particle attachment. More water is incorporated into the brush matrix after particle immobilization, which leads to a swelling of the polymer chains in the hybrid material. Water can be removed from the brush by decreasing the relative humidity, which leads to brush shrinking and forces the AuNPs to get closer to each other. PMID:25275215

  15. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules.

    PubMed

    Halberg, Kenneth A; Rainey, Stephanie M; Veland, Iben R; Neuert, Helen; Dornan, Anthony J; Klämbt, Christian; Davies, Shireen-Anne; Dow, Julian A T

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell-cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most abundantly expressed in the adult renal (Malpighian) tubule rather than in neuronal tissues. The role Fas2 serves in this epithelium is unknown. Here we show that Fas2 is essential to brush border maintenance in renal tubules of Drosophila. Fas2 is dynamically expressed during tubule morphogenesis, localizing to the brush border whenever the tissue is transport competent. Genetic manipulations of Fas2 expression levels impact on both microvilli length and organization, which in turn dramatically affect stimulated rates of fluid secretion by the tissue. Consequently, we demonstrate a radically different role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border. PMID:27072072

  16. The cell adhesion molecule Fasciclin2 regulates brush border length and organization in Drosophila renal tubules

    PubMed Central

    Halberg, Kenneth A.; Rainey, Stephanie M.; Veland, Iben R.; Neuert, Helen; Dornan, Anthony J.; Klämbt, Christian; Davies, Shireen-Anne; Dow, Julian A. T.

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms rely on cell adhesion molecules to coordinate cell–cell interactions, and to provide navigational cues during tissue formation. In Drosophila, Fasciclin 2 (Fas2) has been intensively studied due to its role in nervous system development and maintenance; yet, Fas2 is most abundantly expressed in the adult renal (Malpighian) tubule rather than in neuronal tissues. The role Fas2 serves in this epithelium is unknown. Here we show that Fas2 is essential to brush border maintenance in renal tubules of Drosophila. Fas2 is dynamically expressed during tubule morphogenesis, localizing to the brush border whenever the tissue is transport competent. Genetic manipulations of Fas2 expression levels impact on both microvilli length and organization, which in turn dramatically affect stimulated rates of fluid secretion by the tissue. Consequently, we demonstrate a radically different role for this well-known cell adhesion molecule, and propose that Fas2-mediated intermicrovillar homophilic adhesion complexes help stabilize the brush border. PMID:27072072

  17. Controlled synthesis of photochromic polymer brushes by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    SciTech Connect

    Piech, Marcin; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Long, Timothy Michael

    2005-06-01

    This work reports on the grafting of methyl methacrylate polymer brushes containing spirobenzopyran pendant groups from flat silica surfaces and colloidal particles utilizing atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The reaction conditions were optimized with respect to the kind of surface bound initiator, the type of halide and ligand used in the catalytic complex, the presence/absence of untethered initiator, and solvent type. This enabled synthesis of coatings up to 80 {+-} 3 nm thick with controlled spirobenzopyran content. While polymerization kinetics indicate the presence of chain termination reactions, the 'living' character of the process is confirmed by controlled formation of block copolymer brushes. UV/vis spectroscopy was used to characterize the UV-induced isomerization of spirobenzopyran to zwitterionic merocyanine and the thermal back-reaction. Spectral and kinetic analyses of this latter bleaching process points to the existence of free and associated merocyanines in the polymeric brush in both tetrahydrofuran and toluene. However, stabilization of merocyanine species by the polymer matrix is considerably greater in toluene with thermal back-reaction rates approaching those determined for solid dry films.

  18. Lipid rafts in epithelial brush borders: atypical membrane microdomains with specialized functions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2003-10-31

    Epithelial cells that fulfil high-throughput digestive/absorptive functions, such as small intestinal enterocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells, are endowed with a dense apical brush border. It has long been recognized that the microvillar surface of the brush border is organized in cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains commonly known as lipid rafts. More recent studies indicate that microvillar rafts, in particular those of enterocytes, have some unusual properties in comparison with rafts present on the surface of other cell types. Thus, microvillar rafts are stable rather than transient/dynamic, and their core components include glycolipids and the divalent lectin galectin-4, which together can be isolated as "superrafts", i.e., membrane microdomains resisting solubilization with Triton X-100 at physiological temperature. These glycolipid/lectin-based rafts serve as platforms for recruitment of GPI-linked and transmembrane digestive enzymes, most likely as an economizing effort to secure and prolong their digestive capability at the microvillar surface. However, in addition to microvilli, the brush border surface also consists of membrane invaginations between adjacent microvilli, which are the only part of the apical surface sterically accessible for membrane fusion/budding events. Many of these invaginations appear as pleiomorphic, deep apical tubules that extend up to 0.5-1 microm into the underlying terminal web region. Their sensitivity to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin suggests them to contain cholesterol-dependent lipid rafts of a different type from the glycolipid-based rafts at the microvillar surface. The brush border is thus an example of a complex membrane system that harbours at least two different types of lipid raft microdomains, each suited to fulfil specialized functions. This conclusion is in line with an emerging, more varied view of lipid rafts being pluripotent microdomains capable of adapting in size, shape, and content to

  19. Keep Kids' Mouths Healthy: Brush 2min2X

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids’ Teeth Teeth Helpful Resources Links Keep Kids’ Mouths Healthy Roll over or click the time line below for healthy mouth information. Email Link Kids' Care Timeline Brush 2min2x - ...

  20. Shedding light on azopolymer brush dynamics by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kollarigowda, R H; De Santo, I; Rianna, C; Fedele, C; Manikas, A C; Cavalli, S; Netti, P A

    2016-09-14

    Understanding the response to illumination at a molecular level as well as characterising polymer brush dynamics are key features that guide the engineering of new light-stimuli responsive materials. Here, we report on the use of a confocal microscopy technique that was exploited to discern how a single molecular event such as the photoinduced isomerisation of azobenzene can affect an entire polymeric material at a macroscopic level leading to photodriven mass-migration. For this reason, a set of polymer brushes, containing azobenzene (Disperse Red 1, DR) on the side chains of poly(methacrylic acid), was synthesised and the influence of DR on the polymer brush dynamics was investigated for the first time by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Briefly, two dynamics were observed, a short one coming from the isomerisation of DR and a long one related to the brush main chain. Interestingly, photoinduced polymer aggregation in the confocal volume was observed. PMID:27491890

  1. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-01-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor's swimmer). PMID:26975329

  2. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes

    PubMed Central

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-01-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor’s swimmer). PMID:26975329

  3. Surface wave excitations and backflow effect over dense polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagi, Sofia; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Sciortino, Francesco; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2016-03-01

    Polymer brushes are being increasingly used to tailor surface physicochemistry for diverse applications such as wetting, adhesion of biological objects, implantable devices and much more. Here we perform Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations to study the behaviour of dense polymer brushes under flow in a slit-pore channel. We discover that the system displays flow inversion at the brush interface for several disconnected ranges of the imposed flow. We associate such phenomenon to collective polymer dynamics: a wave propagating on the brush surface. The relation between the wavelength, the amplitude and the propagation speed of the flow-generated wave is consistent with the solution of the Stokes equations when an imposed traveling wave is assumed as the boundary condition (the famous Taylor’s swimmer).

  4. Astronauts Culbertson and Bursch brush their teeth on Discovery's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Astronauts Frank L. Culbertson (right), mission commander, and Daniel W. Bursch, mission specialist, brush their teeth on Discovery's middeck. Two sleep restraints form part of the backdrop for the photograph.

  5. Counterion-mediated protein adsorption into polyelectrolyte brushes.

    PubMed

    He, Su-Zhen; Merlitz, Holger; Sommer, Jens-Uwe; Wu, Chen-Xu

    2015-09-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of the interaction of fullerene-like, inhomogeneously charged proteins with polyelectrolyte brushes. A motivation of this work is the experimental observation that proteins, carrying an integral charge, may enter like-charged polymer brushes. Simulations of varying charge distributions on the protein surfaces are performed to unravel the physical mechanism of the adsorption. Our results prove that an overall neutral protein can be strongly driven into polyelectrolyte brush whenever the protein features patches of positive and negative charge. The findings reported here give further evidence that the strong adsorption of proteins is also driven by entropic forces due to counterion release, since charged patches on the surface of the proteins can act as multivalent counterions of the oppositely charged polyelectrolyte chains. A corresponding number of mobile co- and counterions is released from the brush and the vicinity of the proteins so that the entropy of the total system increases. PMID:26385737

  6. Unique Tuft Test Facility Dramatically Reduces Brush Seal Development Costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Brush seals have been incorporated in the latest turbine engines to reduce leakage and improve efficiency. However, the life of these seals is limited by wear. Studies have shown that optimal sealing characteristics for a brush seal occur before the interference fit between the brush and shaft is excessively worn. Research to develop improved tribopairs (brush and coating) with reduced wear and lower friction has been hindered by the lack of an accurate, low-cost, efficient test methodology. Estimated costs for evaluating a new material combination in an engine company seal test program are on the order of $100,000. To address this need, the NASA Lewis Research Center designed, built, and validated a unique, innovative brush seal tuft tester that slides a single tuft of brush seal wire against a rotating shaft under controlled loads, speeds, and temperatures comparable to those in turbine engines. As an initial screening tool, the brush seal tuft tester can tribologicaly evaluate candidate seal materials for 1/10th the cost of full-scale seal tests. Previous to the development of the brush seal tuft tester facility, most relevant tribological data had been obtained from full-scale seal tests conducted primarily to determine seal leakage characteristics. However, from a tribological point of view, these tests included the confounding effects of varying contact pressures, bristle flaring, high-temperature oxidation, and varying bristle contact angles. These confounding effects are overcome in tuft testing. The interface contact pressures can be either constant or varying depending on the tuft mounting device, and bristle wear can be measured optically with inscribed witness marks. In a recent cooperative program with a U.S. turbine engine manufacturer, five metallic wire candidates were tested against a plasma-sprayed Nichrome-bonded chrome carbide. The wire materials used during this collaboration were either nickel-chrome- or cobaltchrome-based superalloys. These

  7. Fibre evaluation for spacecraft cleaning. [vacuum brush materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, W. M.

    1976-01-01

    The employment of vacuum brushes utilizing sable tail hair for the physical removal of particulates from spacecraft surfaces has become problematical in connection with a lack of compatibility of the bristle with sterilization and biological decontamination procedures required for spacecraft cleaning. An investigation was, therefore, conducted to find a suitable fiber which can replace sable bristle. Felor fiber was found to have the best properties for use in a motorized cleaning brush.

  8. Chinese brushes: controllable liquid transfer in ratchet conical hairs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianbin; Su, Bin; Liu, Huan; Jiang, Lei

    2014-07-23

    The controllable liquid transfer of a Chinese brush is attributable to the unique anisotropic multi-scale structures of the freshly emergent hairs. A large mass of liquid an be dynamically balanced within the brush as a cooperative effect of the Laplace pressure difference, the asymmetrical retention force, and gravity. Inspired by this, a device is developed with parallel hairs that allows for direct writing of micro-lines. PMID:24781976

  9. Oral hygiene: a history of tongue scraping and brushing.

    PubMed

    Christen, A G; Swanson, B Z

    1978-02-01

    Tongue scraping and brushing have been practiced for hundreds of years but are still little appreciated or used by the public. Throughout the centuries, tongue scrapers have been constructed of thin, flexible strips of wood, various meals, ivory, mother-of-pearl, whalebone, celluloid, tortoiseshell, and plastic. Recent scientific evidence has validated the need to practice habitual and thorough tongue brushing as part of daily home oral hygiene procedures. PMID:342578

  10. Tension amplification in tethered layers of bottle-brush polymers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leuty, Gary M.; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary S.; Rubinstein, Michael

    2016-02-26

    In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained bead–spring model have been used to study the effects of molecular crowding on the accumulation of tension in the backbone of bottle-brush polymers tethered to a flat substrate. The number of bottle-brushes per unit surface area, Σ, as well as the lengths of the bottle-brush backbones Nbb (50 ≤ Nbb ≤ 200) and side chains Nsc (50 ≤ Nsc ≤ 200) were varied to determine how the dimensions and degree of crowding of bottle-brushes give rise to bond tension amplification along the backbone, especially near the substrate. From these simulations, wemore » have identified three separate regimes of tension. For low Σ, the tension is due solely to intramolecular interactions and is dominated by the side chain repulsion that governs the lateral brush dimensions. With increasing Σ, the interactions between bottle-brush polymers induce compression of the side chains, transmitting increasing tension to the backbone. For large Σ, intermolecular side chain repulsion increases, forcing side chain extension and reorientation in the direction normal to the surface and transmitting considerable tension to the backbone.« less

  11. Polymer brushes grafted to "passivated" silicon substrates using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ostaci, Roxana-Viorela; Damiron, Denis; Capponi, Simona; Vignaud, Guillaume; Léger, Liliane; Grohens, Yves; Drockenmuller, Eric

    2008-03-18

    We present herein a versatile method for grafting polymer brushes to passivated silicon surfaces based on the Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (click chemistry) of omega-azido polymers and alkynyl-functionalized silicon substrates. First, the "passivation" of the silicon substrates toward polymer adsorption was performed by the deposition of an alkyne functionalized self-assembled monolayer (SAM). Then, three tailor-made omega-azido linear brush precursors, i.e., PEG-N3, PMMA-N3, and PS-N3 (Mn approximately 20,000 g/mol), were grafted to alkyne-functionalized SAMs via click chemistry in tetrahydrofuran. The SAM, PEG, PMMA, and PS layers were characterized by ellipsometry, scanning probe microscopy, and water contact angle measurements. Results have shown that the grafting process follows the scaling laws developed for polymer brushes, with a significant dependence over the weight fraction of polymer in the grafting solution and the grafting time. The chemical nature of the brushes has only a weak influence on the click chemistry grafting reaction and morphologies observed, yielding polymer brushes with thickness of ca. 6 nm and grafting densities of ca. 0.2 chains/nm2. The examples developed herein have shown that this highly versatile and tunable approach can be extended to the grafting of a wide range of polymer (pseudo-) brushes to silicon substrates without changing the tethering strategy. PMID:18247640

  12. Rotordynamic and leakage characteristics of a 4-stage brush seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, K. J.; Childs, D. W.

    1992-12-01

    Experimental results are presented for the direct and cross-coupled stiffness and damping coefficients as well as the leakage performance for a 4-stage brush seal. Variable test parameters include the inlet pressure, pressure ratio, shaft speed, fluid prerotation, and seal spacing. Direct damping is shown to increase with running speed; otherwise, the rotordynamic coefficients are relatively insensitive to changes in the test parameters. Cross-coupled stiffness is generally unchanged by increasing the inlet tangential velocity to the seals, suggesting that the brush seal is not affected by inlet swirl. Direct stiffness is shown to increase with frequency; however, the magnitudes of direct stiffness are always positive. Cross-coupled stiffness increases slightly with frequency; yet not as drastically as direct stiffness. Comparisons of test results for the 4-stage brush seal with an 8-cavity labyrinth showed superior rotordynamics performance for the brush seal; viz., large values for direct stiffness and lower values for the (destabilizing) cross-coupled stiffness coefficient. The damping for brush seals is smaller, but comparable to labyrinth seals. The whirl-frequency ratio is always smaller for the brush seal.

  13. Effect of Salt on Phosphorylcholine-based Zwitterionic Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Moxey, Mark; Alswieleh, Abdullah; Morse, Andrew J; Lewis, Andrew L; Geoghegan, Mark; Leggett, Graham J

    2016-05-24

    A quantitative investigation of the responses of surface-grown biocompatible brushes of poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) to different types of salt has been carried out using ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements, and friction force microscopy. Both cations and anions of varying valency over a wide range of concentrations were examined. Ellipsometry shows that the height of the brushes is largely independent of the ionic strength, confirming that the degree of swelling of the polymer is independent of the ionic character of the medium. In contrast, QCM measurements reveal significant changes in mass and dissipation to the PMPC brush layer, suggesting that ions bind to phosphorylcholine (PC) groups in PMPC molecules, which results in changes in the stiffness of the brush layer, and the binding affinity varies with salt type. Nanotribological measurements made using friction force microscopy show that the coefficient of friction decreases with increasing ionic strength for a variety of salts, supporting the conclusion drawn from QCM measurements. It is proposed that the binding of ions to the PMPC molecules does not change their hydration state, and hence the height of the surface-grown polymeric brushes. However, the balance of the intra- and intermolecular interactions is strongly dependent upon the ionic character of the medium between the hydrated chains, modulating the interactions between the zwitterionic PC pendant groups and, consequently, the stiffness of the PMPC molecules in the brush layer. PMID:27133955

  14. Stereoregular polyacrylamide and its copolymer brushes: Preparation and surface characters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jianguo; Wang, Xiaoshu; Lu, Xiaoyan; Lu, Yun

    2008-12-01

    Two kinds of polymer brushes, the single one with stereospecific polyacrylamide (PAAM) chains and the dual-component one with random poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) segments grafting from stereospecific PAAM chains, were prepared on silicon wafer for the first time by combining the immobilization of initiator and the stereospecific living radical in situ polymerization. With the addition of the Lewis acid AlCl 3 into the polymerization system, the PAAM brushes obtained exhibited an increased stereospecificity as well as a decreased hydrophilicity, which might attribute to the reduced thickness of PAAM brushes on the silicon wafer and the handicap of the free rotation of the stereospecific molecular chain. The smoother surface morphology of the stereospecific PAAM brushes shown in AFM images was in good agreement with the experimental data of water contact angle. Also, block amphiphilic copolymer brushes were prepared with the stereospecific PAAM formed first on silicon wafer as the anchored-initiator and revealed a novel surface self-assembly behavior after being treated with different solvent such as toluene or water. The stereospecificity of PAAM chains in the polymer brushes could be modulated by adjusting reaction conditions according to the requirement of applications for surface hydrophilicity.

  15. Dispersion of Mixed Brush Gold Nanorods in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Robert; Koski, Jason; Riggleman, Robert; Composto, Russell

    In this work we investigate, both experimentally and through hybrid particle/self-consistent field theoretic (hSCFT) calculations, the dispersion state of gold nanorods (AuNRs) grafted with homopolymer, bidispersed, or mixed polymer brushes. AuNRs are grafted with 11.5 kg/mol PS (HNRs), 11.5 kg/mol PS and 5.3 kg/mol PS (BNRs), or 11.5 kg/mol PS and 5 kg/mol poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) (MBNRs) and cast in PS or PMMA films consisting of short to very long chains compared to the grafted brush. We further investigated the MBNR systems by varying the length of the PS brush. Overall, we find that the MBNRs dispersed markedly better than the other brush types (HNRs or BNRs) in PS matrices. We utilize hSCFT calculations, in particular potential of mean force (PMF) and brush profile calculations, to elucidate the thermodynamics of these systems. The PMFs and brush profiles exhibit similar trends for the BNRs and MBNRs where the short grafted chain forces the longer grafted chain away from the AuNR surface and promotes wetting by the matrix chains. The hSCFT calculations demonstrated qualitative trends consistent with the aggregation observed for AuNRs in PMMA matrices. Therefore, we have demonstrated that MBNR dispersion in polymer matrices is enhanced compared to the HNR and BNR cases, which extends the dispersion window for new combinations of nanorods and polymers.

  16. Cues to Action as Motivators for Children's Brushing.

    PubMed

    Walker, Kimberly K; Steinfort, Erin L; Keyler, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is the most common chronic childhood disease. Home self-care procedures are the most important strategies to prevent tooth decay. Brushing is the most important single intervention for the prevention of tooth decay, yet compliance is not practiced and there is limited understanding of children's behavioral decisions. Guided by the Health Belief Model, this study consisted of eight focus groups with children in the second through fifth grades at three different socioeconomic-level school districts to determine the cues to action that are motivating or can motivate their brushing behavior. Results indicated children are primarily motivated to brush for aesthetic reasons, mainly due to viewed media pictures of "perfect" teeth. Other less commonly expressed motivations for brushing stemmed from interpersonal connections, such as relatives with dentures. Social media, on the other hand, played a key role in some children's understanding of more advanced oral health connections such as links between cardiovascular and oral disease, and smoking and oral cancer. These links were viewed as threatening to children to motivate better brushing. Additionally, the study found that home computers can be used as an external motivator to deliver tailored messages to encourage better brushing. PMID:25204365

  17. Brush development for underwater ship hull coating maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribou, Melissa Eileen

    Ship hull grooming has been proposed as an environmentally friendly method of maintaining ship hull coatings in a fouling-free condition. It is defined as the frequent and gentle cleaning of a ship hull coating to prevent the establishment of fouling. This research investigated the grooming tool properties and operational requirements needed to implement the method. The grooming tool needs to provide sufficient force to remove incipient fouling without damaging the surface and consume minimal energy. Research showed that a vertical rotating brush design containing brushes filled with angled polypropylene bristles provided an effective method. This brush system was able to successfully prevent incipient fouling from becoming established on a copper ablative and two silicone fouling release coatings when groomed on a weekly basis; however, biofilm was not completely controlled. Brush design and operational parameters in relation to brush normal forces were investigated and models were developed to understand the relationship between bristle stiffness, dimensions, and angular velocity. A preliminary look at wear found that bristle stiffness has an effect on the degree of marring of the surface of a silicone fouling release coating. The knowledge gained by this research may be used to optimize grooming brush design and operational parameters that can be applied to the design and deployment of low power autonomous underwater vehicles that will groom the ship while in port.

  18. Insertion of nanoparticles into polymer brush under variable solvent conditions.

    PubMed

    Egorov, S A

    2012-10-01

    In this work, two-dimensional lattice-based self-consistent field theory is used to study the free energy cost associated with the insertion of a nanoparticle into a polymer brush. The nanoparticle is modeled as a cylinder and the self-consistent field equations are formulated on a cylindrical lattice. The use of two-dimensional formalism makes it possible to take into account the distortion of the brush density profile due to the embedded nanoinclusion. The insertion free energy penalty is analyzed as a function of the particle size, the brush grafting density, and the solvent quality. In agreement with the earlier simulation work, we find that the insertion free energy cost increases both with the particle size and the brush grafting density and decreases with deteriorating solvent quality. For nanoparticles located deep inside the brush, the insertion free energy is shown to scale with either squared (good solvent) or cubed (poor solvent) monomer volume fraction profile, in agreement with the earlier theoretical results. For shallow nanoinclusions located close to the brush surface, the insertion free energy is shown to scale linearly with the monomer volume fraction profile under both good and theta solvent conditions, again in agreement with the earlier work. PMID:23039611

  19. Insertion of nanoparticles into polymer brush under variable solvent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    In this work, two-dimensional lattice-based self-consistent field theory is used to study the free energy cost associated with the insertion of a nanoparticle into a polymer brush. The nanoparticle is modeled as a cylinder and the self-consistent field equations are formulated on a cylindrical lattice. The use of two-dimensional formalism makes it possible to take into account the distortion of the brush density profile due to the embedded nanoinclusion. The insertion free energy penalty is analyzed as a function of the particle size, the brush grafting density, and the solvent quality. In agreement with the earlier simulation work, we find that the insertion free energy cost increases both with the particle size and the brush grafting density and decreases with deteriorating solvent quality. For nanoparticles located deep inside the brush, the insertion free energy is shown to scale with either squared (good solvent) or cubed (poor solvent) monomer volume fraction profile, in agreement with the earlier theoretical results. For shallow nanoinclusions located close to the brush surface, the insertion free energy is shown to scale linearly with the monomer volume fraction profile under both good and theta solvent conditions, again in agreement with the earlier work.

  20. Polyelectrolyte brushes in mixed ionic medium studied via intermolecular forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, Robert; Laugel, Nicolas; Pincus, Philip; Tirrell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    The vast uses and applications of polyelectrolyte brushes make them an attractive field of research especially with the growing interest in responsive materials. Polymers which respond via changes in temperature, pH, and ionic strength are increasingly being used for applications in drug delivery, chemical gating, etc. When polyelectrolyte brushes are found in either nature (e.g., surfaces of cartilage and mammalian lung interiors) or commercially (e.g., skin care products, shampoo, and surfaces of medical devices) they are always surrounded by mixed ionic medium. This makes the study of these brushes in varying ionic environments extremely relevant for both current and future potential applications. The polyelectrolyte brushes in this work are diblock co-polymers of poly-styrene sulfonate (N=420) and poly-t-butyl styrene (N=20) which tethers to a hydrophobic surface allowing for a purely thermodynamic study of the polyelectrolyte chains. Intermolecular forces between two brushes are measured using the SFA. As multi-valent concentrations are increased, the brushes collapse internally and form strong adhesion between one another after contact (properties not seen in a purely mono-valent environment).

  1. Response behavior of diblock copolymer brushes in explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Kai; Marshall, Bennett D.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of phase behavior of copolymer brushes is of fundamental importance for the design of smart materials. In this paper, we have performed classical density functional theory calculations to study diblock copolymer brushes (A-B) in an explicit solvent which prefers the A block to B block. With increasing B-block length (NB), we find a structural transition of the copolymer brush from mixed to collapsed, partial-exposed, and exposed structure, which is qualitatively consistent with experiments. The phase transitions are attributed to the interplay between entropic cost of folding copolymer brushes and enthalpic effect of contact between unlike components. In addition, we examine the effect of different parameters, such as grafting density (ρg), the bottom block length (NA), and the chain length of solvent (NS) on the solvent response of copolymer brushes. The transition chain length (NB) increases with decreasing ρg and NA, and a smaller solvent molecule makes the collapsed structure less stable due to its lower penetration cost. Our results provide the insight to phase behavior of copolymer brushes in selective solvents from a molecular view.

  2. The Unusual Conformational Behavior of Polyzwitterionic Brushes in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jun; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Guangcui; Yu, Jing; Tirrell, Matthew

    Polyzwitterions constitute a peculiar class of polyelectrolytes, which are electrically neutral polymers containing both a positive and a negative charge on each repeating unit. Surfaces coated with polyzwitterionic brushes are resistant to the nonspecific accumulation of proteins and microorganisms, making them excellent candidates for a wide range of antifouling applications, from biocompatible medical devices to marine coatings. The surrounding environment can dramatically influence the conformational behavior of polyzwitterionic brushes. High-density polyzwitterionic brushes poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) were synthesized using surface initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization, and neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements were performed to investigate the ionic strength dependence of the conformational behaviors of PMPC brushes in monovalent salt solutions. Despite the numerous observations of normal pure polyelectrolyte brushes, NR results showed that both the densely concentrated layer near the substrate surface and the relatively swollen layer into the solution have been observed in different q range in a single neutron reflectivity profile. These results will definitely help us to better understand the relationship between the solution behaviors of zwitterionic polymer brushes and their antifouling properties.

  3. Spatial control over brush growth through sunlight-induced atom transfer radical polymerization using dye-sensitized TiO2 as a photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Yu, Bo; Zhou, Feng

    2014-07-01

    Simulated-sunlight induced atom transfer radical polymerization is used for spatial control over polymer brush growth by in situ photo-generation of the Cu(I) /L activator complex from its higher oxidation state Cu(II) /L deactivator complex using dye sensitized titanium dioxide nano-particles. The polymerization is well controlled under sunlight irradiation. Another attractive feature of this method is the possibility of creating various patterned surfaces of brushes using photomasks. When a nanoporous alumina oxide membrane is used as the template for confinement diffusion of photogenerated Cu(I) /L catalyst, patterns with sub-50 nm resolution are obtained. PMID:24740888

  4. Adsorption of enzymes to stimuli-responsive polymer brushes: Influence of brush conformation on adsorbed amount and biocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Meike; Bittrich, Eva; König, Ulla; Rajeev, Bhadra Lakshmi; Müller, Martin; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Thomas, Sabu; Stamm, Manfred; Uhlmann, Petra

    2016-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte brushes can be utilized to immobilize enzymes on macroscopic surfaces. This report investigates the influence of the pH value of the surrounding medium on the amount and the activity of enzymes adsorbed to poly(2-vinylpyridine) and poly(acrylic acid) brushes, as well as the creation of thermoresponsive biocatalytically active coatings via the adsorption of enzymes onto a mixed brush consisting of a polyelectrolyte and temperature-sensitive poly(N-isopropylacryl amide). Spectroscopic ellipsometry and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to monitor the adsorption process. Additionally, infrared spectra are evaluated in terms of the secondary structure of the enzymes. Glucose oxidase is used as a model enzyme, where the enzymatic activity is measured after different adsorption conditions. Poly(acrylic acid) brushes generally adsorb larger amounts of enzyme, while less glucose oxidase is found on poly(2-vinylpyridine), which however exhibits higher specific activity. This difference in activity could be attributed to a difference in secondary structure of the adsorbed enzyme. For glucose oxidase adsorbed to mixed brushes, switching of enzymatic activity between an active state at 20°C and a less active state at 40°C as compared to the free enzyme in solution is observed. However, this switching is strongly depending on pH in mixed brushes of poly(acrylic acid) and poly(N-isopropylacryl amide) due to interactions between the polymers. PMID:27447452

  5. Modeling bristle lift-off in idealized brush seal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Vijay

    1993-10-01

    We attempt in this paper to develop a model for the flow through brush seals and determine their elastic behavior in order to predict the dependence of brush/journal clearance on geometry and operating conditions. Several idealizations regarding brush seal configuration, flow conditions, and elastic behavior are made in the analysis in order to determine closed form parametric dependence. This formulation assumes that there is no initial interference between the bristle tip and the rotor. Also, interbristle, bristle-backing plate, and bristle-rotor friction is neglected. The bristle bundle or the brush seal as it is alternately called is assumed homogeneous and isotropic on a macroscopic scale so that a physical property like permeability is uniform. The fluid is assumed to be homogeneous, incompressible, viscous, and flowing under steady conditions. A schematic of a brush seal is shown. If the nominal bristle-shaft interference is absent then under static conditions the bristles may deflect axially due to the imposed pressure differential. This axial deflection may create a clearance permitting leakage flow in excess of that which occurs through the porous matrix formed by the bristle bundles. Under dynamic conditions the Couette flow created by shaft motion could be strong enough to cause bristle deflection and once again a clearance may develop. The paper proposes a means to determine this clearance (or at least describe its parametric dependence on geometry and operating conditions) under static as well as dynamic conditions.

  6. What information can frictional properties of polymer brushes tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Moxey, Mark; Morse, Andrew; Armes, Steven; Lewis, Andrew; Geoghegan, Mark; Leggett, Graham

    2013-03-01

    We have used friction force microscopy (FFM) to quantitatively examine surface grown zwitterionic polymer brushes: poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC), and to establish the correlation between its frictional behaviour to other intrinsic properties. In a good solvent, it was found that the coefficient of friction (μ) decreased with increasing film thickness. We conclude that the amount of bound solvent increases as the brush length increases, causing the osmotic pressure to increase and yielding a reduced tendency for the brush layer to deform under applied load. When measured in a series of alcohol/water mixtures, a significant increase in μ was observed for ethanol/water mixtures at a volume fraction of 90%. This is attributed to brush collapse due to co-nonsolvency, leading to loss of hydration of the brush chains and hence substantially reduced lubrication. We show that single asperity contact mechanics is strongly dependent on solvent quality. Friction-load relationship was found linear in methanol (good solvent), but sub-linear in water and ethanol (moderate solvent).

  7. Supporting awareness through collaborative brushing and linking of tabular data.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Amir Hossein; Tory, Melanie; Leung, Rock

    2013-12-01

    Maintaining an awareness of collaborators' actions is critical during collaborative work, including during collaborative visualization activities. Particularly when collaborators are located at a distance, it is important to know what everyone is working on in order to avoid duplication of effort, share relevant results in a timely manner and build upon each other's results. Can a person's brushing actions provide an indication of their queries and interests in a data set? Can these actions be revealed to a collaborator without substantially disrupting their own independent work? We designed a study to answer these questions in the context of distributed collaborative visualization of tabular data. Participants in our study worked independently to answer questions about a tabular data set, while simultaneously viewing brushing actions of a fictitious collaborator, shown directly within a shared workspace. We compared three methods of presenting the collaborator's actions: brushing & linking (i.e. highlighting exactly what the collaborator would see), selection (i.e. showing only a selected item), and persistent selection (i.e. showing only selected items but having them persist for some time). Our results demonstrated that persistent selection enabled some awareness of the collaborator's activities while causing minimal interference with independent work. Other techniques were less effective at providing awareness, and brushing & linking caused substantial interference. These findings suggest promise for the idea of exploiting natural brushing actions to provide awareness in collaborative work. PMID:24051785

  8. Isolation and characterization of rabbit kidney brush borders

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, S. J.; Robinson, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    1. Brush borders were isolated from rabbit kidney-cortex homogenates by rate-zonal centrifugation through a sucrose density gradient in a B-XIV zonal rotor, followed by differential centrifugation. 2. The method of preparation gave brush borders of high purity with a reasonable yield. The morphological appearance supported the evidence from enzymic and chemical investigations, that the brush borders were only slightly contaminated with endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, lysosomes and nuclei. 3. The molar ratio of cholesterol to phospholipid lay within the range found in other plasma membranes, but the carbohydrate content was double that found in liver plasma membranes. 4. Alkaline phosphatase, maltase, trehalase and aminopeptidase were major enzymic constituents of the brush borders, and had an approximately equal yield and enrichment, but none of these enzymes fulfilled the criteria for marker enzymes. 5. Mg2+-dependent and Na+,K+-dependent adenosine triphosphatases, although found in brush borders, had low yields and low enrichments. ImagesPLATE 2PLATE 1 PMID:4264701

  9. Surface Grafted Polysarcosine as a Peptoid Antifouling Polymer Brush

    PubMed Central

    Lau, King Hang Aaron; Ren, Chunlai; Sileika, Tadas S.; Park, Sung Hyun; Szleifer, Igal; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    Poly(N-substituted glycine) “peptoids” are a class of peptidomimetic molecules receiving significant interest as engineered biomolecules. Sarcosine (i.e. poly(N-methyl glycine)) has the simplest sidechain chemical structure of this family. In this contribution, we demonstrate that surface-grafted polysarcosine (PSAR) brushes exhibit excellent resistance to non-specific protein adsorption and cell attachment. Polysarcosine was coupled to a mussel adhesive protein inspired DOPA-Lys pentapeptide, which enabled solution grafting and control of the surface chain density of the PSAR brushes. Protein adsorption was found to decrease monotonically with increasing grafted chain densities, and protein adsorption could be completely inhibited above certain critical chain densities specific to different polysarcosine chain-lengths. The dependence of protein adsorption on chain length and density was also investigated by a molecular theory. PSAR brushes at high chain length and density were shown to resist fibroblast cell attachment over a 7 wk period, as well as resist the attachment of some clinically relevant bacteria strains. The excellent antifouling performance of PSAR may be related to the highly hydrophilic character of polysarcosine, which was evident from high-pressure liquid chromatography measurements of polysarcosine and water contact angle measurements of the PSAR brushes. Peptoids have been shown to resist proteolytic degradation and polysarcosine could be produced in large quantities by N-carboxy anhydride polymerization. In summary, surface grafted polysarcosine peptoid brushes hold great promise for antifouling applications. PMID:23101930

  10. Specific ion modulated thermoresponse of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Ben A; Willott, Joshua D; Murdoch, Timothy J; Webber, Grant B; Wanless, Erica J

    2016-02-17

    The influence of specific anions on the equilibrium thermoresponse of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) brushes has been studied using in situ ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and static contact angle measurements between 20 and 45 °C in the presence of up to 250 mM acetate and thiocyanate anions in water. The thickness and changes in dissipation exhibited a broad swelling transition spanning approximately 15 °C from collapsed (high temperatures) to swollen conformation (low temperatures) while the brush surface wettability changed over approximately 2 °C. In the presence of the kosmotropic acetate anions, the measured lower critical solution temperature (LCST) by the three techniques was very similar and decreased linearly as a function of ionic strength. Conversely, increasing the concentration of the chaotropic thiocyanate anions raised the LCST of the pNIPAM brushes with variation in the measured LCST between the three techniques increasing with ionic strength. The thickness of the pNIPAM brush was seen to progressively increase with increasing thiocyanate concentration at all temperatures. It is proposed that specific ion binding of the chaotropic thiocyanate anion with pNIPAM amide moieties increases the electrostatic intra- and intermolecular repulsion within and between pNIPAM chains. This allows the brush to begin to swell at higher temperatures and to an overall greater extent. PMID:26840183

  11. Modeling bristle lift-off in idealized brush seal configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modi, Vijay

    1993-01-01

    We attempt in this paper to develop a model for the flow through brush seals and determine their elastic behavior in order to predict the dependence of brush/journal clearance on geometry and operating conditions. Several idealizations regarding brush seal configuration, flow conditions, and elastic behavior are made in the analysis in order to determine closed form parametric dependence. This formulation assumes that there is no initial interference between the bristle tip and the rotor. Also, interbristle, bristle-backing plate, and bristle-rotor friction is neglected. The bristle bundle or the brush seal as it is alternately called is assumed homogeneous and isotropic on a macroscopic scale so that a physical property like permeability is uniform. The fluid is assumed to be homogeneous, incompressible, viscous, and flowing under steady conditions. A schematic of a brush seal is shown. If the nominal bristle-shaft interference is absent then under static conditions the bristles may deflect axially due to the imposed pressure differential. This axial deflection may create a clearance permitting leakage flow in excess of that which occurs through the porous matrix formed by the bristle bundles. Under dynamic conditions the Couette flow created by shaft motion could be strong enough to cause bristle deflection and once again a clearance may develop. The paper proposes a means to determine this clearance (or at least describe its parametric dependence on geometry and operating conditions) under static as well as dynamic conditions.

  12. Evaluation of Internal Brushing on Pinch Weld Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P

    2005-12-01

    Post machining operations such as borescope inspection can cause linear indications down the length of the bore of fill stems. Often these indications are removed or obscured using rotary wire brushing. This study evaluated the effect this mechanical operation may have on pinch weld quality when relatively cold welds were made. A total of four stems with two levels of brushing of both Type 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two each of the Type 304L stems were Nitradd cleaned and the other two were aqueously cleaned; all four 21-6-9 stems were aqueously cleaned. All of the brushed stem areas exhibited more surface anomalies based on borescope evaluation. On average, the bond rating was a higher value (worse) for the brushed areas than the unadulterated areas for both Type 304L and 21-6-9 stems. The test method used may have biased the results towards a lesser quality bond for the brushed areas so additional testing is recommended.

  13. Excluded volume effects in compressed polymer brushes: A density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Cangyi; Tang, Ping E-mail: fengqiu@fudan.edu.cn; Qiu, Feng E-mail: fengqiu@fudan.edu.cn; Shi, An-Chang

    2015-03-28

    A classical density functional theory (DFT) is applied to investigate the behavior of compressed polymer brushes composed of hard-sphere chains. The excluded volume interactions among the chain segments are explicitly treated. Two compression systems are used to study the behavior of brush-wall and brush-brush interactions. For the brush-brush systems, an obvious interpenetration zone has been observed. The extent of the interpenetration depends strongly on the grafting density. Furthermore, the repulsive force between the brush and wall or between the two brushes has been obtained as a function of the compression distance. Compared to the prediction of the analytic self-consistent field theory, such force increases more rapidly in the brush-wall compression with high polymer grafting densities or at higher compressions. In the brush-brush compression system, the interpenetration between the two compressed brushes creates a “softer” interaction. The influence of hard-sphere solvents on the behavior of compressed brushes is also discussed.

  14. Chemical and structural changes in a pH-responsive mixed polyelectrolyte brush studied by infrared ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Karsten; Aulich, Dennis; Ionov, Leonid; Esser, Norbert; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Motornov, Mikhail; Stamm, Manfred; Minko, Sergiy

    2009-09-15

    This work provides direct chemical and structural insight into pH-dependent changes of an ultrathin (d=12 nm) mixed polyelectrolyte brush. In-situ infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry was used for the first time to study the gradual pH-responsive behavior of the brush, constituted of weak anionic and cationic polyelectrolytes, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP), respectively. The pH-dependent infrared fingerprints in the mid-infrared spectral range were analyzed as a function of chemical and structural changes in the mixed brush caused by pH changes. Thereby, the IR spectra were directly correlated to different chemical states of the brush, giving previously not accessible new information on the ionization of the thin film. In contrast to other techniques (e.g., classical attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy) we used almost plane Si-substrates for the IR ellipsometric approach with application of a single reflection mode. The optical path through Si is of minimal length, which makes a large spectral range accessible. For the most pronounced bands of the carboxyl group at 1718 cm(-1) and the carboxylate ion at 1565 cm(-1), the band amplitudes were correlated with the degree of ionization of the carboxylic groups. Interpretation of the pH-dependent changes in the spectral signature reveals gradual changes of the chemical structures of the mixed brush between three distinct switchable states: strongly ionized PAA at pH 10, strongly ionized P2VP at pH 2, and mainly nonionized functional groups in a "dry" PAA-P2VP polyelectrolyte complex in the range from pH=4 to pH=7. At intermediate pH, the IR spectra confirm the previously made hypothesis of the formation of a polyelectrolyte complex between P2VP and PAA in the mixed brush. From IR spectra it is also concluded that the polyelectrolyte complex is formed as a result of a small fraction of ionized functional groups. PMID:19572506

  15. [Perforating injuries of the eyes caused by rotating steel brushes].

    PubMed

    Höh, H; Krannig, H J

    1990-03-01

    Three cases of perforating lamellating injuries to the eyes are described which illustrate the hazards of using rotating wire brushes. All three patients were home handymen who failed to take the customary safety precautions. In one case the eye injury was partially due to an inappropriate combination of tools (a low-speed wire brush used with a high-speed drill). In view of the constantly increasing popularity of DIY work tool manufacturers, social insurance funds, private insurance companies and public institutions are called upon to help reduce the frequency of accidents in the DIY sector through appropriate design, organizational measures and publicity campaigns. Practical proposals are outlined in this paper. Perforating eye injuries caused by wire brushes can easily be overlooked. Thorough ophthalmological examination is therefore essential, and a diagnostic intervention may be required. PMID:2342318

  16. A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenstein, J.A.; DellaCorte, C.

    1994-10-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  17. Integrity testing of brush seal in a T-700 engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Griffin, Thomas A.; Bobula, George A.; Bill, Robert C.; Howe, Harold W.

    1993-10-01

    A split-ring brush seal was fabricated, installed between two labyrinth-honeycomb shroud seals, and tested in the fourth-stage turbine of a T-700 engine. The annealed Haynes 25 bristles rubbed directly against the nonconditioned, irregular Rene 80 turbine blade shroud surface. A total of 21 hr of cyclic and steady-state data were taken with surface speeds of 335 m/s (1100 ft/s) and shroud temperatures to 620 C (1150 F). Wear appeared to be rapid initially, with an orange flash of hot brush fragments during the first engine startup, to minimal after 10 hr of operation. The brush survived the testing but experienced some bristle pullouts and severe bristle wear; some turbine interface wear and possible material transfer was noted. Future design concerns center on tribological behavior at the interface with or without lubricants.

  18. Macromolecular Brushes as Stabilizers of Hydrophobic Solute Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hanying; Raciti, David; Wang, Chao; Herrera-Alonso, Margarita

    2016-06-01

    Macromolecular brushes bearing poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(d,l-lactide) side chains were used to stabilize hydrophobic solute nanoparticles formed by a rapid change in solvent quality. Unlike linear diblock copolymers with the same hydrophilic and hydrophobic block chemistries, the brush copolymer enabled the formation of ellipsoidal β-carotene nanoparticles, which in cosolvent mixtures developed into rod-like structures, resulting from a combination of Ostwald ripening and particle aggregation. The stabilizing ability of the copolymer was highly dependent on the mobility of the hydrophobic component, influenced by its molecular weight. As shown here, asymmetric amphiphilic macromolecular brushes of this type may be used as hydrophobic drug stabilizers and potentially assist the shape control of nonspherical aggregate morphologies. PMID:27035279

  19. An Overview of Non-Metallic Brush Seal Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggiero, Eric J.

    2009-01-01

    Non-metallic brush seals are ultra-low flow sealing elements ideal for low pressure differentials (<30 psid) and low temperature (typically <300 degF) applications. The compliant bristle pack of a non-metallic brush seal is advantageous in terms of sealing capability during transients. However, if not designed properly, the bristle pack compliance can be detrimental to the performance of the seal. GE GLobal Research has investigated the stiffness and heat generation properties of non-metallic brush seals made from Kevlar and Carbon Fiber. The presentation will review the progress made on the design points of the seals, as well as highlight some current commercial applications of the technology.

  20. Surface and interface structure of diblock copolymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgun, Bulent

    The main objective of the work presented in this thesis is to understand the surface and interface structure and dynamics of diblock copolymer brushes (DCBs). DCBs are stimuli-responsive materials and the surface properties of a DCB can be changed from those characteristic of one polymer block to those characteristic of the other one by treating the DCB with a solvent selective for one of its blocks. For this purpose, polystyrene- block-polyacrylate or polyacrylate-block-polystyrene brushes were synthesized using the "grafting from" technique in combination with atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the first part of this project the internal structure of DCBs after the synthesis and surface rearrangement were investigated using neutron reflectivity (NR) and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). It was found that the internal brush structure depends strongly on the synthesis sequence of polymer blocks and the value of chiN. For small values of chiN (chiN ≤ 11), a model of two layers with an interfacial region of finite width provides a good description of the data. The interface width is found to be larger for DCBs which have the polymer block with the lower surface energy synthesized next to the substrate. A three layer model must be used to describe the structure of DCBs of larger chiN values (chiN ≤ 23) and of sufficiently asymmetric composition. The necessity of including a third layer is consistent with the presence of a lateral ordering of some type in the center of the brush, as evidenced by correlation peaks in the GISAXS data. The spacing of the in-plane ordering varies with the thickness of the poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) block. After a DCB is treated with a selective solvent, Bragg rods appear in the GISAXS pattern. The appearance of Bragg rods indicates the formation of a new 2D structure which has a lateral spacing on the order of the total thickness of the brush. The Bragg rods disappear upon heating to 80

  1. Numerical simulations of plasma brush behavior in hybrid armatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawke, R. S.; Pincosy, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Hybrid armatures used to accelerate projectiles in railguns are often the consequence of using a solid armature or in some cases the preferred armature type. Although hybrid armatures are often used, their design has been empirical and their performance sporadic. As a first step towards understanding hybrid design and performance, we have begun a combined numerical simulation and experimental verification effort. This paper will describe numerical simulations performed with a quasi 1-D MHD code (CONFUSE) which has been applied to simulate the behavior of plasma brushes used in hybrid armatures. The simulations have provided estimates of the plasma brush length, resistive voltage drop and temperatures corresponding to a range of; 1) brush gap size, 2) fuse thickness, and 3) magnetic pressure. The results of these simulations is presented and discussed.

  2. A bulk flow model of a brush seal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Schlumberger, S.; Braun, M. J.; Choy, F.; Mullen, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers can be readily fabricated into a variety of seal configurations that are compliant and responsive to high speed or lightly loaded systems. A linear, circular, or contoured brush seal system is a contact seal consisting of the bristle pattern and hardened interface. When compared to a labyrinth seal, the brush seal system is superior and features low leakage, dynamic stability, and permits compliant structures. But in turn, the system usually requires a hardened smooth interface and permits only limited pressure drops. Wear life and wear debris for operations with static or dynamic excitation are largely undetermined. A seal system involves control of fluid within specific boundaries. The brush and rub ring (or rub surface) form a seal system. Design similitudes, a bulk flow model, and rub ring (interface) coatings are discussed. The bulk flow model calculations are based on flows in porous media and filters. The coatings work is based on experience and expanded to include current practice.

  3. A New Tribological Test for Candidate Brush Seal Materials Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700 C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  4. Scaling Behavior and Segment Concentration Profile of Densely Grafted Polymer Brushes Swollen in Vapor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Akgun, Bulent; Hu, Renfeng; Browning, James F; Wu, David T; Foster, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    The scaling of the thickness, hs, of a densely grafted polymer brush of chain length N and grafting density σ swollen in vapor agrees quantitatively with the scaling reported by Kuhl et al. for densely grafted brushes swollen in liquid. Deep in the brush, next to the substrate, the shape of the segment concentration profile is the same whether the brush is swollen by liquid or by vapor. Differences in the segment concentration profile are manifested primarily in the swollen brush interface with the surrounding fluid. The interface of the polymer brush swollen in vapor is much more abrupt than that of the same brush swollen in liquid. This has implications for the compressibility of the swollen brush surface and for fluctuations at that surface. PMID:27172089

  5. Doubly anchored nematic polymer brushes: Shear, field effects, and quasipiezoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halperin, A.; Williams, D. R. M.

    1994-02-01

    The shear behavior of a doubly anchored brush of liquid-crystalline polymers immersed in a nematic solvent is investigated. In such a brush the grafted polymers bridge two plates. Remarkably, the Franck nematic elasticity in this system can dominate the shear modulus. In the presence of a field the system undergoes a Fréedericksz transition modified by the bridging polymers. In particular: (i) the polymeric elasticity affects the critical field Ec; (ii) the shear modulus vanishes as the field approaches Ec; and (iii) the nematic distortion couples to a shear strain. The system exhibits quasipiezoelectricity, which is nonlinear and is not associated with any inverse effect.

  6. EFFICACY OF BIOFILM DISCLOSING AGENT AND OF THREE BRUSHES IN THE CONTROL OF COMPLETE DENTURE CLEANSING

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This report evaluated the efficacy of three brushes and one biofilm disclosing agent in complete denture cleansing. Methods: Twenty-seven wearers of maxillary dentures were distributed into three groups and received different brushes: Oral B40, conventional toothbrush (Oral B); Denture, denture-specific brush (Condor); Johnson & Johnson, denture-specific brush (Johnson & Johnson). The 60-day experimental period was divided into two techniques: I - brushing (brush associated with a paste - Dentu Creme, Dentco) three times a day; II - brushing and daily application of 1% neutral red on the denture internal surface. Biofilm quantification was carried out weekly and the areas with dye biofilm were obtained by means of Image Tool 2.02 software. Results: Biofilm removal was more effective during Technique II (Wilcoxon test: p=0.01) for the three groups of brushes. When the brushes were compared in Technique I, the Kruskal Wallis test indicated statistical difference between Denture X Johnson & Johnson and Denture X Oral B40, in which the Denture was more efficient. For Technique II, there was no statistical difference between brushes (p>0.05). Conclusion: The disclosed application promoted more efficacy on biofilm removal, regardless of the brush used. Denture (Condor) was more efficient than the other brushes during Technique I. PMID:19089247

  7. Brush Lettering I; Commercial and Advertising Art--Basic: 9183.05.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline has been prepared as a guide to help the students gain mastery in the proper brush techniques required for efficiency in brush lettering. The student is first given an orientation to the materials and equipment used, and the preparation of tempera paints for brush lettering. After this introduction, the student is guided through…

  8. Thicker is better? Synthesis and evaluation of well-defined polymer brushes with controllable catalytic loadings.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Antony E; Dirani, Ali; d'Haese, Cécile; Deumer, Gladys; Guo, Weiming; Hensenne, Peter; Nahra, Fady; Laloyaux, Xavier; Haufroid, Vincent; Nysten, Bernard; Riant, Olivier; Jonas, Alain M

    2012-12-01

    Polymer brushes (PBs) have been used as supports for the immobilization of palladium complexes on silicon surfaces. The polymers were grown by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and postdecorated with dipyridylamine (dpa) ligands. The pendant dpa units were in turn complexed with [Pd(OAc)(2)] to afford hybrid catalytic surfaces. A series of catalytic samples of various thicknesses (ca. 20-160 nm) and associated palladium loadings (ca. 10-45 nmol  cm(-2)) were obtained by adjusting the SI-ATRP reaction time and characterized by ellipsometry, X-ray reflectivity, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). ICP-MS revealed a near-linear relationship between thickness of the polymer brush and palladium content, which confirmed the robustness of the preparation and postmodification sequence presented herein, rendering possible the creation of functional architectures with predefined catalytic potential. The activities of the catalytic PBs were determined by systematically exploring a full range of substrate-to-catalyst ratios in a model palladium(0)-catalyzed reaction. Quantitative transformations were observed for loadings down to 0.03 mol % and a maximum turnover number (TON) of around 3500 was established for the system. Comparison of the catalytic performances evidenced a singular influence of the thickness on conversions and TONs. The limited recyclability of the hairy catalysts has been attributed to palladium leaching. PMID:23032959

  9. Some metallographic results for brush bristles and brush segments of a shroud ring brush seal tested in a T-700 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Robert C.; Griffin, Thomas A.; Bobula, George A.; Bill, Robert C.; Hull, David R.; Csavina, Kristine R.

    1994-01-01

    Post-test investigation of a T-700 engine brush seal found regions void of bristles ('yanked out'), regions of bent-over bristles near the inlet, some 'snapped' bristles near the fence, and a more uniform smeared bristle interface between the first and last axial rows of bristles. Several bristles and four brush segments were cut from the brush seal, wax mounted, polished, and analyzed. Metallographic analysis of the bristle near the rub tip showed tungsten-rich phases uniformly distributed throughout the bristle, no apparent change within 1 mu m of the interface, and possibly a small amount of titanium, which would represent a transfer from the rotor. Analysis of the bristle wear face showed nonuniform tungsten, which is indicative of material resolidification. The cut end contained oxides and internal fractures; the worn end was covered with oxide scale. Material losses due to wear and elastoplastic deformation within the shear zone and third-body lubrication effects in the contact zone are discussed.

  10. Conformational switching of modified guest chains in polymer brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeis, D.; Sommer, J.-U.

    2013-07-01

    Using a numerical quasi off-lattice self-consistent field method which describes heterogeneous chains of spherical monomers we study the case of a densely grafted polymer brush with a fraction of free chain ends being replaced by a modified end-group differing in size and solvent selectivity. We can confirm the observation from molecular dynamics simulations that upon changing the solvent conditions, a switching in location of end-groups which are bigger than monomers from a state "exposed" to the solvent (on the top of the brush) to a "hidden" state (inside the brush) takes place. Our numerical method allows a detailed study of the switching effect as a function of the relevant parameters, such as grafting density, chain length, size of end-groups and their volume fraction. We find that the switching effect is enhanced for long chains, low fractions of modified chains, and big end-groups. We consider the case of low fraction of modified chains in more detail using a test chain method. Here, we explore the optimal grafting density as a function of the size of the end-groups, where the switching is most sensitive. These values can be in the experimental range for end-groups which are at least 3-4 times bigger than the monomers. The end-groups can be realized by attaching nano-particles to the last monomer of a brush-chain.

  11. Switching Shape of Cylindrical Brush Molecules at Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei; da Silva, Marcelo; Prokhorova, Svetlana; Beers, Kathryn; Boerner, Hans; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2002-03-01

    Significant progress in polymer synthesis has been made towards preparation of three-dimensional macromolecules with well-defined shapes, interiors, and surface structures. The most prominent examples are dendrimers and cylindrical brushes. In contrast to solid particles, hyperbranched macromolecules retain flexibility of chain segments and demonstrate significant density fluctuations. They can be regarded as soft molecular particles, which can change their shape in response to changes in the surrounding environment. The conformational changes are particularly subtle for cylindrical brushes adsorbed to an interface. The surface breaks the molecular symmetry due to partial desorption of the side chains and due to uneven distribution of the side chains with respect to the backbone. The constraints imposed by the branching topology result in a number of distinct conformations and transitions between them. Recently, we have succeeded in monitoring of the conformational changes and motion of individual brush molecules using scanning force microscopy. The most peculiar properties of cylindrical brushes, namely axial contraction, conformational transitions, and persistent motion will be discussed.

  12. The Conformation of Thermoresponsive Polymer Brushes Probed by Optical Reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Varma, Siddhartha; Bureau, Lionel; Débarre, Delphine

    2016-04-01

    We describe a microscope-based optical setup that allows us to perform space- and time-resolved measurements of the spectral reflectance of transparent substrates coated with ultrathin films. This technique is applied to investigate the behavior in water of thermosensitive polymer brushes made of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) grafted on glass. We show that spectral reflectance measurements yield quantitative information about the conformation and axial structure of the brushes as a function of temperature. We study how parameters such as grafting density and chain length affect the hydration state of a brush, and provide one of the few experimental evidences for the occurrence of vertical phase separation in the vicinity of the lower critical solution temperature of the polymer. The origin of the hysteretic behavior of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes upon cycling the temperature is also clarified. We thus demonstrate that our optical technique allows for in-depth characterization of stimuli-responsive polymer layers, which is crucial for the rational design of smart polymer coatings in actuation, gating, or sensing applications. PMID:26986181

  13. Brush Seal Would Impede Flow Of Hot Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Paul F.; Easter, Barry P.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed brush seal helps prevent recirculating flow of hot combustion gases from reaching bellows seal located deep in gap in wall of combustion chamber. More durable, more tolerant of irregularities, and easier to install. Seals also helpful in impeding deleterious flows of hot gases in other combustion chambers such as those of furnaces and turbomachines.

  14. AN INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO VALUING WATER FROM BRUSH CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analytical methodology utilizing models from three disciplines is developed to assess the viability of brush control for wate yield in the Frio River Basin, TX. Ecological, hydrologic, and economic models are used to portray changes in forage production and water supply result...

  15. Self-organization of multivalent counterions in polyelectrolyte brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jianzhong

    2013-03-01

    The structure and interfacial properties of a polyelectrolyte brush (PEB) depend on a broad range of parameters such as the polymer charge and grafting density, counterion valence, salt concentration, and solvent conditions. These properties are of fundamental importance in technological applications of PEBs including colloid stabilization, surface modification and lubrication, and in functioning of biological systems such as genome packaging in single-strand DNA/RNA viruses. Despite intensive studies by experiments, molecular simulations, and myriad analytical methods including scaling analyses, self-consistent-field theory, and most recently density functional theory, the behavior of PEBs in the presence of multivalent counterions remains poorly understood. In this talk, I will present a density functional method for polyelectrolyte brushes and discuss self-organization of multivalent counterions within highly charged polyelectrolyte brushes. The counterion-mediated attraction between polyions leads to a first-order phase transition similar to that for a neutral brush in a poor solvent. The self-organization of multivalent counterions results in a wavelike electrostatic potential and charge density that oscillate between positive and negative values.

  16. Patterned biofunctional poly(acrylic acid) brushes on silicon surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dong, Rong; Krishnan, Sitaraman; Baird, Barbara A; Lindau, Manfred; Ober, Christopher K

    2007-10-01

    Protein patterning was carried out using a simple procedure based on photolithography wherein the protein was not subjected to UV irradiation and high temperatures or contacted with denaturing solvents or strongly acidic or basic solutions. Self-assembled monolayers of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on silicon surfaces were exposed to oxygen plasma through a patterned photoresist. The etched regions were back-filled with an initiator for surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). ATRP of sodium acrylate was readily achieved at room temperature in an aqueous medium. Protonation of the polymer resulted in patterned poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) brushes. A variety of biomolecules containing amino groups could be covalently tethered to the dense carboxyl groups of the brush, under relatively mild conditions. The PEG regions surrounding the PAA brush greatly reduced nonspecific adsorption. Avidin was covalently attached to PAA brushes, and biotin-tagged proteins could be immobilized through avidin-biotin interaction. Such an immobilization method, which is based on specific interactions, is expected to better retain protein functionality than direct covalent binding. Using biotin-tagged bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model, a simple strategy was developed for immobilization of small biological molecules using BSA as linkages, while BSA can simultaneously block nonspecific interactions. PMID:17880179

  17. 75 FR 39706 - Natural Bristle Paint Brushes From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... the antidumping duty order on natural bristle paint brushes from China (75 FR 21347, April 23, 2010... revoke the order on June 16, 2010 (75 FR 34097). In light of these developments, the Commission is... INFORMATION CONTACT: Keysha Martinez (202-205-2136), Office of Investigations, U.S. International...

  18. Design optimization of a brush turbine with a cleaner/water based solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Rhyn H.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, a turbine-brush was analyzed based on the energy conservation and the force momentum equation with an empirical relationship of the drag coefficient. An equation was derived to predict the rotational speed of the turbine-brush in terms of the blade angle, number of blades, rest of geometries of the turbine-brush and the incoming velocity. Using the observed flow conditions, drag coefficients were determined. Based on the experimental values as boundary conditions, the turbine-brush flows were numerically simulated to understand first the nature of the flows, and to extend the observed drag coefficient to a flow without holding the turbine-brush.

  19. Brush-eating device promises reforestation, wood energy aid

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, T.

    1981-01-01

    An invention which began as a low-ground-pressure skidder developed into a machine which clears brush, thins plantations, and can harvest wood for energy. First came the notion of an extra-low-ground-pressure log skidder. A swinging chopper was added to the front to clear the skid roads. Working in manzanita brush 10 to 12 foot tall, and with stems up to 18 inches in diameter, the Shar 20 can clear one to two and a half acres an hour. The 30 will be able to clear two to five acres an hour. The big machine will have two chopper heads rotating in opposite directions to force the chopped wood into a chipper built into the machine. Chips will be blown to a van following the harvester so they can be used for hog fuel or as feedstock for methanol production. The head spins at a relatively slow 450 rpm - a safety factor. Surrounding brush catches most of the cut material, but an occasional chunk of wood does fly several yards. Companies are paying more attention to reforestation. Clearing the land will leave a mulch-like debris on the ground. This offers some shade and helps retain soil moisture. Even when brush is harvested for energy, about 10% of the material is left on the ground. California's Department of Forestry wants to start a five-year clearing cycle for the chaparral stands, ''mowing'' a million acres a year and returning every fifth year to reclear the brush. California alone has 27 million acres of brushland not suitable for timber. A brushy acre averages from 30 to 200 tons of wood at 10% moisture content. The machines are designed to run at up to 12 mph when moving.

  20. Hydrologic Effects of Brush Management in Central Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, J. R.; Slattery, R.

    2011-12-01

    Encroachment of woody vegetation into traditional savanna grassland ecosystems in central Texas has largely been attributed to land use practices of settlers, most notably overgrazing and fire suppression. Implementing brush management practices (removing the woody vegetation and allowing native grasses to reestablish in the area), could potentially change the hydrology in a watershed. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with several local, State, and Federal cooperators, studied the hydrologic effects of ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei) removal as a brush management conservation practice in the Honey Creek State Natural Area in Comal County, Tex. Two adjacent watersheds of 104 and 159 hectares were used in a paired study. Rainfall, streamflow, evapotranspiration (Bowen ratio method), and water quality data were collected in both watersheds. Using a hydrologic mass balance approach, rainfall was allocated to surface-water runoff, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. Groundwater recharge was not directly measured, but estimated as the residual of the hydrologic mass balance. After hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for 3 years, approximately 80 percent of the woody vegetation (ashe juniper) was selectively removed from the 159 hectare watershed (treatment watershed). Brush management was not implemented in the other (reference) watershed. Hydrologic data were collected in both watersheds for six years after brush management implementation. The resulting data were examined for differences in the hydrologic budget between the reference and treatment watersheds as well as between pre- and post-brush management periods to assess effects of the treatment. Preliminary results indicate there are differences in the hydrologic budget as well as water quality between the watersheds during pre- and post-treatment periods.

  1. Adsorption of Anionic or Cationic Surfactants in Polyanionic Brushes and Its Effect on Brush Swelling and Fouling Resistance during Emulsion Filtration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhefei; Tarabara, Volodymyr V; Bruening, Merlin L

    2015-11-01

    Atom transfer radical polymerization of ionic monomers from membrane surfaces yields polyelectrolyte brushes that swell in water and repel oil droplets to resist fouling during filtration of oil-in-water emulsions. However, surfactant adsorption to polyelectrolyte brushes may overcome this fouling resistance. This work examines adsorption of cationic and anionic surfactants in polyanionic brushes and the effect of these surfactants on emulsion filtration. In situ ellipsometry with films on flat surfaces shows that brushes composed of poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate salts) (pSPMK) swell 280% in water and do not adsorb sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). pSPMK-modified microfiltration membranes reject >99.9% of the oil from SDS-stabilized submicron emulsions, and the specific flux through these modified membranes is comparable to that through NF270 nanofiltration membranes. Moreover, the brush-modified membranes show no decline in flux over a 12 h filtration, whereas the flux through NF270 membranes decreases by 98.7%. In contrast, pSPMK brushes adsorb large quantities of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and at low chain densities the brushes collapse in the presence of this cationic surfactant. Filtration of CTAB-stabilized emulsions through pSPMK-modified membranes gives minimal oil rejection, presumably due to the brush collapse. Thus, the fouling resistance of polyelectrolyte brush-modified membranes clearly depends on the surfactant composition in a particular emulsion. PMID:26442835

  2. Adsorption and desorption behavior of asphaltene on polymer-brush-immobilized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Yuji; Hatae, Kaoru; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Takanohashi, Toshimasa; Hayashi, Jun-ichiro; Takahara, Atsushi

    2014-11-26

    The adsorption behavior of a model compound for surface-active component of asphaltenes, N-(1-hexylheptyl)-N'-(12-carboxylicdodecyl) perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic bisimide (C5Pe), and detachment behavior of asphaltene deposit films for high-density polymer brushes were investigated. Zwitterionic poly(3-(N-2-methacryloyloxyethyl-N,N-dimethyl)ammonatopropanesulfonate (PMAPS) brushes and hydrophobic poly(n-hexyl methacrylate) (PHMA) brushes exhibit less C5Pe adsorption than poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The asphaltene deposit films on the PHMA brush detached in a model oil (toluene/n-heptane=1/4 (v/v)), and the asphaltene films on the PMAPS brush detached in water. The antifouling character was explained by the interface free energy for the polymer-brush/asphaltenes (γSA) and polymer-brush/toluene (γSO). PMID:25370500

  3. Block copolymer assembly on nanoscale patterns of polymer brushes formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing.

    PubMed

    Onses, M Serdar; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Hur, Su-Mi; Sutanto, Erick; Williamson, Lance; Alleyne, Andrew G; Nealey, Paul F; de Pablo, Juan J; Rogers, John A

    2014-07-22

    Fundamental understanding of the self-assembly of domains in block copolymers (BCPs) and capabilities in control of these processes are important for their use as nanoscale templates in various applications. This paper focuses on the self-assembly of spin-cast and printed poly(styrene-block-methyl methacrylate) BCPs on patterned surface wetting layers formed by electrohydrodynamic jet printing of random copolymer brushes. Here, end-grafted brushes that present groups of styrene and methyl methacrylate in geometries with nanoscale resolution deterministically define the morphologies of BCP nanostructures. The materials and methods can also be integrated with lithographically defined templates for directed self-assembly of BCPs at multiple length scales. The results provide not only engineering routes to controlled formation of complex patterns but also vehicles for experimental and simulation studies of the effects of chemical transitions on the processes of self-assembly. In particular, we show that the methodology developed here provides the means to explore exotic phenomena displayed by the wetting behavior of BCPs, where 3-D soft confinement, chain elasticity, interfacial energies, and substrate's surface energy cooperate to yield nonclassical wetting behavior. PMID:24882265

  4. Post-Functionalized Polymer Brushes for Bio-Separation: Tuning GFP Adsorption via Functional Group Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamanti, Steve; Arifuzzaman, Shafi; Genzer, Jan; Naik, Rajesh; Vaia, Richard

    2007-03-01

    An inexpensive and robust biosensor platform that can be tuned to separate and/or detect complex mixtures of biomolecules while minimizing reagents would be of great use for military, homeland security, and medical diagnostic applications. Gradient surfaces of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) brushes have been previously shown to spatially localize biomolecule binding, while minimizing non-specific adsorption of the same biomolecule on other regions of the gradient specimen. In order to further improve the specificity and to provide latent functionality for detection of the binding events, post-polymerization modification of PHEMA with various functional groups has been investigated. Using standard succinimide-based coupling, hydroxyl pendants of PHEMA brushes were conjugated to oligo-peptides, alkanes and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) through an alpha-terminus primary amine. Ellipsometry, contact angle, XPS and ER-FTIR spectroscopy indicated that coupling occurred with efficiencies ranging from 10-40%. Post-functionalization of PHEMA with OEG and hexadecane allows manipulation of the hydrophilicity of the surface and thus tuning of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) binding.

  5. Synthesis of iron oxide rods coated with polymer brushes and control of their assembly in thin films.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Ishige, Ryohei; Tsujii, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Kohji

    2015-01-27

    We investigated the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using monodisperse rod-type particles of iron oxide, β-FeOOH. The slow hydrolysis of iron(III) chloride yielded monodisperse β-FeOOH rods with an average length-to-width ratio, L/W, of 6 (L = 210 nm and W = 35 nm on average). The surfaces of the β-FeOOH rods were modified with a triethoxysilane derivative as an ATRP-initiating site, namely, (2-bromo-2-methyl)propionyloxypropyl triethoxysilane. The SI-ATRP of MMA, mediated by a copper complex, was performed using the initiator-coated β-FeOOH rods in the presence of a "sacrificial" free initiator. Well-defined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes with molecular weights of up to 700,000 could be grafted on the β-FeOOH rods with a surface density as high as 0.3 chains/nm(2). The resultant polymer-brush-afforded hybrid rods exhibited high dispersibility in various solvents for PMMA without forming aggregates. Thin films were prepared by dip-coating from a suspension of the hybrid rods, and the rods were oriented in a specific direction in the films. The arrangement of the rods could be controlled by varying the chain length of the polymer brush and the withdrawal speed during the dip-coating process. PMID:25552325

  6. Improved endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography brush increases diagnostic yield of malignant biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Frederick K; Luong-Player, Adelina; Khara, Harshit S; Liu, Haiyan; Lin, Fan; Shellenberger, Matthew J; Johal, Amitpal S; Diehl, David L

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine if a new brush design could improve the diagnostic yield of biliary stricture brushings. METHODS: Retrospective chart review was performed of all endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures with malignant biliary stricture brushing between January 2008 and October 2012. A standard wire-guided cytology brush was used prior to protocol implementation in July 2011, after which, a new 9 French wire-guided cytology brush (Infinity sampling device, US Endoscopy, Mentor, OH) was used for all cases. All specimens were reviewed by blinded pathologists who determined whether the sample was positive or negative for malignancy. Cellular yield was quantified by describing the number of cell clusters seen. RESULTS: Thirty-two new brush cases were compared to 46 historical controls. Twenty-five of 32 (78%) cases in the new brush group showed abnormal cellular findings consistent with malignancy as compared to 17 of 46 (37%) in the historical control group (P = 0.0003). There was also a significant increase in the average number of cell clusters of all sizes (21.1 vs 9.9 clusters, P = 0.0007) in the new brush group compared to historical controls. CONCLUSION: The use of a new brush design for brush cytology of biliary strictures shows increased diagnostic accuracy, likely due to improved cellular yield, as evidenced by an increase in number of cellular clusters obtained. PMID:25031790

  7. Computer simulations of the mechanical response of brushes on the surface of cancerous epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goicochea, A. Gama; Guardado, S. J. Alas

    2015-08-01

    We report a model for atomic force microscopy by means of computer simulations of molecular brushes on surfaces of biological interest such as normal and cancerous cervical epithelial cells. Our model predicts that the force needed to produce a given indentation on brushes that can move on the surface of the cell (called “liquid” brushes) is the same as that required for brushes whose ends are fixed on the cell’s surface (called “solid” brushes), as long as the tip of the microscope covers the entire area of the brush. Additionally, we find that cancerous cells are softer than normal ones, in agreement with various experiments. Moreover, soft brushes are found to display larger resistance to compression than stiff ones. This phenomenon is the consequence of the larger equilibrium length of the soft brushes and the cooperative association of solvent molecules trapped within the brushes, which leads to an increase in the osmotic pressure. Our results show that a careful characterization of the brushes on epithelial cells is indispensable when determining the mechanical response of cancerous cells.

  8. pH-Responsive Behavior of Poly(acrylic acid) Brushes of Varying Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Vivek; Robertson, Megan; Conrad, Jacinta

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the pH-dependent response of polyelectrolyte brushes of varying thickness. Our model system consists of poly(acrylic acid) brushes, which change from hydrophobic and neutral at low pH to hydrophilic and negatively charged at high pH, synthesized using a grafting-from approach at constant grafting density. As the polymer brush thickness increased, the brushes exhibited greater hysteresis in static water contact angle as a function of pH. We extracted the pKa of the polymer brushes from contact angle measurements. The relationship between the pKa and brush thickness depended on the order in which the brushes were exposed to solutions of varying pH: pKa decreased on increasing brush thickness when going from basic to acidic medium whereas pKa increased on increasing brush thickness when going from acidic to basic medium. We speculate that the origin of hysteresis can be explained by pH-dependent conformational changes in these polyelectrolyte brushes.

  9. Wettability and antifouling behavior on the surfaces of superhydrophilic polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Terayama, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Terada, Masami; Murakami, Daiki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takahara, Atsushi

    2012-05-01

    The surface wettabilities of polymer brushes with hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional groups were discussed on the basis of conventional static and dynamic contact angle measurements of water and hexadecane in air and captive bubble measurements in water. Various types of high-density polymer brushes with nonionic and ionic functional groups were prepared on a silicon wafer by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization. The surface free energies of the brushes were estimated by Owens-Wendt equation using the contact angles of various probe liquids with different polarities. The decrease in the water contact angle corresponded to the polarity of fluoroalkyl, hydroxy, ethylene oxide, amino, carboxylic acid, ammonium salt, sulfonate, carboxybetaine, sulfobetaine, and phosphobetaine functional groups. The poly(2-perfluorooctylethyl acrylate) brush had a low surface free energy of approximately 8.7 mN/m, but the polyelectrolyte brushes revealed much higher surface free energies of 70-74 mN/m, close to the value for water. Polyelectrolyte brushes repelled both air bubbles and hexadecane in water. Even when the silicone oil was spread on the polyelectrolyte brush surfaces in air, once they were immersed in water, the oil quickly rolled up and detached from the brush surface. The oil detachment behavior observed on the superhydrophilic polyelectrolyte brush in water was explained by the low adhesion force between the brush and the oil, which could contribute to its excellent antifouling and self-cleaning properties. PMID:22500465

  10. Computer simulations of the mechanical response of brushes on the surface of cancerous epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Goicochea, A. Gama; Guardado, S. J. Alas

    2015-01-01

    We report a model for atomic force microscopy by means of computer simulations of molecular brushes on surfaces of biological interest such as normal and cancerous cervical epithelial cells. Our model predicts that the force needed to produce a given indentation on brushes that can move on the surface of the cell (called “liquid” brushes) is the same as that required for brushes whose ends are fixed on the cell’s surface (called “solid” brushes), as long as the tip of the microscope covers the entire area of the brush. Additionally, we find that cancerous cells are softer than normal ones, in agreement with various experiments. Moreover, soft brushes are found to display larger resistance to compression than stiff ones. This phenomenon is the consequence of the larger equilibrium length of the soft brushes and the cooperative association of solvent molecules trapped within the brushes, which leads to an increase in the osmotic pressure. Our results show that a careful characterization of the brushes on epithelial cells is indispensable when determining the mechanical response of cancerous cells. PMID:26315877