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Sample records for 111in implanted zno

  1. Photoluminescence of He-implanted ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, D. W.; Lucca, D. A.; Lee, J.-K.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    A study of the effects of ion-implanted He{sup +} on the 4.2 K photoluminescence (PL) of ZnO is presented. This investigation is motivated by the need to further understand the effects of damage resulting from the implantation process on the PL of ZnO. For this study, 10 keV He{sup +} ions were implanted at a dose of 2.5 x 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} in the (0001) Zn-terminated surface. The implantation process is seen to reduce the overall luminescence efficiency, although the number and relative intensities of the bound-exciton peaks are observed to be similar to that of unimplanted ZnO. The 4.2 K PL of the implanted surface exhibits a broad orange/red peak near 1.86 eV nm and is attributed to damage introduced during the implantation process. This peak is identified as donor-acceptor pair (DAP) luminescence with a thermal activation energy of 11 meV. The 1.86 eV peak is not observed for H-implanted ZnO suggesting that H passivates the implantation-induced defects responsible for this luminescence.

  2. Continuous and Localized Mn Implantation of ZnO

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We present results derived from continuous and localized 35 keV55Mn+ion implantations into ZnO. Localized implantations were carried out by using self-ordered alumina membranes as masks leading to ordered arrays of implanted volumes on the substrate surfaces. Defects and vacancies in the small implantation volumes of ZnO were generated due to the implantation processes besides the creation of new phases. Rapid thermal annealing was applied in the case of continuous implantation. The samples were characterized by HRSEM, GIXRD, Raman spectroscopy and RBS/C. Magnetic characterization of the samples pointed out appreciable differences among the samples obtained by the different implantation methods. This fact was mainly attributed to the different volume/surface ratios present in the implanted zones as well as to the increase of Mn atom concentrations along the grain frontiers in the nanostructured surfaces. The samples also showed a ferromagnetic transition phase at temperature value higher than room temperature. PMID:20596285

  3. Nanocluster formation in Co/Fe implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharuth-Ram, K.; Masenda, H.; Doyle, T. B.; Geburt, S.; Ronning, C.

    2015-04-01

    Conversion electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (CEMS) measurements were made on a ZnO single crystal sample implanted at room temperature (RT) with of 145 and 345 keV 59Co ions with respective fluences of 1.15×1016 ions/cm 2 and 4.17×1016 ions/cm 2, followed by implantation of 60 keV 57Fe to a fluence of 0.50×1016/cm 2 to yield a `box-shaped' implantation profile with a Co + Fe concentration of about 3.2 at. %. CEM spectra were collected after annealing the sample up to 973 K. The spectra after annealing up to 973 K are similar to spectra observed in other CEMS studies on Fe implanted ZnO, but show a dramatic change after the 973 K annealing step; it is dominated by a doublet component with fit parameters typical of Fe 3+. Magnetization curves of the sample after the 973 K anneal show hysteresis, with a small residual magnetization at RT that increases at 4 K. The saturation magnetization at 4 K was approximately 0.33 μ B/CoFe ion, in good agreement with observations for 5-8 nm sized Co nanoclusters in ZnO.

  4. Thermal stability of ion-implanted ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, V; Tan, H; Jagadish, C; Kucheyev, S; Zou, J

    2005-06-16

    Zinc oxide single crystals implanted at room temperature with high-dose (1.4 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}) 300 keV As{sup +} ions are annealed at 1000-1200 C. Damage recovery is studied by a combination of Rutherford backscattering/ channeling spectrometry (RBS/C), cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results show that such a thermal treatment leads to the decomposition and evaporation of the heavily-damaged layer instead of apparent defect recovery and recrystallization that could be inferred from RBS/C and XTEM data alone. Such a relatively poor thermal stability of heavily-damaged ZnO has significant implications for understanding results on thermal annealing of ion-implanted ZnO.

  5. Crystallographically oriented Zn nanocrystals formed in ZnO by Mn{sup +}-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. J.; Zhang, B.; Lu, W.; Wang, Y.; Zou, J.

    2008-09-29

    The nanostructural characteristics of ZnO implanted with Mn{sup +} to doses ranging from 1x10{sup 15} to 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} are systematically studied for both as-implanted and postannealed cases. The detailed structural characterizations confirmed that the Mn{sup +} implantation and postannealing result in (1) the formation of crystallographically orientated Zn nanocrystals in the ZnO matrix and (2) Mn atoms occupy the Zn sites in ZnO.

  6. Conductivity fluctuations in proton-implanted ZnO microwires.

    PubMed

    Dolgin, B; Lorite, I; Kumar, Y; Esquinazi, P; Jung, G; Straube, B; Heluani, S Perez de

    2016-07-29

    Electric noise can be an important limitation for applications of conducting elements in the nanometer size range. The intrinsic electrical noise of prospective materials for opto-spintronics applications like ZnO has not yet been characterized. In this study, we have investigated the conductivity fluctuations in 10 nm thick current paths produced by proton implantation of ZnO microwires at room temperature. The voltage noise under a constant dc current bias in undoped, as well as in Li-doped microwires, is characterized by [Formula: see text] power spectra with [Formula: see text]. The noise intensity scales with the square of the bias current pointing to bias-independent resistivity fluctuations as a source of the observed noise. The normalized power spectral density appears inversely proportional to the number of carriers in the probed sample volume, in agreement with the phenomenological Hooge law. For the proton-implanted ZnO microwire and at 1 Hz we obtain a normalized power spectral density as low as [Formula: see text] Hz(-1). PMID:27306486

  7. Conductivity fluctuations in proton-implanted ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolgin, B.; Lorite, I.; Kumar, Y.; Esquinazi, P.; Jung, G.; Straube, B.; Perez de Heluani, S.

    2016-07-01

    Electric noise can be an important limitation for applications of conducting elements in the nanometer size range. The intrinsic electrical noise of prospective materials for opto-spintronics applications like ZnO has not yet been characterized. In this study, we have investigated the conductivity fluctuations in 10 nm thick current paths produced by proton implantation of ZnO microwires at room temperature. The voltage noise under a constant dc current bias in undoped, as well as in Li-doped microwires, is characterized by 1/{f}a power spectra with a∼ 1. The noise intensity scales with the square of the bias current pointing to bias-independent resistivity fluctuations as a source of the observed noise. The normalized power spectral density appears inversely proportional to the number of carriers in the probed sample volume, in agreement with the phenomenological Hooge law. For the proton-implanted ZnO microwire and at 1 Hz we obtain a normalized power spectral density as low as ∼ {10}-11 Hz‑1.

  8. Amorphous clusters in Co implanted ZnO induced by boron pre-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Potzger, K.; Shalimov, A.; Zhou, S.; Schmidt, H.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Liberati, M.; Arenholz, E.

    2009-02-09

    We demonstrate the formation of superparamagnetic/ferromagnetic regions within ZnO(0001) single crystals sequently implanted with B and Co. While the pre-implantation with B plays a minor role for the electrical transport properties, its presence leads to the formation of amorphous phases. Moreover, B acts strongly reducing on the implanted Co. Thus, the origin of the ferromagnetic ordering in local clusters with large Co concentration is itinerant d-electrons as in the case of metallic Co. The metallic amorphous phases are non-detectable by common X-ray diffraction.

  9. Determination of Na acceptor level in Na+ ion-implanted ZnO single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Liu, Huibin; He, Haiping; Huang, Jingyun; Chen, Lingxiang; Ye, Zhizhen

    2015-03-01

    Ion implantation was used to dope Na acceptor into ZnO single crystals. With three mixed implantation energies, uniform depth distribution of Na ion in the surface region (~300 nm) of ZnO bulk crystals is achieved. Via post-implantation annealing, a donor-acceptor pair recombination band is identified in the low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, from which the energy level of Na-related acceptor in single crystalline ZnO is estimated to be 300 meV. A p-n junction based on this ZnO-Na layer shows rectifying characteristics, confirming the p-type conductivity.

  10. Effects of high-dose hydrogen implantation on defect formation and dopant diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoob, Faisal; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-07-01

    This work reports on the effects of a deep high-dose hydrogen ion implant on damage accumulation, defect retention, and silver diffusion in silver implanted ZnO crystals. Single-crystal ZnO samples were implanted with Ag ions in a region ˜150 nm within the surface, and some of these samples were additionally implanted with hydrogen ions to a dose of 2 × 1016 cm-2, close to the depth ˜250 nm. Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling measurements show that crystal damage caused by Ag ion implantation and the amount of defects retained in the near surface region following post-implantation annealing were found to diminish in the case with the H implantation. On the other hand, the additional H ion implantation resulted in a reduction of substitutional Ag atoms upon post-implantation annealing. Furthermore, the presence of H also modified the diffusion properties of Ag atoms in ZnO. We discuss these findings in the context of the effects of nano-cavities on formation and annihilation of point defects as well as on impurity diffusion and trapping in ZnO crystals.

  11. Synthesis of ZnO nanocrystals by subsequent implantation of Zn and O species

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.K.; Tewell, C.R.; Schulze, R.K.; Nastasi, M.; Hamby, D.W.; Lucca, D.A.; Jung, H.S.; Hong, K.S.

    2005-05-02

    We report the preparation of ZnO nanocrystals embedded in a SiO{sub 2} matrix formed using sequential zinc and oxygen ion implantations. The optical absorption spectra and photoemission spectra of zinc implanted and zinc/oxygen coimplanted silica show that the first zinc implantation produces zinc clusters and that the subsequent oxygen implantation following the zinc implantation rearranges the distribution of zinc and oxygen ions at an atomic level. While thermal annealing of Zn only implanted silica leads to the formation of Zn nanocrystals, thermal annealing of zinc/oxygen coimplanted silica promotes the growth of ZnO nanocrystals. The absorption and photoluminescence spectra show that ZnO nanocrystals form in an amorphous SiO{sub 2} matrix and that their systematic change as a function of annealing temperature corresponds to the typical correlation between the increase of particle size and a redshift in near-band-edge emission.

  12. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Er implanted ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, P. P.; Kennedy, J.; Ruck, B. J.; Leveneur, J.

    2015-09-01

    We report the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Er implanted and annealed ZnO thin films. The effect of annealing in oxygen-deficient and oxygen-rich conditions was investigated. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry results revealed that the Er atoms are located at the implantation depth of around 13 nm, and annealing conditions had no adverse effect on the Er concentration in the layer. Raman spectroscopy results showed peak related to E2(high) mode of ZnO indicating enhanced crystalline quality of the Er implanted and annealed ZnO films. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy results demonstrated pre-edge features in O K-edge which are attributed to the structural defects in the films. Room temperature magnetic ordering was observed in Er implanted and annealed films, and is mainly assigned to the intrinsic defects in ZnO.

  13. Impurity-limited lattice disorder recovery in ion-implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of implanted impurities can affect intrinsic defect annihilation or, in macroscopic terms, so-called lattice recovery, specifically in high dose implantation experiments typically applied to radiation hard materials, e.g., ZnO. Correlating diffusion and lattice recovery data, we demonstrate that F bombardment of ZnO results in a unique situation when implantation induced disorder anneals at anomalously low temperatures, specifically due to the F outdiffusion from the disordered region. Control F + B implants resulted in the suppression of F diffusion and stabilization of the lattice disorder providing the evidence for impurity-limited lattice recovery.

  14. Slow positron beam study of hydrogen ion implanted ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yi; Xue, Xudong; Wu, Yichu

    2014-08-01

    The effects of hydrogen related defect on the microstructure and optical property of ZnO thin films were investigated by slow positron beam, in combination with x-ray diffraction, infrared and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The defects were introduced by 90 keV proton irradiation with doses of 1×1015 and 1×1016 ions cm-2. Zn vacancy and OH bonding (VZn+OH) defect complex were identified in hydrogen implanted ZnO film by positron annihilation and infrared spectroscopy. The formation of these complexes led to lattice disorder in hydrogen implanted ZnO film and suppressed the luminescence process.

  15. Effect of Thermal Annealing on the Characteristics of Phosphorus-Implanted ZnO Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, T. S.; Yu, J. H.; Mo, H. S.; Kim, T. S.; Lim, K. Y.; Youn, C. J.; Hong, K. J.; Kim, H. S.

    2014-07-01

    A P-doped ZnO surface layer on undoped ZnO wafers was prepared by phosphorus (P) ion implantation. Hall effect measurement revealed p-type conduction in such layers annealed at 800°C. This indicates that acceptor levels are present in P-doped ZnO, even though the ZnO is still n-type. Micro-Raman scattering in - z( xy) z geometry was conducted on P-implanted ZnO. The E {2/high} mode shift observed toward the high-energy region was related to compressive stress as a result of P-ion implantation. This compressive stress led to the appearance of an A 1(LO) peak, which is an inactive mode. This A 1(LO) peak relaxed during thermal annealing in ambient oxygen at temperatures higher than 700°C. The P2p3/2 peak observed at 135.6 eV by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is associated with chemical bond formation leading to 2(P2O5) molecules. This indicates that implanted P ions substituted Zn sites in the ZnO layer. In photoluminescence spectroscopy, the P-related peaks observed at energies ranging between 3.1 and 3.5 eV originated from (A0, X) emission, because of PZn-2VZn complexes acting as shallow acceptors. The acceptor level was observed to be 126.9 meV above the valence band edge. Observation of this P-related emission indicates that ion implantation results in acceptor levels in the P-doped ZnO layer. This suggests that the P2O5 bonds are responsible for the p-type activity of P-implanted ZnO.

  16. Optical and electrical studies of ZnO thin films heavily implanted with silver ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyadov, N. M.; Gumarov, A. I.; Valeev, V. F.; Nuzhdin, V. I.; Khaibullin, R. I.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.

    2014-12-01

    Thin films of zinc oxide (ZnO) with the thickness of 200 nm have been deposited on quartz substrates by using ion-beam sputtering technique. Then Ag+ ions with the energy of 30 keV have been implanted into as-deposited ZnO films to the fluences in the range of (0.25-1.00)×1017 ions/cm2 to form ZnO:Ag composite layers with different concentrations of the silver impurity. The analysis of the microstructure has shown that the thickness of the ZnO film decreases, and the Ag dopant concentration tends to the saturation with increasing Ag implantation fluence. The ZnO:Ag composite layers reveal the optical selective absorption at the wavelength of the surface plasmon resonance that is typical for silver nanoparticles dispersed in the ZnO matrix. The red shift of the plasmon resonance peak from 480 to 500 nm is observed with the increase in the implantation fluence to 0.75×1017 Ag ions/cm2. Then the absorption peak position starts the backward motion, and the absorption intensity decreases with the subsequent increase in the implantation fluence. The non-monotonic dependence of the absorption peak position on the implantation fluence has been analyzed within of Maxwell Garnet theory and taking into account the strong sputtering of ZnO films during implantation. The ZnO:Ag composite layers exhibit the p-type conductivity indicating that a part of Ag+ ions is in the form of acceptor impurities implanted into the ZnO lattice.

  17. Local structural properties of Co-ion-implanted ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C. I.; Jin, Zhenlan; Jeong, E. S.; Hwang, I. H.; Han, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    We examined the local structural properties around Co and Zn ions in Co-ion-implanted ZnO nanorods by using an X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Vertically-aligned ZnO nanorods were synthesized on Al2O3 substrates by using a catalyst-free metal-organic chemicalvapor deposition. Co ions (Co+ and Co2+) with energies of 50 and 100 keV and fluxes of 1013 and 1015 particles/cm2 were implanted in the ZnO nanorods, and the ion-implanted ZnO nanorods were annealed at 400-650°C. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses demonstrated that the chemical valence state of the Co ions were mostly 2+. An extended XAFS (EXAFS) analysis revealed that the Co ions were mostly substituted at the Zn sites of ZnO nanorods at a Coion flux of 1015 particles/cm2. However, at a flux of 1013 particles/cm2, Co ions formed Co-O and Co-Co clusters. These results were in contrast to the Co distribution in Co-added ZnO predicted by using a Monte Carlo method.

  18. Third generation biosensing matrix based on Fe-implanted ZnO thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Shibu; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2010-09-01

    Third generation biosensor based on Fe-implanted ZnO (Fe-ZnO) thin film has been demonstrated. Implantation of Fe in rf-sputtered ZnO thin film introduces redox center along with shallow donor level and thereby enhance its electron transfer property. Glucose oxidase (GOx), chosen as model enzyme, has been immobilized on the surface of the matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and photometric assay show that the prepared bioelectrode, GOx/Fe-ZnO/ITO/Glass is sensitive to the glucose concentration with enhanced response of 0.326 μA mM-1 cm-2 and low Km of 2.76 mM. The results show promising application of Fe-implanted ZnO thin film as an attractive matrix for third generation biosensing.

  19. Damage annealing in low temperature Fe/Mn implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Johnston, K.; Langouche, G.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Naidoo, D.; Ólafsson, O.; Weyer, G.

    2015-04-01

    57Fe Emission Mössbauer spectra obtained after low fluence (<1012 cm -2) implantation of 57Mn ( T 1/2= 1.5 min.) into ZnO single crystal held at temperatures below room temperature (RT) are presented. The spectra can be analysed in terms of four components due to Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ on Zn sites, interstitial Fe and Fe in damage regions (Fe D ). The Fe D component is found to be indistinguishable from similar component observed in emission Mössbauer spectra of higher fluence (˜1015 cm -2)57Fe/ 57Co implanted ZnO and 57Fe implanted ZnO, demonstrating that the nature of the damage regions in the two types of experiments is similar. The defect component observed in the low temperature regime was found to anneal below RT.

  20. Third generation biosensing matrix based on Fe-implanted ZnO thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Shibu; Gupta, Vinay; Sreenivas, K.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2010-09-27

    Third generation biosensor based on Fe-implanted ZnO (Fe-ZnO) thin film has been demonstrated. Implantation of Fe in rf-sputtered ZnO thin film introduces redox center along with shallow donor level and thereby enhance its electron transfer property. Glucose oxidase (GOx), chosen as model enzyme, has been immobilized on the surface of the matrix. Cyclic voltammetry and photometric assay show that the prepared bioelectrode, GOx/Fe-ZnO/ITO/Glass is sensitive to the glucose concentration with enhanced response of 0.326 {mu}A mM{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and low Km of 2.76 mM. The results show promising application of Fe-implanted ZnO thin film as an attractive matrix for third generation biosensing.

  1. Properties of nitrogen implanted and electron beam annealed bulk ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.; Carder, D. A.; Markwitz, A.; Reeves, R. J.

    2010-05-15

    The optical properties of bulk ZnO ion implanted with nitrogen ions, at an energy of 23 keV have been studied as a function of implantation fluence and electron beam (EB) annealing conditions. Nuclear reaction analysis and Raman results have revealed the implanted N concentration and its structural changes with respect to various nitrogen ion fluences. The optical properties of nitrogen implanted bulk ZnO were investigated by low temperature photoluminescence measurements. An enhanced peak at 3.235 eV has been attributed to donor-accepter pair (DAP) emission involving the implanted N acceptor in ZnO. The emission near 3.3085 eV is attributed to a free electron to acceptor transition. We also report a broad band emission feature at {approx}3.09 eV in the nitrogen implanted with 1-2x10{sup 15} ions cm{sup -2} and EB annealed at 800-900 deg. C. This is assigned to a thermally activated nitrogen acceptor transition as it is unique only to nitrogen implanted samples. An ionization energy of 377 meV indicates that this line may correspond to a significantly less shallow acceptor level. In addition an increase in the intensity and dominance of this DAP line in nitrogen implanted samples over the other acceptor transitions was observed with increasing annealing time and temperatures. It is shown that EB annealing offers a method of enhanced nitrogen activation when compared to a more conventional furnace approach.

  2. Deep-level emissions influenced by O and Zn implantations in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Q. X.; Klason, P.; Willander, M.; Zhong, H. M.; Lu, W.; Yang, J. H.

    2005-11-01

    A set of bulk ZnO samples implanted with O and Zn at various densities were investigated by photoluminescence. The implantation concentration of O and Zn is varied between 1×1017/cm3 and 5×1019/cm3. The samples were thermally treated in an oxygen gas environment after the implantation. The results clearly show the influence of O and Zn implantations on the deep-level emission. By comparing the photoluminescence spectra for the samples with different implantations, we can conclude that the VZn is responsible to the observed deep-level emission. In addition, a novel transition at the emission energy of 3.08eV at 77K appears in the O-implanted sample with 5×1019/cm3 implantation concentration. The novel emission is tentatively identified as O-antisite OZn.

  3. Deep-level emissions influenced by O and Zn implantations in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Q.X.; Klason, P.; Willander, M.; Zhong, H.M.; Lu, W.; Yang, J.H.

    2005-11-21

    A set of bulk ZnO samples implanted with O and Zn at various densities were investigated by photoluminescence. The implantation concentration of O and Zn is varied between 1x10{sup 17}/cm{sup 3} and 5x10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}. The samples were thermally treated in an oxygen gas environment after the implantation. The results clearly show the influence of O and Zn implantations on the deep-level emission. By comparing the photoluminescence spectra for the samples with different implantations, we can conclude that the V{sub Zn} is responsible to the observed deep-level emission. In addition, a novel transition at the emission energy of 3.08 eV at 77 K appears in the O-implanted sample with 5x10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3} implantation concentration. The novel emission is tentatively identified as O-antisite O{sub Zn}.

  4. Ion Implantation in ZnO: Defect Interaction and Impurity Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoob, Faisal

    In the first part of this research we studied the entropy changes in diffusion prefactor and its effects on diffusion mechanisms and activation energies. We demonstrate a method based on ion implantation and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy combined with ion channeling (RBS/C) to experimentally determine the diffusion properties of substitutional and interstitial diffusing atoms. The activation energies for each diffusing species are found to be in good agreement with those calculated in previous theoretical studies. The exponential prefactors of the measured diffusion coefficients vary by ten orders of magnitude among substitutional and interstitial diffusing species, allowing us to assign a specific diffusion mechanism to each type of diffusant according to both its diffusion energetics and entropic changes. In addition, the diffusion activation energies and the diffusivity prefactor for the four diffusing species studied are found to follow the Meyer--Neldel relationship with a characteristic excitation energy of ~ 92 meV in ZnO. In another important problem related to the p-doping difficulty in ZnO materials, we studied the effects of ion-implanted hydrogen ions on defect formation and impurity redistribution in ZnO crystals implanted with silver ions. Following Ag ion implantation, the damage level in the ZnO lattice was higher in the sample without H ion implantation than the sample with the H. We found that the damage created to oxygen lattice by the Ag atoms during implantation was higher than the damaged caused to the zinc lattice. Moreover, the Zn lattice recovered faster than the O lattice during thermal annealing. The Ag atoms have higher substitutional fraction in samples without H and increases with annealing temperature. In H implanted samples Ag and H is passivated in defect-related cluster, resulting lower activation of Ag. The diffusion process is affected by H implantation, making it difficult to diffuse to substitutional sites. We discuss

  5. Discrepancy between ambient annealing and H+ implantation in optical absorption of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jinpeng; Li, Chundong

    2016-05-01

    The discrepancy between sub-bandgap absorption in ZnO induced by thermal annealing and H+ implantation is investigated in this study for the first time. Results indicate that nonreductive annealing-induced optical absorption is independent of annealing ambient, and can be assigned to VO, whereas the absorption centers caused by H+ implantation and H2 annealing are primarily associated with VO and ionized Zni.

  6. Ionoluminescence study of Zn- and O- implanted ZnO crystals: An additional perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epie, E. N.; Chu, W. K.

    2016-05-01

    An investigation into the role of native point defects on the optical properties of ZnO using ion implantation, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and ionoluminescence (IL) is presented. Low-energy (60 keV) fixed-fluence (8 × 1015 cm-2) Zn- and O- implantation has been used to directly introduce native point defects into ZnO single crystals. It is shown that annealing of implanted samples in Ar at T = 1000 °C for 2 min amplifies the deep band emission (DBE) peak centered around 2.4 eV while at the same time revealing subtle differences not clearly resolved in similar implanted samples treated under prolonged annealing. Particularly, a relative shift in the DBE peak maxima of the O and Zn doped samples subjected to RTA is observed. Gaussian decomposition of the IL spectra show distinct enhancements of the red (1.62 eV) and yellow (2.15 eV) emission bands in the O- implanted sample and the green (2.36 eV) emission band in the Zn- implanted sample. Based on these results, and recent density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have proposed a possible energy level scheme for some common ZnO native point defects.

  7. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-03-01

    The diffusion properties of H+ in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface.

  8. NMR Observation of Mobile Protons in Proton-Implanted ZnO Nanorods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Kue; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion properties of H+ in ZnO nanorods are investigated before and after 20 MeV proton beam irradiation by using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Herein, we unambiguously observe that the implanted protons occupy thermally unstable site of ZnO, giving rise to a narrow NMR line at 4.1 ppm. The activation barrier of the implanted protons was found to be 0.46 eV by means of the rotating-frame spin-lattice relaxation measurements, apparently being interstitial hydrogens. High-energy beam irradiation also leads to correlated jump diffusion of the surface hydroxyl group of multiple lines at ~1 ppm, implying the presence of structural disorder at the ZnO surface. PMID:26988733

  9. Zn precipitation and Li depletion in Zn implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. S.; Vines, L.; Li, L.; Jagadish, C.; Svensson, B. G.; Wong-Leung, J.

    2016-07-01

    Ion implantation of Zn substituting elements in ZnO has been shown to result in a dramatic Li depletion of several microns in hydrothermally grown ZnO. This has been ascribed to a burst of mobile Zn interstials. In this study, we seek to understand the reason behind this interstitial mediated transient enhanced diffusion in Li-containing ZnO samples after Zn implantation. ZnO wafers were implanted with Zn to two doses, 5 × 1015 cm-2 and 1 × 1017 cm-2. Secondary ion mass spectrometry was carried out to profile the Li depletion depth for different annealing temperatures between 600 and 800 °C. The 800 °C annealing had the most significant Li depletion of close to 60 μm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was carried out in selected samples to identify the reason behind the Li depletion. In particular, TEM investigations of samples annealed at 750 °C show significant Zn precipitation just below the depth of the projected range of the implanted ions. We propose that the Zn precipitation is indicative of Zn supersaturation. Both the Li depletion and Zn precipitation are competing synchronous processes aimed at reducing the excess Zn interstitials.

  10. ZnO nanoparticles embedded in sapphire fabricated by ion implantation and annealing.

    PubMed

    Xiang, X; Zu, X T; Zhu, S; Wei, Q M; Zhang, C F; Sun, K; Wang, L M

    2006-05-28

    ZnO nanoparticles were fabricated in sapphire (α-Al(2)O(3) single crystal) by Zn ion implantation (48 keV) at an ion fluence of 1 × 10(17) cm(-2) and subsequent thermal annealing in a flowing oxygen atmosphere. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that metallic Zn nanoparticles of 3-10 nm in dimensions formed in the as-implanted sample and that ZnO nanoparticles of 10-12 nm in dimensions formed after annealing at 600 °C. A broad absorption band, peaked at 280 nm, appeared in the as-implanted crystal, due to surface plasma resonance (SPR) absorption of metallic Zn nanoparticles. After annealing at 600 °C, ZnO nanoparticles resulted in an exciton absorption peak at 360 nm. The photoluminescence (PL) of the as-implanted sample was very weak when using a He-Cd 325 nm line as the excitation source. However, two emission peaks appeared in the PL spectrum of ZnO nanopraticles, i.e., one ultraviolet (UV) peak at 370 nm and the other a green peak at 500 nm. The emission at 500 nm is stronger and has potential applications in green/blue light-emitting devices. PMID:21727517

  11. Towards p-type doping of ZnO by ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, V; Tan, H H; Jagadish, C; Kucheyev, S; Phillips, M; Zou, J

    2005-01-18

    Zinc oxide is a very attractive material for a range of optoelectronic devices including blue light-emitting diodes and laser diodes. Though n-type doping has been successfully achieved, p-type doing of ZnO is still a challenge that must be overcome before p-n junction devices can be realized. Ion implantation is widely used in the microelectronics industry for selective area doping and device isolation. Understanding damage accumulation and recrystallization processes is important for achieving selective area doping. In this study, As (potential p-type dopant) ion implantation and annealing studies were carried out. ZnO samples were implanted with high dose (1.4 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}) 300 keV As ions at room temperature. Furnace annealing of samples in the range of 900 C to 1200 C was employed to achieve recrystallization of amorphous layers and electrical activation of the dopant. Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy and cathodolumiescence spectroscopy were used to monitor damage accumulation and annihilation behavior in ZnO. Results of this study have significant implications for p-type doing of ZnO by ion implantation.

  12. Study of the negative magneto-resistance of single proton-implanted lithium-doped ZnO microwires.

    PubMed

    Lorite, I; Zandalazini, C; Esquinazi, P; Spemann, D; Friedländer, S; Pöppl, A; Michalsky, T; Grundmann, M; Vogt, J; Meijer, J; Heluani, S P; Ohldag, H; Adeagbo, W A; Nayak, S K; Hergert, W; Ernst, A; Hoffmann, M

    2015-07-01

    The magneto-transport properties of single proton-implanted ZnO and of Li(7%)-doped ZnO microwires have been studied. The as-grown microwires were highly insulating and not magnetic. After proton implantation the Li(7%) doped ZnO microwires showed a non-monotonous behavior of the negative magneto-resistance (MR) at temperature above 150 K. This is in contrast to the monotonous NMR observed below 50 K for proton-implanted ZnO. The observed difference in the transport properties of the wires is related to the amount of stable Zn vacancies created at the near surface region by the proton implantation and Li doping. The magnetic field dependence of the resistance might be explained by the formation of a magnetic/non-magnetic heterostructure in the wire after proton implantation. PMID:26043764

  13. Study of the negative magneto-resistance of single proton-implanted lithium-doped ZnO microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite, I.; Zandalazini, C.; Esquinazi, P.; Spemann, D.; Friedländer, S.; Pöppl, A.; Michalsky, T.; Grundmann, M.; Vogt, J.; Meijer, J.; Heluani, S. P.; Ohldag, H.; Adeagbo, W. A.; Nayak, S. K.; Hergert, W.; Ernst, A.; Hoffmann, M.

    2015-06-01

    The magneto-transport properties of single proton-implanted ZnO and of Li(7%)-doped ZnO microwires have been studied. The as-grown microwires were highly insulating and not magnetic. After proton implantation the Li(7%) doped ZnO microwires showed a non-monotonous behavior of the negative magneto-resistance (MR) at temperature above 150 K. This is in contrast to the monotonous NMR observed below 50 K for proton-implanted ZnO. The observed difference in the transport properties of the wires is related to the amount of stable Zn vacancies created at the near surface region by the proton implantation and Li doping. The magnetic field dependence of the resistance might be explained by the formation of a magnetic/non-magnetic heterostructure in the wire after proton implantation.

  14. Annealing of damage and stability of implanted ions in ZnO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Sonder, E.; Zuhr, R.A.; Valiga, R.E.

    1988-08-01

    The annealing of Bi, Cr, and Mn, implanted in ZnO, has been studied by Rutherford backscattering, ion channeling, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Implantation of approx.10/sup 16/ ions/cm/sup 2/ of any of these elements produces large concentrations of Zn interstitials, but no completely amorphous region. The temperature at which these interstitials anneal is a function of the implant species. Other defects produced by the implantation, which give rise to dechanneling and a consequent increased scattering probability in the tails of backscattering spectra, anneal at significantly higher temperature. This annealing is also a function of the implant species. Motion of the implant ions themselves does not occur when the interstitials anneal; it takes place above 700 /sup 0/C for Bi and Mn, and above 1000 /sup 0/C for Cr.

  15. Damage formation and annealing at low temperatures in ion implanted ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Wendler, E.; Bilani, O.; Wesch, W.; Hayes, M.

    2005-11-07

    N, Ar, and Er ions were implanted into ZnO at 15 K within a large fluence range. The Rutherford backscattering technique in the channeling mode was used to study in situ the damage built-up in the Zn sublattice at 15 K. Several stages in the damage formation were observed. From the linear increase of the damage for low implantation fluences, an upper limit of the Zn displacement energy of 65 eV could be estimated for [0001] oriented ZnO. Annealing measurements below room temperature show a significant recovery of the lattice starting at temperatures between 80 and 130 K for a sample implanted with low Er fluence. Samples with higher damage levels do not reveal any damage recovery up to room temperature, pointing to the formation of stable defect complexes.

  16. Luminescence and structural properties of defects in ion implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, T.; Soares, M. J.; Neves, A. J.; Carmo, M. C.; Peres, M.; Cruz, A.; Alves, E.; Wahl, U.; Rita, E.; Munoz-Sanjose, V.; Zuniga-Perez, J.

    2006-03-01

    ZnO substrates and films were intentionally implanted with rare earth and transition metal ions. The influence of the implantation and subsequent air thermal annealing treatments on the structural and optical properties of ZnO samples were studied by using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and low temperature photoluminescence techniques. Intraionic Tm-related emission was observed for bulk and ZnO films. Similarly, Eu and Tb-doped ZnO films follow the same trend observed in bulk samples. No intraionic related emission was observed for Eu-doped samples even being the ion in Zn sites and for the Tb-doped samples ion segregation was observed for thermal annealing temperatures above 800 °C. For the Mn-doped ZnO bulk samples the lattice recovery follows the same trend to that one observed for the Fe-doped samples, starting near 800 °C being fully recovered at 1050 °C. Although Fe3+ was observed no intraionic Mn-related emission was detected under the used conditions.

  17. Origins of low resistivity in Al ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2011-06-15

    The origins of low resistivity in Al ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are studied by combining Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), photoluminescence (PL), and Van der Pauw methods. The Al-ion implantation (peak concentration: 2.6 x 10{sup 20}cm{sup -3}) into ZnO is performed using a multiple-step energy. The resistivity decreases from {approx}10{sup 4{Omega}} cm for un-implanted ZnO to 1.4 x 10{sup -1{Omega}} cm for as-implanted, and reaches 6.0 x 10{sup -4{Omega}} cm for samples annealed at 1000 deg. C. RBS and NRA measurements for as-implanted ZnO suggest the existence of the lattice displacement of Zn (Zn{sub i}) and O (O{sub i}), respectively. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, the Zn{sub i} related defects remain and the O{sub i} related defects disappear. The origin of the low resistivity in the as-implanted sample is attributed to the Zn{sub i} ({approx}30 meV [Look et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2552 (1999)]). In contrast, the origin of the low resistivity in the sample annealed at 1000 deg. C is assigned to both of the Zn{sub i} related defects and the electrically activated Al donor. A new PL emission appears at around 3.32 eV after annealing at 1000 deg. C, suggesting electrically activated Al donors.

  18. Equilibrium shape of nano-cavities in H implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. S.; Vines, L.; Li, L.; Jagadish, C.; Svensson, B. G.; Wong-Leung, J.

    2015-05-01

    Thermally equilibrated nano-cavities are formed in ZnO by H implantation and subsequent high temperature annealing to determine the relative surface formation energies and step energies of ZnO from reverse Wulff construction and related analysis. H adsorption, vicinal surfaces, and surface polarity are found to play an important role in determining the final thermal equilibrium shape of the nano-cavities. Under H coverage, the O-terminated surface shows a significantly lower surface formation energy than the Zn-terminated surface.

  19. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Minggang; Cheng, Zhaofang; Han, Jinyun; Zheng, Minrui; Sow, Chorng-Haur; Thong, John T. L.; Zhang, Shengli; Li, Baowen

    2014-05-01

    The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga+) implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga+ implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 103 Ω-1m-1 to 1.46 × 104 Ω-1m-1 and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm-1K-1 to 1.22 Wm-1K-1 for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga+ implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga+ point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga+-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  20. Paramagnetism and antiferromagnetic interactions in single-phase Fe-implanted ZnO.

    PubMed

    Pereira, L M C; Wahl, U; Correia, J G; Van Bael, M J; Temst, K; Vantomme, A; Araújo, J P

    2013-10-16

    As the intrinsic origin of the high-temperature ferromagnetism often observed in wide-gap dilute magnetic semiconductors becomes increasingly debated, there is a growing need for comprehensive studies on the single-phase region of the phase diagram of these materials. Here we report on the magnetic and structural properties of Fe-doped ZnO prepared by ion implantation of ZnO single crystals. A detailed structural characterization shows that the Fe impurities substitute for Zn in ZnO in a wurtzite Zn(1-x)Fe(x)O phase which is coherent with the ZnO host. In addition, the density of beam-induced defects is progressively decreased by thermal annealing up to 900 ° C, from highly disordered after implantation to highly crystalline upon subsequent annealing. Based on a detailed analysis of the magnetometry data, we demonstrate that isolated Fe impurities occupying Zn-substitutional sites behave as localized paramagnetic moments down to 2 K, irrespective of the Fe concentration and the density of beam-induced defects. With increasing local concentration of Zn-substitutional Fe, strong nearest-cation-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions favor the antiparallel alignment of the Fe moments. PMID:24025311

  1. Paramagnetism and antiferromagnetic interactions in single-phase Fe-implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Van Bael, M. J.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; Araújo, J. P.

    2013-10-01

    As the intrinsic origin of the high-temperature ferromagnetism often observed in wide-gap dilute magnetic semiconductors becomes increasingly debated, there is a growing need for comprehensive studies on the single-phase region of the phase diagram of these materials. Here we report on the magnetic and structural properties of Fe-doped ZnO prepared by ion implantation of ZnO single crystals. A detailed structural characterization shows that the Fe impurities substitute for Zn in ZnO in a wurtzite Zn1-xFexO phase which is coherent with the ZnO host. In addition, the density of beam-induced defects is progressively decreased by thermal annealing up to 900 ° C, from highly disordered after implantation to highly crystalline upon subsequent annealing. Based on a detailed analysis of the magnetometry data, we demonstrate that isolated Fe impurities occupying Zn-substitutional sites behave as localized paramagnetic moments down to 2 K, irrespective of the Fe concentration and the density of beam-induced defects. With increasing local concentration of Zn-substitutional Fe, strong nearest-cation-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions favor the antiparallel alignment of the Fe moments.

  2. Secondary phase segregation in heavily transition metal implanted ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Schumm, Marcel; Koerdel, Martin; Geurts, Jean; Mueller, Sven; Ronning, Carsten; Dynowska, Elzbieta; Golacki, Zbigniew; Szuszkiewicz, Wojciech

    2009-04-15

    With micro-Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD), we studied ZnO crystals implanted with Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, respectively, with implantation concentrations from 4 up to 16 at. %. Using thermal treatments in air up to 700 deg. C, we analyzed the annealing effect on the ZnO crystal lattice as well as the onset of secondary phases and their microstructure on the sample surface. While the 500 deg. C treatment induces a considerable annealing, secondary phases are observed for transition metal (TM) concentrations >=8 at. % after the treatment at 700 deg. C. Their microstructure strongly depends on the TM species. Various stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric TM oxide precipitates as well as elemental TM clusters are identified by their Raman and XRD signatures and their possible magnetic impact is discussed.

  3. Effects of oxygen ion implantation in spray-pyrolyzed ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, K. P.; Ratheesh Kumar, P. M.; Sudha Kartha, C.; Wilson, K. C.; Singh, F.; Nair, K. G. M.; Kashiwaba, Y.

    2006-04-01

    ZnO thin films, prepared using the chemical spray pyrolysis technique, were implanted using 100 keV O+ ions. Both pristine and ion-implanted samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical absorption, electrical resistivity measurements, thermally stimulated current measurements and photoluminescence. Samples retained their crystallinity even after irradiation at a fluence of 1015 ions/cm2. However, at a still higher fluence of 2 × 1016 ions/cm2, the films became totally amorphous. The optical absorption edge remained unaffected by implantation and optical absorption spectra indicated two levels at 460 and 510 nm. These were attributed to defect levels corresponding to zinc vacancies (VZn) and oxygen antisites (OZn), respectively. Pristine samples had a broad photoluminescence emission centred at 517 nm, which was depleted on implantation. In the case of implanted samples, two additional emissions appeared at 425 and 590 nm. These levels were identified as due to zinc vacancies (VZn) and oxygen vacancies (VO), respectively. The electrical resistivity of implanted samples was much higher than that of pristine, while photosensitivity decreased to a very low value on implantation. This can be utilized in semiconductor device technology for interdevice isolation. Hall measurements showed a marked decrease in mobility due to ion implantation, while carrier concentration slightly increased.

  4. Rutherford backscattering and nuclear reaction analyses of hydrogen ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaida, T.; Kamioka, K.; Ida, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2014-08-01

    The origins of low resistivity in H ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) photoluminescence (PL), and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak concentration: 1.45 × 1020 cm-3) into ZnO is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The resistivity decreases from 2.5 × 103 Ω cm for unimplanted ZnO to 6.5 Ω cm for as-implanted one. RBS measurements show that Zn interstitial as a shallow donor is not recognized in as-implanted samples. From photoluminescence measurements, the broad green band emission is observed in as-implanted samples. NRA measurements for as-implanted ZnO suggest the existence of the oxygen interstitial. The origins of the low resistivity in the as-implanted sample are attributed to both the H interstitial as a shallow donor and complex donor between H and disordered O. The activation energy of H related donors estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration is 29 meV.

  5. Dynamic hyperfine interactions in 111In(111Cd)-doped ZnO semiconductor: PAC results supported by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Emiliano L.; Mercurio, Marcio E.; Cordeiro, Moacir R.; Pereira, Luciano F. D.; Carbonari, Artur W.; Rentería, Mario

    2012-08-01

    In this work, we present results of Time-Differential γ-γ Perturbed-Angular-Correlations (PAC) experiments performed in 111Cd-doped ZnO semiconductor. The PAC technique has been applied in order to characterize the electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor at (111In (EC)→) 111Cd nuclei located, as was later demonstrated, at defect-free cation sites of the ZnO host structure. The PAC experiments were performed in the temperature range of 77-1075 K. At first glance, the unexpected presence of low-intensity dynamic hyperfine interactions was observed, which were analyzed with a perturbation factor based on the Bäverstam and Othaz model. The experimental EFG results were compared with ab initio calculations performed with the Full-Potential Augmented Plane Wave plus local orbital (FP-APW+lo) method, in the framework of the Density Functional Theory (DFT), using the Wien2K code. The presence of the dynamic hyperfine interactions has been analyzed enlightened by the FP-APW+lo calculations of the EFG performed as a function of the charge state of the cell. We could correlate the large strength of the dynamic hyperfine interaction with the strong variation of the EFG due to changes in the electronic charge distribution in the Cd vicinity during the time-window of the PAC measurement. It was also revealed that the Cd impurity decays to a final stable neutral charge state (Cd2+) fast enough (in few ns) to produce the nearly undamped observed PAC spectra.

  6. Intrinsic Point-Defect Balance in Self-Ion-Implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuvonen, Pekka T.; Vines, Lasse; Svensson, Bengt G.; Kuznetsov, Andrej Yu.

    2013-01-01

    The role of excess intrinsic atoms for residual point defect balance has been discriminated by implanting Zn or O ions into Li-containing ZnO and monitoring Li redistribution and electrical resistivity after postimplant anneals. Strongly Li-depleted regions were detected in the Zn-implanted samples at depths beyond the projected range (Rp) upon annealing ≥600°C, correlating with a resistivity decrease. In contrast, similar anneals of the O-implanted samples resulted in Li accumulation at Rp and an increased resistivity. Control samples implanted with Ar or Ne ions, yielding similar defect production as for the Zn or O implants but with no surplus of intrinsic atoms, revealed no Li depletion. Thus, the depletion of Li shows evidence of excess Zn interstitials (ZnI) being released during annealing of the Zn-implanted samples. These ZnI’s convert substitutional Li atoms (LiZn) into highly mobile interstitial ones leading to the strongly Li-depleted regions. In the O-implanted samples, the high resistivity provides evidence of stable OI-related acceptors.

  7. A study of the structural and magnetic properties of ZnO implanted by Gd ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macková, A.; Malinský, P.; Sofer, Z.; Šimek, P.; Sedmidubský, D.; Mikulics, M.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2014-08-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of ZnO (0 0 0 1) single crystals implanted with 200 keV Gd ions up to a fluence of 5 × 1015 cm-2 and subsequently annealed at 800 °C in various atmospheres were studied. The chemical composition and concentration depth profiles of ion-implanted layers were characterised by Rutherford Back-Scattering spectrometry (RBS) and compared to SRIM simulations. The as-implanted Gd depth profiles were found to be broader than those simulated by SRIM, but the projected range coincided well with that simulated. After annealing at 800 °C, the depth profiles became narrower. The structural changes in the layers modified by ion implantation and subsequent annealing were characterised by RBS channelling. The annealing led to partial recrystallisation and a decrease in the number of Gd atoms situated in substitutional positions. Raman spectroscopy showed that the point defects in Zn and O vacancies had been created by implantation and that these defects are most effectively cured after annealing in oxygen atmosphere. AFM analysis was used to determine the surface-morphology changes after the implantation and annealing procedures. The as-implanted samples exhibited ferromagnetism persisting up to room temperature. The annealing procedure led to paramagnetic behaviour, probably caused by the formation of gadolinium clusters.

  8. Silver migration and trapping in ion implanted ZnO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Alexander; Vines, Lasse; Rauwel, Protima; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2016-05-01

    Potentially, group-Ib elements (Cu, Ag, and Au) incorporated on Zn sites can be used for p-type doping of ZnO, and in the present paper, we use ion implantation to introduce Ag atoms in wurtzite ZnO single crystals. Monitoring the Li behavior, being a residual impurity in the crystals, as a tracer, we demonstrate that Zn interstitials assist the Ag diffusion and lead to Ag pile-up behind the implanted region after annealing above 800 °C. At even higher temperatures, a pronounced Ag loss from the sample surface occurs and concurrently the Ag atoms exhibit a trap-limited diffusion into the crystal bulk with an activation energy of ˜2.6 eV. The dominant traps are most likely Zn vacancies and substitutional Li atoms, yielding substitutional Ag atoms. In addition, formation of an anomalous multipeak Ag distribution in the implanted near-surface region after annealing can be attributed to local implantation-induced stoichiometry disturbances leading to trapping of the Ag atoms by O and Zn vacancies in the vicinity of the surface and in the end-of-range region, respectively.

  9. Compositional and Structural Study of Gd Implanted ZnO Films

    SciTech Connect

    Murmu, Peter P.; Kennedy, John V.; Markwitz, Andreas; Ruck, Ben J.

    2009-07-23

    We report a compositional and structural study of ZnO films implanted with 30 keV Gd ions. The depth profile of the implanted ions, measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, matches predictions of DYNAMIC-TRIM calculations. However, after annealing at temperatures above 550 deg. C the Gd ions are observed to migrate towards the bulk, and at the same time atomic force microscope images of the film surfaces show significant roughening. Raman spectroscopy shows that the annealed films have a reduced number of crystalline defects. The overall results are useful for developing an implantation-annealing regime to produce well characterized samples to investigate magnetism in the ZnO:Gd system.

  10. Electrical, optical, photocatalytic, and bactericidal properties of polyethylene glycol-assisted sol-gel synthesized ZnTiO3-implanted ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunakaran, Chockalingam; Vinayagamoorthy, Pazhamalai; Jayabharathi, Jayaraman

    2014-12-01

    ZnTiO3-implanted ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel method employing polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 and 20 000. The high resolution transmission electron micrographs, selected area electron diffraction pattern, energy dispersive x-ray spectra and powder x-ray diffractograms show the prepared materials as core/shell nanoparticles. Increase of the molecular mass of PEG decreases the d-spacing in ZnO of ZnTiO3-implanted ZnO and pristine ZnO nanoparticles. The charge transfer resistances of ZnTiO3-implanted ZnO nanoparticles are larger than those of pristine ZnO and precursor ZnTiO3 nanoparticles. The optical properties of ZnTiO3/ZnO nanoparticles are similar to those of pristine ZnO nanoparticles. The photocatalytic activity of ZnO is enhanced by the presence of ZnTiO3 core in the ZnO lattice. The bactericidal activity of core/shell ZnTiO3/ZnO nanoparticles is not less than that of ZnO nanoparticles.

  11. Lattice location and thermal stability of implanted Fe in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Rita, E.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J.G.; Alves, E.; Soares, J.C.

    2004-11-22

    The emission channeling technique was applied to evaluate the lattice location of implanted {sup 59}Fe in single-crystalline ZnO. The angular distribution of {beta}{sup -} particles emitted by {sup 59}Fe was monitored with a position-sensitive electron detector, following 60 keV low dose (2.0x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) room-temperature implantation of the precursor isotope {sup 59}Mn. The emission patterns around the [0001], [1102],[1101], and [2113] directions revealed that following annealing at 800 deg. C, 95(8)% of the Fe atoms occupy ideal substitutional Zn sites with rms displacements of 0.06-0.09 A.

  12. Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.; Hallén, A.; Du, X. L.

    2014-02-21

    Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from {sup 11}B to {sup 209}Bi) to ion doses up to 2 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600 °C, while co-implantation with B (via BF{sub 2}) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ∼500 °C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900 °C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability.

  13. Effect of implanted species on thermal evolution of ion-induced defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Hallén, A.; Du, X. L.; Rauwel, P.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.

    2014-02-01

    Implanted atoms can affect the evolution of ion-induced defects in radiation hard materials exhibiting a high dynamic annealing and these processes are poorly understood. Here, we study the thermal evolution of structural defects in wurtzite ZnO samples implanted at room temperature with a wide range of ion species (from 11B to 209Bi) to ion doses up to 2 × 1016 cm-2. The structural disorder was characterized by a combination of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, nuclear reaction analysis, and transmission electron microscopy, while secondary ion mass spectrometry was used to monitor the behavior of both the implanted elements and residual impurities, such as Li. The results show that the damage formation and its thermal evolution strongly depend on the ion species. In particular, for F implanted samples, a strong out-diffusion of the implanted ions results in an efficient crystal recovery already at 600 °C, while co-implantation with B (via BF2) ions suppresses both the F out-diffusion and the lattice recovery at such low temperatures. The damage produced by heavy ions (such as Cd, Au, and Bi) exhibits a two-stage annealing behavior where efficient removal of point defects and small defect clusters occurs at temperatures ˜500 °C, while the second stage is characterized by a gradual and partial annealing of extended defects. These defects can persist even after treatment at 900 °C. In contrast, the defects produced by light and medium mass ions (O, B, and Zn) exhibit a more gradual annealing with increasing temperature without distinct stages. In addition, effects of the implanted species may lead to a nontrivial defect evolution during the annealing, with N, Ag, and Er as prime examples. In general, the obtained results are interpreted in terms of formation of different dopant-defect complexes and their thermal stability.

  14. Tunable transport properties of n-type ZnO nanowires by Ti plasma immersion ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, L.; Zhang, Z.; Yan, B.; Li, G. P.; Wu, T.; Shen, Z. X.; Yu, T.; Yang, Y.; Cao, H. T.; Chen, L. L.; Tay, B. K.; Sun, X. W.

    2008-10-01

    Single-crystalline, transparent conducting ZnO nanowires were obtained simply by Ti plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). Electrical transport characterizations demonstrate that the n-type conduction of ZnO nanowire could be tuned by appropriate Ti-PIII. When the energy of PIII is increased, the resistivity of ZnO decreases from 4x10{sup 2} to 3.3x10{sup -3} {omega} cm, indicating a semiconductor-metal transition. The failure-current densities of the metallic ZnO could be up to 2.75x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Therefore, this facile method may provide an inexpensive alternative to tin doped indium oxide as transparent conducting oxide materials.

  15. Fabrication of ZnO nanoparticles in SiO{sub 2} by ion implantation combined with thermal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Amekura, H.; Umeda, N.; Sakuma, Y.; Kishimoto, N.; Buchal, Ch.

    2005-07-04

    Zinc-oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) are fabricated in silica glasses (SiO{sub 2}) by implantation of Zn{sup +} ions of 60 keV up to 1.0x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} and following thermal oxidation. After the oxidation at 700 deg. C for 1 h, the absorption in the visible region due to Zn metallic NPs disappears and a new absorption edge due to ZnO appears at {approx}3.25 eV. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy confirms the formation of ZnO NPs of 5-10 nm in diameter within the near-surface region of {approx}80 nm thick and larger ZnO NPs on the surface. Under He-Cd laser excitation at {lambda}=325 nm, an exciton luminescence peak centered at 375 nm with FWHM of 113 meV was observed at room temperature.

  16. Single phase formation of Co-implanted ZnO thin films by swift heavy ion irradiation: Optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravi; Singh, Fouran; Angadi, Basavaraj; Choi, Ji-Won; Choi, Won-Kook; Jeong, Kwangho; Song, Jong-Han; Khan, M. Wasi; Srivastava, J. P.; Kumar, Ajay; Tandon, R. P.

    2006-12-01

    Low temperature photoluminescence and optical absorption studies on 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiated Co-implanted ZnO thin films were studied. The Co clusters present in as implanted samples were observed to be dissolved using 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiation with a fluence of 1x10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The photoluminescence spectrum of pure ZnO thin film was characterized by the I{sub 4} peak due to the neutral donor bound excitons and the broad green emission. The Co-doped ZnO films show three sharp levels and two shoulders corresponding to 3t{sub 2g} and 2e{sub g} levels of crystal field splitted Co d orbitals, respectively. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy also shows the systematic variation of band gap after 200 MeV Ag{sup +15} ion irradiation.

  17. Tuning quantum corrections and magnetoresistance in ZnO nanowires by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Y J; Pereira, L M C; Menghini, M; Temst, K; Vantomme, A; Locquet, J-P; Van Haesendonck, C

    2012-02-01

    Using ion implantation, the electrical as well as the magnetotransport properties of individual ZnO nanowires (NWs) can be tuned. The virgin NWs are configured as field-effect transistors which are in the enhancement mode. Al-implanted NWs reveal a three-dimensional metallic-like behavior, for which the magnetoresistance is well described by a semiempirical model that takes into account the presence of doping induced local magnetic moments and of two conduction bands. On the other hand, one-dimensional electron transport is observed in Co-implanted NWs. At low magnetic fields, the anisotropic magnetoresistance can be described in the framework of weak electron localization in the presence of strong spin-orbit scattering. From the weak localization, a large phase coherence length is inferred that reaches up to 800 nm at 2.5 K. The temperature-dependent dephasing is shown to result from a one-dimensional Nyquist noise-related mechanism. At the lowest temperatures, the phase coherence length becomes limited by magnetic scattering. PMID:22214218

  18. Crucial role of implanted atoms on dynamic defect annealing in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, A. Yu.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.; Wendler, E.

    2014-02-03

    Processes of defect formation in radiation hard semiconductors exhibiting efficient dynamic annealing are different from those in amorphizible ones, and the latter are generally more well-studied. In the present work, we investigate structural disorder in wurtzite ZnO, which is a radiation hard material, implanted with different ions at room temperature and 15 K. The sample analysis was undertaken by Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry performed in-situ without changing the sample temperature. The fluence dependence of bulk disorder exhibits the so-called IV-stage evolution, where the high fluence regime is characterized by both a strong influence on the damage build-up by the ion type and a reverse temperature effect. A straightforward methodology is demonstrated to differentiate between the contributions of pure ballistic and ion-defect reaction processes in the damage formation.

  19. Ferromagnetism and suppression of metallic clusters in Fe implanted ZnO -- a phenomenon related to defects?

    SciTech Connect

    Arenholz, Elke; Zhou, S.; Potzger, K.; Talut, G.; Reuther, H.; Kuepper, K.; Grenzer, J.; Xu, Q.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.

    2008-03-12

    We investigated ZnO(0001) single crystals annealed in high vacuum with respect to their magnetic properties and cluster formation tendency after implant-doping with Fe. While metallic Fe cluster formation is suppressed, no evidence for the relevance of the Fe magnetic moment to the observed ferromagnetism was found. The latter along with the cluster suppression is discussed with respect to defects in the ZnO host matrix, since the crystalline quality of the substrates was lowered due to the preparation as observed by x-ray diffraction.

  20. Characteristic properties of Raman scattering and photoluminescence on ZnO crystals doped through phosphorous-ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, T. S.; Yu, J. H.; Mo, H. S.; Kim, T. S.; Lim, K. Y.; Youn, C. J.; Hong, K. J.

    2014-02-01

    P-doped ZnO was fabricated by means of the ion-implantation method. At the Raman measurement, the blue shift of the E2high mode and A1(LO) phonon of the inactive mode were observed after the P-ion implantation. It suggested to be caused by the compressive stress. Thus, Hall effect measurement indicates that the acceptor levels exists in P-doped ZnO while still maintaining n-type ZnO. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the chemical bond formation of the P2p3/2 spectrum consisted of 2(P2O5) molecules. Therefore, the implanted P ions were substituted to the Zn site in ZnO. From the photoluminescence (PL) spectra, P-related PL peaks were observed in the energy ranges of 3.1 and 3.5 eV, and its origin was analyzed at PZn-2VZn complexes, acting as a shallow acceptor. With increasing temperatures, the neutral-acceptor bound-exciton emission, (A0, X), shows a tendency to quench the intensity and extend the emission linewidth. From the relations of the intensity and the linewidth as a function of temperature, the broadening of linewidth was believed to the result that the vibration mode of E2high participates in the broadening process of (A0, X) and the change of luminescent intensity was attributed to the partial dissociation of (A0, X). Consequently, these facts indicate that the acceptor levels existed in P-doped ZnO layer by the ion implantation.

  1. Characteristic properties of Raman scattering and photoluminescence on ZnO crystals doped through phosphorous-ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, T. S.; Yu, J. H.; Mo, H. S.; Kim, T. S.; Lim, K. Y.; Youn, C. J.; Hong, K. J.

    2014-02-07

    P-doped ZnO was fabricated by means of the ion-implantation method. At the Raman measurement, the blue shift of the E{sub 2}{sup high} mode and A{sub 1}(LO) phonon of the inactive mode were observed after the P-ion implantation. It suggested to be caused by the compressive stress. Thus, Hall effect measurement indicates that the acceptor levels exists in P-doped ZnO while still maintaining n-type ZnO. From the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the chemical bond formation of the P2p{sub 3/2} spectrum consisted of 2(P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) molecules. Therefore, the implanted P ions were substituted to the Zn site in ZnO. From the photoluminescence (PL) spectra, P-related PL peaks were observed in the energy ranges of 3.1 and 3.5 eV, and its origin was analyzed at P{sub Zn}-2V{sub Zn} complexes, acting as a shallow acceptor. With increasing temperatures, the neutral-acceptor bound-exciton emission, (A{sup 0}, X), shows a tendency to quench the intensity and extend the emission linewidth. From the relations of the intensity and the linewidth as a function of temperature, the broadening of linewidth was believed to the result that the vibration mode of E{sub 2}{sup high} participates in the broadening process of (A{sup 0}, X) and the change of luminescent intensity was attributed to the partial dissociation of (A{sup 0}, X). Consequently, these facts indicate that the acceptor levels existed in P-doped ZnO layer by the ion implantation.

  2. Embedment of ZnO nanoparticles in SiO{sub 2} by ion implantation and low-temperature oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Amekura, H.; Umeda, N.; Boldyryeva, H.; Kishimoto, N.; Buchal, Ch.; Mantl, S.

    2007-02-19

    Samples of silica glass (SiO{sub 2}) implanted with 60 keV Zn ions to a fluence of 1.0x10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} were annealed in oxygen gas to form ZnO nanoparticles (NPs). Although the ZnO NPs were formed mainly on the SiO{sub 2} surface after oxidation at 700 deg. C for 1 h, they were formed inside the SiO{sub 2} substrate after lower temperature and long-duration oxidation at 500 deg. C for {approx}70 h, i.e., the embedment of ZnO NPs in SiO{sub 2} was attained. The embedded NPs show a slightly stronger exciton peak and much weaker defect luminescence than the NPs formed on the surface.

  3. Optical activity and defect/dopant evolution in ZnO implanted with Er

    SciTech Connect

    Azarov, Alexander; Galeckas, Augustinas; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.; Hallén, Anders

    2015-09-28

    The effects of annealing on the optical properties and defect/dopant evolution in wurtzite (0001) ZnO single crystals implanted with Er ions are studied using a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and photoluminescence measurements. The results suggest a lattice recovery behavior dependent on ion dose and involving formation/evolution of an anomalous multipeak defect distribution, thermal stability of optically active Er complexes, and Er outdiffusion. An intermediate defect band occurring between the surface and ion-induced defects in the bulk is stable up to 900 °C and has a photoluminescence signature around 420 nm well corresponding to Zn interstitials. The optical activity of the Er atoms reaches a maximum after annealing at 700 °C but is not directly associated to the ideal Zn site configuration, since the Er substitutional fraction is maximal already in the as-implanted state. In its turn, annealing at temperatures above 700 °C leads to dissociation of the optically active Er complexes with subsequent outdiffusion of Er accompanied by the efficient lattice recovery.

  4. Optical activity and defect/dopant evolution in ZnO implanted with Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Alexander; Galeckas, Augustinas; Hallén, Anders; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G.

    2015-09-01

    The effects of annealing on the optical properties and defect/dopant evolution in wurtzite (0001) ZnO single crystals implanted with Er ions are studied using a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and photoluminescence measurements. The results suggest a lattice recovery behavior dependent on ion dose and involving formation/evolution of an anomalous multipeak defect distribution, thermal stability of optically active Er complexes, and Er outdiffusion. An intermediate defect band occurring between the surface and ion-induced defects in the bulk is stable up to 900 °C and has a photoluminescence signature around 420 nm well corresponding to Zn interstitials. The optical activity of the Er atoms reaches a maximum after annealing at 700 °C but is not directly associated to the ideal Zn site configuration, since the Er substitutional fraction is maximal already in the as-implanted state. In its turn, annealing at temperatures above 700 °C leads to dissociation of the optically active Er complexes with subsequent outdiffusion of Er accompanied by the efficient lattice recovery.

  5. Nuclear reaction analysis of Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals: The evaluation of the displacement in oxygen lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2014-08-01

    The displacement of oxygen lattices in Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals is studied by nuclear reaction analysis (NAR), photoluminescence (PL), and Van der Pauw methods. The Ge ion-implantation (net concentration: 2.6 × 1020 cm-3) into ZnO is performed using a multiple-step energy. The high resistivity of ∼103 Ω cm in un-implanted samples remarkably decreased to ∼10-2 Ω cm after implanting Ge-ion and annealing subsequently. NRA measurements of as-implanted and annealed samples suggest the existence of the lattice displacement of O atoms acting as acceptor defects. As O related defects still remain after annealing, these defects are not attributed to the origin of the low resistivity in 800 and 1000 °C annealed ZnO.

  6. Two shallow donors related to Zn interstitial in S-ion implanted ZnO epitaxial film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2014-06-01

    Two shallow donors are observed in sulfur-ion implanted ZnO epitaxial films on sapphire substrates. The resistivity varies from ~103 Ω cm for un-implanted samples to 1.7×10-2 Ω cm for as-implanted ones. This low resistivity is attributed to zinc interstitial (Zni), corresponding to the activation energy (26 meV) estimated from the temperature dependence of electron concentration. The presence of Zni is evaluated from ion channeling by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The disordered concentration is ~40% of Zn atoms at a maximum point (300 nm) from the surface in as-implanted samples and recovers to ~80% after 1000 °C annealing. In 1000 °C annealed samples, a shallower donor level of 12 meV is observed, suggesting the presence of complex defects consisting of remaining Zni and sulfur atoms replaced to the oxygen atom.

  7. Depth Profiling of N and C in Ion Implanted ZnO and Si Using Deuterium Induced Nuclear Reaction Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, John; Murmu, Peter; Markwitz, Andreas

    2008-11-03

    Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) with deuteron ion beams has been used to probe for ion implanted nitrogen and carbon with high sensitivity in zinc oxide and silicon single crystals. The ion implanted N was measured using 1.4 MeV deuteron ion beams and was found to be in agreement with calculated values. The limit of detection for N in ZnO is 8x10{sup 14} ions cm{sup -2}. Raman measurements of the ion implanted samples showed three additional modes at 275, 504, and 644 cm{sup -1} compared to the un-implanted ZnO crystals. The NRA and Raman results provided information on the N concentration, depth distribution, and structural changes that occur in dependence on the nitrogen ion fluences. The deuterium induced {sup 12}C(d,p){sup 13}C reaction was used to measure the carbon impurity/dose in ion implanted silicon. It was found that the use of a large cold shield (liquid nitrogen trap) in the ion implanter chamber greatly reduces the amount of carbon impurity on the surface of ion implanted silicon. Various implantations with N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2} and Pb ions were performed with and without cooling of the liquid nitrogen trap. Simultaneous detection of ppm-level concentrations of {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 14}N enables highly sensitive measurement of impurities that may be incorporated during the fabrication process, transport of the samples and/or storage of the samples in air.

  8. Origins of low resistivity and Ge donor level in Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2013-12-01

    The energy level of Ge in Ge-ion implanted ZnO single crystals is studied by Hall-effect and photoluminescence (PL) methods. The variations in resistivity from ˜103 Ωcm for un-implanted samples to ˜10-2 Ωcm for as-implanted ones are observed. The resistivity is further decreased to ˜10-3 Ωcm by annealing. The origins of the low resistivity are attributed to both the zinc interstitial (Zni) related defects and the electrical activated Ge donor. An activation energy of Ge donors estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration is 102 meV. In PL studies, the new peak at 372 nm (3.33 eV) related to the Ge donor is observed in 1000 °C annealed samples.

  9. Origins of low resistivity and Ge donor level in Ge ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2013-12-04

    The energy level of Ge in Ge-ion implanted ZnO single crystals is studied by Hall-effect and photoluminescence (PL) methods. The variations in resistivity from ∼10{sup 3} Ωcm for un-implanted samples to ∼10{sup −2} Ωcm for as-implanted ones are observed. The resistivity is further decreased to ∼10{sup −3} Ωcm by annealing. The origins of the low resistivity are attributed to both the zinc interstitial (Zn{sub i}) related defects and the electrical activated Ge donor. An activation energy of Ge donors estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration is 102 meV. In PL studies, the new peak at 372 nm (3.33 eV) related to the Ge donor is observed in 1000 °C annealed samples.

  10. Controlling the growth of ZnO quantum dots embedded in silica by Zn/F sequential ion implantation and subsequent annealing.

    PubMed

    Ren, F; Zhang, L Y; Xiao, X H; Cai, G X; Fan, L X; Liao, L; Jiang, C Z

    2008-04-16

    We report the formation of embedded ZnO quantum dots (QDs) by Zn and F ion sequential implantation and subsequent annealing. Optical absorption and photoluminescence spectrum measurements, transmission electron microscopy bright field images and selected area electron diffraction patterns indicate that ZnO QDs were formed after annealing in air or vacuum at temperatures higher than 500 °C. Atomic force microscopy images show a comparatively flat surface of the annealed samples, which indicates that only very few Zn atoms are evaporated to the surfaces. The formation of ZnO QDs during the thermal annealing can be attributed to the direct oxidization of Zn nanoparticles by the oxygen molecules in the substrate produced during the implantation of F ions. The quality of ZnO QDs increases with the increase of annealing temperature. PMID:21825624

  11. Ferromagnetism in 200-MeV Ag{sup +15}-ion-irradiated Co-implanted ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Angadi, Basavaraj; Jung, Y.S.; Choi, Won-Kook; Kumar, Ravi; Jeong, K.; Shin, S.W.; Lee, J.H.; Song, J.H.; Wasi Khan, M.; Srivastava, J.P.

    2006-04-03

    Structural, electrical resistivity, and magnetization properties of 200-MeV Ag{sup +15}-ion-irradiated Co-implanted ZnO thin films are presented. The structural studies show the presence of Co clusters whose size is found to increase with increase of Co implantation. The implanted films were irradiated with 200-MeV Ag{sup +15} ions to fluence of 1x10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The Co clusters on irradiation dissolve in the ZnO matrix. The electrical resistivity of the irradiated samples is lowered to half. The magnetization hysteresis measurements show ferromagnetic behavior at 300 K, and the coercive field increases with the Co implantation. The ferromagnetism at room temperature is confirmed by magnetic force microscopy measurements. The results are explained on the basis of the close interplay between the electrical and the magnetic properties.

  12. Up conversion from visible to ultraviolet in bulk ZnO implanted with Tm ions

    SciTech Connect

    Monteiro, T.; Neves, A. J.; Soares, M. J.; Carmo, M.C.; Peres, M.; Alves, E.; Rita, E.

    2005-11-07

    We report on the up-converted ultraviolet near-band edge emission of bulk ZnO generated by visible and ultraviolet photons with energies below the band gap. This up-converted photoluminescence was observed in samples intentionally doped with Tm ions, suggesting that the energy levels introduced by the rare earth ion in the ZnO band gap are responsible for this process.

  13. Characteristics of ZnO Wafers Implanted with 60 keV Sn{sup +} Ions at Room Temperature and at 110 K

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, Giang T.; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Hirao, Takashi; Nitta, Noriko

    2011-01-07

    ZnO wafers implanted with 60 keV Sn{sup +} ions at room temperature (RT) and at 110 K are investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. The effect of implantation temperature is evident in the XRD and PL data. A yellow-orange (YO) band near 600 nm appears in the PL spectra of the ZnO wafers implanted to the doses of 4x10{sup 14} and 8x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} at RT. The intensity of this band increases and the peak position blue-shifts after illumination of the samples with the 325 nm line of a He-Cd laser. The PL data suggests that the CB (conduction band){yields}V{sub O}{sup +} and Zn{sub i}{sup +{yields}}V{sub Zn}{sup -} transitions contribute to the photoemission of the YO band.

  14. Hydrogen interstitial in H-ion implanted ZnO bulk single crystals: Evaluation by elastic recoil detection analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaida, T.; Kamioka, K.; Nishimura, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.; Kinomura, A.

    2015-12-01

    The origins of low resistivity in H ion-implanted ZnO bulk single crystals are evaluated by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Van der Pauw methods. The H-ion implantation (peak concentration: 5.0 × 1015 cm-2) into ZnO is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The maximum of the concentration of the implanted H estimated by a TRIM simulation is at 3600 nm in depth. The resistivity decreases from ∼103 Ω cm for un implanted ZnO to 6.5 Ω cm for as-implanted, 2.3 × 10-1 Ω cm for 200 °C annealed, and 3.2 × 10-1 Ω cm for 400 °C annealed samples. The ERDA measurements can evaluate the concentration of hydrogens which move to the vicinity of the surface (surface to 300 nm or 100 nm) because of the diffusion by the annealing at 200 °C and 400 °C. The hydrogen concentration near the surface estimated using the 2.0 MeV helium beam is ∼3.8 × 1013 cm-2 for annealed samples. From EPR measurements, the oxygen vacancy of +charge state (Vo+) is observed in as-implanted samples. The Vo+ related signal (g = 1.96) observed under no illumination disappears after successive illumination with a red LED and appears again with a blue light illumination. The activation energy of as-implanted, 200 °C annealed, and 400 °C annealed samples estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration lies between 29 meV and 23 meV, suggesting the existence of H interstitial as a shallow donor level.

  15. Revealing the surface origin of green band emission from ZnO nanostructures by plasma immersion ion implantation induced quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Sun, X. W.; Tay, B. K.; Cao, Peter H. T.; Wang, J. X.; Zhang, X. H.

    2008-03-15

    Surface defect passivation for ZnO nanocombs (NCBs), random nanowires (RNWs), and aligned nanowires (ANWs) was performed through a metal plasma immersion ion implantation with low bias voltages ranging from 0 to 10 kV, where Ni was used as the modification ion. The depth of surface-originated green band (GB) emission is thus probed, revealing the surface origin of the GB. It is also found that the GB is closely related to oxygen gas content during growth of the nanostructures. The GB origin of NCBs and RNWs grown with higher oxygen content is shallower ({approx}0.5 nm), which can be completely quenched with no bias applied. However, the GB origin of ANWs grown at lower oxygen content is much deeper ({approx}7 nm) with a complete quenching bias of 10 kV. Quenching of the GB can be attributed to passivation of the surface hole or electron trapping sites (oxygen vacancies) by Ni ions.

  16. Temperature dependent formation of ZnO and Zn2SiO4 nanoparticles by ion implantation and thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B.; Weathers, D. L.

    2014-08-01

    ZnO and Zn2SiO4 nanoparticles have been synthesized by dual beam implantation of 45 keV ZnO- molecular ions and 15 keV O- ions into Si (100) substrates at room temperature to fluences of 1 × 1017 and 2 × 1017 ions/cm2, respectively. Implanted samples were annealed at different temperatures in a mixture of Ar and H2 for 1 h. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was used to confirm the implanted ion fluences. The diffusion of Zn and O ions due to annealing was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). It was observed that at 700 °C annealing temperature, oxygen diffused into the substrate whereas Zn diffused in both directions; at 900 °C, oxygen diffused more into the substrate but the Zn diffused outward toward the surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to investigate the phase formation and particle sizes. At 700 °C annealing temperature, ZnO phase with an average nanoparticle size of ∼17.5 nm was observed whereas at 900 °C annealing temperature, Zn2SiO4 phase with an average nanoparticle size of ∼19 nm was observed.

  17. Characterization of the lattice defects in Ge-ion implanted ZnO bulk single crystals by Rutherford Backscattering: Origins of low resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamioka, K.; Oga, T.; Izawa, Y.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2013-07-01

    A Ge ion implantation using a multiple-step energy into ZnO bulk single crystals is performed (net concentration: 2.6 × 1020 cm-3). The origins of low resistivity of the Ge implanted ZnO samples are studied by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), photoluminescence (PL). The resistivity measured by Van der Pauw method decreases from ˜103 Ωcm for the un-implanted samples to 1.45 × 10-2 Ωcm for the as-implanted samples, originating from the lattice displacement of Zn (Zni) (˜30 meV [Look et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2552 (1999)]), the existence of which is revealed by the RBS measurements. In contrast, the 1000 °C annealed samples show the higher resistivity of 6.26 × 10-1 Ωcm, indicating that the Zni related defects decrease but still remain despite the annealing. A new PL emission appears at around 372 nm (3.33 eV) in the annealed samples, suggesting a Ge donor with an activation energy of 100 meV. This value corresponds to the activation energy (102 meV) of a Ge donor estimated from the temperature dependence of carrier concentration. These results suggest that the resistivity in the 1000 °C annealed samples results from both the Zni related defects and the electrically activated Ge donor.

  18. Microstrip structures of ZnO nanoparticle aggregates of millimetric length formed by selected-area ion implantation and thermal oxidation.

    PubMed

    Amekura, H; Wang, H-S; Hishita, S; Pan, J; Kishimoto, N; Buchal, Ch; Mantl, S

    2009-02-11

    Regularly arrayed microstrip regions of width approximately 1.4 microm and length extending up to approximately 5 mm, consisting of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) of diameter approximately 50 nm, were fabricated on silica substrates by a two-step process: i.e., selected-area ion implantation and thermal oxidation. The implantation of 60 keV Zn ions in periodic microstrip regions via a resist mask generated periodic grooves with large wings on the surface of silica glass, which can be ascribed to the radiation-induced plastic deformation of silica and sputtering loss. This is the lowest record of the electronic energy loss (S(e)) value to induce the radiation-induced plastic deformation of silica, while no or very low threshold energy has been predicted from a recent study. After thermal oxidation at 700 degrees C for 1 h, the groove structures with the wings disappeared, and periodic microstrips of ZnO nanoparticle aggregates up to 5 mm long appeared on the surface of the substrate. A clear free-exciton peak due to ZnO NPs is observed from these microstrip structures both in optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra. PMID:19417379

  19. Study of non-linear Hall effect in nitrogen-grown ZnO microstructure and the effect of H{sup +}-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Yogesh Bern, Francis; Barzola-Quiquia, Jose; Lorite, Israel; Esquinazi, Pablo

    2015-07-13

    We report magnetotransport studies on microstructured ZnO film grown by pulsed laser deposition in N{sub 2} atmosphere on a-plane Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates and the effect of low energy H{sup +}-implantation. Non-linearity has been found in the magnetic field dependent Hall resistance, which decreases with temperature. We explain this effect with a two-band model assuming the conduction through two different parallel channels having different types of charge carriers. Reduced non-linearity after H{sup +}-implantation in the grown film is due to the shallow-donor effect of hydrogen giving rise to an increment in the electron density, reducing the effect of the other channel.

  20. Development of novel implants with self-antibacterial performance through in-situ growth of 1D ZnO nanowire.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhao; Li, Tak Lung; Wong, Hoi Man; Chu, Paul K; Kao, Richard Y T; Wu, Shuilin; Leung, Frankie K L; Wong, Tak Man; To, Michael K T; Cheung, Kenneth M C; Yeung, Kelvin W K

    2016-05-01

    To prevent the attachment of bacteria to implant surfaces, the 1D zinc oxide nanowire-coating has been successfully developed on material surfaces by using a custom-made hydrothermal approach. The chemical nature, surface topography and wettability of spike-like 1D ZnO nanowire-coating are comprehensively investigated. The anti-adhesive and antimicrobial properties of 1D nanowire-coating are tested against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli by using in vitro live/dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. We find that the adhesion of bacteria can be reduced via the special spike-like topography and that the release of Zn(2+) ions can help suppress the growth of attached bacteria. Furthermore, the antimicrobial effect is also evaluated under in vivo conditions by using a rat model infected with bioluminescent S. aureus. The amount of live bacteria in the rat implanted with a nanowire-coated sample is less than that of the control at various time points. Hence, it is believed that the nanowire-coated material is promising for application in orthopaedic implantation after the long-term animal studies have been completed. PMID:26918511

  1. Characteristic local association of In impurities dispersed in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, W.; Komatsuda, S.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Local environments in 0.5 at.% In-doped ZnO were investigated by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) method. In a comparative study, using the 111Cd probe nuclei as the decay products of different parents, 111In and 111mCd, we found that 111In microscopically forms a unique structure with nonradioactive In ion(s) dispersed in ZnO, whereas 111mCd has no specific interaction with the In impurities. The spectral damping of the TDPAC spectra is attributed to the aftereffect following the EC decay of 111In. It was demonstrated from the aftereffect that the local density and/or mobility of conduction electrons at the 111In probe site in the In-doped ZnO is lowered due to the characteristic structure locally formed by the dispersed In ion(s).

  2. PAC studies on impurities in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deubler, S.; Meier, J.; Schütz, R.; Witthuhn, W.

    1992-01-01

    Acceptor-donor pairs in ZnO are studied by the perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy (PAC) using radioactive 111In/ 111Cd probe atoms. In undoped ZnO the trapping of O-vacancies as well as the trapping of Zn-interstitials at the probe atoms which are located at substitutional Zn sites is observed after different sample treatments. In Cu-, Li-, and Na-doped ZnO the acceptor impurities form complexes with the In donors. The structure of these complexes is given and compared with theoretical calculations.

  3. Growth of a Novel Nanostructured ZnO Urchin: Control of Cytotoxicity and Dissolution of the ZnO Urchin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imani, Roghayeh; Drašler, Barbara; Kononenko, Veno; Romih, Tea; Eleršič, Kristina; Jelenc, Janez; Junkar, Ita; Remškar, Maja; Drobne, Damjana; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-11-01

    The applications of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) in implantable wireless devices, such as diagnostic nanobiosensors and nanobiogenerators, have recently attracted enormous attention due to their unique properties. However, for these implantable nanodevices, the biocompatibility and the ability to control the behaviour of cells in contact with ZnO NWs are demanded for the success of these implantable devices, but to date, only a few contrasting results from their biocompatibility can be found. There is a need for more research about the biocompatibility of ZnO nanostructures and the adhesion and viability of cells on the surface of ZnO nanostructures. Here, we introduce synthesis of a new nature-inspired nanostructured ZnO urchin, with the dimensions of the ZnO urchin's acicula being controllable. To examine the biocompatibility and behaviour of cells in contact with the ZnO urchin, the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell line was chosen as an in vitro experimental model. The results of the viability assay indicated that, compared to control, the number of viable cells attached to the surface of the ZnO urchin and its surrounding area were reduced. The measurements of the Zn contents of cell media confirmed ZnO dissolution, which suggests that the ZnO dissolution in cell culture medium could lead to cytotoxicity. A purposeful reduction of ZnO cytotoxicity was achieved by surface coating of the ZnO urchin with poly(vinylidene fluorid-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP), which changed the material matrix to slow the Zn ion release and consequently reduce the cytotoxicity of the ZnO urchin without reducing its functionality.

  4. Growth of a Novel Nanostructured ZnO Urchin: Control of Cytotoxicity and Dissolution of the ZnO Urchin.

    PubMed

    Imani, Roghayeh; Drašler, Barbara; Kononenko, Veno; Romih, Tea; Eleršič, Kristina; Jelenc, Janez; Junkar, Ita; Remškar, Maja; Drobne, Damjana; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-12-01

    The applications of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) in implantable wireless devices, such as diagnostic nanobiosensors and nanobiogenerators, have recently attracted enormous attention due to their unique properties. However, for these implantable nanodevices, the biocompatibility and the ability to control the behaviour of cells in contact with ZnO NWs are demanded for the success of these implantable devices, but to date, only a few contrasting results from their biocompatibility can be found. There is a need for more research about the biocompatibility of ZnO nanostructures and the adhesion and viability of cells on the surface of ZnO nanostructures. Here, we introduce synthesis of a new nature-inspired nanostructured ZnO urchin, with the dimensions of the ZnO urchin's acicula being controllable. To examine the biocompatibility and behaviour of cells in contact with the ZnO urchin, the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell line was chosen as an in vitro experimental model. The results of the viability assay indicated that, compared to control, the number of viable cells attached to the surface of the ZnO urchin and its surrounding area were reduced. The measurements of the Zn contents of cell media confirmed ZnO dissolution, which suggests that the ZnO dissolution in cell culture medium could lead to cytotoxicity. A purposeful reduction of ZnO cytotoxicity was achieved by surface coating of the ZnO urchin with poly(vinylidene fluorid-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP), which changed the material matrix to slow the Zn ion release and consequently reduce the cytotoxicity of the ZnO urchin without reducing its functionality. PMID:26573932

  5. Iliac artery mural thrombus formation. Effect of antiplatelet therapy on 111In-platelet deposition in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, S.R.; Paxton, L.D.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-09-01

    To measure the rate, extent, and time course of arterial mural thrombus formation in vivo and to assess the effects of antiplatelet therapy in that setting, we have studied autologous /sup 111/In-platelet deposition induced by experimental iliac artery aneurysms in baboons. Scintillation camera imaging analyses were performed at 1, 24, 48, and 72 hours after implantation of the device. Correction for tissue attenuation was determined by using a small, comparably located /sup 111/In source implanted at the time of surgery. In five animals, /sup 111/In-platelet activity accumulated progressively after device implantation, reaching a maximum after the third day. Repeat image analysis carried out 2 weeks after the surgical procedure also showed progressive accumulation of /sup 111/In-platelets over 3 days but at markedly reduced amounts as compared with the initial study. In five additional animals, treatment with a combination of aspirin and dipyridamole begun 1 hour after surgical implantation reduced /sup 111/In-platelet deposition to negligible levels by the third day. Although platelet survival time was shortened and platelet turnover was reciprocally increased in all operated animals, platelet survival and turnover were not affected by antiplatelet therapy. We conclude that, in contrast to platelet survival and turnover measurements, /sup 111/In-platelet imaging is a reliable and sensitive method for localizing and quantifying focal arterial thrombi and for assessing the effects of antiplatelet therapy.

  6. Effect of laser annealing using high repetition rate pulsed laser on optical properties of phosphorus-ion-implanted ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogaki, Tetsuya; Ofuji, Taihei; Tetsuyama, Norihiro; Okazaki, Kota; Higashihata, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Daisuke; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Asano, Tanemasa; Okada, Tatsuo

    2014-02-01

    The effect of high repetition rate pulsed laser annealing with a KrF excimer laser on the optical properties of phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods has been investigated. The recovery levels of phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods have been measured by photoluminescence spectra and cathode luminescence images. Cathode luminescence disappeared over 300 nm below the surface due to the damage caused by ion implantation with an acceleration voltage of 25 kV. When the annealing was performed at a low repetition rate of the KrF excimer laser, cathode luminescence was recovered only in a shallow area below the surface. The depth of the annealed area was increased along with the repetition rate of the annealing laser. By optimizing the annealing conditions such as the repetition rate, the irradiation fluence and so on, we have succeeded in annealing the whole damaged area of over 300 nm in depth and in observing cathode luminescence. Thus, the effectiveness of high repetition rate pulsed laser annealing on phosphorus-ion-implanted zinc oxide nanorods was demonstrated.

  7. ZnO quantum dots-decorated ZnO nanowires for the enhancement of antibacterial and photocatalytic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jyh Ming; Tsay, Li-Yi

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate highly antibacterial activities for killing off Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli using ZnO nanowires decorated with ZnO quantum dots (so-called ZnO QDs/NWs) under visible-light irradiation and dark conditions. The average size of the ZnO QDs is in the range of 3-5 nm; these were uniformly dispersed on the ZnO nanowires’ surface to form the ZnO QDs/NWs. A significant blue-shift effect was observed using photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The size of the ZnO QDs is strongly dependent on the material’s synthesis time. The ZnO QDs/NWs exhibited an excellent photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation. The ZnO QDs’ active sites (i.e. the O-H bond and Zn2+) accelerate the photogenerated-carrier migration from the QDs to the NWs. As a consequence, the electrons reacted with the dissolved oxygen to form oxygen ions and produced hydroperoxyl radicals to enhance photocatalytic activity. The antibacterial activities (as indicated by R-factor-inhibiting activity) of the ZnO QDs/NWs for killing off Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli is around 4.9 and 5.5 under visible-light irradiation and dark conditions, respectively. The hydroxyl radicals served as an efficient oxidized agent for decomposing the organic dye and microorganism species. The antibacterial activities of the ZnO QDs/NWs in the dark may be attributed to the Zn2+ ions that were released from the ZnO QDs and infused into the microbial solution against the growth of bacteria thus disrupting the microorganism. The highly antibacterial and photocatalytic activity of the ZnO QDs/NWs can be well implanted on a screen window, thus offering a promising solution to inhibit the spread of germs under visible-light and dark conditions.

  8. Green emission in carbon doped ZnO films

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, L. T.; Yi, J. B. Zhang, X. Y.; Xing, G. Z.; Luo, X.; Li, S.; Fan, H. M.; Herng, T. S.; Ding, J.; Ionescu, M.

    2014-06-15

    The emission behavior of C-doped ZnO films, which were prepared by implantation of carbon into ZnO films, is investigated. Orange/red emission is observed for the films with the thickness of 60–100 nm. However, the film with thickness of 200 nm shows strong green emission. Further investigations by annealing bulk ZnO single crystals under different environments, i.e. Ar, Zn or C vapor, indicated that the complex defects based on Zn interstitials are responsible for the strong green emission. The existence of complex defects was confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement.

  9. Green emission in carbon doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, L. T.; Yi, J. B.; Zhang, X. Y.; Xing, G. Z.; Fan, H. M.; Herng, T. S.; Luo, X.; Ionescu, M.; Ding, J.; Li, S.

    2014-06-01

    The emission behavior of C-doped ZnO films, which were prepared by implantation of carbon into ZnO films, is investigated. Orange/red emission is observed for the films with the thickness of 60-100 nm. However, the film with thickness of 200 nm shows strong green emission. Further investigations by annealing bulk ZnO single crystals under different environments, i.e. Ar, Zn or C vapor, indicated that the complex defects based on Zn interstitials are responsible for the strong green emission. The existence of complex defects was confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) and low temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurement.

  10. Ferromagnetism in Co- and Mn-doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodoropoulou, N. A.; Hebard, A. F.; Norton, D. P.; Budai, J. D.; Boatner, L. A.; Lee, J. S.; Khim, Z. G.; Park, Y. D.; Overberg, M. E.; Pearton, S. J.; Wilson, R. G.

    2003-12-01

    Bulk single crystals of Sn-doped ZnO were implanted with Co or Mn at doses designed to produce transition metal concentrations of 3-5 at.% in the near-surface (˜2000 Å) region. The implantation was performed at ˜350 °C to promote dynamic annealing of ion-induced damage. Following annealing at 700 °C, temperature-dependent magnetization measurements showed ordering temperatures of ˜300 K for Co- and ˜250 K for Mn-implanted ZnO. Clear hysteresis loops were obtained at these temperatures. The coercive fields were ⩽100 Oe for all measurement temperatures. X-ray diffraction showed no detectable second phases in the Mn-implanted material. One plausible origin for the ferromagnetism in this case is a carrier-induced mechanism. By sharp contrast, the Co-implanted material showed evidence for the presence of Co precipitates with hexagonal symmetry, which is the cause of the room temperature ferromagnetism. Our results are consistent with the stabilization of ferromagnetic states by electron doping in transition metal-doped ZnO predicted by Sato and Katayama-Yoshida [Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 40 (2001) L334]. This work shows the excellent promise of Mn-doped ZnO for potential room temperature spintronic applications.

  11. Immunoscintigraphy with 111In antimyosin Fab.

    PubMed

    Morguet, A J; Munz, D L; Kreuzer, H; Emrich, D

    1990-11-01

    Monoclonal 111In antimyosin Fab is a marker for myocytes which have lost their membrane integrity. Because of the slow blood pool clearance of the radiopharmaceutical, imaging is usually started 24-48 h after intravenous injection of 74 MBq of the tracer. This long postinjection interval restricts its utilization in the primary diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. However, antimyosin may help to differentiate between necrotic and viable myocardium in the subacute stage of incomplete myocardial infarction. Serial endomyocardial biopsy for early detection of transplant rejection after heart transplantation may be partially replaced or supplemented by antimyosin scintigraphy. The compound may facilitate the diagnosis of myocarditis. Other potential indications may be prognostic assessment of dilated cardiomyopathy, monitoring cardiotoxic side-effects of chemotherapeutics, recognition of cardiac contusion as well as diagnosis of rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma. In specific clinical situations 111In antimyosin Fab immunoscintigraphy may provide valuable diagnostic information. PMID:2277688

  12. Control of optical and electrical properties of ZnO nanocrystals by nanosecond-laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogaki, T.; Ofuji, T.; Tetsuyama, N.; Kawahara, H.; Higashihata, M.; Ikenoue, H.; Nakamura, D.; Okada, T.

    2014-03-01

    Effects of laser annealing on electrical and optical properties of Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals, which are expected as building blocks for optoelectronic devices, have been investigated in this study. In the case of fabricating p-n junction in single one-dimensional ZnO nanocrystal, phosphorus-ions implanted p-type ZnO nanocrystals were recrystallized and recovered in the optical properties by nanosecond-laser annealing using a KrF excimer laser. Antimony-doped p-type ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by irradiating laminated structure which antimony thin film were deposited on ZnO nanocrystals with the laser beam. Additionally, it is possible to control the growth rate of ZnO nanowires by using laser annealing. Irradiating with pulsed laser a part of ZnO buffer layer deposited on the a-cut sapphire substrate, then ZnO nanowires were grown on the ZnO buffer layer by the nanoparticle assisted pulsed laser deposition method. As a result, the clear boundary of the laser annealed and non-laser annealed area was appeared. It was observed that ZnO nanowires were grown densely at non-laser annealed area, on the other hand, sparse ones were grown at the laser-annealed region. In this report, the possibility of laser annealing techniques to establish the stable and reliable fabrication process of ZnO nanowires-based LD and LED are discussed on the basis of experimental results.

  13. Killing of human lung cancer cells using a new ( sup 111 In)bleomycin complex ( sup 111 In)BLMC

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, D.Y.; Hamburger, A.W.; Beach, J.L.; Maruyama, Y. )

    1989-01-01

    The ability of a ({sup 111}In)bleomycin complex (({sup 111}In)BLMC) to kill five cell lines of human lung cancer (small cell lung cancer) was investigated. Cells were exposed to either 0.9% NaCl, ({sup 111}In)Cl3, BLM, ({sup 111}In)BLMC, nonradioactive InCl3, or In-BLMC for 60 minutes, plated in soft agarose, and assessed for colony formation. ({sup 111}In)BLMC (40-200 microCi carried by 15-25 micrograms BLM/ml) was more cytotoxic than BLM (15-25 micrograms BLM/ml) by a factor of 1.6-5.3 for five cell lines. The percent survival of N417 cells was 28.4 for ({sup 111}In)BLMC (40 microCi/15 micrograms BLM/ml) and 54.3 for BLM (15 micrograms/ml); 1.9 for ({sup 111}In)BLMC (200 microCi/25 micrograms BLM/ml), and 10.0 for BLM (25 micrograms/ml). {sup 111}InCl3 (200 microCi/ml) and nonradioactive InCl3 failed to inhibit colony formation. The new ({sup 111}In)BLMC may be useful for therapy of some lung cancer patients.

  14. Characterization of ZnO and Zn0.95Co0.05O prepared by sol-gel method using PAC spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, M. E.; Carbonari, A. W.; Cordeiro, M. R.; Saxena, R. N.

    The measurement of the electric field gradient (efg) with PAC spectroscopy was used to follow the heat treatment during the preparation of ZnO samples using sol-gel method. In particular, the investigation was carried out on samples of intrinsically n-type II-VI wurtzite semiconductor ZnO and Co-doped Zn0.95Co0.05O samples prepared by sol-gel methodology from pure metallic Zn(99.9999%). Carrier-free 111In nuclei were introduced in the samples by thermal diffusion. 111In solution was added to the precursor sol-gel solution prior to the formation of gel material. PAC measurements were carried out to follow the formation of the ZnO. Two undoped ZnO samples, which were heated in air and argon atmosphere, show different results. PAC measurements were also used to follow the 111In diffusion in a commercially purchased ZnO (99.99%) sample as well as to compare the results with the measurements taken with sol-gel prepared samples. The results show that samples prepared by sol-gel process followed by heating in argon produce better quality ZnO samples. The results also show that the Co atoms in Zn0.95Co0.05O are in substitutional sites.

  15. Characterization of ZnO and Zn0.95Co0.05O prepared by sol-gel method using PAC spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, M. E.; Carbonari, A. W.; Cordeiro, M. R.; Saxena, R. N.

    2007-07-01

    The measurement of the electric field gradient (efg) with PAC spectroscopy was used to follow the heat treatment during the preparation of ZnO samples using sol-gel method. In particular, the investigation was carried out on samples of intrinsically n-type II-VI wurtzite semiconductor ZnO and Co-doped Zn0.95Co0.05O samples prepared by sol-gel methodology from pure metallic Zn(99.9999%). Carrier-free 111In nuclei were introduced in the samples by thermal diffusion. 111In solution was added to the precursor sol-gel solution prior to the formation of gel material. PAC measurements were carried out to follow the formation of the ZnO. Two undoped ZnO samples, which were heated in air and argon atmosphere, show different results. PAC measurements were also used to follow the 111In diffusion in a commercially purchased ZnO (99.99%) sample as well as to compare the results with the measurements taken with sol-gel prepared samples. The results show that samples prepared by sol-gel process followed by heating in argon produce better quality ZnO samples. The results also show that the Co atoms in Zn0.95Co0.05O are in substitutional sites.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigation of possible ferromagnetic ordering in wide band gap ZnO and related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, A.; Sanyal, D.; Dechoudhury, S.; Bhowmick, D.; Rakshit, T.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2016-07-01

    Room temperature ferromagnetic ordering has been induced in the ZnO thin film by 26 keV C ion implantation. Several orders of resistivity reduction have been observed after C implantation. Ab initio calculations in the frame work of density functional theory indicates that C substitution at the oxygen vacancy site can induce magnetic moment in ZnO. C substitution at zinc vacancy site cannot produce any ferromagnetic moment although zinc vacancy in undoped ZnO induces the same. It has also been shown that ferromagnetic ZnO with sufficient hole concentration at room temperature cannot be realized by adjusting native vacancies only. After C substitution in the system, donor like states appear near the conduction band causing more n-type character compared to undoped ZnO.

  17. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  18. The identification and nature of bound exciton I-line PL systems in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, K.; Cullen, J.; Henry, M. O.; McGlynn, Enda; Khawaga, Rehab I.

    2013-12-04

    The chemical identification of donor bound excitons in ZnO has been studied using radioactive ions. Implantations of {sup 117}Ag - which decays to radioactive Cd and In - have enabled the identification of the I{sub 2} optical feature as being the ionized donor counterpart of I{sub 9}, one of the most prominent optical features in the photoluminescence spectrum of ZnO. Both of these lines are consistent with In occupying a Zn site.

  19. The identification and nature of bound exciton I-line PL systems in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, K.; Cullen, J.; Henry, M. O.; McGlynn, Enda; Khawaga, Rehab I.

    2013-12-01

    The chemical identification of donor bound excitons in ZnO has been studied using radioactive ions. Implantations of 117Ag - which decays to radioactive Cd and In - have enabled the identification of the I2 optical feature as being the ionized donor counterpart of I9, one of the most prominent optical features in the photoluminescence spectrum of ZnO. Both of these lines are consistent with In occupying a Zn site.

  20. Hydrogen-Induced Plastic Deformation in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukáč, F.; Čížek, J.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Traeger, F.; Rogalla, D.; Becker, H.-W.

    In the present work hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals covered with Pd over-layer were electrochemically loaded with hydrogen and the influence of hydrogen on ZnO micro structure was investigated by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) was employed for determination of depth profile of hydrogen concentration in the sample. NRA measurements confirmed that a substantial amount of hydrogen was introduced into ZnO by electrochemical charging. The bulk hydrogen concentration in ZnO determined by NRA agrees well with the concentration estimated from the transported charge using the Faraday's law. Moreover, a subsurface region with enhanced hydrogen concentration was found in the loaded crystals. Slow positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) investigations of hydrogen-loaded crystal revealed enhanced concentration of defects in the subsurface region. This testifies hydrogen-induced plastic deformation of the loaded crystal. Absorbed hydrogen causes a significant lattice expansion. At low hydrogen concentrations this expansion is accommodated by elastic straining, but at higher concentrations hydrogen-induced stress exceeds the yield stress in ZnO and plastic deformation of the loaded crystal takes place. Enhanced hydrogen concentration detected in the subsurface region by NRA is, therefore, due to excess hydrogen trapped at open volume defects introduced by plastic deformation. Moreover, it was found that hydrogen-induced plastic deformation in the subsurface layer leads to typical surface modification: formation of hexagonal shape pyramids on the surface due to hydrogen-induced slip in the [0001] direction.

  1. Osteomyelitis complicating fracture: pitfalls of /sup 111/In leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Pjura, G.A.; Lowry, P.A.; Gobuty, A.H.; Traina, J.F.

    1987-05-01

    /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging has shown greater accuracy and specificity than alternative noninvasive methods in the detection of uncomplicated osteomyelitis. Forty patients with suspected osteomyelitis complicating fractures (with and without surgical intervention) were evaluated with /sup 111/In-labeled leukocytes. All five patients with intense focal uptake, but only one of 13 with no uptake, had active osteomyelitis. However, mild to moderate /sup 111/In leukocyte uptake, observed in 22 cases, indicated the presence of osteomyelitis in only four of these; the other false-positive results were observed in noninfected callus formation, heterotopic bone formation, myositis ossificans, and sickle-cell disease. These results suggest that /sup 111/In-labeled leukocyte imaging is useful for the evaluation of suspected osteomyelitis complicating fracture but must be used in conjunction with clinical and radiographic correlation to avoid false-positive results.

  2. Development of 111In-labeled porphyrins for SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Shaghayegh; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Rahimi, Mohammad; Jalilian, Amir R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this research was the development of 111In-labeled porphyrins as possible radiopharmaceuticals for the imaging of tumors. Methods: Ligands, 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (3, 5-dihydroxyphenyl) porphyrin) (TDHPP), 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin (THPP) and 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) porphyrin) (TDMPP) were labeled with 111InCl3 (produced from proton bombardment of natCd target) in 60 min at 80 ºC. Quality control of labeled compounds was performed via RTLC and HPLC followed by stability studies in final formulation and presence of human serum at 37 ºC for 48 h as well as partition coefficient determination. The biodistribution studies performed using tissue dissection and SPECT imaging up to 24h. Results: The complexes were prepared with more than 99% radiochemical purity (HPLC and RTLC) and high stability to 48 h. Partition coefficients (calculated as log P) for 111In-TDHPP, 111In-THPP and 111In-TDMPP were 0.88, 0.8 and 1.63 respectively. Conclusion: Due to urinary excretion with fast clearance for 111In-TDMPP, this complex is probably a suitable candidate for considering as a possible tumor imaging agent. PMID:27408865

  3. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... electrodes are inserted. The electronic device at the base of the electrode array is then placed under ... FDA approval for implants The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates cochlear implant devices for both adults ...

  4. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Goserelin implant is used in combination with radiation therapy and other medications to treat localized prostate cancer and is ... treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications called gonadotropin- ...

  5. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  6. Carmustine Implant

    MedlinePlus

    Carmustine implant is used along with surgery and sometimes radiation therapy to treat malignant glioma (a certain type of ... Carmustine implant comes as a small wafer that is placed in the brain by a doctor during surgery to ...

  7. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, these devices do not restore ...

  8. Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Updated Safety Information (Consumer Article) FDA Provides Updated Safety Data on Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implants (Press Announcement) [ARCHIVED] Breast Implant Guidance for Industry (2006) Post Approval Studies Webpage Freedom of Information ...

  9. /sup 111/In-/sup 109/In mass difference

    SciTech Connect

    Takagui, E.M.; Dietzsch, O.

    1980-04-01

    A measurement of the difference of Q values for the /sup 108/Cd(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 109/In and the /sup 110/Cd(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 111/In reactions shows a significant discrepancy with the value from the 1977 Atomic Mass Tables. We find Q(/sup 110/Cd(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 111/In) -Q(/sup 108/Cd(/sup 3/He,d)/sup 109/In)=806.5 +- 2.6 keV, leading to a new improved mass excess difference for /sup 111/In-/sup 109/In of -1904.5 +- 7.5 keV.

  10. Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc ion implanted titanium.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guodong; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Meng, Fanhao; Zhu, Hongqin; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-05-01

    Titanium (Ti) and its alloys are widely used as orthopedic and dental implants. In this work, zinc (Zn) was implanted into oxalic acid etched titanium using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to investigate the surface morphology and composition of Zn-implanted titanium. The results indicate that the depth profile of zinc in Zn-implanted titanium resembles a Gaussian distribution, and zinc exists in the form of ZnO at the surface whereas in the form of metallic Zn in the interior. The Zn-implanted titanium can significantly stimulate proliferation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells as well as initial adhesion, spreading activity, ALP activity, collagen secretion and extracellular matrix mineralization of the rat mesenchymal stem cells. The Zn-implanted titanium presents partly antibacterial effect on both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The ability of the Zn-implanted titanium to stimulate cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation as well as the antibacterial effect on E. coli can be improved by increasing implantation time even to 2 h in this work, indicating that the content of zinc implanted in titanium can easily be controlled within the safe concentration using plasma immersion ion implantation technology. The Zn-implanted titanium with excellent osteogenic activity and partly antibacterial effect can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic and dental implants. PMID:24632388

  11. Monitoring of cardiac antirejection therapy with /sup 111/In lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lerch, R.A.; Bergmann, S.R.; Carlson, E.M.; Saffitz, J.E.; Sobel, B.E.

    1982-06-01

    To determine whether lymphocytes labeled with /sup 111/In permit noninvasive assessment of antirejection therapy, we performed 40 allogeneic heterotopic cardiac transplants in rats. Antirejection therapy with azathioprine (30 mg/kg) and sodium salicylate (200 mg/kg) prolonged contractile function of the graft from 7.5 +/- 1.5 (s.d.) days in controls to 19.4 +/- 3.7 days in treated animals. Six to seven days after transplantation, autologous lymphocytes labeled with /sup 111/In were injected intravenously in seven untreated and eight treated rats. Scintigraphy and organ counting were performed 24 hr after administration of labeled cells. At sacrifice all grafts in untreated rats exhibited contractile failure, whereas grafts in all treated rats were beating well. Transplants in untreated recipients exhibited marked accumulation of /sup 111/In lymphocytes detectable scintigraphically, with ratios of 7.7 +/- 1.9 for the activity in the transplant over that in the native heart (HT/HO), as obtained by well counting. In contrast, accumulation was not scintigraphically detectable in transplants of treated rats, with HT/HO ratios of 2.6 +/- 1.8 (p less than 0.005). The results suggested that imaging with /sup 111/In-labeled lymphocytes will permit noninvasive assessment of antirejection therapy.

  12. Lattice sites of Na dopants in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Amorim, L.; Decoster, S.; da Silva, M. R.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2016-09-01

    The angular distribution of β ‑ particles emitted by the radioactive isotope 24Na was monitored following implantation into ZnO single crystals at fluences above 5 × 1012 cm‑2 at CERN’s ISOLDE facility. We identified sodium on two distinct sites: on substitutional Zn sites and on interstitial sites that are close to the so-called octahedral site. The interstitial Na was to a large extent already converted to substitutional Na for annealing at 200 °C, from which an activation energy of 0.8–1.3 eV, most likely around 1.2 eV, is estimated for the migration of interstitial Na in ZnO.

  13. Hyperfine fields in ZnO studied under uni- and biaxial pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przewodnik, R.; Kessler, P.; Vianden, R.

    2013-05-01

    The II-VI semiconductor ZnO has many potential applications in optoelectronic and sensor devices. When used as a transparent conducting contact it is often grown epitaxially onto a different substrate with the consequence that the layers are biaxially strained due to lattice mismatch. Similarly, impurity-implanted layers can lead to the development of local strain fields. Strain usually changes the electronic properties of layers and/ or implanted crystal regions. Detailed knowledge about local strain and its influence on the crystal fields is therefore helpful in predicting changes in crystal properties. The perturbed angular correlation technique was applied to study the electric field gradient (EFG) at the site of implanted In dopants in ZnO under uniaxial and biaxial strain. The observed linear change of the EFG with pressure and a change in symmetry due to compression perpendicular to the c-axis could be well reproduced by theoretical calculations using the point charge model.

  14. Advances in methods to obtain and characterise room temperature magnetic ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Lorite, I.; Kumar, P.; Esquinazi, P.; Straube, B.; Villafuerte, M.; Ohldag, H.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.; Perez de Heluani, S.; Antonov, V. N.; Bekenov, L. V.; Ernst, A.; and others

    2015-02-23

    We report the existence of magnetic order at room temperature in Li-doped ZnO microwires after low energy H{sup +} implantation. The microwires with diameters between 0.3 and 10 μm were prepared by a carbothermal process. We combine spectroscopy techniques to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure and local environment of Zn, O, and Li and their vacancies on the magnetic response. Ferromagnetism at room temperature is obtained only after implanting H{sup +} in Li-doped ZnO. The overall results indicate that low-energy proton implantation is an effective method to produce the necessary amount of stable Zn vacancies near the Li ions to trigger the magnetic order.

  15. Advances in methods to obtain and characterise room temperature magnetic ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorite, I.; Straube, B.; Ohldag, H.; Kumar, P.; Villafuerte, M.; Esquinazi, P.; Rodríguez Torres, C. E.; Perez de Heluani, S.; Antonov, V. N.; Bekenov, L. V.; Ernst, A.; Hoffmann, M.; Nayak, S. K.; Adeagbo, W. A.; Fischer, G.; Hergert, W.

    2015-02-01

    We report the existence of magnetic order at room temperature in Li-doped ZnO microwires after low energy H+ implantation. The microwires with diameters between 0.3 and 10 μm were prepared by a carbothermal process. We combine spectroscopy techniques to elucidate the influence of the electronic structure and local environment of Zn, O, and Li and their vacancies on the magnetic response. Ferromagnetism at room temperature is obtained only after implanting H+ in Li-doped ZnO. The overall results indicate that low-energy proton implantation is an effective method to produce the necessary amount of stable Zn vacancies near the Li ions to trigger the magnetic order.

  16. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  17. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  18. [Implant allergies].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2010-03-01

    An increasing number of patients receive and benefit from osteosynthesis materials or artificial joint replacement. The most common complications are mechanical problems or infection. Metals like nickel, chromium and cobalt as well as bone cement components like acrylates and gentamicin are potential contact allergens which can cause intolerance reactions to implants. Eczema, delayed wound/bone healing, recurrent effusions, pain and implant loosening all have been described as manifestation of implant allergy. In contrast to the high incidence of cutaneous metal allergy, allergies associated with implants are rare. Diagnosis of metal implant allergy is still difficult. Thus differential diagnoses--in particular infection--have to be excluded and a combined approach of allergologic diagnostics by patch test and histopathology of peri-implant tissue is recommended. It is still unknown which conditions induce allergic sensitization to implants or trigger peri-implant allergic reactions in the case of preexisting cutaneous metal allergy. Despite the risk of developing complications being unclear, titanium based osteosynthesis materials are recommended for metal allergic patients and the use of metal-metal couplings in arthroplasty is not recommended for such patients. If the regular CoCr-polyethylene articulation is employed, the patient should give informed written consent. PMID:20204719

  19. Standardisation and half-life measurements of (111)In.

    PubMed

    Dziel, Tomasz; Listkowska, Anna; Tymiński, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    The standardisation of (111)In by 4π(LS)-γ coincidence and anticoincidence counting is presented. Absolute measurements were performed for samples with different concentrations of carrier solution and for different window settings in the gamma channel. The radioactive concentration of the master solution determined on the same reference date was consistent for all measurements performed. The evaluated typical uncertainty was 0.43%. The half-life of (111)In was determined using a time series of measurements performed with an ionisation chamber. A least squares fit of the measured data resulted in a half-life of 2.8067 (34) days consistent with Decay Data Evaluation Project recommended value (0.064% higher than the DDEP value). PMID:26651174

  20. Minority anion substitution by Ni in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Amorim, L. M.; Decoster, S.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Silva, D. J.; Bosne, E.; Silva, M. R. da

    2013-08-26

    We report on the lattice location of implanted Ni in ZnO using the β{sup −} emission channeling technique. In addition to the majority substituting for the cation (Zn), a significant fraction of the Ni atoms occupy anion (O) sites. Since Ni is chemically more similar to Zn than it is to O, the observed O substitution is rather puzzling. We discuss these findings with respect to the general understanding of lattice location of dopants in compound semiconductors. In particular, we discuss potential implications on the magnetic behavior of transition metal doped dilute magnetic semiconductors.

  1. Determination of secondary ion mass spectrometry relative sensitivity factors for polar and non-polar ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Laufer, Andreas; Volbers, Niklas; Eisermann, Sebastian; Meyer, Bruno K.; Potzger, Kay; Geburt, Sebastian; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-11-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is regarded as a promising material for optoelectronic devices, due to its electronic properties. Solely, the difficulty in obtaining p-type ZnO impedes further progress. In this connection, the identification and quantification of impurities is a major demand. For quantitative information using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), so-called relative sensitivity factors (RSF) are mandatory. Such conversion factors did not yet exist for ZnO. In this work, we present the determined RSF values for ZnO using primary (ion implanted) as well as secondary (bulk doped) standards. These RSFs have been applied to commercially available ZnO substrates of different surface termination (a-plane, Zn-face, and O-face) to quantify the contained impurities. Although these ZnO substrates originate from the same single-crystal, we observe discrepancies in the impurity concentrations. These results cannot be attributed to surface termination dependent RSF values for ZnO.

  2. [Pharmacokinetic substantiation of the use of 111In-citrate in bone marrow studies].

    PubMed

    Korsunskiĭ, V N; Tarasenko, Iu I; Koval'chuk, N D; Kosheleva, I Iu; Popov, V I

    1986-07-01

    Soviet radiopharmaceutical 111In-citrin has been studied to define its possible application for marrow visualization. 111In-citrin has been shown to accumulate in the red marrow, parenchymal organs and to be excreted from animal organism by urinary system predominately. 111In-citrin has advantages in defining the nuclide concentrations in marrow blood and serum as compared with colloid preparations and 111In-chloride. 111In-citrin is supposed to be an adequate radiopharmaceutical preparation for visualization of the red marrow. PMID:3736386

  3. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... additional visits are needed for activating, adjusting, and programming the various electrodes that have been implanted. Also, ... to the center for checkups once the final programming is made to the speech processor. Both children ...

  4. Histrelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone growth and development of sexual characteristics) in girls usually between 2 and 8 years of age ... MRI scans (radiology techniques designed to show the images of body structures) to find the implant when ...

  5. Goserelin Implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... which the type of tissue that lines the uterus [womb] grows in other areas of the body ... with the treatment of abnormal bleeding of the uterus. Goserelin implant is in a class of medications ...

  6. Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langouche, G.; Yoshida, Y.

    In this tutorial we describe the basic principles of the ion implantation technique and we demonstrate that emission Mössbauer spectroscopy is an extremely powerful technique to investigate the atomic and electronic configuration around implanted atoms. The physics of dilute atoms in materials, the final lattice sites and their chemical state as well as diffusion phenomena can be studied. We focus on the latest developments of implantation Mössbauer spectroscopy, where three accelerator facilities, i.e., Hahn-Meitner Institute Berlin, ISOLDE-CERN and RIKEN, have intensively been used for materials research in in-beam and on-line Mössbauer experiments immediately after implantation of the nuclear probes.

  7. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  8. 16. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT BUILDING 11 (111) IN 1952. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST AT BUILDING 11 (111) IN 1952. IN 1952, BUILDINGS 11 (111), 12 (121), 21 (221), 22 (122), 23 (123), AND 42 (442) WERE OCCUPIED. BUILDINGS 91 (991) AND 81 (881) WERE OPERATIONAL. BUILDINGS 44 (444) AND 71 (771) WERE UNDER CONSTRUCTION. THE TOTAL COST FOR CONSTRUCTION BY 1952 WAS $2.5 MILLION. BY SEPTEMBER OF 1953, AUSTIN COMPANY HAD COMPLETED 21 BUILDINGS FOR AN APPROXIMATE COST OF $43.3 MILLION (1952). - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  9. In situ 111In-doping for achieving biocompatible and non-leachable 111In-labeled Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianfeng; Jia, Bing; Qiao, Ruirui; Wang, Chao; Jing, Lihong; Wang, Fan; Gao, Mingyuan

    2014-02-28

    The present study reports a new approach for synthesizing (111)In-radiolabeled biocompatible Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Radioactive (111)In is doped in situ into the lattice of Fe3O4 nanoparticles to achieve robust radiolabeling for accurately tracing PEGylated Fe3O4 particles in vivo. PMID:24430864

  10. Defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCluskey, M. D.; Jokela, S. J.

    2009-10-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconductor with potential applications in optoelectronics, transparent electronics, and spintronics. The high efficiency of UV emission in this material could be harnessed in solid-state white lighting devices. The problem of defects, in particular, acceptor dopants, remains a key challenge. In this review, defects in ZnO are discussed, with an emphasis on the physical properties of point defects in bulk crystals. As grown, ZnO is usually n-type, a property that was historically ascribed to native defects. However, experiments and theory have shown that O vacancies are deep donors, while Zn interstitials are too mobile to be stable at room temperature. Group-III (B, Al, Ga, and In) and H impurities account for most of the n-type conductivity in ZnO samples. Interstitial H donors have been observed with IR spectroscopy, while substitutional H donors have been predicted from first-principles calculations but not observed directly. Despite numerous reports, reliable p-type conductivity has not been achieved. Ferromagnetism is complicated by the presence of secondary phases, grain boundaries, and native defects. The famous green luminescence has several possible origins, including Cu impurities and Zn vacancies. The properties of group-I (Cu, Li, and Na) and group-V (N, P, As, and Sb) acceptors, and their complexes with H, are discussed. In the future, doping of ZnO nanocrystals will rely on an understanding of these fundamental properties.

  11. The Hg isoelectronic defect in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, J.; Johnston, K.; Dunker, D.; McGlynn, E.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Bayer, M.; Henry, M. O.

    2013-11-01

    We report a study of the luminescence due to Hg in ZnO, concentrating on the main zero phonon line (ZPL) at 3.2766(1) eV and its associated phonon sidebands. For a sample implanted with radioactive 192Hg, the ZPL intensity, normalised to that of shallow bound exciton emission, is observed to decrease with an equivalent half-life of 4.5(1) h, very close to the 4.85(20) h half-life of 192Hg. ZnO implanted with stable Hg impurities produces the same luminescence spectrum. Temperature dependent measurements confirm that the zero phonon line is a thermalizing doublet involving one allowed and one largely forbidden transition from excited states separated by 0.91(1) meV to a common ground state. Uniaxial stress measurements show that the allowed transition takes place from an orbitally degenerate excited state to a non-degenerate ground state in a centre of trigonal (C3v) symmetry while the magneto-optical properties are characteristic of electron-hole pair recombination at an isoelectronic defect. The doublet luminescence is assigned to bound exciton recombination involving exchange-split Γ5 and Γ1,2 excited states (using C6v symmetry labels; Γ3 and Γ1,2 using C3v labels) at isoelectronic Hg impurities substituting for Zn in the crystal. The electron and hole g values deduced from the magneto-optical data indicate that this Hg impurity centre in ZnO is hole-attractive.

  12. The Hg isoelectronic defect in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, J.; McGlynn, E. Henry, M. O.; Johnston, K.; Dunker, D.; Bayer, M.; Yakovlev, D. R.

    2013-11-21

    We report a study of the luminescence due to Hg in ZnO, concentrating on the main zero phonon line (ZPL) at 3.2766(1) eV and its associated phonon sidebands. For a sample implanted with radioactive {sup 192}Hg, the ZPL intensity, normalised to that of shallow bound exciton emission, is observed to decrease with an equivalent half-life of 4.5(1) h, very close to the 4.85(20) h half-life of {sup 192}Hg. ZnO implanted with stable Hg impurities produces the same luminescence spectrum. Temperature dependent measurements confirm that the zero phonon line is a thermalizing doublet involving one allowed and one largely forbidden transition from excited states separated by 0.91(1) meV to a common ground state. Uniaxial stress measurements show that the allowed transition takes place from an orbitally degenerate excited state to a non-degenerate ground state in a centre of trigonal (C{sub 3v}) symmetry while the magneto-optical properties are characteristic of electron-hole pair recombination at an isoelectronic defect. The doublet luminescence is assigned to bound exciton recombination involving exchange-split Γ{sub 5} and Γ{sub 1,2} excited states (using C{sub 6v} symmetry labels; Γ{sub 3} and Γ{sub 1,2} using C{sub 3v} labels) at isoelectronic Hg impurities substituting for Zn in the crystal. The electron and hole g values deduced from the magneto-optical data indicate that this Hg impurity centre in ZnO is hole-attractive.

  13. Electrical properties of ZnO single nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Markus; Barzola-Quiquia, José; Zoraghi, Mahsa; Esquinazi, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the electrical resistance R(T) of ZnO nanowires of ≈ 400 nm diameter as a function of temperature, between 30 K and 300 K, and frequency in the range 40 Hz to 30 MHz. The measurements were done on the as-prepared and after low-energy proton implantation at room temperature. The temperature dependence of the resistance of the wire, before proton implantation, can be well described by two processes in parallel. One process is the fluctuation induced tunneling conductance (FITC) and the other the usual thermally activated process. The existence of a tunneling conductance was also observed in the current-voltage (I-V) results, and can be well described by the FITC model. Impedance spectroscopy measurements in the as-prepared state and at room temperature, indicate and support the idea of two contributions of these two transport processes in the nanowires. Electron backscatter diffraction confirms the existence of different crystalline regions. After the implantation of H+ a third thermally activated process is found that can be explained by taking into account the impurity band splitting due to proton implantation.

  14. Al-doped ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, Pratibha; Agashe, Chitra; Mahamuni, Shailaja

    2008-11-01

    Al3+-doped ZnO nanocrystals were differently obtained by wet chemical and an electrochemical route. An increase in forbidden gap due to change in crystal size and also due to Al3+ doping in ZnO is critically analyzed. The Moss-Burstein type shift in Al3+-doped ZnO nanocrystals provides an evidence of successful Al3+ doping in ZnO nanocrystals. The possibility of varying the carrier concentration in ZnO nanocrystals is the indirect implication of the present investigations.

  15. A Comparison of ZnO and ZnO(-)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations are performed to support and to help interpret the experimental work reported in the proceeding manuscript. The CCSD(T) approach, in conjunction with a large basis set, is used to compute spectroscopic constants for the X(exp 1)Epsilon(+) and (3)II states of ZnO and the X(exp 2)Epsilon(+) state of ZnO(-). The spectroscopic constants, including the electron affinity, are in good agreement with experiment. The ZnO EA is significantly larger than that of O, thus relative to the atomic ground state asymptotes, ZnO(-) has a larger D(sub o) than the (1)Epsilon(+) state, despite the fact that the extra electron goes into an antibonding orbital. The changes in spectroscopic constants can be understood in terms of the X(exp 1)Epsilon(+) formally dissociating to Zn (1)S + O (1)D while the (3)II and (2)Epsilon(+) states dissociate to Zn (1)S + O (3)P and Zn (1) and O(-) (2)P, respectively.

  16. Nonstoichiometric zinc oxide and indium-doped zinc oxide: Electrical conductivity and {sup 111}In-TDPAC studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.; Sleight, A.W.; Platzer, R.; Gardner, J.A.

    1996-02-15

    Indium-doped zinc oxide powders have been prepared which show room-temperature electrical conductivities as high as 30 {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}. The indium doping apparently occurs as Zn{sub 1-x}In{sub x}O,Zn{sub 1-y}In{sub y}O{sub 1+y/2}, or a combination of these. Optimum conductivity occurs for Zn{sub 1-x}In{sub x}O where the maximum value of x obtained was about 0.5 at%. The degrees of sample reduction were determined by iodimetric titration. Time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) spectroscopy on indium doped zinc oxide is consistent with indium substituting at normal zinc sites in the ZnO lattice. TDPAC studies on zinc oxide annealed under zinc vapors show a second environment for the {sup 111}In probe. In this case, there is an unusually high temperature dependence of the electric field gradient which may be caused by a nearby zinc interstitial. An important conclusion of this work is that zinc interstitials are not ionized and do not therefore contribute significantly to the increased conductivity of reduced zinc oxide.

  17. Flexible, transparent and exceptionally high power output nanogenerators based on ultrathin ZnO nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ngoc, Huynh; Kang, Dae Joon

    2016-02-01

    Novel nanogenerator structures composed of ZnO nanoflakes of less than 10 nm thickness were fabricated using a novel method involving a facile synthetic route and a rational design. The fabricated nanogenerators exhibited a short-circuit current density of 67 μA cm-2, a peak-to-peak open-circuit voltage of 110 V, and an overall output power density exceeding 1.2 mW cm-2, and to the best of our knowledge, these are the best values that have been reported so far in the literature on ZnO-based nanogenerators. We demonstrated that our nanogenerator design could instantaneously power 20 commercial green light-emitting diodes without any additional energy storage processes. Both the facile synthetic route for the ZnO nanoflakes and the straightforward device fabrication process present great scaling potential in order to power mobile and personal electronics that can be used in smart wearable systems, transparent and flexible devices, implantable telemetric energy receivers, electronic emergency equipment, and other self-powered nano/micro devices.Novel nanogenerator structures composed of ZnO nanoflakes of less than 10 nm thickness were fabricated using a novel method involving a facile synthetic route and a rational design. The fabricated nanogenerators exhibited a short-circuit current density of 67 μA cm-2, a peak-to-peak open-circuit voltage of 110 V, and an overall output power density exceeding 1.2 mW cm-2, and to the best of our knowledge, these are the best values that have been reported so far in the literature on ZnO-based nanogenerators. We demonstrated that our nanogenerator design could instantaneously power 20 commercial green light-emitting diodes without any additional energy storage processes. Both the facile synthetic route for the ZnO nanoflakes and the straightforward device fabrication process present great scaling potential in order to power mobile and personal electronics that can be used in smart wearable systems, transparent and flexible

  18. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... outside of the body, behind the ear. A second part is surgically placed under the skin. An implant does not restore normal hearing. It can help a person understand speech. Children and adults can benefit from them. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  19. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePlus

    ... are sent along the auditory nerve to the brain. A deaf person does not have a functioning inner ear. A cochlear implant tries to replace the function of the inner ear by ... signals to the brain. Sound is picked up by a microphone worn ...

  20. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D. Corolewski, Caleb D.; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. Grant; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence indicates these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.4, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO{sub 2} contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals is attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a Zn vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g{sub ⊥} = 2.0015 and g{sub //} = 2.0056, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0035.

  1. Acceptors in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Corolewski, Caleb; Lv, Jinpeng; Tarun, Marianne C.; Teklemichael, Samuel T.; Walter, Eric D.; Norton, M. G.; Harrison, Kale W.; Ha, Su Y.

    2015-03-21

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has potential for a range of applications in the area of optoelectronics. The quest for p-type ZnO has focused much attention on acceptors. In this paper, Cu, N, and Li acceptor impurities are discussed. Experimental evidence shows that these point defects have acceptor levels 3.2, 1.5, and 0.8 eV above the valence-band maximum, respectively. The levels are deep because the ZnO valence band is quite low compared to conventional, non-oxide semiconductors. Using MoO2 contacts, the electrical resistivity of ZnO:Li was measured and showed behavior consistent with bulk hole conduction for temperatures above 400 K. A photoluminescence peak in ZnO nanocrystals has been attributed to an acceptor, which may involve a zinc vacancy. High field (W-band) electron paramagnetic resonance measurements on the nanocrystals revealed an axial center with g = 2.0033 and g = 2.0075, along with an isotropic center at g = 2.0053.

  2. Homoepitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C-H; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; McCarty, P.; George, M. A.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    ZnO films have high potential for many applications, such as surface acoustic wave filters, UV detectors, and light emitting devices due to its structural, electrical, and optical properties. High quality epitaxial films are required for these applications. The Al2O3 substrate is commonly used for ZnO heteroepitaxial growth. Recently, high quality ZnO single crystals are available for grow homoepitaxial films. Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (O-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. As a comparison, films were also deposited on (0001) Al2O3 substrates. It was found that the two polar ZnO surfaces have different photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, surface structure and morphology, which strongly influence the epitaxial film growth. The morphology and structure of homoepitaxial films grown on the ZnO substrates were different from heteroepitaxial films grown on the Al2O3. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite surface. The measurements of PL, low-angle incident x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy of ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth.

  3. Preparation of new morphological ZnO and Ce-doped ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Chelouche, A.; Djouadi, D.; Aksas, A.

    2013-12-16

    ZnO micro-tori and cerium doped hexangulars ZnO have been prepared by the sol-gel method under methanol hypercritical conditions of temperature and pressure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement has revealed the high crystalline quality and the nanometric size of the samples. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has shown that the ZnO powder has a torus-like shape while that of ZnO:Ce has a hexangular-like shape, either standing free or inserted into the cores of ZnO tori. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has revealed that the ZnO particles have sizes between 25 and 30 nm while Ce-doped ZnO grains have diameters ranging from 75 nm to 100 nm. Photoluminescence spectra at room temperature of the samples have revealed that the introduction of cerium in ZnO reduces the emission intensity lines, particularly the ZnO red and green ones.

  4. p type doping of zinc oxide by arsenic ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Braunstein, G.; Muraviev, A.; Saxena, H.; Dhere, N.; Richter, V.; Kalish, R.

    2005-11-07

    p type doping of polycrystalline ZnO thin films, by implantation of arsenic ions, is demonstrated. The approach consisted of carrying out the implantations at liquid-nitrogen temperature ({approx}-196 deg. C), followed by a rapid in situ heating of the sample, at 560 deg. C for 10 min, and ex situ annealing at 900 deg. C for 45 min in flowing oxygen. p type conductivity with a hole concentration of 2.5x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} was obtained using this approach, following implantation of 150 keV 5x10{sup 14} As/cm{sup 2}. A conventional room-temperature implantation of 1x10{sup 15} As/cm{sup 2}, followed by the same ex situ annealing, resulted in n type conductivity with a carrier concentration of 1.7x10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}.

  5. Effect of ZnO morphology on affecting bactericidal property of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajeev Kumar; Agarwal, Meenakshi; Balani, Kantesh

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infection of implants can be controlled by selective trapping of bacteria, followed with consequent killing by targeted antibacterial agents. Herein, the role of various ZnO morphologies, viz. micro-rods (R), nanoparticles (NP), and micro-disks (D) on antibacterial efficacy of ZnO via release of Zn(2+) and H2O2 is assessed, both as isolated powders and via incorporating them in cytocompatible ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Though ZnO is antibacterial, interestingly, all ZnO morphologies elicited a supportive growth of gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) in culture medium (until 28-35μg/ml). But, all ZnO morphologies did elicit bactericidal effect on gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis) both in culture medium (for 0-2.5μg/ml) or when incorporated (5-20wt.%) into UHMWPE. The bactericidal mechanisms were quantified for various ZnO morphologies via: (i) H2O2 production, (ii) Zn(2+) release, and (iii) the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. On one hand, where only ZnO(NP) elicited release of H2O2 in the absence of light, maximum Zn(2+) release was elicited by ZnO(D). Interestingly, when ZnO is incorporated as reinforcement (5-20wt.%), its antibacterial action against E. coli was vividly observed due to selective proliferation of bacteria only on friendly UHMWPE matrix. Hence, luring bacteria on affable UHMWPE surface can be complemented with their targeted killing by ZnO present in composite. PMID:26952491

  6. Impurity sublattice localization in ZnO revealed by Li marker diffusion.

    PubMed

    Azarov, A Yu; Knutsen, K E; Neuvonen, P T; Vines, L; Svensson, B G; Kuznetsov, A Yu

    2013-04-26

    Sublattice localization of impurities in compound semiconductors, e.g., ZnO, determines their electronic and optical action. Despite that the impurity position may be envisaged based on charge considerations, the actual localization is often unknown, limiting our understanding of the incorporation and possible doping mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that the preferential sublattice occupation for a number of impurities in ZnO can be revealed by monitoring Li diffusion. In particular, using ion implantation, the impurity incorporation into the Zn sublattice (holds for, B, Mg, P, Ag, Cd, and Sb) manifests in the formation of Li-depleted regions behind the implanted one, while Li pileups in the region of the implantation peaks for impurities residing on O sites, e.g., N. The behavior appears to be of general validity and the phenomena are explained in terms of the apparent surplus of Zn and O interstitials, related to the lattice localization of the impurities. Furthermore, Cd+O and Mg+O co-doping experiments revealed that implanted O atoms act as an efficient blocking "filter" for fast diffusing Zn interstitials. PMID:23679745

  7. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Transition Metal Doped CVD-Grown ZnO Films and Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. H.; Gateau, R.; Bartynski, R. A.; Wu, P.; Lu, Y.; Wielunski, L.; Poltavets, V.; Greenblatt, M.; Arena, D. A.; Dvorak, J.; Calvin, S.

    2006-03-01

    We have characterized the chemical, compositional, and magnetic properties of Mn- and Fe-ion implanted epitaxial ZnO films and single crystal nanostructures grown by MOCVD as candidate room temperature diluted magnetic semiconductors. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAS) shows that Mn-implanted films contain Mn^2+ ions which convert to a mixture of Mn^3+ and Mn^4+ upon annealing. Fe-implanted films contain a mixture of Fe^2+ and Fe^3+ which converts to a higher concentration of Fe^3+ upon annealing. XAS and preliminary analysis of EXAFS data indicate that the TM ions are substitutional for Zn. SQUID magnetometry shows that as-implanted films are ferromagnetic at 5K and the annealed films are ferromagnetic at room temperature. X-ray diffraction shows that the annealed films remain epitaxial with excellent long range order. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry indicates a substantial recovery of local order upon annealing as well. The properties of in-situ Fe-doped MOCVD-grown ZnO epitaxial films and nanostructures will also be discussed.

  8. Acceptor Type Vacancy Complexes In As-Grown ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Zubiaga, A.; Tuomisto, F.; Zuniga-Perez, J.

    2010-11-01

    One of the many technological areas that ZnO is interesting for is the construction of opto-electronic devices working in the blue-UV range as its large band gap ({approx}3.4 eV at 10 K) makes them suitable for that purpose. As-grown ZnO shows generally n-type conductivity partially due to the large concentration of unintentional shallow donors, like H, but impurities can also form complexes with acceptor type defects (Zn vacancy) leading to the creation of compensating defects. Recently, Li{sub Zn} and Na{sub Zn} acceptors have been measured and H could form similar type of defects. Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation spectroscopy experimental results on the observation of Zn related vacancy complexes in ZnO thin films, as-grown, O implanted and Al doped will be presented. Results show that as-grown ZnO film show small Zn vacancy related complexed that could be related to presence of H as a unintentional doping element.

  9. NEXAFS and XMCD studies of single-phase Co doped ZnO thin films.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhinav Pratap; Kumar, Ravi; Thakur, P; Brookes, N B; Chae, K H; Choi, W K

    2009-05-01

    A study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of Co doped ZnO thin films synthesized by ion implantation followed by swift heavy ion irradiation is presented using near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements. The spectral features of NEXAFS at the Co L(3,2)-edge show entirely different features than that of metallic Co clusters and other Co oxide phases. The atomic multiplet calculations are performed to determine the valence state, symmetry and the crystal field splitting, which show that in the present system Co is in the 2+ state and substituted at the Zn site in tetrahedral symmetry with 10Dq = -0.6 eV. The ferromagnetic character of these materials is confirmed through XMCD spectra. To rule out the possibilities of defect induced magnetism, the results are compared with Ar annealed and Ar-ion implanted pure ZnO thin films. The presented results confirm the substitution of Co at the Zn site in the ZnO matrix, which is responsible for room temperature ferromagnetism. PMID:21825451

  10. Gold coated ZnO nanorod biosensor for glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Anuradha; Jain, Chhavi; Rao, V. Padmanapan; Banerjee, S.

    2012-06-01

    Gold coated ZnO nanorod based biosensor has been fabricated for its glucose detecting abilities and compared with that of ZnO nanorod based biosensor. SEM images of electrochemically grown ZnO nanorods show hexagonally grown ZnO nanorods on an ITO substrate. Electrochemical analysis show that gold coated ZnO based biosensors have higher sensitivity, lower limit of detection and a wider linear range for glucose detection. The results demonstrate that gold coated ZnO nanorod based biosensors are a promising material for biosensor applications over single component ZnO nanorod based biosensor.

  11. [Preparation of two poor water soluble drugs - nanoporous ZnO solid dispersions and the mechanism of drug dissolution improvement].

    PubMed

    Gao, Bei; Sun, Chang-shan; Zhi, Zhuang-zhi; Wang, Yan; Chang, Di; Wang, Si-ling; Jiang, Tong-ying

    2011-11-01

    Nanoporous ZnO was used as a carrier to prepare drug solid dispersion, the mechanism of which to improve the drug dissolution was also studied. Nanoporous ZnO, obtained through chemical deposition method, was used as a carrier to prepare indomethacin and cilostazol solid dispersions by melt-quenching method, separately. The results of scanning electron microscope, surface area analyzer, fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimeter and X-ray diffraction showed that drugs were implanted into nanopores of ZnO by physical adsorption effect and highly dispersed into nanopores of ZnO in amorphous form, moreover, these nanopores strongly inhibited amorphous recrystallization in the condition of 45 degrees C and 75% RH. In addition, the results of the dissolution tested in vitro exhibited that the accumulated dissolutions of indomethacin and cilostazol solid dispersions achieved about 90% within 5 min and approximately 80% within 30 min. It was indicated in this study that the mechanism of drug dissolution improvement was associated with the effects of nanoporous ZnO carrier on increasing drug dispersion, controlling drug in nanopores as amorphous form and inhibiting amorphous recrystallization. PMID:22260037

  12. DFT study of the hyperfine parameters and magnetic properties of ZnO doped with 57Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Piñera, I.; Leyva, A.; Cabal, A. E.; Van Espen, P.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic state of 57Fe implanted and doped ZnO samples have been reported and studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy at different temperatures. The Mössbauer spectra mainly showed four doublets and three sextets, but some ambiguous identification remains regarding the probe site location and influence of defects in the hyperfine and magnetic parameters. In the present work some possible implantation configurations are suggested and evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation and electronic structure calculations within the density functional theory. Various implantation environments were proposed and studied considering the presence of defects. The obtained 57Fe hyperfine parameters show a good agreement with the reported experimental values for some of these configurations. The possibility of Fe pair formation, as well as a Zn site vacancy stabilization between the second and third neighborhood of the implantation site, is supported.

  13. N Doping to ZnO Nanorods for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting under Visible Light: Engineered Impurity Distribution and Terraced Band Structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Ren, Feng; Zhou, Jigang; Cai, Guangxu; Cai, Li; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Dongniu; Liu, Yichao; Guo, Liejin; Shen, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Solution-based ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) were modified with controlled N doping by an advanced ion implantation method, and were subsequently utilized as photoanodes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting under visible light irradiation. A gradient distribution of N dopants along the vertical direction of ZnO nanorods was realized. N doped ZnO NRAs displayed a markedly enhanced visible-light-driven PEC photocurrent density of ~160 μA/cm2 at 1.1 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE), which was about 2 orders of magnitude higher than pristine ZnO NRAs. The gradiently distributed N dopants not only extended the optical absorption edges to visible light region, but also introduced terraced band structure. As a consequence, N gradient-doped ZnO NRAs can not only utilize the visible light irradiation but also efficiently drive photo-induced electron and hole transfer via the terraced band structure. The superior potential of ion implantation technique for creating gradient dopants distribution in host semiconductors will provide novel insights into doped photoelectrode materials for solar water splitting. PMID:26262752

  14. N Doping to ZnO Nanorods for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting under Visible Light: Engineered Impurity Distribution and Terraced Band Structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Ren, Feng; Zhou, Jigang; Cai, Guangxu; Cai, Li; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Dongniu; Liu, Yichao; Guo, Liejin; Shen, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Solution-based ZnO nanorod arrays (NRAs) were modified with controlled N doping by an advanced ion implantation method, and were subsequently utilized as photoanodes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting under visible light irradiation. A gradient distribution of N dopants along the vertical direction of ZnO nanorods was realized. N doped ZnO NRAs displayed a markedly enhanced visible-light-driven PEC photocurrent density of ~160 μA/cm(2) at 1.1 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE), which was about 2 orders of magnitude higher than pristine ZnO NRAs. The gradiently distributed N dopants not only extended the optical absorption edges to visible light region, but also introduced terraced band structure. As a consequence, N gradient-doped ZnO NRAs can not only utilize the visible light irradiation but also efficiently drive photo-induced electron and hole transfer via the terraced band structure. The superior potential of ion implantation technique for creating gradient dopants distribution in host semiconductors will provide novel insights into doped photoelectrode materials for solar water splitting. PMID:26262752

  15. Retrograde peri-implantitis.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Jumshad B; Shivakumar, B; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  16. Diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients: Value of 111In-leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Brown, M.L.; Sutton, R.T. )

    1991-09-01

    The noninvasive diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot in diabetic patients with currently available radiologic and radionuclide imaging techniques is often difficult. Recently, 111In-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy has been proposed as an attractive alternative. Accordingly, the authors retrospectively reviewed 51 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, 49 technetium-99m bone scans, and 49 plain radiographs obtained in 51 adults with diabetes in whom osteomyelitis of the foot was suspected. The sensitivity and specificity of these techniques were evaluated in all patients, as well as in a subgroup of 11 patients with neuroarthropathy. Results with 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were also examined in subsets of patients with soft-tissue ulcers (n = 35) and those receiving antibiotics during investigation (n = 20). Confirmation or exclusion of osteomyelitis was made surgically in 28 patients and clinically in 23. Fourteen patients had osteomyelitis. Bone scans were most sensitive (93%) but least specific (43%); plain radiographs were most specific (83%) but least sensitive (43%). 111In-labeled leukocyte scans were both sensitive (79%) and specific (78%), and remained useful in patients with neuroarthropathy, soft-tissue ulcers, and antibiotic treatment. Poor spatial resolution contributed to the false-negative and false-positive 111In-labeled leukocyte scans, suggesting that this technique should not be interpreted independent of other tests. 111In-labeled leukocyte scans are a valuable diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of pedal osteomyelitis in diabetic patients.

  17. Evaluation in a Dog Model of Three Antimicrobial Glassy Coatings: Prevention of Bone Loss around Implants and Microbial Assessments

    PubMed Central

    López-Píriz, Roberto; Solá-Linares, Eva; Rodriguez-Portugal, Mercedes; Malpica, Beatriz; Díaz-Güemes, Idoia; Enciso, Silvia; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Cabal, Belén; Granizo, Juan José; Moya, José Serafín; Torrecillas, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study is to evaluate, in a ligature-induced peri-implantitis model, the efficacy of three antimicrobial glassy coatings in the prevention of biofilm formation, intrasulcular bacterial growth and the resulting peri-implant bone loss. Methods Mandibular premolars were bilaterally extracted from five beagle dogs. Four dental implants were inserted on each hemiarch. Eight weeks after, one control zirconia abutment and three with different bactericidal coatings (G1n-Ag, ZnO35, G3) were connected. After a plaque control period, bacterial accumulation was allowed and biofilm formation on abutments was observed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Peri-implantitis was induced by cotton ligatures. Microbial samples and peri-implant crestal bone levels of all implant sites were obtained before, during and after the breakdown period. Results During experimental induce peri-implantitis: colony forming units counts from intrasulcular microbial samples at implants with G1n-Ag coated abutment remained close to the basal inoculum; G3 and ZnO35 coatings showed similar low counts; and anaerobic bacterias counts at control abutments exhibited a logarithmic increase by more than 2. Bone loss during passive breakdown period was no statistically significant. Additional bone loss occurred during ligature-induce breakdown: 0.71 (SD 0.48) at G3 coating, 0.57 (SD 0.36) at ZnO35 coating, 0.74 (SD 0.47) at G1n-Ag coating, and 1.29 (SD 0.45) at control abutments; and statistically significant differences (p<0.001) were found. The lowest bone loss at the end of the experiment was exhibited by implants dressing G3 coated abutments (mean 2.1; SD 0.42). Significance Antimicrobial glassy coatings could be a useful tool to ward off, diminish or delay peri-implantitis progression. PMID:26489088

  18. Spinel ferrite nanocrystals embedded inside ZnO: Magnetic, electronic, and magnetotransport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Potzger, K.; Xu, Qingyu; Kuepper, K.; Talut, G.; Markó, D.; Mücklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.; Schmidt, H.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we show that spinel ferrite nanocrystals ( NiFe2O4 , and CoFe2O4 ) can be texturally embedded inside a ZnO matrix by ion implantation and postannealing. The two kinds of ferrites show different magnetic properties, e.g., coercivity and magnetization. Anomalous Hall effect and positive magnetoresistance have been observed. Our study suggests a ferrimagnet/semiconductor hybrid system for potential applications in magnetoelectronics. This hybrid system can be tuned by selecting different transition-metal ions (from Mn to Zn) to obtain various magnetic and electronic properties.

  19. Spinel ferrite nanocrystals embedded inside ZnO: magnetic, electronic andmagneto-transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shengqiang; Potzger, K.; Xu, Qingyu; Kuepper, K.; Talut, G.; Marko, D.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Arenholz, E.; Schmidt, H.

    2009-08-21

    In this paper we show that spinel ferrite nanocrystals (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) can be texturally embedded inside a ZnO matrix by ion implantation and post-annealing. The two kinds of ferrites show different magnetic properties, e.g. coercivity and magnetization. Anomalous Hall effect and positive magnetoresistance have been observed. Our study suggests a ferrimagnet/semiconductor hybrid system for potential applications in magneto-electronics. This hybrid system can be tuned by selecting different transition metal ions (from Mn to Zn) to obtain various magnetic and electronic properties.

  20. High-temperature ferromagnetism in transition metal implanted wide-bandgap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raley, Jeremy A.

    The field of spin transport electronics (spintronics) is a viable candidate for advancing computing and communication technologies. Material with both semiconductor and magnetic properties, which is commonly called a dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS), will prove most useful in the fabrication of spintronic devices. In order to produce a DMS at above room temperature, transition metals (TMs) were implanted into host semiconductors of p-GaN, Al0.35Ga0.65N, or ZnO. Magnetic hysteresis measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer show that some of the material combinations clearly exhibit ferromagnetism above room temperature. The most promising materials for creating spintronic devices using ion implantation are p-GaN:Mn, Al0.35Ga0.65N:Cr, and Fe-implanted ZnO nanotips on Al2O3. Temperature-dependent magnetization measurements confirm that indications of ferromagnetism are due to DMS behavior. Photo- and cathodoluminescence measurements show that implantation damage is recovered and the implanted TMs are incorporated into the semiconductor. As progress is made toward realizing practical spintronic devices, the work reported here will be useful for determining material combinations and implantation conditions that will yield the needed materials.

  1. The nitridation of ZnO nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) with diameters of 50 to 250 nm and lengths of several micrometres have been grown by reactive vapour transport via the reaction of Zn with oxygen on 1 nm Au/Si(001) at 550°C under an inert flow of Ar. These exhibited clear peaks in the X-ray diffraction corresponding to the hexagonal wurtzite crystal structure of ZnO and a photoluminescence spectrum with a peak at 3.3 eV corresponding to band edge emission close to 3.2 eV determined from the abrupt onset in the absorption-transmission through ZnO NWs grown on 0.5 nm Au/quartz. We find that the post growth nitridation of ZnO NWs under a steady flow of NH3 at temperatures ≤600°C promotes the formation of a ZnO/Zn3N2 core-shell structure as suggested by the suppression of the peaks related to ZnO and the emergence of new ones corresponding to the cubic crystal structure of Zn3N2 while maintaining their integrity. Higher temperatures lead to the complete elimination of the ZnO NWs. We discuss the effect of nitridation time, flow of NH3, ramp rate and hydrogen on the conversion and propose a mechanism for the nitridation. PMID:22397754

  2. Fabrication of ZnO nanoparticles by laser ablation of sintered ZnO in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Keisuke; Nanai, Yasushi; Kimura, Seiji; Okuno, Tsuyoshi

    2012-04-01

    Fabrication of ZnO nanoparticles by laser ablation in liquid medium is reported. The possibility of using a sintered ZnO target for the ablation as well as a Zn plate is demonstrated. The appropriate aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate is found to be 1 mM for ZnO growing. The shape of ZnO nanoparticles is sphere and its diameter is 30˜60 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectra, Raman scattering spectra, and photoluminescence spectra reveal the optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles. Nanoparticles obtained by using ZnO targets show a smaller defect density compared with those by using Zn targets.

  3. Growth of vertically aligned ZnO nanorods using textured ZnO films

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A hydrothermal method to grow vertical-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays on ZnO films obtained by atomic layer deposition (ALD) is presented. The growth of ZnO nanorods is studied as function of the crystallographic orientation of the ZnO films deposited on silicon (100) substrates. Different thicknesses of ZnO films around 40 to 180 nm were obtained and characterized before carrying out the growth process by hydrothermal methods. A textured ZnO layer with preferential direction in the normal c-axes is formed on substrates by the decomposition of diethylzinc to provide nucleation sites for vertical nanorod growth. Crystallographic orientation of the ZnO nanorods and ZnO-ALD films was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Composition, morphologies, length, size, and diameter of the nanorods were studied using a scanning electron microscope and energy dispersed x-ray spectroscopy analyses. In this work, it is demonstrated that crystallinity of the ZnO-ALD films plays an important role in the vertical-aligned ZnO nanorod growth. The nanorod arrays synthesized in solution had a diameter, length, density, and orientation desirable for a potential application as photosensitive materials in the manufacture of semiconductor-polymer solar cells. PACS 61.46.Hk, Nanocrystals; 61.46.Km, Structure of nanowires and nanorods; 81.07.Gf, Nanowires; 81.15.Gh, Chemical vapor deposition (including plasma-enhanced CVD, MOCVD, ALD, etc.) PMID:21899743

  4. Emission channeling studies on transition-metal doped GaN and ZnO: Cation versus anion substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Amorim, L. M.; Silva, D. J.; Decoster, S.; da Silva, M. R.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.

    2014-08-01

    The magnetic and electric properties of impurities in semiconductors are strongly dependent on the lattice sites which they occupy. While the majority site can often be predicted based on chemical similarities with the host elements and is usually simple to confirm experimentally, minority sites are far more complicated to predict, detect and identify. We have carried out extensive β- emission channeling studies on the lattice location of transition metal impurities in wide-gap dilute magnetic semiconductors, namely Co and Mn in GaN and ZnO, making use of radioactive 61Co and 56Mn implanted at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. In addition to the majority occupation of cation (Ga, Zn) sites, we located significant fractions (of the order of 20%) of the Co and Mn impurities in anion (N, O) sites, which are virtually unaffected by thermal annealing up to 900 °C. Here, we present the β- emission channeling experiments on 61Co-implanted GaN. We discuss these results in the context of our recent reports of minority anion substitution in Mn-implanted GaN Pereira et al. (2012) [19] and Mn/Co-implanted ZnO Pereira et al. (2011) [20], particularly in terms of the advantages of the emission channeling technique in such cases of multi-site occupancy.

  5. Sensitivity of 57Fe emission Mössbauer spectroscopy to Ar and C induced defects in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharuth-Ram, K.; Mølholt, T. E.; Langouche, G.; Geburt, S.; Ronning, C.; Doyle, T. B.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Ncube, M.; Gislason, H.; Ólafsson, S.; Weyer, G.

    2016-12-01

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy (eMS) measurements, following low fluence (<1012 cm-2) implantation of 57Mn (t 1/2 = 1.5 min.) into ZnO single crystals pre-implanted with Ar and C ions, has been utilized to test the sensitivity of the 57Fe eMS technique to the different types of defects generated by the different ion species. The dominant feature of the Mössbauer spectrum of the Ar implanted ZnO sample was a magnetic hyperfine field distribution component, attributed to paramagnetic Fe3+, while that of the C implanted sample was a doublet attributed to substitutional Fe2+ forming a complex with the C dopant ions in the 2- state at O vacancies. Magnetization measurements on the two samples, on the other hand, yield practically identical m(H) curves. The distinctly different eMS spectra of the two samples display the sensitivity of the probe nucleus to the defects produced by the different ion species.

  6. sup 111 In-labeled nonspecific immunoglobulin scanning in the detection of focal infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Keech, F.; Ahmad, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Strauss, H.W. )

    1989-10-05

    We performed radionuclide scanning after the intravenous injection of human IgG labeled with indium-111 in 128 patients with suspected focal sites of inflammation. Localization of 111In-labeled IgG correlated with clinical findings in 51 infected patients (21 with abdominal or pelvic infections, 11 with intravascular infections, 7 with pulmonary infections, and 12 with skeletal infections). Infecting organisms included gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, Pneumocystis carinii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Candida albicans. No focal localization of 111In-labeled IgG was observed in 63 patients without infection. There were five false negative results, and nine results were unusable. Serial scans were carried out in eight patients: continued localization correctly predicted relapse in six, and the absence of localization indicated resolution in two. To determine whether 111In-labeled IgG localization was specific for inflammation, we studied 16 patients with cancer. Focal localization occurred in 13 of these patients (5 with melanomas, 5 with gynecologic cancers, and 1 each with lymphoma, prostate cancer, and malignant fibrous histiocytoma). No localization was seen in patients with renal or colon cancer or metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. We conclude that 111In-labeled IgG imaging is effective for the detection of focal infection and that serial scans may be useful in assessing therapeutic efficacy. This technique may also be helpful in the evaluation of certain cancers.

  7. Urinary incontinence - injectable implant

    MedlinePlus

    Injectable implants are injections of material into the urethra to help control urine leakage ( urinary incontinence ) caused by a ... into the tissue next to the sphincter. The implant procedure is usually done in the hospital. Or ...

  8. Single ZnO nanocactus gas sensor formed by etching of ZnO nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryong Ryu, Sung; Ram, S. D. Gopal; Cho, Hak-Dong; Lee, Dong Jin; Won Kang, Tae; Woo, Yongdeuk

    2015-06-01

    Etching of materials on the nanoscale is a challenging but necessary process in nanomaterials science. Gas sensing using a single ZnO nanocactus (NC), which was prepared by facile isotropic nanoetching of zinc oxide nanorods (NR) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using an organic photoresist (PR) by a thermochemical reaction, is reported in this work. PR consists of carboxylic acid groups (COOH) and cyclopentanone (C5H8O), which can react with zinc and oxygen atoms, respectively, on the surface of a ZnO NR. The thermochemical reaction is controllable by varying the concentration of PR and reaction time. A gas sensor was fabricated using a single NC. Gas sensing was tested using different gases such as CH4, NH3 and carbon monoxide (CO). It was estimated that the surface area of a ZnO NC in the case of 50% PR was found to increase four-fold. When compared with a single ZnO NR gas sensor, the sensitivity of a ZnO NC was found to increase four-fold. This increase in sensitivity is attributed to the increase in surface area of the ZnO NC. The formed single ZnO NC gas sensor has good stability, response and recovery time.Etching of materials on the nanoscale is a challenging but necessary process in nanomaterials science. Gas sensing using a single ZnO nanocactus (NC), which was prepared by facile isotropic nanoetching of zinc oxide nanorods (NR) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using an organic photoresist (PR) by a thermochemical reaction, is reported in this work. PR consists of carboxylic acid groups (COOH) and cyclopentanone (C5H8O), which can react with zinc and oxygen atoms, respectively, on the surface of a ZnO NR. The thermochemical reaction is controllable by varying the concentration of PR and reaction time. A gas sensor was fabricated using a single NC. Gas sensing was tested using different gases such as CH4, NH3 and carbon monoxide (CO). It was estimated that the surface area of a ZnO NC in the case of 50% PR was found to increase four

  9. Hair implant complications.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Norins, A L; Pantzer, J G; Bennett, J E

    1981-04-01

    Four men who underwent hair implantation for pattern baldness were treated for complications such as infection, foreign-body reaction, pruritus, and scarring. The complications were similar to those reported with synthetic modacrylic fiber implants that have been used for the same purpose. Although we believe this is the first article to report complications from hair implants, the illogical basis of the procedure suggests that complications will occur in many unsuspecting patients who undergo hair implantation. PMID:7009899

  10. Characterisation of irradiation-induced defects in ZnO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, I.; Cizek, J.; Lukac, F.; Melikhova, O.; Valenta, J.; Havranek, V.; Anwand, W.; Skuratov, V. A.; Strukova, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) combined with optical methods was employed for characterisation of defects in the hydrothermally grown ZnO single crystals irradiated by 167 MeV Xe26+ ions to fluences ranged from 3×1012 to 1×1014 cm-2. The positron lifetime (LT), Doppler broadening as well as slow-positron implantation spectroscopy (SPIS) techniques were involved. The ab-initio theoretical calculations were utilised for interpretation of LT results. The optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements were conducted, too. The virgin ZnO crystal exhibited a single component LT spectrum with a lifetime of 182 ps which is attributed to saturated positron trapping in Zn vacancies associated with hydrogen atoms unintentionally introduced into the crystal during the crystal growth. The Xe ion irradiated ZnO crystals have shown an additional component with a longer lifetime of ≈ 360 ps which comes from irradiation-induced larger defects equivalent in size to clusters of ≈10 to 12 vacancies. The concentrations of these clusters were estimated on the basis of combined LT and SPIS data. The PAS data were correlated with irradiation induced changes seen in the optical spectroscopy experiments.

  11. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  12. Extraoral Cementation Technique to Minimize Cement-Associated Peri-implant Marginal Bone Loss: Can a Thin Layer of Zinc Oxide Cement Provide Sufficient Retention?

    PubMed

    Frisch, Eberhard; Ratka-Krüger, Petra; Weigl, Paul; Woelber, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the use of laboratory-fabricated crown intaglio replicas for extraorally prepared cementation of fixed restorations to implants. This technique minimizes excess cement and may therefore reduce the risk of cement-related marginal peri-implant bone loss. It is unclear whether the remaining thin layer of luting agent provides sufficient retention if low-adhesive zinc oxide (ZnO) cement is used. In 85 consecutive patients, 113 single crowns were cemented to implants using extraoral cementation technique (ECT) and ZnO cement. All patients were followed for 6 months and investigated for decementation. Seven events of decementation (incidence: 6.19%) were found in 7 patients (8.24%). ECT may represent a viable cementation technique for implant-supported single crowns, even using low-adhesion cements. PMID:27479343

  13. Diagnosis of arterial prosthetic graft infection by /sup 111/In oxine white blood cell scans

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, P.P.; Miller, D.C.; Jamieson, S.W.; Mitchell, R.S.; Reitz, B.A.; Olcott, C.; Mehigan, J.T.; Silberstein, R.J.; McDougall, I.R.

    1982-08-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of infected prosthetic arterial grafts is difficult, despite the application of diverse diagnostic modalities. Delay in making the diagnosis is largely responsible for the high amputation and mortality rates associated with this complication. In nine patients with suspected graft infections, /sup 111/In white blood cell scanning was useful and accurate. Graft infection was proved in five cases and ruled out in three. One false-positive scan was due to a sigmoid diverticular abscess overlying the graft. /sup 111/In white blood cell scans may improve the accuracy of diagnosing infected prosthetic grafts, which may result in better limb and patient salvage rates.

  14. Esthesioneuroblastoma (olfactory neuroblastoma) treated with 111In-octreotide and 177Lu-DOTATATE PRRT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-04-01

    A 51-year-old man with a recurrent metastatic esthesioneuroblastoma (olfactory neuroblastoma) was referred for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). He received 4 treatments of 111In-octreotide over 8 months and 3 treatments of 177Lu-DOTATATE over 4 months, which helped alleviate his symptoms and improved his quality of life; however, the tumor ultimately progressed and he passed away shortly thereafter. PRRT with 111In-octreotide or 177Lu-DOTATATE could play a role in the management of esthesioneuroblastoma. PMID:25674857

  15. Synthesis and antibacterial properties of ZnO brush pens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Rong; Li, Yilin; Weng, Yuan; Liang, Weiquan; Zhang, Wenfeng; Zheng, Weitao; Hu, Haimei

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, ZnO with a novel hierarchical nanostructure has been synthesized by a new solution method. The novel hierarchical structure is named a ‘brush pen’. The biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of ZnO brush pens have been evaluated. The results demonstrate that ZnO brush pens show good antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

  16. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  17. Intrinsic magnetic order and inhomogeneous transport in Gd-implanted zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, John; Williams, Grant V. M.; Murmu, Peter P.; Ruck, Ben J.

    2013-12-01

    We report the results from magnetic, resistivity, and Hall effect measurements on a ferromagnetically ordered 5% Gd low energy implanted ZnO single crystal. Temperature-dependent magnetization measurements show that the Gd ions do not contribute to the magnetic order; hence, the magnetic order is intrinsic. The electronic transport in the Gd-implanted region is inhomogeneous, and there is a nonlinear Hall resistance. The nonlinear Hall resistance is likely to be a consequence of the inhomogeneous transport and not due to an anomalous Hall effect.

  18. TiO2 nanotube composite layers as delivery system for ZnO and Ag nanoparticles - an unexpected overdose effect decreasing their antibacterial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Roguska, A; Belcarz, A; Pisarek, M; Ginalska, G; Lewandowska, M

    2015-06-01

    Enhancement of biocompatibility and antibacterial properties of implant materials is potentially beneficial for their practical value. Therefore, the use of metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles as antimicrobial coatings components which induce minimized antibacterial resistance receives currently particular attention. In this work, TiO2 nanotubes layers loaded with ZnO and Ag nanoparticles were designed for biomedical coatings and delivery systems and evaluated for antimicrobial activity. TiO2 nanotubes themselves exhibited considerable and diameter-dependent antibacterial activity against planktonic Staphylococcus epidermidis cells but favored bacterial adhesion. Loading of nanotubes with moderate amount of ZnO nanoparticles significantly diminished S. epidermidis cell adhesion and viability just after 1.5h contact with modified surfaces. However, an increase of loaded ZnO amount unexpectedly altered the structure of nanoparticle-nanolayer, caused partial closure of nanotube interior and significantly reduced ZnO solubility and antibacterial efficacy. Co-deposition of Ag nanoparticles enhanced the antibacterial properties of synthesized coatings. However, the increase of ZnO quantity on Ag nanoparticles co-deposited surfaces favored the adhesion of bacterial cells. Thus, ZnO/Ag/TiO2 nanotube composite layers may be promising delivery systems for combating post-operative infections in hard tissue replacement procedures. However, the amount of loaded antibacterial agents must be carefully balanced to avoid the overdose and reduced efficacy. PMID:25842121

  19. ZnO nanolasers on graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Hyeonjun; Park, Jun Beom; Park, Jong-woo; Hyun, Jerome K.; Yoon, Hosang; Oh, Hongseok; Yoon, Jiyoung

    2016-06-01

    We grew and characterized zinc oxide (ZnO) nanolasers on graphene films. By using graphene as a growth medium, we were able to prepare position-controlled and vertically aligned ZnO nanotube lasers. The ZnO nanolasers grown on graphene films showed good optical characteristics, evidenced by a low lasing threshold. Furthermore, the nanolaser/graphene system was easily lifted off the original substrate and transferred onto foreign substrates. The lasing performance was observed to be significantly enhanced by depositing a layer of silver on the back of the graphene film during this transfer process, which was quantitatively investigated using finite-difference time-domain simulations. Due to the wide selection of substrates enabled by the use of graphene films, our results suggest promising strategies for preparing practical nanolasers with improved performance.

  20. Silicone breast implant materials.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A U

    2012-01-01

    This opinion article has been written on request because of the recent public controversy over silicone breast implants produced by a now-defunct company, Poly Implant Prosthese (PIP) in France. More than 300,000 PIP devices have been implanted. The purposes of my article are to (1.) provide a general overview of silicone breast implant materials, (2.) to describe the general safety of these materials as reported to date, and (3.) to summarise current publicly available information about these aspects of the PIP prostheses. The materials covered are the silicone rubber from which the implant shells are made and the silicone gel used to fill the shell. The materials safety issues are biocompatibility (especially of the gel) and biodurability of the shell. The literature reviewed indicates that biocompatibility is not an issue with other current generation implants. However, biodurability is. A rough estimate of implant shell rupture rate is ~10+% at 10 years. Information is still emerging about the PIP implants. Initial regulatory disclosures suggest the PIP implants may have both biocompatibility and biodurability problems. They also suggest that PIP implants may have been produced using silicone materials not certified as medical grade. Governmental health and regulatory agencies are just now in the process of deciding what actions should be taken to protect patients. PMID:22826101

  1. Dye-Sensitization Of Nanocrystalline ZnO Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajimsha, R. S.; Tyagi, M.; Das, A. K.; Misra, P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Nannocrystalline and nanoporus thin films of ZnO were synthesized on glass substrates by using wet chemical drop casting method. X-ray diffraction measurements on these samples confirmed the formation of ZnO nanocrystallites in hexagonal wurtzite phase with mean size of ˜20 nm. Photo sensitization of these nanostructured ZnO thin films was carried out using three types of dyes Rhodamine 6 G, Chlorophyll and cocktail of Rhodamine 6 G and Chlorophyll in 1:1 ratio. Dye sensitized ZnO thin films showed enhanced optical absorption in visible spectral region compared to the pristine ZnO thin films.

  2. Dye-Sensitization Of Nanocrystalline ZnO Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Ajimsha, R. S.; Tyagi, M.; Das, A. K.; Misra, P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Nannocrystalline and nanoporus thin films of ZnO were synthesized on glass substrates by using wet chemical drop casting method. X-ray diffraction measurements on these samples confirmed the formation of ZnO nanocrystallites in hexagonal wurtzite phase with mean size of {approx}20 nm. Photo sensitization of these nanostructured ZnO thin films was carried out using three types of dyes Rhodamine 6 G, Chlorophyll and cocktail of Rhodamine 6 G and Chlorophyll in 1:1 ratio. Dye sensitized ZnO thin films showed enhanced optical absorption in visible spectral region compared to the pristine ZnO thin films.

  3. Tailoring the coercivity in ferromagnetic ZnO thin films by 3d and 4f elements codoping

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. J.; Xing, G. Z. Yi, J. B.; Li, S.; Chen, T.; Ionescu, M.

    2014-01-06

    Cluster free, Co (3d) and Eu (4f) doped ZnO thin films were prepared using ion implantation technique accompanied by post annealing treatments. Compared with the mono-doped ZnO thin films, the samples codoped with Co and Eu exhibit a stronger magnetization with a giant coercivity of 1200 Oe at ambient temperature. This was further verified through x-ray magnetic circular dichroism analysis, revealing the exchange interaction between the Co 3d electrons and the localized carriers induced by Eu{sup 3+} ions codoping. The insight gained with modulating coercivity in magnetic oxides opens up an avenue for applications requiring non-volatility in spintronic devices.

  4. Quantitative simultaneous 111In/99mTc SPECT-CT of osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cervo, Morgan; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Park, Mi-Ae; Moore, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A well-established approach for diagnostic imaging of osteomyelitis (OM), a bone infection, is simultaneous SPECT-CT of 99mTc sulfur colloid (SC) and 111In white blood cells (WBC). This method provides essentially perfect spatial registration of the tracers within anatomic sites of interest. Currently, diagnosis is based purely on a visual assessment—where relative discordance between 99mTc and 111In uptake in bone, i.e., high 111In and low 99mTc, suggests OM. To achieve more quantitative images, noise, scatter, and crosstalk between radionuclides must be addressed through reconstruction. Here the authors compare their Monte Carlo-based joint OSEM (MC-JOSEM) algorithm, which reconstructs both radionuclides simultaneously, to a more conventional triple-energy window-based reconstruction (TEW-OSEM), and to iterative reconstruction with no compensation for scatter (NC-OSEM). Methods: The authors created numerical phantoms of the foot and torso. Multiple bone-infection sites were modeled using high-count Monte Carlo simulation. Counts per voxel were then scaled to values appropriate for 111In WBC and 99mTc SC imaging. Ten independent noisy projection image sets were generated by drawing random Poisson deviates from these very low-noise images. Data were reconstructed using the two iterative scatter-compensation methods, TEW-OSEM and MC-JOSEM, as well as the uncorrected method (NC-OSEM). Mean counts in volumes of interest (VOIs) were used to evaluate the bias and precision of each method. Data were also acquired using a phantom, approximately the size of an adult ankle, consisting of regions representing infected and normal bone marrow, within a bone-like attenuator and surrounding soft tissue; each compartment contained a mixture of 111In and 99mTc. Low-noise data were acquired during multiple short scans over 29 h on a Siemens Symbia T6 SPECT-CT with medium-energy collimators. Pure 99mTc and 111In projection datasets were derived by fitting the acquired

  5. Characterization of reaction between ZnO and COS

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaoka, Eiji; Taniguchi, Kazuo; Uddin, M.A.; Hirano, Shigeru; Kasaoka, Shigeaki; Sakata, Yusaku

    1996-07-01

    In order to understand the behavior of COS in a ZnO desulfurization reactor, the reaction between ZnO and COS was studied in the presence of gases which compose a coal-derived gas. The behavior of COS in the reaction zone of a ZnO packed bed can be predicted as follows: H{sub 2}S in coal-derived gas reacts more easily with ZnO than COS; most of COS is converted to H{sub 2}S by catalytic hydrolysis and then reacts with ZnO, although a part of COS may react directly with ZnO; H{sub 2} accelerates the conversion of COS to H{sub 2}S; the water-gas shift reaction accelerates the reaction between ZnO and COS; and CO{sub 2} does not affect the reaction.

  6. Controlled doping of graphene using ZnO substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Misuk; Choi, Won Jin; Jeong, Yoon Jang; Lee, Young Kuk; Kim, Ju-Jin; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2016-06-01

    We show that graphene device could be controllably doped by the bottom substrate by inserting atomic layer deposition grown ZnO between graphene and SiO2 substrate. To clarify the effect of bottom ZnO, length of the graphene transistor channel was varied from 20 to 200 μm, while that of ZnO was fixed to 10 μm. Graphene devices supported on ZnO film show marked difference from those supported on SiO2 substrates; bottom ZnO layer behave as an electron donor. UV illumination experiment on hybrid graphene-ZnO device reveals that the effect of doping from ZnO becomes negligible when the graphene channel length made about four times larger than that of ZnO stripe.

  7. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of ZnO Containing Glasses.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Sanz, Jesús; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José Serafín

    2015-01-01

    A new family of non-toxic biocides based on low melting point (1250°C) transparent glasses with high content of ZnO (15-40wt%) belonging to the miscibility region of the B2O3-SiO2-Na2O-ZnO system has been developed. These glasses have shown an excellent biocide activity (logarithmic reduction >3) against Gram- (E. coli), Gram+ (S. aureus) and yeast (C. krusei); they are chemically stable in different media (distilled water, sea-like water, LB and DMEN media) as well as biocompatible. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the Neutral Red Uptake using NIH-3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cells) and the cell viability was >80%. These new glasses can be considered in several and important applications in the field of inorganic non-toxic biocide agents such as medical implants, surgical equipment, protective apparels in hospitals, water purifications systems, food packaging, food storages or textiles. PMID:26230940

  8. Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of ZnO Containing Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Sanz, Jesús; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José Serafín

    2015-01-01

    A new family of non-toxic biocides based on low melting point (1250°C) transparent glasses with high content of ZnO (15–40wt%) belonging to the miscibility region of the B2O3-SiO2-Na2O-ZnO system has been developed. These glasses have shown an excellent biocide activity (logarithmic reduction >3) against Gram- (E. coli), Gram+ (S. aureus) and yeast (C. krusei); they are chemically stable in different media (distilled water, sea-like water, LB and DMEN media) as well as biocompatible. The cytotoxicity was evaluated by the Neutral Red Uptake using NIH-3T3 (mouse embryonic fibroblast cells) and the cell viability was >80%. These new glasses can be considered in several and important applications in the field of inorganic non-toxic biocide agents such as medical implants, surgical equipment, protective apparels in hospitals, water purifications systems, food packaging, food storages or textiles. PMID:26230940

  9. Implants in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rohit A.; Mitra, Dipika K.; Rodrigues, Silvia V.; Pathare, Pragalbha N.; Podar, Rajesh S.; Vijayakar, Harshad N.

    2013-01-01

    Implants have gained tremendous popularity as a treatment modality for replacement of missing teeth in adults. There is extensive research present on the use of implants in adults, but there is a dearth of data available on the same in adolescents. The treatment planning and execution of implant placement in adolescents is still in its infancy. This review article is an attempt to bring together available literature. PMID:24174743

  10. Larynx: implants and stents

    PubMed Central

    Sittel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In the human larynx, implants a primarily used for the correction of glottis insufficiency. In a broader sense laryngeal stents may be considered as implants as well. Laryngeal implants can be differentiated into injectable and solid. The most important representatives of both groups are discussed in detail along with the respective technique of application. Laryngeal stents are primarily used perioperatively. Different types and their use are presented. PMID:22073097

  11. Evaluation of [111In]-Labeled Zinc-Dipicolylamine Tracers for SPECT Imaging of Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Douglas R.; Plaunt, Adam J.; Turkyilmaz, Serhan; Smith, Miles; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study prepared three structurally related zinc-dipicolylamine (ZnDPA) tracers with [111In] labels and conducted biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies of a mouse leg infection model. Methods Two monovalent tracers, ZnDPA-[111In]DTPA and ZnDPA-[111In]DOTA, each with a single zinc-dipicolylamine targeting unit, and a divalent tracer, Bis(ZnDPA)-[111In]DTPA,with two zinc-dipicolylamine units were prepared. Organ biodistribution and SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed on living mice with a leg infection created by injection of clinically relevant Gram positive Streptococcus pyogenes. Fluorescent and luminescent Eu3+-labeled versions of these tracers were also prepared and used to measure relative affinity for the exterior membrane surface of bacterial cells and mimics of healthy mammalian cells. Results All three 111In-labeled radiotracers were prepared with radiopurity > 90%. The biodistribution studies showed that the two monovalent tracers were cleared from the body through the liver and kidney, with retained % injected dose for all organs of < 8 % at 20 hours and infected leg T/NT ratio of ≤ 3.0. Clearance of the divalent tracer from the bloodstream was slower and primarily through the liver, with a retained % injected dose for all organs < 37% at 20 hours and T/NT ratio rising to 6.2 after 20 hours. The SPECT/CT imaging indicated the same large difference in tracer pharmacokinetics and higher accumulation of the divalent tracer at the site of infection. Conclusions All three [111In]-ZnDPA tracers selectively targeted the site of a clinically relevant mouse infection model that could not be discerned by visual external inspection of the living animal. The highest target selectivity, observed with a divalent tracer equipped with two zinc-dipicolylamine targeting units, compares quite favorably with the imaging selectivities previously reported for other nuclear tracers that target bacterial cell surfaces. The tracer pharmacokinetics depended

  12. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  13. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  14. Synthetic facial implants.

    PubMed

    Quatela, Vito C; Chow, Jen

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a range of synthetic implant materials for use in facial plastic surgery. The authors discuss alternatives to autogenous tissue transfer in terms of biocompatibility, technique, complications, controversies, and cautions. The reader is presented information about a range of synthetic implant materials such as silicone, polyester fiber, polyamide mesh, metal, polyethylene, polyacrylamide gel, hydroxyapatite, polylactic acid, collagen, and others. PMID:18063244

  15. Implantable CMOS Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Jun; Tokuda, Takashi; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Noda, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The results of recent research on our implantable CMOS biomedical devices are reviewed. Topics include retinal prosthesis devices and deep-brain implantation devices for small animals. Fundamental device structures and characteristics as well as in vivo experiments are presented. PMID:22291554

  16. Batteryless implanted echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K.

    1977-01-01

    Miniature ultrasonic echosonometer implanted within laboratory animals obtains energy from RF power oscillator that is electronically transduced via induction loop to power receiving loop located just under animal's skin. Method of powering device offers significant advantages over those in which battery is part of implanted package.

  17. Gold bead implants.

    PubMed

    Durkes, T E

    1992-03-01

    Gold bead implantation is an experimental area of study in the acupuncture field dealing with chronic diseases. Special acupuncture techniques are required to implant the gold beads successfully in the proper location. Gold beads are used to treat degenerative joint disease, osteochondritis, osteochondritis dessicans, ventral spondylosis, and seizures. PMID:1581658

  18. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  19. Number of implants for mandibular implant overdentures: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Yol; Kim, Ha-Young; Bryant, S. Ross

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this systematic review is to address treatment outcomes of Mandibular implant overdentures relative to implant survival rate, maintenance and complications, and patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic literature search was conducted by a PubMed search strategy and hand-searching of relevant journals from included studies. Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) and comparative clinical trial studies on mandibular implant overdentures until August, 2010 were selected. Eleven studies from 1098 studies were finally selected and data were analyzed relative to number of implants. RESULTS Six studies presented the data of the implant survival rate which ranged from 95% to 100% for 2 and 4 implant group and from 81.8% to 96.1% for 1 and 2 implant group. One study, which statistically compared implant survival rate showed no significant differences relative to the number of implants. The most common type of prosthetic maintenance and complications were replacement or reattaching of loose clips for 2 and 4 implant group, and denture repair due to the fracture around an implant for 1 and 2 implant groups. Most studies showed no significant differences in the rate of prosthetic maintenance and complication, and patient satisfaction regardless the number of implants. CONCLUSION The implant survival rate of mandibular overdentures is high regardless of the number of implants. Denture maintenance is likely not inflenced substantially by the number of implants and patient satisfaction is typically high again regardless os the number of implants. PMID:23236572

  20. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  1. Cochlear implants in children.

    PubMed

    Young, N M

    1994-04-01

    Children with such profound deafness that they are not helped by hearing aids are now candidates for cochlear implantation. This technology permits us to provide these children with a significant degree of useful hearing. The degree of improvement in speech perception and spoken language in pediatric cochlear implant recipients varies. However, the younger the children and the less time they have been completely deprived of auditory stimuli, the more likely they are to make significant progress. The evaluation of the deaf child for implantation is best done by a multidisciplinary team who understands the needs of hearing-impaired children and who can work with the family, the child, and classroom teachers, as well as other school professionals. The decision to proceed with cochlear implantation in a child is one that requires long-term commitment on the part of the family and the cochlear implant team. PMID:8039409

  2. [Implantable medical devices].

    PubMed

    Crickx, B; Arrault, X

    2008-01-01

    Medical devices have been individualized to include a category of implantable medical devices, "designed to be totally implanted in the human body or to replace an epithelial surface or a surface of the eye, through surgery, and remain in place after the intervention" (directive 93/42/CEE and decree of 20 April 206). Each implantable medical device has a common name and a commercial name for precise identification of the model (type/references). The users' service and the implanting physician should be clearly identified. There are a number of rules concerning health traceability to rapidly identify patients exposed to risks in which the implantable medical devices of a particular batch or series were used and to monitor the consequences. The traceability data should be preserved 10 years and the patient's medical file for 20 years. PMID:18442666

  3. Pediatric leptomeningeal metastasis: 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, M C

    1994-04-01

    Nine children (five girls and four boys) ranging in age from 1 to 18 years (median age, 12 years) with leptomeningeal metastasis were evaluated for cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization with cerebrospinal fluid flow studies using ventricular diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid labeled with indium 111 (111In-DTPA). Histologic diagnosis included medulloblastoma (two), primitive neuroectodermal tumor (two), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (two), pineoblastoma (one), ependymoma (one), and anaplastic astrocytoma (one). Sixteen 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies were performed, of which nine demonstrated normal anterograde cerebrospinal fluid flow of radionuclide, with the following cerebrospinal fluid compartment median times to appearance, with ranges in parentheses: ventricles, 1 minute (0 to 3 minutes); cisterna magna/basal cisterns, 5 minutes (3 to 5 minutes); cervical subarachnoid space, 8 minutes (5 to 10 minutes); thoracic subarachnoid space, 15 minutes (10 to 30 minutes); lumbar subarachnoid space, 35 minutes (20 to 45 minutes); and sylvian cistern, 80 minutes (60 to 90 minutes). Blockage of normal anterograde cerebrospinal fluid flow was seen in seven 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies in the following cerebrospinal fluid compartments: cervical subarachnoid space (four), lumbar subarachnoid space (two), and cisterna magna/basal cisterns (one). Five 111In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow studies were performed after demonstration of cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization and treatment with limited-field radiation therapy to involved regions; cerebrospinal fluid flow blocks resolved in three. In conclusion, cerebrospinal fluid compartmentalization, as shown by radionuclide ventriculography, is a common occurrence in pediatric leptomeningeal metastasis (four of nine patients, or 44%) and may be palliated by involved-field radiotherapy. PMID:8006365

  4. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with sup 111 In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Planting, A.; Verweij, J.; Cox, P.; Pillay, M.; Stoter, G. )

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with {sup 111}In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma.

  5. Clinical diagnostic application of 111In-DTPA-octreotide scintigraphy in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaccarili, M; Lococo, A; Fabiani, F; Staffilano, A

    2000-01-01

    Some years ago it was proved that a good percentage of small cell lung cancers, classified among cancers of the APUD system, produces somatostatin receptors that can be detected in vivo by scintigraphy with 111In-DTPA-octreotide. With the method in the whole body it is possible to identify the principal neoformation and the probable metastases. The authors present a study of 21 patients afflicted with small cell lung cancer diagnosed histologically. The study, carried out between January 1995 and December 1997, compared the radiologic iconography of the CT scan with the scintigraphic map obtained by a planar scintigraphy and in SPECT 1, 4 and 24-hr after iv injection of 110 MBq of 111In-DTPA-octreotide. The comparison was made with reference to the principal neoplasm and probable metastases. A scintigraphic study, a CT of restaging and a follow-up, done after 3 and 6 months of chemotherapy, on 15 patients with cancer that produces somatostatin receptors proved that the neoplasm sometimes regresses and sometimes progresses. In the latter case, it is possible to identify cerebral, mediastinal and hepatic metastases with the administration of 200 microg of octreotide 3 times a day for 7 days before the scintigraphy. In fact, the administration lowers background activity. The authors concluded that scintigraphy with 111In-DTPA-octreotide plays an important part in the study of patients afflicted with small cell lung cancer. Scintigraphy identifies the subgroups of patients who can be cured with somatostatin analogues together with chemotherapy. Scintigraphy presents a good sensibility in the re-staging and in the follow-up of patients who are treated, even though it is difficult to identify subdiaphragmatic metastases where liver, spleen and kidney show an increase in 111In-DTPA-octreotide. PMID:10939603

  6. Growth of vertically aligned one-dimensional ZnO nanowire arrays on sol-gel derived ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Nobuaki; Aono, Masami; Watanabe, Yoshihisa

    2014-11-01

    Vertically aligned one-dimensional ZnO nanowire arrays have been synthesized by a hydrothermal method on sol-gel derived ZnO films. Sol-gel derived ZnO films and corresponding ZnO nanowire arrays have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The effect of sol-gel derived ZnO film surface on the morphology of ZnO nanowire arrays has been investigated. The authors suggest from our investigation that sol-gel derived ZnO films affect the growth of one-dimensional ZnO nanostructures. Not only crystalline ZnO films but also amorphous ones can act as a scaffold for ZnO nucleus. Tilted ZnO micro-rods are grown on ZnO gel films, whereas vertically aligned ZnO nanowire arrays are grown on nanometer-sized ZnO grains. The average diameter of ZnO nanowire arrays are correlated strongly with the grain size of sol-gel derived ZnO films.

  7. Evaluation of the viability of /sup 111/In-abeled DTPA coupled to fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Layne, W.W.; Hnatowich, D.J.; Doherty, P.W.; Childs, R.L.; Lanteigne, D.; Ansell, J.

    1982-07-01

    In earlier work, DTPA has been covalently coupled to albumin via the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Using fibrinogen, we have studied the effect of such coupling on protein viability by both an in vitro and an in vivo assay. Clotting time remained identical to that of the native protein whether the anhydride-to-protein molar ratio was 1:1 or 5:1. In vivo studies were done in dogs, with human fibrinogen labeled with /sup 125/I and /sup 111/In. Throughout 130 hr, blood clearances for the two tracers agreed whether with 1:1 or 5:1 coupling. In a dog model with a thrombogenic catheter, the clot-to-blood ratios for the two radiotracers agreed within experimental error. Finally, 1:1-coupled canine fibrinogen, labeled with /sup 111/In, was administered to dogs with a catheter in a jugular vein, and scintigrams at 24 hr clearly showed clotting along the length of the catheter. We conclude that fibrinogen, coupled to DTPA, retains its viability, behaving like radioiodinated fibrinogen in vivo, and /sup 111/In labeled fibrinogen looks promising as a clinical diagnostic agent.

  8. Evaluation of 111In-labeled Anginex as Potential SPECT Tracer for Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Van Mourik, Tiemen R; Läppchen, Tilman; Rossin, Raffaella; Van Beijnum, Judy R; Macdonald, John R; Mayo, Kevin H; Griffioen, Arjan W; Nicolay, Klaas; Grüll, Holger

    2015-11-01

    Angiogenesis is a prerequisite for solid tumors to grow and metastasize, providing oxygen and nutrients to the tumor site. The protein galectin-1 has been identified to be overexpressed on tumor vasculature and represents an interesting target for anti-angiogenic therapy, as well as in molecular imaging. Therefore, the galectin-1-binding peptide Anginex was modified for radiolabeling using (111)In. In vitro, (111)In-Ax showed significantly more binding to galectin-1-positive EC-RF24 and MDA-MB-231-LITG cells than to galectin-1-negative LS174T cells and association with EC-RF24 cells was reduced in the presence of excess native Anginex. However, ex vivo biodistribution profiles showed little tumor uptake of (111)In-Ax and extensive accumulation in non-target organs. Although this study shows the ease of modification of the therapeutic peptide Anginex and favorable characteristics in vitro, in vivo assessment of the tracer revealed negligible tumor targeting. Hence, the strategy we employed lends little support for successful non-invasive imaging of tumor angiogenesis using this peptide. PMID:26504018

  9. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anilkumar T., S.; Girija M., L.; Venkatesh, J.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) Thin films were deposited on glass substrate using Spin coating method. Zinc acetate dehydrate, Carbinol and Mono-ethanolamine were used as the precursor, solvent and stabilizer respectively to prepare ZnO Thin-films. The molar ratio of Monoethanolamine to Zinc acetate was maintained as approximately 1. The thickness of the films was determined by Interference technique. The optical properties of the films were studied by UV Vis-Spectrophotometer. From transmittance and absorbance curve, the energy band gap of ZnO is found out. Electrical Conductivity measurements of ZnO are carried out by two probe method and Activation energy for the electrical conductivity of ZnO are found out. The crystal structure and orientation of the films were analyzed by XRD. The XRD patterns show that the ZnO films are polycrystalline with wurtzite hexagonal structure.

  10. Physical vapor transport crystal growth of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Jianping, Ma; Fuli, Liu; Yuan, Zang; Yantao, Liu

    2014-03-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has a wide band gap, high stability and a high thermal operating range that makes it a suitable material as a semiconductor for fabricating light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes, photodiodes, power diodes and other semiconductor devices. Recently, a new crystal growth for producing ZnO crystal boules was developed, which was physical vapor transport (PVT), at temperatures exceeding 1500 °C under a certain system pressure. ZnO crystal wafers in sizes up to 50 mm in diameter were produced. The conditions of ZnO crystal growth, growth rate and the quality of ZnO crystal were analyzed. Results from crystal growth and material characterization are presented and discussed. Our research results suggest that the novel crystal growth technique is a viable production technique for producing ZnO crystals and substrates for semiconductor device applications.

  11. Homoepitaxial regrowth habits of ZnO nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic regrowth of ZnO nanowires [NWs] under a similar chemical vapor transport and condensation [CVTC] process can produce abundant ZnO nanostructures which are not possible by a single CVTC step. In this work, we report three different regrowth modes of ZnO NWs: axial growth, radial growth, and both directions. The different growth modes seem to be determined by the properties of initial ZnO NW templates. By varying the growth parameters in the first-step CVTC process, ZnO nanostructures (e.g., nanoantenna) with drastically different morphologies can be obtained with distinct photoluminescence properties. The results have implications in guiding the rational synthesis of various ZnO NW heterostructures. PMID:22151820

  12. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  13. Optimizing stem cell functions and antibacterial properties of TiO2 nanotubes incorporated with ZnO nanoparticles: experiments and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenwen; Su, Penglei; Gonzales, Arthur; Chen, Su; Wang, Na; Wang, Jinshu; Li, Hongyi; Zhang, Zhenting; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    To optimize mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and antibacterial properties of titanium (Ti), nano-sized zinc oxide (ZnO) particles with tunable concentrations were incorporated into TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) using a facile hydrothermal strategy. It is revealed here for the first time that the TNTs incorporated with ZnO nanoparticles exhibited better biocompatibility compared with pure Ti samples (controls) and that the amount of ZnO (tailored by the concentration of Zn(NO3)2 in the precursor) introduced into TNTs played a crucial role on their osteogenic properties. Not only was the alkaline phosphatase activity improved to about 13.8 U/g protein, but the osterix, collagen-I, and osteocalcin gene expressions was improved from mesenchymal stem cells compared to controls. To further explore the mechanism of TNTs decorated with ZnO on cell functions, a response surface mathematical model was used to optimize the concentration of ZnO incorporation into the Ti nanotubes for stem cell differentiation and antibacterial properties for the first time. Both experimental and modeling results confirmed (R2 values of 0.8873–0.9138 and 0.9596–0.9941, respectively) that Ti incorporated with appropriate concentrations (with an initial concentration of Zn(NO3)2 at 0.015 M) of ZnO can provide exceptional osteogenic properties for stem cell differentiation in bone cells with strong antibacterial effects, properties important for improving dental and orthopedic implant efficacy. PMID:25792833

  14. Substrate Preparations in Epitaxial ZnO Film Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; Callahan, M. J.; George, M. A.

    2000-01-01

    Epitaxial ZnO films were grown on the two polar surfaces (O-face and Zn-face) of (0001) ZnO single crystal substrates using off-axis magnetron sputtering deposition. Annealing-temperature dependence of ZnO substrates was studied. ZnO films grown on sapphire substrates have also been investigated for comparison purposes and the annealing temperature of A1203 substrates is 1000 C. Substrates and films were characterized using photoluminescence (PL) spectrum, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscope, energy dispersive spectrum, and electric transport measurements. It has been found that the ZnO film properties were different when films were grown on the two polarity surfaces of ZnO substrates and the A1203 substrates. An interesting result shows that high temperature annealing of ZnO single crystals will improve the surface structure on the O-face surface rather than the opposite surface. The measurements of homoepitaxial ZnO films indicate that the O-terminated surface is better for ZnO epitaxial film growth.

  15. Photophysics and photochemistry of quantized ZnO colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, P.V.; Patrick, B.

    1992-08-06

    The photophysical and photochemical behavior of quantized ZnO colloids in ethanol has been investigated by time-resolved transient absorption and emission measurements. Trapping of electrons at the ZnO surface resulted in broad absorption in the red region. The green emission of ZnO colloids was readily quenched by hole scavengers such as SCN{sup -} and I{sup -}. The photoinduced charge transfer to these hole scavengers was studied by laser flash photolysis. The yield of oxidized product increased considerably when ZnO colloids were coupled with ZnSe. 36 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Buffer layer effect on ZnO nanorods growth alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongxu; Andreazza, Caroline; Andreazza, Pascal; Ma, Jiangang; Liu, Yichun; Shen, Dezhen

    2005-06-01

    Vertical aligned ZnO nanorods array was fabricated on Si with introducing a ZnO thin film as a buffer layer. Two different nucleation mechanisms were found in growth process. With using Au catalyst, Zn vapor could diffuse into Au nanoclusters with forming a solid solution. Then the ZnO nucleation site is mainly on the catalyst by oxidation of Au/Zn alloy. Without catalyst, nucleation could occur directly on the surface of buffer layer by homoepitaxy. The density and the size of ZnO nanorods could be governed by morphological character of catalyst and buffer layer. The nanorods growth is followed by vapor-solid mechanism.

  17. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  18. [Implantable hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Luers, J C; Beutner, D; Hüttenbrink, K-B

    2011-10-01

    Strictly speaking, implantable hearing aids are technical systems that process audiological signals and convey these by direct mechanical stimulation of the ossicular chain or cochlea. They have certain benefits over conventional hearing aids in terms of wearing comfort and general acceptance. As current studies lack convincing audiological results, the indications for implantable hearing aids are primarily of medical or cosmetic nature. To date, three systems are available in Germany: Vibrant Soundbridge®, Carina®, and Esteem®. Because the performance of the different implantable and nonimplantable hearing systems together with various surgical procedures are currently undergoing major changes, audiological indications may also develop in the future. PMID:21956678

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Oliemy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease. PMID:25374670

  20. Radiolabeling of equine platelets in plasma with /sup 111/In-(2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide) and their in vivo survival

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, C.P.; Kelly, A.B.; Hornof, W.J.; O'Brien, T.R.; Philp, M.S.; Lamb, J.F.

    1987-03-01

    A method is presented for the in vitro isolation and radiolabeling of equine platelets with the isotope indium /sup 111/ (/sup 111/In: half-life = 2.8 days, gamma = 173 keV, 89%; 247 keV, 94%). The technique described involves complexing /sup 111/In with the lipid-soluble chelating agent, 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (merc), in an aqueous medium. /sup 111/In-merc platelet-labeling efficiencies in autologous plasma pretreated with or without ferric citrate reagent were 82 +/- 7% and 24 +/- 12%, respectively. Mean intravascular survivals of /sup 111/In-merc-radiolabeled platelets in 8 healthy horses according to simple linear, exponential, mean, weighted-mean residual sum of squares analysis, and multiple-hit model were 5.5 +/- 0.49, 3.5 +/- 0.53, 4.5 +/- 0.18, 4.3 +/- 0.65, and 3.6 +/- 0.97 days, respectively.

  1. The evolution of embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    McGowen, Michael R; Erez, Offer; Romero, Roberto; Wildman, Derek E

    2014-01-01

    Embryo implantation varies widely in placental mammals. We review this variation in mammals with a special focus on two features: the depth of implantation and embryonic diapause. We discuss the two major types of implantation depth, superficial and interstitial, and map this character on a well-resolved molecular phylogenetic tree of placental mammals. We infer that relatively deep interstitial implantation has independently evolved at least eight times within placental mammals. Moreover, the superficial type of implantation represents the ancestral state for placental mammals. In addition, we review the genes involved in various phases of implantation, and suggest a future direction in investigating the molecular evolution of implantation-related genes. PMID:25023681

  2. Sodium doping in ZnO crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, N. S. Lynn, K. G.

    2015-01-12

    ZnO bulk single crystals were doped with sodium by thermal diffusion. Positron annihilations spectroscopy confirms the filling of zinc vacancies, to >6 μm deep in the bulk. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurement shows the diffusion of sodium up to 8 μm with concentration (1–3.5) × 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3}. Broad photoluminescence excitation peak at 3.1 eV, with onset appearance at 3.15 eV in Na:ZnO, is attributed to an electronic transition from a Na{sub Zn} level at ∼(220–270) meV to the conduction band. Resistivity in Na doped ZnO crystals increases up to (4–5) orders of magnitude at room temperature.

  3. Preparation, structural and optical characterization of ZnO, ZnO: Al nanopowder

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R. Raj; Rajendran, K.; Sambath, K.

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, ZnO and ZnO:Al nanopowders have been synthesized by low cost hydrothermal method. Zinc nitrate, hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and aluminium nitrate are used as precursors for ZnO and AZO with different molar ratios. The structural and optical characterization of doped and un-doped ZnO powders have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), photoluminescence (PL) and ultra violet visible (UV-Vis) absorption studies. The SEM results show that the hydrothermal synthesis can be used to obtain nanoparticles with different morphology. It is observed that the grain size of the AZO nanoparticles increased with increasing of Al concentration. The PL measurement of AZO shows that broad range of green emission around 550nm with high intensity. The green emission resulted mainly because of intrinsic defects.

  4. Spin noise spectroscopy of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, H.; Berski, F.; Hübner, J.; Oestreich, M.; Balocchi, A.; Marie, X.; Mansur-Al-Suleiman, M.; Bakin, A.; Waag, A.

    2013-12-04

    We investigate the thermal equilibrium dynamics of electron spins bound to donors in nanoporous ZnO by optical spin noise spectroscopy. The spin noise spectra reveal two noise contributions: A weak spin noise signal from undisturbed localized donor electrons with a dephasing time of 24 ns due to hyperfine interaction and a strong spin noise signal with a spin dephasing time of 5 ns which we attribute to localized donor electrons which interact with lattice defects.

  5. Use of Local {sup 111}In-Capromab Pendetide Scan Results to Predict Outcome After Salvage Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, Bridget F. Mouraviev, Vladimir; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Mayes, Janice; Chen, Stephanie H.; Wong, Terence Z.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Sun, Leon; Moul, Judd; Polascik, Thomas J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: The {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan (ProstaScint; Cytogen Corp., Princeton NJ) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to evaluate increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after radical prostatectomy. This study evaluated the role of prostate bed {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan findings to predict response to salvage radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients who had PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy and a {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan immediately before salvage prostate bed RT (median, 66 Gy) were identified from the Duke Prostate Center database. Patients with distant uptake of capromab pendetide or long-term androgen deprivation therapy were excluded. Median follow-up after salvage RT was 2.7 years. Patient demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics; PSA values; and {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan results were retrospectively analyzed. A PSA failure after salvage RT was defined as PSA level greater than 0.2 ng/ml. Data were combined with other published results in a secondary pooled analysis of 106 patients. Results: {sup 111}In-Capromab pendetide findings included 20 patients with negative scan results and 20 with locally positive scan results. Two-year progression-free survival rates were 60% for patients with a negative scan result and 74% for those with a locally positive scan result (p = 0.49). Combined analysis did not show a difference in outcome based on local {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result. Conclusion: For patients without distant signal detected by using {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan, patients with locally positive scan findings did not have statistically different progression-free survival than those with a negative scan result, suggesting that salvage RT may be successful in patients with either a locally positive or negative {sup 111}In-capromab pendetide scan result.

  6. Kinetics and sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a quantitative study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns, A.D.; Loetter, M.G.; Badenhorst, P.N.; de Kock, F.; Pieters, H.; Herbst, C.; van Reenen, O.R.; Kotze, H.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1982-04-01

    Kinetics and quantification of the sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled autologous platelets were investigated in eight patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The mean platelet count was 17 +/- 9 X 10(9)/liter; platelets were separated by differential centrifugation and labeled with 5.6 +/- 2.5 MBq /sup 111/In. Whole body and organ /sup 111/In-platelet distribution was quantitated with a scintillation camera and a computer-assisted imaging system acquisition matrix. Areas of interest were selected with the computer and organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity expressed as a percentage of whole body activity. Mean platelet survival was 49.5 +/- 29.6 hr and the survival curves were exponential. Equilibrium percentage organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity was (normal values in parentheses): spleen 33.7 +/- 8.8 (31.1 +/- 10.2); liver 16.1 +/- 9.5 (13.1 +/- 1.3); thorax 22.8 +/- 3.7 (28.2 +/- 5.6). Percentage organ /sup 111/In-activity at the time when labeled platelets had disappeared from the circulation was: spleen 44.5 +/- 16.4 (40 +/- 16); liver 16.0 +/- 11.5 (32.4 +/- 7.2); thorax 19.7 +/- 6.0 (17.7 +/- 10.3). Thorax activity corresponds to bone marrow radioactivity. Three patterns of platelet sequestration were evident. Three patients had mainly splenic sequestration, two mainly hepatic sequestration, and three diffuse reticuloendothelial system sequestration with a major component of platelets destroyed in the bone marrow. Splenectomy was performed in two patients. The pattern of /sup 111/In-platelet sequestration was not predictive of response of glucocorticoid therapy or indicative of the necessity for splenectomy. Quantitative /sup 111/In-labeled autologous platelet kinetic studies provide a new tool for the investigation of platelet disorders.U

  7. Internal radiotherapy and dosimetric study for 111In/ 177Lu-pegylated liposomes conjugates in tumor-bearing mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Hung-Man; Lu, Yi-Ching; Heish, Ning-Ning; Tseng, Yun-Long; Huang, Kuang-Liang; Chuang, Kuo-Tang; Chen, Chin-Hsiung; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Deng, Win-Ping

    2006-12-01

    In vivo characterization and dosimetric analysis has been performed to evaluate the potential of pegylated liposomes as carriers of radionuclides in tumor internal radiotherapy. MethodsThe DTPA/PEG-liposomes were synthesized with a medium size of 110 nm, conjugated with 111In/ 177Lu-(oxine) 3 to afford 111In/ 177Lu-liposome. The stability of 111In/ 177Lu-liposome in serum was investigated. The biodistribution, scintigraphic imaging and pharmacokinetics of 111In/ 177Lu-liposomes after intravenous(i.v.) injection into C-26 tumor-bearing BALB/cByJ mice were studied. Radiation dose was estimated by MIRD-III program. ResultsThe incorporation efficiency of 111In/ 177Lu into liposomes was 95%. After incubation at 37 °C for 72 h in serum, more than 83% of radioactivity was still retained in the intact 111In/ 177Lu-liposomes. The biodistribution of 111In-liposomes showed that the radioactivity in the blood decreased from 23.14±8.16%ID/g at 1 h to 0.02±0.00%ID/g at 72 h post-injection (p.i.), while reaching its maximum accumulation in tumors at 48 h p.i., with half-life in blood of 10.2 h. The results were supported by that of 177Lu-liposomes. Scintigraphic imaging with 111In-liposomes showed unambiguous tumor images at 48 h p.i. Dose estimation showed that the absorbed dose in tumor from 177Lu-liposomes was 5.74×10 -5 Gy/MBq. ConclusionsThis study provides an in vivo characterization and dosimetric evaluation for the use of liposome systems as carriers in targeted radionuclide therapy. The results suggest that adequate tumor targeting as well as dose delivered to tumors could be achieved by the use of radionuclide targeted liposomes.

  8. Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity of PVP stabilized ZnO and modified ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandekar, Gauri; Rajurkar, N. S.; Mulla, I. S.; Mulik, U. P.; Amalnerkar, D. P.; Adhyapak, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, ZnO nanostructures have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal, sonochemical and precipitation methods using polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the capping agent. The ZnO nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), UV-Visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. The XRD results revealed the hexagonal wurtzite structure of the ZnO nanostructures for all the samples. Furthermore, the morphology of the ZnO particles was obtained from FESEM micrographs. Particles prepared by hydrothermal method were found to be rice grain shaped and that prepared by precipitation and sonochemical methods were spherical shaped. Sunlight driven photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) was studied for ZnO nanostructures synthesized by various methods. The ZnO nanostructures were further decorated with Ag nanoparticles to enhance its dye degradation efficiency. The Ag decorated ZnO nanoparticles exhibited a higher degradation rate as compared to pure ZnO nanoparticles which was independent of pH. Since this process of dye degradation relies on the degradation of dye due to oxidation by highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, there are many factors which affect the efficiency of this process. Hence a study was conducted on the effect of various parameters on ZnO viz amount of catalyst, reaction pH and concentration of MB dye.

  9. [Silicone breast implants].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, M; Brandt, B; Breiting, V B; Christensen, L H; Thomsen, J L

    1989-12-18

    A brief review of the use of silicone breast implants, their structure, methods of implantation and complications is presented. Acute complications are rare, being mainly infection and hematoma. Long-term complications, on the contrary, are common, consisting mainly of capsular contracture around the prosthesis with subsequent pain and deformation of the breast. More rarely silicone granulomas form, and prosthesis rupture or herniation occurs. The importance of silicone leakage for these complications is discussed separately as well as the treatment of and prevention of capsular contracture and demonstration of silicone in tissue. A critical attitude towards the use of silicone breast implants, when these are used for purely cosmetic purposes, is recommended at present. New improved types of silicone breast implants are currently being tested clinically. PMID:2692262

  10. Peri-Implant Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and flossing and regular check-ups from a dental professional. Other risks factors for developing peri-implant disease include previous periodontal disease diagnosis, poor plaque control, smoking , and diabetes . It is essential to routinely ...

  11. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  12. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  13. Clinically based implant selection.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1999-01-01

    A hierarchy of implant selection is presented, based on overcoming specific clinical challenges in a variety of situations, including maximization of the esthetic, comfort, and functional potentials of therapy. PMID:10709488

  14. Breast reconstruction - implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... stages, or surgeries. During the first stage, a tissue expander is used. An implant is placed during the ... a pouch under your chest muscle. A small tissue expander is placed in the pouch. The expander is ...

  15. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  16. Implantable microscale neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karen C

    2007-12-01

    Implantable neural microsystems provide an interface to the nervous system, giving cellular resolution to physiological processes unattainable today with non-invasive methods. Such implantable microelectrode arrays are being developed to simultaneously sample signals at many points in the tissue, providing insight into processes such as movement control, memory formation, and perception. These electrode arrays have been microfabricated on a variety of substrates, including silicon, using both surface and bulk micromachining techniques, and more recently, polymers. Current approaches to achieving a stable long-term tissue interface focus on engineering the surface properties of the implant, including coatings that discourage protein adsorption or release bioactive molecules. The implementation of a wireless interface requires consideration of the necessary data flow, amplification, signal processing, and packaging. In future, the realization of a fully implantable neural microsystem will contribute to both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as a neuroprosthetic interface to restore motor functions in paralyzed patients. PMID:17252207

  17. Implant treatment planning: endodontic considerations.

    PubMed

    Simonian, Krikor; Frydman, Alon; Verdugo, Fernando; Roges, Rafael; Kar, Kian

    2014-12-01

    Implants are a predictable and effective method for replacing missing teeth. Some clinicians have advocated extraction and replacement of compromised but treatable teeth on the assumption that implants will outperform endodontically and/or periodontally treated teeth. However, evidence shows that conventional therapy is as effective as implant treatment. With data on implants developing complications long term and a lack of predictable treatment for peri-implantitis, retaining and restoring the natural dentition should be the first choice when possible. PMID:25928961

  18. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  19. Mixed Zn and O substitution of Co and Mn in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, L. M. C.; Wahl, U.; Correia, J. G.; Decoster, S.; Amorim, L. M.; Vantomme, A.; Silva, M. R. da; Araujo, J. P.

    2011-09-15

    The physical properties of an impurity atom in a semiconductor are primarily determined by the lattice site it occupies. In general, this occupancy can be correctly predicted based on chemical intuition, but not always. We report on one such exception in the dilute magnetic semiconductors Co- and Mn-doped ZnO, experimentally determining the lattice location of Co and Mn using {beta}{sup -}-emission channeling from the decay of radioactive {sup 61}Co and {sup 56}Mn implanted at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Surprisingly, in addition to the majority substituting for Zn, we find up to 18% (27%) of the Co (Mn) atoms in O sites, which is virtually unaffected by thermal annealing up to 900 deg. C. We discuss how this anion site configuration, which had never been considered before for any transition metal in any metal oxide material, may in fact have a low formation energy. This suggests a change in paradigm regarding transition-metal incorporation in ZnO and possibly other oxides and wide-gap semiconductors.

  20. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  1. [Implantable materials (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schaldach, M

    1975-11-01

    There is a steadily increasing importance of implants used as substitutions for body functions which have been impaired due to disease, natural abrasion or accident. With the present state of the art, the limitations for the application of surgical substitutions are due to insufficient properties of biomaterials with regard to specific applications as well as to deficiencies in design and function of the implants used. The basis for the improvement and new development of implants is therefore a functionally adequate design in which the specific properties of the material are taken into account with regard to the individual requirements of the implantation site. For orthopedic implants, materials have to be developed which are to a large extent corrosion and degradation resistant, and withstand high mechanical stress. For implants in the cardiovascular system, compatibility with blood is most significant. Present research in this field is concentrated on efforts to improve the thromboresistivity of conventional polymers by different kinds of surface treatments. One possibility is to influence actively the electrochemical interactions between material and blood components, e.g. by the use of redox catalysts. PMID:1107653

  2. Local investigation of hyperfine interactions in pure and Co-doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercurio, M. E.; Carbonari, A. W.; Cordeiro, M. R.; Saxena, R. N.; D'Agostino, L. Z.

    2010-05-01

    In the present work bulk samples of pure as well as Co-doped ZnO with different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method from highly pure metallic Zn (99.9999%) and Co (99.9999%). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray microanalysis (EDS) and perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. Carrier-free 111In nuclei were introduced during preparation of the samples and used as probe nuclei at Zn sites for PAC measurements. PAC results show that both pure and Zn1-xCoxO ( x≤0.15) samples have the same electric quadrupole frequency when Co-doped samples are annealed in air, argon or nitrogen atmosphere at 1173 K. SEM and EDS results showed that Co-doped samples are homogeneous without any secondary Co phases. These observations indicate that Co ions are substituted for Zn ions and have a similar electronic structure of Zn ions. A weak local magnetism was observed at temperatures below about 300 K for Co concentration of 10% when sample was annealed in Nitrogen.

  3. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with 111In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Planting, A; Verweij, J; Cox, P; Pillay, M; Stoter, G

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with 111In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma. PMID:2297748

  4. Role of ZnO thin film in the vertically aligned growth of ZnO nanorods by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Nguyen Thanh; Noh, Jin-Seo; Park, Sungho

    2016-08-01

    The effect of ZnO thin film on the growth of ZnO nanorods was investigated. ZnO thin films were sputter-deposited on Si substrate with varying the thickness. ZnO nanorods were grown on the thin film using a chemical bath deposition (CBD) method at 90 °C. The ZnO thin films showed granular structure and vertical roughness on the surface, which facilitated the vertical growth of ZnO nanorods. The average grain size and the surface roughness of ZnO film increased with an increase in film thickness, and this led to the increase in both the average diameter and the average length of vertically grown ZnO nanorods. In particular, it was found that the average diameter of ZnO nanorods was very close to the average grain size of ZnO thin film, confirming the role of ZnO film as a seed layer for the vertical growth of ZnO nanorods. The CBD growth on ZnO seed layers may provide a facile route to engineering vertically aligned ZnO nanorod arrays.

  5. Fast synthesize ZnO quantum dots via ultrasonic method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Zhang, Bing; Ding, Nan; Ding, Wenhao; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-05-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic sol-gel method. The ZnO quantum dots were synthesized in various ultrasonic temperature and time. Photoluminescence properties of these ZnO quantum dots were measured. Time-resolved photoluminescence decay spectra were also taken to discover the change of defects amount during the reaction. Both ultrasonic temperature and time could affect the type and amount of defects in ZnO quantum dots. Total defects of ZnO quantum dots decreased with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time. The dangling bonds defects disappeared faster than the optical defects. Types of optical defects first changed from oxygen interstitial defects to oxygen vacancy and zinc interstitial defects. Then transformed back to oxygen interstitial defects again. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by both ultrasonic temperature and time as well. That is, with the increasing of ultrasonic temperature and time, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased. Moreover, concentrated raw materials solution brought larger sizes and more optical defects of ZnO quantum dots. PMID:26611814

  6. Implant interactions with orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Celenza, Frank

    2012-09-01

    Many situations arise in which orthodontic therapy in conjunction with implant modalities is beneficial, relevant or necessary. These situations might entail orthodontic treatment preparatory to the placement of an implant, such as in the site preparation for implant placement. Traditionally, this has been somewhat well understood, but there are certain guidelines that must be adhered to as well as diagnostic steps that must be followed. Provision of adequate space for implant placement is of paramount importance, but there is also the consideration of tissue manipulation and remodeling which orthodontic therapy can achieve very predictably and orthodontists should be well versed in harnessing and employing this modality of site preparation. In this way, hopeless teeth that are slated for extraction can still be utilized by orthodontic extraction to augment tissues, both hard and soft, thereby facilitating site development. On the corollary, and representing a significant shift in treatment sequencing, there are many situations in which orthodontic mechanotherapy can be simplified, expedited, and facilitated by the placement of an implant and utilization as an integral part of the mechanotherapy. Implants have proven to provide excellent anchorage, and have resulted in a new class of anchorage known as "absolute anchorage". Implants can be harnessed as anchors both in a direct and indirect sense, depending upon the dictates of the case. Further, this has led to the development of orthodontic miniscrew systems and techniques, which can have added features such as flexibility in location and placement, as well as ease of use and removal. As orthodontic appliances evolve, the advent of aligner therapy has become mainstream and well accepted, and many of the aforementioned combined treatment modalities can and should be incorporated into this relatively new treatment modality as well. PMID:23040348

  7. Ultrasonic synthesis of fern-like ZnO nanoleaves and their enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qing Lan; Xiong, Rui; Zhai, Bao-gai; Huang, Yuan Ming

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional fern-like ZnO nanoleaves were synthesized by ultrasonicating zinc microcrystals in water. The morphology, crystal structure, optical property and photocatalytic activity of the fern-like ZnO nanoleaves were characterized with scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, respectively. It is found that one fern-like ZnO nanoleaf is composed of one ZnO nanorod as the central trunk and a number of ZnO nanoplates as the side branches in opposite pairs along the central ZnO nanorod. The central ZnO nanorod in the fern-like nanoleaves is about 1 μm long while the side-branching ZnO nanoplates are about 100 nm long and 20 nm wide. Further analysis has revealed that ZnO nanocrystals are the building blocks of the central ZnO nanorod and the side-branching ZnO nanoplates. Under identical conditions, fern-like ZnO nanoleaves exhibit higher photocatalytic activity in photodegrading methyl orange in aqueous solution than spherical ZnO nanocrystals. The first-order photocatalytic rate constant of the fern-like ZnO nanoleaves is about four times as large as that of the ZnO nanoparticles. The branched architecture of the hierarchical nanoleaves is suggested be responsible for the enhanced photocatalytic activity of the fern-like ZnO nanoleaves.

  8. Fabrication of a ZnO Pyroelectric Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Huang, Kuo-Yi; Hu, Yuh-Chung

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-step radio frequency (RF) sputtering process to form a ZnO film for pyroelectric sensors. It is shown that the two-step sputtering process with a lower power step followed by a higher power step can significantly improve the voltage responsivity of the ZnO pyroelectric sensor. The improvement is attributed mainly to the formation of ZnO film with a strongly preferred orientation towards the c-axis. Furthermore, a nickel film deposited onto the uncovered parts of the ZnO film can effectively improve the voltage responsivity at higher modulating frequencies since the nickel film can enhance the incident energy absorption of the ZnO layer.

  9. A Novel Way for Synthesizing Phosphorus-Doped Zno Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We developed a novel approach to synthesize phosphorus (P)-doped ZnO nanowires by directly decomposing zinc phosphate powder. The samples were demonstrated to be P-doped ZnO nanowires by using scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectrum, Raman spectra and photoluminescence measurements. The chemical state of P was investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analyses in individual ZnO nanowires. P was found to substitute at oxygen sites (PO), with the presence of anti-site P on Zn sites (PZn). P-doped ZnO nanowires were high resistance and the related P-doping mechanism was discussed by combining EELS results with electrical measurements, structure characterization and photoluminescence measurements. Our method provides an efficient way of synthesizing P-doped ZnO nanowires and the results help to understand the P-doping mechanism.

  10. Review of zincblende ZnO: Stability of metastable ZnO phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, A.; Jagadish, C.

    2007-10-01

    Common II-VI compound semiconducting materials are stable thermodynamically with zincblende phase, while the II-O materials such as zinc oxide (ZnO) and beryllium oxide (BeO) are stable with wurtzite phase, and cadmium oxide (CdO) and magnesium oxide (MgO) are stable in rocksalt phase. This phase disharmony in the same material family laid a challenge for the basic physics and in practical applications in optoelectronic devices, where ternary and quaternary compounds are employed. Thermodynamically the zincblende ZnO is a metastable phase which is free from the giant internal electric fields in the [001] directions and has an easy cleavage facet in the ⟨110⟩ directions for laser cavity fabrication that combined with evidence for the higher optical gain. The zincblende materials also have lower ionicity that leads to the lower carrier scattering and higher doping efficiencies. Even with these outstanding features in the zincblende materials, the growth of zincblende ZnO and its fundamental properties are still limited. In this paper, recent progress in growth and fundamental properties of zincblende ZnO material has been reviewed.

  11. Correlation between radioactivity and chemotherapeutics of the 111In-VNB-liposome in pharmacokinetics and biodistribution in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Hsien; Huang, Chih-Min; Wu, Yu-Tse; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Ho, Chung-Li; Chang, Tsui-Jung; Lee, Te-Wei; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2012-01-01

    Background The combination of a radioisotope with a chemotherapeutic agent in a liposomal carrier (ie, Indium-111-labeled polyethylene glycol pegylated liposomal vinorelbine, [111In-VNB-liposome]) has been reported to show better therapeutic efficiency in tumor growth suppression. Nevertheless, the challenge remains as to whether this therapeutic effect is attributable to the combination of a radioisotope with chemotherapeutics. The goal of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and correlation of Indium-111 radioactivity and vinorelbine concentration in the 111In-VNB-liposome. Methods The VNB-liposome and 111In-VNB-liposome were administered to rats. Blood, liver, and spleen tissue were collected to determine the distribution profile of the 111In-VNB-liposome. A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry system and gamma counter were used to analyze the concentration of vinorelbine and radioactivity of Indium-111. Results High uptake of the 111In-VNB-liposome in the liver and spleen demonstrated the properties of a nanosized drug delivery system. Linear regression showed a good correlation (r = 0.97) between Indium-111 radioactivity and vinorelbine concentration in the plasma of rats administered the 111In-VNB-liposome. Conclusion A significant positive correlation between the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of 111Indium radioactivity and vinorelbine in blood, spleen, and liver was found following administration of the 111In-VNB-liposome. The liposome efficiently encapsulated both vinorelbine and Indium-111, and showed a similar concentration-radioactivity time profile, indicating the correlation between chemotherapy and radiotherapy could be identical in the liposomal formulation. PMID:22359447

  12. Positron implantation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, V.J.; Lynn, K.G.; Welch, D.O.

    1993-12-31

    The Monte Carlo technique for modeling positron prior to annihilation and electron implantation in semi-infinite metals is described. Particle implantation is modelled as a multistep process, a series of collisions with the atoms of the host material. In elastic collisions with neutral atoms there is no transfer of energy. The particle loses energy by several different channels, excitation of the electron gas, ionization of the ion cores, or, at low energies, by phonon excitation. These competing scattering mechanisms have been incorporated into the Monte Carlo framework and several different models are being used. Brief descriptions of these Monte Carlo schemes, as well as an analytic model for positron implantation are included. Results of the Monte Carlo simulations are presented and compared with expermental data. Problems associated with modeling positron implantation are discuss and the need for more expermental data on energy-loss in different materials is stressed. Positron implantation in multilayers of different metals is briefly described and extensions of this work to include a study of multilayers and heterostructures is suggested.

  13. Imaging for cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Phelps, P D; Annis, J A; Robinson, P J

    1990-07-01

    Insertion of a sound amplification device into the round window niche (extracochlear implant) or into the coils of the cochlea (intracochlear implant) can give significant benefits to some carefully selected, severely deaf patients. Imaging has an essential role in selective and pre-operative assessment. Severe otosclerosis and post-meningitic labyrinthitis ossificans are common causes of deafness in these patients and can be demonstrated by computed tomography (CT). The most suitable side for operation can be assessed. We describe our experiences with 165 patients, 69 of whom were found suitable for implants. Thin (1 mm) section CT in axial and coronal planes is the best imaging investigation of the petrous temporal bones but the place of magnetic resonance scanning to confirm that the inner ear is fluid-filled and polytomography to show a multichannel implant in the cochlea is discussed. No implants were used for congenital deformities, but some observations are made of this type of structural deformity of the inner ear. PMID:2390686

  14. Noninvasive detection of coronary thrombi with /sup 111/In platelets: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, S.R.; Lerch, R.A.; Mathias, C.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Welch, M.J.

    1983-02-01

    The need for rapid, definitive identification of coronary thrombosis has been intensified by the advent of thrombolytic therapy and by interest in the role of thrombosis in the etiology of coronary artery disease. To determine whether platelet thrombi can be detected noninvasively with /sup 111/In platelets, a method was developed in which /sup 99m/Tc-tagged red blood cells were used to correct for activity within the blood attributable to platelets circulating but not associated with thrombus. In 18 dogs coronary thrombi were induced closed-chest with a copper coil introduced into the coronary artery. /sup 111/In platelets and /sup 99m/Tc RBCs were administered either before or 1 hr after induction of thrombus, and serial scintigrams obtained. Coronary thrombus was identified readily in the processed scintigrams. In six dogs, thrombolysis was achieved with intracoronary streptokinase. In each case serial scintigraphy demonstrated resolution of the clot. The dual radiotracer technique should permit serial noninvasive delineation of the temporal relationship between platelet deposition and coronary heart disease in patients, and should facilitate the evaluation of interventions designed to prevent platelet aggregation or to lyse existing thrombi.

  15. Imaging of carbonic anhydrase IX with an 111In-labeled dual-motif inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xing; Minn, Il; Rowe, Steven P; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Gorin, Michael A; Brummet, Mary; Lee, Hye Soo; Koo, Soo Min; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Mease, Ronnie C; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Allaf, Mohamad E; Pomper, Martin G

    2015-10-20

    We developed a new scaffold for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). Compound XYIMSR-01, a DOTA-conjugated, bivalent, low-molecular-weight ligand, has two moieties that target two separate sites on CAIX, imparting high affinity. We synthesized [111In]XYIMSR-01 in 73.8-75.8% (n = 3) yield with specific radioactivities ranging from 118 - 1,021 GBq/μmol (3,200-27,600 Ci/mmol). Single photon emission computed tomography of [111In]XYIMSR-01 in immunocompromised mice bearing CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 tumors revealed radiotracer uptake in tumor as early as 1 h post-injection. Biodistribution studies demonstrated 26% injected dose per gram of radioactivity within tumor at 1 h. Tumor-to-blood, muscle and kidney ratios were 178.1 ± 145.4, 68.4 ± 29.0 and 1.7 ± 1.2, respectively, at 24 h post-injection. Retention of radioactivity was exclusively observed in tumors by 48 h, the latest time point evaluated. The dual targeting strategy to engage CAIX enabled specific detection of ccRCC in this xenograft model, with pharmacokinetics surpassing those of previously described radionuclide-based probes against CAIX. PMID:26418876

  16. Imaging of carbonic anhydrase IX with an 111In-labeled dual-motif inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Gorin, Michael A.; Brummet, Mary; Lee, Hye Soo; Koo, Soo Min; Sysa-Shah, Polina; Mease, Ronnie C.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new scaffold for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). Compound XYIMSR-01, a DOTA-conjugated, bivalent, low-molecular-weight ligand, has two moieties that target two separate sites on CAIX, imparting high affinity. We synthesized [111In]XYIMSR-01 in 73.8–75.8% (n = 3) yield with specific radioactivities ranging from 118 – 1,021 GBq/μmol (3,200–27,600 Ci/mmol). Single photon emission computed tomography of [111In]XYIMSR-01 in immunocompromised mice bearing CAIX-expressing SK-RC-52 tumors revealed radiotracer uptake in tumor as early as 1 h post-injection. Biodistribution studies demonstrated 26% injected dose per gram of radioactivity within tumor at 1 h. Tumor-to-blood, muscle and kidney ratios were 178.1 ± 145.4, 68.4 ± 29.0 and 1.7 ± 1.2, respectively, at 24 h post-injection. Retention of radioactivity was exclusively observed in tumors by 48 h, the latest time point evaluated. The dual targeting strategy to engage CAIX enabled specific detection of ccRCC in this xenograft model, with pharmacokinetics surpassing those of previously described radionuclide-based probes against CAIX. PMID:26418876

  17. 111In platelet imaging of left ventricular thrombi. Predictive value for systemic emboli

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ritchie, J.L. )

    1990-04-01

    To determine whether a positive indium 111 platelet image for a left ventricular thrombus, which indicates ongoing thrombogenic activity, predicts an increased risk of systemic embolization, we compared the embolic rate in 34 patients with positive {sup 111}In platelet images with that in 69 patients with negative images during a mean follow-up of 38 +/- 31 (+/- SD) months after platelet imaging. The positive and negative image groups were similar with respect to age (59 +/- 11 vs. 62 +/- 10 years), prevalence of previous infarction (94% vs. 78%, p less than 0.05), time from last infarction (28 +/- 51 vs. 33 +/- 47 months), ejection fraction (29 +/- 14 vs. 33 +/- 14), long-term or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (15% vs. 26%), warfarin therapy during follow-up (26% vs. 20%), platelet-inhibitory therapy during follow-up (50% vs. 33%), injected {sup 111}In dose (330 +/- 92 vs. 344 +/- 118 microCi), and latest imaging time (greater than or equal to 48 hours in all patients). During follow-up, embolic events occurred in 21% (seven of 34) of patients with positive platelet images for left ventricular thrombi as compared with 3% (two of 69) of patients with negative images (p = 0.002). By actuarial methods, at 42 months after platelet imaging, only 86% of patients with positive images were embolus free as compared with 98% of patients with negative images (p less than 0.01).

  18. Preoperative clinical radioimmunodetection of pancreatic cancer by 111 In-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody Nd2.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Nishihara, T; Yamamoto, A; Teraoka, H; Yamashita, Y; Okamura, T; Ochi, H; Ho, J J; Kim, Y S; Hirakawa, K

    1999-10-01

    The present study was carried out with the purpose of evaluating the clinical usefulness of radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 111In-labeled murine/human chimeric monoclonal antibody, Nd2 (c-Nd2) in patients with pancreatic cancer. Nineteen patients suspected to have pancreatic cancer were administered intravenously 74 MBq/2 mg 111In-labeled c-Nd2 in 100 ml of saline containing 2% albumin over 30 min. A scintigram was obtained on the 3rd day after infusion by using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. Of the 14 patients finally diagnosed as having pancreatic cancer on the basis of surgical specimens or progress of disease, specific focal uptake at the site of the tumor was detected in 12 (true positive cases), representing a sensitivity of 85.7% (12/14), and liver metastasis was found in one case with metastasis. Of the 5 patients diagnosed with tumor-forming pancreatitis (TFP), 4 patients demonstrated true negative imaging, but one patient whose tumor demonstrated interesting findings in histology and immunostaining, showed false positive imaging. Of patients investigated for human anti-chimeric antibody (HACA) response, none showed HACA response, and no allergic reaction was seen in any of the patients administered c-Nd2. These results suggest that RAID with 11In-labeled c-Nd2 is useful for differential preoperative diagnosis between invasive pancreatic cancer and TFP. PMID:10595748

  19. Characterization of zinc implanted silica: Effects of thermal annealing and picosecond laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Mu, R.; Ueda, A.; Wu, M.H.; Tung, Y.; Gu, Z.; Henderson, D.O.; White, C.W.; Budai, J.D.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1998-05-01

    Zinc ion implanted silica with controlled thermal treatments and pulsed laser radiation has been investigated. Optical spectra of the as-implanted silica at higher doses ({gt}3{times}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}) and/or the samples annealed in a reducing atmosphere show both Zn clusters and Zn metal colloid formation. The absorption peak at {approximately}5.3 eV is attributed to the surface plasmon absorption of Zn metal colloids in silica. The oxidized samples with the ion dose {ge}3{times}10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} show an absorption peak in 4.3{endash}4.7 eV region implying ZnO quantum dot formation. It is expected that the average size of the ZnO nanoparticles becomes smaller for lower ion dose. Therefore, a blueshift of the absorption peak with lower ion dose can be attributed to the quantum confinement effects. Pulsed laser radiation at 266 nm with energy density of 30mJ/cm{sup 2} causes a brownish coloration in these optically transparent Zn implanted silica substrates. The color formation is an irreversible process. Therefore, it is believed that new chemical species may have formed through photochemical reactions. The results also show that the coloring process is photon energy dependent. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  20. 111In-BnDTPA-F3: an Auger electron-emitting radiotherapeutic agent that targets nucleolin

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The F3 peptide (KDEPQRRSARLSAKPAPPKPEPKPKKAPAKK), a fragment of the human high mobility group protein 2, binds nucleolin. Nucleolin is expressed in the nuclei of normal cells but is also expressed on the membrane of some cancer cells. The goal was to investigate the use of 111In-labeled F3 peptide for Auger electron-targeted radiotherapy. Methods F3 was labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for confocal microscopy and conjugated to p-SCN-benzyl-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (BnDTPA) for labeling with 111In to form 111In-BnDTPA-F3. MDA-MB-231-H2N (231-H2N) human breast cancer cells were exposed to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 and used in cell fractionation, γH2AX immunostaining (a marker of DNA double-strand breaks), and clonogenic assays. In vivo, biodistribution studies of 111In-BnDTPA-F3 were performed in 231-H2N xenograft-bearing mice. In tumor growth delay studies, 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (3 μg, 6 MBq/μg) was administered intravenously to 231-H2N xenograft-bearing mice once weekly for 3 weeks. Results Membrane-binding of FITC-F3 was observed in 231-H2N cells, and there was co-localization of FITC-F3 with nucleolin in the nuclei. After exposure of 231-H2N cells to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 for 2 h, 1.7% of 111In added to the medium was membrane-bound. Of the bound 111In, 15% was internalized, and of this, 37% was localized in the nucleus. Exposure of 231-H2N cells to 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (1 μM, 6 MBq/μg) resulted in a dose-dependent increase in γH2AX foci and in a significant reduction of clonogenic survival compared to untreated cells or cells exposed to unlabeled BnDTPA-F3 (46 ± 4.1%, 100 ± 1.8%, and 132 ± 7.7%, respectively). In vivo, tumor uptake of 111In-BnDTPA-F3 (3 μg, 6 MBq/μg) at 3-h post-injection was 1% of the injected dose per gram (%ID/g), and muscle uptake was 0.5%ID/g. In tumor growth delay studies, tumor growth rate was reduced 19-fold compared to untreated or unlabeled BnDTPA-F3-treated mice (p = 0.023). Conclusion 111In-BnDTPA-F3 is

  1. H4octapa-Trastuzumab: Versatile Acyclic Chelate System for 111In and 177Lu Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Price, Eric W.; Zeglis, Brian M.; Cawthray, Jacqueline F.; Ramogida, Caterina F.; Ramos, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    A bifunctional derivative of the versatile acyclic chelator H4octapa, p-SCNBn- H4octapa, has been synthesized for the first time. The chelator was conjugated to the HER2/neu-targeting antibody trastuzumab and labeled in high radiochemical purity and specific activity with the radioisotopes 111In and 177Lu. The in vivo behavior of the resulting radioimmunoconjugates was investigated in mice bearing ovarian cancer xenografts and compared to analogous radioimmunoconjugates employing the ubiquitous chelator DOTA. The H4octapa-trastuzumab conjugates displayed faster radiolabeling kinetics with more reproducible yields under milder conditions (15 min, RT, ~94–95%) than those based on DOTA-trastuzumab (60 min, 37 °C ~50–88%). Further, antibody integrity was better preserved in the 111In- and 177Lu-octapatrastuzumab constructs, with immunoreactive fractions of 0.99 for each compared to 0.93–0.95 for 111In- and 177Lu-DOTA-trastuzumab. These results translated to improved in vivo biodistribution profiles and SPECT imaging results for 111In- and 177Lu-octapa-trastuzumab compared to 111In- and 177Lu-DOTA-trastuzumab, with increased tumor uptake and higher tumor-to-tissue activity ratios. PMID:23901833

  2. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  3. Hydroxylapatite Otologic Implants

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, A.D.; Lauf, R.J.; Beale, B.; Johnson, R.

    2000-01-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) and Smith and Nephew Richards Inc. of Bartlett, TN, was initiated in March 1997. The original completion date for the Agreement was March 25, 1998. The purpose of this work is to develop and commercialize net shape forming methods for directly creating dense hydroxylapatite (HA) ceramic otologic implants. The project includes three tasks: (1) modification of existing gelcasting formulations to accommodate HA slurries; (2) demonstration of gelcasting to fabricate green HA ceramic components of a size and shape appropriate to otologic implants: and (3) sintering and evaluation of the HA components.

  4. Ion implantation in silicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, G.W.

    1993-12-01

    This review examines the effects of ion implantation on the physical properties of silicate glasses, the compositional modifications that can be brought about, and the use of metal implants to form colloidal nanosize particles for increasing the nonlinear refractive index.

  5. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  6. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  7. The ruptured PIP breast implant.

    PubMed

    Helyar, V; Burke, C; McWilliams, S

    2013-08-01

    Public concern erupted about the safety of Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP) breast implants when it was revealed in 2011 that they contained an inferior, unlicensed industrial-grade silicone associated with a high rate of rupture. There followed national guidance for UK clinicians, which led to a considerable increase in referrals of asymptomatic women for breast implant assessment. In this review we discuss possible approaches to screening the PIP cohort and the salient characteristics of a ruptured implant. PMID:23622796

  8. Rehabilitation using single stage implants

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jumshad B.; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K. V.; Shivakumar, B.

    2009-01-01

    Implant related prosthesis has become an integral part of rehabilitation of edentulous areas. Single stage implant placement has become popular because of its ease of use and fairly predictable results. In this paper, we present a series of cases of single stage implants being used to rehabilitate different clinical situations. All the implants placed have been successfully restored and followed up for up to one year. PMID:20376239

  9. Gold as an intruder in ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Reyes, José M; Monroy, B Marel; Bizarro, Monserrat; Güell, Frank; Martínez, Ana; Ramos, Estrella

    2015-09-01

    Several techniques for obtaining ZnO nanowires (ZnO NWs) have been reported in the literature. In particular, vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) with Au as a catalyst is widely used. During this process, Au impurities in the ZnO NWs can be incorporated accidentally, and for this reason we named these impurities as intruders. It is thought that these intruders may produce interesting alterations in the electronic characteristics of nanowires. In the experiment, it is not easy to detect either Au atoms in these nanowires, or the modification that intruders produce in different electrical, optical and other properties. For this reason, in this density functional theory investigation, the effect of Au intruders on ZnO NWs is analysed. Au extended (thread) and point defects (atoms replacing Zn or O, or Au interstitials) are used to simulate the presence of gold atoms. Optimised geometries, band-gaps and density of states indicate that the presence of small amounts of Au drastically modifies the electronic states of ZnO NWs. The results reported here clearly indicate that small amounts of Au have a strong impact on the electronic properties of ZnO NWs, introducing states in the band edges that may promote transitions in the visible spectral region. The presence of Au as an intruder in ZnO NWs enhances the potential use of this system for photonic and photovoltaic applications. PMID:26219752

  10. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahran, H. Y.; Yahia, I. S.

    2015-06-01

    ZnO was prepared by direct combustion method of pure zinc metal at 1000 °C for 30 min. After combustion, ZnO was formed as a fumed powder. The as-synthesized ZnO was characterized by means of different techniques such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), diffused reflectance and the electrical conductivity measurements. XRD showed that ZnO has a nanocrystalline hexagonal phase with lattice constants a = 3.24982 Å and c = 5.20661 Å as compared to JCDPS card. From the analysis of the diffused reflectance spectra, the optical band gap was calculated and equals 3.2 eV which is in the same range for commercial ZnO and the reported ZnO prepared by other techniques. SEM micrographs showed the nanotetrapods structure of ZnO with highly uniform distribution of tetrapods. The DC electrical conductivity measurement was carried out in the temperature range 293-473 K, and it was found to be increased with increasing temperature forming three different conduction mechanisms associated with three activation energies.

  11. Growth of Homoepitaxial ZnO Semiconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; George, Michael A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    As a high temperature semiconductor, ZnO has been used for many applications such as wave-guide, solar cells, and surface acoustic wave devices. Since the ZnO material has an energy gap of 3.3 eV at room temperature and an excitonic binding energy (60 meV) that is possible to make excitonic lasering at room temperature a recent surge of interest is to synthesize ZnO films for electro-optical devices. These applications require films with a smooth surface, good crystal quality, and low defect density. Homoepitaxial films have been studied in terms of morphology, crystal structure, and electrical and optical properties. ZnO single crystals are grown by the hydrothermal method. Substrates are mechanically polished and annealed in air for four hours before deposited films. The annealing temperature-dependence of ZnO substrates is studied. Films are synthesized by the off-axis reactive sputtering deposition. The films have very smooth surface with a roughness ZnO films grown of (0001) ZnO and (0001) sapphire substrates will be also compared and discussed in the presentation.

  12. Superhydrophobic ZnO networks with high water adhesion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ZnO structures were deposited using a simple chemical bath deposition technique onto interdigitated electrodes fabricated by a conventional photolithography method on SiO2/Si substrates. The X-ray diffraction studies show that the ZnO samples have a hexagonal wurtzite crystalline structure. The scanning electron microscopy observations prove that the substrates are uniformly covered by ZnO networks formed by monodisperse rods. The ZnO rod average diameter and length were tuned by controlling reactants' concentration and reaction time. Optical spectroscopy measurements demonstrate that all the samples display bandgap values and emission bands typical for ZnO. The electrical measurements reveal percolating networks which are highly sensitive when the samples are exposed to ammonia vapors, a variation in their resistance with the exposure time being evidenced. Other important characteristics are that the ZnO rod networks exhibit superhydrophobicity, with water contact angles exceeding 150° and a high water droplet adhesion. Reproducible, easily scalable, and low-cost chemical bath deposition and photolithography techniques could provide a facile approach to fabricate such ZnO networks and devices based on them for a wide range of applications where multifunctionality, i.e., sensing and superhydrophobicity, properties are required. PACS 81.07.-b; 81.05.Dz; 68.08.Bc PMID:25136286

  13. Polarized Raman scattering of single ZnO nanorod

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J. L. Lai, Y. F. Wang, Y. Z.; Cheng, S. Y.

    2014-01-21

    Polarized Raman scattering measurement on single wurtzite c-plane (001) ZnO nanorod grown by hydrothermal method has been performed at room temperature. The polarization dependence of the intensity of the Raman scattering for the phonon modes A{sub 1}(TO), E{sub 1}(TO), and E{sub 2}{sup high} in the ZnO nanorod are obtained. The deviations of polarization-dependent Raman spectroscopy from the prediction of Raman selection rules are observed, which can be attributed to the structure defects in the ZnO nanorod as confirmed by the comparison of the transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence spectra as well as the polarization dependent Raman signal of the annealed and unannealed ZnO nanorod. The Raman tensor elements of A{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 1}(TO) phonon modes normalized to that of the E{sub 2}{sup high} phonon mode are |a/d|=0.32±0.01, |b/d|=0.49±0.02, and |c/d|=0.23±0.01 for the unannealed ZnO nanorod, and |a/d|=0.33±0.01, |b/d|=0.45±0.01, and |c/d|=0.20±0.01 for the annealed ZnO nanorod, which shows strong anisotropy compared to that of bulk ZnO epilayer.

  14. Prosthetic failure in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sadid-Zadeh, Ramtin; Kutkut, Ahmad; Kim, Hyeongil

    2015-01-01

    Although osseointegrated dental implants have become a predictable and effective modality for the treatment of single or multiple missing teeth, their use is associated with clinical complications. Such complications can be biologic, technical, mechanical, or esthetic and may compromise implant outcomes to various degrees. This article presents prosthetic complications accompanied with implant-supported single and partial fixed dental prostheses. PMID:25434566

  15. Improved activity estimation with MC-JOSEM versus TEW-JOSEM in 111In SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Fakhri, Georges El; Moore, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously developed a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based joint ordered-subset expectation maximization (JOSEM) iterative reconstruction algorithm, MC-JOSEM. A phantom study was performed to compare quantitative imaging performance of MC-JOSEM with that of a triple-energy-window approach (TEW) in which estimated scatter was also included additively within JOSEM, TEW-JOSEM. We acquired high-count projections of a 5.5 cm3 sphere of 111In at different locations in the water-filled torso phantom; high-count projections were then obtained with 111In only in the liver or only in the soft-tissue background compartment, so that we could generate synthetic projections for spheres surrounded by various activity distributions. MC scatter estimates used by MC-JOSEM were computed once after five iterations of TEW-JOSEM. Images of different combinations of liver∕background and sphere∕background activity concentration ratios were reconstructed by both TEW-JOSEM and MC-JOSEM for 40 iterations. For activity estimation in the sphere, MC-JOSEM always produced better relative bias and relative standard deviation than TEW-JOSEM for each sphere location, iteration number, and activity combination. The average relative bias of activity estimates in the sphere for MC-JOSEM after 40 iterations was −6.9%, versus −15.8% for TEW-JOSEM, while the average relative standard deviation of the sphere activity estimates was 16.1% for MC-JOSEM, versus 27.4% for TEW-JOSEM. Additionally, the average relative bias of activity concentration estimates in the liver and the background for MC-JOSEM after 40 iterations was −3.9%, versus −12.2% for TEW-JOSEM, while the average relative standard deviation of these estimates was 2.5% for MC-JOSEM, versus 3.4% for TEW-JOSEM. MC-JOSEM is a promising approach for quantitative activity estimation in 111In SPECT. PMID:18561679

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities in patients with neoplastic meningitis. An evaluation using /sup 111/In-DTPA ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, S.A.; Trump, D.L.; Chen, D.C.; Thompson, G.; Camargo, E.E.

    1982-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics were evaluated by /sup 111/In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (/sup 111/In-DTPA) ventriculography in 27 patients with neoplastic meningitis. Nineteen patients (70 percent) had evidence of cerebrospinal fluid flow disturbances. These occurred as ventricular outlet obstructions, abnormalities of flow in the spinal canal, or flow distrubances over the cortical convexities. Tumor histology, physical examination, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, myelograms, and computerized axial tomographic scans were not sufficient to predict cerebrospinal fluid flow patterns. These data indicate that cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities are common in patients with neoplastic meningitis and that /sup 111/In-DTPA cerebrospinal fluid flow imaging is useful in characterizing these abnormalities. This technique provides insight into the distribution of intraventricularly administered chemotherapy and may provide explanations for treatment failure and drug-induced neurotoxicity in patients with neoplastic meningitis.

  17. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Jr., Kenneth J; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S; Wilgen, John B; Evans, III, Boyd McCutchen

    2014-02-25

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  18. Cochlear Implantation in Neurobrucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Savaş, Özden; Aslan, Filiz; Sennaroğlu, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurobrucellosis is a disease consisting of a wide spectrum of complications such as peripheral neuropathy, cranial nerve involvement, ataxia, meningeal irritation, paraplegia, seizures, coma, and even death. The vestibulocochlear nerve seems to be the most commonly affected cranial nerve (10%). We present a patient with neurobrucellosis whose auditory perception and speech intelligibility skill performances improved after cochlear implantation. Case Report: A 35 year-old woman was admitted to another hospital 2 years ago with the symptoms of headache, nausea, and altered consciousness, who was finally diagnosed with neurobrucellosis. She developed bilateral profound sensorineural hearing loss during the following 6 months. There was no benefit of using hearing aids. After successful treatment of her illness, she was found to be suitable for cochlear implantation. After the operation, her auditory perception skills improved significantly with a Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) score of 5. According to clinical observations and her family members’ statements, her Speech Intelligibility Rating (SIR) score was 3. Her speech intelligibility skills are still improving. Conclusion: Our case report represents the second case of hearing rehabilitation with cochlear implantation after neurobrucellosis. Cochlear implantation is a cost-effective and time-proven successful intervention in post-lingual adult patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Early timing of the surgery after appropriate treatment of meningitis helps the patient to achieve better postoperative results. PMID:26966626

  19. Implantable electrical device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhabvala, M. D. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fully implantable and self contained device is disclosed composed of a flexible electrode array for surrounding damaged nerves and a signal generator for driving the electrode array with periodic electrical impulses of nanoampere magnitude to induce regeneration of the damaged nerves.

  20. Remote actuated valve implant

    DOEpatents

    McKnight, Timothy E.; Johnson, Anthony; Moise, Kenneth J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Baba, Justin S.; Wilgen, John B.; Evans, Boyd Mccutchen

    2016-05-10

    Valve implant systems positionable within a flow passage, the systems having an inlet, an outlet, and a remotely activatable valve between the inlet and outlet, with the valves being operable to provide intermittent occlusion of the flow path. A remote field is applied to provide thermal or magnetic activation of the valves.

  1. Implantable Drug Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Drugs such as insulin are injected as needed directly into bloodstream by compact implantable dispensing unit. Two vapor cavities produce opposing forces on drug-chamber diaphragm. Heaters in cavities allow control of direction and rate of motion of bellows. Dispensing capsule fitted with coil so batteries can be recharged by induction.

  2. Allergy to Surgical Implants.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Karin A

    2015-01-01

    Surgical implants have a wide array of therapeutic uses, most commonly in joint replacements, but also in repair of pes excavatum and spinal disorders, in cardiac devices (stents, patches, pacers, valves), in gynecological implants, and in dentistry. Many of the metals used are immunologically active, as are the methacrylates and epoxies used in conjunction with several of these devices. Allergic responses to surgical components can present atypically as failure of the device, with nonspecific symptoms of localized pain, swelling, warmth, loosening, instability, itching, or burning; localized rash is infrequent. Identification of the specific metal and cement components used in a particular implant can be difficult, but is crucial to guide testing and interpretation of results. Nickel, cobalt, and chromium remain the most common metals implicated in implant failure due to metal sensitization; methacrylate-based cements are also important contributors. This review will provide a guide on how to assess and interpret the clinical history, identify the components used in surgery, test for sensitization, and provide advice on possible solutions. Data on the pathways of metal-induced immune stimulation are included. In this setting, the allergist, the dermatologist, or both have the potential to significantly improve surgical outcomes and patient care. PMID:26362550

  3. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at $7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at $6.2 billion. Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing 'only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around $2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  4. Semiconductor Ion Implanters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Barry A.; Ruffell, John P.

    2011-06-01

    In 1953 the Raytheon CK722 transistor was priced at 7.60. Based upon this, an Intel Xeon Quad Core processor containing 820,000,000 transistors should list at 6.2 billion! Particle accelerator technology plays an important part in the remarkable story of why that Intel product can be purchased today for a few hundred dollars. Most people of the mid twentieth century would be astonished at the ubiquity of semiconductors in the products we now buy and use every day. Though relatively expensive in the nineteen fifties they now exist in a wide range of items from high-end multicore microprocessors like the Intel product to disposable items containing `only' hundreds or thousands like RFID chips and talking greeting cards. This historical development has been fueled by continuous advancement of the several individual technologies involved in the production of semiconductor devices including Ion Implantation and the charged particle beamlines at the heart of implant machines. In the course of its 40 year development, the worldwide implanter industry has reached annual sales levels around 2B, installed thousands of dedicated machines and directly employs thousands of workers. It represents in all these measures, as much and possibly more than any other industrial application of particle accelerator technology. This presentation discusses the history of implanter development. It touches on some of the people involved and on some of the developmental changes and challenges imposed as the requirements of the semiconductor industry evolved.

  5. The reverse zygomatic implant: a new implant for maxillofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Andrew; Collier, Jonathan; Darwood, Alastair; Tanner, Susan

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the rehabilitation of a patient who had been treated with a hemimaxillectomy, reconstruction with a latissimus dorsi vascularized free flap, and radiotherapy for carcinoma of the sinus some years previously. Limited jaw opening, difficult access through the flap to the bony site, and the very small amount of bone available in which to anchor the implant inspired the development and use of a new "reverse zygomatic" implant. For this treatment, site preparation and implant insertion were accomplished using an extraoral approach. The implant was used along with two other conventional zygomatic implants to provide support for a milled titanium bar and overdenture to rehabilitate the maxilla. Two years later, the patient continues to enjoy a healthy reconstruction. The reverse zygomatic implant appears to show promise as a useful addition to the implant armamentarium for the treatment of the patient undergoing maxillectomy. PMID:26574864

  6. Preclinical evaluation of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X anti-Ku70/Ku80 monoclonal antibody in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Axelsson, Susan; Vilhelmsson Timmermand, Oskar; Welinder, Charlotte; Borrebaeck, Carl AK; Strand, Sven-Erik; Tran, Thuy A; Jansson, Bo; Bjartell, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess the Ku70/Ku80 complex as a potential target for antibody imaging of prostate cancer. We evaluated the in vivo and ex vivo tumor targeting and biodistribution of the 111In-labeled human internalizing antibody, INCA-X (111In-DTPA-INCA-X antibody), in NMRI-nude mice bearing human PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 or DU145 xenografts. DTPA-conjugated, non-labeled antibody was pre-administered at different time-points followed by a single intravenous injection of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X. At 48, 72 and 96 h post-injection, tissues were harvested, and the antibody distribution was determined by measuring radioactivity. Preclinical SPECT/CT imaging of mice with and without the predose was performed at 48 hours post-injection of labeled DTPA-INCA-X. Biodistribution of the labeled antibody showed enriched activity in tumor, spleen and liver. Animals pre-administered with DTPA-INCA-X showed increased tumor uptake and blood content of 111In-DTPA-INCA-X with reduced splenic and liver uptake. The in vitro and in vivo data presented show that the 111In-labeled INCA-X antibody is internalized into prostate cancer cells and by pre-administering non-labeled DTPA-INCA-X, we were able to significantly reduce the off target binding and increase the 111In-DTPA-INCA-X mAb uptake in PC-3, PC-3M-Lu2 and DU145 xenografts. The results are encouraging and identifying the Ku70/Ku80 antigen as a target is worth further investigation for functional imaging of prostate cancer. PMID:24982817

  7. High pressure and high temperature behaviour of ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Thakar, Nilesh A.; Bhatt, Apoorva D.; Pandya, Tushar C.

    2014-04-24

    The thermodynamic properties with the wurtzite (B4) and rocksalt (B1) phases of ZnO under high pressures and high temperatures have been investigated using Tait's Equation of state (EOS). The effects of pressures and temperatures on thermodynamic properties such as bulk modulus, thermal expansivity and thermal pressure are explored for both two structures. It is found that ZnO material gradually softens with increase of temperature while it hardens with the increment of the pressure. Our predicted results of thermodynamics properties for both the phases of ZnO are in overall agreement with the available data in the literature.

  8. Hierarchical structures of ZnO spherical particles synthesized solvothermally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Noriko; Haneda, Hajime

    2011-12-01

    We review the solvothermal synthesis, using a mixture of ethylene glycol (EG) and water as the solvent, of zinc oxide (ZnO) particles having spherical and flower-like shapes and hierarchical nanostructures. The preparation conditions of the ZnO particles and the microscopic characterization of the morphology are summarized. We found the following three effects of the ratio of EG to water on the formation of hierarchical structures: (i) EG restricts the growth of ZnO microcrystals, (ii) EG promotes the self-assembly of small crystallites into spheroidal particles and (iii) the high water content of EG results in hollow spheres.

  9. ZnO Nanocoral Structures for Photoelectrochemical Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, K. S.; Yan, Y.; Shet, S.; Jones, K.; Deutsch, T.; Turner, J.; Al-Jassim, M.

    2008-01-01

    We report on synthesis of a uniform and large area of a new form of ZnO nanocorals. These nanostructures can provide suitable electrical pathways for efficient carrier collection as well as large surface areas for the photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. PEC devices made from these ZnO nanocoral structures demonstrate significantly enhanced photoresponse as compared to ZnO compact and nanorod films. Our results suggest that the nanocoral structures could be an excellent choice for nanomaterial-based applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, electrochromic windows, and batteries.

  10. Unsuspected pneumonia detected by increased lung uptake on 111In-ibritumomab tiuxetan scan.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Misun; Joyce, Judith M; Klein, Herbert; Hou, Jing-Zhou

    2012-10-01

    99Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) is a CD20-targeted radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma approved by the FDA in 2002. The acquisition of an 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan scan (bioscan) to confirm normal biodistribution before treatment with 99Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan was initially required in the United States until November 2011. This is the first documented example of abnormal biodistribution due to unsuspected pneumonia detected by increased lung uptake on the bioscan. The pneumonia was treated and resolved before 99Y Zevalin, avoiding potential harm and indicating that a screening chest x-ray may be appropriate when a bioscan is not performed. PMID:22955077

  11. Dye-sensitized solar cells using ZnO nanotips and Ga-doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hanhong; Du Pasquier, Aurelien; Saraf, Gaurav; Zhong, Jian; Lu, Yicheng

    2008-04-01

    Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) transparent conducting films and well-aligned ZnO nanotips were sequentially grown on a glass substrate using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The morphology control of ZnO from dense films to nanotips was realized through temperature-modulated growth. The ZnO nanotips/GZO structure was sensitized with dye N719 to form photoelectrochemical cells. It is found that the power conversion efficiency linearly increases with the length of ZnO nanotips. For the 1.0 cm2 dye-sensitized solar cell built from 4.8 µm ZnO nanotips, a peak incident photo-to-current conversion efficiency of 79% (at ~530 nm) and a power conversion efficiency of 0.77% under the illumination of one sun-simulated sunlight were achieved. UV light harvesting directly by ZnO was observed. The I-V characteristics of the cells were analyzed using a one-diode equivalent circuit model.

  12. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements. PMID:24286654

  13. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric behaviors of insulator/semiconductor (Al2O3/ZnO) nanolaminates with various ZnO thicknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin; Bi, Xiaofang

    2016-07-01

    Al2O3/ZnO nanolaminates (NLs) with various ZnO sublayer thicknesses were prepared by atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 sublayers are characterized as amorphous and the ZnO sublayers have an oriented polycrystalline structure. As the ZnO thickness decreases to a certain value, each NL exhibits a critical temperature at which its dielectric constant starts to rise quickly. Moreover, this temperature increases as the ZnO thickness is decreased further. On the other hand, the permittivity demonstrates a large value of several hundred at a frequency  ⩽1000 Hz, followed by a steplike decrease at a higher frequency. The change in the cut-off frequency with ZnO thickness is characterized by a hook function. It is revealed that the Coulomb confinement effect becomes predominant in the dielectric behaviors of the NLs with very thin ZnO. As the ZnO thickness decreases to about the same as or even smaller than the Bohr radius of ZnO, a great change in the carrier concentration and effective mass of ZnO is induced, which is shown to be responsible for the peculiar dielectric behaviors of Al2O3/ZnO with very thin ZnO. These findings provide insight into the prevailing mechanisms to optimize the dielectric properties of semiconductor/insulator laminates with nanoscale sublayer thickness.

  14. Novel ZnO microballs synthesized via pyrolysis of zinc-acetate in oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xianhui; Zhu, Liping; Ye, Zhizhen; Yuan, Guodong; Zhao, Binghui; Qian, Qing

    2005-09-01

    Novel micrometer-sized ZnO balls have been synthesized on (1 1 1)-Si substrates via pyrolysis of zinc acetate in oxygen atmosphere. The ZnO microballs exhibit unique geometrical shapes with partly porous or hollow structures and their walls are composed of large size textured ZnO microcrystals. The growth mechanism of the ZnO microballs is proposed to be a process following the formation of ZnO film layer, ZnO branches and then ZnO microballs. The phase structure and crystalline structure of the as-grown ZnO microballs were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), respectively. The room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum shows prominent UV emission around 394 nm and weak green emission peaks indicating that there are few defects in the single crystal grains of the ZnO microballs.

  15. Substrate lattice relaxations, spectral distortions, and nanoparticle inclusions of ion implanted zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Ma, B.; Zhang, W.; Li, D.; Zhao, Y.; Finch, A. A.; Townsend, P. D.

    2015-09-01

    Low temperature radioluminescence and thermoluminescence spectra of ZnO track numerous changes produced by copper ion implantation into the surface layer. A significant, but unexpected, feature is that the bulk crystal becomes modified by the stress generated in the surface layer. This is reflected by the energy of intrinsic band gap emission. There are also differences in the spectra and peak temperatures of the thermoluminescence components, consistent with such a structural relaxation. The copper implant layer is both absorbing and reflective, so this introduces major distortions on the radioluminescence component from the bulk region, since the bulk luminescence signals are transmitted through, or reflected from, the implant layer. The temperature dependence of the spectra includes anomalies that are typical of changes driven by phase transitions of nanoparticle inclusions. Overall, the features of bulk relaxation, spectral distortion, and detection of nanoparticle inclusions are rarely considered for ion implanted luminescence studies, but the data suggest they are almost inevitable in a wide range of implanted materials.

  16. Formation and annihilation of E4 centers in ZnO: Influence of hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hupfer, A.; Bhoodoo, C.; Vines, L.; Svensson, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    Hydrothermally grown n-type ZnO bulk samples have been implanted with protons and deuterium ions to fluences in the range of 8 × 1010 to 8 × 1011 cm-2. The implantations were performed at the temperature of 285 K, and the samples were then analyzed in-situ by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) using a setup connected to the implanter beam line. The concentration of the so-called E4 center, having an apparent energy level at ˜0.57 eV below the conduction edge, is found to increase linearly with the ion fluence and the generation rate is proportional to the elastic energy deposition, as expected for a primary defect. Isothermal annealing of the E4 center at temperatures between 290 and 315 K reveals first-order kinetics with the activation energy of ˜0.6 eV. The annealing rate is strongly enhanced with increasing hydrogen fluence, and a model invoking migration of interstitial hydrogen and subsequent reaction with E4 exhibits close agreement with the experimental data. The rate of electron capture by E4 during the DLTS filling pulse depends on temperature, and it displays a thermal barrier of ˜0.15 eV. Most of these experimental results for E4 conform to the theoretically predicted properties of the oxygen vacancy (VO) and a tentative assignment of E4 to VO is made, corroborating previous suggestions in the literature. In particular, the 0.57 eV level is ascribed to the double donor state of VO.

  17. Electronic structure and photoluminescence properties of Zn-ion implanted silica glass before and after thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Boukhvalov, D. W.; Kurmaev, E. Z.; Pchelkina, Z. V.; Gavrilov, N. V.

    2016-01-01

    The results of XPS core-level and valence band measurements, photoluminescence spectra of a-SiO2 implanted by Zn-ions (E=30 keV, D=1*1017 cm^-2) and Density Functional Theory calculations of electronic structure as well as formation energies of structural defects in silica glass induced by Zn-ion implantation are presented. Both theory and experiment show that it is energetically more favorable for implanted zinc ions to occupy the interstitial positions instead of cation substitution. As a result, the Zn-ions embedded to interstitials, form chemical bonds with the surrounding oxygen atoms, formation ZnO-like nanoparticles and oxygen-deficient SiOx matrix. The subsequent thermal annealing at 900 0C (1 hr) strongly reduces the amount of ZnO nanoparticles and induces the formation of {\\alpha}-Zn2SiO4 phase which markedly enhances the green emission.

  18. Hydrodynamic fabrication of structurally gradient ZnO nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Min; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Song, Young Seok

    2016-02-26

    We studied a new approach where structurally gradient nanostructures were fabricated by means of hydrodynamics. Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized in a drag-driven rotational flow in a controlled manner. The structural characteristics of nanorods such as orientation and diameter were determined by momentum and mass transfer at the substrate surface. The nucleation of ZnO was induced by shear stress which plays a key role in determining the orientation of ZnO nanorods. The nucleation and growth of such nanostructures were modeled theoretically and analyzed numerically to understand the underlying physics of the fabrication of nanostructures controlled by hydrodynamics. The findings demonstrated that the precise control of momentum and mass transfer enabled the formation of ZnO nanorods with a structural gradient in diameter and orientation. PMID:26807679

  19. Synthesis and Optical Properties of ZnO Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Duo-Fa; Liao, Lei; Li, Jin-Chai; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Ming-Zeng; Zhou, Jun-Ming

    2005-08-01

    ZnO nanostructures with different morphologies were fabricated by changing the partial oxygen pressure. The structures, morphologies and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures were investigated by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectra at room temperature. All the samples show preferred orientation along the c-axis. The oxygen partial pressure and the annealing atmosphere have important effect on the PL property of ZnO nanostructures. The high oxygen partial pressure during growth of samples and high-temperature annealing of the ZnO samples in oxygen can increase oxygen vacancies and can especially increase antisite oxygen (Ozn) defects, which degraded the near band-edge emission. However, the annealing in H2 can significantly modify the NBE emission.

  20. Li doped ZnO thin films for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, K. M.; Bhat, Shreesha; Serrao, F. J.; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    We have prepared undoped (ZnO) and Li doped ZnO (LZO) thin films using cost effective sol gel spin coating method.The structural properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and it showed that Li ions occupied interstitial positions in the LZO film. The optical properties like band bending effect, absorption length, band edge sharpness, which have direct impact on solar cell performance has been calculated. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the films showed dominant blue emission with CIE coordinate numbers (0.1384, 0.0836) for ZnO and (0.1356, 0.0910) for LZO. The dominating wavelength of the blue emission is present at 470.9 nm and 472.3 nm for ZnO and LZO films respectively. The structural and optical parameters determined in the present study could be used in LED applications.

  1. Direct observation of voltage barriers in ZnO varistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivanek, O. L.; Williams, P.; Lin, Y.-C.

    1979-01-01

    Voltage barriers in a ZnO varistor have been imaged by voltage-contrast scanning electron microscopy. They are due to grain boundaries and are capable of supporting voltage differences of up to about 4 V.

  2. Photoluminescence of polycrystalline ZnO under different annealing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Tae-Bong; Jeen, Gwang Soo; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae; Kim, Hyung-Kook

    2003-11-01

    We investigated polycrystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) with different annealing conditions in air by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence. We found that the concentration of antisite oxide (OZn) increases when ZnO ceramics were in an O-rich condition. As the concentration of antisite oxide (OZn) increased, the photoluminescence intensity of the green band emission increased. The crossover temperature of the free and bound excitons was roughly estimated as 100 K.

  3. Anodized ZnO nanostructures for photoelectrochemical water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mao-Chia; Wang, TsingHai; Wu, Bin-Jui; Lin, Jing-Chie; Wu, Ching-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures were fabricated on the polished zinc foil by anodic deposition in an alkaline solution containing 1.0 M NaOH and 0.25 M Zn(NO3)2. Potentiostatic anodization was conducted at two potentials (-0.7 V in the passive region and -1.0 V in the active region vs. SCE) which are higher than the open circuit potential (-1.03 V vs. SCE) and as-obtained ZnO nanostrcutures were investigated focusing on their structural, optical, electrical and photoelectrochemical (PEC) characteristics. All samples were confirmed ZnO by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectra. Observations in the SEM images clearly showed that ZnO nanostructures prepared at -0.7 V vs. SCE were composed of nanowires at while those obtained at -1.0 V vs. SCE possessed nanosheets morphology. Result from transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction patterns suggested that the ZnO nanowires belonged to single crystalline with a preferred orientation of (0 0 2) whereas the ZnO nanosheets were polycrystalline. Following PEC experiments indicated that ZnO nanowires had higher photocurrent density of 0.32 mA/cm2 at 0.5 V vs. SCE under 100 mW/cm2 illumination. This value was about 1.9 times higher than that of ZnO nanosheets. Observed higher photocurrent was likely due to the single crystalline, preferred (0 0 2) orientation, higher carrier concentration and lower charge transfer resistance.

  4. Vapor Transport of ZnO in Closed Ampoules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, Witold

    2005-01-01

    Vapor transport of ZnO by PVT and CVT using carbon, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen as the transport agents was studied. Theoretical calculations of the mass flux were based on equilibrium thermodynamics and 1-D diffusional mass transport. Experimental results were found to be consistent with theoretical predictions. NO apparent kinetic limitations to sublimation were observed. Slow reaction of carbon with ZnO source was found.

  5. Pediatric Cochlear Implantation: Why Do Children Receive Implants Late?

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Julia; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Early cochlear implantation has been widely promoted for children who derive inadequate benefit from conventional acoustic amplification. Universal newborn hearing screening has led to earlier identification and intervention, including cochlear implantation in much of the world. The purpose of this study was to examine age and time to cochlear implantation and to understand the factors that affected late cochlear implantation in children who received cochlear implants. Design: In this population-based study, data were examined for all children who underwent cochlear implant surgery in one region of Canada from 2002 to 2013. Clinical characteristics were collected prospectively as part of a larger project examining outcomes from newborn hearing screening. For this study, audiologic details including age and severity of hearing loss at diagnosis, age at cochlear implant candidacy, and age at cochlear implantation were documented. Additional detailed medical chart information was extracted to identify the factors associated with late implantation for children who received cochlear implants more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Results: The median age of diagnosis of permanent hearing loss for 187 children was 12.6 (interquartile range: 5.5, 21.7) months, and the age of cochlear implantation over the 12-year period was highly variable with a median age of 36.2 (interquartile range: 21.4, 71.3) months. A total of 118 (63.1%) received their first implant more than 12 months after confirmation of hearing loss. Detailed analysis of clinical profiles for these 118 children revealed that late implantation could be accounted for primarily by progressive hearing loss (52.5%), complex medical conditions (16.9%), family indecision (9.3%), geographical location (5.9%), and other miscellaneous known (6.8%) and unknown factors (8.5%). Conclusions: This study confirms that despite the trend toward earlier implantation, a substantial number of children

  6. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan; Stricker, Andres; Berg, Britt-Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. PMID:26635486

  7. Implants as absolute anchorage.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Caruso, Joseph M

    2005-11-01

    Anchorage control is essential for successful orthodontic treatment. Each tooth has its own anchorage potential as well as propensity to move when force is applied. When teeth are used as anchorage, the untoward movements of the anchoring units may result in the prolonged treatment time, and unpredictable or less-than-ideal outcome. To maximize tooth-related anchorage, techniques such as differential torque, placing roots into the cortex of the bone, the use of various intraoral devices and/or extraoral appliances have been implemented. Implants, as they are in direct contact with bone, do not possess a periodontal ligament. As a result, they do not move when orthodontic/orthopedic force is applied, and therefore can be used as "absolute anchorage." This article describes different types of implants that have been used as orthodontic anchorage. Their clinical applications and limitations are also discussed. PMID:16463910

  8. Hormonal control of implantation.

    PubMed

    Sandra, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    In mammals, implantation represents a key step of pregnancy and its progression conditions not only the success of pregnancy but health of the offspring. Implantation requires a complex and specific uterine tissue, the endometrium, whose biological functions are tightly regulated by numerous signals, including steroids and polypeptide hormones. Endometrial tissue is endowed with dynamic properties that associate its ability to control the developmental trajectory of the embryo (driver property) and its ability to react to embryos displaying distinct capacities to develop to term (sensor property). Since dynamical properties of the endometrium can be affected by pre- and post-conceptional environment, determining how maternal hormonal signals and their biological actions are affected by environmental factors (e.g. nutrition, stress, infections) is mandatory to reduce or even to prevent their detrimental effects on endometrial physiology in order to preserve the optimal functionality of this tissue. PMID:27172870

  9. Sterilisation of implantable devices.

    PubMed

    Matthews, I P; Gibson, C; Samuel, A H

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis and rates of infection associated with the use of a wide variety of implantable devices are described. The multi-factorial nature of post-operative periprosthetic infection is outlined and the role of sterilisation of devices is explained. The resistance of bacterial spores is highlighted as a problem and a full description is given of the processes of sterilisation by heat, steam, ethylene oxide, low temperature steam and formaldehyde, ionising radiation and liquid glutaraldehyde. Sterility assurance and validation are discussed in the context of biological indicators and physical/chemical indicators. Adverse effects upon the material composition of devices and problems of process control are listed. Finally, possible optimisations of the ethylene oxide process and their potential significance to the field of sterilisation of implants is explored. PMID:10172076

  10. Data Evaluation Acquired Talys 1.0 Code to Produce 111In from Various Accelerator-Based Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipoor, Zahra; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Seyyedi, Solaleh; Aref, Morteza

    The Indium-111 physical-decay parameters as a β-emitter radionuclide show some potential for radiodiagnostic and radiotherapeutic purposes. Medical investigators have shown that 111In is an important radionuclide for locating and imaging certain tumors, visualization of the lymphatic system and thousands of labeling reactions have been suggested. The TALYS 1.0 code was used here to calculate excitation functions of 112/114-118Sn+p, 110Cd+3He, 109Ag+3He, 111-114Cd+p, 110/111Cd+d, 109Ag+α to produce 111In using low and medium energy accelerators. Calculations were performed up to 200 MeV. Appropriate target thicknesses have been assumed based on energy loss calculations with the SRIM code. Theoretical integral yields for all the latter reactions were calculated. The TALYS 1.0 code predicts that the production of a few curies of 111In is feasible using a target of isotopically highly enriched 112Cd and a proton energy between 12 and 25 MeV with a production rate as 248.97 MBq·μA-1 · h-1. Minimum impurities shall be produced during the proton irradiation of an enriched 111Cd target yielding a production rate for 111In of 67.52 MBq· μA-1 · h-1.

  11. Localization of neuroendocrine tumours with [111In] DTPA-octreotide scintigraphy (Octreoscan): a comparative study with CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, W; Johnston, C F; Buchanan, K D; Ferguson, W R; Laird, J D; Crothers, J G; McIlrath, E M

    1998-04-01

    A wide variety of neuroendocrine tumours express somatostatin receptors, and can be visualized by radiolabelled somatostatin analogue scintigraphy. To investigate the value of [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy (Octreoscan), 48 patients (37 with proven carcinoid, pancreatic endocrine and medullary carcinoma of thyroid tumours, 11 with neuroendocrine syndromes multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-I) and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) were examined with 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide. Scintigrams were obtained at 24 and 48 h, and the results were compared with CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-five of 48 patients had positive [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy (23/25 (92%) carcinoids, 8/9 (89%) PETs, 4/11 (36%) MEN-I & ZES). Of the 42 lesions located by conventional imaging techniques, 37 (88%) were also identified by Octreoscan. Unexpected lesions (40 sites), not detected by CT or MR imaging were found in 24/48 (50%) patients. [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy has a higher sensitivity for tumour detection, and is superior to MR imaging and CT scanning in the identification of previously unsuspected extraliver and lymph node metastases. It may also be helpful for the localization of clinically suspected tumours in patients with MEN-I and ZES. PMID:9666953

  12. The in vivo behavior of granulocytes labeled with indium-111 in a canine model of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, J.P.; Konopka, R.G.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.; Spragg, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    Use of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes in the study of pulmonary inflammation requires study of their in vivo behavior. To study the pulmonary deposition of these cells and their ability to migrate from the capillary to the alveolus, we injected (/sup 111/In)granulocytes into dogs 24 h after the induction of a right lower lobe pneumococcal pneumonia. Using external imaging, we found rapid clearance of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes from the uninvolved lung (with a residual radioactivity of 24.5 +/- 4.2% at 4 h). In contrast, 83 +/- 12.4% of the initial radioactivity was present in inflamed lung at 4 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the inflamed lung was more cellular than that from control lung, contained a greater fraction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (82 +/- 4.1% versus 20 +/- 6.2%), and much greater cell-associated radioactivity (ratio of 423:1, inflamed to control). Autoradiography disclosed that this radioactivity was localized to consolidated alveoli and was not prominently distributed in arterioles or venules or in airways larger than 0.6 mm. We conclude that (/sup 111/In)granulocytes are biologically active in the setting of acute lung inflammation.

  13. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Janaki, A Chinnammal; Sailatha, E; Gunasekaran, S

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity. PMID:25748589

  14. Light emission from electrically stressed ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucera, Luca; Adnane, Lhacene; Cil, Kadir; Manthina, Venkata; Agrios, Alexander; Silva, Helena; Gokirmak, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were grown on various substrates by a chemical growth process based on a ZnO seed solution, and starting from Zinc acetate (ZnAc) material. The nanorods were grown on insulating silicon (low doped) and oxidized silicon substrates, and also over patterned conducting (highly-doped) nanocrystalline silicon microwires. When high voltage is applied directly to the ZnO film using tungsten needles (˜ 50-60 V across ˜ 5-10 μm), high intensity blue and white light emission is observed, both in air and under high vacuum (10-4 - 10-5 Torr). Blue light appears as broad bright flashes covering a large area whereas white light is more localized and appears to come from individual nanostructures. The results suggest a combination of electroluminescence and photoluminescence processes that take place after an electrical breakdown (possibly across individual ZnO nanorods) that is observed as an exponential increase in current. Percolative conduction and light paths are also observed during the measurements. Measurements of the ZnO films of rods on conducting silicon substrate give more repeatable results, likely due to the higher probability of conducting paths between the two probes. The electrical stress results in significant self-heating and modification of the ZnO nanostructures and the contacts.[4pt] [1] Greene L. E. et al. Solution-Grown Zinc oxide nanowires. Innorganic Chemistry. Vol 45. 7535-7543. (2006)

  15. High efficient ZnO nanowalnuts photocatalyst: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Feng; Zhang, Siwen; Liu, Yang; Liu, Hongfeng; Qu, Fengyu; Cai, Xue; Wu, Xiang

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Walnut-like ZnO nanostructures are synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. • Morphologies and microstructures of the as-obtained ZnO products were investigated. • The photocatalytic results demonstrate that methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution can be degraded over 97% after 45 min under UV light irradiation. - Abstract: Walnut-like ZnO nanostructures are successfully synthesized through a facile hydrothermal method. The structure and morphology of the as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The photocatalytic properties of ZnO nanowalnuts are investigated by photodegradating several organic dyes, such as Congo red (CR), methyl orange (MO) and eosin red aqueous solutions under UV irradiation, respectively. The results demonstrate that methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution can be degraded over 97% after 45 min under UV light irradiation. In addition, eosin red and Congo red (CR) aqueous solution degradation experiments are also conducted in the same condition, respectively. It showed that ZnO nanowalnuts represent high photocatalytic activities with a degradation efficiency of 87% for CR with 115 min of irradiation and 97% for eosin red with 55 min of irradiation. The reported ZnO products may be promising candidates as the photocatalysts in waste water treatment.

  16. Luminescence mechanisms of defective ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Camarda, Pietro; Messina, Fabrizio; Vaccaro, Lavinia; Agnello, Simonpietro; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Schneider, Reinhard; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Lorenzi, Roberto; Gelardi, Franco Mario; Cannas, Marco

    2016-06-28

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLAL) of a zinc plate in deionized water were investigated by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) and complementary techniques (TEM, AFM, μRaman). HRTEM images show that PLAL produces crystalline ZnO NPs in wurtzite structure with a slightly distorted lattice parameter a. Consistently, optical spectra show the typical absorption edge of wurtzite ZnO (Eg = 3.38 eV) and the related excitonic PL peaked at 3.32 eV with a subnanosecond lifetime. ZnO NPs display a further PL peaking at 2.2 eV related to defects, which shows a power law decay kinetics. Thermal annealing in O2 and in a He atmosphere produces a reduction of the A1(LO) Raman mode at 565 cm(-1) associated with oxygen vacancies, accompanied by a decrease of defect-related emission at 2.2 eV. Based on our experimental results the emission at 2.2 eV is proposed to originate from a photo-generated hole in the valence band recombining with an electron deeply trapped in a singly ionized oxygen vacancy. This investigation clarifies important aspects of the photophysics of ZnO NPs and indicates that ZnO emission can be controlled by thermal annealing, which is important in view of optoelectronic applications. PMID:27251452

  17. Growth mechanism of ZnO low-temperature homoepitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S. H.; Minegishi, T.; Lee, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Yao, T.; Oh, D. C.; Ko, H. J.

    2011-09-01

    The authors report on the growth mechanism of ZnO homoepitaxy at the low-temperature range of 500 deg. C, which is unavailable to obtain high-quality ZnO films in heteroepitaxy. One typical set of ZnO films were grown on (0001) ZnO substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy: a standard structure without buffer and two buffered structures with high-temperature (HT) homobuffer and low-temperature (LT) homobuffer. As a result, the LT homobuffered structure had the outstanding material properties: the surface roughness is 0.9 nm, the full width at half maximum of x-ray rocking curve is 13 arcsec, and the emission linewidth of donor-bound excitons is 2.4 meV. In terms of the theoretical interpretation of the experimentally obtained electron mobilities, it was found that the LT homobuffered structure suffers less from the dislocation scattering and the ionized-impurity scattering compared to the HT homobuffered structure. It is proposed that, in the ZnO low-temperature homoepitaxy, the LT homobuffer plays a key role in inducing the complete termination of dislocations in the homointerface and suppressing the outdiffusion of contaminants and point defects on the ZnO surface, which results in the formation of smooth wetting layer on the homointerface.

  18. Synthesis, characteristics and antimicrobial activity of ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janaki, A. Chinnammal; Sailatha, E.; Gunasekaran, S.

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of various plant resources for the bio synthesis of metallic nano particles is called green technology and it does not utilize any harmful protocols. Present study focuses on the green synthesis of ZnO nano particles by Zinc Carbonate and utilizing the bio-components of powder extract of dry ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale). The ZnO nano crystallites of average size range of 23-26 nm have been synthesized by rapid, simple and eco friendly method. Zinc oxide nano particles were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). FTIR spectra confirmed the adsorption of surfactant molecules at the surface of ZnO nanoparticles and the presence of ZnO bonding. Antimicrobial activity of ZnO nano particles was done by well diffusion method against pathogenic organisms like Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans and Penicillium notatum. It is observed that the ZnO synthesized in the process has the efficient antimicrobial activity.

  19. Applicability check of ZnO crystals for device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Mithun; Ullrich, Bruno; Ariza, David; Xi, Haowen

    2014-03-01

    There has always been vital interest in wide-band gap semiconductors for their applicability in short-wavelength photonic devices and in electronic devices operating in high frequency regime. Historically, ZnO was never favored as a potential material for the above applications primarily because of difficulty in growing it. This situation, however, has improved drastically in the past decade thereby renewing the attention on this material system. Hence, ZnO is being proposed for potential light emitting devices in the blue and UV regions of electromagnetic spectrum. ZnO single crystals are also being considered for high power transistors. In this work, we present investigations of optical properties of pure (99.99%) ZnO performing transmittance, reflectance, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. The ZnO single crystals employed in this work, were obtained commercially. We present detailed analysis of the measured data through theoretical calculations. Our results identify the state-of-the-art application potential of commercially available ZnO, revealing its advantages and limitations when compared to similar materials such as GaN.

  20. Controlled modification of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with Zno nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiuying; Xia Baiying; Zhu Xingfu; Chen Jiesheng; Qiu Shilun; Li Jixue

    2008-04-15

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been successfully modified with ZnO nanostructures by zinc-ammonitum complex ion covalently attached to the MWNTs through the C-N bonds. Flower-like ZnO on the tips of MWNTs and ZnO nanoparticles on the surface of MWNTs have been obtained, respectively, via adjusting the reaction time. The modified MWNTs have been characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. A growth mechanism has been proposed in which the soaking time plays a key role in controlling the size, morphology, and site of ZnO nanostructures. Photoluminescence properties of the as-synthesized products have also been investigated. - Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT)/flower-like ZnO heterojunctions and MWNT/ZnO nanoparticle composites were prepared by zinc-ammonitum complex ion covalently attached to the MWNTs through the C-N bonds via adjusting the reaction time. A growth mechanism has been proposed in which the soaking time plays a key role in controlling the size, morphology, and site of ZnO nanostructures.

  1. Effect of silver doping on ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawai, U. P.; Khawal, H. A.; Bodke, M. R.; Dole, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    Ag doped ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by co-precipitation method with the nominal compositions (x=0.00, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06). The as-synthesized Ag doped ZnO nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FTIR and UV-Vis. From XRD patterns samples shows hexagonal structure. The average crystallite size is in the range of 41-47 nm. All as synthesized Zn1-xAgxO nanocrystals are highly textured, with wurtzite structure along the (101) growth direction. The energy band gap of pure and Ag doped ZnO were calculated from UV-Vis spectra. FTIR spectra were confirmed that Ag substituted into ZnO. Chemical species of the samples were detected using FTIR spectra An increase in the hexagonal lattice parameters of ZnO is observed on increasing the Ag concentration. An optical absorption study shows an increment in the band gap with increasing Ag content. From optical study the samples determines blue shift. Atomic packing fraction (APF) and c/a ratio were calculated using XRD data. It confirms the formation of ZnO with the stretching vibrational mode around at 506 to 510 cm-1.

  2. ZnO based potentiometric and amperometric nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Willander, Magnus; Khun, Kimleang; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain

    2014-09-01

    The existence of nanomaterials provides the solid platform for sensing applications due to owing of high sensitivity and a low concentration limit of detection. More likely used nanomaterials for sensing applications includes gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, magnetic nanoparticles such as Fe3O4, quantum dots and metal oxides etc. Recently nanomaterial and biological detection becomes an interdisciplinary field and is very much focussed by the researchers. Among metal oxides ZnO is largely considered due to its less toxic nature, biocompatible, cheap and easy to synthesis. ZnO nanomaterial is highly used for the chemical sensing, especially electrochemical sensing due to its fascinating properties such as high surface to volume ratio, atoxic, biosafe and biocompatible. Moreover, ZnO nanostructures exhibit unique features which could expose a suitable nanoenviroment for the immobilization of proteineous material such as enzymes, DNA, antibodies, etc. and in doing so it retains the biological efficiency of the immobilized bio sensitive material. The following review describes the two different coatings (i.e., ionophore and enzyme) on the surface of ZnO nanorods for the chemical sensing of zinc ion detection, thallium (I) ion detection, and L-lactic acid and the measurement of galactose molecules. ZnO nanorods provide the excellent transducing properties in the generation of strong electrical signals. Moreover, this review is very much focused on the applications of ZnO nanostructures in the sensing field. PMID:25924295

  3. Optical and structural characterization of zinc implanted silica under various thermal treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, R.; Chen, J.; Gu, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Zn ion implanted silica with controlled thermal annealing was investigated. Low temperature optical measurements indicate presence of Zn cluster in as-implanted silica. Optical spectra of the annealed sample under a reducing environment suggest Zn cluster and Zn metal colloid formation. The absorption peak at 5.3 eV may be due to surface plasma absorption of Zn metal colloids in silica. Oxidized samples (10 and 6x10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}) show an absorption peak at 4.3 and 4.8 eV, respectively, and imply ZnO quantum dot formation. The blueshift in exciton absorption can be attributed to quantum confinement effects.

  4. Miniature implantable ultrasonic echosonometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, G. K. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A miniature echosonometer adapted for implantation in the interior of an animal for imaging the internal structure of a organ, tissue or vessel is presented. The echosonometer includes a receiver/transmitter circuit which is coupled to an ultrasonic transducer. Power is coupled to the echosonometer by electromagnetic induction through the animal's skin. Imaging signals from the echosonometer are electromagnetically transmitted through the animal's skin to an external readout apparatus.

  5. Hip Resurfacing Implants.

    PubMed

    Cadossi, Matteo; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Sambri, Andrea; Mazzotti, Antonio; Giannini, Sandro

    2015-08-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Describe the advantages of hip resurfacing. 2. Describe the disadvantages of hip resurfacing. 3. Identify the population in which hip resurfacing is most often indicated. 4. Demonstrate how to properly postoperatively manage patients with metal-on-metal prostheses. Hip resurfacing offers a suitable solution for young patients affected by hip disease who have high function demands and good bone quality. Bone stock preservation, restoration of the normal proximal femur anatomy, the lack of stress shielding, and the possibility of resuming sporting activity are proven advantages of hip resurfacing. However, there are some disadvantages, such as fracture of the femoral neck, onset of neck narrowing, and possible complications due to the metal-on-metal bearings, including pseudotumors, peri-implant osteolysis, and chronic elevation of metal ions in serum levels. Recent data suggest that the ideal candidate for hip resurfacing is an active male, younger than 65 years, with primary or posttraumatic osteoarthritis, and with a femoral head diameter larger than 50 to 54 mm. Based on these selection criteria, the literature reports implant survival to be similar to that of total hip arthroplasty. The current authors' experience confirms a low failure rate and excellent functional outcomes, with metal ion serum levels becoming stable over time in well-functioning implants. Proper surgical technique, correct patient selection, and the right choice of a well-established prosthetic model are essential elements for the long-term success of these implants. PMID:26270748

  6. Electrochemical growth of ZnO nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illy, B.; Shollock, B. A.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Ryan, M. P.

    2005-02-01

    ZnO films were grown on polycrystalline Zn foil by cathodic electrodeposition in an aqueous zinc chloride/calcium chloride solution at 80 °C. Variation in the electrochemical parameters resulted in a variation in growth morphology from 1D (nanorods), 2D ('nanoplates') to 3D crystal growth. An as-received or mechanically polished substrate proved the most suitable substrate finish and allowed more highly aligned, dense structures to be grown; in contrast, electropolished substrates formed inhomogeneous deposits. Substrate annealing gave rise to large homogenous areas of nanorod deposition. Two-dimensional sheet growth was found to occur in conjunction with nanorods under specific electrochemical conditions. Hexagonal 'plates' approximately 50 nm in thickness and several microns in diameter were formed normal to the substrate.

  7. Excitonic transport in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noltemeyer, Martin; Bertram, Frank; Hempel, Thomas; Bastek, Barbara; Christen, Juergen; Brandt, Matthias; Lorenz, Michael; Grundmann, Marius

    2012-02-01

    The temperature dependence of diffusion length and lifetime or diffusivity of the free exciton is measured in a commercial ZnO-substrate and in an epitaxial ZnO quantum well using nm-spatially and ps-time resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. The characteristic temperature dependence of the exciton mobility is a fingerprint of the underlying excitonic scattering processes. Since excitons are neutral particles scattering at ionized impurities should be not effective. With decreasing temperature diffusion lengths and lifetimes give rise to a monotonous increase of the excitonic mobility. Two different methods for determining the excitonic transport parameters will be presented. On the one hand we are able to perform completely pulsed excitation experiments and on the other hand a combination of cw- and pulsed excitation in two independent measurements are needed.

  8. Lateral arrays of vertical ZnO nanowalls on a periodically polarity-inverted ZnO template.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Minegishi, Tsutomu; Ha, Jun-Seok; Park, Jin-sub; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Lee, Hyun Jung; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu; Hong, Soon-Ku; Jeon, Heonsu; Yao, Takafumi

    2009-06-10

    Well aligned ZnO nanowall arrays with submicron pitch were grown on a periodically polarity-inverted ZnO template using a carbothermal reduction process. Under the conditions of a highly dense Au catalyst for increasing nucleation sites, ZnO nanowalls with a thickness of 126 +/- 10 nm, an average height of 3.4 microm, and a length of about 10 mm were formed on the template. The nanowalls were only grown on a Zn-polar surface due to a different growth mode with an O-polar surface. The results of x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence (PL) measurements revealed a single crystalline, vertical alignment on the template, and a large surface to volume ratio of the ZnO nanowalls. PMID:19448285

  9. [Neurotology and cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Merchán, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    In this review we analyse cochlear implantation in terms of the fundamental aspects of the functioning of the auditory system. Concepts concerning neuronal plasticity applied to electrical stimulation in perinatal and adult deep hypoacusis are reviewed, and the latest scientific bases that justify early implantation following screening for congenital deafness are discussed. Finally, this review aims to serve as an example of the importance of fostering the sub-specialty of neurotology in our milieu, with the aim of bridging some of the gaps between specialties and thus improving both the knowledge in the field of research on auditory pathologies and in the screening of patients. The objectives of this review, targeted above all towards specialists in the field of otorhinolaryngology, are to analyse some significant neurological foundations in order to reach a better understanding of the clinical events that condition the indications and the rehabilitation of patients with cochlear implants, as well as to use this means to foster the growth of the sub-specialty of neurotology. PMID:25912703

  10. Effect of Mg doping in ZnO buffer layer on ZnO thin film devices for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Pushpa; Chakrabarti, P.

    2016-05-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) thin films have been grown on p-silicon (Si) substrate using magnesium doped ZnO (Mg: ZnO) buffer layer by radio-frequency (RF) sputtering method. In this paper, we have optimized the concentration of Mg (0-5 atomic percent (at. %)) ZnO buffer layer to examine its effect on ZnO thin film based devices for electronic and optoelectronic applications. The crystalline nature, morphology and topography of the surface of the thin film have been characterized. The optical as well as electrical properties of the active ZnO film can be tailored by varying the concentration of Mg in the buffer layer. The crystallite size in the active ZnO thin film was found to increase with the Mg concentration in the buffer layer in the range of 0-3 at. % and subsequently decrease with increasing Mg atom concentration in the ZnO. The same was verified by the surface morphology and topography studies carried out with scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic electron microscopy (AFM) respectively. The reflectance in the visible region was measured to be less than 80% and found to decrease with increase in Mg concentration from 0 to 3 at. % in the buffer region. The optical bandgap was initially found to increase from 3.02 eV to 3.74 eV by increasing the Mg content from 0 to 3 at. % but subsequently decreases and drops down to 3.43 eV for a concentration of 5 at. %. The study of an Au:Pd/ZnO Schottky diode reveals that for optimum doping of the buffer layer the device exhibits superior rectifying behavior. The barrier height, ideality factor, rectification ratio, reverse saturation current and series resistance of the Schottky diode were extracted from the measured current voltage (I-V) characteristics.

  11. Therapeutic efficacy evaluation of 111in-VNB-liposome on human colorectal adenocarcinoma HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wan-Chi; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Tseng, Yun-Long; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chang, Ya-Fang; Lu, Yi-Ching; Ting, Gann; Whang-Peng, Jaqueline; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the liposome encaged with vinorelbine (VNB) and 111In-oxine on human colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) using HT-29/ luc mouse xenografts. HT-29 cells stably transfected with plasmid vectors containing luciferase gene ( luc) were transplanted subcutaneously into the male NOD/SCID mice. Biodistribution of the drug was performed when tumor size reached 500-600 mm 3. The uptakes of 111In-VNB-liposome in tumor and normal tissues/organs at various time points postinjection were assayed. Multimodalities, including gamma scintigraphy, bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and whole-body autoradiography (WBAR), were applied for evaluating the therapeutic efficacy when tumor size was about 100 mm 3. The tumor/blood ratios of 111In-VNB-liposome were 0.044, 0.058, 2.690, 20.628 and 24.327, respectively, at 1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 h postinjection. Gamma scinitigraphy showed that the tumor/muscle ratios were 2.04, 2.25 and 4.39, respectively, at 0, 5 and 10 mg/kg VNB. BLI showed that significant tumor control was achieved in the group of 10 mg/kg VNB ( 111In-VNB-liposome). WBAR also confirmed this result. In this study, we have demonstrated a non-invasive imaging technique with a luciferase reporter gene and BLI for evaluation of tumor treatment efficacy in vivo. The SCID mice bearing HT-29/ luc xenografts treated with 111In-VNB-liposome were shown with tumor reduction by this technique.

  12. Short implants: are they a viable option in implant dentistry?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Steven Richard

    2015-04-01

    Short-length implants (<10 mm) can be used effectively in atrophic maxillae or mandibles even with crown/implant ratios that previously would have been considered excessive. Short implants can support either single or multiple units and can be used for fixed prostheses or overdentures. The use of short-length implants may avoid the need for complicated bone augmentation procedures, thus allowing patients who were either unwilling or unable for financial or medical reasons to undergo these advanced grafting techniques to be adequately treated. PMID:25835796

  13. Self-assembled ZnO nanoparticles on ZnO microsheet: ultrafast synthesis and tunable photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahma, Sanjaya; Khatei, Jayakrishna; Sunkara, S.; Lo, K.-Y.; Shivashankar, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the tunable photoluminescence characteristics of porous ZnO microsheets fabricated within 1-5 min of microwave irradiation in the presence of a capping agent such as citric acid, and mixture of citric acid with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The UV emission intensity reduces to 60% and visible emission increases tenfold when the molar concentration of citric acid is doubled. Further diminution of the intensity of UV emission (25%) is observed when PVP is mixed with citric acid. The addition of nitrogen donor ligands to the parent precursor leads to a red shift in the visible luminescence. The deep level emission covers the entire visible spectrum and gives an impression of white light emission from these ZnO samples. The detailed luminescence mechanism of our ZnO samples is described with the help of a band diagram constructed by using the theoretical models that describe the formation energy of the defect energy levels within the energy band structure. Oxygen vacancies play the key role in the variation of the green luminescence in the ZnO microsheets. Our research findings provide an insight that it is possible to retain the microstructure and simultaneously introduce defects into ZnO. The growth of the ZnO microsheets may be due to the self assembly of the fine sheets formed during the initial stage of nucleation.

  14. [Actuality with the breast implants].

    PubMed

    Duchateau, J

    2013-09-01

    The author presents the history of breast implants, and the modern evolution where breast implants are largely used in both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. Breast augmentation is one of the most performed cosmetic procedures, with a high satisfaction rate. However, one needs to remind that breast implants have a limited duration of life. The estimated rate of breast implant rupture after 10 years is of 10% in the current literature, This rate will probably become lower with the new more cohesive implants recently available on the market. It is therefore essential to propose a regular follow-up to all patients having breast implants. This follow-up is performed using a combination of physical examination, mammograms, ultrasound and MRI. The more specific therapeutic approach for patients having a PIP prosthesis will also be discussed. PMID:24195240

  15. Positron Implantation Profile in Kapton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryzek, J.; Dryzek, E.

    2006-11-01

    The discussion presented in the paper focuses on processes accompanying positron implantation in condensed matter. They finally constitute the positron implantation profile which generally does not exhibit the exponential behavior as it is concluded from the Monte Carlo simulation made using the EGSnrc 4.0 code. The simulation was performed for the kapton and two commonly used positron sources 22Na and 68Ge\\68Ga. New formula for the implantation profile was proposed.

  16. [Pre-implant esthetic study].

    PubMed

    Missika, P; Khayat, P

    1990-09-01

    The first dental prostheses used on Branemark implants were aesthetically disappointing both for the dentists and their patients. Therefore the authors will consider the various aesthetic problems encountered when treating loss of teeth with implant systems. The problems related to resorption are numerous: large bone losses are resolved by adapting removable acrylic, carrying out bone transplants immediately fixed by the implants, using filling materials, or complete dentures fixed with attachments supported by the implants. Periodontal surgery often provides a solution to the problem of gum visibility at the level of the maxillary anterior teeth. The problems related to the site where implants emerge can often be avoided by consultation between the surgeon and the prosthodontist and by flexing a surgical guide compiled from a pre-prosthetic analysis of the clinical situation. The aesthetic problems related to the actual implant systems are dependent on three factors: When the prosthesis is directly screwed onto the implant, the axis of the implant determines the axis of the dental prosthesis and can lead to the emergence of the screw on the buccal surface; With angulated cores, orientated screws provide the required solution. The implant material, when metallic leads to an unsightly border at the gingival level. Ceramic implants, or the "ceraming" of titanium, provide a solution to this problem. In case of diastema the use of an implant system gives the best choice in comparison to the more conventional treatments. In conclusion, the authors point out the importance of pre-implant analysis which must give an evaluation of the aesthetic result. The fragility of the aesthetic evaluation should encourage dentists to obtain the "clear and written consent" of their patients, accepting the risks run by treatment of this kind. PMID:2268774

  17. Piezoelectric and semiconducting coupled power generating process of a single ZnO belt/wire. A technology for harvesting electricity from the environment.

    PubMed

    Song, Jinhui; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the experimental observation of piezoelectric generation from a single ZnO wire/belt for illustrating a fundamental process of converting mechanical energy into electricity at nanoscale. By deflecting a wire/belt using a conductive atomic force microscope tip in contact mode, the energy is first created by the deflection force and stored by piezoelectric potential, and later converts into piezoelectric energy. The mechanism of the generator is a result of coupled semiconducting and piezoelectric properties of ZnO. A piezoelectric effect is required to create electric potential of ionic charges from elastic deformation; semiconducting property is necessary to separate and maintain the charges and then release the potential via the rectifying behavior of the Schottky barrier at the metal-ZnO interface, which serves as a switch in the entire process. The good conductivity of ZnO is rather unique because it makes the current flow possible. This paper demonstrates a principle for harvesting energy from the environment. The technology has the potential of converting mechanical movement energy (such as body movement, muscle stretching, blood pressure), vibration energy (such as acoustic/ultrasonic wave), and hydraulic energy (such as flow of body fluid, blood flow, contraction of blood vessels) into electric energy that may be sufficient for self-powering nanodevices and nanosystems in applications such as in situ, real-time, and implantable biosensing, biomedical monitoring, and biodetection. PMID:16895352

  18. International Classification of Reliability for Implanted Cochlear Implant Receiver Stimulators

    PubMed Central

    Battmer, Rolf-Dieter; Backous, Douglas D.; Balkany, Thomas J.; Briggs, Robert J. S.; Gantz, Bruce J.; van Hasselt, Andrew; Kim, Chong Sun; Kubo, Takeshi; Lenarz, Thomas; Pillsbury, Harold C.; O’Donoghue, Gerard M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To design an international standard to be used when reporting reliability of the implanted components of cochlear implant systems to appropriate governmental authorities, cochlear implant (CI) centers, and for journal editors in evaluating manuscripts involving cochlear implant reliability. Study Design The International Consensus Group for Cochlear Implant Reliability Reporting was assembled to unify ongoing efforts in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia to create a consistent and comprehensive classification system for the implanted components of CI systems across manufacturers. Setting All members of the consensus group are from tertiary referral cochlear implant centers. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measure A clinically relevant classification scheme adapted from principles of ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1) originally designed for reporting reliability of cardiac pacemakers, pulse generators, or leads. Results Standard definitions for device failure, survival time, clinical benefit, reduced clinical benefit, and specification were generated. Time intervals for reporting back to implant centers for devices tested to be “out of specification,” categorization of explanted devices, the method of cumulative survival reporting, and content of reliability reports to be issued by manufacturers was agreed upon by all members. The methodology for calculating Cumulative survival was adapted from ISO standard 5841-2:2000 (1). Conclusion The International Consensus Group on Cochlear Implant Device Reliability Reporting recommends compliance to this new standard in reporting reliability of implanted CI components by all manufacturers of CIs and the adoption of this standard as a minimal reporting guideline for editors of journals publishing cochlear implant research results. PMID:20864879

  19. Implant biomaterials: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Monika; Singh, Yashpal; Arora, Pooja; Arora, Vipin; Jain, Krati

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate selection of the implant biomaterial is a key factor for long term success of implants. The biologic environment does not accept completely any material so to optimize biologic performance, implants should be selected to reduce the negative biologic response while maintaining adequate function. Every clinician should always gain a thorough knowledge about the different biomaterials used for the dental implants. This article makes an effort to summarize various dental bio-materials which were used in the past and as well as the latest material used now. PMID:25610850

  20. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate.

  1. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J A

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  2. Implantable medical devices MRI safe.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Renzo; Hecker, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Pacemakers, ICDs, neurostimulators like deep brain stimulator electrodes, spiral cord stimulators, insulin pumps, cochlear implants, retinal implants, hearing aids, electro cardio gram (ECG) leads, or devices in interventional MRI such as vascular guide wires or catheters are affected by MRI magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Design of MRI Safe medical devices requires computer modeling, bench testing, phantom testing, and animal studies. Implanted medical devices can be MRI unsafe, MRI conditional or MRI safe (see glossary). In the following paragraphs we will investigate how to design implanted medical devices MRI safe. PMID:23739365

  3. Graphene synthesis by ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Garaj, Slaven; Hubbard, William; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ion implantation method for large-scale synthesis of high quality graphene films with controllable thickness. Thermally annealing polycrystalline nickel substrates that have been ion implanted with carbon atoms results in the surface growth of graphene films whose average thickness is controlled by implantation dose. The graphene film quality, as probed with Raman and electrical measurements, is comparable to previously reported synthesis methods. The implantation synthesis method can be generalized to a variety of metallic substrates and growth temperatures, since it does not require a decomposition of chemical precursors or a solvation of carbon into the substrate. PMID:21124725

  4. Luminance behavior of lithium-doped ZnO nanowires with p-type conduction characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ko, Won Bae; Lee, Jun Seok; Lee, Sang Hyo; Cha, Seung Nam; Sohn, Jung Inn; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Young Jun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-09-01

    The present study describes the room-temperature cathodeluminescence (CL) and temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) properties of p-type lithium (Li)-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) grown by hydrothermal doping and post-annealing processes. A ZnO thin film was used as a seed layer in NW growth. The emission wavelengths and intensities of undoped ZnO NWs and p-type Li-doped ZnO NWs were analyzed for comparison. CL and PL observations of post-annealed p-type Li-doped ZnO NWs clearly exhibited a dominant sharp band-edge emission. Finally, a n-type ZnO thin film/p-type annealed Li-doped ZnO NW homojunction diode was prepared to confirm the p-type conduction of annealed Li-doped ZnO NWs as well as the structural properties measured by transmission electron microscopy. PMID:24205635

  5. Fabrication and photovoltaic properties of ZnO nanorods/perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirahata, Yasuhiro; Tanaike, Kohei; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Kazuya; Suzuki, Atsushi; Balachandran, Jeyadevan; Oku, Takeo

    2016-02-01

    ZnO nanorods/perovskite solar cells with different lengths of ZnO nanorods were fabricated. The ZnO nanorods were prepared by chemical bath deposition and directly confirmed to be hexagon-shaped nanorods. The lengths of the ZnO nanorads were controlled by deposition condition of ZnO seed layer. Photovoltaic properties of the ZnO nanorods/CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells were investigated by measuring current density-voltage characteristics and incident photon to current conversion efficiency. The highest conversion efficiency was obtained in ZnO nanorods/CH3NH3PbI3 with the longest ZnO nanorods.

  6. Determining the minimum number of detectable cardiac-transplanted 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells by SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuan; Kong, Huafu; Stodilka, Rob Z.; Wells, R. Glenn; Zabel, Pamela; Merrifield, Peter A.; Sykes, Jane; Prato, Frank S.

    2005-10-01

    In this work, we determined the minimum number of detectable 111In-tropolone-labelled bone-marrow-derived stem cells from the maximum activity per cell which did not affect viability, proliferation and differentiation, and the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of 111In by SPECT. Canine bone marrow mesenchymal cells were isolated, cultured and expanded. A number of samples, each containing 5 × 106 cells, were labelled with 111In-tropolone from 0.1 to 18 MBq, and cell viability was measured afterwards for each sample for 2 weeks. To determine the MDA, the anthropomorphic torso phantom (DataSpectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC) was used. A point source of 202 kBq 111In was placed on the surface of the heart compartment, and the phantom and all compartments were then filled with water. Three 111In SPECT scans (duration: 16, 32 and 64 min; parameters: 128 × 128 matrix with 128 projections over 360°) were acquired every three days until the 111In radioactivity decayed to undetectable quantities. 111In SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with and without background, scatter or attenuation corrections. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the reconstructed image was calculated, and MDA was set equal to the 111In activity corresponding to a CNR of 4. The cells had 100% viability when incubated with no more than 0.9 MBq of 111In (80% labelling efficiency), which corresponded to 0.14 Bq per cell. Background correction improved the detection limits for 111In-tropolone-labelled cells. The MDAs for 16, 32 and 64 min scans with background correction were observed to be 1.4 kBq, 700 Bq and 400 Bq, which implies that, in the case where the location of the transplantation is known and fixed, as few as 10 000, 5000 and 2900 cells respectively can be detected.

  7. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Cell Death in Myocardial Infarction using 111In-GSAO

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Nobuhiro; Zandbergen, H. Reinier; de Haas, Hans J.; Petrov, Artiom; Pandurangi, Raghu; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Zhou, Jun; Imaizumi, Tsutomu; Slart, Riemer H. J. A.; Dyszlewski, Mary; Scarabelli, Tiziano; Kini, Annapoorna; Reutelingsperger, Chris; Narula, Navneet; Fuster, Valentin; Narula, Jagat

    2014-01-01

    Acute insult to the myocardium is associated with substantial loss of cardiomyocytes during the process of myocardial infarction. In this setting, apoptosis (programmed cell death) and necrosis may operate on a continuum. Because the latter is characterized by the loss of sarcolemmal integrity, we propose that an appropriately labeled tracer directed at a ubiquitously present intracellular moiety would allow non-invasive definition of cardiomyocyte necrosis. A trivalent arsenic peptide, GSAO (4-(N-(S-glutathionylacetyl)amino)phenylarsonous acid), is capable of binding to intracellular dithiol molecules such as HSP90 and filamin-A. Since GSAO is membrane impermeable and dithiol molecules abundantly present intracellularly, we propose that myocardial localization would represent sarcolemmal disruption or necrotic cell death. In rabbit and mouse models of myocardial infarction and post-infarct heart failure, we employed In-111-labelled GSAO for noninvasive radionuclide molecular imaging. 111In-GSAO uptake was observed within the regions of apoptosis seeking agent- 99mTc-Annexin A5 uptake, suggesting the colocalization of apoptotic and necrotic cell death processes. PMID:25351258

  8. Optical reflectance studies of highly specular anisotropic nanoporous (111) InP membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. A.; Lewis, R. A.; Sirbu, L.; Enachi, M.; Tiginyanu, I. M.; Skuratov, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    High-precision optical angular reflectance measurements are reported for a specular anisotropic nanoporous (111) InP membrane prepared by doping-assisted wet-electrochemical etching. The membrane surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscope imaging and revealed a quasi-uniform and self-organized nanoporous network consisting of semiconductor ‘islands’ in the sub-wavelength regime. The optical response of the nanoporous InP surface was studied at 405 nm (740 THz; UV), 633 nm (474 THz; VIS) and 1064 nm (282 THz; NIR), and exhibited a retention of basic macro-dielectric properties. Refractive index determinations demonstrate an optical anisotropy for the membrane which is strongly dependent on the wavelength of incident light, and exhibits an interesting inversion (positive anisotropy to negative) between 405 and 633 nm. The inversion of optical anisotropy is attributed to a strongly reduced ‘metallic’ behaviour in the membrane when subject to above-bandgap illumination. For the simplest case of sub-bandgap incident irradiation, the optical properties of the nanoporous InP sample are analysed in terms of an effective refractive index neff and compared to effective media approximations.

  9. Influence of nanomechanical stress induced by ZnO nanoparticles of different shapes on the viability of cells.

    PubMed

    Matuła, Kinga; Richter, Łukasz; Adamkiewicz, Witold; Åkerström, Bo; Paczesny, Jan; Hołyst, Robert

    2016-05-14

    There is growing interest in nanostructures interacting with living organisms. However, there are still no general rules for the design of biocompatible nanodevices. Here, we present a step towards understanding the interactions between nanostructures and living cells. We study the influence of nanomechanical stress induced by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures of different shapes on the viability of both prokaryotic (Gram-negative bacteria: Escherichia coli and Enterobacter aerogenes, and Gram-positive bacteria: Staphylococcus epidermidis and Corynebacterium glutamicum) and eukaryotic cells (yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and liver cancer cell line HepG2). Nanoparticles (NPs) and nanorods (NRs) of matching crystallographic structure (P63mc) and active surface area (in the order of 5 × 10(-2)μm(2)) are almost non-toxic for cells under static conditions. However, under conditions that enable collisions between ZnO nanostructures and cells, NRs appear to be more damaging compared to NPs. This is due to the increased probability of mechanical damage caused by nanorods upon puncturing of the cell wall and membranes. Gram-positive bacteria, which have thicker cell walls, are more resistant to nanomechanical stress induced by NRs compared to Gram-negative strains and eukaryotic cells. The presented results may be exploited to improve the properties of nanotechnology based products such as implants, drug delivery systems, antibacterial emulsions and cosmetics. PMID:27074722

  10. Nature of red luminescence band in research-grade ZnO single crystals: A "self-activated" configurational transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. N.; Xu, S. J.; Zheng, C. C.; Ning, J. Q.; Ling, F. C. C.; Anwand, W.; Brauer, G.; Skorupa, W.

    2014-07-01

    By implanting Zn+ ions into research-grade intentionally undoped ZnO single crystal for facilitating Zn interstitials (Zni) and O vacancies (VO) which is revealed by precise X-Ray diffraction rocking curves, we observe an apparent broad red luminescence band with a nearly perfect Gaussian lineshape. This red luminescence band has the zero phonon line at ˜2.4 eV and shows distinctive lattice temperature dependence which is well interpreted with the configurational coordinate model. It also shows a low "kick out" thermal energy and small thermal quenching energy. A "self-activated" optical transition between a shallow donor and the defect center of Zni-VO complex or VZnVO di-vacancies is proposed to be responsible for the red luminescence band. Accompanied with the optical transition, large lattice relaxation simultaneously occurs around the center, as indicated by the generation of multiphonons.

  11. Growth of Homoepitaxial ZnO Semiconducting Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, C.-H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Harris, M. T.; George, M. A.; McCarty, P.

    1999-01-01

    As a high temperature wide-band-gap (3.3 eV at room temperature) semiconductor, ZnO has been used for many applications such as wave-guides, solar cells, and surface acoustic wave devices, Since ZnO has a 60 meV excitonic binding energy that makes it possible to produce excitonic lasing at room temperature, a recent surge of interest is to synthesize ZnO films for UV/blue/green laser diodes. These applications require films with a smooth surface, good crystal quality, and low defect density. Thus, homoepitaxial film growth is the best choice. Homoepitaxial films have been studied in terms of morphology, crystal structure, and electrical and optical properties. ZnO single crystal substrates grown by the hydrothermal method are mechanically polished and annealed in air for four hours before the films are deposited. The annealing temperature-dependence on ZnO substrate morphology and electrical properties is investigated. Films are synthesized by off-axis reactive sputtering deposition. This produces films that have very smooth surfaces with roughness less than or equal to 5 nm on a 5 microns x 5 microns area. The full width at half maximum of film theta rocking curves measured by the x-ray diffraction is slightly larger than that of the crystal substrate. Films are also characterized by measuring resistivity, optical transmittance, and photoluminescence. The properties of ZnO films grown on (0001) ZnO and (0001) sapphire substrates will also be compared and discussed.

  12. Solution precursor plasma deposition of nanostructured ZnO coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tummala, Raghavender; Guduru, Ramesh K.; Mohanty, Pravansu S.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} The solution precursor route employed is an inexpensive process with capability to produce large scale coatings at fast rates on mass scale production. {yields} It is highly capable of developing tailorable nanostructures. {yields} This technique can be employed to spray the coatings on any kind of substrates including polymers. {yields} The ZnO coatings developed via solution precursor plasma spray process have good electrical conductivity and reflectivity properties in spite of possessing large amount of particulate boundaries, porosity and nanostructured grains. -- Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a wide band gap semiconducting material that has various applications including optical, electronic, biomedical and corrosion protection. It is usually synthesized via processing routes, such as vapor deposition techniques, sol-gel, spray pyrolysis and thermal spray of pre-synthesized ZnO powders. Cheaper and faster synthesis techniques are of technological importance due to increased demand in alternative energy applications. Here, we report synthesis of nanostructured ZnO coatings directly from a solution precursor in a single step using plasma spray technique. Nanostructured ZnO coatings were deposited from the solution precursor prepared using zinc acetate and water/isopropanol. An axial liquid atomizer was employed in a DC plasma spray torch to create fine droplets of precursor for faster thermal treatment in the plasma plume to form ZnO. Microstructures of coatings revealed ultrafine particulate agglomerates. X-ray diffraction confirmed polycrystalline nature and hexagonal Wurtzite crystal structure of the coatings. Transmission electron microscopy studies showed fine grains in the range of 10-40 nm. Observed optical transmittance ({approx}65-80%) and reflectivity ({approx}65-70%) in the visible spectrum, and electrical resistivity (48.5-50.1 m{Omega} cm) of ZnO coatings are attributed to ultrafine particulate morphology of the coatings.

  13. In vitro evaluation of bioactivity of SiO2-CaO-P2O5-Na2O-CaF2-ZnO glass-ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Saleemi, Farhat; Bashir, Farooq; Hossain, Tousif; Kayani, Zohra

    2014-09-01

    Zinc is an essential trace element that stimulates bone formation but it is also known as an inhibitor of apatite crystal growth. In this work addition of ZnO to SiO2-CaO-P2O5-Na2O-CaF2 glass-ceramic system was made by conventional melt-quenching technique. DSC curves showed that the addition of ZnO moved the endothermic and exothermic peaks to lower temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis did not reveal any additional phase caused by ZnO addition and showed the presence of wollastonite and hydroxyapatite crystalline phases only in all the glass-ceramic samples. As bio-implant apatite forming ability is an essential condition, the surface reactivity of the prepared glass-ceramic specimens was studied in vitro in Kokubo's simulated body fluid (SBF) [1] with ion concentration nearly equal to human blood plasma for 30 days at 37 °C under static condition. Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to study the changes in element concentrations in soaking solutions and XRD, FT-IR and SEM were used to elucidate surface properties of prepared glass-ceramics, which confirmed the formation of HCAp on the surface of all glass-ceramics. It was found that the addition of ZnO had a positive effect on bioactivity of glass-ceramics and made it a potential candidate for restoration of damaged bones.

  14. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  15. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  16. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  17. [Implantation of the zygote].

    PubMed

    Hicks Gómez, J J

    1990-01-01

    In order for implantation to occur, the endometrium must be adequately differentiated, a estate which results from the sequential interaction of progesterone and estrogens, and the local effects of prostaglandins and histamine. Nevertheless, the exact mechanism through which these hormones affect the uterus is not clearly understood. Recently it has been proposed the role of second messengers (cAMP.cGMP, inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol) in this process. All these messengers are related with the intracellular mechanisms of proteic and steroid hormones action. PMID:2177440

  18. Formation energy of oxygen vacancies in ZnO determined by investigating thermal behavior of Al and In impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsuda, S.; Sato, W.; Ohkubo, Y.

    2014-11-14

    Thermal behavior and interacting nature of 100-ppm Al and ∼100-ppt In impurities doped in zinc oxide (ZnO) were investigated by means of the time-differential perturbed angular correlation method with the {sup 111}In(→{sup 111}Cd) probe. Contrasting interactions between Al and In impurities were observed depending on different atmospheric conditions: (1) in air, Al and In impurities irreversibly associate with each other in the process of their thermal diffusion, but (2) in vacuum, their bound state formed in air dissociates by heat treatment at temperatures higher than 873 K, and this process is enhanced with increasing temperature. Detailed investigation of the thermal behavior of the impurities has revealed that the dissociation reaction is triggered by the formation of oxygen vacancies in the vicinity of the locally associated In-Al structure. A unique method to determine the activation energy of the oxygen-vacancy formation is presented with the estimated experimental value of E{sub a} = 0.72(6) eV.

  19. Role of morphology in the aggregation kinetics of ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dongxu; Keller, Arturo A

    2010-05-01

    The aggregation kinetics of two types of ZnO nanoparticles were investigated under various conditions. Distinct differences in aggregation kinetics were observed between the two ZnO particles. The aggregation of the nearly spherical ZnO (denoted as Me ZnO) exhibited strong dependence on the ionic strength (IS) of the solution; while minimal influence of IS was seen on the irregularly shaped ZnO (mixture of slab-like and rod-shaped particles, denoted as Mk ZnO) in the IS ranged tested. It is postulated that Mk ZnO possesses a critical coagulation concentration (CCC) below the lowest electrolyte concentration tested (1 mM NaCl) due to the interactions between various surfaces. The CCC of ZnO was found to be a function of pH; the CCC increased significantly as the pH was further away from the point of zero charge. Natural organic matter (NOM) was found to substantially hinder the aggregation of both types of ZnO particles (above 10 mg/L for Me ZnO and above 1 mg/L for Mk ZnO). A Langmuir adsorption model was used to describe the NOM to ZnO nanoparticle adsorption isotherms. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the effect of particle morphology on nanoparticle aggregation, which outlines the importance of accounting morphology into environmental transport assessment of nanoparticles. PMID:20227744

  20. Gd{sup 3+} incorporated ZnO nanoparticles: A versatile material

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Surender Sahare, P.D.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Chemically synthesized Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles. • The broad visible emission of the ZnO is dependent on the surface defects and can be tailored by Gd{sup 3+} doing. • PL and magnetic properties are modified by Gd{sup 3+} doping. • Photocatalysis experiment reveals that the ZnO: Gd{sup 3+} degrades the Rh B dye faster than the undoped ZnO. - Abstract: Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles are synthesized by wet chemical route method and investigated through structural, optical, magnetic and photocatalytic properties. Transmission Electron Microscopy technique has been performed on undoped and Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman analyses are carried out in order to examine the desired phase formation and substitution of Gd{sup 3+} in the ZnO matrix. Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles show enhanced photoluminescent and ferromagnetic properties as compared to undoped ZnO. The broad visible emission of ZnO is found to be largely dependent on the surface defects and these surface defects can be tailored by Gd{sup 3+} doping concentration. Furthermore, Gd{sup 3+} doped ZnO nanoparticles also show improved photocatalytic properties as compared with undoped ZnO nanoparticles under ultraviolet irradiation.

  1. SiO2 and ZnO Dopants in 3D Printed TCP Scaffolds Enhances Osteogenesis and Angiogenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fielding, Gary; Bose, Susmita

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds with three dimensionally (3D) interconnected pores play an important role in mechanical interlocking and biological fixation in bone implant applications. CaPs alone, however, are only osteoconductive (ability to guide bone growth). Much attention has been given to the incorporation of biologics and pharmacologics to add osteoinductive (ability to cause new bone growth) properties to CaP materials. Because biologics and pharmacologics are generally delicate compounds and also subject to increased regulatory scrutiny, there is a need to investigate alternative methods to introduce osteoinductivity to CaP materials. In this study silica (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been incorporated in to 3D printed β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds to investigate their potential to trigger osteoinduction in vivo. Silicon and zinc are trace elements that are common to bone and have also been shown to have many beneficial properties from increased bone regeneration to angiogenesis. Implants were placed in bicortical femur defects introduced to a murine model for up to 16 weeks. Addition of dopants into TCP increased the capacity for new early bone formation by modulating collagen I production and osteocalcin production. Neovascularization was found to be up to three times more than the pure TCP control group. The findings from this study indicate that the combination of SiO2 and ZnO dopants in TCP may be a viable alternative to introduce osteoinductive properties to CaPs. PMID:23871941

  2. SiO2 and ZnO dopants in three-dimensionally printed tricalcium phosphate bone tissue engineering scaffolds enhance osteogenesis and angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Gary; Bose, Susmita

    2013-11-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds with three-dimensionally-interconnected pores play an important role in mechanical interlocking and biological fixation in bone implant applications. CaPs alone, however, are only osteoconductive (able to guide bone growth). Much attention has been given to the incorporation of biologics and pharmacologics to add osteoinductive (able to cause new bone growth) properties to CaP materials. Because biologics and pharmacologics are generally delicate compounds and also subject to increased regulatory scrutiny, there is a need to investigate alternative methods to introduce osteoinductivity to CaP materials. In this study silica (SiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) have been incorporated into three-dimensional printed β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds to investigate their potential to trigger osteoinduction in vivo. Silicon and zinc are trace elements that are common in bone and have also been shown to have many beneficial properties, from increased bone regeneration to angiogenesis. Implants were placed in bicortical femur defects introduced to a murine model for up to 16 weeks. The addition of dopants into TCP increased the capacity for new early bone formation by modulating collagen I production and osteocalcin production. Neovascularization was found to be up to three times more than the pure TCP control group. The findings from this study indicate that the combination of SiO2 and ZnO dopants in TCP may be a viable alternative to introducing osteoinductive properties to CaPs. PMID:23871941

  3. ZnO Thin Film Electronics for More than Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Jose Israel

    Zinc oxide thin film transistors (TFTs) are investigated in this work for large-area electronic applications outside of display technology. A constant pressure, constant flow, showerhead, plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process has been developed to fabricate high mobility TFTs and circuits on rigid and flexible substrates at 200 °C. ZnO films and resulting devices prepared by PEALD and pulsed laser deposition (PLD) have been compared. Both PEALD and PLD ZnO films result in densely packed, polycrystalline ZnO thin films that were used to make high performance devices. PEALD ZnO TFTs deposited at 300 °C have a field-effect mobility of ˜ 40 cm2/V-s (and > 20 cm2/V-S deposited at 200 °C). PLD ZnO TFTs, annealed at 400 °C, have a field-effect mobility of > 60 cm2/V-s (and up to 100 cm2/V-s). Devices, prepared by either technique, show high gamma-ray radiation tolerance of up to 100 Mrad(SiO2) with only a small radiation-induced threshold voltage shift (VT ˜ -1.5 V). Electrical biasing during irradiation showed no enhanced radiation-induced effects. The study of the radiation effects as a function of material stack thicknesses revealed the majority of the radiation-induced charge collection happens at the semiconductor-passivation interface. A simple sheet-charge model at that interface can describe the radiation-induced charge in ZnO TFTs. By taking advantage of the substrate-agnostic process provided by PEALD, due to its low-temperature and excellent conformal coatings, ZnO electronics were monolithically integrated with thin-film complex oxides. Application-based examples where ZnO electronics provide added functionality to complex oxide-based devices are presented. In particular, the integration of arrayed lead zirconate titanate (Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 or PZT) thin films with ZnO electronics for microelectromechanical systems (MEMs) and deformable mirrors is demonstrated. ZnO switches can provide voltage to PZT capacitors with fast charging and slow

  4. Controlling Au Photodeposition on Large ZnO Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Joseph F S; Shortell, Matthew P; Noble, Christopher J; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Jaatinen, Esa A; Waclawik, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated how to control the rate of photoreduction of metastable AuCl2(-) at the solid-solution interface of large ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (50-100 nm size). Band-gap photoexcitation of electronic charge in ZnO by 370 nm UV light yielded Au NP deposition and the formation of ZnO-Au NP hybrids. Au NP growth was observed to be nonepitaxial, and the patterns of Au photodeposition onto ZnO NPs observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were consistent with reduction of AuCl2(-) at ZnO facet edges and corner sites. Au NP photodeposition was effective in the presence of labile oleylamine ligands attached to the ZnO surface; however, when a strong-binding dodecanethiol ligand coated the surface, photodeposition was quenched. Rates of interfacial electron transfer at the ZnO-solution interface were adjusted by changing the solvent, and these rates were observed to strongly depend on the solvent's permittivity (ε) and viscosity. From measurements of electron transfer from ZnO to the organic dye toluidine blue at the ZnO-solution interface, it was confirmed that low ε solvent mixtures (ε ≈ 9.5) possessed markedly higher rates of photocatalytic interfacial electron transfer (∼3.2 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)) compared to solvent mixtures with high ε (ε = 29.9, ∼1.9 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)). Dissolved oxygen content in the solvent and the exposure time of ZnO to band-gap, near-UV photoexcitation were also identified as factors that strongly affected Au photodeposition behavior. Production of Au clusters was favored under conditions that caused electron accumulation in the ZnO-Au NP hybrid. Under conditions where electron discharge was rapid (such as in low ε solvents), AuCl2(-) precursor ions photoreduced at ZnO surfaces in less than 5 s, leading to deposition of several small, isolated ∼6 nm Au NP on the ZnO host instead. PMID:27196721

  5. Efficient nitrogen incorporation in ZnO nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Stehr, Jan E.; Chen, Weimin M.; Reddy, Nandanapalli Koteeswara; Tu, Charles W.; Buyanova, Irina A.

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional ZnO nanowires (NWs) are a promising materials system for a variety of applications. Utilization of ZnO, however, requires a good understanding and control of material properties that are largely affected by intrinsic defects and contaminants. In this work we provide experimental evidence for unintentional incorporation of nitrogen in ZnO NWs grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition, from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The incorporated nitrogen atoms are concluded to mainly reside at oxygen sites (NO). The NO centers are suggested to be located in proximity to the NW surface, based on their reduced optical ionization energy as compared with that in bulk. This implies a lower defect formation energy at the NW surface as compared with its bulk value, consistent with theoretical predictions. The revealed facilitated incorporation of nitrogen in ZnO nanostructures may be advantageous for realizing p-type conducting ZnO via N doping. The awareness of this process can also help to prevent such unintentional doping in structures with desired n-type conductivity. PMID:26299157

  6. Genomic DNA binding to ZnO microrods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Embús, D. A.; Cardozo, M. Orrego; Vargas-Hernández, C.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, ZnO microrods were produced by hydrothermal synthesis. DNA was extracted from pork spleen cells by cellular lysis, deproteinization and precipitation. The analysis of the DNA binding to the ZnO was performed using Raman spectroscopy a technique that allowed for the evaluation of the effect that the presence of the ZnO in the complex has on the DNA structure. Vibrational spectral bands from the DNA molecule and hexagonal wurtzite ZnO were observed and classified as E2(M), A1(TO), E2(High), E1(LO) and 2LO. The Raman signals from the vibrational bands corresponding to the phosphodiester bond 5‧-C-O-P-O-C-3‧ and bond stretching of the PO2- group, as well as ring vibrations of the nitrogenous bases of the DNA, were enhanced by the presence of the ZnO microrods. The bands from the modes corresponding to the C-O and Odbnd Psbnd O- molecules of the DNA backbone were observed to exhibit larger spectral shifts due to the compression and tensile stresses generated at the ZnO/DNA interface, respectively. In addition, the relative vibrational mode intensities of the nitrogenous bases increased.

  7. Efficient nitrogen incorporation in ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, Jan E.; Chen, Weimin M.; Reddy, Nandanapalli Koteeswara; Tu, Charles W.; Buyanova, Irina A.

    2015-08-01

    One-dimensional ZnO nanowires (NWs) are a promising materials system for a variety of applications. Utilization of ZnO, however, requires a good understanding and control of material properties that are largely affected by intrinsic defects and contaminants. In this work we provide experimental evidence for unintentional incorporation of nitrogen in ZnO NWs grown by rapid thermal chemical vapor deposition, from electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. The incorporated nitrogen atoms are concluded to mainly reside at oxygen sites (NO). The NO centers are suggested to be located in proximity to the NW surface, based on their reduced optical ionization energy as compared with that in bulk. This implies a lower defect formation energy at the NW surface as compared with its bulk value, consistent with theoretical predictions. The revealed facilitated incorporation of nitrogen in ZnO nanostructures may be advantageous for realizing p-type conducting ZnO via N doping. The awareness of this process can also help to prevent such unintentional doping in structures with desired n-type conductivity.

  8. Fluorescent security markers on ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Kristy; Tzolov, Marian

    2012-02-01

    Zink oxide is an efficient emitter of light thanks to the large exciton binding energy of 60 meV. The narrow emission lines from ZnO nanowires can be used as an enhanced security feature in documents and can be easily recognized from the background originating from the paper itself. We have studied the emission properties of ZnO nanowires in the UV range and how they can be implemented into paper products for document security. The zinc oxide nanowires were synthesized by chemical vapor transport and postprocessed in solution. The nanowires were dispersed using a sonicator into nitric acid water solutions with a pH of 2 and 4, and ammonium hydroxide water solution with a pH of 5 and 7. The morphology of the dispersed ZnO nanowires was imaged under a scanning electron microscope. Fluorescence measurements have shown better light emission from the nanoparticles dispersed in the basic pH solution. This material was then implemented into crafted paper and viewed under UV lamps and with a spectrometer. We have studied the loading of the paper with ZnO nanoparticles. A comparison was done with equivalently processed material of ZnO in powder form. The implementation of zinc oxide nanowires into paper products can advance document security at a relatively low cost.

  9. Sequential provisional implant prosthodontics therapy.

    PubMed

    Zinner, Ira D; Markovits, Stanley; Jansen, Curtis E; Reid, Patrick E; Schnader, Yale E; Shapiro, Herbert J

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication and long-term use of first- and second-stage provisional implant prostheses is critical to create a favorable prognosis for function and esthetics of a fixed-implant supported prosthesis. The fixed metal and acrylic resin cemented first-stage prosthesis, as reviewed in Part I, is needed for prevention of adjacent and opposing tooth movement, pressure on the implant site as well as protection to avoid micromovement of the freshly placed implant body. The second-stage prosthesis, reviewed in Part II, should be used following implant uncovering and abutment installation. The patient wears this provisional prosthesis until maturation of the bone and healing of soft tissues. The second-stage provisional prosthesis is also a fail-safe mechanism for possible early implant failures and also can be used with late failures and/or for the necessity to repair the definitive prosthesis. In addition, the screw-retained provisional prosthesis is used if and when an implant requires removal or other implants are to be placed as in a sequential approach. The creation and use of both first- and second-stage provisional prostheses involve a restorative dentist, dental technician, surgeon, and patient to work as a team. If the dentist alone cannot do diagnosis and treatment planning, surgery, and laboratory techniques, he or she needs help by employing the expertise of a surgeon and a laboratory technician. This team approach is essential for optimum results. PMID:23220306

  10. [Allergy diagnostics in implant intolerance].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Thomsen, M

    2008-02-01

    To clarify a suspected implant allergy, a patch test with implant metals and bone cement components can be used. The (immuno)histology of periimplant tissue may also indicate T-lymphocyte-dominant inflammation. Identification of histological allergy characteristics and evaluation of the lymphocyte transformation test beyond indications of sensitization will be possible only when larger studies are available. PMID:18227997

  11. Implant Maintenance: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Govila, Vivek; Anand, Vishal; Anand, Bhargavi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The differences in the supporting structure of the implant make them more susceptible to inflammation and bone loss when plaque accumulates as compared to the teeth. Therefore, a comprehensive maintenance protocol should be followed to ensure the longevity of the implant. Material and Method. A research to provide scientific evidence supporting the feasibility of various implant care methods was carried out using various online resources to retrieve relevant studies published since 1985. Results. The electronic search yielded 708 titles, out of which a total of 42 articles were considered appropriate and finally included for the preparation of this review article. Discussion. A typical maintenance visit for patients with dental implants should last 1 hour and should be scheduled every 3 months to evaluate any changes in their oral and general history. It is essential to have a proper instrument selection to prevent damage to the implant surface and trauma to the peri-implant tissues. Conclusion. As the number of patients opting for dental implants is increasing, it becomes increasingly essential to know the differences between natural teeth and implant care and accept the challenges of maintaining these restorations. PMID:27437506

  12. Porous metal for orthopedics implants

    PubMed Central

    Matassi, Fabrizio; Botti, Alessandra; Sirleo, Luigi; Carulli, Christian; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Porous metal has been introduced to obtain biological fixation and improve longevity of orthopedic implants. The new generation of porous metal has intriguing characteristics that allows bone healing and high osteointegration of the metallic implants. This article gives an overview about biomaterials properties of the contemporary class of highly porous metals and about the clinical use in orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24133527

  13. Regenerative Surgical Treatment of Peri-implantitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Failure of Dental Implant Due to Infection; Infection; Inflammation; Peri-implantitis; Bacterial Infections; Bleeding of Subgingival Space; Molecular Sequence Variation; Periodontal Diseases; Mouth Diseases

  14. Improved labelling of DTPA- and DOTA-conjugated peptides and antibodies with 111In in HEPES and MES buffer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT], high specific activity of 111In-labelled tracers will allow administration of low amounts of tracer to prevent receptor saturation and/or side effects. To increase the specific activity, we studied the effect of the buffer used during the labelling procedure: NaAc, NH4Ac, HEPES and MES buffer. The effect of the ageing of the 111InCl3 stock and cadmium contamination, the decay product of 111In, was also examined in these buffers. Methods Escalating amounts of 111InCl3 were added to 1 μg of the diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid [DTPA]- and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid [DOTA]-conjugated compounds (exendin-3, octreotide and anti-carbonic anhydrase IX [CAIX] antibody). Five volumes of 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid [MES], 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid [HEPES], NH4Ac or NaAc (0.1 M, pH 5.5) were added. After 20 min at 20°C (DTPA-conjugated compounds), at 95°C (DOTA-exendin-3 and DOTA-octreotide) or at 45°C (DOTA-anti-CAIX antibody), the labelling efficiency was determined by instant thin layer chromatography. The effect of the ageing of the 111InCl3 stock on the labelling efficiency of DTPA-exendin-3 as well as the effect of increasing concentrations of Cd2+ (the decay product of 111In) were also examined. Results Specific activities obtained for DTPA-octreotide and DOTA-anti-CAIX antibody were five times higher in MES and HEPES buffer. Radiolabelling of DTPA-exendin-3, DOTA-exendin-3 and DTPA-anti-CAIX antibody in MES and HEPES buffer resulted in twofold higher specific activities than that in NaAc and NH4Ac. Labelling of DTPA-exendin-3 decreased with 66% and 73% for NaAc and NH4Ac, respectively, at day 11 after the production date of 111InCl3, while for MES and HEPES, the maximal decrease in the specific activity was 10% and 4% at day 11, respectively. The presence of 1 pM Cd2+ in the labelling mixture of DTPA-exendin-3 in NaAc and NH4Ac

  15. Activation of 112Cd by deuteron induced reactions up to 50 MeV: An alternative for 111In production?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Adam Rebeles, R.; Van den Winkel, P.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.

    2014-11-01

    In stacked foil irradiations with an incident 50 MeV deuteron beam on highly enriched 112Cd targets, the excitation functions for 109,110g,111In and 111,110g,106Ag were determined, relative to the monitor reactions natAl(d,x)22,24Na. The results were compared to the scarce literature values on enriched Cd isotopes. Through combination of reaction cross section data on all stable Cd isotopes listed in the on-line library TENDL-2013 (calculated with the TALYS 1.4 theoretical code) a comparison with our earlier study on natCd is made. The possible production of 111In through 112Cd(d,3n), as an alternative to 112Cd(p,2n), is discussed.

  16. Assessment of effective absorbed dose of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin in human on the basis of biodistribution rat data.

    PubMed

    Lahooti, Afsaneh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Jalilian, Amir Reza; Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effective absorbed dose to human organs was estimated, following intra vascular administration of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin using biodistribution data from rats. Rats were sacrificed at exact time intervals of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 24 h post injections. The Medical Internal Radiation Dose formulation was applied to extrapolate from rats to humans and to project the absorbed radiation dose for various human organs. From rat data, it was estimated that a 185-MBq injection of (111)In-DTPA-Buserelin into the human might result in an estimated absorbed dose of 24.27 mGy to the total body and the highest effective absorbed dose was in kidneys, 28.39 mSv. The promising results of this study emphasises the importance of absorbed doses in humans estimated from data on rats. PMID:22874898

  17. Formation of medical radioisotopes 111In, 117 m Sn, 124Sb, and 177Lu in photonuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danagulyan, A. S.; Hovhannisyan, G. H.; Bakhshiyan, T. M.; Avagyan, R. H.; Avetisyan, A. E.; Kerobyan, I. A.; Dallakyan, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of the photonuclear production of radioisotopes 111In, 117 m Sn, 124Sb, and 177Lu is discussed. Reaction yields were measured by the gamma-activation method. The enriched tin isotopes 112, 118Sn and Te and HfO2 of natural isotopic composition were used as targets. The targets were irradiated at the linear electron accelerator of Alikhanian National Science Laboratory (Yerevan) at the energy of 40 MeV. The experimental results obtained in this way reveal that the yield and purity of radioisotopes 111In and 117 mSn are acceptable for their production via photonuclear reactions. Reactions proceeding on targets from Te and HfO2 of natural isotopic composition and leading to the formation of 124Sb and 177Lu have small yields and are hardly appropriate for the photoproduction of these radioisotopes even in the case of enriched targets.

  18. Anatomic consideration for preventive implantation.

    PubMed

    Denissen, H W; Kalk, W; Veldhuis, H A; van Waas, M A

    1993-01-01

    The aim of preventive implant therapy is to prevent or delay loss of alveolar ridge bone mass. For use in an anatomic study of 60 mandibles, resorption of the alveolar ridge was classified into four preventive stages: (1) after extraction of teeth; (2) after initial resorption; (3) when the ridge has atrophied to a knife-edge shape; and (4) when only basal bone remains. Implantation in stage 3 necessitates removal of the knife-edge ridge to create space for cylindrical implants. Therefore, implantation in stage 2 is advocated to prevent the development of stage 3. The aim of implantation in stage 4 is to prevent total loss of function of the atrophic mandible. PMID:8359876

  19. Fabrication of ZnO and doped ZnO waveguides deposited by Spin Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Rosmin Elsa; R, Neha P.; T, Shalu; C, Darshana K.; Sreelatha, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the synthesis of ZnO and doped Zn1-xAgxO (where x=0.03) nanoparticles by co- precipitation is reported. The precursors used were Zinc Nitrate and Potassium hydroxide pellets. For doping, 3% AgNO3 in ZnNO3 was considered as a separate buffer solution. The prepared nanoparticles were subsequently spin coated onto silica glass substrates at a constant chuck rate of 3000 rpm. The substrate acts as the lower cladding of a waveguide structure. The upper cladding is assumed to be air in the present investigation. The nanostructures of the ZnO powders in the doped and undoped cases were studied using X-ray Diffraction patterns. There was a decrease in the grain size with doping which increase the tunability of the powders to be used as photoluminescent devices. The optical characteristics of the sample were also investigated using UV-Visible spectrophotometer at 200-900 nm wavelengths. The photoluminescence peaks also report a dramatic increase in intensity at the same wavelength for the doped case compared to the undoped one.

  20. Structural and optical properties of ZnO rods hydrothermally formed on polyethersulfone substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Chang Mi; Jang, Jin-Tak; Kim, Chang-Yong; Ryu, Hyukhyun; Lee, Won-Jae; Chang, Ji-Ho; Son, Chang-Sik; Choi, Heelack

    2012-06-01

    Various unique ZnO morphologies, such as cigar-like and belt-like structures and microrod and nanorod structures, were formed on flexible polyethersulfone (PES) substrates by using a low temperature hydrothermal route. The structural properties of ZnO depended highly on the precursor concentration. The effect of a thin ZnO seed layer deposited the on PES substrate by using atomic layer deposition on the structural and the optical properties of ZnO hydrothermally grown on the ZnO seed layer/PES substrates was studied. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and photoluminescence (PL) measurements were employed to analyze the characteristics of hydrothermally-grown ZnO. The diameter of the ZnO nanorods grown on the ZnO seed layer/PES substrates increased with increasing precursor concentration from 0.025 to 0.125 M due to the Ostwald ripening process. ZnO hydrothermally-grown on the ZnO seed layer/PES substrates at a low precursor concentration showed better structural properties than ZnO formed without a seed layer. Well-formed ZnO nanorods deposited on the ZnO seed layer/PES substrates showed two PL peaks, one in the ultraviolet and the other in the visible region, whereas horizontally positioned ZnO formed on the PES substrate in the absence of a seed layer emitted only one broad PL peak in the violet region. The ZnO grown on PES substrates in this work can be used as high-quality transparent electrodes for solar cells fabricated on flexible substrates.

  1. High mobility ZnO nanowires for terahertz detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiqiang; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Chu, Shijin

    2014-07-01

    An oxide nanowire material was utilized for terahertz detection purpose. High quality ZnO nanowires were synthesized and field-effect transistors were fabricated. Electrical transport measurements demonstrated the nanowire with good transfer characteristics and fairly high electron mobility. It is shown that ZnO nanowires can be used as building blocks for the realization of terahertz detectors based on a one-dimensional plasmon detection configuration. Clear terahertz wave (˜0.3 THz) induced photovoltages were obtained at room temperature with varying incidence intensities. Further analysis showed that the terahertz photoresponse is closely related to the high electron mobility of the ZnO nanowire sample, which suggests that oxide nanoelectronics may find useful terahertz applications.

  2. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence bandmore » relative to the vacuum level.« less

  3. Nitrogen is a deep acceptor in ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Tarun, M. C.; Iqbal, M. Zafar; McCluskey, M. D.

    2011-04-14

    Zinc oxide is a promising material for blue and UV solid-state lighting devices, among other applications. Nitrogen has been regarded as a potential p-type dopant for ZnO. However, recent calculations indicate that nitrogen is a deep acceptor. This paper presents experimental evidence that nitrogen is, in fact, a deep acceptor and therefore cannot produce p-type ZnO. A broad photoluminescence (PL) emission band near 1.7 eV, with an excitation onset of ~2.2 eV, was observed, in agreement with the deep-acceptor model of the nitrogen defect. Thus the deep-acceptor behavior can be explained by the low energy of the ZnO valence band relative to the vacuum level.

  4. Electrical Property of Conventionally Sintered ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tak, S. K.; Shekhwat, M. S.; Mangal, R.

    ZnO powder was synthesized by solid state reaction method. The synthesized powder was granulated and pressed using uni-axial press for preparing the pallets. The prepared pellets were sintered in conventional furnace at different temperatures (900-1300° C). The phase study was done by powder X-ray diffraction and it was found that the there is no other phase present in the synthesized material but the peak intensity is increasing with temperature. The crystallite size of the synthesized ZnO powder was found to be increase with temperature. The effect of sintering on grain growth is investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM revels that the average grain size is increases with increase in sintering temperature. AC impedance of these samples was decreased markedly with increased sintering temperature. In present work the effect of sintering temperatures and hold time on micro structural and electrical properties of ZnO ceramics is carried out.

  5. Nanodamage and Nanofailure of 1d Zno Nanomaterials and Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peifeng; Yang, Ya; Huang, Yunhua; Zhang, Yue

    2012-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanomaterials include nanowires, nanobelts, and nanorods etc. The extensive applied fields and excellent properties of 1D ZnO nanomaterials can meet the requests of the electronic and electromechanical devices for "smaller, faster and colder", and would be applied in new energy convention, environmental protection, information science and technology, biomedical, security and defense fields. While micro porous, etching pits nanodamage and brittle fracture, dissolving, functional failure nanofailure phenomena of 1D ZnO nanomaterials and nanodevices are observed in some practical working environments like illumination, currents or electric fields, external forces, and some chemical gases or solvents. The more important thing is to discuss the mechanism and reduce or prohibit their generation.

  6. Mobility of indium on the ZnO(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Heinhold, R.; Reeves, R. J.; Allen, M. W.; Williams, G. T.; Evans, D. A.

    2015-02-02

    The mobility of indium on the Zn-polar (0001) surface of single crystal ZnO wafers was investigated using real-time x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A sudden transition in the wettability of the ZnO(0001) surface was observed at ∼520 °C, with indium migrating from the (0001{sup ¯}) underside of the wafer, around the non-polar (11{sup ¯}00) and (112{sup ¯}0) sidewalls, to form a uniform self-organized (∼20 Å) adlayer. The In adlayer was oxidized, in agreement with the first principles calculations of Northrup and Neugebauer that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} precipitation can only be avoided under a combination of In-rich and Zn-rich conditions. These findings suggest that unintentional In adlayers may form during the epitaxial growth of ZnO on indium-bonded substrates.

  7. Excellent acetone sensing properties of porous ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-Bai; Liu, Xing-Yi; Wang, Sheng-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Porous ZnO was obtained by hydrothermal method. The results of scanning electron microscope revealed the porous structure in the as-prepared materials. The acetone sensing test results of porous ZnO show that porous ZnO possesses excellent acetone gas sensing properties. The response is 35.5 at the optimum operating temperature of 320 °C to 100 ppm acetone. The response and recovery times to 50 ppm acetone are 2 s and 8 s, respectively. The lowest detecting limit to acetone is 0.25 ppm, and the response value is 3.8. Moreover, the sensors also exhibit excellent selectivity and long-time stability to acetone. Projected supported by the Project of Challenge Cup for College Students, China (Grant No. 450060497053).

  8. Mobility of indium on the ZnO(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinhold, R.; Reeves, R. J.; Williams, G. T.; Evans, D. A.; Allen, M. W.

    2015-02-01

    The mobility of indium on the Zn-polar (0001) surface of single crystal ZnO wafers was investigated using real-time x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A sudden transition in the wettability of the ZnO(0001) surface was observed at ˜520 °C, with indium migrating from the ( 000 1 ¯ ) underside of the wafer, around the non-polar ( 1 1 ¯ 00 ) and ( 11 2 ¯ 0 ) sidewalls, to form a uniform self-organized (˜20 Å) adlayer. The In adlayer was oxidized, in agreement with the first principles calculations of Northrup and Neugebauer that In2O3 precipitation can only be avoided under a combination of In-rich and Zn-rich conditions. These findings suggest that unintentional In adlayers may form during the epitaxial growth of ZnO on indium-bonded substrates.

  9. Growth and characterization of periodically polarity-inverted ZnO structures on sapphire substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jinsub; Yao, Takafumi

    2012-10-15

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of periodically polarity inverted (PPI) ZnO heterostructures on (0 0 0 1) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates. For the periodically inverted array of ZnO polarity, CrN and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} polarity selection buffer layers are used for the Zn- and O-polar ZnO films, respectively. The change of polarity and period in fabricated ZnO structures is evaluated by diffraction patterns and polarity sensitive piezo-response microscopy. Finally, PPI ZnO structures with subnanometer scale period are demonstrated by using holographic lithography and regrowth techniques.

  10. Structural and electrical properties of electric field assisted spray deposited pea structured ZnO film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Neha; Swami, Sanjay Kumar; Dutta, Viresh

    2016-05-01

    Spray deposition of ZnO film was carried out. The uneven growth of ZnO nanostructures is resulted for spray deposited ZnO film. Application of DC voltage (1000V) during spray deposition provides formation of pea like structures with uniform coverage over the substrate. Electric field assisted spray deposition provides increased crystallinity with reduced resistivity and improved mobility of the ZnO film as compared to spray deposited ZnO film without electric field. This with large area deposition makes the process more efficient than other techniques.

  11. Evolution of tetrapod structure in sonochemically synthesized ZnO: B nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, N. R.; Acharya, B. S.; Nayak, P.

    2012-06-01

    Sonochemical synthesis of ZnO and ZnO doped with boron has been carried out in a conventional sonicator and the presence of boron has been confirmed from ICP-OES measurement. PXRD indicates the formation of hexagonal wurzite structure of ZnO with larger crystallite size in the doped samples. TEM studies show the formation of tetrapod like structures for ZnO: B samples which is not seen in ZnO as prepared. The evolution of tetrapods has been explained on the base of impurity adsorption and carbo-thermal reduction taking place during the process of sonication.

  12. Ferromagnetism in Sm doped ZnO nanorods by a hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Jingyuan; Tseng, Li-Ting; Yi, Jiabao

    2016-04-01

    Sm doped ZnO nanorods with various concentrations have been successfully synthesized using a hydrothermal method. XRD analysis indicates that there are no impurities or secondary phases in all the samples. The continuous expansion of d-spacing from XRD and TEM analysis suggests the effective corporation of Sm ions in ZnO. It is found that pure ZnO is paramagnetic. Both 1% and 5% Sm doped ZnO nanorods are ferromagnetic at room temperature. 5% Sm doped ZnO has a large paramagnetic signal at low temperature, suggesting the formation of the precipitation or clusters of samarium oxide.

  13. Characterization of the quality of ZnO thin films using reflective second harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-J.; Chu, S.-Y.; Lo, K.-Y.; Liu, C.-W.; Liu, C.-C.

    2009-08-31

    A polar mirror symmetrical contribution originated from the arrangement of grain boundaries existing in the ZnO film is detected by reflective second harmonic generation pattern. The ordering of ZnO grain boundary is dependent on the kinetic energy of deposited atoms and affects the quality of ZnO films. The net direction of the grain boundary in ZnO film trends toward the [110] direction of Si(111) to reach the minimum grain energy for better quality ZnO film. The polar structure of the mirrorlike boundaries under the optically macroscopic viewpoint presents a correlation with film quality.

  14. Design of Shallow p-type Dopants in ZnO (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.H.; Li, J.; Yan. Y.

    2008-05-01

    ZnO is a promising material for short wave-length opto-electronic devices such as UV lasers and LEDs due to its large exciton binding energy and low material cost. ZnO can be doped easily n-type, but the realization of stable p-type ZnO is rather difficult. Using first-principles band structure methods the authors address what causes the p-type doping difficulty in ZnO and how to overcome the p-type doping difficulty in ZnO.

  15. Effect of gamma irradiation on DC electrical conductivity of ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Swaroop, K.; Somashekarappa, H. M.; Naveen, C. S.; Jayanna, H. S.

    2015-06-24

    The temperature dependent dc electrical conductivity of gamma irradiated Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles is presented in this paper. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern shows hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) confirms Zn-O stretching vibrations. UV-Visible spectroscopy studies show that the energy band gap (E{sub g}) of the prepared ZnO nanoparticles increases with respect to gamma irradiation dose, which can be related to room temperature dc electrical conductivity. The result shows significant variation in the high temperature dc electrical conductivity of ZnO nanoparticles due to gamma irradiation.

  16. Effect of bath temperature on surface morphology and photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriharan, N.; Muthukumarasamy, N.; Senthil, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    ZnO nanorods were prepared by using simple hydrothermal method using four different bath temperatures. All the prepared ZnO nanorods are annealed at 450°C and are characterized by using various techniques such as X-ray diffraction, UV spectra and scanning electron microscopy. Photocatalytic activity of the prepared ZnO nanorods is analyzed. A novel photocatalytic reactor designed with ZnO nanorods prepared at 90°C shows enhanced catalytic efficiency. The role of light irradiation time, bath temperature and surface morphology of the ZnO nanorods on the performance of photocatalytic reaction is analyzed.

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  18. Resistive switching characteristics of a compact ZnO nanorod array grown directly on an Al-doped ZnO substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, E. J.; Shin, J. Y.; Yoon, T. S.; Kang, C. J.; Choi, Y. J.

    2016-07-01

    ZnO’s resistive switching properties have drawn much attention because ZnO has a simple chemical composition and is easy to manipulate. The propulsion mechanism for resistive switching in ZnO is based on a conducting filament that consists of oxygen vacancies. In the case of film structure, the random formation of the conducting filaments occasionally leads to unstable switching characteristics. Limiting the direction in which the conducting filaments are formed is one way to solve this problem. In this study, we demonstrate reliable resistive switching behavior in a device with an Au/compact ZnO nanorod array/Al-doped ZnO structure with stable resistive switching over 105 cycles and a long retention time of 104 s by confining conducting filaments along the boundaries between ZnO nanorods. The restrictive formation of conducting filaments along the boundaries between ZnO nanorods is observed directly using conductive atomic force microscopy.

  19. A Retrospective Analysis of Ruptured Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Woo Yeol; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background Rupture is an important complication of breast implants. Before cohesive gel silicone implants, rupture rates of both saline and silicone breast implants were over 10%. Through an analysis of ruptured implants, we can determine the various factors related to ruptured implants. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 72 implants that were removed for implant rupture between 2005 and 2014 at a single institution. The following data were collected: type of implants (saline or silicone), duration of implantation, type of implant shell, degree of capsular contracture, associated symptoms, cause of rupture, diagnostic tools, and management. Results Forty-five Saline implants and 27 silicone implants were used. Rupture was diagnosed at a mean of 5.6 and 12 years after insertion of saline and silicone implants, respectively. There was no association between shell type and risk of rupture. Spontaneous was the most common reason for the rupture. Rupture management was implant change (39 case), microfat graft (2 case), removal only (14 case), and follow-up loss (17 case). Conclusions Saline implants have a shorter average duration of rupture, but diagnosis is easier and safer, leading to fewer complications. Previous-generation silicone implants required frequent follow-up observation, and it is recommended that they be changed to a cohesive gel implant before hidden rupture occurs. PMID:25396188

  20. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    PubMed

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  1. A high power ZnO thin film piezoelectric generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Weiwei; Li, Tao; Li, Yutong; Qiu, Junwen; Ma, Xianjun; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A highly efficient and large area piezoelectric ZnO thin film nanogenerator (NG) was fabricated. The ZnO thin film was deposited onto a Si substrate by pulsed laser ablation at a substrate temperature of 500 °C. The deposited ZnO film exhibited a preferred c-axis orientation and a high piezoelectric value of 49.7 pm/V characterized using Piezoelectric Force Microscopy (PFM). Thin films of ZnO were patterned into rectangular power sources with dimensions of 0.5 × 0.5 cm2 with metallic top and bottom electrodes constructed via conventional semiconductor lithographic patterning processes. The NG units were subjected to periodic bending/unbending motions produced by mechanical impingement at a fixed frequency of 100 Hz at a pressure of 0.4 kg/cm2. The output electrical voltage, current density, and power density generated by one ZnO NG were recorded. Values of ∼95 mV, 35 μA cm-2 and 5.1 mW cm-2 were recorded. The level of power density is typical to that produced by a PZT NG on a flexible substrate. Higher energy NG sources can be easily created by adding more power units either in parallel or in series. The thin film ZnO NG technique is highly adaptable with current semiconductor processes, and as such, is easily integrated with signal collecting circuits that are compatible with mass production. A typical application would be using the power harvested from irregular human foot motions to either to operate blue LEDs directly or to drive a sensor network node in mille-power level without any external electric source and circuits.

  2. Photoluminescence of Sequential Infiltration Synthesized ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocola, Leonidas; Gosztola, David; Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Connolly, Aine

    We have investigated a variation of atomic layer deposition (ALD), called sequential infiltration synthesis (SiS), as an alternate method to incorporate ZnO and other oxides inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and other polymers. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) results show that we synthesize ZnO up to 300 nm inside a PMMA film. Photoluminescence data on a PMMA film shows that we achieve a factor of 400X increase in photoluminescence (PL) intensity when comparing a blank Si sample and a 270 nm thick PMMA film, where both were treated with the same 12 alternating cycles of H2O and diethyl zinc (DEZ). PMMA is a well-known ebeam resist. We can expose and develop patterns useful for photonics or sensing applications first, and then convert them afterwards into a hybrid polymer-oxide material. We show that patterning does indeed affect the photoluminescence signature of native ZnO. We demonstrate we can track the growth of the ZnO inside the PMMA polymer using both photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy and determine the point in the process where ZnO is first photoluminescent and also at which point ZnO first exhibits long range order in the polymer. This work was supported by the Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  3. Correlation between defect and magnetism of low energy Ar+9 implanted and un-implanted Zn0.95Mn0.05O thin films suitable for electronic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, S. K.; Midya, N.; Pramanik, P.; Banerjee, A.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Taki, G. S.; Krishna, J. B. M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.

    2016-06-01

    The structural, morphological, optical and magnetic properties of Ar+9 implanted 5 at% Mn doped ZnO films have been investigated to detect the correlation between ferromagnetism (FM) and defect. Sol-gel derived films were implanted with fluences 0 (un-implanted), 5×1014 (low), 1015 (intermediate) and 1016 (high) ions/cm2. Rutherford back scattering (RBS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM) and magnetic force microscope (MFM), UV-visible, photoluminescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and superconducting quantum interference device vibrating sample magnetometer (SQUID VSM) were employed for investigation. XRD indicated single phase nature of the films. Absence of impurity phase has been confirmed from several other measurements also. Ion implantation induces a large concentration of point defects into the films as identified from optical study. All films exhibit intrinsic FM at room temperature (RT). The magnetization attains the maximum for the film implanted with fluence 1016 ions/cm2 with saturation magnetization (MS) value 0.69 emu/gm at RT. Magnetic properties of the films were interpreted using bound magnetic polaron (BMP). BMP generated from the intrinsic exchange interaction of Mn2+ ions and VZn related defects actually controls the FM. The practical utility of these films in transparent spin electronic device has also been exhibited.

  4. Percutaneous Pulmonary Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoung-Doo

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is a frequent sequelae after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonary atresia, truncus arteriosus, Rastelli and Ross operation. Due to patient growth and conduit degeneration, these conduits have to be changed frequently due to regurgitation or stenosis. However, morbidity is significant in these repeated operations. To prolong conduit longevity, bare-metal stenting in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) obstruction has been performed. Stenting the RVOT can reduce the right ventricular pressure and symptomatic improvement, but it causes PR with detrimental effects on the right ventricle function and risks of arrhythmia. Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment for patients with pulmonary valve insufficiency, or stenotic RVOTs. PMID:23170091

  5. Nitinol Surfaces for Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabalovskaya, Svetlana; Rondelli, Gianni; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2009-08-01

    Nitinol, a group of nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloys, steadily conquers new areas of application. Because of the need to keep a low profile of miniature implant devices, and considering the lack of compatibility between Nitinol superelasticity and the mechanical properties of traditional coatings, bare surfaces are of interest. In this article, an overview of our studies of bare Nitinol surfaces is presented, and the performance of coated surfaces is outlined. Together dense and porous Nitinol offer a wide array of surface topographies, suitable for attachment and migration of biological cells and tissue ingrowth. Native Nitinol surface oxides vary from amorphous to crystalline and exhibit semiconducting properties associated with better blood compatibility. Nitinol surfaces are analyzed with regard to high and lasting nickel release in vitro. Surface oxide thickness and Nitinol intermetallic particulates are discussed in relation to corrosion resistance and mechanical performance of the material.

  6. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care. PMID:27021619

  7. Implantable, multifunctional, bioresorbable optics

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Siebert, Sean M.; Pritchard, Eleanor M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Panilaitis, Bruce J. B.; Brenckle, Mark A.; Amsden, Jason J.; Levitt, Jonathan; Fantini, Sergio; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2012-01-01

    Advances in personalized medicine are symbiotic with the development of novel technologies for biomedical devices. We present an approach that combines enhanced imaging of malignancies, therapeutics, and feedback about therapeutics in a single implantable, biocompatible, and resorbable device. This confluence of form and function is accomplished by capitalizing on the unique properties of silk proteins as a mechanically robust, biocompatible, optically clear biomaterial matrix that can house, stabilize, and retain the function of therapeutic components. By developing a form of high-quality microstructured optical elements, improved imaging of malignancies and of treatment monitoring can be achieved. The results demonstrate a unique family of devices for in vitro and in vivo use that provide functional biomaterials with built-in optical signal and contrast enhancement, demonstrated here with simultaneous drug delivery and feedback about drug delivery with no adverse biological effects, all while slowly degrading to regenerate native tissue. PMID:23150544

  8. Comparative study of ZnO nanorods and thin films for chemical and biosensing applications and the development of ZnO nanorods based potentiometric strontium ion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khun, K.; Ibupoto, Z. H.; Chey, C. O.; Lu, Jun.; Nur, O.; Willander, M.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the comparative study of ZnO nanorods and ZnO thin films were performed regarding the chemical and biosensing properties and also ZnO nanorods based strontium ion sensor is proposed. ZnO nanorods were grown on gold coated glass substrates by the hydrothermal growth method and the ZnO thin films were deposited by electro deposition technique. ZnO nanorods and thin films were characterised by field emission electron microscopy [FESEM] and X-ray diffraction [XRD] techniques and this study has shown that the grown nanostructures are highly dense, uniform and exhibited good crystal quality. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy [TEM] was used to investigate the quality of ZnO thin film and we observed that ZnO thin film was comprised of nano clusters. ZnO nanorods and thin films were functionalised with selective strontium ionophore salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone [ST] membrane, galactose oxidase, and lactate oxidase for the detection of strontium ion, galactose and L-lactic acid, respectively. The electrochemical response of both ZnO nanorods and thin films sensor devices was measured by using the potentiometric method. The strontium ion sensor has exhibited good characteristics with a sensitivity of 28.65 ± 0.52 mV/decade, for a wide range of concentrations from 1.00 × 10-6 to 5.00 × 10-2 M, selectivity, reproducibility, stability and fast response time of 10.00 s. The proposed strontium ion sensor was used as indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of strontium ion versus ethylenediamine tetra acetic acid [EDTA]. This comparative study has shown that ZnO nanorods possessed better performance with high sensitivity and low limit of detection due to high surface area to volume ratio as compared to the flat surface of ZnO thin films.

  9. Growth modes of ZnO nanostructures from laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Amarilio-Burshtein, I.; Tamir, S.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2010-03-08

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) and other nanostructures were grown by laser ablation of a ZnO containing target onto different substrates with and without the presence of an Au catalyst. The morphology and structure of the NWs were studied using high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopes [including imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS)]. The different growth modes obtainable could be tuned by varying the Zn concentration in the vapor phase keeping other growth parameters intact. Possible growth mechanisms of these nanowires are suggested and discussed.

  10. Electron-hole quantum physics in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versteegh, M. A. M.

    2011-09-01

    This dissertation describes several new aspects of the quantum physics of electrons and holes in zinc oxide (ZnO), including a few possible applications. Zinc oxide is a II-VI semiconductor with a direct band gap in the ultraviolet. Experimental and theoretical studies have been performed, both on bulk ZnO and on ZnO nanowires. Chapter 2 presents a new technique for an ultrafast all-optical shutter, based on two-photon absorption in a ZnO crystal. This shutter can be used for luminescence experiments requiring extremely high time-resolution. Chapter 3 describes a time-resolved study on the electron-hole many-body effects in highly excited ZnO at room temperature, in particular band-filling, band-gap renormalization, and the disappearance of the exciton resonance due to screening. In Chapter 4, the quantum many-body theory developed and experimentally verified in Chapter 3, is used to explain laser action in ZnO nanowires, and compared with experimental results. In contrast to current opinion, the results indicate that excitons are not involved in the laser action. The measured emission wavelength, the laser threshold, and the spectral distance between the laser modes are shown to be excellently explained by our quantum many-body theory. Multiple scattering of light in a forest of nanowires can be employed to enhance light absorption in solar cells. Optimization of this technique requires better understanding of light diffusion in such a nanowire forest. In Chapter 5 we demonstrate a method, based on two-photon absorption, to directly measure the residence time of light in a nanowire forest, and we show that scanning electron microscope (SEM) images can be used to predict the photon mean free path. In Chapter 6 we present a new ultrafast all-optical transistor, consisting of a forest of ZnO nanowires. After excitation, laser action in this forest causes rapid recombination of the majority of the electrons and holes, limiting the amplification to 1.2 picoseconds only

  11. Single photon emission from ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sumin; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R.; Aharonovich, Igor; Johnson, Brett C.; Castelletto, Stefania

    2014-06-30

    Room temperature single photon emitters are very important resources for photonics and emerging quantum technologies. In this work, we study single photon emission from defect centers in 20 nm zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles. The emitters exhibit bright broadband fluorescence in the red spectral range centered at 640 nm with polarized excitation and emission. The studied emitters showed continuous blinking; however, bleaching can be suppressed using a polymethyl methacrylate coating. Furthermore, hydrogen termination increased the density of single photon emitters. Our results will contribute to the identification of quantum systems in ZnO.

  12. Optical characterization of ZnO nanomaterial with praseodymium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Y. K.; Pal, Sudha; Goyal, Priyanka; Bind, Umesh Chandra

    2016-05-01

    ZnO nanomaterial with praseodymium ions was prepared by chemical synthesis method. The ZnO nanomaterial was characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. Their absorption in UV-VIS/NIR regions was measured at room temperature. The experimental oscillator strengths were calculated from the areas under the absorption bands. Eight absorption bands have been observed. From these spectral data various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon, Lande, Racah, Nephelauxetic ratio and bonding parameters have been computed. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been carried out using the absorption spectra to evaluate the radiative properties for luminescent levels of the praseodymium ion and discussed. The observed nano particle size is 2nm.

  13. Kinetics of Congruent Vaporization of ZnO Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.J.; Stach, E.; Garcia, R.E.

    2011-09-28

    We examine the congruent vaporization of ZnO islands using in situ transmission electron microscopy. Correlating quantitative measurements with a theoretical model offers a comprehensive understanding of the equilibrium conditions of the system, including equilibrium vapor pressure and surface free energy. Interestingly, the surface energy depends on temperature, presumably due to a charged surface at our specific condition of low P and high T. We find that the vaporization temperature decreases with decreasing system size, a trend that is more pronounced at higher T. Applying our results of island decay towards the growth of the ZnO provides new insights into the cooperative facet growth of anisotropic nanocrystals.

  14. Improved Response of ZnO Films for Pyroelectric Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Yu, Shih-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the temperature variation rate is a useful method for enhancing the response of pyroelectric devices. A three-dimensional ZnO film was fabricated by the aerosol deposition (AD) rapid process using the shadow mask method, which induces lateral temperature gradients on the sidewalls of the responsive element, thereby increasing the temperature variation rate. To enhance the quality of the film and reduce the concentration of defects, the film was further treated by laser annealing, and the integration of a comb-like top electrode enhanced the voltage response and reduced the response time of the resulting ZnO pyroelectric devices. PMID:23235444

  15. Structure of graphene oxide dispersed with ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Rishikesh Pandey, Devendra K.; Khare, P. S.

    2014-10-15

    Graphene has been proposed as a promising two-dimensional nanomaterial with outstanding electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties for many applications. In present work a process of dispersion of graphene oxide with ZnO nanoparticles in ethanol solution with different pH values, have been studied. Samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM, PL, UV-visible spectroscopy and particles size measurement. The results analysis indicates overall improved emission spectrum. It has been observed that the average diameter of RGO (Reduced Graphene Oxide) decreases in presence of ZnO nanoparticles from 3.8μm to 0.41μm.

  16. Reducing ZnO nanoparticle cytotoxicity by surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingdeng; Shen, Cenchao; Feltis, Bryce N.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Hughes, Anthony E.; Wright, Paul F. A.; Turney, Terence W.

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticulate zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the most widely used engineered nanomaterials and its toxicology has gained considerable recent attention. A key aspect for controlling biological interactions at the nanoscale is understanding the relevant nanoparticle surface chemistry. In this study, we have determined the disposition of ZnO nanoparticles within human immune cells by measurement of total Zn, as well as the proportions of extra- and intracellular dissolved Zn as a function of dose and surface coating. From this mass balance, the intracellular soluble Zn levels showed little difference in regard to dose above a certain minimal level or to different surface coatings. PEGylation of ZnO NPs reduced their cytotoxicity as a result of decreased cellular uptake arising from a minimal protein corona. We conclude that the key role of the surface properties of ZnO NPs in controlling cytotoxicity is to regulate cellular nanoparticle uptake rather than altering either intracellular or extracellular Zn dissolution.Nanoparticulate zinc oxide (ZnO) is one of the most widely used engineered nanomaterials and its toxicology has gained considerable recent attention. A key aspect for controlling biological interactions at the nanoscale is understanding the relevant nanoparticle surface chemistry. In this study, we have determined the disposition of ZnO nanoparticles within human immune cells by measurement of total Zn, as well as the proportions of extra- and intracellular dissolved Zn as a function of dose and surface coating. From this mass balance, the intracellular soluble Zn levels showed little difference in regard to dose above a certain minimal level or to different surface coatings. PEGylation of ZnO NPs reduced their cytotoxicity as a result of decreased cellular uptake arising from a minimal protein corona. We conclude that the key role of the surface properties of ZnO NPs in controlling cytotoxicity is to regulate cellular nanoparticle uptake rather than

  17. Light Confinement-Induced Antireflection of ZnO Nanocones

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Duty, Chad E; Xu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    The antireflective features of aperiodic vertical aligned ZnO nanocones on Si wafer were studied both experimentally and theoretically through comparison with planar ZnO films on Si substrates and bare Si substrates. The measured diffuse reflectance spectra show that the nanocone-based texture reduces the light reflection in a broad spectral range, and is much more effective than the planar textures. The numerical simulations exhibit a good agreement with the experimental data and suggest that the light confinement inside nanocones by controlling the diameters can bring further improvement of light absorption into Si.

  18. Noise in ZnO nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hao D; Wang, Wenyong; Suehle, John S; Richter, Curt A; Hong, Woong-Ki; Lee, Takhee

    2009-02-01

    The noise power spectra in ZnO nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) were experimentally investigated and showed a classical 1/f dependence. A Hooge's constant of 5 x 10(-3) was estimated. This value is within the range reported for CMOS FETs with high-k dielectrics, supporting the concept that nanowires can be utilized for future beyond-CMOS electronic applications from the point of view of device noise properties. ZnO FETs measured in a dry O2 environment displayed elevated noise levels compared to in vacuum. At low temperature, random telegraph signals are observed in the drain current. PMID:19441450

  19. Nonvolatile resistive switching in single crystalline ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuchao; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Min; Zeng, Fei; Zhou, Weiya; Xie, Sishen; Pan, Feng

    2011-04-01

    We demonstrate nonvolatile resistive switching in single crystalline ZnO nanowires with high ON/OFF ratios and low threshold voltages. Unlike the mechanism of continuous metal filament formation along grain boundaries in polycrystalline films, the resistive switching in single crystalline ZnO nanowires is speculated to be induced by the formation of a metal island chain on the nanowire surface. Resistive memories based on bottom-up semiconductor nanowires hold potential for next generation ultra-dense nonvolatile memories. PMID:21394361

  20. Growth modes of ZnO nanostructures from laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarilio-Burshtein, I.; Tamir, S.; Lifshitz, Y.

    2010-03-01

    ZnO nanowires (NWs) and other nanostructures were grown by laser ablation of a ZnO containing target onto different substrates with and without the presence of an Au catalyst. The morphology and structure of the NWs were studied using high resolution scanning and transmission electron microscopes [including imaging, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS)]. The different growth modes obtainable could be tuned by varying the Zn concentration in the vapor phase keeping other growth parameters intact. Possible growth mechanisms of these nanowires are suggested and discussed.

  1. Tunable Lattice Constant and Band Gap of Single- and Few-Layer ZnO.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; Sorescu, Dan C; Deng, Xingyi

    2016-04-01

    Single and few-layer ZnO(0001) (ZnO(nL), n = 1-4) grown on Au(111) have been characterized via scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that the in-plane lattice constants of the ZnO(nL, n ≤ 3) are expanded compared to that of the bulk wurtzite ZnO(0001). The lattice constant reaches a maximum expansion of 3% in the ZnO(2L) and decreases to the bulk wurtzite ZnO value in the ZnO(4L). The band gap decreases monotonically with increasing number of ZnO layers from 4.48 eV (ZnO(1L)) to 3.42 eV (ZnO(4L)). These results suggest that a transition from a planar to the bulk-like ZnO structure occurs around the thickness of ZnO(4L). The work also demonstrates that the lattice constant and the band gap in ultrathin ZnO can be tuned by controlling the number of layers, providing a basis for further investigation of this material. PMID:27003692

  2. Hyperthermia enhances localization of sup 111 In-labeled hapten to bifunctional antibody in human colon tumor xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Gridley, D.S.; Ewart, K.L.; Cao, J.D.; Stickney, D.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A unique bifunctional antibody (BFA) delivery system was examined for radiolocalization and distribution following hyperthermia (41.5 degrees C, 45 min) of T380h human colon tumor xenografts. The BFA is an F(ab')2 fragment made by combining two murine monoclonal antibodies with different specificities, one directed against carcinoembryonic antigen (monoclonal antibody CEM 231) and the other (monoclonal antibody CHA 255) against a hapten found on a derivative of 111In-labeled benzyl-EDTA (EOTUBE). This BFA is known as CEM/CHA. The CEM/CHA accumulates in carcinoembryonic antigen-expressing tissue and clears from normal tissues prior to administration of the radiolabeled hapten. T380h tumor chunks were injected s.c. into 31 nude mice. Two weeks later mean tumor volume was 352 mm3 and the animals were assigned to one of four groups: (a) CEM/CHA + hyperthermia + 111In-EOTUBE; (b) CHA 255 F(ab')2 + hyperthermia + 111In-EOTUBE, and (c and d) treated in the same manner as a and b, respectively, but without heat. The CEM/CHA, CHA 255 F(ab')2, and 111In-labeled hapten were injected i.p. at 14 micrograms, 7 micrograms, and 140-200 microCi/mouse, respectively. The hyperthermia was administered 22-24 h after BFA and the radiolabeled hapten was injected 2 h later. Twenty-four h thereafter, the animals were euthanized for testing. A significantly greater percentage of injected radioactivity localized within heated compared to unheated tumors in mice given CEM/CHA and 111In-EOTUBE (7.39%/g tumor and 4.46%/tumor versus 2.72%/g tumor and 1.44%/tumor, respectively). The percentage of kidney activity in mice given CHA 255 F(ab')2 fragments and heat was 57% lower than in the nonheated group when expressed on a per g basis (12.73 and 22.20%, respectively). Microautoradiography showed greater radiolocalization in heated tumors than in nonheated control tumors of comparable size.

  3. Tunable Surface Wettability of ZnO Nanoparticle Arrays for Controlling the Alignment of Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yueh-Feng; Chen, Mu-Zhe; Yang, Sheng-Hsiung; Jeng, Shie-Chang

    2015-05-13

    The control of the liquid crystal (LC) alignment is very important for both academic research and practical applications. LC molecules aligned on the ZnO nanoparticle arrays (ZnO NPAs) are demonstrated and the pretilt angles of LCs can be controlled by using ZnO NPAs with different surface wettability. The wettability of ZnO NPAs fabricated by the solution-based hydrothermal method can be controlled by changing the annealing temperature of the as-prepared ZnO NPAs. The measurements of the energy-dispersive spectra and photoluminescence have shown that the chemical properties of ZnO NPAs have been changed with the annealing temperature. Our results show that the pretilt angle of LCs can be tuned continuously from ∼0 to ∼90° as the contact angle of water on ZnO NPAs changes from 33 to 108°. PMID:25895105

  4. Fluorescence property of ZnO nanoparticles and the interaction with bromothymol blue.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qiaoli; Cheng, Jinmei; Li, Guang; Zhang, Ke; Zhai, Yanling; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jifeng

    2011-05-01

    We synthesized ZnO quantum dots (QDs) simply in alcoholic solution, and investigated the interaction between ZnO QDs and bromothymol blue. The structural, morphological, size and spectral properties of ZnO QDs were studied. It was found that ZnO QDs were spherical nanoparticles in the crystal structure, and the average diameter of ZnO QDs was about 4.8 nm. The excitation and emission peaks were located at 346 nm and 520 nm, respectively, which were obtained on a common fluorophotometer. The quantum yield of ZnO QDs was obtained by using quinine sulfate as a reference reagent. In addition, the fluorescence of ZnO QDs can be quenched by bromothymol blue, and the quenching mechanism was proposed in a dynamic quenching mode. PMID:21170671

  5. Opto-electrical properties of Sb-doped p-type ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Tzu-Hsuan; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Chiu, Chung-Hua; Huang, Chun-Wei; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-03-17

    P-type ZnO nanowires (NWs) have attracted much attention in the past years due to the potential applications for optoelectronics and piezotronics. In this study, we have synthesized Sb-doped p-type ZnO NWs on Si (100) substrates by chemical vapor deposition with Aucatalyst. The Sb-doped ZnO NWs are single crystalline with high density, grown along [1-1-2] direction. The doping percentage of Sb is about 2.49%, which has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ZnO NW field effect transistor demonstrated its p-type characteristics. A high responsivity to ultraviolet photodetection was also observed. In addition, compared to intrinsic ZnO NWs, the conductivity of the Sb-doped ZnO NWs exhibited ∼2 orders of magnitude higher. These properties make the p-type ZnO NWs a promising candidate for electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  6. Dynamics of ZnO nanoparticles formed in the high-pressure phase during growth of ZnO nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, D.; Shimogaki, T.; Takao, S.; Nakao, S.; Harada, K.; Higashihata, M.; Okada, T.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles formed in Ar gas of 200 Torr by laser ablation are visualized by ultraviolet Rayleigh scattering imaging. The time-resolved imaging of the ZnO nanoparticles are presented for several conditions of single-pulse ablation and 10 Hz ablation at room temperature. Scattering light from the nanoparticles appeared at 1-2 ms after ablation, and the spatial distribution was a mushroom like swirling cloud. The cloud propagates forward about 2.6 m/s without lateral expansion. In addition, nanoparticle distribution at a substrate heating condition, which is growth condition of ZnO nanocrystals is investigated. The nanoparticles under heating condition formed almost the same spatial distribution as that of room temperature and their speed was increased to 3.2 m/s at 750 °C.

  7. Study of ZnO and Mg doped ZnO nanoparticles by sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, Mohd Meenhaz Arshad, Mohd; Tripathi, Pushpendra

    2015-06-24

    Nano-crystalline undoped and Mg doped ZnO (Mg-ZnO) nanoparticles with compositional formula Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}O (x=0,1,3,5,7,10 and 12 %) were synthesized using sol-gel process. The XRD diffraction peaks match with the pattern of the standard hexagonal structure of ZnO that reveals the formation of hexagonal wurtzite structure in all samples. SEM images demonstrates clearly the formation of spherical ZnO nanoparticles, and change of the morphology of the nanoparticles with the concentration of the magnesium, which is in close agreement with that estimated by Scherer formula based on the XRD pattern. To investigate the doping effect on optical properties, the UV–VIS absorption spectra was obtained and the band gap of the samples calculated.

  8. Built-in electric field in ZnO based semipolar quantum wells grown on (1012) ZnO substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chauveau, J.-M.; Xia, Y.; Roland, B.; Vinter, B.; University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, F-06102 Nice Cedex 2 ; Ben Taazaet-Belgacem, I.; Teisseire, M.; Nemoz, M.; Brault, J.; Damilano, B.; Leroux, M.

    2013-12-23

    We report on the properties of semipolar (Zn,Mg)O/ZnO quantum wells homoepitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (1012) R-plane ZnO substrates. We demonstrate that atomically flat interfaces can be achieved with fully relaxed quantum wells because the mismatch between (Zn,Mg)O and ZnO is minimal for this growth orientation. The photoluminescence properties evidence a quantum confined Stark effect with an internal electric field estimated to 430 kV/cm for a 17% Mg content in the barriers. The quantum well emission is strongly polarized along the 1210 direction and a comparison with the semipolar bulk ZnO luminescence polarization points to the effect of the confinement.

  9. Microsystems Technology for Retinal Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, James

    2005-03-01

    The retinal prosthesis is targeted to treat age-related macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa, and other outer retinal degenerations. Simulations of artificial vision have predicted that 600-1000 individual pixels will be needed if a retinal prosthesis is to restore function such as reading large print and face recognition. An implantable device with this many electrode contacts will require microsystems technology as part of its design. An implantable retinal prosthesis will consist of several subsystems including an electrode array and hermetic packaging. Microsystems and microtechnology approaches are being investigated as possible solutions for these design problems. Flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate electrode arrays and silicon micromachined electrode arrays are under development. Inactive PDMS electrodes have been implanted in 3 dogs to assess mechanical biocompatibility. 3 dogs were followed for 6 months. The implanted was securely fastened to the retina with a single retinal tack. No post-operative complications were evident. The array remained within 100 microns of the retinal surface. Histological evaluation showed a well preserved retina underneath the electrode array. A silicon device with electrodes suspended on micromachined springs has been implanted in 4 dogs (2 acute implants, 2 chronic implants). The device, though large, could be inserted into the eye and positioned on the retina. Histological analysis of the retina from the spring electrode implants showed that spring mounted posts penetrated the retina, thus the device will be redesigned to reduce the strength of the springs. These initial implants will provide information for the designers to make the next generation silicon device. We conclude that microsystems technology has the potential to make possible a retinal prosthesis with 1000 individual contacts in close proximity to the retina.

  10. In vitro antibacterial activity of ZnO and Nd doped ZnO nanoparticles against ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Abdulrahman Syedahamed Haja; Karthikeyan, Chandrasekaran; Ahamed, Abdulazees Parveez; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Ravi, Ganasan

    2016-01-01

    Pure ZnO and Neodymium (Nd) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs showed nanorod and nanoflower like morphology respectively. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 422 and 451 cm(-1) for ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs respectively. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurement, the excitonic peaks were found around 373 nm and 380 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of ten different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The antibacterial studies performed against extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed that the Nd doped ZnO NPs possessed a greater antibacterial effect than the pure ZnO NPs. From confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis, the apoptotic nature of the cells was confirmed by the cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell wall and cell membrane and dead cell of the bacteria. SEM analysis revealed the existence of bacterial loss of viability due to an impairment of cell membrane integrity, which was highly consistent with the damage of cell walls. PMID:27071382

  11. In vitro antibacterial activity of ZnO and Nd doped ZnO nanoparticles against ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Abdulrahman Syedahamed Haja; Karthikeyan, Chandrasekaran; Ahamed, Abdulazees Parveez; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Ravi, Ganasan

    2016-01-01

    Pure ZnO and Neodymium (Nd) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs showed nanorod and nanoflower like morphology respectively. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 422 and 451 cm−1 for ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs respectively. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurement, the excitonic peaks were found around 373 nm and 380 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of ten different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The antibacterial studies performed against extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed that the Nd doped ZnO NPs possessed a greater antibacterial effect than the pure ZnO NPs. From confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis, the apoptotic nature of the cells was confirmed by the cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell wall and cell membrane and dead cell of the bacteria. SEM analysis revealed the existence of bacterial loss of viability due to an impairment of cell membrane integrity, which was highly consistent with the damage of cell walls. PMID:27071382

  12. In vitro antibacterial activity of ZnO and Nd doped ZnO nanoparticles against ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Abdulrahman Syedahamed Haja; Karthikeyan, Chandrasekaran; Ahamed, Abdulazees Parveez; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Ravi, Ganasan

    2016-04-01

    Pure ZnO and Neodymium (Nd) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs showed nanorod and nanoflower like morphology respectively. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 422 and 451 cm‑1 for ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs respectively. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurement, the excitonic peaks were found around 373 nm and 380 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of ten different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The antibacterial studies performed against extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed that the Nd doped ZnO NPs possessed a greater antibacterial effect than the pure ZnO NPs. From confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis, the apoptotic nature of the cells was confirmed by the cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell wall and cell membrane and dead cell of the bacteria. SEM analysis revealed the existence of bacterial loss of viability due to an impairment of cell membrane integrity, which was highly consistent with the damage of cell walls.

  13. Male chest enhancement: pectoral implants.

    PubMed

    Benito-Ruiz, J; Raigosa, J M; Manzano-Surroca, M; Salvador, L

    2008-01-01

    The authors present their experience with the pectoral muscle implant for male chest enhancement in 21 patients. The markings and technique are thoroughly described. The implants used were manufactured and custom made. The candidates for implants comprised three groups: group 1 (18 patients seeking chest enhancement), group 2 (1 patient with muscular atrophy), and group 3 (2 patients with muscular injuries). Because of the satisfying results obtained, including significant enhancement of the chest contour and no major complications, this technique is used for an increasing number of male cosmetic surgeries. PMID:17676376

  14. Pediatric cochlear implantation: an update.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, Vincenzo; Bacciu, Andrea; Guida, Maurizio; Marra, Francesca; Bertoldi, Barbara; Bacciu, Salvatore; Pasanisi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Deafness in pediatric age can adversely impact language acquisition as well as educational and social-emotional development. Once diagnosed, hearing loss should be rehabilitated early; the goal is to provide the child with maximum access to the acoustic features of speech within a listening range that is safe and comfortable. In presence of severe to profound deafness, benefit from auditory amplification cannot be enough to allow a proper language development. Cochlear implants are partially implantable electronic devices designed to provide profoundly deafened patients with hearing sensitivity within the speech range. Since their introduction more than 30 years ago, cochlear implants have improved their performance to the extent that are now considered to be standard of care in the treatment of children with severe to profound deafness. Over the years patient candidacy has been expanded and the criteria for implantation continue to evolve within the paediatric population. The minimum age for implantation has progressively reduced; it has been recognized that implantation at a very early age (12-18 months) provides children with the best outcomes, taking advantage of sensitive periods of auditory development. Bilateral implantation offers a better sound localization, as well as a superior ability to understand speech in noisy environments than unilateral cochlear implant. Deafened children with special clinical situations, including inner ear malformation, cochlear nerve deficiency, cochlear ossification, and additional disabilities can be successfully treated, even thogh they require an individualized candidacy evaluation and a complex post-implantation rehabilitation. Benefits from cochlear implantation include not only better abilities to hear and to develop speech and language skills, but also improved academic attainment, improved quality of life, and better employment status. Cochlear implants permit deaf people to hear, but they have a long way to go before

  15. Silicone breast implants and platinum.

    PubMed

    Wixtrom, Roger N

    2007-12-01

    Platinum, in a specific form, is used as a catalyst in the cross-linking reactions of the silicone gel and elastomer in breast implants. After manufacture, it remains in the devices at low-parts-per-million levels. Potential concerns have been raised as to whether this platinum might diffuse from silicone breast implants into the body and result in adverse health effects. The weight of evidence indicates that the platinum present is in its most biocompatible (zero valence) form, and the very minute levels (<0.1 percent) that might diffuse from the implants do not represent a significant health risk to patients. PMID:18090821

  16. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...

  17. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...

  18. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...

  19. 21 CFR 522.1350 - Melatonin implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Melatonin implant. 522.1350 Section 522.1350 Food... Melatonin implant. (a) Specifications. The drug is a silicone rubber elastomer implant containing 2.7...—(1) Amount. One implant per mink. (2) Indications for use. For use in healthy male and female kit...

  20. Occlusion on oral implants: current clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Koyano, K; Esaki, D

    2015-02-01

    Proper implant occlusion is essential for adequate oral function and the prevention of adverse consequences, such as implant overloading. Dental implants are thought to be more prone to occlusal overloading than natural teeth because of the loss of the periodontal ligament, which provides shock absorption and periodontal mechanoreceptors, which provide tactile sensitivity and proprioceptive motion feedback. Although many guidelines and theories on implant occlusion have been proposed, few have provided strong supportive evidence. Thus, we performed a narrative literature review to ascertain the influence of implant occlusion on the occurrence of complications of implant treatment and discuss the clinical considerations focused on the overloading factors at present. The search terms were 'dental implant', 'dental implantation', 'dental occlusion' and 'dental prosthesis'. The inclusion criteria were literature published in English up to September 2013. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), prospective cohort studies and case-control studies with at least 20 cases and 12 months follow-up interval were included. Based on the selected literature, this review explores factors related to the implant prosthesis (cantilever, crown/implant ratio, premature contact, occlusal scheme, implant-abutment connection, splinting implants and tooth-implant connection) and other considerations, such as the number, diameter, length and angulation of implants. Over 700 abstracts were reviewed, from which more than 30 manuscripts were included. We found insufficient evidence to establish firm clinical guidelines for implant occlusion. To discuss the ideal occlusion for implants, further well-designed RCTs are required in the future. PMID:25284468

  1. 111In-cetuximab as a diagnostic agent by accessible epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor targeting in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Hsia; Peng, Cheng-Liang; Lee, Shin-Yu; Chiang, Ping-Fang; Yao, Cheng-Jung; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2015-06-30

    Colorectal adenocarcinoma is a common cause death cancer in the whole world. The aim of this study is to define the 111In-cetuximab as a diagnosis tracer of human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In this research, cell uptake, nano-SPECT/CT scintigraphy, autoradiography, biodistribution and immunohitochemical staining of EGF receptor were included. HCT-116 and HT-29 cell expressed a relatively high and moderate level of EGF receptor, respectively. The nano-SPECT/CT image of 111In-cetuximab showed tumor radiation uptake of subcutaneous HCT-116 xenograft tumor was higher than SW-620. Autoradiography image also showed that tumor of HCT-116 had high 111In-cetuximab uptake. Mice that bearing CT-26 in situ xenograft colorectal tumors showed similar high uptake in vivo and ex vivo through nano-SPECT/CT imaging at 72 hours. Metastatic HCT-116/Luc tumors demonstrated the highest uptake at 72 hours after the injection of 111In-cetuximab. Relatively, results of 111In-DTPA showed that metabolism through urinary system, especially in the kidney. The quantitative analysis of biodistribution showed count value of metastatic HCT-116/Luc tumors that treated with 111In-cetuximab had a significant difference (P < 0.05) compared with that treated with 111In-DTPA after injection 72 hours. Result of immunohistologic staining of EGF receptor also showed high EGF receptor expression and uptake in metastatic colorectal tumors. In summary, we suggested that 111In-cetuximab will be a potential tool for detecting EGF receptor expression in human metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:26062654

  2. Multimodality Molecular Imaging of [18F]-Fluorinated Carboplatin Derivative Encapsulated in [111In]-Labeled Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamichhane, Narottam

    -(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid as the labeling agent to coordinate with the cisplatin aqua complex. It was then used to treat various cell lines and compared with cisplatin and carboplatin at different concentrations ranging from 0.001 microM to 100 microM for 72 hrs and 96 hrs. IC50 values calculated from cell viability indicated that 19F-FCP is a more potent drug than Carboplatin. Manual radiosynthesis and characterization of [18F]-FCP was performed using [18F]-2-(5-fluoro-pentyl)-2-methyl malonic acid with coordination with cisplatin aqua complex. Automated radiosynthesis of [18F]-FCP was optimized using the manual synthetic procedures and using them as macros for the radiosynthesizer. [18F]-FCP was evaluated in vivo with detailed biodistribution studies and PET imaging in normal and KB 3-1 and KB 8-5 tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. The biodistribution studies and PET imaging of [18F]-FCP showed major uptake in kidneys which attributes to the renal clearance of radiotracer. In vivo plasma and urine stability demonstrated intact [18F]-FCP. [ 111In]-Labeled Liposomes was synthesized and physiochemical properties were assessed with DLS. [111In]-Labeled Liposome was evaluated in vivo with detailed pharmacokinetic studies and SPECT imaging. The biodistribution and ROI analysis from SPECT imaging showed the spleen and liver uptake of [111In]-Labeled Liposome and subsequent clearance of activity with time. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was developed and physiochemical properties were characterized with DLS. [18F]-FCP encapsulated [111In]-Labeled Liposome was used for in vivo dual tracer PET and SPECT imaging from the same nanoconstruct in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice. PET imaging of [18F]-FCP in KB 3-1 (sensitive) and COLO 205 (resistant) tumor xenograft bearing nude mice was performed. Naked [18F]-FCP and [18F]-FCP encapsulated [ 111In]-Labeled Liposome showed different pharmacokinetic profiles. PET

  3. [Imaging in silicone breast implantation].

    PubMed

    Gielens, Maaike P M; Koolen, Pieter G L; Hermens, Roland A E C; Rutten, Matthieu J C M

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been concerns regarding the use of breast implants from Poly Implant Prothèse (PIP, Seyne sur Mer, France) for breast augmentation due to their tendency to rupture and the possibility of having toxic contents. MRI using a specific silicone-sensitive sequence has proven to be the most sensitive and specific technique in the detection of intra- and extracapsular implant rupture. However, given its high costs, it is important that this technique is used sparingly. In this clinical lesson, we compare the sensitivity and specificity of mammography, ultrasound, CT and MRI for the detection of breast implant rupture. Based on two cases, a diagnostic approach is given in order to reduce health care costs. PMID:24252405

  4. ANTIARRHYTHMICS VERSUS IMPLANTABLE DEFIBRILLATORS (AVID)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluates whether use of an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) results in reduction in total mortality, when compared with conventional pharmacological therapy, in patients resuscitated from sudden cardiac death who are otherwise at very high risk of mortality from arrhythmi...

  5. Advances in lens implant technology

    PubMed Central

    Kampik, Anselm; Dexl, Alois K.; Zimmermann, Nicole; Glasser, Adrian; Baumeister, Martin; Kohnen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Cataract surgery is one of the oldest and the most frequent outpatient clinic operations in medicine performed worldwide. The clouded human crystalline lens is replaced by an artificial intraocular lens implanted into the capsular bag. During the last six decades, cataract surgery has undergone rapid development from a traumatic, manual surgical procedure with implantation of a simple lens to a minimally invasive intervention increasingly assisted by high technology and a broad variety of implants customized for each patient’s individual requirements. This review discusses the major advances in this field and focuses on the main challenge remaining – the treatment of presbyopia. The demand for correction of presbyopia is increasing, reflecting the global growth of the ageing population. Pearls and pitfalls of currently applied methods to correct presbyopia and different approaches under investigation, both in lens implant technology and in surgical technology, are discussed. PMID:23413369

  6. Implants for draining neovascular glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Molteno, A C; Van Rooyen, M M; Bartholomew, R S

    1977-01-01

    The implant design, surgical technique, and pharmacological methods of controlling bleb fibrosis, used to treat neovascular glaucoma, are described, together with the results of 14 operations performed on 12 eyes. Images PMID:843508

  7. In vivo and in vitro uptake of 111In, delivered with the affibody molecule (ZEGFR:955)2, in EGFR expressing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, E; Orlova, A; Friedman, M; Tolmachev, V; Ståhl, S; Nilsson, F Y; Glimelius, B; Carlsson, J

    2008-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR, is overexpressed in many carcinomas. Targeting this receptor with radionuclides is important for imaging and therapy applications in nuclear medicine. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo properties of a new high affinity EGFR binding affibody molecule, (ZEGFR:955)2, when conjugated with CHX-A''-DTPA and labelled with 111In. The binding time patterns and retention studies were performed using cultured squamous carcinoma A431 cells that overexpress EGFR. In the in vivo studies, female BALB/c nu/nu mice carrying tumours from xenografted A431 cells were used. The in vitro studies showed EGFR specific binding, high uptake and good retention of 111In when delivered as [111In](ZEGFR:955)2. The retention after 72 h of incubation was 38.0+/-1.15% of the initial level. The biodistribution study showed a tumour specific 111In uptake of 3.8+/-1.4% of injected dose per gram tumour tissue 4 h post-injection. The tumour to blood ratio was 9.1 and the tumours could easily be visualized with a gamma camera at this time-point. 111In delivered with [111In](ZEGFR:955)2 gave an EGFR specific uptake and the results indicated that the (ZEGFR:955)2 affibody molecule is a candidate for radionuclide-based tumour imaging. Potential therapy applications are discussed. PMID:18357367

  8. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  9. Fiber implantation for pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Bergfeld, W F

    1979-01-12

    Examination of 20 patients who had fiber implantation for the treatment of pattern baldness showed that nearly all the fibers had fallen out by ten weeks. Complications observed were facial swelling, infection, foreign-body granulomas, scarring, and permanent hair loss. Scanning electron microscopy identified the fibers as modacrylic fibers. The complications, high monetary cost, and ultimate futility of fiber implantation make it an unacceptable procedure. PMID:364078

  10. ZnO nanowire-based CO sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Mon-Shu; Chen, Wei-Hao; Chen, Yu-Lin; Chang, Meng-Fan

    This study applied ZnO nanowires to the fabrication of a CO gas sensor operable at room temperature. Following the deposition of a seed layer by spin coating, an aqueous solution method was used to grow ZnO nanowires. This was followed by the self-assembly of an electrode array via dielectrophoresis prior to the fabrication of the CO sensing device. The material characteristics were analyzed using FE-SEM, EDS, GIXRD, FE-TEM, and the measurement of photoluminescence (PL). Our results identified the ZnO nanowires as a single crystalline wurtzite structure. Extending the growth period from 30 min to 360 min led to an increase in the length and diameter of the nanowires. After two hours, the ZnO presented a preferred crystal orientation of [002]. Sensor chips were assembled using 60 pairs of electrodes with gaps of 2 μm, over which were lain nanowires to complete the sensing devices. The average sensing response was 48.37 s and the average recovery time was 65.61 s, with a sensing response magnitude of approximately 6.8% at room temperature.

  11. Memristive switching of ZnO nanorod mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevgeniy, Puzyrev; Shen, Xiao; Ni, Kai; Zhang, Xuan; Hachtel, Jordan; Choi, Bo; Chisholm, Matthew; Fleetwood, Daniel; Schrimpf, Ronald; Pantelides, Sokrates

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of memristive switching in a self-assembled mesh of ZnO nanorods. A ZnO nanorod mesh spans the area between Ag contacts in a device that exhibits hysteresis with large ON/OFF ratio, reaching ION/IOFF values of 104. We show that switching behavior depends critically on the geometry of the nanorod mesh. We employ density functional theory (DFT) calculations to deduce the mechanism for resistive switching for the nanorod mesh. Redistribution of Ag atoms, driven by an electrical field, leads to the formation and evolution of a conducting path through nanorods. Field-induced migration of Ag atoms changes the doping level of nanorods and modulates their conductivity. Using static DFT and nudged-elastic-band calculations, we investigate the energy of interaction between Ag clusters and a ZnO surface, including migration barriers of Ag atoms. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics are modeled using percolation theory in a nanorod mesh. To describe the dynamics of SET/RESET phenomena, model parameters include the experimentally observed nanorod geometry and the energetics of Ag on ZnO surfaces, obtained from DFT calculations. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR-1207241, DOE Grant DE-FG02-09ER46554, and the McMinn Endowment at Vanderbilt University. Computational support was provided by the NSF XSEDE under Grant #DMR TG-DMR130121.

  12. Growth of ZnO and GaN Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J.; Hong, S.-K.; Matsumoto, K.; Tokunaga, H.; Tachibana, A.; Lee, S. W.; Cho, M.-W.

    . Zinc oxide (ZnO) and gallium nitride (GaN) are wide bandgap semi conductors applicable to light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) with wavelengths ranging from ultraviolet to blue light. Now ZnO and GaN are key ma terials for optoelectronic device applications and their applications are being rapidly expanded to lots of other technology including electronics, biotechnology, nanotech-nology, and fusion technology among all these. As a fundamental starting point for the development of this new technique, epitaxy of ZnO and GaN films is one of the most important key technology. Hence, development of the growth technique for high quality epitaxial films is highly necessary. Among the various kinds of epi taxy technique for semiconductor films developed so far, physical vapor deposition (PVD)-based epitaxy technique has been revealed to be the appropriate way for the high quality ZnO film and related alloy growths, while chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-based epitaxy technique has been proved to be the best method for the high quality GaN film and related alloy growths.

  13. ZnO Nanostructure-Based Intracellular Sensor.

    PubMed

    Asif, Muhammad H; Danielsson, Bengt; Willander, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Recently ZnO has attracted much interest because of its usefulness for intracellular measurements of biochemical species by using its semiconducting, electrochemical, catalytic properties and for being biosafe and biocompatible. ZnO thus has a wide range of applications in optoelectronics, intracellular nanosensors, transducers, energy conversion and medical sciences. This review relates specifically to intracellular electrochemical (glucose and free metal ion) biosensors based on functionalized zinc oxide nanowires/nanorods. For intracellular measurements, the ZnO nanowires/nanorods were grown on the tip of a borosilicate glass capillary (0.7 µm in diameter) and functionalized with membranes or enzymes to produce intracellular selective metal ion or glucose sensors. Successful intracellular measurements were carried out using ZnO nanowires/nanorods grown on small tips for glucose and free metal ions using two types of cells, human fat cells and frog oocytes. The sensors in this study were used to detect real-time changes of metal ions and glucose across human fat cells and frog cells using changes in the electrochemical potential at the interface of the intracellular micro-environment. Such devices are helpful in explaining various intracellular processes involving ions and glucose. PMID:26007730

  14. Self-focused ZnO transducers for ultrasonic biomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cannata, J. M.; Williams, J. A.; Zhou, Q. F.; Sun, L.; Shung, K. K.; Yu, H.; Kim, E. S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple fabrication technique was developed to produce high frequency (100 MHz) self-focused single element transducers with sputtered zinc oxide (ZnO) crystal films. This technique requires the sputtering of a ZnO film directly onto a curved backing substrate. Transducers were fabricated by sputtering an 18 μm thick ZnO layer on 2 mm diameter aluminum rods with ends shaped and polished to produce a 2 mm focus or f-number equal to one. The aluminum rod served a dual purpose as the backing layer and positive electrode for the resultant transducers. A 4 μm Parylene matching layer was deposited on the transducers after housing and interconnect. This matching layer was used to protect the substrate and condition the transfer of acoustic energy between the ZnO film and the load medium. The pulse-echo response for a representative transducer was centered at 101 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 49%. The measured two way insertion loss was 44 dB. A tungsten wire phantom and an adult zebrafish eye were imaged to show the capability of these transducers. PMID:18596925

  15. Ecotoxicity of Manufactured ZnO Nanoparticles - A Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents an exhaustive literature review on the toxicity of manufactured ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to ecological receptors across different phylum: bacteria, algae and plants, aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates and freshwater fish. Results show that the majority of s...

  16. Co doped ZnO nanowires as visible light photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šutka, Andris; Käämbre, Tanel; Pärna, Rainer; Juhnevica, Inna; Maiorov, Mihael; Joost, Urmas; Kisand, Vambola

    2016-06-01

    High aspect ratio cobalt doped ZnO nanowires showing strong photocatalytic activity and moderate ferromagnetic behaviour were successfully synthesized using a solvothermal method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities evaluated for visible light driven degradation of an aqueous methylene orange (MO) solution were higher than for Co doped ZnO nanoparticles at the same doping level and synthesized by the same synthesis route. The rate constant for MO visible light photocatalytic degradation was 1.9·10-3 min-1 in case of nanoparticles and 4.2·10-3 min-1 in case of nanowires. We observe strongly enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity for moderate Co doping levels, with an optimum at a composition of Zn0.95Co0.05O. The enhanced photocatalytic activities of Co doped ZnO nanowires were attributed to the combined effects of enhanced visible light absorption at the Co sites in ZnO nanowires, and improved separation efficiency of photogenerated charge carriers at optimal Co doping.

  17. Photoluminescence of spray pyrolysis deposited ZnO nanorods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence of highly structured ZnO layers comprising well-shaped hexagonal rods is presented. The ZnO rods (length 500-1,000 nm, diameter 100-300 nm) were grown in air onto a preheated soda-lime glass (SGL) or ITO/SGL substrate by low-cost chemical spray pyrolysis method using zinc chloride precursor solutions and growth temperatures in the range of 450-550°C. We report the effect of the variation in deposition parameters (substrate type, growth temperature, spray rate, solvent type) on the photoluminescence properties of the spray-deposited ZnO nanorods. A dominant near band edge (NBE) emission is observed at 300 K and at 10 K. High-resolution photoluminescence measurements at 10 K reveal fine structure of the NBE band with the dominant peaks related to the bound exciton transitions. It is found that all studied technological parameters affect the excitonic photoluminescence in ZnO nanorods. PACS: 78.55.Et, 81.15.Rs, 61.46.Km PMID:21711895

  18. Perovskite enhanced solid state ZnO solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, L.; Briscoe, J.; Dunn, S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper will report on the design, fabrication and testing of a solid-state perovskite enhanced ZnO solar cell. The p-type perovskite material used is bismuth ferrite (BFO) which has an absorption range within the blue range of the visible light spectrum. The solid state solar cell, was sensitized with N719 dye and used a CuSCN hole conductor. A disadvantage of ZnO is its poor chemical stability in acidic and corrosive environments. As chemical solution techniques were used in depositing BFO, a buffer method using an aminosilane ((3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane or H2N(CH2)3Si(OCH3)3)) coating was used to provide a protective coating on the ZnO nanorods before the BFO film was spin coated onto the ZnO nanorods. The photovoltaic performance of the solar cells were tested using a Keithley 2400 source meter under 100mW/cm2, AM 1.5G simulated sunlight, where improvements in Jsc and efficiency were observed. The BFO was able to harness more electrons and also acted as a buffer from electron recombination.

  19. Rapid synthesis of flower-like ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Maryam; Mahjoub, Ali Reza; Yavari, Issa; Kowsari, Elaheh

    2010-09-01

    Flower-like ZnO nanostructures were prepared via microwave assisted heating in the presence and absence of ionic liquid (IL). X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy SEM and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra have been employed for characterization of the products. The SEM image illustrates the surface of flower-like ZnO prepared in the presence of IL is not smooth and consists of nanoparticles with grain size of about 48 nm. PL spectra of flower-like ZnO in absence and presence IL reveal similar photoluminescence features: a strong UV, weak blue and green-yellow emissions peak at a bout 393 nm, 448 nm and 583 nm respectively. The strong UV photoluminescence and the weak green emission indicate the good crystallization quality of the flower-like nanostructure. The results show that imidazolium-based IL can be used as template for achieving very high level control over the size and shape of nanostructures. The approach developed in this work can potentially be used as a viable method for making various other uniform nanostructures in the presence of IL. This method is simple, fast, low-cost and suitable for large-scale production of ZnO nanostructures. PMID:21133168

  20. Aerogel tempelated ZnO dye-sensitized solar cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, T. W.; Martinson , A. B. E.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Hupp, J. T.; Materials Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition is employed to conformally coat low density, high surface area aerogel films with ZnO. The ZnO/aerogel membranes are incorporated as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, which exhibit excellent power efficiencies of up to 2.4% under 100 mW cm{sup -2} light intensity.

  1. ZnO Nanostructure-Based Intracellular Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Muhammad H.; Danielsson, Bengt; Willander, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Recently ZnO has attracted much interest because of its usefulness for intracellular measurements of biochemical species by using its semiconducting, electrochemical, catalytic properties and for being biosafe and biocompatible. ZnO thus has a wide range of applications in optoelectronics, intracellular nanosensors, transducers, energy conversion and medical sciences. This review relates specifically to intracellular electrochemical (glucose and free metal ion) biosensors based on functionalized zinc oxide nanowires/nanorods. For intracellular measurements, the ZnO nanowires/nanorods were grown on the tip of a borosilicate glass capillary (0.7 µm in diameter) and functionalized with membranes or enzymes to produce intracellular selective metal ion or glucose sensors. Successful intracellular measurements were carried out using ZnO nanowires/nanorods grown on small tips for glucose and free metal ions using two types of cells, human fat cells and frog oocytes. The sensors in this study were used to detect real-time changes of metal ions and glucose across human fat cells and frog cells using changes in the electrochemical potential at the interface of the intracellular micro-environment. Such devices are helpful in explaining various intracellular processes involving ions and glucose. PMID:26007730

  2. Synthesis of ZnO flowers and their photoluminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Changle; Qiao Xueliang Luo Langli; Li Haijun

    2008-07-01

    Flower-like ZnO nano/microstructures have been synthesized by thermal treatment of Zn(NH{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2+} precursor in aqueous solvent, using ammonia as the structure directing agent. A number of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scan electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal analysis, and photoluminescence (PL) were used to characterize the obtained ZnO structures. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements indicated that the as-synthesized ZnO structures showed UV ({approx}375 nm), blue ({approx}465 nm), and yellow ({approx}585 nm) emission bands when they were excited by a He-Gd laser using 320 nm as the excitation source. Furthermore, it has been interestingly found that the intensity of light emission at {approx}585 nm remarkably decreased when the obtained ZnO nanocrystals were annealed at 600 deg. C for 3 h in air. The reason might be the possible oxygen vacancies and interstitials in the sample decreased at high temperature.

  3. ZnO for photocatalytic air purification applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, I. V.; Suchea, M.

    2016-06-01

    Nano and micro-structured ZnO coatings onto various substrates were grown by chemical methods and optimized with respect to their photocatalytic activity against in-doors common air pollutants. Excellent quality coatings with high stability and photocatalytic efficiency were obtained with the scope to be integrated in a novel air-purification system.

  4. Self-focused ZnO transducers for ultrasonic biomicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, J. M.; Williams, J. A.; Zhou, Q. F.; Sun, L.; Shung, K. K.; Yu, H.; Kim, E. S.

    2008-04-15

    A simple fabrication technique was developed to produce high frequency (100 MHz) self-focused single element transducers with sputtered zinc oxide (ZnO) crystal films. This technique requires the sputtering of a ZnO film directly onto a curved backing substrate. Transducers were fabricated by sputtering an 18 {mu}m thick ZnO layer on 2 mm diameter aluminum rods with ends shaped and polished to produce a 2 mm focus or f-number equal to one. The aluminum rod served a dual purpose as the backing layer and positive electrode for the resultant transducers. A 4 {mu}m Parylene matching layer was deposited on the transducers after housing and interconnect. This matching layer was used to protect the substrate and condition the transfer of acoustic energy between the ZnO film and the load medium. The pulse-echo response for a representative transducer was centered at 101 MHz with a -6 dB bandwidth of 49%. The measured two way insertion loss was 44 dB. A tungsten wire phantom and an adult zebrafish eye were imaged to show the capability of these transducers.

  5. Growth Kinetics and Modeling of ZnO Nanoparticles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Penny S.; Maddox, Leone M.; Shapter, Joe G.; Voelcker, Nico H.; Ford, Michael J.; Waclawik, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The technique for producing quantum-sized zinc oxide (ZnO) particles is much safer than a technique that used hydrogen sulfide gas to produce cadmium sulfide and zinc sulfide nanoparticles. A further advantage of this method is the ability to sample the solution over time and hence determine the growth kinetics.

  6. Piezotronically modified double Schottky barriers in ZnO varistors.

    PubMed

    Raidl, Nadine; Supancic, Peter; Danzer, Robert; Hofstätter, Michael

    2015-03-25

    Double Schottky barriers in ZnO are modified piezotronically by the application of mechanical stresses. New effects such as the enhancement of the potential barrier height and the increase or decrease of the natural barrier asymmetry are presented. Also, an extended model for the piezotronic modification of double Schottky barriers is given. PMID:25655302

  7. Nanostructured Surfaces of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bressan, Eriberto; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Tocco, Ilaria; Roman, Marco; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Stellini, Edoardo; Gardin, Chiara; Ferroni, Letizia; Sivolella, Stefano; Zavan, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The structural and functional fusion of the surface of the dental implant with the surrounding bone (osseointegration) is crucial for the short and long term outcome of the device. In recent years, the enhancement of bone formation at the bone-implant interface has been achieved through the modulation of osteoblasts adhesion and spreading, induced by structural modifications of the implant surface, particularly at the nanoscale level. In this context, traditional chemical and physical processes find new applications to achieve the best dental implant technology. This review provides an overview of the most common manufacture techniques and the related cells-surface interactions and modulation. A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning nanostructuration of implant surface and their related biological interaction. In this paper, we stressed the importance of the modifications on dental implant surfaces at the nanometric level. Nowadays, there is still little evidence of the long-term benefits of nanofeatures, as the promising results achieved in vitro and in animals have still to be confirmed in humans. However, the increasing interest in nanotechnology is undoubted and more research is going to be published in the coming years. PMID:23344062

  8. Ion implanted dielectric elastomer circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Benjamin M.; Rosset, Samuel; Anderson, Iain A.; Shea, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    Starfish and octopuses control their infinite degree-of-freedom arms with panache—capabilities typical of nature where the distribution of reflex-like intelligence throughout soft muscular networks greatly outperforms anything hard, heavy, and man-made. Dielectric elastomer actuators show great promise for soft artificial muscle networks. One way to make them smart is with piezo-resistive Dielectric Elastomer Switches (DES) that can be combined with artificial muscles to create arbitrary digital logic circuits. Unfortunately there are currently no reliable materials or fabrication process. Thus devices typically fail within a few thousand cycles. As a first step in the search for better materials we present a preliminary exploration of piezo-resistors made with filtered cathodic vacuum arc metal ion implantation. DES were formed on polydimethylsiloxane silicone membranes out of ion implanted gold nano-clusters. We propose that there are four distinct regimes (high dose, above percolation, on percolation, low dose) in which gold ion implanted piezo-resistors can operate and present experimental results on implanted piezo-resistors switching high voltages as well as a simple artificial muscle inverter. While gold ion implanted DES are limited by high hysteresis and low sensitivity, they already show promise for a range of applications including hysteretic oscillators and soft generators. With improvements to implanter process control the promise of artificial muscle circuitry for soft smart actuator networks could become a reality.

  9. Auditory midbrain implant: a review.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hubert H; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI) is a new hearing prosthesis designed for stimulation of the inferior colliculus in deaf patients who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. The authors have begun clinical trials in which five patients have been implanted with a single shank AMI array (20 electrodes). The goal of this review is to summarize the development and research that has led to the translation of the AMI from a concept into the first patients. This study presents the rationale and design concept for the AMI as well a summary of the animal safety and feasibility studies that were required for clinical approval. The authors also present the initial surgical, psychophysical, and speech results from the first three implanted patients. Overall, the results have been encouraging in terms of the safety and functionality of the implant. All patients obtain improvements in hearing capabilities on a daily basis. However, performance varies dramatically across patients depending on the implant location within the midbrain with the best performer still not able to achieve open set speech perception without lip-reading cues. Stimulation of the auditory midbrain provides a wide range of level, spectral, and temporal cues, all of which are important for speech understanding, but they do not appear to sufficiently fuse together to enable open set speech perception with the currently used stimulation strategies. Finally, several issues and hypotheses for why current patients obtain limited speech perception along with several feasible solutions for improving AMI implementation are presented. PMID:19762428

  10. Therapy using implanted organic bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Amanda; Song, Zhiyang; Nilsson, David; Meyerson, Björn A.; Simon, Daniel T.; Linderoth, Bengt; Berggren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs provide their therapeutic action only at specific sites in the body, but are administered in ways that cause the drug’s spread throughout the organism. This can lead to serious side effects. Local delivery from an implanted device may avoid these issues, especially if the delivery rate can be tuned according to the need of the patient. We turned to electronically and ionically conducting polymers to design a device that could be implanted and used for local electrically controlled delivery of therapeutics. The conducting polymers in our device allow electronic pulses to be transduced into biological signals, in the form of ionic and molecular fluxes, which provide a way of interfacing biology with electronics. Devices based on conducting polymers and polyelectrolytes have been demonstrated in controlled substance delivery to neural tissue, biosensing, and neural recording and stimulation. While providing proof of principle of bioelectronic integration, such demonstrations have been performed in vitro or in anesthetized animals. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an implantable organic electronic delivery device for the treatment of neuropathic pain in an animal model. Devices were implanted onto the spinal cord of rats, and 2 days after implantation, local delivery of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was initiated. Highly localized delivery resulted in a significant decrease in pain response with low dosage and no observable side effects. This demonstration of organic bioelectronics-based therapy in awake animals illustrates a viable alternative to existing pain treatments, paving the way for future implantable bioelectronic therapeutics. PMID:26601181

  11. Auditory Midbrain Implant: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hubert H.; Lenarz, Minoo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The auditory midbrain implant (AMI) is a new hearing prosthesis designed for stimulation of the inferior colliculus in deaf patients who cannot sufficiently benefit from cochlear implants. The authors have begun clinical trials in which five patients have been implanted with a single shank AMI array (20 electrodes). The goal of this review is to summarize the development and research that has led to the translation of the AMI from a concept into the first patients. This study presents the rationale and design concept for the AMI as well a summary of the animal safety and feasibility studies that were required for clinical approval. The authors also present the initial surgical, psychophysical, and speech results from the first three implanted patients. Overall, the results have been encouraging in terms of the safety and functionality of the implant. All patients obtain improvements in hearing capabilities on a daily basis. However, performance varies dramatically across patients depending on the implant location within the midbrain with the best performer still not able to achieve open set speech perception without lip-reading cues. Stimulation of the auditory midbrain provides a wide range of level, spectral, and temporal cues, all of which are important for speech understanding, but they do not appear to sufficiently fuse together to enable open set speech perception with the currently used stimulation strategies. Finally, several issues and hypotheses for why current patients obtain limited speech perception along with several feasible solutions for improving AMI implementation are presented. PMID:19762428

  12. Why are mini-implants lost: The value of the implantation technique!

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Fabio Lourenço; Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The use of mini-implants have made a major contribution to orthodontic treatment. Demand has aroused scientific curiosity about implant placement procedures and techniques. However, the reasons for instability have not yet been made totally clear. The aim of this article is to establish a relationship between implant placement technique and mini-implant success rates by means of examining the following hypotheses: 1) Sites of poor alveolar bone and little space between roots lead to inadequate implant placement; 2) Different sites require mini-implants of different sizes! Implant size should respect alveolar bone diameter; 3) Properly determining mini-implant placement site provides ease for implant placement and contributes to stability; 4) The more precise the lancing procedures, the better the implant placement technique; 5) Self-drilling does not mean higher pressures; 6) Knowing where implant placement should end decreases the risk of complications and mini-implant loss. PMID:25741821

  13. Imaging of common breast implants and implant-related complications: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amisha T; Jankharia, Bijal B

    2016-01-01

    The number of women undergoing breast implant procedures is increasing exponentially. It is, therefore, imperative for a radiologist to be familiar with the normal and abnormal imaging appearances of common breast implants. Diagnostic imaging studies such as mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging are used to evaluate implant integrity, detect abnormalities of the implant and its surrounding capsule, and detect breast conditions unrelated to implants. Magnetic resonance imaging of silicone breast implants, with its high sensitivity and specificity for detecting implant rupture, is the most reliable modality to asses implant integrity. Whichever imaging modality is used, the overall aim of imaging breast implants is to provide the pertinent information about implant integrity, detect implant failures, and to detect breast conditions unrelated to the implants, such as cancer. PMID:27413269

  14. Influence of homo buffer layer thickness on the quality of ZnO epilayers.

    PubMed

    Eid, E A; Fouda, A N

    2015-10-01

    ZnO buffer layers with different thicknesses were deposited on a-plane sapphire substrates at 300 °C. ZnO epilayers were grown on ZnO buffers at 600 °C by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and vacuum annealed at 900 °C for an hour. Influence of nucleation layer thickness on the structural and quality of ZnO thin films was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Raman spectroscopy. The best ZnO film quality was obtained with the ZnO buffer layer of 45 nm thick which provided the smoothest surface with RMS value of 0.3 nm. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the films have a single phase wurtzite structure with (0001) preferred crystal orientation. As evident from narrow FWHM of ZnO (0002) rocking curve, ZnO buffer can serve as a good template for the growth of high-quality ZnO films with little tilt. In addition, the micro-Raman scattering measurements at room temperature revealed the existence of Raman active phonon modes of ZnO; A1(TO), A1(LO) and E2(high). The latter two modes were not observed in thin buffer layer beside the dis-appearance of E2(low) mode in all films. PMID:25950638

  15. Effect of nanocomposite packaging containing ZnO on growth of Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Esmailzadeh, Hakimeh; Sangpour, Parvaneh; Shahraz, Farzaneh; Hejazi, Jalal; Khaksar, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have opened new windows in active food packaging. Nano-sized ZnO is an inexpensive material with potential antimicrobial properties. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the antibacterial effect of low density Polyethylene (LDPE) containing ZnO nanoparticles on Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter aerogenes. ZnO nanoparticles have been synthesized by facil molten salt method and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite films containing 2 and 4 wt.% ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by melt mixing in a twin-screw extruder. The growth of both microorganisms has decreased in the presence of ZnO containing nanocomposites compared with controls. Nanocomposites with 4 wt.% ZnO nanoparticles had stronger antibacterial effect against both bacteria in comparison with the 2 wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites. B. subtilis as Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to ZnO containing nanocomposite films compared with E. aerogenes as Gram-negative bacteria. There were no significant differences between the migration of Zn ions from 2 and 4 wt.% ZnO containing nanocomposites and the released Zn ions were not significantly increased in both groups after 14 days compared with the first. Regarding the considerable antibacterial effects of ZnO nanoparticles, their application in active food packaging can be a suitable solution for extending the shelf life of food. PMID:26478403

  16. Photocorrosion inhibition and enhancement of photocatalytic activity for ZnO via hybridization with C60.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hongbo; Xu, Tongguang; Zhu, Shengbao; Zhu, Yongfa

    2008-11-01

    C60 molecules with monomolecular layer state dispersed on the surface of ZnO and formed the hybridized interaction between ZnO and C60. C60-hybridized ZnO photocatalyst showed enhanced photocatalytic activity for the degradation of the organic dye and the photocorrosion of ZnO was successfully inhibited bythe hybridization of C60 molecules. The photocorrosion inhibition of ZnO by C60 molecule could be attributed to the reduced activation of surface oxygen atom. The enhanced photocatalytic activity for C60-hybridized ZnO was originated from the high migration efficiency of photoinduced electrons on the interface of C60 and ZnO, which was produced by the interaction of C60 and ZnO with a conjugative pi-system. The enhancement degree of photocatalytic activity was strongly depended on the coverage of C60 molecules on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles, and the optimum hybridization effect was found at a weight ratio of 1.5% (C60/ZnO). The hybridization of C60 with semiconductors could be used to improve the photocatalytic activity as well as the photostability. PMID:19031903

  17. The growth of porous ZnO nanowires by thermal oxidation of ZnS nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Wen-Tai; Wu, Kuen-Hsien

    2011-12-01

    The growth of porous ZnO nanowires (NWs) via phase transformation of ZnS NWs at 500-850 degrees C in air was studied. The ZnS NWs were first synthesized by thermal evaporation of ZnS powder at 1100 degrees C in Ar. On subsequent annealing at 500 degrees C in air, discrete ZnO epilayers formed on the surface of ZnS NWs. At 600 degrees C, polycrystalline ZnO and the crack along the (0001) interface between the ZnO epilayer and ZnS NW were observed. At 700-750 degrees C ZnS NWs transformed to ZnO NWs, meanwhile nanopores and interfacial cracks were observed in the ZnO NWs. Two factors, the evaporation of SO2 and SO3 and the stress induced by the incompatible structure at the interface of ZnO epilayer and ZnS NW, can be responsible for the formation of porous ZnO NWs from ZnS NW templates on annealing at 700-750 degrees C in air. Rapid growth of ZnO at 850 degrees C could heal the pores and cracks and thus resulted in the well-crystallized ZnO NWs. PMID:22409083

  18. The Antibacterial Activity of Ta-doped ZnO Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bing-Lei; Han, Ping; Guo, Li-Chuan; Cao, Yan-Qiang; Li, Ai-Dong; Kong, Ji-Zhou; Zhai, Hai-Fa; Wu, Di

    2015-08-01

    A novel photocatalyst of Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles was prepared by a modified Pechini-type method. The antimicrobial study of Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles on several bacteria of Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis ( B. subtilis) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus) and Gram-negative Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) were performed using a standard microbial method. The Ta-doping concentration effect on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of various bacteria under dark ambient has been evaluated. The photocatalytical inactivation of Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles under visible light irradiation was examined. The MIC results indicate that the incorporation of Ta5+ ions into ZnO significantly improve the bacteriostasis effect of ZnO nanoparticles on E. coli, S. aureus, and B. subtilis in the absence of light. Compared to MIC results without light irradiation, Ta-doped ZnO and pure ZnO nanoparticles show much stronger bactericidal efficacy on P. aeruginosa, E. coli, and S. aureus under visible light illumination. The possible antimicrobial mechanisms in Ta-doped ZnO systems under visible light and dark conditions were also proposed. Ta-doped ZnO nanoparticles exhibit more effective bactericidal efficacy than pure ZnO in dark ambient, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of enhanced surface bioactivity and increased electrostatic force due to the incorporation of Ta5+ ions into ZnO. Based on the antibacterial tests, 5 % Ta-doped ZnO is a more effective antimicrobial agent than pure ZnO.

  19. Electronic structure of Co-doped ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neffati, Ahmed; Souissi, Hajer; Kammoun, Souha

    2012-10-01

    The optical transmission spectra, the photoluminescence (PL), and the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of the cobalt doped zinc oxide nanorods Zn1-xCoxO (x = 0.01, 0.10) were measured by Loan et al. [J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 42, 065412 (2009)] in the region 1.5-4 eV. These spectra exhibit a group of ultraviolet narrow lines in the region of 3.0-3.4 eV related to the near-band-edge emission of the host ZnO materials and a group of emission lines in the red region of 1.8-1.9 eV assigned to the radiative transitions within the tetrahedral Co2+ ions in the ZnO host crystal. The group of lines in the visible region provides important information about the electronic structure of the cobalt doped zinc oxide nanorods. This work investigates a theoretical crystal-field analysis of the visible lines associated to the Co2+ ion transition occupying a Td site symmetry in ZnO host crystal. A satisfactory correlations were obtained between experimental and calculated energy levels. The electronic structure was compared with the reported for cobalt transition ion doped in ZnO nanoparticles and bulk crystals [Volbers et al., Appl. Phys. A 88, 153 (2007) and H. J. Schulz and M. Thiede, Phys. Rev. B 35, 18 (1987)]. In order to explain the existence of excitation peaks observed near the band edge of the ZnO host, an energy transfer mechanism is proposed.

  20. Zn2NF and Related Analogues of ZnO.

    PubMed

    Lingampalli, Srinivasa Rao; Manjunath, Krishnappa; Shenoy, Sandhya; Waghmare, Umesh V; Rao, C N R

    2016-07-01

    Substitution of aliovalent N(3-) and F(-) anions in place of O(2-) in ZnO brings about major changes in the electronic structure and properties, the composition, even with 10 atomic percent or less of the two anions, rendering the material yellow colored with a much smaller band gap. We have examined the variation of band gap of ZnO with progressive substitution of N and F and more importantly prepared Zn2NF which is the composition one obtains ultimately upon complete replacement of O(2-) ions. In this article, we present the results of a first complete study of the crystal and electronic structures as well as of properties of a stable metal nitride fluoride, Zn2NF. This material occurs in two crystal forms, tetragonal and orthorhombic, both with a band gap much smaller than that of ZnO. Electronic structures of Zn2NF as well as ZnO0.2N0.5F0.3 investigated by first-principles calculations show that the valence bands of these are dominated by the N (2p) states lying at the top. Interestingly, the latter is a p-type material, a property that has been anticipated for long time. The calculations predict conduction and valence band edges in Zn2NF to be favorable for water splitting. Zn2NF does indeed exhibit good visible-light-induced hydrogen evolution activity unlike ZnO. The present study demonstrates how aliovalent anion substitution can be employed for tuning band gaps of materials. PMID:27299368

  1. Repeatability of Radiotracer Uptake in Normal Abdominal Organs with 111In-Pentetreotide Quantitative SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven P.; Vicente, Esther; Anizan, Nadège; Wang, Hao; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Lodge, Martin A.; Frey, Eric C.; Wahl, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    With an increasing emphasis on quantitation of SPECT imaging and its use in dosimetry to guide therapies, it is desirable to understand the repeatability in normal-organ SPECT uptake values (SPECT-UVs). We investigated the variability of normal abdominal organ uptake in repeated 111In-pentetreotide SPECT studies. Methods Nine patients with multiple 111In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT studies for clinical purposes were evaluated. Volumes of interest were drawn for the abdominal organs and applied to SPECT-UVs. The variability of those values was assessed. Results The average SPECT-UV for the liver (1.7 ± 0.6) was much lower than for the kidneys (right, 8.0 ± 2.4; left, 7.5 ± 1.7). Interpatient and intrapatient variability was similar (intraclass correlation coefficients, 0.40–0.59) for all organs. The average coefficients of variation for each organ for each patient were obtained and averaged across all patients (0.26 for liver, 0.22 for right kidney, and 0.20 for left kidney). The coefficients of variation for the organs across all scans were 0.33 (liver), 0.30 (right kidney), and 0.22 (left kidney). Conclusion Variability across all patients and all scans for the liver was higher than reported with 18F-FDG PET, though left kidney variability was similar to PET liver variability and left kidney uptake may be able to serve as an internal metric for determining the quantifiability of an 111In-pentetreotide SPECT study. PMID:25977467

  2. Ohmic-Rectifying Conversion of Ni Contacts on ZnO and the Possible Determination of ZnO Thin Film Surface Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Kim Guan; Tneh, Sau Siong; Tan, Gaik Leng; Yam, Fong Kwong; Ng, Sha Shiong; Hassan, Zainuriah

    2014-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of Ni contacts with the surfaces of ZnO thin films as well as single crystal (0001) ZnO substrate are investigated. The ZnO thin film shows a conversion from Ohmic to rectifying behavior when annealed at 800°C. Similar findings are also found on the Zn-polar surface of (0001) ZnO. The O-polar surface, however, only shows Ohmic behavior before and after annealing. The rectifying behavior observed on the Zn-polar and ZnO thin film surfaces is associated with the formation of nickel zinc oxide (Ni1-xZnxO, where x = 0.1, 0.2). The current-voltage characteristics suggest that a p-n junction is formed by Ni1-xZnxO (which is believed to be p-type) and ZnO (which is intrinsically n-type). The rectifying behavior for the ZnO thin film as a result of annealing suggests that its surface is Zn-terminated. Current-voltage measurements could possibly be used to determine the surface polarity of ZnO thin films. PMID:24466144

  3. Synthesis, structural and optical properties of pure ZnO and Co doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by the co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, P. Geetha; Velu, A. Sakthi

    2016-09-01

    Pure ZnO and Cobalt (Co) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Co doped ZnO NPs showed Spherical and nanorod mixed phase and Spherical like morphology, respectively. The amount of dopant (Co2+) incorporated into ZnO sample was determined by EDAX. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 438 and 427 cm-1 for ZnO and Co doped ZnO NPs. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurements, the excitonic pecks were found around 376 and 370 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of seven different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Zeta potential measurements were used to find out the size and surface charges.

  4. Synthesis, structural and optical properties of pure ZnO and Co doped ZnO nanoparticles prepared by the co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, P. Geetha; Velu, A. Sakthi

    2016-05-01

    Pure ZnO and Cobalt (Co) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Co doped ZnO NPs showed Spherical and nanorod mixed phase and Spherical like morphology, respectively. The amount of dopant (Co2+) incorporated into ZnO sample was determined by EDAX. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 438 and 427 cm-1 for ZnO and Co doped ZnO NPs. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurements, the excitonic pecks were found around 376 and 370 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of seven different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) and Zeta potential measurements were used to find out the size and surface charges.

  5. Effect of ZnO seed layer on the morphology and optical properties of ZnO nanorods grown on GaN buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, R. Mohan, S. Major, S. S.; Srinivasa, R. S.

    2014-04-24

    ZnO nanorods were grown by chemical bath deposition on sputtered, polycrystalline GaN buffer layers with and without ZnO seed layer. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction show that the ZnO nanorods on GaN buffer layers are not vertically well aligned. Photoluminescence spectrum of ZnO nanorods grown on GaN buffer layer, however exhibits a much stronger near-band-edge emission and negligible defect emission, compared to the nanorods grown on ZnO buffer layer. These features are attributed to gallium incorporation at the ZnO-GaN interface. The introduction of a thin (25 nm) ZnO seed layer on GaN buffer layer significantly improves the morphology and vertical alignment of ZnO-NRs without sacrificing the high optical quality of ZnO nanorods on GaN buffer layer. The presence of a thick (200 nm) ZnO seed layer completely masks the effect of the underlying GaN buffer layer on the morphology and optical properties of nanorods.

  6. Biomechanical load analysis of cantilevered implant systems.

    PubMed

    Osier, J F

    1991-01-01

    Historically, dental implants have been placed in areas where quality bone exists. The maxillary sinus areas and mandibular canal proximities have been avoided. From these placements, various cantilevered prosthetic applications have emerged. This analysis uses static engineering principles to define the loads (i.e., forces) placed upon the implants. These principles make use of Newton's first and third laws of mechanics by summing the forces and moments to zero. These summations then generate mathematical equations and their algebraic solutions. Three implant systems are analyzed. The first is a two-implant system. The second is a three-implant cross-arch stabilized system usually found in mandibular replacements of lower full dentures. The third is a five-implant system which is identical to the three-implant cantilevered system but which uses implants in the first molar area, thereby negating the cantilevered load magnification of the three-implant design. These analyses demonstrate that, in a cantilevered application, the implant closest to the point of load application (usually the most posterior implant) takes the largest compressive load. Implants opposite the load application (generally the anterior implant) are in tension. These loads on the implants are normally magnified over the biting force and can easily reach 2 1/2 to five times the biting load. PMID:1942131

  7. The Phenomenology of Ion Implantation-Induced Blistering and Thin-Layer Splitting in Compound Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Christiansen, S. H.; Moutanabbir, O.; Gösele, U.

    2010-10-01

    Hydrogen and/or helium implantation-induced surface blistering and layer splitting in compound semiconductors such as InP, GaAs, GaN, AlN, and ZnO are discussed. The blistering phenomenon depends on many parameters such as the semiconductor material, ion fluence, ion energy, and implantation temperature. The optimum values of these parameters for compound semiconductors are presented. The blistering and splitting processes in silicon have been studied in detail, motivated by the fabrication of the widely used silicon-on-insulator wafers. Hence, a comparison of the blistering process in Si and compound semiconductors is also presented. This comparative study is technologically relevant since ion implantation-induced layer splitting combined with direct wafer bonding in principle allows the transfer of any type of semiconductor layer onto any foreign substrate of choice—the technique is known as the ion-cut or Smart-Cut™ method. For the aforementioned compound semiconductors, investigations regarding layer transfer using the ion-cut method are still in their infancy. We report feasibility studies of layer transfer by the ion-cut method for some of the most important and widely used compound semiconductors. The importance of characteristic values for successful wafer bonding such as wafer bow and surface flatness as well as roughness are discussed, and difficulties in achieving some of these values are pointed out.

  8. Pediatric cochlear implant candidacy issues.

    PubMed

    Osberger, M J; Chute, P M; Pope, M L; Kessler, K S; Carotta, C C; Firszt, J B; Zimmerman-Phillips, S

    1991-01-01

    Children with progressive sensorineural hearing impairment represent a special challenge to the audiologist and the otologist. These are patients with some residual auditory abilities that deteriorate with time as the hearing loss progresses. No doubt, the unnecessary implantation of an ear that significantly benefits from amplification needs to be avoided at all costs. By the same token however, there appears to be no advantage to waiting an inordinate amount of time after the loss of functional auditory abilities before recommending implantation. At times when a complete loss is predictable, implantation may be advantageous before the onset of complete auditory deprivation. Steps the clinicians should take to manage these patients effectively are briefly summarized below: Implementation of rigorous and frequent audiologic monitoring. If, for instance, a significant progressive loss of hearing has occurred over a 6-month period, resulting in a complete absence of open-set speech recognition abilities in the auditory-alone mode with appropriate hearing aids, it is probably counterproductive to wait to the point of a complete absence of aided speech detection. Implantation at a critical point in time will prevent complete auditory deprivation. Parental counseling concerning various management strategies, such as use of vibrotactile devices, changing communication skills, and issues involving cochlear implants need to be undertaken early. Parents need to be involved in every phase of the evaluation process because they are the ones who make the final decision concerning the implantation of their child. Relatively early implantation should be considered in light of what is known concerning the effects of disruption in a child's linguistic, cognitive, and emotional development resulting from complete auditory deprivation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2069195

  9. Drug-eluting medical implants.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Kraitzer, Amir; Grinberg, Orly; Elsner, Jonathan J

    2010-01-01

    Drug-eluting medical implants are actually active implants that induce healing effects, in addition to their regular task of support. This effect is achieved by controlled release of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) into the surrounding tissue. In this chapter we focus on three types of drug-eluting devices: drug-eluting vascular stents, drug-eluting wound dressings and protein-eluting scaffolds for tissue regeneration, thus describing both internal and external implants. Each of these drug-eluting devices also presents an approach for solving the drug release issue. Most drug-eluting vascular stents are loaded with water-insoluble antiproliferative agents, and their diffusion from the device to the surrounding tissue is relatively slow. In contrast, most drug-eluting wound dressings are loaded with highly water-soluble antibacterial agents and the issue of fast release must therefore be addressed. Growth factor release from scaffolds for tissue regeneration offers a new approach of incorporating high-molecular-weight bioactive agents which are very sensitive to process conditions and preserve their activity during the preparation stage. The drug-eluting medical implants are described here in terms of matrix formats and polymers, incorporated drugs and their release profiles from the implants, and implant functioning. Basic elements, such as new composite core/shell fibers and structured films, can be used to build new antibiotic-eluting devices. As presented in this chapter, the effect of the processing parameters on the microstructure and the resulting drug release profiles, mechanical and physical properties, and other relevant properties, must be elucidated in order to achieve the desired properties. Newly developed implants and novel modifications of previously developed approaches have enhanced the tools available for creating clinically important biomedical applications. PMID:20217535

  10. Fundamental understanding of the growth, doping and characterization of aligned ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Gang

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a II-VI semiconductor whose wide direct bandgap (3.37 eV) and large exciton binding energy (60 meV) make it compelling for optoelectronic devices such as light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, solar cells, and mechanical energy harvesting devices. One dimensional structures of ZnO (nanowires) have become significant due to their unique physical properties arising from quantum confinement, and they are ideal for studying transport mechanisms in one-dimensional systems. In this doctoral research work, ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays were synthesized on sapphire substrates through carbo-thermal reduction of ZnO powders, and the effects of growth parameters on the properties of ZnO NW arrays were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Based on the phonon mode selection rules in wurtzite ZnO, confocal Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the alignment of ZnO NWs in an array, thereby complementing X-ray diffraction. Al doped ZnO NW arrays were achieved by mixing Al powder into the ZnO and graphite source mixture, and the presence of Al was confirmed by Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The incorporation of Al had the effects of lowering the electrical resistivity, slightly deteriorating crystal quality and suppressing defect related green emission. Two models of ZnO NW growth were developed by establishing the relationship between NW length and diameter for undoped and Al doped ZnO NWs separately. The growth of undoped ZnO NWs followed the diffusion-induced model which was characterized by thin wires being longer than thick wires, while the growth of Al doped ZnO was controlled by Gibbs-Thomson effect which was characterized by thin wires being shorter than thin wires. Local electrode atom probe analysis of ZnO NWs was carried out to study the crystal stoichiometry and Al incorporation. Undoped ZnO NWs were found to be high purity with no detectable impurities

  11. Synthesis of nano-dimensional ZnO and Ga doped ZnO thin films by vapor phase transport and study as transparent conducting oxide.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Saurav, M; Pandey, B; Srivastava, P

    2008-05-01

    We report synthesis of polycrystalline ZnO and Ga doped ZnO (ZnO:Ga) thin films (approximately 80 nm) on Si and quartz substrates in a non-vacuum muffle furnace, a simple and cost-effective route, without any catalyst/reactive carrier gases, at relatively low processing temperature of 550 degrees C. The crystalline phases of the films are identified by grazing angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD). The growth of ZnO films is examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM) as a function of deposition time. An optical transmission of approximately 90% is observed for pure ZnO film having a resistivity of approximately 2.1 Omega-cm as measured by van der Pauw technique. Doping with Ga results in single phase ZnO:Ga films, retaining an optical transmission of about 80% and three orders of magnitude decrease in resistivity as compared to pure ZnO film. PMID:18572702

  12. Risk factors affecting dental implant survival.

    PubMed

    Vehemente, Valerie A; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Daher, Shadi; Muftu, Ali; Dodson, Thomas B

    2002-01-01

    Given the predictability of dental implant success, the attention of the scientific community is moving from descriptions of implant success toward a more detailed analysis of factors associated with implant failure. The purposes of this study were (1) to estimate the 1- and 5-year survival of Bicon dental implants and (2) to identify risk factors associated with implant failure in an objective, statistically valid manner. To address the research purposes, we used a retrospective cohort study design and a study sample composed of patients who had one or more implants placed. The predictor variables were grouped into the following categories: demographic, health status, anatomic, implant fixture-specific, prosthetic, perioperative, and ancillary variables. The major outcome variable of interest was implant failure defined as implant removal. Overall implant survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. Risk factors for implant failure were identified using the Cox proportional hazard regression models. The study sample was composed of 677 patients who had 677 implants randomly selected for analysis. The overall 1- and 5-year survival of the Bicon implant system was 95.2% and 90.2%, respectively. After adjusting for other covariates in a multivariate model, both tobacco use (P = .0004) and single-stage implant placement (P = .01) were statistically associated with an increased risk for failure. The results of these analyses suggest that the overall survival of the Bicon dental implant is comparable with other current implant systems. In addition, after controlling for covariates, we identified 2 exposures associated with implant survival, tobacco use and implant staging. Of interest, both of these exposures are under the clinician's control. PMID:12498449

  13. Multicomponent Implant Releasing Dexamethasone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, L.; Vapalahti, K.; Ashammakhi, N.

    2008-02-01

    Several inflammatory conditions are usually treated with corticosteroids. There are various problems like side effects with traditional applications of steroids, e.g. topical, or systemic routes. Local drug delivery systems have been studied and developed to gain more efficient administration with fewer side effects. Earlier, we reported on developing Dexamethasone (DX) releasing biodegradable fibers. However, their drug release properties were not satisfactory in terms of onset of drug release. Thus, we assessed the development of multicomponent (MC) implant to enhance earlier drug release from such biodegradable fibers. Poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and 2 wt-% and 8 wt-% DX were compounded and extruded with twin-screw extruder to form of fibers. Some of the fibers were sterilized to obtain a change in drug release properties. Four different fiber classes were studied: 2 wt-%, 8 wt-%, sterilized 2 wt-%, and sterilized 8 wt-%. 3×4 different DX-releasing fibers were then heat-pressed to form one multicomponent rod. Half of the rods where sterilized. Drug release was measured from initial fibers and multicomponent rods using a UV/VIS spectrometer. Shear strength and changes in viscosity were also measured. Drug release studies showed that drug release commenced earlier from multicomponent rods than from component fibers. Drug release from multicomponent rods lasted from day 30 to day 70. The release period of sterilized rods extended from day 23 to day 57. When compared to the original component fibers, the drug release from MC rods commenced earlier. The initial shear strength of MC rods was 135 MPa and decreased to 105 MPa during four weeks of immersion in phosphate buffer solution. Accordingly, heat pressing has a positive effect on drug release. After four weeks in hydrolysis, no disintegration was observed.

  14. Biomimetic implant coatings.

    PubMed

    Eisenbarth, E; Velten, D; Breme, J

    2007-02-01

    Biomaterials and tissue engineering technologies are becoming increasingly important in biomedical practice, particularly as the population ages. Cellular responses depend on topographical properties of the biomaterial at the nanometer scale. Structures on biomaterial surfaces are used as powerful tools to influence or even control interactions between implants and the biological system [; ]. The influence of nanometer sized surface structures on osteoblastlike cell interactions was tested with niobium oxide coatings on polished titanium slices (cp-Ti grade 2). The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of nanoscopic surface structures on osteoblast interactions in order to support collagen I production and cell adhesion. The coatings were done by means of the sol-gel process. The surface structure was adjusted by annealing of the metaloxide ceramic coatings due to temperature depended crystal growth. The applied annealing temperatures were 450, 550 and 700 degrees C for 1 h, corresponding to Ra-numbers of 7, 15 and 40 nm. The surfaces were characterized by means of AFM, DTA/TG, diffractometry and white light interferometry. The cell reactions were investigated concerning adhesion kinetics, migration, spreading, cell adhesion, and collagen I synthesis. The smooth surface (Ra=7 nm) resulted in the fastest cell anchorage and cell migration. The closest cell adhesion was reached with the surface structure of Ra=15 nm. The roughest surface (Ra=40 nm) impedes the cell migration as well as a proper spreading of the cells. The best results concerning cell adhesion and spreading was reached with an intermediate surface roughness of Ra=15 nm of the niobium oxide coating on cp-titanium slices. PMID:16828342

  15. Investigation on plasma immersion ion implantation treated medical implants.

    PubMed

    Mändl, S; Sader, R; Thorwarth, G; Krause, D; Zeilhofer, H-F; Horch, H H; Rauschenbach, B

    2002-08-01

    In this work the biocompatibility of osteosynsthesis plates treated with plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was tested using a rat model. Small rods (Ø 0.9 mm, and length 10 mm) prepared from different materials-pure Ti, anodised Ti, and two NiTi alloys (SE 508, and SM 495)-were implanted with oxygen by PIII to form a rutile surface layer and subsequently inserted into rat femurs, together with a control group of untreated samples. The results of the biomechanical tests correlate with the histological results, and show that plasma immersion ion implantation leads to an increase of biocompatibility and osseointegration of titanium and NiTi, albeit no improvement of the (bad) biocompatibility of the anodised Ti. Despite the layer thickness of up to 0.5 microm a strong influence of the base material is still present. PMID:12202173

  16. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of Mn-doped ZnO column arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mei; Guo, Zhixing; Qiu, Kehui; Long, Jianping; Yin, Guangfu; Guan, Denggao; Liu, Sutian; Zhou, Shijie

    2010-04-01

    Mn-doped ZnO column arrays were successfully synthesized by conventional sol-gel process. Effect of Mn/Zn atomic ratio and reaction time were investigated, and the morphology, tropism and optical properties of Mn-doped ZnO column arrays were characterized by SEM, XRD and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The result shows that a Mn/Zn atomic ratio of 0.1 and growth time of 12 h are the optimal condition for the preparation of densely distributed ZnO column arrays. XRD analysis shows that Mn-doped ZnO column arrays are highly c-axis oriented. As for Mn-doped ZnO column arrays, obvious increase of photoluminescence intensity is observed at the wavelength of ˜395 nm and ˜413 nm, compared to pure ZnO column arrays.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonally patterned quasi-1D ZnO nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) ZnO nanowire arrays with hexagonal pattern have been successfully synthesized via the vapor transport process without any metal catalyst. By utilizing polystyrene microsphere self-assembled monolayer, sol–gel-derived ZnO thin films were used as the periodic nucleation sites for the growth of ZnO nanowires. High-quality quasi-1D ZnO nanowires were grown from nucleation sites, and the original hexagonal periodicity is well-preserved. According to the experimental results, the vapor transport solid condensation mechanism was proposed, in which the sol–gel-derived ZnO film acting as a seed layer for nucleation. This simple method provides a favorable way to form quasi-1D ZnO nanostructures applicable to diverse fields such as two-dimensional photonic crystal, nanolaser, sensor arrays, and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:24521308

  19. Application of Eu2O3/ZnO nanoparticles in dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Manveen; Verma, N. K.

    2013-06-01

    The synthesis of ZnO, Eu2O3 coated ZnO nanoparticles and their application in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been reported. The synthesized samples have been characterized by XRD and the diffraction of crystal plane (222) of Eu2O3 was detected, demonstrating the existence of Eu2O3 on the surface of ZnO3, which has also been verified through EDAX. Compared to ZnO electrodes, Eu2O3 coated ZnO electrodes adsorbed more dye. Eu2O3 coating on ZnO forms an energy barrier, which suppresses the charge recombination. Consequently, the photoelectrochemical properties of the modified electrodes improved and the overall energy conversion efficiency η increased from 0.21% to 0.61% under the illumination of simulated light of 100mW/cm2.

  20. Atomic layer deposition of ZnO on Cu-nanoclusters for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Ziyu; Patterson, Matthew; Ren Maoming; Wang Ying; Flake, John C.; Sprunger, Phillip T.; Kurtz, Richard L.

    2013-01-15

    The properties of ALD-grown ZnO thin films on Cu clusters supported on ZnO(1010) have been studied with scanning tunneling and scanning electron microscopy in combination with angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Deposition at room temperature of two monolayers of Cu on ZnO(1010) results in metallic Cu{sup 0} clusters {approx}8 nm wide by 1.4 nm high. Higher coverages of 15 ML results in a similar morphology, with slightly larger cluster sizes. Following air-exposure and ALD-growth of two cycles of ZnO, the Cu exhibits Cu{sup +} species characteristic of Cu{sub 2}O and the thin ZnO coating is hydroxylated. Electrochemical studies of ALD ZnO coatings on Cu suggest that they are more active for CO{sub 2} reduction.