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Sample records for 124-plex snp typing

  1. A robust SNP barcode for typing Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Francesc; McNerney, Ruth; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Glynn, Judith R.; Perdigão, João; Viveiros, Miguel; Portugal, Isabel; Pain, Arnab; Martin, Nigel; Clark, Taane G.

    2014-01-01

    Strain-specific genomic diversity in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) is an important factor in pathogenesis that may affect virulence, transmissibility, host response and emergence of drug resistance. Several systems have been proposed to classify MTBC strains into distinct lineages and families. Here, we investigate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as robust (stable) markers of genetic variation for phylogenetic analysis. We identify ~92k SNP across a global collection of 1,601 genomes. The SNP-based phylogeny is consistent with the gold-standard regions of difference (RD) classification system. Of the ~7k strain-specific SNPs identified, 62 markers are proposed to discriminate known circulating strains. This SNP-based barcode is the first to cover all main lineages, and classifies a greater number of sublineages than current alternatives. It may be used to classify clinical isolates to evaluate tools to control the disease, including therapeutics and vaccines whose effectiveness may vary by strain type. PMID:25176035

  2. Imputation of KIR Types from SNP Variation Data.

    PubMed

    Vukcevic, Damjan; Traherne, James A; Næss, Sigrid; Ellinghaus, Eva; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Dilthey, Alexander; Lathrop, Mark; Karlsen, Tom H; Franke, Andre; Moffatt, Miriam; Cookson, William; Trowsdale, John; McVean, Gil; Sawcer, Stephen; Leslie, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Large population studies of immune system genes are essential for characterizing their role in diseases, including autoimmune conditions. Of key interest are a group of genes encoding the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which have known and hypothesized roles in autoimmune diseases, resistance to viruses, reproductive conditions, and cancer. These genes are highly polymorphic, which makes typing expensive and time consuming. Consequently, despite their importance, KIRs have been little studied in large cohorts. Statistical imputation methods developed for other complex loci (e.g., human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) on the basis of SNP data provide an inexpensive high-throughput alternative to direct laboratory typing of these loci and have enabled important findings and insights for many diseases. We present KIR∗IMP, a method for imputation of KIR copy number. We show that KIR∗IMP is highly accurate and thus allows the study of KIRs in large cohorts and enables detailed investigation of the role of KIRs in human disease. PMID:26430804

  3. Imputation of KIR Types from SNP Variation Data

    PubMed Central

    Vukcevic, Damjan; Traherne, James A.; Næss, Sigrid; Ellinghaus, Eva; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Dilthey, Alexander; Lathrop, Mark; Karlsen, Tom H.; Franke, Andre; Moffatt, Miriam; Cookson, William; Trowsdale, John; McVean, Gil; Sawcer, Stephen; Leslie, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Large population studies of immune system genes are essential for characterizing their role in diseases, including autoimmune conditions. Of key interest are a group of genes encoding the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which have known and hypothesized roles in autoimmune diseases, resistance to viruses, reproductive conditions, and cancer. These genes are highly polymorphic, which makes typing expensive and time consuming. Consequently, despite their importance, KIRs have been little studied in large cohorts. Statistical imputation methods developed for other complex loci (e.g., human leukocyte antigen [HLA]) on the basis of SNP data provide an inexpensive high-throughput alternative to direct laboratory typing of these loci and have enabled important findings and insights for many diseases. We present KIR∗IMP, a method for imputation of KIR copy number. We show that KIR∗IMP is highly accurate and thus allows the study of KIRs in large cohorts and enables detailed investigation of the role of KIRs in human disease. PMID:26430804

  4. Typing SNP based on the near-infrared spectroscopy and artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Li; Wang, Wei-Peng; Gao, Yu-Zhen; Yu, Xiao-Wei; Xie, Hong-Ping

    2009-07-01

    Based on the near-infrared spectra (NIRS) of the measured samples as the discriminant variables of their genotypes, the genotype discriminant model of SNP has been established by using back-propagation artificial neural network (BP-ANN). Taking a SNP (857G > A) of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) as an example, DNA fragments containing the SNP site were amplified by the PCR method based on a pair of primers to obtain the three-genotype (GG, AA, and GA) modeling samples. The NIRS-s of the amplified samples were directly measured in transmission by using quartz cell. Based on the sample spectra measured, the two BP-ANN-s were combined to obtain the stronger ability of the three-genotype classification. One of them was established to compress the measured NIRS variables by using the resilient back-propagation algorithm, and another network established by Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm according to the compressed NIRS-s was used as the discriminant model of the three-genotype classification. For the established model, the root mean square error for the training and the prediction sample sets were 0.0135 and 0.0132, respectively. Certainly, this model could rightly predict the three genotypes (i.e. the accuracy of prediction samples was up to100%) and had a good robust for the prediction of unknown samples. Since the three genotypes of SNP could be directly determined by using the NIRS-s without any preprocessing for the analyzed samples after PCR, this method is simple, rapid and low-cost.

  5. SNP-VISTA

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nameeta; Teplitsky, Michael; Minovitsky, Simon; Dubchak, Inna

    2005-11-07

    SNP-VISTA aids in analyses of the following types of data: A. Large-scale re-sequence data of disease-related genes for discovery of associated and/or causative alleles (GeneSNP-VISTA). B. Massive amounts of ecogenomics data for studying homologous recombination in microbial populations (EcoSNP-VISTA). The main features and capabilities of SNP-VISTA are: 1) Mapping of SNPs to gene structure; 2) classification of SNPs, based on their location in the gene, frequency of occurrence in samples and allele composition; 3) clustering, based on user-defined subsets of SNPs, highlighting haplotypes as well as recombinant sequences; 4) integration of protein conservation visualization; and 5) display of automatically calculated recombination points that are user-editable. The main strength of SNP-VISTA is its graphical interface and use of visual representations, which support interactive exploration and hence better understanding of large-scale SNPs data.

  6. High-throughput bacterial SNP typing identifies distinct clusters of Salmonella Typhi causing typhoid in Nepalese children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) causes typhoid fever, which remains an important public health issue in many developing countries. Kathmandu, the capital of Nepal, is an area of high incidence and the pediatric population appears to be at high risk of exposure and infection. Methods We recently defined the population structure of S. Typhi, using new sequencing technologies to identify nearly 2,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that can be used as unequivocal phylogenetic markers. Here we have used the GoldenGate (Illumina) platform to simultaneously type 1,500 of these SNPs in 62 S. Typhi isolates causing severe typhoid in children admitted to Patan Hospital in Kathmandu. Results Eight distinct S. Typhi haplotypes were identified during the 20-month study period, with 68% of isolates belonging to a subclone of the previously defined H58 S. Typhi. This subclone was closely associated with resistance to nalidixic acid, with all isolates from this group demonstrating a resistant phenotype and harbouring the same resistance-associated SNP in GyrA (Phe83). A secondary clone, comprising 19% of isolates, was observed only during the second half of the study. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the utility of SNP typing for monitoring bacterial populations over a defined period in a single endemic setting. We provide evidence for genotype introduction and define a nalidixic acid resistant subclone of S. Typhi, which appears to be the dominant cause of severe pediatric typhoid in Kathmandu during the study period. PMID:20509974

  7. SNP-VISTA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-11-07

    SNP-VISTA aids in analyses of the following types of data: A. Large-scale re-sequence data of disease-related genes for discovery of associated and/or causative alleles (GeneSNP-VISTA). B. Massive amounts of ecogenomics data for studying homologous recombination in microbial populations (EcoSNP-VISTA). The main features and capabilities of SNP-VISTA are: 1) Mapping of SNPs to gene structure; 2) classification of SNPs, based on their location in the gene, frequency of occurrence in samples and allele composition; 3) clustering,more » based on user-defined subsets of SNPs, highlighting haplotypes as well as recombinant sequences; 4) integration of protein conservation visualization; and 5) display of automatically calculated recombination points that are user-editable. The main strength of SNP-VISTA is its graphical interface and use of visual representations, which support interactive exploration and hence better understanding of large-scale SNPs data.« less

  8. Association of rs5888 SNP in the scavenger receptor class B type 1 gene and serum lipid levels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bai Ku Yao is a special subgroup of the Yao minority in China. The present study was undertaken to detect the association of rs5888 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SCARB1) gene and several environmental factors with serum lipid levels in the Guangxi Bai Ku Yao and Han populations. Methods A total of 598 subjects of Bai Ku Yao and 585 subjects of Han Chinese were randomly selected from our stratified randomized cluster samples. Genotypes of the SCARB1 rs5888 SNP were determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism combined with gel electrophoresis, and then confirmed by direct sequencing. Results The levels of total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), apolipoprotein (Apo) AI were lower but ApoB was higher in Bai Ku Yao than in Han (P < 0.05-0.001). The frequencies of C and T alleles were 78.3% and 21.7% in Bai Ku Yao, and 73.7% and 26.3% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The frequencies of CC, CT and TT genotypes were 60.0%, 36.6% and 3.4% in Bai Ku Yao, and 54.2%, 39.0% and 6.8% in Han (P < 0.01); respectively. The subjects with TT genotype in both ethnic groups had lower HDL-C and ApoAI levels than the subjects with CC or CT genotype (P < 0.05 for all). Subgroup analyses showed that the subjects with TT genotype in Bai Ku Yao had lower HDL-C and ApoAI levels in males than the subjects with CC or CT genotype (P < 0.05 for all), and the T allele carriers had higher TC, LDL-C and ApoB levels in females than the T allele noncarriers (P < 0.05 for all). The participants with TT genotype in Han also had a lower tendency of HDL-C and ApoAI levels in males than the participants with CC or CT genotype, but the difference did not reach statistically significant (P = 0.063 and P = 0.086; respectively). The association of serum HDL-C and ApoAI levels and genotypes was confirmed by

  9. Eight New Genomes and Synthetic Controls Increase the Accessibility of Rapid Melt-MAMA SNP Typing of Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Byström, Mona; Forsman, Mats; Frangoulidis, Dimitrios; Janse, Ingmar; Larsson, Pär; Lindgren, Petter; Öhrman, Caroline; van Rotterdam, Bart; Sjödin, Andreas; Myrtennäs, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The case rate of Q fever in Europe has increased dramatically in recent years, mainly because of an epidemic in the Netherlands in 2009. Consequently, there is a need for more extensive genetic characterization of the disease agent Coxiella burnetii in order to better understand the epidemiology and spread of this disease. Genome reference data are essential for this purpose, but only thirteen genome sequences are currently available. Current methods for typing C. burnetii are criticized for having problems in comparing results across laboratories, require the use of genomic control DNA, and/or rely on markers in highly variable regions. We developed in this work a method for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing of C. burnetii isolates and tissue samples based on new assays targeting ten phylogenetically stable synonymous canonical SNPs (canSNPs). These canSNPs represent previously known phylogenetic branches and were here identified from sequence comparisons of twenty-one C. burnetii genomes, eight of which were sequenced in this work. Importantly, synthetic control templates were developed, to make the method useful to laboratories lacking genomic control DNA. An analysis of twenty-one C. burnetii genomes confirmed that the species exhibits high sequence identity. Most of its SNPs (7,493/7,559 shared by >1 genome) follow a clonal inheritance pattern and are therefore stable phylogenetic typing markers. The assays were validated using twenty-six genetically diverse C. burnetii isolates and three tissue samples from small ruminants infected during the epidemic in the Netherlands. Each sample was assigned to a clade. Synthetic controls (vector and PCR amplified) gave identical results compared to the corresponding genomic controls and are viable alternatives to genomic DNA. The results from the described method indicate that it could be useful for cheap and rapid disease source tracking at non-specialized laboratories, which requires accurate genotyping

  10. SNP genotyping by DNA photoligation: application to SNP detection of genes from food crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Yoshinaga; Ohtake, Tomoko; Okada, Hajime; Ami, Takehiro; Tsukaguchi, Tadashi; Fujimoto, Kenzo

    2009-06-01

    We describe a simple and inexpensive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing method, using DNA photoligation with 5-carboxyvinyl-2'-deoxyuridine and two fluorophores. This SNP-typing method facilitates qualitative determination of genes from indica and japonica rice, and showed a high degree of single nucleotide specificity up to 10 000. This method can be used in the SNP typing of actual genomic DNA samples from food crops.

  11. SNP-VISTA: An interactive SNP visualization tool

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nameeta; Teplitsky, Michael V; Minovitsky, Simon; Pennacchio, Len A; Hugenholtz, Philip; Hamann, Bernd; Dubchak, Inna L

    2005-01-01

    Background Recent advances in sequencing technologies promise to provide a better understanding of the genetics of human disease as well as the evolution of microbial populations. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are established genetic markers that aid in the identification of loci affecting quantitative traits and/or disease in a wide variety of eukaryotic species. With today's technological capabilities, it has become possible to re-sequence a large set of appropriate candidate genes in individuals with a given disease in an attempt to identify causative mutations. In addition, SNPs have been used extensively in efforts to study the evolution of microbial populations, and the recent application of random shotgun sequencing to environmental samples enables more extensive SNP analysis of co-occurring and co-evolving microbial populations. The program is available at [1]. Results We have developed and present two modifications of an interactive visualization tool, SNP-VISTA, to aid in the analyses of the following types of data: A. Large-scale re-sequence data of disease-related genes for discovery of associated and/or causative alleles (GeneSNP-VISTA). B. Massive amounts of ecogenomics data for studying homologous recombination in microbial populations (EcoSNP-VISTA). The main features and capabilities of SNP-VISTA are: 1) mapping of SNPs to gene structure; 2) classification of SNPs, based on their location in the gene, frequency of occurrence in samples and allele composition; 3) clustering, based on user-defined subsets of SNPs, highlighting haplotypes as well as recombinant sequences; 4) integration of protein evolutionary conservation visualization; and 5) display of automatically calculated recombination points that are user-editable. Conclusion The main strength of SNP-VISTA is its graphical interface and use of visual representations, which support interactive exploration and hence better understanding of large-scale SNP data by the user. PMID

  12. Electrochemical detection of type 2 diabetes mellitus-related SNP via DNA-mediated growth of silver nanoparticles on single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jia; Zhao, Peng; Zheng, Jing; Wu, Cuichen; Shi, Muling; Li, Jishan; Li, Yinhui; Yang, Ronghua

    2015-11-01

    Herein, we proposed a new electrochemical sensing strategy for T2DM-related SNP detection via DNA-mediated growth of AgNPs on a SWCNT-modified electrode. Coupled with RNase HII enzyme assisted amplification, this approach could realize T2DM-related SNP assay and be applied in crude extracts of carcinoma pancreatic β-cell lines. PMID:26365891

  13. Genome-wide detection of CNVs in Chinese indigenous sheep with different types of tails using ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Caiye; Fan, Hongying; Yuan, Zehu; Hu, Shijin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Junli; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Li; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Fuping; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chinese indigenous sheep can be classified into three types based on tail morphology: fat-tailed, fat-rumped, and thin-tailed sheep, of which the typical breeds are large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, respectively. To unravel the genetic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences among Chinese indigenous sheep with tails of three different types, we used ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays to detect genome-wide copy number variation (CNV). In large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, 371, 301, and 66 CNV regions (CNVRs) with lengths of 71.35 Mb, 51.65 Mb, and 10.56 Mb, respectively, were identified on autosomal chromosomes. Ten CNVRs were randomly chosen for confirmation, of which eight were successfully validated. The detected CNVRs harboured 3130 genes, including genes associated with fat deposition, such as PPARA, RXRA, KLF11, ADD1, FASN, PPP1CA, PDGFA, and PEX6. Moreover, multilevel bioinformatics analyses of the detected candidate genes were significantly enriched for involvement in fat deposition, GTPase regulator, and peptide receptor activities. This is the first high-resolution sheep CNV map for Chinese indigenous sheep breeds with three types of tails. Our results provide valuable information that will support investigations of genomic structural variation underlying traits of interest in sheep. PMID:27282145

  14. Genome-wide detection of CNVs in Chinese indigenous sheep with different types of tails using ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Caiye; Fan, Hongying; Yuan, Zehu; Hu, Shijin; Ma, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Junli; Wang, Hongwei; Zhang, Li; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Fuping; Du, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chinese indigenous sheep can be classified into three types based on tail morphology: fat-tailed, fat-rumped, and thin-tailed sheep, of which the typical breeds are large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, respectively. To unravel the genetic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic differences among Chinese indigenous sheep with tails of three different types, we used ovine high-density 600K SNP arrays to detect genome-wide copy number variation (CNV). In large-tailed Han sheep, Altay sheep, and Tibetan sheep, 371, 301, and 66 CNV regions (CNVRs) with lengths of 71.35 Mb, 51.65 Mb, and 10.56 Mb, respectively, were identified on autosomal chromosomes. Ten CNVRs were randomly chosen for confirmation, of which eight were successfully validated. The detected CNVRs harboured 3130 genes, including genes associated with fat deposition, such as PPARA, RXRA, KLF11, ADD1, FASN, PPP1CA, PDGFA, and PEX6. Moreover, multilevel bioinformatics analyses of the detected candidate genes were significantly enriched for involvement in fat deposition, GTPase regulator, and peptide receptor activities. This is the first high-resolution sheep CNV map for Chinese indigenous sheep breeds with three types of tails. Our results provide valuable information that will support investigations of genomic structural variation underlying traits of interest in sheep. PMID:27282145

  15. Localization of Type 1 Diabetes susceptibility in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 by high density SNP mapping.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose Luis; Li, Wentian; Lee, Annette; Martinez, Alfonso; Chandrasekaran, Alamelu; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Khalili, Houman; de la Concha, Emilio G; Urcelay, Elena; Gregersen, Peter K

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the ancestral haplotype 18.2 (AH18.2) carries additional susceptibility gene to Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) on the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). We analyzed 10 DR3/TNFa1b5 homozygous subjects in order to establish the conservation of the AH18.2 and then compared this conserved region with other DR3 haplotype, the AH8.1. The Illumina's HumanHap550 Bead chip was used to perform an extensive genotyping of the MHC region. The AH18.2 was highly conserved between DDR1 and HLA-DQA1 genes; therefore most probably the second susceptibility gene is located within this region. We can exclude the region centromeric to HLA-DRA gene and telomeric to DDR1 gene. A comparison between the AH18.2 and AH8.1 haplotypes showed that 233 SNPs were different in the aforementioned conserved region. These data suggest that the 1.65 Mb MHC region between DDR1 and HLA-DRA genes is likely to carry additional susceptibility alleles for T1D on the AH18.2 haplotype. PMID:19591919

  16. Peopling of the North Circumpolar Region – Insights from Y Chromosome STR and SNP Typing of Greenlanders

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Jill Katharina; Pereira, Vania; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The human population in Greenland is characterized by migration events of Paleo- and Neo-Eskimos, as well as admixture with Europeans. In this study, the Y-chromosomal variation in male Greenlanders was investigated in detail by typing 73 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs). Approximately 40% of the analyzed Greenlandic Y chromosomes were of European origin (I-M170, R1a-M513 and R1b-M343). Y chromosomes of European origin were mainly found in individuals from the west and south coasts of Greenland, which is in agreement with the historic records of the geographic placements of European settlements in Greenland. Two Inuit Y-chromosomal lineages, Q-M3 (xM19, M194, L663, SA01 and L766) and Q-NWT01 (xM265) were found in 23% and 31% of the male Greenlanders, respectively. The time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of the Q-M3 lineage of the Greenlanders was estimated to be between 4,400 and 10,900 years ago (y. a.) using two different methods. This is in agreement with the theory that the North Circumpolar Region was populated via a second expansion of humans in the North American continent. The TMRCA of the Q-NWT01 (xM265) lineage in Greenland was estimated to be between 7,000 and 14,300 y. a. using two different methods, which is older than the previously reported TMRCA of this lineage in other Inuit populations. Our results indicate that Inuit individuals carrying the Q-NWT01 (xM265) lineage may have their origin in the northeastern parts of North America and could be descendants of the Dorset culture. This in turn points to the possibility that the current Inuit population in Greenland is comprised of individuals of both Thule and Dorset descent. PMID:25635810

  17. Use of SNP array analysis to identify a novel TRIM32 mutation in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H.

    PubMed

    Cossée, Mireille; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Seguela, Claire; Mohr, Michel; Leturcq, France; Gundesli, Hulya; Chelly, Jamel; Tranchant, Christine; Koenig, Michel; Mandel, Jean-Louis

    2009-04-01

    Molecular diagnosis of monogenic diseases with high genetic heterogeneity is usually challenging. In the case of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, multiplex Western blot analysis is a very useful initial step, but that often fails to identify the primarily affected protein. We report how homozygosity analysis using a genome-wide SNP array allowed us to solve the diagnostic enigma in a patient with a moderate form of LGMD, born from consanguineous parents. The genome-wide scan performed on the patient's DNA revealed several regions of homozygosity, that were compared to the location of known LGMD genes. One such region indeed contained the TRIM32 gene. This gene was previously found mutated in families with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2H (LGMD2H), a mild autosomal recessive myopathy described in Hutterite populations and in 4 patients with a diagnosis of sarcotubular myopathy. A single missense mutation was found in all these patients, located in a conserved domain of the C-terminal part of the protein. Another missense mutation affecting the N-terminal part of TRIM32, observed in a single consanguineous Bedouin family, was reported to cause the phenotypically unrelated and genetically heterogeneous Bardet-Biedl syndrome, defining the BBS11 locus. Sequencing of TRIM32 in our patient revealed a distal frameshift mutation, c.1753_1766dup14 (p.Ile590Leu fsX38). Together with two recently reported mutations, this novel mutation confirms that integrity of the C-terminal domain of TRIM32 is necessary for muscle maintenance. PMID:19303295

  18. SNP panels/Imputation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participants from thirteen countries discussed services that Interbull can perform or recommendations that Interbull can make to promote harmonization and assist member countries in improving their genomic evaluations in regard to SNP panels and imputation. The panel recommended: A mechanism to shar...

  19. Development of ARMS-PCR assay for genotyping of Pro12Ala SNP of PPARG gene: a cost effective way for case-control studies of type 2 diabetes in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mehboob; Awan, Fazli Rabbi; Baig, Shahid Mahmood

    2014-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a prevalent metabolic disorder across the globe. Research is underway on various aspects including genetics to understand and control the global epidemic of diabetes. Recently, several SNPs in various genes have been associated with T2D. These association studies are mainly carried out in the developed countries through Genome Wide Association Scans, with follow-up replication/validation studies by high-throughput genotyping techniques (e.g. Taqman Technology). Although, similar studies could be conducted in developing countries, however, the limiting factors are the associated cost and expertise. These factors hamper research into the genetic association and replication studies from low-income countries to figure out the role of putatively associated SNPs in diabetes. Although, there are several SNP detection methods (e.g. Taqman assay, Dot-blot, PCR-RFLP, DGGE, SSCP) but these are either expensive or labor intensive or less sensitive. Hence, our aim was to develop a low-cost method for the validation of PPARG (Pro12Ala, CCA>GCA) SNP (rs1801282) for its association with T2D. Here, we developed a cost-effective and rapid amplification refractory mutation specific-PCR (ARMS-PCR) method for this SNP detection. We successfully genotyped PPARG SNPs (Pro12Ala) in human samples and the validity of this method was confirmed by DNA sequencing of a few representative samples for the three different genotypes. Furthermore, ARMS-PCR was applied to T2D patients and control samples for the screening of this SNP. PMID:25063576

  20. Temple syndrome: A patient with maternal hetero-UPD14, mixed iso- and hetero-disomy detected by SNP microarray typing of patient-father duos.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Hye; Cho, Eunhae; Lee, Cha Gon

    2016-08-01

    Temple syndrome (TS, MIM 616222) is an imprinting disorder involving genes within the imprinted region of chromosome 14q32. TS is a genetically complex disorder, which is associated with maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14 (UPD14), paternal deletions on chromosome 14, or loss of methylation at the intergenic differentially methylated region (IG-DMR). Here, we describe the case of a patient with maternal hetero-UPD14, mixed iso-/hetero-disomy mechanism identified by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analysis of patient-father duos study. The phenotype of our case is similarities to Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) during infancy and to Russell-Silver syndrome (RSS) during childhood. This SNP array appears to be an effective initial screening tool for patients with nonspecific clinical features suggestive of chromosomal disorders. PMID:26867509

  1. SNPConvert: SNP Array Standardization and Integration in Livestock Species

    PubMed Central

    Nicolazzi, Ezequiel Luis; Marras, Gabriele; Stella, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    One of the main advantages of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array technology is providing genotype calls for a specific number of SNP markers at a relatively low cost. Since its first application in animal genetics, the number of available SNP arrays for each species has been constantly increasing. However, conversely to that observed in whole genome sequence data analysis, SNP array data does not have a common set of file formats or coding conventions for allele calling. Therefore, the standardization and integration of SNP array data from multiple sources have become an obstacle, especially for users with basic or no programming skills. Here, we describe the difficulties related to handling SNP array data, focusing on file formats, SNP allele coding, and mapping. We also present SNPConvert suite, a multi-platform, open-source, and user-friendly set of tools to overcome these issues. This tool, which can be integrated with open-source and open-access tools already available, is a first step towards an integrated system to standardize and integrate any type of raw SNP array data. The tool is available at: https://github. com/nicolazzie/SNPConvert.git. PMID:27600083

  2. SNPConvert: SNP Array Standardization and Integration in Livestock Species.

    PubMed

    Nicolazzi, Ezequiel Luis; Marras, Gabriele; Stella, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    One of the main advantages of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array technology is providing genotype calls for a specific number of SNP markers at a relatively low cost. Since its first application in animal genetics, the number of available SNP arrays for each species has been constantly increasing. However, conversely to that observed in whole genome sequence data analysis, SNP array data does not have a common set of file formats or coding conventions for allele calling. Therefore, the standardization and integration of SNP array data from multiple sources have become an obstacle, especially for users with basic or no programming skills. Here, we describe the difficulties related to handling SNP array data, focusing on file formats, SNP allele coding, and mapping. We also present SNPConvert suite, a multi-platform, open-source, and user-friendly set of tools to overcome these issues. This tool, which can be integrated with open-source and open-access tools already available, is a first step towards an integrated system to standardize and integrate any type of raw SNP array data. The tool is available at: https://github. com/nicolazzie/SNPConvert.git. PMID:27600083

  3. Exhaustive Genome-Wide Search for SNP-SNP Interactions Across 10 Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Murk, William; DeWan, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    The identification of statistical SNP-SNP interactions may help explain the genetic etiology of many human diseases, but exhaustive genome-wide searches for these interactions have been difficult, due to a lack of power in most datasets. We aimed to use data from the Resource for Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) study to search for SNP-SNP interactions associated with 10 common diseases. FastEpistasis and BOOST were used to evaluate all pairwise interactions among approximately N = 300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.15, for the dichotomous outcomes of allergic rhinitis, asthma, cardiac disease, depression, dermatophytosis, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hemorrhoids, hypertensive disease, and osteoarthritis. A total of N = 45,171 subjects were included after quality control steps were applied. These data were divided into discovery and replication subsets; the discovery subset had > 80% power, under selected models, to detect genome-wide significant interactions (P < 10(-12)). Interactions were also evaluated for enrichment in particular SNP features, including functionality, prior disease relevancy, and marginal effects. No interaction in any disease was significant in both the discovery and replication subsets. Enrichment analysis suggested that, for some outcomes, interactions involving SNPs with marginal effects were more likely to be nominally replicated, compared to interactions without marginal effects. If SNP-SNP interactions play a role in the etiology of the studied conditions, they likely have weak effect sizes, involve lower-frequency variants, and/or involve complex models of interaction that are not captured well by the methods that were utilized. PMID:27185397

  4. Exhaustive Genome-Wide Search for SNP-SNP Interactions Across 10 Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Murk, William; DeWan, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of statistical SNP-SNP interactions may help explain the genetic etiology of many human diseases, but exhaustive genome-wide searches for these interactions have been difficult, due to a lack of power in most datasets. We aimed to use data from the Resource for Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) study to search for SNP-SNP interactions associated with 10 common diseases. FastEpistasis and BOOST were used to evaluate all pairwise interactions among approximately N = 300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 0.15, for the dichotomous outcomes of allergic rhinitis, asthma, cardiac disease, depression, dermatophytosis, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, hemorrhoids, hypertensive disease, and osteoarthritis. A total of N = 45,171 subjects were included after quality control steps were applied. These data were divided into discovery and replication subsets; the discovery subset had > 80% power, under selected models, to detect genome-wide significant interactions (P < 10−12). Interactions were also evaluated for enrichment in particular SNP features, including functionality, prior disease relevancy, and marginal effects. No interaction in any disease was significant in both the discovery and replication subsets. Enrichment analysis suggested that, for some outcomes, interactions involving SNPs with marginal effects were more likely to be nominally replicated, compared to interactions without marginal effects. If SNP-SNP interactions play a role in the etiology of the studied conditions, they likely have weak effect sizes, involve lower-frequency variants, and/or involve complex models of interaction that are not captured well by the methods that were utilized. PMID:27185397

  5. A Bayesian Framework for SNP Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Havre, Susan L.; Payne, Deborah A.

    2005-07-01

    Current proteomics techniques, such as mass spectrometry, focus on protein identification, usually ignoring most types of modifications beyond post-translational modifications, with the assumption that only a small number of peptides have to be matched to a protein for a positive identification. However, not all proteins are being identified with current techniques and improved methods to locate points of mutation are becoming a necessity. In the case when single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are observed, brute force is the most common method to locate them, quickly becoming computationally unattractive as the size of the database associated with the model organism grows. We have developed a Bayesian model for SNPs, BSNP, incorporating evolutionary information at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Formulating SNPs as a Bayesian inference problem allows probabilities of interest to be easily obtained, for example the probability of a specific SNP or specific type of mutation over a gene or entire genome. Three SNP databases were observed in the evaluation of the BSNP model; the first SNP database is a disease specific gene in human, hemoglobin, the second is also a disease specific gene in human, p53, and the third is a more general SNP database for multiple genes in mouse. We validate that the BSNP model assigns higher posterior probabilities to the SNPs defined in all three separate databases than can be attributed to chance under specific evolutionary information, for example the amino acid model described by Majewski and Ott in conjunction with either the four-parameter nucleotide model by Bulmer or seven-parameter nucleotide model by Majewski and Ott.

  6. pfSNP: An integrated potentially functional SNP resource that facilitates hypotheses generation through knowledge syntheses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingbo; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Chong, Samuel S; Lee, Caroline G L

    2011-01-01

    Currently, >14,000,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are reported. Identifying phenotype-affecting SNPs among these many SNPs pose significant challenges. Although several Web resources are available that can inform about the functionality of SNPs, these resources are mainly annotation databases and are not very comprehensive. In this article, we present a comprehensive, well-annotated, integrated pfSNP (potentially functional SNPs) Web resource (http://pfs.nus.edu.sg/), which is aimed to facilitate better hypothesis generation through knowledge syntheses mediated by better data integration and a user-friendly Web interface. pfSNP integrates >40 different algorithms/resources to interrogate >14,000,000 SNPs from the dbSNP database for SNPs of potential functional significance based on previous published reports, inferred potential functionality from genetic approaches as well as predicted potential functionality from sequence motifs. Its query interface has the user-friendly "auto-complete, prompt-as-you-type" feature and is highly customizable, facilitating different combination of queries using Boolean-logic. Additionally, to facilitate better understanding of the results and aid in hypotheses generation, gene/pathway-level information with text clouds highlighting enriched tissues/pathways as well as detailed-related information are also provided on the results page. Hence, the pfSNP resource will be of great interest to scientists focusing on association studies as well as those interested to experimentally address the functionality of SNPs. PMID:20672376

  7. SNP genotyping by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Paniego, Norma; Fusari, Corina; Lia, Verónica; Puebla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Heteroduplex-based genotyping methods have proven to be technologically effective and economically efficient for low- to medium-range throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) determination. In this chapter we describe two protocols that were successfully applied for SNP detection and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in association studies. The protocols involve (1) enzymatic mismatch cleavage with endonuclease CEL1 from celery, associated with fragment separation using capillary electrophoresis (CEL1 cleavage), and (2) differential retention of the homo/heteroduplex DNA molecules under partial denaturing conditions on ion pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Both methods are complementary since dHPLC is more versatile than CEL1 cleavage for identifying multiple SNP per target region, and the latter is easily optimized for sequences with fewer SNPs or small insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Besides, CEL1 cleavage is a powerful method to localize the position of the mutation when fragment resolution is done using capillary electrophoresis. PMID:25373754

  8. The utility of high-resolution melting analysis of SNP nucleated PCR amplicons--an MLST based Staphylococcus aureus typing scheme.

    PubMed

    Lilliebridge, Rachael A; Tong, Steven Y C; Giffard, Philip M; Holt, Deborah C

    2011-01-01

    High resolution melting (HRM) analysis is gaining prominence as a method for discriminating DNA sequence variants. Its advantage is that it is performed in a real-time PCR device, and the PCR amplification and HRM analysis are closed tube, and effectively single step. We have developed an HRM-based method for Staphylococcus aureus genotyping. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were derived from the S. aureus multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) database on the basis of maximized Simpson's Index of Diversity. Only G↔A, G↔T, C↔A, C↔T SNPs were considered for inclusion, to facilitate allele discrimination by HRM. In silico experiments revealed that DNA fragments incorporating the SNPs give much higher resolving power than randomly selected fragments. It was shown that the predicted optimum fragment size for HRM analysis was 200 bp, and that other SNPs within the fragments contribute to the resolving power. Six DNA fragments ranging from 83 bp to 219 bp, incorporating the resolution optimized SNPs were designed. HRM analysis of these fragments using 94 diverse S. aureus isolates of known sequence type or clonal complex (CC) revealed that sequence variants are resolved largely in accordance with G+C content. A combination of experimental results and in silico prediction indicates that HRM analysis resolves S. aureus into 268 "melt types" (MelTs), and provides a Simpson's Index of Diversity of 0.978 with respect to MLST. There is a high concordance between HRM analysis and the MLST defined CCs. We have generated a Microsoft Excel key which facilitates data interpretation and translation between MelT and MLST data. The potential of this approach for genotyping other bacterial pathogens was investigated using a computerized approach to estimate the densities of SNPs with unlinked allelic states. The MLST databases for all species tested contained abundant unlinked SNPs, thus suggesting that high resolving power is not dependent upon large numbers of SNPs

  9. Linkage mapping bovine EST-based SNP

    PubMed Central

    Snelling, Warren M; Casas, Eduardo; Stone, Roger T; Keele, John W; Harhay, Gregory P; Bennett, Gary L; Smith, Timothy PL

    2005-01-01

    Background Existing linkage maps of the bovine genome primarily contain anonymous microsatellite markers. These maps have proved valuable for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) to broad regions of the genome, but more closely spaced markers are needed to fine-map QTL, and markers associated with genes and annotated sequence are needed to identify genes and sequence variation that may explain QTL. Results Bovine expressed sequence tag (EST) and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)sequence data were used to develop 918 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to map genes on the bovine linkage map. DNA of sires from the MARC reference population was used to detect SNPs, and progeny and mates of heterozygous sires were genotyped. Chromosome assignments for 861 SNPs were determined by twopoint analysis, and positions for 735 SNPs were established by multipoint analyses. Linkage maps of bovine autosomes with these SNPs represent 4585 markers in 2475 positions spanning 3058 cM . Markers include 3612 microsatellites, 913 SNPs and 60 other markers. Mean separation between marker positions is 1.2 cM. New SNP markers appear in 511 positions, with mean separation of 4.7 cM. Multi-allelic markers, mostly microsatellites, had a mean (maximum) of 216 (366) informative meioses, and a mean 3-lod confidence interval of 3.6 cM Bi-allelic markers, including SNP and other marker types, had a mean (maximum) of 55 (191) informative meioses, and were placed within a mean 8.5 cM 3-lod confidence interval. Homologous human sequences were identified for 1159 markers, including 582 newly developed and mapped SNP. Conclusion Addition of these EST- and BAC-based SNPs to the bovine linkage map not only increases marker density, but provides connections to gene-rich physical maps, including annotated human sequence. The map provides a resource for fine-mapping quantitative trait loci and identification of positional candidate genes, and can be integrated with other data to guide and

  10. Detection of copy number variation by SNP-allelotyping.

    PubMed

    Parker, Brett; Alexander, Ryan; Wu, Xingyao; Feely, Shawna; Shy, Michael; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Li, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is caused by an abnormal copy number variation (CNV) with a trisomy of chromosome 17p12. The increase of the DNA-segment copy number is expected to alter the allele frequency of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the duplicated region. We tested whether SNP allele frequency determined by a Sequenom MassArray can be used to detect the CMT1A mutation. Our results revealed distinct patterns of SNP allele frequency distribution, which reliably differentiated CMT1A patients from controls. This finding suggests that this technique may serve as an alternative approach to identifying CNV in certain diseases, including CMT1A. PMID:24830919

  11. A 48 SNP set for grapevine cultivar identification

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rapid and consistent genotyping is an important requirement for cultivar identification in many crop species. Among them grapevine cultivars have been the subject of multiple studies given the large number of synonyms and homonyms generated during many centuries of vegetative multiplication and exchange. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers have been preferred until now because of their high level of polymorphism, their codominant nature and their high profile repeatability. However, the rapid application of partial or complete genome sequencing approaches is identifying thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) that can be very useful for such purposes. Although SNP markers are bi-allelic, and therefore not as polymorphic as microsatellites, the high number of loci that can be multiplexed and the possibilities of automation as well as their highly repeatable results under any analytical procedure make them the future markers of choice for any type of genetic identification. Results We analyzed over 300 SNP in the genome of grapevine using a re-sequencing strategy in a selection of 11 genotypes. Among the identified polymorphisms, we selected 48 SNP spread across all grapevine chromosomes with allele frequencies balanced enough as to provide sufficient information content for genetic identification in grapevine allowing for good genotyping success rate. Marker stability was tested in repeated analyses of a selected group of cultivars obtained worldwide to demonstrate their usefulness in genetic identification. Conclusions We have selected a set of 48 stable SNP markers with a high discrimination power and a uniform genome distribution (2-3 markers/chromosome), which is proposed as a standard set for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) genotyping. Any previous problems derived from microsatellite allele confusion between labs or the need to run reference cultivars to identify allele sizes disappear using this type of marker. Furthermore, because SNP

  12. SNP-SNP interactions in breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Onay, Venüs Ümmiye; Briollais, Laurent; Knight, Julia A; Shi, Ellen; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wells, Sean; Li, Hong; Rajendram, Isaac; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2006-01-01

    Background Breast cancer predisposition genes identified to date (e.g., BRCA1 and BRCA2) are responsible for less than 5% of all breast cancer cases. Many studies have shown that the cancer risks associated with individual commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are incremental. However, polygenic models suggest that multiple commonly occurring low to modestly penetrant SNPs of cancer related genes might have a greater effect on a disease when considered in combination. Methods In an attempt to identify the breast cancer risk conferred by SNP interactions, we have studied 19 SNPs from genes involved in major cancer related pathways. All SNPs were genotyped by TaqMan 5'nuclease assay. The association between the case-control status and each individual SNP, measured by the odds ratio and its corresponding 95% confidence interval, was estimated using unconditional logistic regression models. At the second stage, two-way interactions were investigated using multivariate logistic models. The robustness of the interactions, which were observed among SNPs with stronger functional evidence, was assessed using a bootstrap approach, and correction for multiple testing based on the false discovery rate (FDR) principle. Results None of these SNPs contributed to breast cancer risk individually. However, we have demonstrated evidence for gene-gene (SNP-SNP) interaction among these SNPs, which were associated with increased breast cancer risk. Our study suggests cross talk between the SNPs of the DNA repair and immune system (XPD-[Lys751Gln] and IL10-[G(-1082)A]), cell cycle and estrogen metabolism (CCND1-[Pro241Pro] and COMT-[Met108/158Val]), cell cycle and DNA repair (BARD1-[Pro24Ser] and XPD-[Lys751Gln]), and within carcinogen metabolism (GSTP1-[Ile105Val] and COMT-[Met108/158Val]) pathways. Conclusion The importance of these pathways and their communication in breast cancer predisposition has been emphasized previously, but their biological interactions

  13. QuantiSNP: an Objective Bayes Hidden-Markov Model to detect and accurately map copy number variation using SNP genotyping data.

    PubMed

    Colella, Stefano; Yau, Christopher; Taylor, Jennifer M; Mirza, Ghazala; Butler, Helen; Clouston, Penny; Bassett, Anne S; Seller, Anneke; Holmes, Christopher C; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2007-01-01

    Array-based technologies have been used to detect chromosomal copy number changes (aneuploidies) in the human genome. Recent studies identified numerous copy number variants (CNV) and some are common polymorphisms that may contribute to disease susceptibility. We developed, and experimentally validated, a novel computational framework (QuantiSNP) for detecting regions of copy number variation from BeadArray SNP genotyping data using an Objective Bayes Hidden-Markov Model (OB-HMM). Objective Bayes measures are used to set certain hyperparameters in the priors using a novel re-sampling framework to calibrate the model to a fixed Type I (false positive) error rate. Other parameters are set via maximum marginal likelihood to prior training data of known structure. QuantiSNP provides probabilistic quantification of state classifications and significantly improves the accuracy of segmental aneuploidy identification and mapping, relative to existing analytical tools (Beadstudio, Illumina), as demonstrated by validation of breakpoint boundaries. QuantiSNP identified both novel and validated CNVs. QuantiSNP was developed using BeadArray SNP data but it can be adapted to other platforms and we believe that the OB-HMM framework has widespread applicability in genomic research. In conclusion, QuantiSNP is a novel algorithm for high-resolution CNV/aneuploidy detection with application to clinical genetics, cancer and disease association studies. PMID:17341461

  14. BM-SNP: A Bayesian Model for SNP Calling Using High Throughput Sequencing Data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanxun; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Yuan; Estecio, Marcos R; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Qiu, Peng; Ji, Yuan; Liang, Shoudan

    2014-01-01

    A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is a sole base change in the DNA sequence and is the most common polymorphism. Detection and annotation of SNPs are among the central topics in biomedical research as SNPs are believed to play important roles on the manifestation of phenotypic events, such as disease susceptibility. To take full advantage of the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, we propose a Bayesian approach, BM-SNP, to identify SNPs based on the posterior inference using NGS data. In particular, BM-SNP computes the posterior probability of nucleotide variation at each covered genomic position using the contents and frequency of the mapped short reads. The position with a high posterior probability of nucleotide variation is flagged as a potential SNP. We apply BM-SNP to two cell-line NGS data, and the results show a high ratio of overlap ( >95 percent) with the dbSNP database. Compared with MAQ, BM-SNP identifies more SNPs that are in dbSNP, with higher quality. The SNPs that are called only by BM-SNP but not in dbSNP may serve as new discoveries. The proposed BM-SNP method integrates information from multiple aspects of NGS data, and therefore achieves high detection power. BM-SNP is fast, capable of processing whole genome data at 20-fold average coverage in a short amount of time. PMID:26357041

  15. Detecting Susceptibility to Breast Cancer with SNP-SNP Interaction Using BPSOHS and Emotional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Peng, Qinke; Fan, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Studies for the association between diseases and informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have received great attention. However, most of them just use the whole set of useful SNPs and fail to consider the SNP-SNP interactions, while these interactions have already been proven in biology experiments. In this paper, we use a binary particle swarm optimization with hierarchical structure (BPSOHS) algorithm to improve the effective of PSO for the identification of the SNP-SNP interactions. Furthermore, in order to use these SNP interactions in the susceptibility analysis, we propose an emotional neural network (ENN) to treat SNP interactions as emotional tendency. Different from the normal architecture, just as the emotional brain, this architecture provides a specific path to treat the emotional value, by which the SNP interactions can be considered more quickly and directly. The ENN helps us use the prior knowledge about the SNP interactions and other influence factors together. Finally, the experimental results prove that the proposed BPSOHS_ENN algorithm can detect the informative SNP-SNP interaction and predict the breast cancer risk with a much higher accuracy than existing methods. PMID:27294121

  16. Detecting Susceptibility to Breast Cancer with SNP-SNP Interaction Using BPSOHS and Emotional Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Fan, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Studies for the association between diseases and informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have received great attention. However, most of them just use the whole set of useful SNPs and fail to consider the SNP-SNP interactions, while these interactions have already been proven in biology experiments. In this paper, we use a binary particle swarm optimization with hierarchical structure (BPSOHS) algorithm to improve the effective of PSO for the identification of the SNP-SNP interactions. Furthermore, in order to use these SNP interactions in the susceptibility analysis, we propose an emotional neural network (ENN) to treat SNP interactions as emotional tendency. Different from the normal architecture, just as the emotional brain, this architecture provides a specific path to treat the emotional value, by which the SNP interactions can be considered more quickly and directly. The ENN helps us use the prior knowledge about the SNP interactions and other influence factors together. Finally, the experimental results prove that the proposed BPSOHS_ENN algorithm can detect the informative SNP-SNP interaction and predict the breast cancer risk with a much higher accuracy than existing methods. PMID:27294121

  17. SNP Arrays for Species Identification in Salmonids.

    PubMed

    Wenne, Roman; Drywa, Agata; Kent, Matthew; Sundsaasen, Kristil Kindem; Lien, Sigbjørn

    2016-01-01

    The use of SNP genotyping microarrays, developed in one species to analyze a closely related species for which genomic sequence information is scarce, enables the rapid development of a genomic resource (SNP information) without the need to develop new species-specific markers. Using large numbers of microarray SNPs offers the best chance to detect informative markers in nontarget species, markers that can very often be assayed using a lower throughput platform as is described in this paper. PMID:27460372

  18. SNP analysis of follistatin gene associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Panneerselvam, Palanisamy; Sivakumari, Kanakarajan; Jayaprakash, Ponmani; Srikanth, Ramanathan

    2010-01-01

    Follistatin has been reported as a candidate gene for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) based on linkage and association studies. In this study, investigation of polymorphisms in the FST gene was done to determine if genetic variation is associated with susceptibility to PCOS. The nucleotide sequence of human follistatin and the protein sequence of human follistatin were retrieved from the NCBI database using Entrez. The follistatin protein of human was retrieved from the Swiss-Prot database. There are 344 amino acids and the molecular weight is 38,007 Da. The ProtParam analysis shows that the isoelectric point is 5.53 and the aliphatic index is 61.25. The hydropathicity is −0.490. The domains in FST protein are as follows: Pfam-B 5005 domain from 1 to 92; EGF-like subdomain from 93 to 116; Kazal 1 domain, occurred in three places, namely, 118–164, 192–239, and 270–316. There are 31 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for this gene. Some are nonsynonymous, some occur in the intron region, and some in an untranslated region. Two nonsynonymous SNPs, namely, rs11745088 and rs1127760, were taken for analysis. In the SNP rs11745088, the change is E152Q. Likewise, in rs1127760, the change is C239S. SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant) showed positions of amino acids and the single letter code of amino acids that can be tolerated or deleterious for each position. There were six SNP results and each result had links to it. The dbSNP id, primary database id, and the type of mutation whether silent and if occurring in coding region are given as phenotype alterations. The FASTA format of protein was given to the nsSNP Analyzer tool, and the variation E152Q and C239S were given as inputs in the SNP data field. E152Q change was neutral and C239S causes disease. Using PANTHER for evolutionary analysis of coding SNPs, the protein sequence was given as input and analyzed for the E152Q and C239S SNPs for deleterious effect on protein function. The genetic association

  19. SNP analysis of follistatin gene associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, Palanisamy; Sivakumari, Kanakarajan; Jayaprakash, Ponmani; Srikanth, Ramanathan

    2010-01-01

    Follistatin has been reported as a candidate gene for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) based on linkage and association studies. In this study, investigation of polymorphisms in the FST gene was done to determine if genetic variation is associated with susceptibility to PCOS. The nucleotide sequence of human follistatin and the protein sequence of human follistatin were retrieved from the NCBI database using Entrez. The follistatin protein of human was retrieved from the Swiss-Prot database. There are 344 amino acids and the molecular weight is 38,007 Da. The ProtParam analysis shows that the isoelectric point is 5.53 and the aliphatic index is 61.25. The hydropathicity is -0.490. The domains in FST protein are as follows: Pfam-B 5005 domain from 1 to 92; EGF-like subdomain from 93 to 116; Kazal 1 domain, occurred in three places, namely, 118-164, 192-239, and 270-316. There are 31 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for this gene. Some are nonsynonymous, some occur in the intron region, and some in an untranslated region. Two nonsynonymous SNPs, namely, rs11745088 and rs1127760, were taken for analysis. In the SNP rs11745088, the change is E152Q. Likewise, in rs1127760, the change is C239S. SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant) showed positions of amino acids and the single letter code of amino acids that can be tolerated or deleterious for each position. There were six SNP results and each result had links to it. The dbSNP id, primary database id, and the type of mutation whether silent and if occurring in coding region are given as phenotype alterations. The FASTA format of protein was given to the nsSNP Analyzer tool, and the variation E152Q and C239S were given as inputs in the SNP data field. E152Q change was neutral and C239S causes disease. Using PANTHER for evolutionary analysis of coding SNPs, the protein sequence was given as input and analyzed for the E152Q and C239S SNPs for deleterious effect on protein function. The genetic association

  20. Genome-wide SNP detection, validation, and development of an 8K SNP array for apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide...

  1. SNPMeta: SNP annotation and SNP metadata collection without a reference genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increase in availability of resequencing data is greatly accelerating SNP discovery and has facilitated the development of SNP genotyping assays. This, in turn, is increasing interest in annotation of individual SNPs. Currently, these data are only available through curation, or comparison to a ...

  2. Construction of a high-density DArTseq SNP-based genetic map and identification of genomic regions with segregation distortion in a genetic population derived from a cross between feral and cultivated-type watermelon.

    PubMed

    Ren, Runsheng; Ray, Rumiana; Li, Pingfang; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Man; Liu, Guang; Yao, Xiefeng; Kilian, Andrzej; Yang, Xingping

    2015-08-01

    Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] is an economically important vegetable crop grown extensively worldwide. To facilitate the identification of agronomically important traits and provide new information for genetic and genomic research on this species, a high-density genetic linkage map of watermelon was constructed using an F2 population derived from a cross between elite watermelon cultivar K3 and wild watermelon germplasm PI 189225. Based on a sliding window approach, a total of 1,161 bin markers representing 3,465 SNP markers were mapped onto 11 linkage groups corresponding to the chromosome pair number of watermelon. The total length of the genetic map is 1,099.2 cM, with an average distance between bins of 1.0 cM. The number of markers in each chromosome varies from 62 in chromosome 07 to 160 in chromosome 05. The length of individual chromosomes ranged between 61.8 cM for chromosome 07 and 140.2 cM for chromosome 05. A total of 616 SNP bin markers showed significant (P < 0.05) segregation distortion across all 11 chromosomes, and 513 (83.3 %) of these distorted loci showed distortion in favor of the elite watermelon cultivar K3 allele and 103 were skewed toward PI 189225. The number of SNPs and InDels per Mb varied considerably across the segregation distorted regions (SDRs) on each chromosome, and a mixture of dense and sparse SNPs and InDel SDRs coexisted on some chromosomes suggesting that SDRs were randomly distributed throughout the genome. Recombination rates varied greatly among each chromosome, from 2.0 to 4.2 centimorgans per megabase (cM/Mb). An inconsistency was found between the genetic and physical positions on the map for a segment on chromosome 11. The high-density genetic map described in the present study will facilitate fine mapping of quantitative trait loci, the identification of candidate genes, map-based cloning, as well as marker-assisted selection (MAS) in watermelon breeding programs. PMID:25702268

  3. SNP Discovery Using Next Generation Transcriptomic Sequencing.

    PubMed

    De Wit, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, I will guide the user through methods to find new SNP markers from expressed sequence (RNA-Seq) data, focusing on the sample preparation and also on the bioinformatic analyses needed to sort through the immense flood of data from high-throughput sequencing machines. The general steps included are as follows: sample preparation, sequencing, quality control of data, assembly, mapping, SNP discovery, filtering, validation. The first few steps are traditional laboratory protocols, whereas steps following the sequencing are of bioinformatic nature. The bioinformatics described herein are by no means exhaustive, rather they serve as one example of a simple way of analyzing high-throughput sequence data to find SNP markers. Ideally, one would like to run through this protocol several times with a new dataset, while varying software parameters slightly, in order to determine the robustness of the results. The final validation step, although not described in much detail here, is also quite critical as that will be the final test of the accuracy of the assumptions made in silico.There is a plethora of downstream applications of a SNP dataset, not covered in this chapter. For an example of a more thorough protocol also including differential gene expression and functional enrichment analyses, BLAST annotation and downstream applications of SNP markers, a good starting point could be the "Simple Fool's Guide to population genomics via RNA-Seq," which is available at http://sfg.stanford.edu . PMID:27460371

  4. Rapid Identification of Ginseng Cultivars (Panax ginseng Meyer) Using Novel SNP-Based Probes

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Ick-Hyun; Bang, Kyong Hwan; Kim, Young-Chang; Lee, Jei-Wan; Seo, A-Yeon; Seong, Bong-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Cha, Seon-Woo; Cho, Yong-Gu; Kim, Hong-Sig

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop a novel system for the discrimination of five ginseng cultivars (Panax ginseng Meyer), single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assays with real-time polymerase chain reaction were conducted. Nucleotide substitution in gDNA library clones of P. ginseng cv. Yunpoong was targeted for the SNP genotyping assay. From these SNP sites, a set of modified SNP specific fluorescence probes (PGP74, PGP110, and PGP130) and novel primer sets have been developed to distinguish among five ginseng cultivars. The combination of the SNP type of the five cultivars, Chungpoong, Yunpoong, Gopoong, Kumpoong, and Sunpoong, was identified as ‘ATA’, ‘GCC’, ‘GTA’, ‘GCA’, and ‘ACC’, respectively. This study represents the first report of the identification of ginseng cultivars by fluorescence probes. An SNP genotyping assay using fluorescence probes could prove useful for the identification of ginseng cultivars and ginseng seed management systems and guarantee the purity of ginseng seed. PMID:23717098

  5. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinming; Shao, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs) and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH)/uniparental disomy (UPD) that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants. PMID:27600067

  6. The SNP Consortium website: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Thorisson, Gudmundur A; Stein, Lincoln D

    2003-01-01

    The SNP Consortium website (http://snp.cshl.org) has undergone many changes since its initial conception three years ago. The database back end has been changed from the venerable ACeDB to the more scalable MySQL engine. Users can access the data via gene or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) keyword searches and browse or dump SNP data to textfiles. A graphical genome browsing interface shows SNPs mapped onto the genome assembly in the context of externally available gene predictions and other features. SNP allele frequency and genotype data are available via FTP-download and on individual SNP report web pages. SNP linkage maps are available for download and for browsing in a comparative map viewer. All software components of the data coordinating center (DCC) website (http://snp.cshl.org) are open source. PMID:12519964

  7. An Improved Opposition-Based Learning Particle Swarm Optimization for the Detection of SNP-SNP Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Junliang; Sun, Yan; Li, Shengjun; Liu, Jin-Xing; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Zhang, Junying

    2015-01-01

    SNP-SNP interactions have been receiving increasing attention in understanding the mechanism underlying susceptibility to complex diseases. Though many works have been done for the detection of SNP-SNP interactions, the algorithmic development is still ongoing. In this study, an improved opposition-based learning particle swarm optimization (IOBLPSO) is proposed for the detection of SNP-SNP interactions. Highlights of IOBLPSO are the introduction of three strategies, namely, opposition-based learning, dynamic inertia weight, and a postprocedure. Opposition-based learning not only enhances the global explorative ability, but also avoids premature convergence. Dynamic inertia weight allows particles to cover a wider search space when the considered SNP is likely to be a random one and converges on promising regions of the search space while capturing a highly suspected SNP. The postprocedure is used to carry out a deep search in highly suspected SNP sets. Experiments of IOBLPSO are performed on both simulation data sets and a real data set of age-related macular degeneration, results of which demonstrate that IOBLPSO is promising in detecting SNP-SNP interactions. IOBLPSO might be an alternative to existing methods for detecting SNP-SNP interactions. PMID:26236727

  8. Mycobacterium leprae in Colombia described by SNP7614 in gyrA, two minisatellites and geography.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Beltrán-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Romero-Montoya, Irma Marcela; Li, Wei; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2013-03-01

    New cases of leprosy are still being detected in Colombia after the country declared achievement of the WHO defined 'elimination' status. To study the ecology of leprosy in endemic regions, a combination of geographic and molecular tools were applied for a group of 201 multibacillary patients including six multi-case families from eleven departments. The location (latitude and longitude) of patient residences were mapped. Slit skin smears and/or skin biopsies were collected and DNA was extracted. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis following a multiplex PCR-was developed for rapid and inexpensive strain typing of Mycobacterium leprae based on copy numbers of two VNTR minisatellite loci 27-5 and 12-5. A SNP (C/T) in gyrA (SNP7614) was mapped by introducing a novel PCR-RFLP into an ongoing drug resistance surveillance effort. Multiple genotypes were detected combining the three molecular markers. The two frequent genotypes in Colombia were SNP7614(C)/27-5(5)/12-5(4) [C54] predominantly distributed in the Atlantic departments and SNP7614 (T)/27-5(4)/12-5(5) [T45] associated with the Andean departments. A novel genotype SNP7614 (C)/27-5(6)/12-5(4) [C64] was detected in cities along the Magdalena river which separates the Andean from Atlantic departments; a subset was further characterized showing association with a rare allele of minisatellite 23-3 and the SNP type 1 of M. leprae. The genotypes within intra-family cases were conserved. Overall, this is the first large scale study that utilized simple and rapid assay formats for identification of major strain types and their distribution in Colombia. It provides the framework for further strain type discrimination and geographic information systems as tools for tracing transmission of leprosy. PMID:23291420

  9. Mycobacterium leprae in Colombia described by SNP7614 in gyrA, two minisatellites and geography

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Castro, Nora; Beltrán-Alzate, Juan Camilo; Romero-Montoya, Irma Marcela; Li, Wei; Brennan, Patrick J; Vissa, Varalakshmi

    2013-01-01

    New cases of leprosy are still being detected in Colombia after the country declared achievement of the WHO defined ‘elimination’ status. To study the ecology of leprosy in endemic regions, a combination of geographic and molecular tools were applied for a group of 201 multibacillary patients including six multi-case families from eleven departments. The location (latitude and longitude) of patient residences were mapped. Slit skin smears and/or skin biopsies were collected and DNA was extracted. Standard agarose gel electrophoresis following a multiplex PCR-was developed for rapid and inexpensive strain typing of M. leprae based on copy numbers of two VNTR minisatellite loci 27-5 and 12-5. A SNP (C/T) in gyrA (SNP7614) was mapped by introducing a novel PCR-RFLP into an ongoing drug resistance surveillance effort. Multiple genotypes were detected combining the three molecular markers. The two frequent genotypes in Colombia were SNP7614(C)/27-5(5)/12-5(4) [C54] predominantly distributed in the Atlantic departments and SNP7614 (T)/27-5(4)/12-5(5) [T45] associated with the Andean departments. A novel genotype SNP7614 (C)/27-5(6)/12-5(4) [C64] was detected in cities along the Magdalena river which separates the Andean from Atlantic departments; a subset was further characterized showing association with a rare allele of minisatellite 23-3 and the SNP type 1 of M. leprae. The genotypes within intra-family cases were conserved. Overall, this is the first large scale study that utilized simple and rapid assay formats for identification of major strain types and their distribution in Colombia. It provides the framework for further strain type discrimination and geographic information systems as tools for tracing transmission of leprosy. PMID:23291420

  10. Genome-wide SNP discovery in walnut with an AGSNP pipeline updated for SNP discovery in allogamous organisms

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A genome-wide set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a valuable resource in genetic research and breeding and is usually developed by re-sequencing a genome. If a genome sequence is not available, an alternative strategy must be used. We previously reported the development of a pipeline (AGSNP) for genome-wide SNP discovery in coding sequences and other single-copy DNA without a complete genome sequence in self-pollinating (autogamous) plants. Here we updated this pipeline for SNP discovery in outcrossing (allogamous) species and demonstrated its efficacy in SNP discovery in walnut (Juglans regia L.). Results The first step in the original implementation of the AGSNP pipeline was the construction of a reference sequence and the identification of single-copy sequences in it. To identify single-copy sequences, multiple genome equivalents of short SOLiD reads of another individual were mapped to shallow genome coverage of long Sanger or Roche 454 reads making up the reference sequence. The relative depth of SOLiD reads was used to filter out repeated sequences from single-copy sequences in the reference sequence. The second step was a search for SNPs between SOLiD reads and the reference sequence. Polymorphism within the mapped SOLiD reads would have precluded SNP discovery; hence both individuals had to be homozygous. The AGSNP pipeline was updated here for using SOLiD or other type of short reads of a heterozygous individual for these two principal steps. A total of 32.6X walnut genome equivalents of SOLiD reads of vegetatively propagated walnut scion cultivar ‘Chandler’ were mapped to 48,661 ‘Chandler’ bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences (BESs) produced by Sanger sequencing during the construction of a walnut physical map. A total of 22,799 putative SNPs were initially identified. A total of 6,000 Infinium II type SNPs evenly distributed along the walnut physical map were selected for the construction of an Infinium Bead

  11. Developing single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers from transcriptome sequences for identification of longan (Dimocarpus longan) germplasm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Boyi; Tan, Hua-Wei; Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Matsumoto, Tracie; Zhang, Dapeng

    2015-01-01

    Longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) is an important tropical fruit tree crop. Accurate varietal identification is essential for germplasm management and breeding. Using longan transcriptome sequences from public databases, we developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers; validated 60 SNPs in 50 longan germplasm accessions, including cultivated varieties and wild germplasm; and designated 25 SNP markers that unambiguously identified all tested longan varieties with high statistical rigor (P<0.0001). Multiple trees from the same clone were verified and off-type trees were identified. Diversity analysis revealed genetic relationships among analyzed accessions. Cultivated varieties differed significantly from wild populations (Fst=0.300; P<0.001), demonstrating untapped genetic diversity for germplasm conservation and utilization. Within cultivated varieties, apparent differences between varieties from China and those from Thailand and Hawaii indicated geographic patterns of genetic differentiation. These SNP markers provide a powerful tool to manage longan genetic resources and breeding, with accurate and efficient genotype identification. PMID:26504559

  12. A SNP-Based Molecular Barcode for Characterization of Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, LiFeng; Jia, JiZeng; Kong, XiuYing

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is grown as a staple crop worldwide. It is important to develop an effective genotyping tool for this cereal grain both to identify germplasm diversity and to protect the rights of breeders. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping provides a means for developing a practical, rapid, inexpensive and high-throughput assay. Here, we investigated SNPs as robust markers of genetic variation for typing wheat cultivars. We identified SNPs from an array of 9000 across a collection of 429 well-known wheat cultivars grown in China, of which 43 SNP markers with high minor allele frequency and variations discriminated the selected wheat varieties and their wild ancestors. This SNP-based barcode will allow for the rapid and precise identification of wheat germplasm resources and newly released varieties and will further assist in the wheat breeding program. PMID:26985664

  13. A SNP-Based Molecular Barcode for Characterization of Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Gao, LiFeng; Jia, JiZeng; Kong, XiuYing

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is grown as a staple crop worldwide. It is important to develop an effective genotyping tool for this cereal grain both to identify germplasm diversity and to protect the rights of breeders. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping provides a means for developing a practical, rapid, inexpensive and high-throughput assay. Here, we investigated SNPs as robust markers of genetic variation for typing wheat cultivars. We identified SNPs from an array of 9000 across a collection of 429 well-known wheat cultivars grown in China, of which 43 SNP markers with high minor allele frequency and variations discriminated the selected wheat varieties and their wild ancestors. This SNP-based barcode will allow for the rapid and precise identification of wheat germplasm resources and newly released varieties and will further assist in the wheat breeding program. PMID:26985664

  14. Applying SNP marker technology in the cacao breeding program at the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this investigation 45 parental cacao plants and five progeny derived from the parental stock studied were genotyped using six SNP markers to determine off-types or mislabeled clones and to authenticate crosses made in the Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) breeding program. Investigation wa...

  15. High-throughput SNP genotyping in Cucurbita pepo for map construction and quantitative trait loci mapping

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cucurbita pepo is a member of the Cucurbitaceae family, the second- most important horticultural family in terms of economic importance after Solanaceae. The "summer squash" types, including Zucchini and Scallop, rank among the highest-valued vegetables worldwide. There are few genomic tools available for this species. The first Cucurbita transcriptome, along with a large collection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP), was recently generated using massive sequencing. A set of 384 SNP was selected to generate an Illumina GoldenGate assay in order to construct the first SNP-based genetic map of Cucurbita and map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Results We herein present the construction of the first SNP-based genetic map of Cucurbita pepo using a population derived from the cross of two varieties with contrasting phenotypes, representing the main cultivar groups of the species' two subspecies: Zucchini (subsp. pepo) × Scallop (subsp. ovifera). The mapping population was genotyped with 384 SNP, a set of selected EST-SNP identified in silico after massive sequencing of the transcriptomes of both parents, using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. The global success rate of the assay was higher than 85%. In total, 304 SNP were mapped, along with 11 SSR from a previous map, giving a map density of 5.56 cM/marker. This map was used to infer syntenic relationships between C. pepo and cucumber and to successfully map QTL that control plant, flowering and fruit traits that are of benefit to squash breeding. The QTL effects were validated in backcross populations. Conclusion Our results show that massive sequencing in different genotypes is an excellent tool for SNP discovery, and that the Illumina GoldenGate platform can be successfully applied to constructing genetic maps and performing QTL analysis in Cucurbita. This is the first SNP-based genetic map in the Cucurbita genus and is an invaluable new tool for biological research, especially considering that most

  16. METU-SNP: an integrated software system for SNP-complex disease association analysis.

    PubMed

    Ustünkar, Gürkan; Aydın Son, Yeşim

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing research to discover genomic biomarkers, haplotypes, and potentially other variables that together contribute to the development of diseases. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common form of genomic variations and they can represent an individual’s genetic variability in greatest detail. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of SNPs, high-dimensional case-control studies, are among the most promising approaches for identifying disease causing variants. METU-SNP software is a Java based integrated desktop application specifically designed for the prioritization of SNP biomarkers and the discovery of genes and pathways related to diseases via analysis of the GWAS case-control data. Outputs of METU-SNP can easily be utilized for the downstream biomarkers research to allow the prediction and the diagnosis of diseases and other personalized medical approaches. Here, we introduce and describe the system functionality and architecture of the METU-SNP. We believe that the METU-SNP will help researchers with the reliable identification of SNPs that are involved in the etiology of complex diseases, ultimately supporting the development of personalized medicine approaches and targeted drug discoveries. PMID:22156365

  17. RNASEL and MIR146A SNP-SNP Interaction as a Susceptibility Factor for Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farzan, Shohreh F.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Christensen, Brock C.; Li, Zhongze; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K.; Nelson, Heather H.

    2014-01-01

    Immunity and inflammatory pathways are important in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Functional genetic variation in immune modulators has the potential to affect disease etiology. We investigated associations between common variants in two key regulators, MIR146A and RNASEL, and their relation to NMSCs. Using a large population-based case-control study of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), we investigated the impact of MIR146A SNP rs2910164 on cancer risk, and interaction with a SNP in one of its putative targets (RNASEL, rs486907). To examine associations between genotype and BCC and SCC, occurrence odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, accounting for multiple confounding factors. We did not observe an overall change in the odds ratios for SCC or BCC among individuals carrying either of the RNASEL or MIR146A variants compared with those who were wild type at these loci. However, there was a sex-specific association between BCC and MIR146A in women (ORGC = 0.73, [95%CI = 0.52–1.03]; ORCC = 0.29, [95% CI = 0.14–0.61], p-trend<0.001), and a reduction in risk, albeit not statistically significant, associated with RNASEL and SCC in men (ORAG = 0.88, [95%CI = 0.65–1.19]; ORAA = 0.68, [95%CI = 0.43–1.08], p-trend = 0.10). Most striking was the strong interaction between the two genes. Among individuals carrying variant alleles of both rs2910164 and rs486907, we observed inverse relationships with SCC (ORSCC = 0.56, [95%CI = 0.38–0.81], p-interaction = 0.012) and BCC (ORBCC = 0.57, [95%CI = 0.40–0.80], p-interaction = 0.005). Our results suggest that genetic variation in immune and inflammatory regulators may influence susceptibility to NMSC, and novel SNP-SNP interaction for a microRNA and its target. These data suggest that RNASEL, an enzyme involved in RNA turnover, is controlled by miR-146a

  18. RNASEL and MIR146A SNP-SNP interaction as a susceptibility factor for non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Farzan, Shohreh F; Karagas, Margaret R; Christensen, Brock C; Li, Zhongze; Kuriger, Jacquelyn K; Nelson, Heather H

    2014-01-01

    Immunity and inflammatory pathways are important in the genesis of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC). Functional genetic variation in immune modulators has the potential to affect disease etiology. We investigated associations between common variants in two key regulators, MIR146A and RNASEL, and their relation to NMSCs. Using a large population-based case-control study of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), we investigated the impact of MIR146A SNP rs2910164 on cancer risk, and interaction with a SNP in one of its putative targets (RNASEL, rs486907). To examine associations between genotype and BCC and SCC, occurrence odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, accounting for multiple confounding factors. We did not observe an overall change in the odds ratios for SCC or BCC among individuals carrying either of the RNASEL or MIR146A variants compared with those who were wild type at these loci. However, there was a sex-specific association between BCC and MIR146A in women (ORGC = 0.73, [95%CI = 0.52-1.03]; ORCC = 0.29, [95% CI = 0.14-0.61], p-trend<0.001), and a reduction in risk, albeit not statistically significant, associated with RNASEL and SCC in men (ORAG = 0.88, [95%CI = 0.65-1.19]; ORAA = 0.68, [95%CI = 0.43-1.08], p-trend = 0.10). Most striking was the strong interaction between the two genes. Among individuals carrying variant alleles of both rs2910164 and rs486907, we observed inverse relationships with SCC (ORSCC = 0.56, [95%CI = 0.38-0.81], p-interaction = 0.012) and BCC (ORBCC = 0.57, [95%CI = 0.40-0.80], p-interaction = 0.005). Our results suggest that genetic variation in immune and inflammatory regulators may influence susceptibility to NMSC, and novel SNP-SNP interaction for a microRNA and its target. These data suggest that RNASEL, an enzyme involved in RNA turnover, is controlled by miR-146a and may be important in NMSC etiology. PMID:24699816

  19. eSNPO: An eQTL-based SNP Ontology and SNP functional enrichment analysis platform.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Li, Xue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Hongchao; Guo, Maozu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have mined many common genetic variants associated with human complex traits like diseases. After that, the functional annotation and enrichment analysis of significant SNPs are important tasks. Classic methods are always based on physical positions of SNPs and genes. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) are genomic loci that contribute to variation in gene expression levels and have been proven efficient to connect SNPs and genes. In this work, we integrated the eQTL data and Gene Ontology (GO), constructed associations between SNPs and GO terms, then performed functional enrichment analysis. Finally, we constructed an eQTL-based SNP Ontology and SNP functional enrichment analysis platform. Taking Parkinson Disease (PD) as an example, the proposed platform and method are efficient. We believe eSNPO will be a useful resource for SNP functional annotation and enrichment analysis after we have got significant disease related SNPs. PMID:27470167

  20. eSNPO: An eQTL-based SNP Ontology and SNP functional enrichment analysis platform

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Jizhe; Li, Xue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Zhang, Ruijie; Lv, Hongchao; Guo, Maozu

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have mined many common genetic variants associated with human complex traits like diseases. After that, the functional annotation and enrichment analysis of significant SNPs are important tasks. Classic methods are always based on physical positions of SNPs and genes. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) are genomic loci that contribute to variation in gene expression levels and have been proven efficient to connect SNPs and genes. In this work, we integrated the eQTL data and Gene Ontology (GO), constructed associations between SNPs and GO terms, then performed functional enrichment analysis. Finally, we constructed an eQTL-based SNP Ontology and SNP functional enrichment analysis platform. Taking Parkinson Disease (PD) as an example, the proposed platform and method are efficient. We believe eSNPO will be a useful resource for SNP functional annotation and enrichment analysis after we have got significant disease related SNPs. PMID:27470167

  1. SNP sets and reading ability: testing confirmation of a 10-SNP set in a population sample.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Michelle; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Bates, Timothy C

    2011-06-01

    A set of 10 SNPs associated with reading ability in 7-year-olds was reported based on initial pooled analyses of 100K SNP chip data, with follow-up testing stages using pooling and individual testing. Here we examine this association in an adolescent population sample of Australian twins and siblings (N = 1177) aged 12 to 25 years. One (rs1842129) of the 10 SNPs approached significance (P = .05) but no support was found for the remaining 9 SNPs or the SNP set itself. Results indicate that these SNPs are not associated with reading ability in an Australian population. The results are interpreted as supporting use of much larger SNP sets in common disorders where effects are small. PMID:21623652

  2. Linkage Analysis and QTL Mapping Using SNP Dosage Data in a Tetraploid Potato Mapping Population

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Christine A.; McLean, Karen; Bryan, Glenn J.

    2013-01-01

    New sequencing and genotyping technologies have enabled researchers to generate high density SNP genotype data for mapping populations. In polyploid species, SNP data usually contain a new type of information, the allele dosage, which is not used by current methodologies for linkage analysis and QTL mapping. Here we extend existing methodology to use dosage data on SNPs in an autotetraploid mapping population. The SNP dosages are inferred from allele intensity ratios using normal mixture models. The steps of the linkage analysis (testing for distorted segregation, clustering SNPs, calculation of recombination fractions and LOD scores, ordering of SNPs and inference of parental phase) are extended to use the dosage information. For QTL analysis, the probability of each possible offspring genotype is inferred at a grid of locations along the chromosome from the ordered parental genotypes and phases and the offspring dosages. A normal mixture model is then used to relate trait values to the offspring genotypes and to identify the most likely locations for QTLs. These methods are applied to analyse a tetraploid potato mapping population of parents and 190 offspring, genotyped using an Infinium 8300 Potato SNP Array. Linkage maps for each of the 12 chromosomes are constructed. The allele intensity ratios are mapped as quantitative traits to check that their position and phase agrees with that of the corresponding SNP. This analysis confirms most SNP positions, and eliminates some problem SNPs to give high-density maps for each chromosome, with between 74 and 152 SNPs mapped and between 100 and 300 further SNPs allocated to approximate bins. Low numbers of double reduction products were detected. Overall 3839 of the 5378 polymorphic SNPs can be assigned putative genetic locations. This methodology can be applied to construct high-density linkage maps in any autotetraploid species, and could also be extended to higher autopolyploids. PMID:23704960

  3. Smarter clustering methods for SNP genotype calling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yan; Tseng, George C.; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Bean, Lora J. H.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Most genotyping technologies for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers use standard clustering methods to ‘call’ the SNP genotypes. These methods are not always optimal in distinguishing the genotype clusters of a SNP because they do not take advantage of specific features of the genotype calling problem. In particular, when family data are available, pedigree information is ignored. Furthermore, prior information about the distribution of the measurements for each cluster can be used to choose an appropriate model-based clustering method and can significantly improve the genotype calls. One special genotyping problem that has never been discussed in the literature is that of genotyping of trisomic individuals, such as individuals with Down syndrome. Calling trisomic genotypes is a more complicated problem, and the addition of external information becomes very important. Results: In this article, we discuss the impact of incorporating external information into clustering algorithms to call the genotypes for both disomic and trisomic data. We also propose two new methods to call genotypes using family data. One is a modification of the K-means method and uses the pedigree information by updating all members of a family together. The other is a likelihood-based method that combines the Gaussian or beta-mixture model with pedigree information. We compare the performance of these two methods and some other existing methods using simulation studies. We also compare the performance of these methods on a real dataset generated by the Illumina platform (www.illumina.com). Availability: The R code for the family-based genotype calling methods (SNPCaller) is available to be downloaded from the following website: http://watson.hgen.pitt.edu/register. Contact: liny@upmc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:18826959

  4. KinSNP software for homozygosity mapping of disease genes using SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Amir, El-Ad David; Bartal, Ofer; Morad, Efrat; Nagar, Tal; Sheynin, Jony; Parvari, Ruti; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered

    2010-08-01

    Consanguineous families affected with a recessive genetic disease caused by homozygotisation of a mutation offer a unique advantage for positional cloning of rare diseases. Homozygosity mapping of patient genotypes is a powerful technique for the identification of the genomic locus harbouring the causing mutation. This strategy relies on the observation that in these patients a large region spanning the disease locus is also homozygous with high probability. The high marker density in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays is extremely advantageous for homozygosity mapping. We present KinSNP, a user-friendly software tool for homozygosity mapping using SNP arrays. The software searches for stretches of SNPs which are homozygous to the same allele in all ascertained sick individuals. User-specified parameters control the number of allowed genotyping 'errors' within homozygous blocks. Candidate disease regions are then reported in a detailed, coloured Excel file, along with genotypes of family members and healthy controls. An interactive genome browser has been included which shows homozygous blocks, individual genotypes, genes and further annotations along the chromosomes, with zooming and scrolling capabilities. The software has been used to identify the location of a mutated gene causing insensitivity to pain in a large Bedouin family. KinSNP is freely available from. PMID:20846928

  5. SNP marker detection and genotyping in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Groenen, M A M; Dibbits, B W; Komen, J

    2012-09-01

    We have generated a unique resource consisting of nearly 175 000 short contig sequences and 3569 SNP markers from the widely cultured GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). In total, 384 SNPs were selected to monitor the wider applicability of the SNPs by genotyping tilapia individuals from different strains and different geographical locations. In all strains and species tested (O. niloticus, O. aureus and O. mossambicus), the genotyping assay was working for a similar number of SNPs (288-305 SNPs). The actual number of polymorphic SNPs was, as expected, highest for individuals from the GIFT population (255 SNPs). In the individuals from an Egyptian strain and in individuals caught in the wild in the basin of the river Volta, 197 and 163 SNPs were polymorphic, respectively. A pairwise calculation of Nei's genetic distance allowed the discrimination of the individual strains and species based on the genotypes determined with the SNP set. We expect that this set will be widely applicable for use in tilapia aquaculture, e.g. for pedigree reconstruction. In addition, this set is currently used for assaying the genetic diversity of native Nile tilapia in areas where tilapia is, or will be, introduced in aquaculture projects. This allows the tracing of escapees from aquaculture and the monitoring of effects of introgression and hybridization. PMID:22524158

  6. COL18A1 is highly expressed during human adipocyte differentiation and the SNP c.1136C > T in its "frizzled" motif is associated with obesity in diabetes type 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Errera, Flavia I V; Canani, Luís H; Yeh, Erika; Kague, Erika; Armelin-Corrêa, Lucia M; Suzuki, Oscar T; Tschiedel, Balduíno; Silva, Maria Elizabeth R; Sertié, Andréa L; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2008-03-01

    Collagen XVIII can generate two fragments, NC11-728 containing a frizzled motif which possibly acts in Wnt signaling and Endostatin, which is cleaved from the NC1 and is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Collagen XVIII and Wnt signaling have recently been associated with adipogenic differentiation and obesity in some animal models, but not in humans. In the present report, we have shown that COL18A1 expression increases during human adipogenic differentiation. We also tested if polymorphisms in the Frizzled (c.1136C>T; Thr379Met) and Endostatin (c.4349G>A; Asp1437Asn) regions contribute towards susceptibility to obesity in patients with type 2 diabetes (113 obese, BMI > or =30; 232 non-obese, BMI < 30) of European ancestry. No evidence of association was observed between the allele c.4349G>A and obesity, but we observed a significantly higher frequency of homozygotes c.1136TT in obese (19.5%) than in non-obese individuals (10.9%) [P = 0.02; OR = 2.0 (95%CI: 1.07-3.73)], suggesting that the allele c.1136T is associated to obesity in a recessive model. This genotype, after controlling for cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides, was independently associated with obesity (P = 0.048), and increases the chance of obesity in 2.8 times. Therefore, our data suggest the involvement of collagen XVIII in human adipogenesis and susceptibility to obesity. PMID:18345385

  7. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) in the Adiponectin Gene and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Chirumbolo, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    Dear Editor, The recent article by Mohammadzadeh et al.[1] on the latest issue of this Journal showed that the T allele +276G/T SNP of ADIPOQ gene is more associated with the increasing risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Adipocytes were described in myocardial tissue of CAD patients and their role recently discussed[2,3]. Susceptibility to CAD by polymorphism in the Q gene of adiponectin has been reported for 3'-UTR, which harbours some genetic loci associated with metabolic risks and atherosclerosis[4]. Actually, previous studies have shown that the haplotype SNP +276G>T was associated with a decreased risk of CAD, after adjustment for potential confounding factors, therefore some controversial opinion still exists[5]. This evidence should be associated with the role exerted by adipocytes and adiponectin in heart physiology. In particular, in hypertensive disorder complicating pregnancy (HDCP), by investigating the population frequency of alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely +45T>G (rs2241766) and +276G>T (rs1501299), some authors found that the SNP +276 TT genotype was significantly associated with protection against HDCP, when compared to the pooled G genotypes[6]. Moreover, the same +276G/T SNP haplotype was strongly associated with biliary atresia, an intractable neonatal inflammatory and obliterative cholangiopathy, leading to progressive fibrosis and cirrhosis[7]. CAD is closely related to adiponectin biology. The same isoforms of adiponectin seem to be not associated to CAD severity but to glucose metabolism and its impairment[8]. In the paper by Mohammadzadeh et al.[1], T allele in +276G/T SNP haplotype is highly associated with CAD in subjects with type 2 diabetes, but this linkage should be reappraised if related much more to diabetes rather than CAD. Association of T allele in the indicated SNP with CAD may be an indirect consequence of type 2 diabetes, as reported

  8. Pigment phenotype and biogeographical ancestry from ancient skeletal remains: inferences from multiplexed autosomal SNP analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouakaze, Caroline; Keyser, Christine; Crubézy, Eric; Montagnon, Daniel; Ludes, Bertrand

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, a multiplexed genotyping assay for ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within six pigmentation candidate genes was developed on modern biological samples and applied to DNA retrieved from 25 archeological human remains from southern central Siberia dating from the Bronze and Iron Ages. SNP genotyping was successful for the majority of ancient samples and revealed that most probably had typical European pigment features, i.e., blue or green eye color, light hair color and skin type, and were likely of European individual ancestry. To our knowledge, this study reports for the first time the multiplexed typing of autosomal SNPs on aged and degraded DNA. By providing valuable information on pigment traits of an individual and allowing individual biogeographical ancestry estimation, autosomal SNP typing can improve ancient DNA studies and aid human identification in some forensic casework situations when used to complement conventional molecular markers. PMID:19415315

  9. Longevity and plasticity of CFTR provide an argument for noncanonical SNP organization in hominid DNA.

    PubMed

    Hill, Aubrey E; Plyler, Zackery E; Tiwari, Hemant; Patki, Amit; Tully, Joel P; McAtee, Christopher W; Moseley, Leah A; Sorscher, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Like many other ancient genes, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has survived for hundreds of millions of years. In this report, we consider whether such prodigious longevity of an individual gene--as opposed to an entire genome or species--should be considered surprising in the face of eons of relentless DNA replication errors, mutagenesis, and other causes of sequence polymorphism. The conventions that modern human SNP patterns result either from purifying selection or random (neutral) drift were not well supported, since extant models account rather poorly for the known plasticity and function (or the established SNP distributions) found in a multitude of genes such as CFTR. Instead, our analysis can be taken as a polemic indicating that SNPs in CFTR and many other mammalian genes may have been generated--and continue to accrue--in a fundamentally more organized manner than would otherwise have been expected. The resulting viewpoint contradicts earlier claims of 'directional' or 'intelligent design-type' SNP formation, and has important implications regarding the pace of DNA adaptation, the genesis of conserved non-coding DNA, and the extent to which eukaryotic SNP formation should be viewed as adaptive. PMID:25350658

  10. Changes in variance explained by top SNP windows over generations for three traits in broiler chicken

    PubMed Central

    Fragomeni, Breno de Oliveira; Misztal, Ignacy; Lourenco, Daniela Lino; Aguilar, Ignacio; Okimoto, Ronald; Muir, William M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the set of genomic regions inferred as accounting for the majority of genetic variation in quantitative traits remain stable over multiple generations of selection. The data set contained phenotypes for five generations of broiler chicken for body weight, breast meat, and leg score. The population consisted of 294,632 animals over five generations and also included genotypes of 41,036 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for 4,866 animals, after quality control. The SNP effects were calculated by a GWAS type analysis using single step genomic BLUP approach for generations 1–3, 2–4, 3–5, and 1–5. Variances were calculated for windows of 20 SNP. The top ten windows for each trait that explained the largest fraction of the genetic variance across generations were examined. Across generations, the top 10 windows explained more than 0.5% but less than 1% of the total variance. Also, the pattern of the windows was not consistent across generations. The windows that explained the greatest variance changed greatly among the combinations of generations, with a few exceptions. In many cases, a window identified as top for one combination, explained less than 0.1% for the other combinations. We conclude that identification of top SNP windows for a population may have little predictive power for genetic selection in the following generations for the traits here evaluated. PMID:25324857

  11. Large-Scale SNP Marker Development and Genotyping in Oat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, our goals are to develop genome-wide SNP markers using next generation sequencing technologies and to apply a highly parallel SNP genotyping system developed by Illumina for genetics and breeding applications in oat. The large amount of DNA sequence sources generated from cDNAs and Di...

  12. Accelerating genetic improvement with SNP chips and DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays is expected to have a profound impact on genetic progress in the U.S. dairy industry. In the 16 months since its initial availability, the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip has been used to genotype nearly 20,000 Holsteins. Thes...

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  14. Identification of Mendelian inconsistencies between SNP and pedigree information of sibs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Using SNP genotypes to apply genomic selection in breeding programs is becoming common practice. Tools to edit and check the quality of genotype data are required. Checking for Mendelian inconsistencies makes it possible to identify animals for which pedigree information and genotype information are not in agreement. Methods Straightforward tests to detect Mendelian inconsistencies exist that count the number of opposing homozygous marker (e.g. SNP) genotypes between parent and offspring (PAR-OFF). Here, we develop two tests to identify Mendelian inconsistencies between sibs. The first test counts SNP with opposing homozygous genotypes between sib pairs (SIBCOUNT). The second test compares pedigree and SNP-based relationships (SIBREL). All tests iteratively remove animals based on decreasing numbers of inconsistent parents and offspring or sibs. The PAR-OFF test, followed by either SIB test, was applied to a dataset comprising 2,078 genotyped cows and 211 genotyped sires. Theoretical expectations for distributions of test statistics of all three tests were calculated and compared to empirically derived values. Type I and II error rates were calculated after applying the tests to the edited data, while Mendelian inconsistencies were introduced by permuting pedigree against genotype data for various proportions of animals. Results Both SIB tests identified animal pairs for which pedigree and genomic relationships could be considered as inconsistent by visual inspection of a scatter plot of pairwise pedigree and SNP-based relationships. After removal of 235 animals with the PAR-OFF test, SIBCOUNT (SIBREL) identified 18 (22) additional inconsistent animals. Seventeen animals were identified by both methods. The numbers of incorrectly deleted animals (Type I error), were equally low for both methods, while the numbers of incorrectly non-deleted animals (Type II error), were considerably higher for SIBREL compared to SIBCOUNT. Conclusions Tests to remove

  15. De novo sequencing of sunflower genome for SNP discovery using RAD (Restriction site Associated DNA) approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Application of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) marker technology as a tool in sunflower breeding programs offers enormous potential to improve sunflower genetics, and facilitate faster release of sunflower hybrids to the market place. Through a National Sunflower Association (NSA) funded initiative, we report on the process of SNP discovery through reductive genome sequencing and local assembly of six diverse sunflower inbred lines that represent oil as well as confection types. Results A combination of Restriction site Associated DNA Sequencing (RAD-Seq) protocols and Illumina paired-end sequencing chemistry generated high quality 89.4 M paired end reads from the six lines which represent 5.3 GB of the sequencing data. Raw reads from the sunflower line, RHA 464 were assembled de novo to serve as a framework reference genome. About 15.2 Mb of sunflower genome distributed over 42,267 contigs were obtained upon assembly of RHA 464 sequencing data, the contig lengths ranged from 200 to 950 bp with an N50 length of 393 bp. SNP calling was performed by aligning sequencing data from the six sunflower lines to the assembled reference RHA 464. On average, 1 SNP was located every 143 bp of the sunflower genome sequence. Based on several filtering criteria, a final set of 16,467 putative sequence variants with characteristics favorable for Illumina Infinium Genotyping Technology (IGT) were mined from the sequence data generated across six diverse sunflower lines. Conclusion Here we report the molecular and computational methodology involved in SNP development for a complex genome like sunflower lacking reference assembly, offering an attractive tool for molecular breeding purposes in sunflower. PMID:23947483

  16. Deriving Gene Networks from SNP Associated with Triacylglycerol and Phospholipid Fatty Acid Fractions from Ribeyes of Angus Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Justin W.; Reecy, James M.; Garrick, Dorian J.; Duan, Qing; Beitz, Don C.; Koltes, James E.; Saatchi, Mahdi; Koesterke, Lars; Mateescu, Raluca G.

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid profile of beef is a complex trait that can benefit from gene-interaction network analysis to understand relationships among loci that contribute to phenotypic variation. Phenotypic measures of fatty acid profile from triacylglycerol and phospholipid fractions of longissimus muscle, pedigree information, and Illumina 54 k bovine SNP genotypes were utilized to derive an annotated gene network associated with fatty acid composition in 1,833 Angus beef cattle. The Bayes-B statistical model was utilized to perform a genome wide association study to estimate associations between 54 k SNP genotypes and 39 individual fatty acid phenotypes within each fraction. Posterior means of the effects were estimated for each of the 54 k SNP and for the collective effects of all the SNP in every 1-Mb genomic window in terms of the proportion of genetic variance explained by the window. Windows that explained the largest proportions of genetic variance for individual lipids were found in the triacylglycerol fraction. There was almost no overlap in the genomic regions explaining variance between the triacylglycerol and phospholipid fractions. Partial correlations were used to identify correlated regions of the genome for the set of largest 1 Mb windows that explained up to 35% genetic variation in either fatty acid fraction. SNP were allocated to windows based on the bovine UMD3.1 assembly. Gene network clusters were generated utilizing a partial correlation and information theory algorithm. Results were used in conjunction with network scoring and visualization software to analyze correlated SNP across 39 fatty acid phenotypes to identify SNP of significance. Significant pathways implicated in fatty acid metabolism through GO term enrichment analysis included homeostasis of number of cells, homeostatic process, coenzyme/cofactor activity, and immunoglobulin. These results suggest different metabolic pathways regulate the development of different types of lipids found in

  17. SNP Markers as Additional Information to Resolve Complex Kinship Cases

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, M. Lurdes; Fondevila, Manuel; Laréu, Maria Victoria; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background DNA profiling with sets of highly polymorphic autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers has been applied in various aspects of human identification in forensic casework for nearly 20 years. However, in some cases of complex kinship investigation, the information provided by the conventionally used STR markers is not enough, often resulting in low likelihood ratio (LR) calculations. In these cases, it becomes necessary to increment the number of loci under analysis to reach adequate LRs. Recently, it has been proposed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used as a supportive tool to STR typing, eventually even replacing the methods/markers now employed. Methods In this work, we describe the results obtained in 7 revised complex paternity cases when applying a battery of STRs, as well as 52 human identification SNPs (SNPforID 52plex identification panel) using a SNaPshot methodology followed by capillary electrophoresis. Results Our results show that the analysis of SNPs, as complement to STR typing in forensic casework applications, would at least increase by a factor of 4 total PI values and correspondent Essen-Möller's W value. Conclusions We demonstrated that SNP genotyping could be a key complement to STR information in challenging casework of disputed paternity, such as close relative individualization or complex pedigrees subject to endogamous relations. PMID:26733770

  18. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Andrulis, Irene L; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Devilee, Peter; Fasching, Peter A; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Guo, Qi; Rhenius, Valerie; Cornelissen, Sten; Rudolph, Anja; Knight, Julia A; Loehberg, Christian R; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Bojesen, Stig E; Flyger, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Van Dyck, Laurien; Nevelsteen, Ines; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Simard, Jacques; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Blomqvist, Carl; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-11-10

    In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox' regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P=1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses. PMID:26317411

  19. SNP-SNP interaction analysis of NF-κB signaling pathway on breast cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Maral; Fagerholm, Rainer; Khan, Sofia; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Andrulis, Irene L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Devilee, Peter; Fasching, Peter A.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Guo, Qi; Rhenius, Valerie; Cornelissen, Sten; Rudolph, Anja; Knight, Julia A.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Bojesen, Stig E.; Flyger, Henrik; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Dyck, Laurien Van; Nevelsteen, Ines; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Simard, Jacques; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Hall, Per; Blomqvist, Carl; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, constitutive activation of NF-κB has been reported, however, the impact of genetic variation of the pathway on patient prognosis has been little studied. Furthermore, a combination of genetic variants, rather than single polymorphisms, may affect disease prognosis. Here, in an extensive dataset (n = 30,431) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium, we investigated the association of 917 SNPs in 75 genes in the NF-κB pathway with breast cancer prognosis. We explored SNP-SNP interactions on survival using the likelihood-ratio test comparing multivariate Cox’ regression models of SNP pairs without and with an interaction term. We found two interacting pairs associating with prognosis: patients simultaneously homozygous for the rare alleles of rs5996080 and rs7973914 had worse survival (HRinteraction 6.98, 95% CI=3.3-14.4, P = 1.42E-07), and patients carrying at least one rare allele for rs17243893 and rs57890595 had better survival (HRinteraction 0.51, 95% CI=0.3-0.6, P = 2.19E-05). Based on in silico functional analyses and literature, we speculate that the rs5996080 and rs7973914 loci may affect the BAFFR and TNFR1/TNFR3 receptors and breast cancer survival, possibly by disturbing both the canonical and non-canonical NF-κB pathways or their dynamics, whereas, rs17243893-rs57890595 interaction on survival may be mediated through TRAF2-TRAIL-R4 interplay. These results warrant further validation and functional analyses. PMID:26317411

  20. Slider—maximum use of probability information for alignment of short sequence reads and SNP detection

    PubMed Central

    Malhis, Nawar; Butterfield, Yaron S. N.; Ester, Martin; Jones, Steven J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: A plethora of alignment tools have been created that are designed to best fit different types of alignment conditions. While some of these are made for aligning Illumina Sequence Analyzer reads, none of these are fully utilizing its probability (prb) output. In this article, we will introduce a new alignment approach (Slider) that reduces the alignment problem space by utilizing each read base's probabilities given in the prb files. Results: Compared with other aligners, Slider has higher alignment accuracy and efficiency. In addition, given that Slider matches bases with probabilities other than the most probable, it significantly reduces the percentage of base mismatches. The result is that its SNP predictions are more accurate than other SNP prediction approaches used today that start from the most probable sequence, including those using base quality. Contact: nmalhis@bcgsc.ca Supplementary information and availability: http://www.bcgsc.ca/platform/bioinfo/software/slider PMID:18974170

  1. Rapid Detection of Rare Deleterious Variants by Next Generation Sequencing with Optional Microarray SNP Genotype Data

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christopher M.; Crinnion, Laura A.; Gurgel‐Gianetti, Juliana; Harrison, Sally M.; Daly, Catherine; Antanavicuite, Agne; Lascelles, Carolina; Markham, Alexander F.; Pena, Sergio D. J.; Bonthron, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autozygosity mapping is a powerful technique for the identification of rare, autosomal recessive, disease‐causing genes. The ease with which this category of disease gene can be identified has greatly increased through the availability of genome‐wide SNP genotyping microarrays and subsequently of exome sequencing. Although these methods have simplified the generation of experimental data, its analysis, particularly when disparate data types must be integrated, remains time consuming. Moreover, the huge volume of sequence variant data generated from next generation sequencing experiments opens up the possibility of using these data instead of microarray genotype data to identify disease loci. To allow these two types of data to be used in an integrated fashion, we have developed AgileVCFMapper, a program that performs both the mapping of disease loci by SNP genotyping and the analysis of potentially deleterious variants using exome sequence variant data, in a single step. This method does not require microarray SNP genotype data, although analysis with a combination of microarray and exome genotype data enables more precise delineation of disease loci, due to superior marker density and distribution. PMID:26037133

  2. The Perils of SNP Microarray Testing: Uncovering Unexpected Consanguinity

    PubMed Central

    Tarini, Beth A.; Konczal, Laura; Goldenberg, Aaron J.; Goldman, Edward B.; McCandless, Shawn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background While single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chromosomal microarrays identify areas of small genetic deletions/duplications, they can also reveal regions of homozygosity indicative of consanguinity. As more non-geneticists order SNP microarrays, they must prepare for the potential ethical, legal and social issues that result from revelation of unanticipated consanguinity. Patient An infant with multiple congenital anomalies underwent SNP microarray testing. Results The results of the SNP microarray revealed several large regions of homozygosity that indicated identity by descent most consistent with a second or third degree relative mating (e.g., uncle/ niece, half brother/sister, first cousins). Mother was not aware of the test's potential to reveal consanguinity. When informed of the test results, she reluctantly admitted to being raped by her half-brother around the time of conception. Conclusions During the pre-testing consent process, providers should inform parents that SNP microarray testing could reveal consanguinity. Providers must also understand the psychological implications, as well as the legal and moral obligations, that accompany SNP microarray results that indicate consanguinity. PMID:23827427

  3. Detection of selective sweeps in cattle using genome-wide SNP data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The domestication and subsequent selection by humans to create breeds and biological types of cattle undoubtedly altered the patterning of variation within their genomes. Strong selection to fix advantageous large-effect mutations underlying domesticability, breed characteristics or productivity created selective sweeps in which variation was lost in the chromosomal region flanking the selected allele. Selective sweeps have now been identified in the genomes of many animal species including humans, dogs, horses, and chickens. Here, we attempt to identify and characterise regions of the bovine genome that have been subjected to selective sweeps. Results Two datasets were used for the discovery and validation of selective sweeps via the fixation of alleles at a series of contiguous SNP loci. BovineSNP50 data were used to identify 28 putative sweep regions among 14 diverse cattle breeds. Affymetrix BOS 1 prescreening assay data for five breeds were used to identify 85 regions and validate 5 regions identified using the BovineSNP50 data. Many genes are located within these regions and the lack of sequence data for the analysed breeds precludes the nomination of selected genes or variants and limits the prediction of the selected phenotypes. However, phenotypes that we predict to have historically been under strong selection include horned-polled, coat colour, stature, ear morphology, and behaviour. Conclusions The bias towards common SNPs in the design of the BovineSNP50 assay led to the identification of recent selective sweeps associated with breed formation and common to only a small number of breeds rather than ancient events associated with domestication which could potentially be common to all European taurines. The limited SNP density, or marker resolution, of the BovineSNP50 assay significantly impacted the rate of false discovery of selective sweeps, however, we found sweeps in common between breeds which were confirmed using an ultra

  4. An extended Tajima’s D neutrality test incorporating SNP calling and imputation uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingrun; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Long, Quan

    2015-01-01

    To identify evolutionary events from the footprints left in the patterns of genetic variation in a population, people use many statistical frameworks, including neutrality tests. In datasets from current high throughput sequencing and genotyping platforms, it is common to have missing data and low-confidence SNP calls at many segregating sites. However, the traditional statistical framework for neutrality tests does not allow for these possibilities; therefore the usual way of treating missing data is to ignore segregating sites with missing/low confidence calls, regardless of the good SNP calls at these sites in other individuals. In this work, we propose a modified neutrality test, Extended Tajima’s D, which incorporates missing data and SNP-calling uncertainties. Because we do not specify any particular error-generating mechanism, this approach is robust and widely applicable. Simulations show that in most cases the power of the new test is better than the original Tajima’s D, given the same type I error. Applications to real data show that it detects fewer outliers associated with low quality data. PMID:26681995

  5. Evaluation of Y chromosomal SNP haplogrouping in the HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity Panel.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Eriko; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran; Kakimoto, Yu; Satoh, Fumiko; Nakatome, Masato; Miyashita, Keiko; Osawa, Motoki

    2016-09-01

    The Y chromosomal haplogroup determined from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) combinations is a valuable genetic marker to study ancestral male lineage and ethical distribution. Next-generation sequencing has been developed for widely diverse genetics fields. For this study, we demonstrate 34 Y-SNP typing employing the Ion PGM™ system to perform haplogrouping. DNA libraries were constructed using the HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity Panel. Emulsion PCR was performed, then DNA sequences were analyzed on the Ion 314 and 316 Chip Kit v2. Some difficulties became apparent during the analytic processes. No-call was reported at rs2032599 and M479 in six samples, in which the least coverage was observed at M479. A minor misreading occurred at rs2032631 and M479. A real time PCR experiment using other pairs of oligonucleotide primers showed that these events might result from the flanking sequence. Finally, Y haplogroup was determined completely for 81 unrelated males including Japanese (n=59) and Malay (n=22) subjects. The allelic divergence differed between the two populations. In comparison with the conventional Sanger method, next-generation sequencing provides a comprehensive SNP analysis with convenient procedures, but further system improvement is necessary. PMID:27591541

  6. ASSIsT: an automatic SNP scoring tool for in- and outbreeding species

    PubMed Central

    Di Guardo, Mario; Micheletti, Diego; Bianco, Luca; Koehorst-van Putten, Herma J. J.; Longhi, Sara; Costa, Fabrizio; Aranzana, Maria J.; Velasco, Riccardo; Arús, Pere; Troggio, Michela; van de Weg, Eric W.

    2015-01-01

    ASSIsT (Automatic SNP ScorIng Tool) is a user-friendly customized pipeline for efficient calling and filtering of SNPs from Illumina Infinium arrays, specifically devised for custom genotyping arrays. Illumina has developed an integrated software for SNP data visualization and inspection called GenomeStudio® (GS). ASSIsT builds on GS-derived data and identifies those markers that follow a bi-allelic genetic model and show reliable genotype calls. Moreover, ASSIsT re-edits SNP calls with null alleles or additional SNPs in the probe annealing site. ASSIsT can be employed in the analysis of different population types such as full-sib families and mating schemes used in the plant kingdom (backcross, F1, F2), and unrelated individuals. The final result can be directly exported in the format required by the most common software for genetic mapping and marker–trait association analysis. ASSIsT is developed in Python and runs in Windows and Linux. Availability and implementation: The software, example data sets and tutorials are freely available at http://compbiotoolbox.fmach.it/assist/. Contact: eric.vandeweg@wur.nl PMID:26249809

  7. Genome-wide SNP analysis of the Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (Clarkson disease)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihui; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Iwaki, Shoko; Chan, Eunice; Wisch, Laura; Young, Michael; Nelson, Celeste M; Porcella, Stephen F; Druey, Kirk M

    2013-01-01

    The Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome (SCLS) is an extremely rare, orphan disease that resembles, and is frequently erroneously diagnosed as, systemic anaphylaxis. The disorder is characterized by repeated, transient, and seemingly unprovoked episodes of hypotensive shock and peripheral edema due to transient endothelial hyperpermeability. SCLS is often accompanied by a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS). Using Affymetrix Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) microarrays, we performed the first genome-wide SNP analysis of SCLS in a cohort of 12 disease subjects and 18 controls. Exome capture sequencing was performed on genomic DNA from nine of these patients as validation for the SNP-chip discoveries and de novo data generation. We identified candidate susceptibility loci for SCLS, which included a region flanking CAV3 (3p25.3) as well as SNP clusters in PON1 (7q21.3), PSORS1C1 (6p21.3), and CHCHD3 (7q33). Among the most highly ranked discoveries were gene-associated SNPs in the uncharacterized LOC100130480 gene (rs6417039, rs2004296). Top case-associated SNPs were observed in BTRC (rs12355803, 3rs4436485), ARHGEF18 (rs11668246), CDH13 (rs4782779), and EDG2 (rs12552348), which encode proteins with known or suspected roles in B cell function and/or vascular integrity. 61 SNPs that were significantly associated with SCLS by microarray analysis were also detected and validated by exome deep sequencing. Functional annotation of highly ranked SNPs revealed enrichment of cell projections, cell junctions and adhesion, and molecules containing pleckstrin homology, Ras/Rho regulatory, and immunoglobulin Ig-like C2/fibronectin type III domains, all of which involve mechanistic functions that correlate with the SCLS phenotype. These results highlight SNPs with potential relevance to SCLS. PMID:24808988

  8. A SNP resource for Douglas-fir: de novo transcriptome assembly and SNP detection and validation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), one of the most economically and ecologically important tree species in the world, also has one of the largest tree breeding programs. Although the coastal and interior varieties of Douglas-fir (vars. menziesii and glauca) are native to North America, the coastal variety is also widely planted for timber production in Europe, New Zealand, Australia, and Chile. Our main goal was to develop a SNP resource large enough to facilitate genomic selection in Douglas-fir breeding programs. To accomplish this, we developed a 454-based reference transcriptome for coastal Douglas-fir, annotated and evaluated the quality of the reference, identified putative SNPs, and then validated a sample of those SNPs using the Illumina Infinium genotyping platform. Results We assembled a reference transcriptome consisting of 25,002 isogroups (unique gene models) and 102,623 singletons from 2.76 million 454 and Sanger cDNA sequences from coastal Douglas-fir. We identified 278,979 unique SNPs by mapping the 454 and Sanger sequences to the reference, and by mapping four datasets of Illumina cDNA sequences from multiple seed sources, genotypes, and tissues. The Illumina datasets represented coastal Douglas-fir (64.00 and 13.41 million reads), interior Douglas-fir (80.45 million reads), and a Yakima population similar to interior Douglas-fir (8.99 million reads). We assayed 8067 SNPs on 260 trees using an Illumina Infinium SNP genotyping array. Of these SNPs, 5847 (72.5%) were called successfully and were polymorphic. Conclusions Based on our validation efficiency, our SNP database may contain as many as ~200,000 true SNPs, and as many as ~69,000 SNPs that could be genotyped at ~20,000 gene loci using an Infinium II array—more SNPs than are needed to use genomic selection in tree breeding programs. Ultimately, these genomic resources will enhance Douglas-fir breeding and allow us to better understand landscape-scale patterns of genetic variation

  9. SNP markers identify widely distributed clonal lineages of Phytophthora colocasiae in Vietnam, Hawaii and Hainan Island, China.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sandesh; Hu, Jian; Fryxell, Rebecca Trout; Mudge, Joann; Lamour, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Taro (Colocasia esculenta) is an important food crop, and taro leaf blight caused by Phytophthora colocasiae can significantly affect production. Our objectives were to develop single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for P. colocasiae and characterize populations in Hawaii (HI), Vietnam (VN) and Hainan Island, China (HIC). In total, 379 isolates were analyzed for mating type and multilocus SNP profiles including 214 from HI, 97 from VN and 68 from HIC. A total of 1152 single nucleotide variant (SNV) sites were identified via restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing of two field isolates. Genotyping with 27 SNPs revealed 41 multilocus SNP genotypes grouped into seven clonal lineages containing 2-232 members. Three clonal lineages were shared among countries. In addition, five SNP markers had a low incidence of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) during asexual laboratory growth. For HI and VN, >95% of isolates were the A2 mating type. On HIC, isolates within single clonal lineages had A1, A2 and A0 (neuter) isolates. The implications for the wide dispersal of clonal lineages are discussed. PMID:24895424

  10. DoGSD: the dog and wolf genome SNP database.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Ming; Tang, Bi-Xia; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, He-Chuan; Liu, Yan-Hu; Zhu, Jun-Wei; Irwin, David M; Wang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advancement of next-generation sequencing technology has generated a deluge of genomic data from domesticated dogs and their wild ancestor, grey wolves, which have simultaneously broadened our understanding of domestication and diseases that are shared by humans and dogs. To address the scarcity of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data provided by authorized databases and to make SNP data more easily/friendly usable and available, we propose DoGSD (http://dogsd.big.ac.cn), the first canidae-specific database which focuses on whole genome SNP data from domesticated dogs and grey wolves. The DoGSD is a web-based, open-access resource comprising ∼ 19 million high-quality whole-genome SNPs. In addition to the dbSNP data set (build 139), DoGSD incorporates a comprehensive collection of SNPs from two newly sequenced samples (1 wolf and 1 dog) and collected SNPs from three latest dog/wolf genetic studies (7 wolves and 68 dogs), which were taken together for analysis with the population genetic statistics, Fst. In addition, DoGSD integrates some closely related information including SNP annotation, summary lists of SNPs located in genes, synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs, sampling location and breed information. All these features make DoGSD a useful resource for in-depth analysis in dog-/wolf-related studies. PMID:25404132

  11. DoGSD: the dog and wolf genome SNP database

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Zhao, Wen-Ming; Tang, Bi-Xia; Wang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Zhang; Yang, He-Chuan; Liu, Yan-Hu; Zhu, Jun-Wei; Irwin, David M.; Wang, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advancement of next-generation sequencing technology has generated a deluge of genomic data from domesticated dogs and their wild ancestor, grey wolves, which have simultaneously broadened our understanding of domestication and diseases that are shared by humans and dogs. To address the scarcity of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data provided by authorized databases and to make SNP data more easily/friendly usable and available, we propose DoGSD (http://dogsd.big.ac.cn), the first canidae-specific database which focuses on whole genome SNP data from domesticated dogs and grey wolves. The DoGSD is a web-based, open-access resource comprising ∼19 million high-quality whole-genome SNPs. In addition to the dbSNP data set (build 139), DoGSD incorporates a comprehensive collection of SNPs from two newly sequenced samples (1 wolf and 1 dog) and collected SNPs from three latest dog/wolf genetic studies (7 wolves and 68 dogs), which were taken together for analysis with the population genetic statistics, Fst. In addition, DoGSD integrates some closely related information including SNP annotation, summary lists of SNPs located in genes, synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs, sampling location and breed information. All these features make DoGSD a useful resource for in-depth analysis in dog-/wolf-related studies. PMID:25404132

  12. Substantial SNP-based heritability estimates for working memory performance

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, C; Gschwind, L; Coynel, D; Freytag, V; Milnik, A; Egli, T; Heck, A; de Quervain, D J-F; Papassotiropoulos, A

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is an important endophenotype in neuropsychiatric research and its use in genetic association studies is thought to be a promising approach to increase our understanding of psychiatric disease. As for any genetically complex trait, demonstration of sufficient heritability within the specific study context is a prerequisite for conducting genetic studies of that trait. Recently developed methods allow estimating trait heritability using sets of common genetic markers from genome-wide association study (GWAS) data in samples of unrelated individuals. Here we present single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based heritability estimates (h2SNP) for a WM phenotype. A Caucasian sample comprising a total of N=2298 healthy and young individuals was subjected to an N-back WM task. We calculated the genetic relationship between all individuals on the basis of genome-wide SNP data and performed restricted maximum likelihood analyses for variance component estimation to derive the h2SNP estimates. Heritability estimates for three 2-back derived WM performance measures based on all autosomal chromosomes ranged between 31 and 41%, indicating a substantial SNP-based heritability for WM traits. These results indicate that common genetic factors account for a prominent part of the phenotypic variation in WM performance. Hence, the application of GWAS on WM phenotypes is a valid method to identify the molecular underpinnings of WM. PMID:25203169

  13. Conditions for the validity of SNP-based heritability estimation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The heritability of a trait (h2) is the proportion of its population variance caused by genetic differences, and estimates of this parameter are important for interpreting the results of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In recent years, researchers have adopted a novel method for estimating a lower bound on heritability directly from GWAS data that uses realized genetic similarities between nominally unrelated individuals. The quantity estimated by this method is purported to be the contribution to heritability that could in principle be recovered from association studies employing the given panel of SNPs (hSNP2). Thus far, the validity of this approach has mostly been tested empirically. Here, we provide a mathematical explication and show that the method should remain a robust means of obtaining hSNP2 SNP under circumstances wider than those under which it has so far been derived. PMID:24744256

  14. Whole genome SNP scanning of snow sheep (Ovis nivicola).

    PubMed

    Deniskova, T E; Okhlopkov, I M; Sermyagin, A A; Gladyr', E A; Bagirov, V A; Sölkner, J; Mamaev, N V; Brem, G; Zinov'eva, N A

    2016-07-01

    This is the first report performing the whole genome SNP scanning of snow sheep (Ovis nivicola). Samples of snow sheep (n = 18) collected in six different regions of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) from 64° to 71° N. For SNP genotyping, we applied Ovine 50K SNP BeadChip (Illumina, United States), designed for domestic sheep. The total number of genotyped SNPs (call rate 90%) was 47796 (88.1% of total SNPs), wherein 1006 SNPs were polymorphic (2.1%). Principal component analysis (PCA) showed the clear differentiation within the species O. nivicola: studied individuals were distributed among five distinct arrays corresponding to the geographical locations of sampling points. Our results demonstrate that the DNA chip designed for domestic sheep can be successfully used to study the allele pool and the genetic structure of snow sheep populations. PMID:27599514

  15. SNP variation in ADRB3 gene reflects the breed difference of sheep populations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianliang; Qiao, Liying; Liu, Jianhua; Yuan, Yanan; Liu, Wenzhong

    2012-08-01

    The β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3), a G-protein coupled receptor, plays a major role in energy metabolism and regulation of lipolysis and homeostasis. We detect the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in full-length sequence of ovine ADRB3 gene in 12 domestic sheep populations within four types by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing to reveal the breed difference. Twenty-two SNPs, 12 of which in the exon 1 and ten in the intron, were detected, and 12 new exonic and four new intronic SNPs were found. Most SNPs presented in Shanxi Dam Line and least ones in Dorset. The average SNP number in both meat and dual purpose for meat and wool breeds was significantly higher than general and dual purpose breeds for wool and meat. Frequency of each SNP in studied breeds or types was different. The 18C Del and 1617T Ins majorly existed in dual purpose breeds for wool and meat. The 25A Del, 119C>G and 130C>T were mostly found in the meat and dual purpose for meat and wool breeds. The 1764C>A more frequently presented in meat than in other types. The majority of variations came from within the populations as suggested by analysis of molecular variance. Close relationship presented among the Chinese and western breeds, respectively. In conclusion, SNPs of ovine ADRB3 gene can reflect the breed difference and within- and between-population variations, and to a great extent, the breed relationship. PMID:22711302

  16. SNP diversity within and among Brassica rapa accessions reveals no geographic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tanhuanpää, P; Erkkilä, M; Tenhola-Roininen, T; Tanskanen, J; Manninen, O

    2016-01-01

    Genetic diversity was studied in a collection of 61 accessions of Brassica rapa, which were mostly oil-type turnip rapes but also included two oil-type subsp. dichotoma and five subsp. trilocularis accessions, as well as three leaf-type subspecies (subsp. japonica, pekinensis, and chinensis) and five turnip cultivars (subsp. rapa). Two-hundred and nine SNP markers, which had been discovered by amplicon resequencing, were used to genotype 893 plants from the B. rapa collection using Illumina BeadXpress. There was great variation in the diversity indices between accessions. With STRUCTURE analysis, the plant collection could be divided into three groups that seemed to correspond to morphotype and flowering habit but not to geography. According to AMOVA analysis, 65% of the variation was due to variation within accessions, 25% among accessions, and 10% among groups. A smaller subset of the plant collection, 12 accessions, was also studied with 5727 GBS-SNPs. Diversity indices obtained with GBS-SNPs correlated well with those obtained with Illumina BeadXpress SNPs. The developed SNP markers have already been used and will be used in future plant breeding programs as well as in mapping and diversity studies. PMID:26694015

  17. Do you really know where this SNP goes?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The release of build 10.2 of the swine genome was a marked improvement over previous builds and has proven extremely useful. However, as most know, there are regions of the genome that this particular build does not accurately represent. For instance, nearly 25% of the 62,162 SNP on the Illumina Por...

  18. Analysis of genetic diversity using SNP markers in oat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery was carried out in cultivated oat using Roche 454 sequencing methods. DNA sequences were generated from cDNAs originating from a panel of 20 diverse oat cultivars, and from Diversity Array Technology (DArT) genomic complexity reductions fr...

  19. Genetic mapping in grapevine using a SNP microarray: intensity values

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotyping microarrays are widely used for genome wide association studies, but in high-diversity organisms, the quality of SNP calls can be diminished by genetic variation near the assayed nucleotide. To address this limitation in grapevine, we developed a simple heuristic that uses hybridization i...

  20. SNP marker diversity in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Cortés, Andrés J; Chavarro, Martha C; Blair, Matthew W

    2011-09-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have become a genetic technology of choice because of their automation and high precision of allele calls. In this study, our goal was to develop 94 SNPs and test them across well-chosen common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm. We validated and accessed SNP diversity at 84 gene-based and 10 non-genic loci using KASPar technology in a panel of 70 genotypes that have been used as parents of mapping populations and have been previously evaluated for SSRs. SNPs exhibited high levels of genetic diversity, an excess of middle frequency polymorphism, and a within-genepool mismatch distribution as expected for populations affected by sudden demographic expansions after domestication bottlenecks. This set of markers was useful for distinguishing Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes but less useful for distinguishing within each gene pool. In summary, slightly greater polymorphism and race structure was found within the Andean gene pool than within the Mesoamerican gene pool but polymorphism rate between genotypes was consistent with genepool and race identity. Our survey results represent a baseline for the choice of SNP markers for future applications because gene-associated SNPs could themselves be causative SNPs for traits. Finally, we discuss that the ideal genetic marker combination with which to carry out diversity, mapping and association studies in common bean should consider a mix of both SNP and SSR markers. PMID:21785951

  1. SNP Discovery through Next-Generation Sequencing and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Banks, Travis W.; Cloutier, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    The decreasing cost along with rapid progress in next-generation sequencing and related bioinformatics computing resources has facilitated large-scale discovery of SNPs in various model and nonmodel plant species. Large numbers and genome-wide availability of SNPs make them the marker of choice in partially or completely sequenced genomes. Although excellent reviews have been published on next-generation sequencing, its associated bioinformatics challenges, and the applications of SNPs in genetic studies, a comprehensive review connecting these three intertwined research areas is needed. This paper touches upon various aspects of SNP discovery, highlighting key points in availability and selection of appropriate sequencing platforms, bioinformatics pipelines, SNP filtering criteria, and applications of SNPs in genetic analyses. The use of next-generation sequencing methodologies in many non-model crops leading to discovery and implementation of SNPs in various genetic studies is discussed. Development and improvement of bioinformatics software that are open source and freely available have accelerated the SNP discovery while reducing the associated cost. Key considerations for SNP filtering and associated pipelines are discussed in specific topics. A list of commonly used software and their sources is compiled for easy access and reference. PMID:23227038

  2. Software solutions for the livestock genomics SNP array revolution.

    PubMed

    Nicolazzi, E L; Biffani, S; Biscarini, F; Orozco Ter Wengel, P; Caprera, A; Nazzicari, N; Stella, A

    2015-08-01

    Since the beginning of the genomic era, the number of available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays has grown considerably. In the bovine species alone, 11 SNP chips not completely covered by intellectual property are currently available, and the number is growing. Genomic/genotype data are not standardized, and this hampers its exchange and integration. In addition, software used for the analyses of these data usually requires not standard (i.e. case specific) input files which, considering the large amount of data to be handled, require at least some programming skills in their production. In this work, we describe a software toolkit for SNP array data management, imputation, genome-wide association studies, population genetics and genomic selection. However, this toolkit does not solve the critical need for standardization of the genotypic data and software input files. It only highlights the chaotic situation each researcher has to face on a daily basis and gives some helpful advice on the currently available tools in order to navigate the SNP array data complexity. PMID:25907889

  3. Association of Atherosclerotic Peripheral Arterial Disease with Adiponectin Genes SNP+45 and SNP+276: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gherman, Claudia D.; Bolboacă, Sorana D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We hypothesized that adiponectin gene SNP+45 (rs2241766) and SNP+276 (rs1501299) would be associated with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Furthermore, the association between circulating adiponectin levels, fetuin-A, and tumoral necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in patients with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease was investigated. Method. Several blood parameters (such as adiponectin, fetuin-A, and TNF-α) were measured in 346 patients, 226 with atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and 120 without symptomatic PAD (non-PAD). Two common SNPs of the ADIPOQ gene represented by +45T/G 2 and +276G/T were also investigated. Results. Adiponectin concentrations showed lower circulating levels in the PAD patients compared to non-PAD patients (P < 0.001). Decreasing adiponectin concentration was associated with increasing serum levels of fetuin-A in the PAD patients. None of the investigated adiponectin SNPs proved to be associated with the subjects' susceptibility to PAD (P > 0.05). Conclusion. The results of our study demonstrated that neither adiponectin SNP+45 nor SNP+276 is associated with the risk of PAD. PMID:23819115

  4. High throughput SNP discovery and validation in the pig: towards the development of a high density swine SNP chip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent developments in sequencing technology have allowed the generation of millions of short read sequences in a fast and inexpensive way. This enables the cost effective large scale identification of hundreds of thousands of SNPs needed for the development of high density SNP arrays. Currently, a ...

  5. Large-Scale SNP Discovery through RNA Sequencing and SNP Genotyping by Targeted Enrichment Sequencing in Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

    PubMed Central

    Pootakham, Wirulda; Shearman, Jeremy R.; Ruang-areerate, Panthita; Sonthirod, Chutima; Sangsrakru, Duangjai; Jomchai, Nukoon; Yoocha, Thippawan; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tangphatsornruang, Sithichoke

    2014-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important crop species being the main source of dietary energy in several countries. Marker-assisted selection has become an essential tool in plant breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery via transcriptome sequencing is an attractive strategy for genome complexity reduction in organisms with large genomes. We sequenced the transcriptome of 16 cassava accessions using the Illumina HiSeq platform and identified 675,559 EST-derived SNP markers. A subset of those markers was subsequently genotyped by capture-based targeted enrichment sequencing in 100 F1 progeny segregating for starch viscosity phenotypes. A total of 2,110 non-redundant SNP markers were used to construct a genetic map. This map encompasses 1,785 cM and consists of 19 linkage groups. A major quantitative trait locus (QTL) controlling starch pasting properties was identified and shown to coincide with the QTL previously reported for this trait. With a high-density SNP-based linkage map presented here, we also uncovered a novel QTL associated with starch pasting time on LG 10. PMID:25551642

  6. High-throughput SNP genotyping for breeding applications in rice using the BeadXpress platform

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have the potential to increase the speed and cost-effectiveness of genotyping, provided that an optimal SNP density is used for each application. To test the efficiency of multiplexed SNP genotyping for diversity, mapping and breeding applicat...

  7. Multiple SNP Set Analysis for Genome-Wide Association Studies Through Bayesian Latent Variable Selection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhao-Hua; Zhu, Hongtu; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Sullivan, Patrick F; Williams, Stephanie N; Zou, Fei

    2015-12-01

    The power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for mapping complex traits with single-SNP analysis (where SNP is single-nucleotide polymorphism) may be undermined by modest SNP effect sizes, unobserved causal SNPs, correlation among adjacent SNPs, and SNP-SNP interactions. Alternative approaches for testing the association between a single SNP set and individual phenotypes have been shown to be promising for improving the power of GWAS. We propose a Bayesian latent variable selection (BLVS) method to simultaneously model the joint association mapping between a large number of SNP sets and complex traits. Compared with single SNP set analysis, such joint association mapping not only accounts for the correlation among SNP sets but also is capable of detecting causal SNP sets that are marginally uncorrelated with traits. The spike-and-slab prior assigned to the effects of SNP sets can greatly reduce the dimension of effective SNP sets, while speeding up computation. An efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm is developed. Simulations demonstrate that BLVS outperforms several competing variable selection methods in some important scenarios. PMID:26515609

  8. The development and characterization of a 57K SNP array for rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we describe the development and characterization of the first high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping array for rainbow trout. The SNP array is publically available from a commercial vendor. The SNP genotyping quality was high and validation rate was close to 90%...

  9. Development of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Markers for Use in Commercial Maize (Zea Mays L.) Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in maize offer the opportunity to utilize DNA markers in many new areas of population genetics, gene discovery, plant breeding, and germplasm identification. However, the steps from sequencing and SNP discovery to SNP marker design and ...

  10. Influence of MDM2 SNP309 and SNP285 status on the risk of cancer in the breast, prostate, lung and colon.

    PubMed

    Gansmo, Liv B; Knappskog, Stian; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Lønning, Per E

    2015-07-01

    MDM2 is a key regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor protein and is overexpressed in many human cancers. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the MDM2 intronic promoter (P2) have been found to exert biological function. The G-allele of SNP309T>G; rs2279744 increases MDM2 transcription and has been linked to increased cancer risk. In contrast, the less frequent SNP285G>C; rs117039649, which is in complete linkage disequilibrium with SNP309 (generating a SNP285C/309G variant haplotype), has been related to reduced MDM2 transcription and to reduced risk of breast, endometrial and ovarian cancer. In this large population-based case-control study, we genotyped SNP309 and SNP285 in 10,830 individuals, including cases with cancer of the breast (n=1,717), colon (n=1,532), lung (n=1,331) and prostate (n=2,501), as well as 3,749 non-cancer controls. We found a slightly reduced risk for lung cancer among individuals harboring the SNP309TG/GG genotypes compared to the SNP309TT genotype (OR= 0.86; CI = 0.67-0.98), but this association was restricted to women (OR = 0.77; CI = 0.63-0.95) and was not present among men (OR = 0.91; CI = 0.77-1.08). Consistent with previous findings, we found a reduced risk for breast cancer among individuals carrying the SNP285GC/309GG genotype versus the SNP285GG/309GG genotype (OR = 0.55; CI = 0.33-0.93). In conclusion, our data support the hypothesis that the effects of both SNP285 and SNP309 status are tissue dependent. PMID:25431177

  11. Role of an SNP in Alternative Splicing of Bovine NCF4 and Mastitis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuge; Yang, Chunhong; Sun, Yan; Jiang, Qiang; Wang, Fei; Li, Mengjiao; Zhong, Jifeng; Huang, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil cytosolic factor 4 (NCF4) is component of the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate oxidase complex, a key factor in biochemical pathways and innate immune responses. In this study, splice variants and functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of NCF4 were identified to determine the variability and association of the gene with susceptibility to bovine mastitis characterized by inflammation. A novel splice variant, designated as NCF4-TV and characterized by the retention of a 48 bp sequence in intron 9, was detected in the mammary gland tissues of infected cows. The expression of the NCF4-reference main transcript in the mastitic mammary tissues was higher than that in normal tissues. A novel SNP, g.18174 A>G, was also found in the retained 48 bp region of intron 9. To determine whether NCF4-TV could be due to the g.18174 A>G mutation, we constructed two mini-gene expression vectors with the wild-type or mutant NCF4 g.18174 A>G fragment. The vectors were then transiently transfected into 293T cells, and alternative splicing of NCF4 was analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR and sequencing. Mini-gene splicing assay demonstrated that the aberrantly spliced NCF4-TV with 48 bp retained fragment in intron 9 could be due to g.18174 A>G, which was associated with milk somatic count score and increased risk of mastitis infection in cows. NCF4 expression was also regulated by alternative splicing. This study proposes that NCF4 splice variants generated by functional SNP are important risk factors for mastitis susceptibility in dairy cows. PMID:26600390

  12. Investigating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density in the human genome and its implications for molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongming; Fu, Yun-Xin; Hewett-Emmett, David; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2003-07-17

    We investigated the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density across the human genome and in different genic categories using two SNP databases: Celera's CgsSNP, which includes SNPs identified by comparing genomic sequences, and Celera's RefSNP, which includes SNPs from a variety of sources and is biased toward disease-associated genes. Based on CgsSNP, the average numbers of SNPs per 10 kb was 8.33, 8.44, and 8.09 in the human genome, in intergenic regions, and in genic regions, respectively. In genic regions, the SNP density in intronic, exonic and adjoining untranslated regions was 8.21, 5.28, and 7.51 SNPs per 10 kb, respectively. The pattern of SNP density based on RefSNP was different from that based on CgsSNP, emphasizing its utility for genotype-phenotype association studies but not for most population genetic studies. The number of SNPs per chromosome was correlated with chromosome length, but the density of SNPs estimated by CgsSNP was not significantly correlated with the GC content of the chromosome. Based on CgsSNP, the ratio of nonsense to missense mutations (0.027), the ratio of missense to silent mutations (1.15), and the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous mutations (1.18) was less than half of that expected in a human protein coding sequence under the neutral mutation theory, reflecting a role for natural selection, especially purifying selection. PMID:12909357

  13. Multiple SNP-sets Analysis for Genome-wide Association Studies through Bayesian Latent Variable Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohua; Zhu, Hongtu; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Stephanie, Williams N.; Zou, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The power of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for mapping complex traits with single SNP analysis may be undermined by modest SNP effect sizes, unobserved causal SNPs, correlation among adjacent SNPs, and SNP-SNP interactions. Alternative approaches for testing the association between a single SNP-set and individual phenotypes have been shown to be promising for improving the power of GWAS. We propose a Bayesian latent variable selection (BLVS) method to simultaneously model the joint association mapping between a large number of SNP-sets and complex traits. Compared to single SNP-set analysis, such joint association mapping not only accounts for the correlation among SNP-sets, but also is capable of detecting causal SNP-sets that are marginally uncorrelated with traits. The spike-slab prior assigned to the effects of SNP-sets can greatly reduce the dimension of effective SNP-sets, while speeding up computation. An efficient MCMC algorithm is developed. Simulations demonstrate that BLVS outperforms several competing variable selection methods in some important scenarios. PMID:26515609

  14. mrsFAST-Ultra: a compact, SNP-aware mapper for high performance sequencing applications

    PubMed Central

    Hach, Faraz; Sarrafi, Iman; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Alkan, Can; Eichler, Evan E.; Sahinalp, S. Cenk

    2014-01-01

    High throughput sequencing (HTS) platforms generate unprecedented amounts of data that introduce challenges for processing and downstream analysis. While tools that report the ‘best’ mapping location of each read provide a fast way to process HTS data, they are not suitable for many types of downstream analysis such as structural variation detection, where it is important to report multiple mapping loci for each read. For this purpose we introduce mrsFAST-Ultra, a fast, cache oblivious, SNP-aware aligner that can handle the multi-mapping of HTS reads very efficiently. mrsFAST-Ultra improves mrsFAST, our first cache oblivious read aligner capable of handling multi-mapping reads, through new and compact index structures that reduce not only the overall memory usage but also the number of CPU operations per alignment. In fact the size of the index generated by mrsFAST-Ultra is 10 times smaller than that of mrsFAST. As importantly, mrsFAST-Ultra introduces new features such as being able to (i) obtain the best mapping loci for each read, and (ii) return all reads that have at most n mapping loci (within an error threshold), together with these loci, for any user specified n. Furthermore, mrsFAST-Ultra is SNP-aware, i.e. it can map reads to reference genome while discounting the mismatches that occur at common SNP locations provided by db-SNP; this significantly increases the number of reads that can be mapped to the reference genome. Notice that all of the above features are implemented within the index structure and are not simple post-processing steps and thus are performed highly efficiently. Finally, mrsFAST-Ultra utilizes multiple available cores and processors and can be tuned for various memory settings. Our results show that mrsFAST-Ultra is roughly five times faster than its predecessor mrsFAST. In comparison to newly enhanced popular tools such as Bowtie2, it is more sensitive (it can report 10 times or more mappings per read) and much faster (six times

  15. Introgression browser: high-throughput whole-genome SNP visualization.

    PubMed

    Aflitos, Saulo Alves; Sanchez-Perez, Gabino; de Ridder, Dick; Fransz, Paul; Schranz, Michael E; de Jong, Hans; Peters, Sander A

    2015-04-01

    Breeding by introgressive hybridization is a pivotal strategy to broaden the genetic basis of crops. Usually, the desired traits are monitored in consecutive crossing generations by marker-assisted selection, but their analyses fail in chromosome regions where crossover recombinants are rare or not viable. Here, we present the Introgression Browser (iBrowser), a bioinformatics tool aimed at visualizing introgressions at nucleotide or SNP (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) accuracy. The software selects homozygous SNPs from Variant Call Format (VCF) information and filters out heterozygous SNPs, multi-nucleotide polymorphisms (MNPs) and insertion-deletions (InDels). For data analysis iBrowser makes use of sliding windows, but if needed it can generate any desired fragmentation pattern through General Feature Format (GFF) information. In an example of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) accessions we visualize SNP patterns and elucidate both position and boundaries of the introgressions. We also show that our tool is capable of identifying alien DNA in a panel of the closely related S. pimpinellifolium by examining phylogenetic relationships of the introgressed segments in tomato. In a third example, we demonstrate the power of the iBrowser in a panel of 597 Arabidopsis accessions, detecting the boundaries of a SNP-free region around a polymorphic 1.17 Mbp inverted segment on the short arm of chromosome 4. The architecture and functionality of iBrowser makes the software appropriate for a broad set of analyses including SNP mining, genome structure analysis, and pedigree analysis. Its functionality, together with the capability to process large data sets and efficient visualization of sequence variation, makes iBrowser a valuable breeding tool. PMID:25704554

  16. Detection of homologous horizontal gene transfer in SNP data

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-07-23

    We study the detection of mutations, sequencing errors, and homologous horizontal gene transfers (HGT) in a set of closely related microbial genomes. We base the model on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP's) and break the genomes into blocks to handle the rearrangement problem. Then we apply a synamic programming algorithm to model whether changes within each block are likely a result of mutations, sequencing errors, or HGT.

  17. Genetic heterogeneity in rhabdomyosarcoma revealed by SNP array analysis.

    PubMed

    Walther, Charles; Mayrhofer, Markus; Nilsson, Jenny; Hofvander, Jakob; Jonson, Tord; Mandahl, Nils; Øra, Ingrid; Gisselsson, David; Mertens, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children and adolescents. Alveolar (ARMS) and embryonal (ERMS) histologies predominate, but rare cases are classified as spindle cell/sclerosing (SRMS). For treatment stratification, RMS is further subclassified as fusion-positive (FP-RMS) or fusion-negative (FN-RMS), depending on whether a gene fusion involving PAX3 or PAX7 is present or not. We investigated 19 cases of pediatric RMS using high resolution single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. FP-ARMS displayed, on average, more structural rearrangements than ERMS; the single FN-ARMS had a genomic profile similar to ERMS. Apart from previously known amplification (e.g., MYCN, CDK4, and MIR17HG) and deletion (e.g., NF1, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B) targets, amplification of ERBB2 and homozygous loss of ASCC3 or ODZ3 were seen. Combining SNP array with cytogenetic data revealed that most cases were polyploid, with at least one case having started as a near-haploid tumor. Further bioinformatic analysis of the SNP array data disclosed genetic heterogeneity, in the form of subclonal chromosomal imbalances, in five tumors. The outcome was worse for patients with FP-ARMS than ERMS or FN-ARMS (6/8 vs. 1/9 dead of disease), and the only children with ERMS showing intratumor diversity or with MYOD1 mutation-positive SRMS also died of disease. High resolution SNP array can be useful in evaluating genomic imbalances in pediatric RMS. PMID:26482321

  18. Robust Demographic Inference from Genomic and SNP Data

    PubMed Central

    Excoffier, Laurent; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Huerta-Sánchez, Emilia; Sousa, Vitor C.; Foll, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a flexible and robust simulation-based framework to infer demographic parameters from the site frequency spectrum (SFS) computed on large genomic datasets. We show that our composite-likelihood approach allows one to study evolutionary models of arbitrary complexity, which cannot be tackled by other current likelihood-based methods. For simple scenarios, our approach compares favorably in terms of accuracy and speed with , the current reference in the field, while showing better convergence properties for complex models. We first apply our methodology to non-coding genomic SNP data from four human populations. To infer their demographic history, we compare neutral evolutionary models of increasing complexity, including unsampled populations. We further show the versatility of our framework by extending it to the inference of demographic parameters from SNP chips with known ascertainment, such as that recently released by Affymetrix to study human origins. Whereas previous ways of handling ascertained SNPs were either restricted to a single population or only allowed the inference of divergence time between a pair of populations, our framework can correctly infer parameters of more complex models including the divergence of several populations, bottlenecks and migration. We apply this approach to the reconstruction of African demography using two distinct ascertained human SNP panels studied under two evolutionary models. The two SNP panels lead to globally very similar estimates and confidence intervals, and suggest an ancient divergence (>110 Ky) between Yoruba and San populations. Our methodology appears well suited to the study of complex scenarios from large genomic data sets. PMID:24204310

  19. PanSNPdb: The Pan-Asian SNP Genotyping Database

    PubMed Central

    Ngamphiw, Chumpol; Assawamakin, Anunchai; Xu, Shuhua; Shaw, Philip J.; Yang, Jin Ok; Ghang, Ho; Bhak, Jong; Liu, Edison; Tongsima, Sissades

    2011-01-01

    The HUGO Pan-Asian SNP consortium conducted the largest survey to date of human genetic diversity among Asians by sampling 1,719 unrelated individuals among 71 populations from China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. We have constructed a database (PanSNPdb), which contains these data and various new analyses of them. PanSNPdb is a research resource in the analysis of the population structure of Asian peoples, including linkage disequilibrium patterns, haplotype distributions, and copy number variations. Furthermore, PanSNPdb provides an interactive comparison with other SNP and CNV databases, including HapMap3, JSNP, dbSNP and DGV and thus provides a comprehensive resource of human genetic diversity. The information is accessible via a widely accepted graphical interface used in many genetic variation databases. Unrestricted access to PanSNPdb and any associated files is available at: http://www4a.biotec.or.th/PASNP. PMID:21731755

  20. Development of a forensic identity SNP panel for Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Augustinus, Daniel; Gahan, Michelle E; McNevin, Dennis

    2015-07-01

    Genetic markers included in forensic identity panels must exhibit Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium (HWE and LE). "Universal" panels designed for global use can fail these tests in regional jurisdictions exhibiting high levels of genetic differentiation such as the Indonesian archipelago. This is especially the case where a single DNA database is required for allele frequency estimates to calculate random match probabilities (RMPs) and associated likelihood ratios (LRs). A panel of 65 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a reduced set of 52 SNPs have been selected from 15 Indonesian subpopulations in the HUGO Pan Asian SNP database using a SNP selection strategy that could be applied to any panel of forensic identity markers. The strategy consists of four screening steps: (1) application of a G test for HWE; (2) ranking for high heterozygosity; (3) selection for LE; and (4) selection for low inbreeding depression. SNPs in our Indonesian panel perform well in comparison to some other universal SNP and short tandem repeat (STR) panels as measured by Fisher's exact test for HWE and LE and Wright's F statistics. PMID:25104323

  1. Multiplex Detection and SNP Genotyping in a Single Fluorescence Channel

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guoliang; Miles, Andrea; Alphey, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Probe-based PCR is widely used for SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping and pathogen nucleic acid detection due to its simplicity, sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. However, the multiplex capability of hydrolysis probe-based PCR is normally limited to one target (pathogen or allele) per fluorescence channel. Current fluorescence PCR machines typically have 4–6 channels. We present a strategy permitting the multiplex detection of multiple targets in a single detection channel. The technique is named Multiplex Probe Amplification (MPA). Polymorphisms of the CYP2C9 gene (cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily C, polypeptide 9, CYP2C9*2) and human papillomavirus sequences HPV16, 18, 31, 52 and 59 were chosen as model targets for testing MPA. The allele status of the CYP2C9*2 determined by MPA was entirely concordant with the reference TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assays. The four HPV strain sequences could be independently detected in a single fluorescence detection channel. The results validate the multiplex capacity, the simplicity and accuracy of MPA for SNP genotyping and multiplex detection using different probes labeled with the same fluorophore. The technique offers a new way to multiplex in a single detection channel of a closed-tube PCR. PMID:22272339

  2. Multiplex detection and SNP genotyping in a single fluorescence channel.

    PubMed

    Fu, Guoliang; Miles, Andrea; Alphey, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Probe-based PCR is widely used for SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotyping and pathogen nucleic acid detection due to its simplicity, sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. However, the multiplex capability of hydrolysis probe-based PCR is normally limited to one target (pathogen or allele) per fluorescence channel. Current fluorescence PCR machines typically have 4-6 channels. We present a strategy permitting the multiplex detection of multiple targets in a single detection channel. The technique is named Multiplex Probe Amplification (MPA). Polymorphisms of the CYP2C9 gene (cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily C, polypeptide 9, CYP2C9*2) and human papillomavirus sequences HPV16, 18, 31, 52 and 59 were chosen as model targets for testing MPA. The allele status of the CYP2C9*2 determined by MPA was entirely concordant with the reference TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assays. The four HPV strain sequences could be independently detected in a single fluorescence detection channel. The results validate the multiplex capacity, the simplicity and accuracy of MPA for SNP genotyping and multiplex detection using different probes labeled with the same fluorophore. The technique offers a new way to multiplex in a single detection channel of a closed-tube PCR. PMID:22272339

  3. How far from the SNP may the causative genes be?

    PubMed

    Brodie, Aharon; Azaria, Johnathan Roy; Ofran, Yanay

    2016-07-27

    While GWAS identify many disease-associated SNPs, using them to decipher disease mechanisms is hindered by the difficulty in mapping SNPs to genes. Most SNPs are in non-coding regions and it is often hard to identify the genes they implicate. To explore how far the SNP may be from the affected genes we used a pathway-based approach. We found that affected genes are often up to 2 Mbps away from the associated SNP, and are not necessarily the closest genes to the SNP. Existing approaches for mapping SNPs to genes leave many SNPs unmapped to genes and reveal only 86 significant phenotype-pathway associations for all known GWAS hits combined. Using the pathway-based approach we propose here allows mapping of virtually all SNPs to genes and reveals 435 statistically significant phenotype-pathway associations. In search for mechanisms that may explain the relationships between SNPs and distant genes, we found that SNPs that are mapped to distant genes have significantly more large insertions/deletions around them than other SNPs, suggesting that these SNPs may sometimes be markers for large insertions/deletions that may affect large genomic regions. PMID:27269582

  4. Population distribution and ancestry of the cancer protective MDM2 SNP285 (rs117039649).

    PubMed

    Knappskog, Stian; Gansmo, Liv B; Dibirova, Khadizha; Metspalu, Andres; Cybulski, Cezary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Aaltonen, Lauri; Vatten, Lars; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Devilee, Peter; Evans, Gareth D; Lin, Dongxin; Van Camp, Guy; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Osorio, Ana; Milani, Lili; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Zalloua, Pierre; Mouzaya, Francis; Bliznetz, Elena; Balanovska, Elena; Pocheshkova, Elvira; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Atramentova, Lubov; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Titov, Konstantin; Lavryashina, Maria; Yusupov, Yuldash; Bogdanova, Natalia; Koshel, Sergey; Zamora, Jorge; Wedge, David C; Charlesworth, Deborah; Dörk, Thilo; Balanovsky, Oleg; Lønning, Per E

    2014-09-30

    The MDM2 promoter SNP285C is located on the SNP309G allele. While SNP309G enhances Sp1 transcription factor binding and MDM2 transcription, SNP285C antagonizes Sp1 binding and reduces the risk of breast-, ovary- and endometrial cancer. Assessing SNP285 and 309 genotypes across 25 different ethnic populations (>10.000 individuals), the incidence of SNP285C was 6-8% across European populations except for Finns (1.2%) and Saami (0.3%). The incidence decreased towards the Middle-East and Eastern Russia, and SNP285C was absent among Han Chinese, Mongolians and African Americans. Interhaplotype variation analyses estimated SNP285C to have originated about 14,700 years ago (95% CI: 8,300 - 33,300). Both this estimate and the geographical distribution suggest SNP285C to have arisen after the separation between Caucasians and modern day East Asians (17,000 - 40,000 years ago). We observed a strong inverse correlation (r = -0.805; p < 0.001) between the percentage of SNP309G alleles harboring SNP285C and the MAF for SNP309G itself across different populations suggesting selection and environmental adaptation with respect to MDM2 expression in recent human evolution. In conclusion, we found SNP285C to be a pan-Caucasian variant. Ethnic variation regarding distribution of SNP285C needs to be taken into account when assessing the impact of MDM2 SNPs on cancer risk. PMID:25327560

  5. Population distribution and ancestry of the cancer protective MDM2 SNP285 (rs117039649)

    PubMed Central

    Knappskog, Stian; Gansmo, Liv B.; Dibirova, Khadizha; Metspalu, Andres; Cybulski, Cezary; Peterlongo, Paolo; Aaltonen, Lauri; Vatten, Lars; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Devilee, Peter; Evans, Gareth D.; Lin, Dongxin; Camp, Guy Van; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G.; Osorio, Ana; Milani, Lili; Ozcelik, Tayfun; Zalloua, Pierre; Mouzaya, Francis; Bliznetz, Elena; Balanovska, Elena; Pocheshkova, Elvira; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Atramentova, Lubov; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Titov, Konstantin; Lavryashina, Maria; Yusupov, Yuldash; Bogdanova, Natalia; Koshel, Sergey; Zamora, Jorge; Wedge, David C.; Charlesworth, Deborah; Dörk, Thilo; Balanovsky, Oleg; Lønning, Per E.

    2014-01-01

    The MDM2 promoter SNP285C is located on the SNP309G allele. While SNP309G enhances Sp1 transcription factor binding and MDM2 transcription, SNP285C antagonizes Sp1 binding and reduces the risk of breast-, ovary- and endometrial cancer. Assessing SNP285 and 309 genotypes across 25 different ethnic populations (>10.000 individuals), the incidence of SNP285C was 6-8% across European populations except for Finns (1.2%) and Saami (0.3%). The incidence decreased towards the Middle-East and Eastern Russia, and SNP285C was absent among Han Chinese, Mongolians and African Americans. Interhaplotype variation analyses estimated SNP285C to have originated about 14,700 years ago (95% CI: 8,300 – 33,300). Both this estimate and the geographical distribution suggest SNP285C to have arisen after the separation between Caucasians and modern day East Asians (17,000 - 40,000 years ago). We observed a strong inverse correlation (r = -0.805; p < 0.001) between the percentage of SNP309G alleles harboring SNP285C and the MAF for SNP309G itself across different populations suggesting selection and environmental adaptation with respect to MDM2 expression in recent human evolution. In conclusion, we found SNP285C to be a pan-Caucasian variant. Ethnic variation regarding distribution of SNP285C needs to be taken into account when assessing the impact of MDM2 SNPs on cancer risk. PMID:25327560

  6. Use of Microsatellite and SNP Markers for Biotype Characterization in Hessian Fly

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Yan Ma; Cambron, Sue E.; Crane, Charles F.; Shukle, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of the biotype structure of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), would improve our knowledge regarding variation in virulence phenotypes and difference in genetic background. Microsatellites (simple sequence repeats) and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are highly variable genetic markers that are widely used in population genetic studies. This study developed and tested a panel of 18 microsatellite and 22 SNP markers to investigate the genetic structure of nine Hessian fly biotypes: B, C, D, E, GP, L, O, vH9, and vH13. The simple sequence repeats were more polymorphic than the SNP markers, and their neighbor-joining trees differed in consequence. Microsatellites suggested a simple geographic association of related biotypes that did not progressively gain virulence with increasing genetic distance from a founder type. Use of the k-means clustering algorithm in the STRUCTURE program shows that the nine biotypes comprise six to eight populations that are related to geography or history within laboratory cultures. PMID:26543089

  7. Fast and Rigorous Computation of Gene and Pathway Scores from SNP-Based Summary Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Rueedi, Rico; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bergmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Integrating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) p-values from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) across genes and pathways is a strategy to improve statistical power and gain biological insight. Here, we present Pascal (Pathway scoring algorithm), a powerful tool for computing gene and pathway scores from SNP-phenotype association summary statistics. For gene score computation, we implemented analytic and efficient numerical solutions to calculate test statistics. We examined in particular the sum and the maximum of chi-squared statistics, which measure the strongest and the average association signals per gene, respectively. For pathway scoring, we use a modified Fisher method, which offers not only significant power improvement over more traditional enrichment strategies, but also eliminates the problem of arbitrary threshold selection inherent in any binary membership based pathway enrichment approach. We demonstrate the marked increase in power by analyzing summary statistics from dozens of large meta-studies for various traits. Our extensive testing indicates that our method not only excels in rigorous type I error control, but also results in more biologically meaningful discoveries. PMID:26808494

  8. SNPs3D: Candidate gene and SNP selection for association studies

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Peng; Melamud, Eugene; Moult, John

    2006-01-01

    Background The relationship between disease susceptibility and genetic variation is complex, and many different types of data are relevant. We describe a web resource and database that provides and integrates as much information as possible on disease/gene relationships at the molecular level. Description The resource has three primary modules. One module identifies which genes are candidates for involvement in a specified disease. A second module provides information about the relationships between sets of candidate genes. The third module analyzes the likely impact of non-synonymous SNPs on protein function. Disease/candidate gene relationships and gene-gene relationships are derived from the literature using simple but effective text profiling. SNP/protein function relationships are derived by two methods, one using principles of protein structure and stability, the other based on sequence conservation. Entries for each gene include a number of links to other data, such as expression profiles, pathway context, mouse knockout information and papers. Gene-gene interactions are presented in an interactive graphical interface, providing rapid access to the underlying information, as well as convenient navigation through the network. Use of the resource is illustrated with aspects of the inflammatory response and hypertension. Conclusion The combination of SNP impact analysis, a knowledge based network of gene relationships and candidate genes, and access to a wide range of data and literature allow a user to quickly assimilate available information, and so develop models of gene-pathway-disease interaction. PMID:16551372

  9. Genome-wide prediction of cancer driver genes based on SNP and cancer SNV data.

    PubMed

    He, Quanze; He, Quanyuan; Liu, Xiaohui; Wei, Youheng; Shen, Suqin; Hu, Xiaohui; Li, Qiao; Peng, Xiangwen; Wang, Lin; Yu, Long

    2014-01-01

    Identifying cancer driver genes and exploring their functions are essential and the most urgent need in basic cancer research. Developing efficient methods to differentiate between driver and passenger somatic mutations revealed from large-scale cancer genome sequencing data is critical to cancer driver gene discovery. Here, we compared distinct features of SNP with SNV data in detail and found that the weighted ratio of SNV to SNP (termed as WVPR) is an excellent indicator for cancer driver genes. The power of WVPR was validated by accurate predictions of known drivers. We ranked most of human genes by WVPR and did functional analyses on the list. The results demonstrate that driver genes are usually highly enriched in chromatin organization related genes/pathways. And some protein complexes, such as histone acetyltransferase, histone methyltransferase, telomerase, centrosome, sin3 and U12-type spliceosomal complexes, are hot spots of driver mutations. Furthermore, this study identified many new potential driver genes (e.g. NTRK3 and ZIC4) and pathways including oxidative phosphorylation pathway, which were not deemed by previous methods. Taken together, our study not only developed a method to identify cancer driver genes/pathways but also provided new insights into molecular mechanisms of cancer development. PMID:25057442

  10. Fast and Rigorous Computation of Gene and Pathway Scores from SNP-Based Summary Statistics.

    PubMed

    Lamparter, David; Marbach, Daniel; Rueedi, Rico; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bergmann, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Integrating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) p-values from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) across genes and pathways is a strategy to improve statistical power and gain biological insight. Here, we present Pascal (Pathway scoring algorithm), a powerful tool for computing gene and pathway scores from SNP-phenotype association summary statistics. For gene score computation, we implemented analytic and efficient numerical solutions to calculate test statistics. We examined in particular the sum and the maximum of chi-squared statistics, which measure the strongest and the average association signals per gene, respectively. For pathway scoring, we use a modified Fisher method, which offers not only significant power improvement over more traditional enrichment strategies, but also eliminates the problem of arbitrary threshold selection inherent in any binary membership based pathway enrichment approach. We demonstrate the marked increase in power by analyzing summary statistics from dozens of large meta-studies for various traits. Our extensive testing indicates that our method not only excels in rigorous type I error control, but also results in more biologically meaningful discoveries. PMID:26808494

  11. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP)-Based Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) Testing by Real Time PCR in Patients Suspect of Myeloproliferative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huijsmans, Cornelis J. J.; Poodt, Jeroen; Damen, Jan; van der Linden, Johannes C.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Pruijt, Johannes F. M.; Hilbink, Mirrian; Hermans, Mirjam H. A.

    2012-01-01

    During tumor development, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) often occurs. When LOH is preceded by an oncogene activating mutation, the mutant allele may be further potentiated if the wild-type allele is lost or inactivated. In myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) somatic acquisition of JAK2V617F may be followed by LOH resulting in loss of the wild type allele. The occurrence of LOH in MPN and other proliferative diseases may lead to a further potentiating the mutant allele and thereby increasing morbidity. A real time PCR based SNP profiling assay was developed and validated for LOH detection of the JAK2 region (JAK2LOH). Blood of a cohort of 12 JAK2V617F-positive patients (n = 6 25–50% and n = 6>50% JAK2V617F) and a cohort of 81 patients suspected of MPN was stored with EDTA and subsequently used for validation. To generate germ-line profiles, non-neoplastic formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue from each patient was analyzed. Results of the SNP assay were compared to those of an established Short Tandem Repeat (STR) assay. Both assays revealed JAK2LOH in 1/6 patients with 25–50% JAK2V617F. In patients with >50% JAK2V617F, JAK2LOH was detected in 6/6 by the SNP assay and 5/6 patients by the STR assay. Of the 81 patients suspected of MPN, 18 patients carried JAK2V617F. Both the SNP and STR assay demonstrated the occurrence of JAK2LOH in 5 of them. In the 63 JAK2V617F-negative patients, no JAK2LOH was observed by SNP and STR analyses. The presented SNP assay reliably detects JAK2LOH and is a fast and easy to perform alternative for STR analyses. We therefore anticipate the SNP approach as a proof of principle for the development of LOH SNP-assays for other clinically relevant LOH loci. PMID:22768290

  12. Rapid Diagnosis of Imprinting Disorders Involving Copy Number Variation and Uniparental Disomy Using Genome-Wide SNP Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiqiang; Zhang, Rui; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Huimin; Yu, Guojiu; Li, Zhihua; Chen, Min; Sun, Xiaofang

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting disorders, such as Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS), can be detected via methylation analysis, methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA), or other methods. In this study, we applied single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based chromosomal microarray analysis to detect copy number variations (CNVs) and uniparental disomy (UPD) events in patients with suspected imprinting disorders. Of 4 patients, 2 had a 5.25-Mb microdeletion in the 15q11.2q13.2 region, 1 had a 38.4-Mb mosaic UPD in the 11p15.4 region, and 1 had a 60-Mb detectable UPD between regions 14q13.2 and 14q32.13. Although the 14q32.2 region was classified as normal by SNP array for the 14q13 UPD patient, it turned out to be a heterodisomic UPD by short tandem repeat marker analysis. MS-MLPA analysis was performed to validate the variations. In conclusion, SNP-based microarray is an efficient alternative method for quickly and precisely diagnosing PWS, AS, BWS, and other imprinted gene-associated disorders when considering aberrations due to CNVs and most types of UPD. PMID:26184742

  13. Exploration of SNP variants affecting hair colour prediction in Europeans.

    PubMed

    Söchtig, Jens; Phillips, Chris; Maroñas, Olalla; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Cruz, Raquel; Alvarez-Dios, Jose; de Cal, María-Ángeles Casares; Ruiz, Yarimar; Reich, Kristian; Fondevila, Manuel; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, María V

    2015-09-01

    DNA profiling is a key tool for forensic analysis; however, current methods identify a suspect either by direct comparison or from DNA database searches. In cases with unidentified suspects, prediction of visible physical traits e.g. pigmentation or hair distribution of the DNA donors can provide important probative information. This study aimed to explore single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variants for their effect on hair colour prediction. A discovery panel of 63 SNPs consisting of already established hair colour markers from the HIrisPlex hair colour phenotyping assay as well as additional markers for which associations to human pigmentation traits were previously identified was used to develop multiplex assays based on SNaPshot single-base extension technology. A genotyping study was performed on a range of European populations (n = 605). Hair colour phenotyping was accomplished by matching donor's hair to a graded colour category system of reference shades and photography. Since multiple SNPs in combination contribute in varying degrees to hair colour predictability in Europeans, we aimed to compile a compact marker set that could provide a reliable hair colour inference from the fewest SNPs. The predictive approach developed uses a naïve Bayes classifier to provide hair colour assignment probabilities for the SNP profiles of the key SNPs and was embedded into the Snipper online SNP classifier ( http://mathgene.usc.es/snipper/ ). Results indicate that red, blond, brown and black hair colours are predictable with informative probabilities in a high proportion of cases. Our study resulted in the identification of 12 most strongly associated SNPs to hair pigmentation variation in six genes. PMID:26162598

  14. Computational tradeoffs in multiplex PCR assay design for SNP genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Rachlin, John; Ding, Chunming; Cantor, Charles; Kasif, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiplex PCR is a key technology for detecting infectious microorganisms, whole-genome sequencing, forensic analysis, and for enabling flexible yet low-cost genotyping. However, the design of a multiplex PCR assays requires the consideration of multiple competing objectives and physical constraints, and extensive computational analysis must be performed in order to identify the possible formation of primer-dimers that can negatively impact product yield. Results This paper examines the computational design limits of multiplex PCR in the context of SNP genotyping and examines tradeoffs associated with several key design factors including multiplexing level (the number of primer pairs per tube), coverage (the % of SNP whose associated primers are actually assigned to one of several available tube), and tube-size uniformity. We also examine how design performance depends on the total number of available SNPs from which to choose, and primer stringency criterial. We show that finding high-multiplexing/high-coverage designs is subject to a computational phase transition, becoming dramatically more difficult when the probability of primer pair interaction exceeds a critical threshold. The precise location of this critical transition point depends on the number of available SNPs and the level of multiplexing required. We also demonstrate how coverage performance is impacted by the number of available snps, primer selection criteria, and target multiplexing levels. Conclusion The presence of a phase transition suggests limits to scaling Multiplex PCR performance for high-throughput genomics applications. Achieving broad SNP coverage rapidly transitions from being very easy to very hard as the target multiplexing level (# of primer pairs per tube) increases. The onset of a phase transition can be "delayed" by having a larger pool of SNPs, or loosening primer selection constraints so as to increase the number of candidate primer pairs per SNP, though the latter

  15. Highly effective SNP-based association mapping and management of recessive defects in livestock.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Carole; Coppieters, Wouter; Rollin, Frédéric; Desmecht, Daniel; Agerholm, Jorgen S; Cambisano, Nadine; Carta, Eloisa; Dardano, Sabrina; Dive, Marc; Fasquelle, Corinne; Frennet, Jean-Claude; Hanset, Roger; Hubin, Xavier; Jorgensen, Claus; Karim, Latifa; Kent, Matthew; Harvey, Kirsten; Pearce, Brian R; Simon, Patricia; Tama, Nico; Nie, Haisheng; Vandeputte, Sébastien; Lien, Sigbjorn; Longeri, Maria; Fredholm, Merete; Harvey, Robert J; Georges, Michel

    2008-04-01

    The widespread use of elite sires by means of artificial insemination in livestock breeding leads to the frequent emergence of recessive genetic defects, which cause significant economic and animal welfare concerns. Here we show that the availability of genome-wide, high-density SNP panels, combined with the typical structure of livestock populations, markedly accelerates the positional identification of genes and mutations that cause inherited defects. We report the fine-scale mapping of five recessive disorders in cattle and the molecular basis for three of these: congenital muscular dystony (CMD) types 1 and 2 in Belgian Blue cattle and ichthyosis fetalis in Italian Chianina cattle. Identification of these causative mutations has an immediate translation into breeding practice, allowing marker assisted selection against the defects through avoidance of at-risk matings. PMID:18344998

  16. Obesity-related known and candidate SNP markers can significantly change affinity of TATA-binding protein for human gene promoters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Obesity affects quality of life and life expectancy and is associated with cardiovascular disorders, cancer, diabetes, reproductive disorders in women, prostate diseases in men, and congenital anomalies in children. The use of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers of diseases and drug responses (i.e., significant differences of personal genomes of patients from the reference human genome) can help physicians to improve treatment. Clinical research can validate SNP markers via genotyping of patients and demonstration that SNP alleles are significantly more frequent in patients than in healthy people. The search for biomedical SNP markers of interest can be accelerated by computer-based analysis of hundreds of millions of SNPs in the 1000 Genomes project because of selection of the most meaningful candidate SNP markers and elimination of neutral SNPs. Results We cross-validated the output of two computer-based methods: DNA sequence analysis using Web service SNP_TATA_Comparator and keyword search for articles on comorbidities of obesity. Near the sites binding to TATA-binding protein (TBP) in human gene promoters, we found 22 obesity-related candidate SNP markers, including rs10895068 (male breast cancer in obesity); rs35036378 (reduced risk of obesity after ovariectomy); rs201739205 (reduced risk of obesity-related cancers due to weight loss by diet/exercise in obese postmenopausal women); rs183433761 (obesity resistance during a high-fat diet); rs367732974 and rs549591993 (both: cardiovascular complications in obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus); rs200487063 and rs34104384 (both: obesity-caused hypertension); rs35518301, rs72661131, and rs562962093 (all: obesity); and rs397509430, rs33980857, rs34598529, rs33931746, rs33981098, rs34500389, rs63750953, rs281864525, rs35518301, and rs34166473 (all: chronic inflammation in comorbidities of obesity). Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay under nonequilibrium conditions, we

  17. Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 gene and IDH1 SNP 105C > T have a prognostic value in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1/IDH2) genes are metabolic enzymes, which are frequently mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The enzymes acquire neomorphic enzymatic activity when they mutated. Methods We have investigated the frequency and outcome of the acquired IDH1/IDH2 mutations and the IDH1 SNP 105C > T (rs11554137) in 189 unselected de novo AML patients by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by direct sequencing. The survival are presented in Kaplan Meier curves with log rank test. Multivariable survival analysis was conducted using Cox regression method, taking age, risk group, treatment, IDH1/2 mutations and IDH1 SNP105 genotype into account. Results Overall, IDH1/2 mutations were found in 41/187 (21.7%) of the AML patients. IDH1 codon 132 mutations were present in 7.9%, whereas IDH2 mutations were more frequent and mutations were identified in codon 140 and 172 in a frequency of 11.1% and 2.6%, respectively. The SNP 105C > T was present in 10.5% of the patients, similar to the normal population. A significantly reduced overall survival (OS) for patients carrying IDH2 codon 140 mutation compared with patients carrying wild-type IDH2 gene (p < 0.001) was observed in the intermediate risk patient group. Neither in the entire patient group nor subdivided in different risk groups, IDH1 mutations had any significance on OS compared to the wild-type IDH1 patients. A significant difference in OS between the heterozygous SNP variant and the homozygous wild-type was observed in the intermediate risk FLT3 negative AML patients (p = 0.004). Conclusions Our results indicate that AML-patients with IDH2 mutations or the IDH1 SNP 105C > T variant can represent a new subgroup for risk stratification and may indicate new treatment options. PMID:25324972

  18. PCR amplification of SNP loci from crude DNA for large-scale genotyping of oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Lyon, Rebecca; Zhou, Yuxin; Lamour, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Similar to other eukaryotes, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are abundant in many oomycete plant pathogen genomes. High resolution DNA melting analysis (HR-DMA) is a cost-effective method for SNP genotyping, but like many SNP marker technologies, is limited by the amount and quality of template DNA. We describe PCR preamplification of Phytophthora and Peronospora SNP loci from crude DNA extracted from a small amount of mycelium and/or infected plant tissue to produce sufficient template to genotype at least 10 000 SNPs. The approach is fast, inexpensive, requires minimal biological material and should be useful for many organisms in a variety of contexts. PMID:24871597

  19. Accuracy of direct genomic values in Holstein bulls and cows using subsets of SNP markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At the current price, the use of high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotyping assays in genomic selection of dairy cattle is limited to applications involving elite sires and dams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of low-density assays to predict direct genomic value (DGV) on five milk production traits, an overall conformation trait, a survival index, and two profit index traits (APR, ASI). Methods Dense SNP genotypes were available for 42,576 SNP for 2,114 Holstein bulls and 510 cows. A subset of 1,847 bulls born between 1955 and 2004 was used as a training set to fit models with various sets of pre-selected SNP. A group of 297 bulls born between 2001 and 2004 and all cows born between 1992 and 2004 were used to evaluate the accuracy of DGV prediction. Ridge regression (RR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) were used to derive prediction equations and to rank SNP based on the absolute value of the regression coefficients. Four alternative strategies were applied to select subset of SNP, namely: subsets of the highest ranked SNP for each individual trait, or a single subset of evenly spaced SNP, where SNP were selected based on their rank for ASI, APR or minor allele frequency within intervals of approximately equal length. Results RR and PLSR performed very similarly to predict DGV, with PLSR performing better for low-density assays and RR for higher-density SNP sets. When using all SNP, DGV predictions for production traits, which have a higher heritability, were more accurate (0.52-0.64) than for survival (0.19-0.20), which has a low heritability. The gain in accuracy using subsets that included the highest ranked SNP for each trait was marginal (5-6%) over a common set of evenly spaced SNP when at least 3,000 SNP were used. Subsets containing 3,000 SNP provided more than 90% of the accuracy that could be achieved with a high-density assay for cows, and 80% of the high-density assay for young bulls

  20. Lack of association between MDM2 promoter SNP309 and clinical outcome in patients with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rihani, Ali; Van Maerken, Tom; De Wilde, Bram; Zeka, Fjoralba; Laureys, Geneviève; Norga, Koen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Coco, Simona; Versteeg, Rogier; Noguera, Rosa; Schulte, Johannes H; Eggert, Angelika; Stallings, Raymond L; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2014-10-01

    While a polymorphism located within the promoter region of the MDM2 proto-oncogene, SNP309 (T > G), has previously been associated with increased risk and aggressiveness of neuroblastoma and other tumor entities, a protective effect has also been reported in certain other cancers. In this study, we evaluated the association of MDM2 SNP309 with outcome in 496 patients with neuroblastoma and its effect on MDM2 expression. No significant difference in overall or event-free survival was observed among patients with neuroblastoma with or without MDM2 SNP309. The presence of SNP309 does not affect MDM2 expression in neuroblastoma. PMID:24391119

  1. Eigenanalysis of SNP data with an identity by descent interpretation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiuwen; Weir, Bruce S

    2016-02-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is widely used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and the principal component axes often represent perpendicular gradients in geographic space. The explanation of PCA results is of major interest for geneticists to understand fundamental demographic parameters. Here, we provide an interpretation of PCA based on relatedness measures, which are described by the probability that sets of genes are identical-by-descent (IBD). An approximately linear transformation between ancestral proportions (AP) of individuals with multiple ancestries and their projections onto the principal components is found. In addition, a new method of eigenanalysis "EIGMIX" is proposed to estimate individual ancestries. EIGMIX is a method of moments with computational efficiency suitable for millions of SNP data, and it is not subject to the assumption of linkage equilibrium. With the assumptions of multiple ancestries and their surrogate ancestral samples, EIGMIX is able to infer ancestral proportions (APs) of individuals. The methods were applied to the SNP data from the HapMap Phase 3 project and the Human Genome Diversity Panel. The APs of individuals inferred by EIGMIX are consistent with the findings of the program ADMIXTURE. In conclusion, EIGMIX can be used to detect population structure and estimate genome-wide ancestral proportions with a relatively high accuracy. PMID:26482676

  2. SNP Markers and Their Impact on Plant Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Mammadov, Jafar; Aggarwal, Rajat; Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kumpatla, Siva

    2012-01-01

    The use of molecular markers has revolutionized the pace and precision of plant genetic analysis which in turn facilitated the implementation of molecular breeding of crops. The last three decades have seen tremendous advances in the evolution of marker systems and the respective detection platforms. Markers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have rapidly gained the center stage of molecular genetics during the recent years due to their abundance in the genomes and their amenability for high-throughput detection formats and platforms. Computational approaches dominate SNP discovery methods due to the ever-increasing sequence information in public databases; however, complex genomes pose special challenges in the identification of informative SNPs warranting alternative strategies in those crops. Many genotyping platforms and chemistries have become available making the use of SNPs even more attractive and efficient. This paper provides a review of historical and current efforts in the development, validation, and application of SNP markers in QTL/gene discovery and plant breeding by discussing key experimental strategies and cases exemplifying their impact. PMID:23316221

  3. New Insights into the Geographic Distribution of Mycobacterium leprae SNP Genotypes Determined for Isolates from Leprosy Cases Diagnosed in Metropolitan France and French Territories

    PubMed Central

    Reibel, Florence; Chauffour, Aurélie; Brossier, Florence; Jarlier, Vincent; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Background Between 20 and 30 bacteriologically confirmed cases of leprosy are diagnosed each year at the French National Reference Center for mycobacteria. Patients are mainly immigrants from various endemic countries or living in French overseas territories. We aimed at expanding data regarding the geographical distribution of the SNP genotypes of the M. leprae isolates from these patients. Methodology/Principal findings Skin biopsies were obtained from 71 leprosy patients diagnosed between January 2009 and December 2013. Data regarding age, sex and place of birth and residence were also collected. Diagnosis of leprosy was confirmed by microscopic detection of acid-fast bacilli and/or amplification by PCR of the M. leprae-specific RLEP region. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), present in the M. leprae genome at positions 14 676, 1 642 875 and 2 935 685, were determined with an efficiency of 94% (67/71). Almost all patients were from countries other than France where leprosy is still prevalent (n = 31) or from French overseas territories (n = 36) where leprosy is not totally eradicated, while only a minority (n = 4) was born in metropolitan France but have lived in other countries. SNP type 1 was predominant (n = 33), followed by type 3 (n = 17), type 4 (n = 11) and type 2 (n = 6). SNP types were concordant with those previously reported as prevalent in the patients’ countries of birth. SNP types found in patients born in countries other than France (Comoros, Haiti, Benin, Congo, Sri Lanka) and French overseas territories (French Polynesia, Mayotte and La Réunion) not covered by previous work correlated well with geographical location and history of human settlements. Conclusions/Significance The phylogenic analysis of M. leprae strains isolated in France strongly suggests that French leprosy cases are caused by SNP types that are (a) concordant with the geographic origin or residence of the patients (non-French countries, French overseas territories

  4. A HapMap leads to a Capsicum annuum SNP infinium array: a new tool for pepper breeding

    PubMed Central

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Ashrafi, Hamid; Plieske, Joerg; Lemm, Jana; Stoffel, Kevin; Hill, Theresa; Luerssen, Hartmut; Pethiyagoda, Charit L; Lawley, Cindy T; Ganal, Martin W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2016-01-01

    The Capsicum genus (Pepper) is a part of the Solanacae family. It has been important in many cultures worldwide for its key nutritional components and uses as spices, medicines, ornamentals and vegetables. Worldwide population growth is associated with demand for more nutritionally valuable vegetables while contending with decreasing resources and available land. These conditions require increased efficiency in pepper breeding to deal with these imminent challenges. Through resequencing of inbred lines we have completed a valuable haplotype map (HapMap) for the pepper genome based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The identified SNPs were annotated and classified based on their gene annotation in the pepper draft genome sequence and phenotype of the sequenced inbred lines. A selection of one marker per gene model was utilized to create the PepperSNP16K array, which simultaneously genotyped 16 405 SNPs, of which 90.7% were found to be informative. A set of 84 inbred and hybrid lines and a mapping population of 90 interspecific F2 individuals were utilized to validate the array. Diversity analysis of the inbred lines shows a distinct separation of bell versus chile/hot pepper types and separates them into five distinct germplasm groups. The interspecific population created between Tabasco (C. frutescens chile type) and P4 (C. annuum blocky type) produced a linkage map with 5546 markers separated into 1361 bins on twelve 12 linkage groups representing 1392.3 cM. This publically available genotyping platform can be used to rapidly assess a large number of markers in a reproducible high-throughput manner for pepper. As a standardized tool for genetic analyses, the PepperSNP16K can be used worldwide to share findings and analyze QTLs for important traits leading to continued improvement of pepper for consumers. Data and information on the array are available through the Solanaceae Genomics Network. PMID:27602231

  5. A HapMap leads to a Capsicum annuum SNP infinium array: a new tool for pepper breeding.

    PubMed

    Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Ashrafi, Hamid; Plieske, Joerg; Lemm, Jana; Stoffel, Kevin; Hill, Theresa; Luerssen, Hartmut; Pethiyagoda, Charit L; Lawley, Cindy T; Ganal, Martin W; Van Deynze, Allen

    2016-01-01

    The Capsicum genus (Pepper) is a part of the Solanacae family. It has been important in many cultures worldwide for its key nutritional components and uses as spices, medicines, ornamentals and vegetables. Worldwide population growth is associated with demand for more nutritionally valuable vegetables while contending with decreasing resources and available land. These conditions require increased efficiency in pepper breeding to deal with these imminent challenges. Through resequencing of inbred lines we have completed a valuable haplotype map (HapMap) for the pepper genome based on single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). The identified SNPs were annotated and classified based on their gene annotation in the pepper draft genome sequence and phenotype of the sequenced inbred lines. A selection of one marker per gene model was utilized to create the PepperSNP16K array, which simultaneously genotyped 16 405 SNPs, of which 90.7% were found to be informative. A set of 84 inbred and hybrid lines and a mapping population of 90 interspecific F2 individuals were utilized to validate the array. Diversity analysis of the inbred lines shows a distinct separation of bell versus chile/hot pepper types and separates them into five distinct germplasm groups. The interspecific population created between Tabasco (C. frutescens chile type) and P4 (C. annuum blocky type) produced a linkage map with 5546 markers separated into 1361 bins on twelve 12 linkage groups representing 1392.3 cM. This publically available genotyping platform can be used to rapidly assess a large number of markers in a reproducible high-throughput manner for pepper. As a standardized tool for genetic analyses, the PepperSNP16K can be used worldwide to share findings and analyze QTLs for important traits leading to continued improvement of pepper for consumers. Data and information on the array are available through the Solanaceae Genomics Network. PMID:27602231

  6. FunctSNP: an R package to link SNPs to functional knowledge and dbAutoMaker: a suite of Perl scripts to build SNP databases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Whole genome association studies using highly dense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are a set of methods to identify DNA markers associated with variation in a particular complex trait of interest. One of the main outcomes from these studies is a subset of statistically significant SNPs. Finding the potential biological functions of such SNPs can be an important step towards further use in human and agricultural populations (e.g., for identifying genes related to susceptibility to complex diseases or genes playing key roles in development or performance). The current challenge is that the information holding the clues to SNP functions is distributed across many different databases. Efficient bioinformatics tools are therefore needed to seamlessly integrate up-to-date functional information on SNPs. Many web services have arisen to meet the challenge but most work only within the framework of human medical research. Although we acknowledge the importance of human research, we identify there is a need for SNP annotation tools for other organisms. Description We introduce an R package called FunctSNP, which is the user interface to custom built species-specific databases. The local relational databases contain SNP data together with functional annotations extracted from online resources. FunctSNP provides a unified bioinformatics resource to link SNPs with functional knowledge (e.g., genes, pathways, ontologies). We also introduce dbAutoMaker, a suite of Perl scripts, which can be scheduled to run periodically to automatically create/update the customised SNP databases. We illustrate the use of FunctSNP with a livestock example, but the approach and software tools presented here can be applied also to human and other organisms. Conclusions Finding the potential functional significance of SNPs is important when further using the outcomes from whole genome association studies. FunctSNP is unique in that it is the only R package that links SNPs to

  7. Networks of intergenic long-range enhancers and snpRNAs drive castration-resistant phenotype of prostate cancer and contribute to pathogenesis of multiple common human disorders

    PubMed Central

    Glinskii, Anna B; Ma, Shuang; Ma, Jun; Grant, Denise; Lim, Chang-Uk; Guest, Ian; Sell, Stewart; Buttyan, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The mechanistic relevance of intergenic disease-associated genetic loci (IDAGL) containing highly statistically significant disease-linked SNPs remains unknown. Here, we present experimental and clinical evidence supporting the importantance of the role of IDAGL in human diseases. A targeted RT-PCR screen coupled with sequencing of purified PCR products detects widespread transcription at multiple IDAGL and identifies 96 small noncoding trans-regulatory RNAs of ∼100–300 nt in length containing SNPs (snpRNAs) associated with 21 common disorders. Multiple independent lines of experimental evidence support functionality of snpRNAs by documenting their cell type-specific expression and evolutionary conservation of sequences, genomic coordinates and biological effects. Chromatin state signatures, expression profiling experiments and luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that many IDAGL are Polycomb-regulated long-range enhancers. Expression of snpRNAs in human and mouse cells markedly affects cellular behavior and induces allele-specific clinically relevant phenotypic changes: NLRP1-locus snpRNAs rs2670660 exert regulatory effects on monocyte/macrophage transdifferentiation, induce prostate cancer (PC) susceptibility snpRNAs and transform low-malignancy hormone-dependent human PC cells into highly malignant androgen-independent PC. Q-PCR analysis and luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that snpRNA sequences represent allele-specific “decoy” targets of microRNAs that function as SNP allele-specific modifiers of microRNA expression and activity. We demonstrate that trans-acting RNA molecules facilitating resistance to androgen depletion (RAD) in vitro and castration-resistant phenotype (CRP) in vivo of PC contain intergenic 8q24-locus SNP variants (rs1447295; rs16901979; rs6983267) that were recently linked with increased risk of PC. Q-PCR analysis of clinical samples reveals markedly increased and highly concordant (r = 0.896; p < 0.0001) snpRNA expression

  8. SNP Discovery for mapping alien introgressions in wheat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring alien introgressions in crop plants is difficult due to the lack of genetic and molecular mapping information on the wild crop relatives. The tertiary gene pool of wheat is a very important source of genetic variability for wheat improvement against biotic and abiotic stresses. By exploring the 5Mg short arm (5MgS) of Aegilops geniculata, we can apply chromosome genomics for the discovery of SNP markers and their use for monitoring alien introgressions in wheat (Triticum aestivum L). Results The short arm of chromosome 5Mg of Ae. geniculata Roth (syn. Ae. ovata L.; 2n = 4x = 28, UgUgMgMg) was flow-sorted from a wheat line in which it is maintained as a telocentric chromosome. DNA of the sorted arm was amplified and sequenced using an Illumina Hiseq 2000 with ~45x coverage. The sequence data was used for SNP discovery against wheat homoeologous group-5 assemblies. A total of 2,178 unique, 5MgS-specific SNPs were discovered. Randomly selected samples of 59 5MgS-specific SNPs were tested (44 by KASPar assay and 15 by Sanger sequencing) and 84% were validated. Of the selected SNPs, 97% mapped to a chromosome 5Mg addition to wheat (the source of t5MgS), and 94% to 5Mg introgressed from a different accession of Ae. geniculata substituting for chromosome 5D of wheat. The validated SNPs also identified chromosome segments of 5MgS origin in a set of T5D-5Mg translocation lines; eight SNPs (25%) mapped to TA5601 [T5DL · 5DS-5MgS(0.75)] and three (8%) to TA5602 [T5DL · 5DS-5MgS (0.95)]. SNPs (gsnp_5ms83 and gsnp_5ms94), tagging chromosome T5DL · 5DS-5MgS(0.95) with the smallest introgression carrying resistance to leaf rust (Lr57) and stripe rust (Yr40), were validated in two released germplasm lines with Lr57 and Yr40 genes. Conclusion This approach should be widely applicable for the identification of species/genome-specific SNPs. The development of a large number of SNP markers will facilitate the precise introgression and

  9. Identification of SNP barcode biomarkers for genes associated with facial emotion perception using particle swarm optimization algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Facial emotion perception (FEP) can affect social function. We previously reported that parts of five tested single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MET and AKT1 genes may individually affect FEP performance. However, the effects of SNP-SNP interactions on FEP performance remain unclear. Methods This study compared patients with high and low FEP performances (n = 89 and 93, respectively). A particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm was used to identify the best SNP barcodes (i.e., the SNP combinations and genotypes that revealed the largest differences between the high and low FEP groups). Results The analyses of individual SNPs showed no significant differences between the high and low FEP groups. However, comparisons of multiple SNP-SNP interactions involving different combinations of two to five SNPs showed that the best PSO-generated SNP barcodes were significantly associated with high FEP score. The analyses of the joint effects of the best SNP barcodes for two to five interacting SNPs also showed that the best SNP barcodes had significantly higher odds ratios (2.119 to 3.138; P < 0.05) compared to other SNP barcodes. In conclusion, the proposed PSO algorithm effectively identifies the best SNP barcodes that have the strongest associations with FEP performance. Conclusions This study also proposes a computational methodology for analyzing complex SNP-SNP interactions in social cognition domains such as recognition of facial emotion. PMID:24955105

  10. The development and characterization of a 60K SNP chip for chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In livestock species like the chicken, high throughput SNP genotyping assays are increasingly being used for whole genome association studies and as a tool in breeding (referred to as genomic selection). We describe the design of a moderate density (60K) Illumina SNP BeadChip in chicken consisting o...

  11. A genome-wide SNP panel for genetic diversity, mapping and breeding studies in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide SNP resource was developed for rice using the GoldenGate assay and used to genotype 400 landrace accessions of O. sativa. SNPs were originally discovered using Perlegen re-sequencing technology in 20 diverse landraces of O. sativa as part of OryzaSNP project (http://irfgc.irri.org). An...

  12. Characterization of the Cattle HapMap Population using the Illumina Bovine-50K SNP Chip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Bovine 50K Illumina™ iSelect SNP chip (51,386 polymorphic SNP markers) was designed using a combination of publicly available SNPs along with highly informative novel SNPs discovered using a reduced representation and next-generation sequencing technology strategy. A total of 576 animals (426 mal...

  13. A new SNP panel for evaluating genetic diversity in a composite cattle breed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A custom 60K SNP panel, extracted from Bovine HD SNP chip was used to evaluate genotypic frequency changes in Braford (BF, a composite breed) when compared to progenitor breeds: Hereford (HF), Brahman (BR), and Nelore (NE). Samples from both the U. S. and Brazil were used. The new panel differentiat...

  14. A Coordinated Approach to Peach SNP Discovery in RosBREED

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the USDA-funded multi-institutional and trans-disciplinary project, “RosBREED”, crop-specific SNP genome scan platforms are being developed for peach, apple, strawberry, and cherry at a resolution of at least one polymorphic SNP marker every 5 cM in any random cross, for use in Pedigree-Based Ana...

  15. Development and Applications of a Bovine 50,000 SNP Chip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop an Illumina iSelect high density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay for cattle, the collaborative iBMC (Illumina, USDA ARS Beltsville, University of Missouri, USDA ARS Clay Center) Consortium first performed a de novo SNP discovery project in which genomic reduced representation l...

  16. SNP discovery and allele frequency estimation by deep sequencing of reduced representation libraries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome projects routinely produce draft sequences for species from diverse evolutionary clades, but generally do not create single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) resources. We present an approach for de novo SNP discovery based on short-read sequencing of reduced representation libraries (RRL) to ge...

  17. Strategies to build high-density linkage maps of the porcine 60k SNP chip

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present here two different strategies to compute high-density linkage maps based on the porcine 60k SNP chip that was genotyped on 4 different pedigrees with a total of 5600 animals. The first strategy uses the draft sequence as a reference order, the SNP being first mapped to it. The second stra...

  18. SNP and haplotype mapping for genetic analysis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saar, Kathrin; Beck, Alfred; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Birney, Ewan; Brocklebank, Denise; Chen, Yuan; Cuppen, Edwin; Demonchy, Stephanie; Dopazo, Joaquin; Flicek, Paul; Foglio, Mario; Fujiyama, Asao; Gut, Ivo G; Gauguier, Dominique; Guigo, Roderic; Guryev, Victor; Heinig, Matthias; Hummel, Oliver; Jahn, Niels; Klages, Sven; Kren, Vladimir; Kube, Michael; Kuhl, Heiner; Kuramoto, Takashi; Kuroki, Yoko; Lechner, Doris; Lee, Young-Ae; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Lathrop, G Mark; Mashimo, Tomoji; Medina, Ignacio; Mott, Richard; Patone, Giannino; Perrier-Cornet, Jeanne-Antide; Platzer, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Reinhardt, Richard; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Schilhabel, Markus; Schulz, Herbert; Serikawa, Tadao; Shikhagaie, Medya; Tatsumoto, Shouji; Taudien, Stefan; Toyoda, Atsushi; Voigt, Birger; Zelenika, Diana; Zimdahl, Heike; Hubner, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    The laboratory rat is one of the most extensively studied model organisms. Inbred laboratory rat strains originated from limited Rattus norvegicus founder populations, and the inherited genetic variation provides an excellent resource for the correlation of genotype to phenotype. Here, we report a survey of genetic variation based on almost 3 million newly identified SNPs. We obtained accurate and complete genotypes for a subset of 20,238 SNPs across 167 distinct inbred rat strains, two rat recombinant inbred panels and an F2 intercross. Using 81% of these SNPs, we constructed high-density genetic maps, creating a large dataset of fully characterized SNPs for disease gene mapping. Our data characterize the population structure and illustrate the degree of linkage disequilibrium. We provide a detailed SNP map and demonstrate its utility for mapping of quantitative trait loci. This community resource is openly available and augments the genetic tools for this workhorse of physiological studies. PMID:18443594

  19. SNP-VISTA: An Interactive SNPs Visualization Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Nameeta; Teplitsky, Michael V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Hamann, Bernd; Dubchak, Inna L.

    2005-07-05

    Recent advances in sequencing technologies promise better diagnostics for many diseases as well as better understanding of evolution of microbial populations. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms(SNPs) are established genetic markers that aid in the identification of loci affecting quantitative traits and/or disease in a wide variety of eukaryotic species. With today's technological capabilities, it is possible to re-sequence a large set of appropriate candidate genes in individuals with a given disease and then screen for causative mutations.In addition, SNPs have been used extensively in efforts to study the evolution of microbial populations, and the recent application of random shotgun sequencing to environmental samples makes possible more extensive SNP analysis of co-occurring and co-evolving microbial populations. The program is available at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/snpvista.

  20. TcSNP: a database of genetic variation in Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Alejandro A.; Carmona, Santiago J.; Agüero, Fernán

    2009-01-01

    The TcSNP database (http://snps.tcruzi.org) integrates information on genetic variation (polymorphisms and mutations) for different stocks, strains and isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The database incorporates sequences (genes from the T. cruzi reference genome, mRNAs, ESTs and genomic sequences); multiple sequence alignments obtained from these sequences; and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and small indels identified by scanning these multiple sequence alignments. Information in TcSNP can be readily interrogated to arrive at gene sets, or SNP sets of interest based on a number of attributes. Sequence similarity searches using BLAST are also supported. This first release of TcSNP contains nearly 170 000 high-confidence candidate SNPs, derived from the analysis of annotated coding sequences. As new sequence data become available, TcSNP will incorporate these data, mapping new candidate SNPs onto the reference genome sequences. PMID:18974180

  1. Genotyping NAT2 with only two SNPs (rs1041983 and rs1801280) outperforms the tagging SNP rs1495741 and is equivalent to the conventional 7-SNP NAT2 genotype.

    PubMed

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Moormann, Oliver; Guballa, Christoph; Kress, Alexander; Truss, Michael C; Gerullis, Holger; Otto, Thomas; Barski, Dimitri; Niegisch, Günter; Albers, Peter; Frees, Sebastian; Brenner, Walburgis; Thüroff, Joachim W; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Seidel, Thilo; Roth, Gerhard; Dietrich, Holger; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans M; Bolt, Hermann M; Falkenstein, Michael; Zimmermann, Anna; Klein, Torsten; Reckwitz, Thomas; Roemer, Hermann C; Löhlein, Dietrich; Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke; Schöps, Wolfgang; Hassan Rizvi, Syed Adibul; Aslam, Muhammad; Bánfi, Gergely; Romics, Imre; Steffens, Michael; Ekici, Arif B; Winterpacht, Andreas; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2011-10-01

    Genotyping N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is of high relevance for individualized dosing of antituberculosis drugs and bladder cancer epidemiology. In this study we compared a recently published tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (rs1495741) to the conventional 7-SNP genotype (G191A, C282T, T341C, C481T, G590A, A803G and G857A haplotype pairs) and systematically analysed if novel SNP combinations outperform the latter. For this purpose, we studied 3177 individuals by PCR and phenotyped 344 individuals by the caffeine test. Although the tagSNP and the 7-SNP genotype showed a high degree of correlation (R=0.933, P<0.0001) the 7-SNP genotype nevertheless outperformed the tagging SNP with respect to specificity (1.0 vs. 0.9444, P=0.0065). Considering all possible SNP combinations in a receiver operating characteristic analysis we identified a 2-SNP genotype (C282T, T341C) that outperformed the tagging SNP and was equivalent to the 7-SNP genotype. The 2-SNP genotype predicted the correct phenotype with a sensitivity of 0.8643 and a specificity of 1.0. In addition, it predicted the 7-SNP genotype with sensitivity and specificity of 0.9993 and 0.9880, respectively. The prediction of the NAT2 genotype by the 2-SNP genotype performed similar in populations of Caucasian, Venezuelan and Pakistani background. A 2-SNP genotype predicts NAT2 phenotypes with similar sensitivity and specificity as the conventional 7-SNP genotype. This procedure represents a facilitation in individualized dosing of NAT2 substrates without losing sensitivity or specificity. PMID:21750470

  2. Design and Characterization of a 52K SNP Chip for Goats

    PubMed Central

    Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Bardou, Philippe; Bouchez, Olivier; Cabau, Cédric; Crooijmans, Richard; Dong, Yang; Donnadieu-Tonon, Cécile; Eggen, André; Heuven, Henri C. M.; Jamli, Saadiah; Jiken, Abdullah Johari; Klopp, Christophe; Lawley, Cynthia T.; McEwan, John; Martin, Patrice; Moreno, Carole R.; Mulsant, Philippe; Nabihoudine, Ibouniyamine; Pailhoux, Eric; Palhière, Isabelle; Rupp, Rachel; Sarry, Julien; Sayre, Brian L.; Tircazes, Aurélie; Jun Wang; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Wenguang

    2014-01-01

    The success of Genome Wide Association Studies in the discovery of sequence variation linked to complex traits in humans has increased interest in high throughput SNP genotyping assays in livestock species. Primary goals are QTL detection and genomic selection. The purpose here was design of a 50–60,000 SNP chip for goats. The success of a moderate density SNP assay depends on reliable bioinformatic SNP detection procedures, the technological success rate of the SNP design, even spacing of SNPs on the genome and selection of Minor Allele Frequencies (MAF) suitable to use in diverse breeds. Through the federation of three SNP discovery projects consolidated as the International Goat Genome Consortium, we have identified approximately twelve million high quality SNP variants in the goat genome stored in a database together with their biological and technical characteristics. These SNPs were identified within and between six breeds (meat, milk and mixed): Alpine, Boer, Creole, Katjang, Saanen and Savanna, comprising a total of 97 animals. Whole genome and Reduced Representation Library sequences were aligned on >10 kb scaffolds of the de novo goat genome assembly. The 60,000 selected SNPs, evenly spaced on the goat genome, were submitted for oligo manufacturing (Illumina, Inc) and published in dbSNP along with flanking sequences and map position on goat assemblies (i.e. scaffolds and pseudo-chromosomes), sheep genome V2 and cattle UMD3.1 assembly. Ten breeds were then used to validate the SNP content and 52,295 loci could be successfully genotyped and used to generate a final cluster file. The combined strategy of using mainly whole genome Next Generation Sequencing and mapping on a contig genome assembly, complemented with Illumina design tools proved to be efficient in producing this GoatSNP50 chip. Advances in use of molecular markers are expected to accelerate goat genomic studies in coming years. PMID:24465974

  3. miRdSNP: a database of disease-associated SNPs and microRNA target sites on 3'UTRs of human genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can lead to the susceptibility and onset of diseases through their effects on gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Recent findings indicate that SNPs could create, destroy, or modify the efficiency of miRNA binding to the 3'UTR of a gene, resulting in gene dysregulation. With the rapidly growing number of published disease-associated SNPs (dSNPs), there is a strong need for resources specifically recording dSNPs on the 3'UTRs and their nucleotide distance from miRNA target sites. We present here miRdSNP, a database incorporating three important areas of dSNPs, miRNA target sites, and diseases. Description miRdSNP provides a unique database of dSNPs on the 3'UTRs of human genes manually curated from PubMed. The current release includes 786 dSNP-disease associations for 630 unique dSNPs and 204 disease types. miRdSNP annotates genes with experimentally confirmed targeting by miRNAs and indexes miRNA target sites predicted by TargetScan and PicTar as well as potential miRNA target sites newly generated by dSNPs. A robust web interface and search tools are provided for studying the proximity of miRNA binding sites to dSNPs in relation to human diseases. Searches can be dynamically filtered by gene name, miRBase ID, target prediction algorithm, disease, and any nucleotide distance between dSNPs and miRNA target sites. Results can be viewed at the sequence level showing the annotated locations for miRNA target sites and dSNPs on the entire 3'UTR sequences. The integration of dSNPs with the UCSC Genome browser is also supported. Conclusion miRdSNP provides a comprehensive data source of dSNPs and robust tools for exploring their distance from miRNA target sites on the 3'UTRs of human genes. miRdSNP enables researchers to further explore the molecular mechanism of gene dysregulation for dSNPs at posttranscriptional level. miRdSNP is freely available on the web at http://mirdsnp.ccr.buffalo.edu. PMID:22276777

  4. Identification of Swedish mosquitoes based on molecular barcoding of the COI gene and SNP analysis.

    PubMed

    Engdahl, Cecilia; Larsson, Pär; Näslund, Jonas; Bravo, Mayra; Evander, Magnus; Lundström, Jan O; Ahlm, Clas; Bucht, Göran

    2014-05-01

    Mosquito-borne infectious diseases are emerging in many regions of the world. Consequently, surveillance of mosquitoes and concomitant infectious agents is of great importance for prediction and prevention of mosquito-borne infectious diseases. Currently, morphological identification of mosquitoes is the traditional procedure. However, sequencing of specified genes or standard genomic regions, DNA barcoding, has recently been suggested as a global standard for identification and classification of many different species. Our aim was to develop a genetic method to identify mosquitoes and to study their relationship. Mosquitoes were captured at collection sites in northern Sweden and identified morphologically before the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences of 14 of the most common mosquito species were determined. The sequences obtained were then used for phylogenetic placement, for validation and benchmarking of phenetic classifications and finally to develop a hierarchical PCR-based typing scheme based on single nucleotide polymorphism sites (SNPs) to enable rapid genetic identification, circumventing the need for morphological characterization. The results showed that exact phylogenetic relationships between mosquito taxa were preserved at shorter evolutionary distances, but at deeper levels, they could not be inferred with confidence using COI gene sequence data alone. Fourteen of the most common mosquito species in Sweden were identified by the SNP/PCR-based typing scheme, demonstrating that genetic typing using SNPs of the COI gene is a useful method for identification of mosquitoes with potential for worldwide application. PMID:24215491

  5. A Customized Pigmentation SNP Array Identifies a Novel SNP Associated with Melanoma Predisposition in the SLC45A2 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Santos; Boyano, M. Dolores; Peña-Chilet, Maria; Pita, Guillermo; Aviles, Jose A.; Mayor, Matias; Gomez-Fernandez, Cristina; Casado, Beatriz; Martin-Gonzalez, Manuel; Izagirre, Neskuts; De la Rua, Concepcion; Asumendi, Aintzane; Perez-Yarza, Gorka; Arroyo-Berdugo, Yoana; Boldo, Enrique; Lozoya, Rafael; Torrijos-Aguilar, Arantxa; Pitarch, Ana; Pitarch, Gerard; Sanchez-Motilla, Jose M.; Valcuende-Cavero, Francisca; Tomas-Cabedo, Gloria; Perez-Pastor, Gemma; Diaz-Perez, Jose L.; Gardeazabal, Jesus; de Lizarduy, Iñigo Martinez; Sanchez-Diez, Ana; Valdes, Carlos; Pizarro, Angel; Casado, Mariano; Carretero, Gregorio; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Nagore, Eduardo; Lazaro, Pablo; Lluch, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Martinez-Cadenas, Conrado; Ribas, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    As the incidence of Malignant Melanoma (MM) reflects an interaction between skin colour and UV exposure, variations in genes implicated in pigmentation and tanning response to UV may be associated with susceptibility to MM. In this study, 363 SNPs in 65 gene regions belonging to the pigmentation pathway have been successfully genotyped using a SNP array. Five hundred and ninety MM cases and 507 controls were analyzed in a discovery phase I. Ten candidate SNPs based on a p-value threshold of 0.01 were identified. Two of them, rs35414 (SLC45A2) and rs2069398 (SILV/CKD2), were statistically significant after conservative Bonferroni correction. The best six SNPs were further tested in an independent Spanish series (624 MM cases and 789 controls). A novel SNP located on the SLC45A2 gene (rs35414) was found to be significantly associated with melanoma in both phase I and phase II (P<0.0001). None of the other five SNPs were replicated in this second phase of the study. However, three SNPs in TYR, SILV/CDK2 and ADAMTS20 genes (rs17793678, rs2069398 and rs1510521 respectively) had an overall p-value<0.05 when considering the whole DNA collection (1214 MM cases and 1296 controls). Both the SLC45A2 and the SILV/CDK2 variants behave as protective alleles, while the TYR and ADAMTS20 variants seem to function as risk alleles. Cumulative effects were detected when these four variants were considered together. Furthermore, individuals carrying two or more mutations in MC1R, a well-known low penetrance melanoma-predisposing gene, had a decreased MM risk if concurrently bearing the SLC45A2 protective variant. To our knowledge, this is the largest study on Spanish sporadic MM cases to date. PMID:21559390

  6. Identification, validation and survey of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with pungency in Capsicum spp.

    PubMed

    Garcés-Claver, Ana; Fellman, Shanna Moore; Gil-Ortega, Ramiro; Jahn, Molly; Arnedo-Andrés, María S

    2007-11-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with pungency was detected within an expressed sequence tag (EST) of 307 bp. This fragment was identified after expression analysis of the EST clone SB2-66 in placenta tissue of Capsicum fruits. Sequence alignments corresponding to this new fragment allowed us to identify an SNP between pungent and non-pungent accessions. Two methods were chosen for the development of the SNP marker linked to pungency: tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (tetra-primer ARMS-PCR) and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence. Results showed that both methods were successful in distinguishing genotypes. Nevertheless, tetra-primer ARMS-PCR was chosen for SNP genotyping because it was more rapid, reliable and less cost-effective. The utility of this SNP marker for pungency was demonstrated by the ability to distinguish between 29 pungent and non-pungent cultivars of Capsicum annuum. In addition, the SNP was also associated with phenotypic pungent character in the tested genotypes of C. chinense, C. baccatum, C. frutescens, C. galapagoense, C. eximium, C. tovarii and C. cardenasi. This SNP marker is a faster, cheaper and more reproducible method for identifying pungent peppers than other techniques such as panel tasting, and allows rapid screening of the trait in early growth stages. PMID:17882396

  7. A system for exact and approximate genetic linkage analysis of SNP data in large pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Mark; Weissbrod, Omer; Otten, Lars; Tzemach, Anna; Anisenia, Andrei; Shtark, Oren; Tuberg, Dvir; Galfrin, Eddie; Gannon, Irena; Shalata, Adel; Borochowitz, Zvi U.; Dechter, Rina; Thompson, Elizabeth; Geiger, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The use of dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data in genetic linkage analysis of large pedigrees is impeded by significant technical, methodological and computational challenges. Here we describe Superlink-Online SNP, a new powerful online system that streamlines the linkage analysis of SNP data. It features a fully integrated flexible processing workflow comprising both well-known and novel data analysis tools, including SNP clustering, erroneous data filtering, exact and approximate LOD calculations and maximum-likelihood haplotyping. The system draws its power from thousands of CPUs, performing data analysis tasks orders of magnitude faster than a single computer. By providing an intuitive interface to sophisticated state-of-the-art analysis tools coupled with high computing capacity, Superlink-Online SNP helps geneticists unleash the potential of SNP data for detecting disease genes. Results: Computations performed by Superlink-Online SNP are automatically parallelized using novel paradigms, and executed on unlimited number of private or public CPUs. One novel service is large-scale approximate Markov Chain–Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis. The accuracy of the results is reliably estimated by running the same computation on multiple CPUs and evaluating the Gelman–Rubin Score to set aside unreliable results. Another service within the workflow is a novel parallelized exact algorithm for inferring maximum-likelihood haplotyping. The reported system enables genetic analyses that were previously infeasible. We demonstrate the system capabilities through a study of a large complex pedigree affected with metabolic syndrome. Availability: Superlink-Online SNP is freely available for researchers at http://cbl-hap.cs.technion.ac.il/superlink-snp. The system source code can also be downloaded from the system website. Contact: omerw@cs.technion.ac.il Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23162081

  8. Genetic analysis of diabetic nephropathy on chromosome 18 in African Americans: linkage analysis and dense SNP mapping.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Caitrin W; Bostrom, Meredith A; Lu, Lingyi; Hicks, Pamela J; Langefeld, Carl D; Divers, Jasmin; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Freedman, Barry I; Bowden, Donald W

    2009-12-01

    Genetic studies in Turkish, Native American, European American, and African American (AA) families have linked chromosome 18q21.1-23 to susceptibility for diabetes-associated nephropathy. In this study, we have carried out fine linkage mapping in the 18q region previously linked to diabetic nephropathy in AAs by genotyping both microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for linkage analysis in an expanded set of 223 AA families multiplexed for type 2 diabetes associated ESRD (T2DM-ESRD). Several approaches were used to evaluate evidence of linkage with the strongest evidence for linkage in ordered subset analysis with an earlier age of T2DM diagnosis compared to the remaining pedigrees (LOD 3.9 at 90.1 cM, ΔP = 0.0161, NPL P value = 0.00002). Overall, the maximum LODs and LOD-1 intervals vary in magnitude and location depending upon analysis. The linkage mapping was followed up by performing a dense SNP map, genotyping 2,814 SNPs in the refined LOD-1 region in 1,029 AA T2DM-ESRD cases and 1,027 AA controls. Of the top 25 most associated SNPs, 10 resided within genic regions. Two candidate genes stood out: NEDD4L and SERPINB7. SNP rs512099, located in intron 1 of NEDD4L, was associated under a dominant model of inheritance [P value = 0.0006; Odds ratio (95% Confidence Interval) OR (95% CI) = 0.70 (0.57-0.86)]. SNP rs1720843, located in intron 2 of SERPINB7, was associated under a recessive model of inheritance [P value = 0.0017; OR (95% CI) = 0.65 (0.50-0.85)]. Collectively, these results suggest that multiple genes in this region may influence diabetic nephropathy susceptibility in AAs. PMID:19690890

  9. DBDiaSNP: An Open-Source Knowledgebase of Genetic Polymorphisms and Resistance Genes Related to Diarrheal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Mehla, Kusum; Ramana, Jayashree

    2015-06-01

    Diarrhea is a highly common infection among children, responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rate worldwide. After pneumonia, diarrhea remains the second leading cause of neonatal deaths. Numerous viral, bacterial, and parasitic enteric pathogens are associated with diarrhea. With increasing antibiotic resistance among enteric pathogens, there is an urgent need for global surveillance of the mutations and resistance genes primarily responsible for resistance to antibiotic treatment. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms are important in this regard as they have a vast potential to be utilized as molecular diagnostics for gene-disease or pharmacogenomics association studies linking genotype to phenotype. DBDiaSNP is a comprehensive repository of mutations and resistance genes among various diarrheal pathogens and hosts to advance breakthroughs that will find applications from development of sequence-based diagnostic tools to drug discovery. It contains information about 946 mutations and 326 resistance genes compiled from literature and various web resources. As of March 2015, it houses various pathogen genes and the mutations responsible for antibiotic resistance. The pathogens include, for example, DEC (Diarrheagenic E.coli), Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Shigella spp., Clostridium difficile, Aeromonas spp., Helicobacter pylori, Entamoeba histolytica, Vibrio cholera, and viruses. It also includes mutations from hosts (e.g., humans, pigs, others) that render them either susceptible or resistant to a certain type of diarrhea. DBDiaSNP is therefore intended as an integrated open access database for researchers and clinicians working on diarrheal diseases. Additionally, we note that the DBDiaSNP is one of the first antibiotic resistance databases for the diarrheal pathogens covering mutations and resistance genes that have clinical relevance from a broad range of pathogens and hosts. For future translational research involving integrative biology and

  10. Drug-SNPing: an integrated drug-based, protein interaction-based tagSNP-based pharmacogenomics platform for SNP genotyping.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Cheng, Yu-Huei; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-03-15

    Many drug or single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-related resources and tools have been developed, but connecting and integrating them is still a challenge. Here, we describe a user-friendly web-based software package, named Drug-SNPing, which provides a platform for the integration of drug information (DrugBank and PharmGKB), protein-protein interactions (STRING), tagSNP selection (HapMap) and genotyping information (dbSNP, REBASE and SNP500Cancer). DrugBank-based inputs include the following: (i) common name of the drug, (ii) synonym or drug brand name, (iii) gene name (HUGO) and (iv) keywords. PharmGKB-based inputs include the following: (i) gene name (HUGO), (ii) drug name and (iii) disease-related keywords. The output provides drug-related information, metabolizing enzymes and drug targets, as well as protein-protein interaction data. Importantly, tagSNPs of the selected genes are retrieved for genotyping analyses. All drug-based and protein-protein interaction-based SNP genotyping information are provided with PCR-RFLP (PCR-restriction enzyme length polymorphism) and TaqMan probes. Thus, users can enter any drug keywords/brand names to obtain immediate information that is highly relevant to genotyping for pharmacogenomics research. PMID:23418190

  11. Porcine colonization of the Americas: a 60k SNP story

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Paz, W; Souza, C A; Megens, H J; Ramayo-Caldas, Y; Melo, M; Lemús-Flores, C; Caal, E; Soto, H W; Martínez, R; Álvarez, L A; Aguirre, L; Iñiguez, V; Revidatti, M A; Martínez-López, O R; Llambi, S; Esteve-Codina, A; Rodríguez, M C; Crooijmans, R P M A; Paiva, S R; Schook, L B; Groenen, M A M; Pérez-Enciso, M

    2013-01-01

    The pig, Sus scrofa, is a foreign species to the American continent. Although pigs originally introduced in the Americas should be related to those from the Iberian Peninsula and Canary islands, the phylogeny of current creole pigs that now populate the continent is likely to be very complex. Because of the extreme climates that America harbors, these populations also provide a unique example of a fast evolutionary phenomenon of adaptation. Here, we provide a genome wide study of these issues by genotyping, with a 60k SNP chip, 206 village pigs sampled across 14 countries and 183 pigs from outgroup breeds that are potential founders of the American populations, including wild boar, Iberian, international and Chinese breeds. Results show that American village pigs are primarily of European ancestry, although the observed genetic landscape is that of a complex conglomerate. There was no correlation between genetic and geographical distances, neither continent wide nor when analyzing specific areas. Most populations showed a clear admixed structure where the Iberian pig was not necessarily the main component, illustrating how international breeds, but also Chinese pigs, have contributed to extant genetic composition of American village pigs. We also observe that many genes related to the cardiovascular system show an increased differentiation between altiplano and genetically related pigs living near sea level. PMID:23250008

  12. Sturgeon conservation genomics: SNP discovery and validation using RAD sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ogden, R; Gharbi, K; Mugue, N; Martinsohn, J; Senn, H; Davey, J W; Pourkazemi, M; McEwing, R; Eland, C; Vidotto, M; Sergeev, A; Congiu, L

    2013-06-01

    Caviar-producing sturgeons belonging to the genus Acipenser are considered to be one of the most endangered species groups in the world. Continued overfishing in spite of increasing legislation, zero catch quotas and extensive aquaculture production have led to the collapse of wild stocks across Europe and Asia. The evolutionary relationships among Adriatic, Russian, Persian and Siberian sturgeons are complex because of past introgression events and remain poorly understood. Conservation management, traceability and enforcement suffer a lack of appropriate DNA markers for the genetic identification of sturgeon at the species, population and individual level. This study employed RAD sequencing to discover and characterize single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) DNA markers for use in sturgeon conservation in these four tetraploid species over three biological levels, using a single sequencing lane. Four population meta-samples and eight individual samples from one family were barcoded separately before sequencing. Analysis of 14.4 Gb of paired-end RAD data focused on the identification of SNPs in the paired-end contig, with subsequent in silico and empirical validation of candidate markers. Thousands of putatively informative markers were identified including, for the first time, SNPs that show population-wide differentiation between Russian and Persian sturgeons, representing an important advance in our ability to manage these cryptic species. The results highlight the challenges of genotyping-by-sequencing in polyploid taxa, while establishing the potential genetic resources for developing a new range of caviar traceability and enforcement tools. PMID:23473098

  13. Association analysis of the FTO gene with obesity in children of Caucasian and African ancestry reveals a common tagging SNP.

    PubMed

    Grant, Struan F A; Li, Mingyao; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Kim, Cecilia E; Annaiah, Kiran; Santa, Erin; Glessner, Joseph T; Casalunovo, Tracy; Frackelton, Edward C; Otieno, F George; Shaner, Julie L; Smith, Ryan M; Imielinski, Marcin; Eckert, Andrew W; Chiavacci, Rosetta M; Berkowitz, Robert I; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2008-01-01

    Recently an association was demonstrated between the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9939609, within the FTO locus and obesity as a consequence of a genome wide association (GWA) study of type 2 diabetes in adults. We examined the effects of two perfect surrogates for this SNP plus 11 other SNPs at this locus with respect to our childhood obesity cohort, consisting of both Caucasians and African Americans (AA). Utilizing data from our ongoing GWA study in our cohort of 418 Caucasian obese children (BMI>or=95th percentile), 2,270 Caucasian controls (BMI<95th percentile), 578 AA obese children and 1,424 AA controls, we investigated the association of the previously reported variation at the FTO locus with the childhood form of this disease in both ethnicities. The minor allele frequencies (MAF) of rs8050136 and rs3751812 (perfect surrogates for rs9939609 i.e. both r(2) = 1) in the Caucasian cases were 0.448 and 0.443 respectively while they were 0.391 and 0.386 in Caucasian controls respectively, yielding for both an odds ratio (OR) of 1.27 (95% CI 1.08-1.47; P = 0.0022). Furthermore, the MAFs of rs8050136 and rs3751812 in the AA cases were 0.449 and 0.115 respectively while they were 0.436 and 0.090 in AA controls respectively, yielding an OR of 1.05 (95% CI 0.91-1.21; P = 0.49) and of 1.31 (95% CI 1.050-1.643; P = 0.017) respectively. Investigating all 13 SNPs present on the Illumina HumanHap550 BeadChip in this region of linkage disequilibrium, rs3751812 was the only SNP conferring significant risk in AA. We have therefore replicated and refined the association in an AA cohort and distilled a tag-SNP, rs3751812, which captures the ancestral origin of the actual mutation. As such, variants in the FTO gene confer a similar magnitude of risk of obesity to children as to their adult counterparts and appear to have a global impact. PMID:18335027

  14. Genome-Wide Joint Meta-Analysis of SNP and SNP-by-Smoking Interaction Identifies Novel Loci for Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Imboden, Medea; Koch, Beate; McArdle, Wendy L.; Smith, Albert V.; Smolonska, Joanna; Sood, Akshay; Tang, Wenbo; Wilk, Jemma B.; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aschard, Hugues; Burkart, Kristin M.; Curjuric, Ivan; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Elliott, Paul; Gu, Xiangjun; Harris, Tamara B.; Janson, Christer; Homuth, Georg; Hysi, Pirro G.; Liu, Jason Z.; Loehr, Laura R.; Lohman, Kurt; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Manning, Alisa K.; Marciante, Kristin D.; Obeidat, Ma'en; Postma, Dirkje S.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Chen, Ting-hsu; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Franceschini, Nora; Heinrich, Joachim; Rotter, Jerome I.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Williams, O. Dale; Bentley, Amy R.; Hofman, Albert; Laurie, Cathy C.; Lumley, Thomas; Morrison, Alanna C.; Joubert, Bonnie R.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Couper, David J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Liu, Yongmei; Wjst, Matthias; Wain, Louise V.; Vonk, Judith M.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rochat, Thierry; Rich, Stephen S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; O'Connor, George T.; North, Kari E.; Mirel, Daniel B.; Meibohm, Bernd; Launer, Lenore J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hammond, Christopher J.; Gläser, Sven; Marchini, Jonathan; Kraft, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Völzke, Henry; Stricker, Bruno H. C.; Spector, Timothy D.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Jarvis, Deborah; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Heckbert, Susan R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Boezen, H. Marike; Barr, R. Graham; Cassano, Patricia A.; Strachan, David P.; Fornage, Myriam; Hall, Ian P.; Dupuis, Josée; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous genetic loci for spirometic measures of pulmonary function, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and its ratio to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC). Given that cigarette smoking adversely affects pulmonary function, we conducted genome-wide joint meta-analyses (JMA) of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and SNP-by-smoking (ever-smoking or pack-years) associations on FEV1 and FEV1/FVC across 19 studies (total N = 50,047). We identified three novel loci not previously associated with pulmonary function. SNPs in or near DNER (smallest PJMA = 5.00×10−11), HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DQA2 (smallest PJMA = 4.35×10−9), and KCNJ2 and SOX9 (smallest PJMA = 1.28×10−8) were associated with FEV1/FVC or FEV1 in meta-analysis models including SNP main effects, smoking main effects, and SNP-by-smoking (ever-smoking or pack-years) interaction. The HLA region has been widely implicated for autoimmune and lung phenotypes, unlike the other novel loci, which have not been widely implicated. We evaluated DNER, KCNJ2, and SOX9 and found them to be expressed in human lung tissue. DNER and SOX9 further showed evidence of differential expression in human airway epithelium in smokers compared to non-smokers. Our findings demonstrated that joint testing of SNP and SNP-by-environment interaction identified novel loci associated with complex traits that are missed when considering only the genetic main effects. PMID:23284291

  15. Fish scales and SNP chips: SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in individual and pooled DNA from historical samples of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA extracted from historical samples is an important resource for understanding genetic consequences of anthropogenic influences and long-term environmental change. However, such samples generally yield DNA of a lower amount and quality, and the extent to which DNA degradation affects SNP genotyping success and allele frequency estimation is not well understood. We conducted high density SNP genotyping and allele frequency estimation in both individual DNA samples and pooled DNA samples extracted from dried Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) scales stored at room temperature for up to 35 years, and assessed genotyping success, repeatability and accuracy of allele frequency estimation using a high density SNP genotyping array. Results In individual DNA samples, genotyping success and repeatability was very high (> 0.973 and > 0.998, respectively) in samples stored for up to 35 years; both increased with the proportion of DNA of fragment size > 1000 bp. In pooled DNA samples, allele frequency estimation was highly repeatable (Repeatability = 0.986) and highly correlated with empirical allele frequency measures (Mean Adjusted R2 = 0.991); allele frequency could be accurately estimated in > 95% of pooled DNA samples with a reference group of at least 30 individuals. SNPs located in polyploid regions of the genome were more sensitive to DNA degradation: older samples had lower genotyping success at these loci, and a larger reference panel of individuals was required to accurately estimate allele frequencies. Conclusions SNP genotyping was highly successful in degraded DNA samples, paving the way for the use of degraded samples in SNP genotyping projects. DNA pooling provides the potential for large scale population genetic studies with fewer assays, provided enough reference individuals are also genotyped and DNA quality is properly assessed beforehand. We provide recommendations for future studies intending to conduct high-throughput SNP

  16. SNP discovery through de novo deep sequencing using the next generation of DNA sequencers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of high volumes of DNA sequence data using new technologies has permitted more efficient identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in vertebrate genomes. This chapter presented practical methodology for production and analysis of DNA sequence data for SNP discovery....

  17. Identification of SNP Haplotypes and Prospects of Association Mapping in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watermelon is the fifth most economically important vegetable crop cultivated world-wide. Implementing Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) marker technology in watermelon breeding and germplasm evaluation programs holds a key to improve horticulturally important traits. Next-generation sequencing...

  18. SNP analysis of AMY2 and CTSL genes in Litopenaeus vannamei and Penaeus monodon shrimp.

    PubMed

    Glenn, K L; Grapes, L; Suwanasopee, T; Harris, D L; Li, Y; Wilson, K; Rothschild, M F

    2005-06-01

    Genetic studies in shrimp have focused on disease, with production traits such as growth left unexamined. Two shrimp species, Litopenaeus vannamei and Penaeus monodon, which represent the majority of US shrimp imports, were selected for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in alpha-amylase (AMY2) and cathepsin-l (CTSL), both candidate genes for growth. In L. vannamei, four SNPs were found in AMY2 and one SNP was found in CTSL. In P. monodon, one SNP was identified in CTSL. The CTSL gene was mapped to linkage group 28 of P. monodon using the female map developed with the Australian P. monodon mapping population. Association analyses for the AMY2 and CTSL genes with body weight (BW) were performed in two L. vannamei populations. While neither gene was found to be significantly associated with BW in these populations, there was a trend in one population towards higher BW for allele G of CTSL SNP C681G. PMID:15932404

  19. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  20. Evaluation of approaches for identifying population informative markers from high density SNP Chips

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic markers can be used to identify and verify the origin of individuals. Motivation for the inference of ancestry ranges from conservation genetics to forensic analysis. High density assays featuring Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers can be exploited to create a reduced panel containing the most informative markers for these purposes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate methods of marker selection and determine the minimum number of markers from the BovineSNP50 BeadChip required to verify the origin of individuals in European cattle breeds. Delta, Wright's FST, Weir & Cockerham's FST and PCA methods for population differentiation were compared. The level of informativeness of each SNP was estimated from the breed specific allele frequencies. Individual assignment analysis was performed using the ranked informative markers. Stringency levels were applied by log-likelihood ratio to assess the confidence of the assignment test. Results A 95% assignment success rate for the 384 individually genotyped animals was achieved with < 80, < 100, < 140 and < 200 SNP markers (with increasing stringency threshold levels) across all the examined methods for marker selection. No further gain in power of assignment was achieved by sampling in excess of 200 SNP markers. The marker selection method that required the lowest number of SNP markers to verify the animal's breed origin was Wright's FST (60 to 140 SNPs depending on the chosen degree of confidence). Certain breeds required fewer markers (< 100) to achieve 100% assignment success. In contrast, closely related breeds require more markers (~200) to achieve > 95% assignment success. The power of assignment success, and therefore the number of SNP markers required, is dependent on the levels of genetic heterogeneity and pool of samples considered. Conclusions While all SNP selection methods produced marker panels capable of breed identification, the power of assignment varied markedly among

  1. A meta-analysis strategy for gene prioritization using gene expression, SNP genotype, and eQTL data.

    PubMed

    Che, Jingmin; Shin, Miyoung

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand disease pathogenesis, improve medical diagnosis, or discover effective drug targets, it is important to identify significant genes deeply involved in human disease. For this purpose, many earlier approaches attempted to prioritize candidate genes using gene expression profiles or SNP genotype data, but they often suffer from producing many false-positive results. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose a meta-analysis strategy for gene prioritization that employs three different genetic resources--gene expression data, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data, and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data--in an integrative manner. For integration, we utilized an improved technique for the order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) to combine scores from distinct resources. This method was evaluated on two publicly available datasets regarding prostate cancer and lung cancer to identify disease-related genes. Consequently, our proposed strategy for gene prioritization showed its superiority to conventional methods in discovering significant disease-related genes with several types of genetic resources, while making good use of potential complementarities among available resources. PMID:25874220

  2. A Meta-Analysis Strategy for Gene Prioritization Using Gene Expression, SNP Genotype, and eQTL Data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand disease pathogenesis, improve medical diagnosis, or discover effective drug targets, it is important to identify significant genes deeply involved in human disease. For this purpose, many earlier approaches attempted to prioritize candidate genes using gene expression profiles or SNP genotype data, but they often suffer from producing many false-positive results. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose a meta-analysis strategy for gene prioritization that employs three different genetic resources—gene expression data, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data, and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data—in an integrative manner. For integration, we utilized an improved technique for the order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS) to combine scores from distinct resources. This method was evaluated on two publicly available datasets regarding prostate cancer and lung cancer to identify disease-related genes. Consequently, our proposed strategy for gene prioritization showed its superiority to conventional methods in discovering significant disease-related genes with several types of genetic resources, while making good use of potential complementarities among available resources. PMID:25874220

  3. Exploring Germplasm Diversity to Understand the Domestication Process in Cicer spp. Using SNP and DArT Markers

    PubMed Central

    Roorkiwal, Manish; von Wettberg, Eric J.; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Warschefsky, Emily; Rathore, Abhishek; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    To estimate genetic diversity within and between 10 interfertile Cicer species (94 genotypes) from the primary, secondary and tertiary gene pool, we analysed 5,257 DArT markers and 651 KASPar SNP markers. Based on successful allele calling in the tertiary gene pool, 2,763 DArT and 624 SNP markers that are polymorphic between genotypes from the gene pools were analyzed further. STRUCTURE analyses were consistent with 3 cultivated populations, representing kabuli, desi and pea-shaped seed types, with substantial admixture among these groups, while two wild populations were observed using DArT markers. AMOVA was used to partition variance among hierarchical sets of landraces and wild species at both the geographical and species level, with 61% of the variation found between species, and 39% within species. Molecular variance among the wild species was high (39%) compared to the variation present in cultivated material (10%). Observed heterozygosity was higher in wild species than the cultivated species for each linkage group. Our results support the Fertile Crescent both as the center of domestication and diversification of chickpea. The collection used in the present study covers all the three regions of historical chickpea cultivation, with the highest diversity in the Fertile Crescent region. Shared alleles between different gene pools suggest the possibility of gene flow among these species or incomplete lineage sorting and could indicate complicated patterns of divergence and fusion of wild chickpea taxa in the past. PMID:25010059

  4. Hybridization modeling of oligonucleotide SNP arrays for accurate DNA copy number estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Lin; Sun, Kelian; Ding, Qi; Cui, Yuehua; Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Elston, Robert C.; Qian, Minping; Fu, Wenjiang J

    2009-01-01

    Affymetrix SNP arrays have been widely used for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype calling and DNA copy number variation inference. Although numerous methods have achieved high accuracy in these fields, most studies have paid little attention to the modeling of hybridization of probes to off-target allele sequences, which can affect the accuracy greatly. In this study, we address this issue and demonstrate that hybridization with mismatch nucleotides (HWMMN) occurs in all SNP probe-sets and has a critical effect on the estimation of allelic concentrations (ACs). We study sequence binding through binding free energy and then binding affinity, and develop a probe intensity composite representation (PICR) model. The PICR model allows the estimation of ACs at a given SNP through statistical regression. Furthermore, we demonstrate with cell-line data of known true copy numbers that the PICR model can achieve reasonable accuracy in copy number estimation at a single SNP locus, by using the ratio of the estimated AC of each sample to that of the reference sample, and can reveal subtle genotype structure of SNPs at abnormal loci. We also demonstrate with HapMap data that the PICR model yields accurate SNP genotype calls consistently across samples, laboratories and even across array platforms. PMID:19586935

  5. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were detectable in approximately 8% of cases by SNP microarray, mostly from FISH noninformative cases. This study also identified several LOH/AOH loci with known and well-defined UPD (uniparental disomy) disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests more strict clinical criteria for FISH analysis. However, if clinical criteria are few or doubtful, in particular newborn/neonate in intensive care, SNP microarray should be the first screening test to be ordered. FISH is ideal test for detecting mosaicism, screening family members, and prenatal diagnosis in proven families. PMID:27051557

  6. High-resolution SNP arrays in mental retardation diagnostics: how much do we gain?

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Laura; Alesi, Viola; Loddo, Sara; Novelli, Antonio; Bottillo, Irene; Battaglia, Agatino; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Zampino, Giuseppe; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Surrey, Saul; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    We used Affymetrix 6.0 GeneChip SNP arrays to characterize copy number variations (CNVs) in a cohort of 70 patients previously characterized on lower-density oligonucleotide arrays affected by idiopathic mental retardation and dysmorphic features. The SNP array platform includes ∼900 000 SNP probes and 900 000 non-SNP oligonucleotide probes at an average distance of 0.7 Kb, which facilitates coverage of the whole genome, including coding and noncoding regions. The high density of probes is critical for detecting small CNVs, but it can lead to data interpretation problems. To reduce the number of false positives, parameters were set to consider only imbalances >75 Kb encompassing at least 80 probe sets. The higher resolution of the SNP array platform confirmed the increased ability to detect small CNVs, although more than 80% of these CNVs overlapped to copy number ‘neutral' polymorphism regions and 4.4% of them did not contain known genes. In our cohort of 70 patients, of the 51 previously evaluated as ‘normal' on the Agilent 44K array, the SNP array platform disclosed six additional CNV changes, including three in three patients, which may be pathogenic. This suggests that about 6% of individuals classified as ‘normal' using the lower-density oligonucleotide array could be found to be affected by a genomic disorder when evaluated with the higher-density microarray platforms. PMID:19809473

  7. Construction of a versatile SNP array for pyramiding useful genes of rice.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, Yusuke; Noda, Tomonori; Yamagata, Yoshiyuki; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn; Sunohara, Hidehiko; Uehara, Kanako; Furuta, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Keisuke; Jena, Kshirod Kumar; Yasui, Hideshi; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Doi, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    DNA marker-assisted selection (MAS) has become an indispensable component of breeding. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are the most frequent polymorphism in the rice genome. However, SNP markers are not readily employed in MAS because of limitations in genotyping platforms. Here the authors report a Golden Gate SNP array that targets specific genes controlling yield-related traits and biotic stress resistance in rice. As a first step, the SNP genotypes were surveyed in 31 parental varieties using the Affymetrix Rice 44K SNP microarray. The haplotype information for 16 target genes was then converted to the Golden Gate platform with 143-plex markers. Haplotypes for the 14 useful allele are unique and can discriminate among all other varieties. The genotyping consistency between the Affymetrix microarray and the Golden Gate array was 92.8%, and the accuracy of the Golden Gate array was confirmed in 3 F2 segregating populations. The concept of the haplotype-based selection by using the constructed SNP array was proofed. PMID:26566831

  8. SNP Microarray in FISH Negative Clinically Suspected 22q11.2 Microdeletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Halder, Ashutosh; Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the role of SNP microarray in 101 cases of clinically suspected FISH negative (noninformative/normal) 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. SNP microarray was carried out using 300 K HumanCytoSNP-12 BeadChip array or CytoScan 750 K array. SNP microarray identified 8 cases of 22q11.2 microdeletions and/or microduplications in addition to cases of chromosomal abnormalities and other pathogenic/likely pathogenic CNVs. Clinically suspected specific deletions (22q11.2) were detectable in approximately 8% of cases by SNP microarray, mostly from FISH noninformative cases. This study also identified several LOH/AOH loci with known and well-defined UPD (uniparental disomy) disorders. In conclusion, this study suggests more strict clinical criteria for FISH analysis. However, if clinical criteria are few or doubtful, in particular newborn/neonate in intensive care, SNP microarray should be the first screening test to be ordered. FISH is ideal test for detecting mosaicism, screening family members, and prenatal diagnosis in proven families. PMID:27051557

  9. Haplotype block partitioning as a tool for dimensionality reduction in SNP association studies

    PubMed Central

    Pattaro, Cristian; Ruczinski, Ingo; Fallin, Danièle M; Parmigiani, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Background Identification of disease-related genes in association studies is challenged by the large number of SNPs typed. To address the dilution of power caused by high dimensionality, and to generate results that are biologically interpretable, it is critical to take into consideration spatial correlation of SNPs along the genome. With the goal of identifying true genetic associations, partitioning the genome according to spatial correlation can be a powerful and meaningful way to address this dimensionality problem. Results We developed and validated an MCMC Algorithm To Identify blocks of Linkage DisEquilibrium (MATILDE) for clustering contiguous SNPs, and a statistical testing framework to detect association using partitions as units of analysis. We compared its ability to detect true SNP associations to that of the most commonly used algorithm for block partitioning, as implemented in the Haploview and HapBlock software. Simulations were based on artificially assigning phenotypes to individuals with SNPs corresponding to region 14q11 of the HapMap database. When block partitioning is performed using MATILDE, the ability to correctly identify a disease SNP is higher, especially for small effects, than it is with the alternatives considered. Advantages can be both in terms of true positive findings and limiting the number of false discoveries. Finer partitions provided by LD-based methods or by marker-by-marker analysis are efficient only for detecting big effects, or in presence of large sample sizes. The probabilistic approach we propose offers several additional advantages, including: a) adapting the estimation of blocks to the population, technology, and sample size of the study; b) probabilistic assessment of uncertainty about block boundaries and about whether any two SNPs are in the same block; c) user selection of the probability threshold for assigning SNPs to the same block. Conclusion We demonstrate that, in realistic scenarios, our adaptive, study

  10. Family-Based Multi-SNP X Chromosome Analysis Using Parent Information

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Alison S.; Shi, Min; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for association analysis of haplotypes on the X chromosome that offers both improved power and robustness to population stratification in studies of affected offspring and their parents if all three have been genotyped. The method makes use of assumed parental haplotype exchangeability (PHE), a weaker assumption than Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). PHE requires that in the source population, of the three X chromosome haplotypes carried by the two parents, each is equally likely to be carried by the father. We propose a pseudo-sibling approach that exploits that exchangeability assumption. Our method extends the single-SNP PIX-LRT method to multiple SNPs in a high linkage block. We describe methods for testing the PHE assumption and also for determining how apparent violations can be distinguished from true fetal effects or maternally-mediated effects. We show results of simulations that demonstrate nominal type I error rate and good power. The methods are then applied to dbGaP data on the birth defect oral cleft, using both Asian and Caucasian families with cleft. PMID:26941777

  11. Sensitive DNA detection and SNP discrimination using ultrabright SERS nanorattles and magnetic beads for malaria diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoan T; Gandra, Naveen; Fales, Andrew M; Taylor, Steve M; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-07-15

    One of the major obstacles to implement nucleic acid-based molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) and in resource-limited settings is the lack of sensitive and practical DNA detection methods that can be seamlessly integrated into portable platforms. Herein we present a sensitive yet simple DNA detection method using a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoplatform: the ultrabright SERS nanorattle. The method, referred to as the nanorattle-based method, involves sandwich hybridization of magnetic beads that are loaded with capture probes, target sequences, and ultrabright SERS nanorattles that are loaded with reporter probes. Upon hybridization, a magnet was applied to concentrate the hybridization sandwiches at a detection spot for SERS measurements. The ultrabright SERS nanorattles, composed of a core and a shell with resonance Raman reporters loaded in the gap space between the core and the shell, serve as SERS tags for signal detection. Using this method, a specific DNA sequence of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum could be detected with a detection limit of approximately 100 attomoles. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination of wild type malaria DNA and mutant malaria DNA, which confers resistance to artemisinin drugs, was also demonstrated. These test models demonstrate the molecular diagnostic potential of the nanorattle-based method to both detect and genotype infectious pathogens. Furthermore, the method's simplicity makes it a suitable candidate for integration into portable platforms for POC and in resource-limited settings applications. PMID:26913502

  12. Family-Based Multi-SNP X Chromosome Analysis Using Parent Information.

    PubMed

    Wise, Alison S; Shi, Min; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for association analysis of haplotypes on the X chromosome that offers both improved power and robustness to population stratification in studies of affected offspring and their parents if all three have been genotyped. The method makes use of assumed parental haplotype exchangeability (PHE), a weaker assumption than Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). PHE requires that in the source population, of the three X chromosome haplotypes carried by the two parents, each is equally likely to be carried by the father. We propose a pseudo-sibling approach that exploits that exchangeability assumption. Our method extends the single-SNP PIX-LRT method to multiple SNPs in a high linkage block. We describe methods for testing the PHE assumption and also for determining how apparent violations can be distinguished from true fetal effects or maternally-mediated effects. We show results of simulations that demonstrate nominal type I error rate and good power. The methods are then applied to dbGaP data on the birth defect oral cleft, using both Asian and Caucasian families with cleft. PMID:26941777

  13. On the use of dense SNP marker data for the identification of distant relative pairs.

    PubMed

    Sun, M; Jobling, M A; Taliun, D; Pramstaller, P P; Egeland, T; Sheehan, N A

    2016-02-01

    There has been recent interest in the exploitation of readily available dense genome scan marker data for the identification of relatives. However, there are conflicting findings on how informative these data are in practical situations and, in particular, sets of thinned markers are often used with no concrete justification for the chosen spacing. We explore the potential usefulness of dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays for this application with a focus on inferring distant relative pairs. We distinguish between relationship estimation, as defined by a pedigree connecting the two individuals of interest, and estimation of general relatedness as would be provided by a kinship coefficient or a coefficient of relatedness. Since our primary interest is in the former case, we adopt a pedigree likelihood approach. We consider the effect of additional SNPs and data on an additional typed relative, together with choice of that relative, on relationship inference. We also consider the effect of linkage disequilibrium. When overall relatedness, rather than the specific relationship, would suffice, we propose an approximate approach that is easy to implement and appears to compete well with a popular moment-based estimator and a recent maximum likelihood approach based on chromosomal sharing. We conclude that denser marker data are more informative for distant relatives. However, linkage disequilibrium cannot be ignored and will be the main limiting factor for applications to real data. PMID:26474828

  14. A genome-wide SNP-based phylogenetic analysis distinguishes different biovars of Brucella suis.

    PubMed

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-07-01

    Brucellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Brucella spp. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis. B. suis is the most genetically diverged species within the genus Brucella. We present the first large-scale B. suis phylogenetic analysis based on an alignment-free k-mer approach of gathering polymorphic sites from whole genome sequences. Genome-wide core-SNP based phylogenetic tree clearly differentiated and discriminated the B. suis biovars and the vaccine strain into different clades. A total of 16,756 SNPs were identified from the genome sequences of 54 B. suis strains. Also, biovar-specific SNPs were identified. The vaccine strain B. suis S2-30 is extensively used in China, which was discriminated from all biovars with the accumulation of the highest number of SNPs. We have also identified the SNPs between B. suis vaccine strain S2-30 and its closest homolog, B. suis biovar 513UK. The highest number of mutations (22) was observed in the phosphomannomutase (pmm) gene essential for the synthesis of O-antigen. Also, mutations were identified in several virulent genes including genes coding for type IV secretion system and the effector proteins, which could be responsible for the attenuated virulence of B. suis S2-30. PMID:27085292

  15. Optimal Design of Low-Density SNP Arrays for Genomic Prediction: Algorithm and Applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Xu, Jiaqi; Feng, Guofei; Wiggans, George R; Taylor, Jeremy F; He, Jun; Qian, Changsong; Qiu, Jiansheng; Simpson, Barry; Walker, Jeremy; Bauck, Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Low-density (LD) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays provide a cost-effective solution for genomic prediction and selection, but algorithms and computational tools are needed for the optimal design of LD SNP chips. A multiple-objective, local optimization (MOLO) algorithm was developed for design of optimal LD SNP chips that can be imputed accurately to medium-density (MD) or high-density (HD) SNP genotypes for genomic prediction. The objective function facilitates maximization of non-gap map length and system information for the SNP chip, and the latter is computed either as locus-averaged (LASE) or haplotype-averaged Shannon entropy (HASE) and adjusted for uniformity of the SNP distribution. HASE performed better than LASE with ≤1,000 SNPs, but required considerably more computing time. Nevertheless, the differences diminished when >5,000 SNPs were selected. Optimization was accomplished conditionally on the presence of SNPs that were obligated to each chromosome. The frame location of SNPs on a chip can be either uniform (evenly spaced) or non-uniform. For the latter design, a tunable empirical Beta distribution was used to guide location distribution of frame SNPs such that both ends of each chromosome were enriched with SNPs. The SNP distribution on each chromosome was finalized through the objective function that was locally and empirically maximized. This MOLO algorithm was capable of selecting a set of approximately evenly-spaced and highly-informative SNPs, which in turn led to increased imputation accuracy compared with selection solely of evenly-spaced SNPs. Imputation accuracy increased with LD chip size, and imputation error rate was extremely low for chips with ≥3,000 SNPs. Assuming that genotyping or imputation error occurs at random, imputation error rate can be viewed as the upper limit for genomic prediction error. Our results show that about 25% of imputation error rate was propagated to genomic prediction in an Angus population. The

  16. Identification of Laying-Related SNP Markers in Geese Using RAD Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yu, ShiGang; Chu, WeiWei; Zhang, LiFan; Han, HouMing; Zhao, RongXue; Wu, Wei; Zhu, JiangNing; Dodson, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Liu, HongLin; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Laying performance is an important economical trait of goose production. As laying performance is of low heritability, it is of significance to develop a marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategy for this trait. Definition of sequence variation related to the target trait is a prerequisite of quantitating MAS, but little is presently known about the goose genome, which greatly hinders the identification of genetic markers for the laying traits of geese. Recently developed restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing is a possible approach for discerning large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and reducing the complexity of a genome without having reference genomic information available. In the present study, we developed a pooled RAD sequencing strategy for detecting geese laying-related SNP. Two DNA pools were constructed, each consisting of equal amounts of genomic DNA from 10 individuals with either high estimated breeding value (HEBV) or low estimated breeding value (LEBV). A total of 139,013 SNP were obtained from 42,291,356 sequences, of which 18,771,943 were for LEBV and 23,519,413 were for HEBV cohorts. Fifty-five SNP which had different allelic frequencies in the two DNA pools were further validated by individual-based AS-PCR genotyping in the LEBV and HEBV cohorts. Ten out of 55 SNP exhibited distinct allele distributions in these two cohorts. These 10 SNP were further genotyped in a goose population of 492 geese to verify the association with egg numbers. The result showed that 8 of 10 SNP were associated with egg numbers. Additionally, liner regression analysis revealed that SNP Record-111407, 106975 and 112359 were involved in a multiplegene network affecting laying performance. We used IPCR to extend the unknown regions flanking the candidate RAD tags. The obtained sequences were subjected to BLAST to retrieve the orthologous genes in either ducks or chickens. Five novel genes were cloned for geese which harbored the candidate laying

  17. Identification of Laying-Related SNP Markers in Geese Using RAD Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, ShiGang; Chu, WeiWei; Zhang, LiFan; Han, HouMing; Zhao, RongXue; Wu, Wei; Zhu, JiangNing; Dodson, Michael V.; Wei, Wei; Liu, HongLin; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Laying performance is an important economical trait of goose production. As laying performance is of low heritability, it is of significance to develop a marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategy for this trait. Definition of sequence variation related to the target trait is a prerequisite of quantitating MAS, but little is presently known about the goose genome, which greatly hinders the identification of genetic markers for the laying traits of geese. Recently developed restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing is a possible approach for discerning large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and reducing the complexity of a genome without having reference genomic information available. In the present study, we developed a pooled RAD sequencing strategy for detecting geese laying-related SNP. Two DNA pools were constructed, each consisting of equal amounts of genomic DNA from 10 individuals with either high estimated breeding value (HEBV) or low estimated breeding value (LEBV). A total of 139,013 SNP were obtained from 42,291,356 sequences, of which 18,771,943 were for LEBV and 23,519,413 were for HEBV cohorts. Fifty-five SNP which had different allelic frequencies in the two DNA pools were further validated by individual-based AS-PCR genotyping in the LEBV and HEBV cohorts. Ten out of 55 SNP exhibited distinct allele distributions in these two cohorts. These 10 SNP were further genotyped in a goose population of 492 geese to verify the association with egg numbers. The result showed that 8 of 10 SNP were associated with egg numbers. Additionally, liner regression analysis revealed that SNP Record-111407, 106975 and 112359 were involved in a multiplegene network affecting laying performance. We used IPCR to extend the unknown regions flanking the candidate RAD tags. The obtained sequences were subjected to BLAST to retrieve the orthologous genes in either ducks or chickens. Five novel genes were cloned for geese which harbored the candidate laying

  18. Generation of SNP datasets for orangutan population genomics using improved reduced-representation sequencing and direct comparisons of SNP calling algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput sequencing has opened up exciting possibilities in population and conservation genetics by enabling the assessment of genetic variation at genome-wide scales. One approach to reduce genome complexity, i.e. investigating only parts of the genome, is reduced-representation library (RRL) sequencing. Like similar approaches, RRL sequencing reduces ascertainment bias due to simultaneous discovery and genotyping of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and does not require reference genomes. Yet, generating such datasets remains challenging due to laboratory and bioinformatical issues. In the laboratory, current protocols require improvements with regards to sequencing homologous fragments to reduce the number of missing genotypes. From the bioinformatical perspective, the reliance of most studies on a single SNP caller disregards the possibility that different algorithms may produce disparate SNP datasets. Results We present an improved RRL (iRRL) protocol that maximizes the generation of homologous DNA sequences, thus achieving improved genotyping-by-sequencing efficiency. Our modifications facilitate generation of single-sample libraries, enabling individual genotype assignments instead of pooled-sample analysis. We sequenced ~1% of the orangutan genome with 41-fold median coverage in 31 wild-born individuals from two populations. SNPs and genotypes were called using three different algorithms. We obtained substantially different SNP datasets depending on the SNP caller. Genotype validations revealed that the Unified Genotyper of the Genome Analysis Toolkit and SAMtools performed significantly better than a caller from CLC Genomics Workbench (CLC). Of all conflicting genotype calls, CLC was only correct in 17% of the cases. Furthermore, conflicting genotypes between two algorithms showed a systematic bias in that one caller almost exclusively assigned heterozygotes, while the other one almost exclusively assigned homozygotes. Conclusions

  19. Application of Multi-SNP Approaches Bayesian LASSO and AUC-RF to Detect Main Effects of Inflammatory-Gene Variants Associated with Bladder Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Calle, M. Luz; Rothman, Nathaniel; Urrea, Víctor; Kogevinas, Manolis; Petrus, Sandra; Chanock, Stephen J.; Tardón, Adonina; García-Closas, Montserrat; González-Neira, Anna; Vellalta, Gemma; Carrato, Alfredo; Navarro, Arcadi; Lorente-Galdós, Belén; Silverman, Debra T.; Real, Francisco X.; Wu, Xifeng; Malats, Núria

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between inflammation and cancer is well established in several tumor types, including bladder cancer. We performed an association study between 886 inflammatory-gene variants and bladder cancer risk in 1,047 cases and 988 controls from the Spanish Bladder Cancer (SBC)/EPICURO Study. A preliminary exploration with the widely used univariate logistic regression approach did not identify any significant SNP after correcting for multiple testing. We further applied two more comprehensive methods to capture the complexity of bladder cancer genetic susceptibility: Bayesian Threshold LASSO (BTL), a regularized regression method, and AUC-Random Forest, a machine-learning algorithm. Both approaches explore the joint effect of markers. BTL analysis identified a signature of 37 SNPs in 34 genes showing an association with bladder cancer. AUC-RF detected an optimal predictive subset of 56 SNPs. 13 SNPs were identified by both methods in the total population. Using resources from the Texas Bladder Cancer study we were able to replicate 30% of the SNPs assessed. The associations between inflammatory SNPs and bladder cancer were reexamined among non-smokers to eliminate the effect of tobacco, one of the strongest and most prevalent environmental risk factor for this tumor. A 9 SNP-signature was detected by BTL. Here we report, for the first time, a set of SNP in inflammatory genes jointly associated with bladder cancer risk. These results highlight the importance of the complex structure of genetic susceptibility associated with cancer risk. PMID:24391818

  20. The Swiss-Prot variant page and the ModSNP database: a resource for sequence and structure information on human protein variants.

    PubMed

    Yip, Yum L; Scheib, Holger; Diemand, Alexander V; Gattiker, Alexandre; Famiglietti, Livia M; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Bairoch, Amos

    2004-05-01

    Missense mutation leading to single amino acid polymorphism (SAP) is the type of mutation most frequently related to human diseases. The Swiss-Prot protein knowledgebase records information on such mutations in various sections of a protein entry, namely in the "feature," "comment," and "reference" fields. To facilitate users in obtaining the most relevant information about each human SAP recorded in the knowledgebase, the Swiss-Prot Variant web pages were created to provide a summary of available sequence information, as well as additional structural information on each variant. In particular, the ModSNP database was set up to store information related to SAPs and to manage the modeling of SAPs onto protein structures via an automatic homology modeling pipeline. Currently, among the 16,566 human SAPs recorded in the Swiss-Prot knowledgebase (release 42.5, 21 November 2003), more than 25% have corresponding 3D-models. Of these variants, 47% are related to disease, 26% are polymorphisms, and 27% are not yet clearly classified. The ModSNP database is updated and the subsequent model construction pipeline is launched with each weekly Swiss-Prot release. Thus, the ModSNP database represents a valuable resource for the structural analysis of protein variation. The Swiss-Prot variant pages are accessible from the NiceProt view of a Swiss-Prot entry on the ExPASy server (www.expasy.org/), via a hyperlink created for the stable and unique identifier FTId of each human SAP. PMID:15108278

  1. SNP Design from 454 Sequencing of Podosphaera plantaginis Transcriptome Reveals a Genetically Diverse Pathogen Metapopulation with High Levels of Mixed-Genotype Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tollenaere, Charlotte; Susi, Hanna; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Koskinen, Patrik; Tack, Ayco; Auvinen, Petri; Paulin, Lars; Frilander, Mikko J.; Lehtonen, Rainer; Laine, Anna-Liisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Molecular tools may greatly improve our understanding of pathogen evolution and epidemiology but technical constraints have hindered the development of genetic resources for parasites compared to free-living organisms. This study aims at developing molecular tools for Podosphaera plantaginis, an obligate fungal pathogen of Plantago lanceolata. This interaction has been intensively studied in the Åland archipelago of Finland with epidemiological data collected from over 4,000 host populations annually since year 2001. Principal Findings A cDNA library of a pooled sample of fungal conidia was sequenced on the 454 GS-FLX platform. Over 549,411 reads were obtained and annotated into 45,245 contigs. Annotation data was acquired for 65.2% of the assembled sequences. The transcriptome assembly was screened for SNP loci, as well as for functionally important genes (mating-type genes and potential effector proteins). A genotyping assay of 27 SNP loci was designed and tested on 380 infected leaf samples from 80 populations within the Åland archipelago. With this panel we identified 85 multilocus genotypes (MLG) with uneven frequencies across the pathogen metapopulation. Approximately half of the sampled populations contain polymorphism. Our genotyping protocol revealed mixed-genotype infection within a single host leaf to be common. Mixed infection has been proposed as one of the main drivers of pathogen evolution, and hence may be an important process in this pathosystem. Significance The developed SNP panel offers exciting research perspectives for future studies in this well-characterized pathosystem. Also, the transcriptome provides an invaluable novel genomic resource for powdery mildews, which cause significant yield losses on commercially important crops annually. Furthermore, the features that render genetic studies in this system a challenge are shared with the majority of obligate parasitic species, and hence our results provide methodological insights

  2. AMY-tree: an algorithm to use whole genome SNP calling for Y chromosomal phylogenetic applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the rapid progress of next-generation sequencing (NGS) facilities, an explosion of human whole genome data will become available in the coming years. These data can be used to optimize and to increase the resolution of the phylogenetic Y chromosomal tree. Moreover, the exponential growth of known Y chromosomal lineages will require an automatic determination of the phylogenetic position of an individual based on whole genome SNP calling data and an up to date Y chromosomal tree. Results We present an automated approach, ‘AMY-tree’, which is able to determine the phylogenetic position of a Y chromosome using a whole genome SNP profile, independently from the NGS platform and SNP calling program, whereby mistakes in the SNP calling or phylogenetic Y chromosomal tree are taken into account. Moreover, AMY-tree indicates ambiguities within the present phylogenetic tree and points out new Y-SNPs which may be phylogenetically relevant. The AMY-tree software package was validated successfully on 118 whole genome SNP profiles of 109 males with different origins. Moreover, support was found for an unknown recurrent mutation, wrong reported mutation conversions and a large amount of new interesting Y-SNPs. Conclusions Therefore, AMY-tree is a useful tool to determine the Y lineage of a sample based on SNP calling, to identify Y-SNPs with yet unknown phylogenetic position and to optimize the Y chromosomal phylogenetic tree in the future. AMY-tree will not add lineages to the existing phylogenetic tree of the Y-chromosome but it is the first step to analyse whole genome SNP profiles in a phylogenetic framework. PMID:23405914

  3. Is MDM2 SNP309 Variation a Risk Factor for Head and Neck Carcinoma?

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xianlu; Ye, Huiping; Li, Qi; Xiang, Zhaolan; Zhang, Xueyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Murine double minute-2 (MDM2) is a negative regulator of P53, and its T309G polymorphism has been suggested as a risk factor for a variety of cancers. Increasing evidence has shown the association of MDM2 T309G polymorphism with head and neck carcinoma (HNC) risk. However, the results are inconsistent. Thus, we performed a meta-analysis to elucidate the association. The meta-analysis retrieved studies published up to August 2015, and essential information was extracted for analysis. Separate analyses on ethnicity, source of controls, sample size, detection method, and cancer types were also conducted. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the association. Pooled data from 16 case–control studies including 4625 cases and 6927 controls failed to indicate a significant association. However, in the subgroup analysis of sample sizes, an increased risk was observed in the largest sample size group (>1000) under a recessive model (OR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.08–2.13). Increased risks were also found in the nasopharyngeal cancer in the subgroup analysis of cancer types (GG vs TT: OR = 2.07; 95% CI = 1.38–3.12; dominant model: OR = 1.48; 95% CI = 1.13–1.93; recessive model: OR = 1.76; 95% CI = 1.17–2.65). The results suggest that homozygote GG alleles of MDM2 SNP309 may be a low-penetrant risk factor for HNC, and G allele may confer nasopharyngeal cancer susceptibility. PMID:26945408

  4. MDM2 SNP309 promoter polymorphism confers risk for hereditary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thunell, Lena K; Bivik, Cecilia; Wäster, Petra; Fredrikson, Mats; Stjernström, Annika; Synnerstad, Ingrid; Rosdahl, Inger; Enerbäck, Charlotta

    2014-06-01

    The p53 pathway regulates stress response, and variations in p53, MDM2, and MDM4 may predispose an individual to tumor development. The aim of this study was to study the impact of genetic variation on sporadic and hereditary melanoma. We have analyzed a combination of three functionally relevant variants of the p53 pathway in 258 individuals with sporadic malignant melanomas, 50 with hereditary malignant melanomas, and 799 healthy controls. Genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, pyrosequencing, and allelic discrimination. We found an increased risk for hereditary melanoma in MDM2 GG homozygotes, which was more pronounced among women (P=0.035). In the event of pairwise combinations of the single nucleotide polymorphisms, a risk elevation was shown for MDM2 GG homozygotes/p53 wild-type Arg in hereditary melanoma (P=0.01). Individuals with sporadic melanomas of the superficial spreading type, including melanoma in situ, showed a slightly higher frequency of the MDM2 GG genotype compared with those with nodular melanomas (P=0.04). The dysplastic nevus phenotype, present in the majority of our hereditary melanoma cases and also in some sporadic cases, further enhanced the effect of the MDM2 GG genotype on melanoma risk (P=0.005). In conclusion, the results show an association between MDM2 SNP309 and an increased risk for hereditary melanoma, especially among women. Analysis of sporadic melanoma also shows an association between MDM2 and the superficial spreading melanoma subtype, as well as an association with the presence of dysplastic nevi in sporadic melanoma. PMID:24625390

  5. A SNP panel for identity and kinship testing using massive parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Grandell, Ida; Samara, Raed; Tillmar, Andreas O

    2016-07-01

    Within forensic genetics, there is still a need for supplementary DNA marker typing in order to increase the power to solve cases for both identity testing and complex kinship issues. One major disadvantage with current capillary electrophoresis (CE) methods is the limitation in DNA marker multiplex capability. By utilizing massive parallel sequencing (MPS) technology, this capability can, however, be increased. We have designed a customized GeneRead DNASeq SNP panel (Qiagen) of 140 previously published autosomal forensically relevant identity SNPs for analysis using MPS. One single amplification step was followed by library preparation using the GeneRead Library Prep workflow (Qiagen). The sequencing was performed on a MiSeq System (Illumina), and the bioinformatic analyses were done using the software Biomedical Genomics Workbench (CLC Bio, Qiagen). Forty-nine individuals from a Swedish population were genotyped in order to establish genotype frequencies and to evaluate the performance of the assay. The analyses showed to have a balanced coverage among the included loci, and the heterozygous balance showed to have less than 0.5 % outliers. Analyses of dilution series of the 2800M Control DNA gave reproducible results down to 0.2 ng DNA input. In addition, typing of FTA samples and bone samples was performed with promising results. Further studies and optimizations are, however, required for a more detailed evaluation of the performance of degraded and PCR-inhibited forensic samples. In summary, the assay offers a straightforward sample-to-genotype workflow and could be useful to gain information in forensic casework, for both identity testing and in order to solve complex kinship issues. PMID:26932869

  6. The extent of linkage disequilibrium in beef cattle breeds using high-density SNP genotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between molecular markers impacts genome-wide association studies and implementation of genomic selection. The availability of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping platforms makes it possible to investigate LD at an unprecedented resolution. In this work, we characterised LD decay in breeds of beef cattle of taurine, indicine and composite origins and explored its variation across autosomes and the X chromosome. Findings In each breed, LD decayed rapidly and r2 was less than 0.2 for marker pairs separated by 50 kb. The LD decay curves clustered into three groups of similar LD decay that distinguished the three main cattle types. At short distances between markers (< 10 kb), taurine breeds showed higher LD (r2 = 0.45) than their indicine (r2 = 0.25) and composite (r2 = 0.32) counterparts. This higher LD in taurine breeds was attributed to a smaller effective population size and a stronger bottleneck during breed formation. Using all SNPs on only the X chromosome, the three cattle types could still be distinguished. However for taurine breeds, the LD decay on the X chromosome was much faster and the background level much lower than for indicine breeds and composite populations. When using only SNPs that were polymorphic in all breeds, the analysis of the X chromosome mimicked that of the autosomes. Conclusions The pattern of LD mirrored some aspects of the history of breed populations and showed a sharp decay with increasing physical distance between markers. We conclude that the availability of the HD chip can be used to detect association signals that remained hidden when using lower density genotyping platforms, since LD dropped below 0.2 at distances of 50 kb. PMID:24661366

  7. SSCP-SNP in pearl millet--a new marker system for comparative genetics.

    PubMed

    Bertin, I; Zhu, J H; Gale, M D

    2005-05-01

    A considerable array of genomic resources are in place in pearl millet, and marker-aided selection is already in use in the public breeding programme at ICRISAT. This paper describes experiments to extend these publicly available resources to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based marker system. A new marker system, single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP)-SNP, was developed using annotated rice genomic sequences to initially predict the intron-exon borders in millet expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and then to design primers that would amplify across the introns. An adequate supply of millet ESTs was available for us to identify 299 homologues of single-copy rice genes in which the intron positions could be precisely predicted. PCR primers were then designed to amplify approximately 500-bp genomic fragments containing introns. Analysis of these fragments on SSCP gels revealed considerable polymorphism. A detailed DNA sequence analysis of variation at four of the SSCP-SNP loci over a panel of eight inbred genotypes showed complex patterns of variation, with about one SNP or indel (insertion-deletion) every 59 bp in the introns, but considerably fewer in the exons. About two-thirds of the variation was derived from SNPs and one-third from indels. Most haplotypes were detected by SSCP. As a marker system, SSCP-SNP has lower development costs than simple sequence repeats (SSRs), because much of the work is in silico, and similar deployment costs and through-put potential. The rates of polymorphism were lower but useable, with a mean PIC of 0.49 relative to 0.72 for SSRs in our eight inbred genotype panel screen. The major advantage of the system is in comparative applications. Syntenic information can be used to target SSCP-SNP markers to specific chromosomal regions or, conversely, SSCP-SNP markers can be used to unravel detailed syntenic relationships in specific parts of the genome. Finally, a preliminary analysis showed that the millet SSCP-SNP primers

  8. Mining and Analysis of SNP in Response to Salinity Stress in Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoge; Lu, Xuke; Wang, Junjuan; Wang, Delong; Yin, Zujun; Fan, Weili; Wang, Shuai; Ye, Wuwei

    2016-01-01

    Salinity stress is a major abiotic factor that affects crop output, and as a pioneer crop in saline and alkaline land, salt tolerance study of cotton is particularly important. In our experiment, four salt-tolerance varieties with different salt tolerance indexes including CRI35 (65.04%), Kanghuanwei164 (56.19%), Zhong9807 (55.20%) and CRI44 (50.50%), as well as four salt-sensitive cotton varieties including Hengmian3 (48.21%), GK50 (40.20%), Xinyan96-48 (34.90%), ZhongS9612 (24.80%) were used as the materials. These materials were divided into salt-tolerant group (ST) and salt-sensitive group (SS). Illumina Cotton SNP 70K Chip was used to detect SNP in different cotton varieties. SNPv (SNP variation of the same seedling pre- and after- salt stress) in different varieties were screened; polymorphic SNP and SNPr (SNP related to salt tolerance) were obtained. Annotation and analysis of these SNPs showed that (1) the induction efficiency of salinity stress on SNPv of cotton materials with different salt tolerance index was different, in which the induction efficiency on salt-sensitive materials was significantly higher than that on salt-tolerant materials. The induction of salt stress on SNPv was obviously biased. (2) SNPv induced by salt stress may be related to the methylation changes under salt stress. (3) SNPr may influence salt tolerance of plants by affecting the expression of salt-tolerance related genes. PMID:27355327

  9. A SNP discovery method to assess variant allele probability from next-generation resequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yufeng; Wan, Zhengzheng; Coarfa, Cristian; Drabek, Rafal; Chen, Lei; Ostrowski, Elizabeth A.; Liu, Yue; Weinstock, George M.; Wheeler, David A.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Yu, Fuli

    2010-01-01

    Accurate identification of genetic variants from next-generation sequencing (NGS) data is essential for immediate large-scale genomic endeavors such as the 1000 Genomes Project, and is crucial for further genetic analysis based on the discoveries. The key challenge in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery is to distinguish true individual variants (occurring at a low frequency) from sequencing errors (often occurring at frequencies orders of magnitude higher). Therefore, knowledge of the error probabilities of base calls is essential. We have developed Atlas-SNP2, a computational tool that detects and accounts for systematic sequencing errors caused by context-related variables in a logistic regression model learned from training data sets. Subsequently, it estimates the posterior error probability for each substitution through a Bayesian formula that integrates prior knowledge of the overall sequencing error probability and the estimated SNP rate with the results from the logistic regression model for the given substitutions. The estimated posterior SNP probability can be used to distinguish true SNPs from sequencing errors. Validation results show that Atlas-SNP2 achieves a false-positive rate of lower than 10%, with an ∼5% or lower false-negative rate. PMID:20019143

  10. Different SNP combinations in the GCH1 gene and use of labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate if there is an association between different SNP combinations in the guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase (GCH1) gene and a number of pain behavior related outcomes during labor. A population-based sample of pregnant women (n = 814) was recruited at gestational week 18. A plasma sample was collected from each subject. Genotyping was performed and three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) previously defined as a pain-protective SNP combination of GCH1 were used. Results Homozygous carriers of the pain-protective SNP combination of GCH1 arrived to the delivery ward with a more advanced stage of cervical dilation compared to heterozygous carriers and non-carriers. However, homozygous carriers more often used second line labor analgesia compared to the others. Conclusion The pain-protective SNP combination of GCH1 may be of importance in the limited number of homozygous carriers during the initial dilation of cervix but upon arrival at the delivery unit these women are more inclined to use second line labor analgesia. PMID:20633294

  11. Supervised learning-based tagSNP selection for genome-wide disease classifications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingzhong; Yang, Jack; Chen, Zhongxue; Yang, Mary Qu; Sung, Andrew H; Huang, Xudong

    2008-01-01

    Background Comprehensive evaluation of common genetic variations through association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with complex human diseases on the genome-wide scale is an active area in human genome research. One of the fundamental questions in a SNP-disease association study is to find an optimal subset of SNPs with predicting power for disease status. To find that subset while reducing study burden in terms of time and costs, one can potentially reconcile information redundancy from associations between SNP markers. Results We have developed a feature selection method named Supervised Recursive Feature Addition (SRFA). This method combines supervised learning and statistical measures for the chosen candidate features/SNPs to reconcile the redundancy information and, in doing so, improve the classification performance in association studies. Additionally, we have proposed a Support Vector based Recursive Feature Addition (SVRFA) scheme in SNP-disease association analysis. Conclusions We have proposed using SRFA with different statistical learning classifiers and SVRFA for both SNP selection and disease classification and then applying them to two complex disease data sets. In general, our approaches outperform the well-known feature selection method of Support Vector Machine Recursive Feature Elimination and logic regression-based SNP selection for disease classification in genetic association studies. Our study further indicates that both genetic and environmental variables should be taken into account when doing disease predictions and classifications for the most complex human diseases that have gene-environment interactions. PMID:18366619

  12. A novel algorithm for simultaneous SNP selection in high-dimensional genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of causal SNPs in most genome wide association studies relies on approaches that consider each SNP individually. However, there is a strong correlation structure among SNPs that needs to be taken into account. Hence, increasingly modern computationally expensive regression methods are employed for SNP selection that consider all markers simultaneously and thus incorporate dependencies among SNPs. Results We develop a novel multivariate algorithm for large scale SNP selection using CAR score regression, a promising new approach for prioritizing biomarkers. Specifically, we propose a computationally efficient procedure for shrinkage estimation of CAR scores from high-dimensional data. Subsequently, we conduct a comprehensive comparison study including five advanced regression approaches (boosting, lasso, NEG, MCP, and CAR score) and a univariate approach (marginal correlation) to determine the effectiveness in finding true causal SNPs. Conclusions Simultaneous SNP selection is a challenging task. We demonstrate that our CAR score-based algorithm consistently outperforms all competing approaches, both uni- and multivariate, in terms of correctly recovered causal SNPs and SNP ranking. An R package implementing the approach as well as R code to reproduce the complete study presented here is available from http://strimmerlab.org/software/care/. PMID:23113980

  13. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Michael T.; Landon, Preston B.; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H.; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  14. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Arrays and Unexpected Consanguinity: Considerations for Clinicians When Returning Results to Families

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Fernanda; Tabor, Holly K.; Chow, Penny M.; Conta, Jessie H.; Feldman, Kenneth W.; Tsuchiya, Karen D.; Beck, Anita E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The broad use of SNP microarrays has increased identification of unexpected consanguinity. Therefore, guidelines to address reporting of consanguinity have been published for clinical laboratories. Because no such guidelines exist for clinicians, we describe a case and present recommendations for clinicians to disclose unexpected consanguinity to families. Methods In a boy with multiple endocrine abnormalities and structural birth defects, SNP array analysis revealed ~23% autosomal homozygosity suggestive of a 1st-degree parental relationship. We assembled an interdisciplinary healthcare team, planned the most appropriate way to discuss results of the SNP array with the adult mother including the possibility of multiple autosomal recessive disorders in her child, and finally met with her as a team. Results From these discussions, we developed four major considerations for clinicians returning results of unexpected consanguinity, all guided by the child’s best interests: 1) ethical and legal obligations for reporting possible abuse, 2) preservation of the clinical relationship, 3) attention to justice and psychosocial challenges, and 4) utilization of the SNP array results to guide further testing. Conclusion As SNP arrays become a common clinical diagnostic tool, clinicians can use this framework to return results of unexpected consanguinity to families in a supportive and productive manner. PMID:25232848

  15. A novel three-round multiplex PCR for SNP genotyping with next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Zhou, Yu-Xun; Li, Kai; Qi, Li-Xin; Zhang, Qi-Fei; Wang, Mao-Chun; Xiao, Jun-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Owing to the high throughput and low cost, next generation sequencing has attracted much attention for SNP genotyping application for researchers. Here, we introduce a new method based on three-round multiplex PCR to precisely genotype SNPs with next generation sequencing. This method can as much as possible consume the equivalent amount of each pair of specific primers to largely eliminate the amplification discrepancy between different loci. After the PCR amplification, the products can be directly subjected to next generation sequencing platform. We simultaneously amplified 37 SNP loci of 757 samples and sequenced all amplicons on ion torrent PGM platform; 90.5 % of the target SNP loci were accurately genotyped (at least 15×) and 90.4 % amplicons had uniform coverage with a variation less than 50-fold. Ligase detection reaction (LDR) was performed to genotype the 19 SNP loci (as part of the 37 SNP loci) with 91 samples randomly selected from the 757 samples, and 99.5 % genotyping data were consistent with the next generation sequencing results. Our results demonstrate that three-round PCR coupled with next generation sequencing is an efficient and economical genotyping approach. Graphical Abstract The schematic diagram of three-round PCR. PMID:27113460

  16. Highly specific SNP detection using 2D graphene electronics and DNA strand displacement.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Michael T; Landon, Preston B; Lee, Joon; Choi, Duyoung; Mo, Alexander H; Glinsky, Gennadi; Lal, Ratnesh

    2016-06-28

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a gene sequence are markers for a variety of human diseases. Detection of SNPs with high specificity and sensitivity is essential for effective practical implementation of personalized medicine. Current DNA sequencing, including SNP detection, primarily uses enzyme-based methods or fluorophore-labeled assays that are time-consuming, need laboratory-scale settings, and are expensive. Previously reported electrical charge-based SNP detectors have insufficient specificity and accuracy, limiting their effectiveness. Here, we demonstrate the use of a DNA strand displacement-based probe on a graphene field effect transistor (FET) for high-specificity, single-nucleotide mismatch detection. The single mismatch was detected by measuring strand displacement-induced resistance (and hence current) change and Dirac point shift in a graphene FET. SNP detection in large double-helix DNA strands (e.g., 47 nt) minimize false-positive results. Our electrical sensor-based SNP detection technology, without labeling and without apparent cross-hybridization artifacts, would allow fast, sensitive, and portable SNP detection with single-nucleotide resolution. The technology will have a wide range of applications in digital and implantable biosensors and high-throughput DNA genotyping, with transformative implications for personalized medicine. PMID:27298347

  17. CsSNP: A Web-Based Tool for the Detecting of Comparative Segments SNPs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Wang, Shuangshuang; Zhou, Dongjie; Yang, Shuai; Xu, Yongchao; Yang, Chao; Yang, Long

    2016-07-01

    SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) is a popular tool for the study of genetic diversity, evolution, and other areas. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a convenient, utility, robust, rapid, and open source detecting-SNP tool for all researchers. Since the detection of SNPs needs special software and series steps including alignment, detection, analysis and present, the study of SNPs is limited for nonprofessional users. CsSNP (Comparative segments SNP, http://biodb.sdau.edu.cn/cssnp/ ) is a freely available web tool based on the Blat, Blast, and Perl programs to detect comparative segments SNPs and to show the detail information of SNPs. The results are filtered and presented in the statistics figure and a Gbrowse map. This platform contains the reference genomic sequences and coding sequences of 60 plant species, and also provides new opportunities for the users to detect SNPs easily. CsSNP is provided a convenient tool for nonprofessional users to find comparative segments SNPs in their own sequences, and give the users the information and the analysis of SNPs, and display these data in a dynamic map. It provides a new method to detect SNPs and may accelerate related studies. PMID:27347883

  18. Breast cancer-associated high-order SNP-SNP interaction of CXCL12/CXCR4-related genes by an improved multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR-ER).

    PubMed

    Fu, Ou-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Yu-Da; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Hou, Ming-Feng; Yang, Cheng-Hong

    2016-09-01

    In association studies, the combined effects of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-SNP interactions and the problem of imbalanced data between cases and controls are frequently ignored. In the present study, we used an improved multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach namely MDR-ER to detect the high order SNP‑SNP interaction in an imbalanced breast cancer data set containing seven SNPs of chemokine CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway genes. Most individual SNPs were not significantly associated with breast cancer. After MDR‑ER analysis, six significant SNP‑SNP interaction models with seven genes (highest cross‑validation consistency, 10; classification error rates, 41.3‑21.0; and prediction error rates, 47.4‑55.3) were identified. CD4 and VEGFA genes were associated in a 2‑loci interaction model (classification error rate, 41.3; prediction error rate, 47.5; odds ratio (OR), 2.069; 95% bootstrap CI, 1.40‑2.90; P=1.71E‑04) and it also appeared in all the best 2‑7‑loci models. When the loci number increased, the classification error rates and P‑values decreased. The powers in 2‑7‑loci in all models were >0.9. The minimum classification error rate of the MDR‑ER‑generated model was shown with the 7‑loci interaction model (classification error rate, 21.0; OR=15.282; 95% bootstrap CI, 9.54‑23.87; P=4.03E‑31). In the epistasis network analysis, the overall effect with breast cancer susceptibility was identified and the SNP order of impact on breast cancer was identified as follows: CD4 = VEGFA > KITLG > CXCL12 > CCR7 = MMP2 > CXCR4. In conclusion, the MDR‑ER can effectively and correctly identify the best SNP‑SNP interaction models in an imbalanced data set for breast cancer cases. PMID:27461876

  19. SNP Discovery by Illumina-Based Transcriptome Sequencing of the Olive and the Genetic Characterization of Turkish Olive Genotypes Revealed by AFLP, SSR and SNP Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Hilal Betul; Cetin, Oznur; Kaya, Hulya; Sahin, Mustafa; Sefer, Filiz; Kahraman, Abdullah; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2013-01-01

    Background The olive tree (Olea europaea L.) is a diploid (2n = 2x = 46) outcrossing species mainly grown in the Mediterranean area, where it is the most important oil-producing crop. Because of its economic, cultural and ecological importance, various DNA markers have been used in the olive to characterize and elucidate homonyms, synonyms and unknown accessions. However, a comprehensive characterization and a full sequence of its transcriptome are unavailable, leading to the importance of an efficient large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in olive. The objectives of this study were (1) to discover olive SNPs using next-generation sequencing and to identify SNP primers for cultivar identification and (2) to characterize 96 olive genotypes originating from different regions of Turkey. Methodology/Principal Findings Next-generation sequencing technology was used with five distinct olive genotypes and generated cDNA, producing 126,542,413 reads using an Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx. Following quality and size trimming, the high-quality reads were assembled into 22,052 contigs with an average length of 1,321 bases and 45 singletons. The SNPs were filtered and 2,987 high-quality putative SNP primers were identified. The assembled sequences and singletons were subjected to BLAST similarity searches and annotated with a Gene Ontology identifier. To identify the 96 olive genotypes, these SNP primers were applied to the genotypes in combination with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers. Conclusions/Significance This study marks the highest number of SNP markers discovered to date from olive genotypes using transcriptome sequencing. The developed SNP markers will provide a useful source for molecular genetic studies, such as genetic diversity and characterization, high density quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis, association mapping and map-based gene cloning in the olive. High levels of

  20. Transcriptome sequencing for SNP discovery across Cucumis melo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    from India and Africa as compared to commercial cultivars, cultigens and landraces from Eastern Europe, Western Asia and the Mediterranean basin is consistent with the evolutionary history proposed for the species. Group-specific SNVs that will be useful in introgression programs were also detected. In a sample of 143 selected putative SNPs, we verified 93% of the polymorphisms in a panel of 78 genotypes. Conclusions This study provides the first comprehensive resequencing data for wild, exotic, and cultivated (landraces and commercial) melon transcriptomes, yielding the largest melon SNP collection available to date and representing a notable sample of the species diversity. This data provides a valuable resource for creating a catalog of allelic variants of melon genes and it will aid in future in-depth studies of population genetics, marker-assisted breeding, and gene identification aimed at developing improved varieties. PMID:22726804

  1. SNP-Seek database of SNPs derived from 3000 rice genomes.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Nickolai; Tai, Shuaishuai; Wang, Wensheng; Mansueto, Locedie; Palis, Kevin; Fuentes, Roven Rommel; Ulat, Victor Jun; Chebotarov, Dmytro; Zhang, Gengyun; Li, Zhikang; Mauleon, Ramil; Hamilton, Ruaraidh Sackville; McNally, Kenneth L

    2015-01-01

    We have identified about 20 million rice SNPs by aligning reads from the 3000 rice genomes project with the Nipponbare genome. The SNPs and allele information are organized into a SNP-Seek system (http://www.oryzasnp.org/iric-portal/), which consists of Oracle database having a total number of rows with SNP genotypes close to 60 billion (20 M SNPs × 3 K rice lines) and web interface for convenient querying. The database allows quick retrieving of SNP alleles for all varieties in a given genome region, finding different alleles from predefined varieties and querying basic passport and morphological phenotypic information about sequenced rice lines. SNPs can be visualized together with the gene structures in JBrowse genome browser. Evolutionary relationships between rice varieties can be explored using phylogenetic trees or multidimensional scaling plots. PMID:25429973

  2. SNP Formation Bias in the Murine Genome Provides Evidence for Parallel Evolution.

    PubMed

    Plyler, Zackery E; Hill, Aubrey E; McAtee, Christopher W; Cui, Xiangqin; Moseley, Leah A; Sorscher, Eric J

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we show novel DNA motifs that promote single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) formation and are conserved among exons, introns, and intergenic DNA from mice (Sanger Mouse Genomes Project), human genes (1000 Genomes), and tumor-specific somatic mutations (data from TCGA). We further characterize SNPs likely to be very recent in origin (i.e., formed in otherwise congenic mice) and show enrichment for both synonymous and parallel DNA variants occurring under circumstances not attributable to purifying selection. The findings provide insight regarding SNP contextual bias and eukaryotic codon usage as strategies that favor long-term exonic stability. The study also furnishes new information concerning rates of murine genomic evolution and features of DNA mutagenesis (at the time of SNP formation) that should be viewed as "adaptive." PMID:26253317

  3. Cross-Species Application of SNP Chips is Not Suitable for Identifying Runs of Homozygosity.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Aaron B A; Miller, Joshua M; Kardos, Marty

    2016-03-01

    Cross-species application of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips is a valid, relatively cost-effective alternative to the high-throughput sequencing methods generally required to obtain a genome-wide sampling of polymorphisms. Kharzinova et al. (2015) examined the applicability of SNP chips developed in domestic bovids (cattle and sheep) to a semi-wild cervid (reindeer). The ancestors of bovids and cervids diverged between 20 and 30 million years ago (Hassanin and Douzery 2003; Bibi et al. 2013). Empirical work has shown that for a SNP chip developed in a bovid and applied to a cervid species, approximately 50% genotype success with 1% of the loci being polymorphic is expected (Miller et al. 2012). The genotyping of Kharzinova et al. (2015) follows this pattern; however, these data are not appropriate for identifying runs of homozygosity (ROH) and can be problematic for estimating linkage disequilibrium (LD) and we caution readers in this regard. PMID:26774056

  4. Large Scale Association Analysis for Drug Addiction: Results from SNP to Gene

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaobo; Liu, Zhifa; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Heping

    2012-01-01

    Many genetic association studies used single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) data to identify genetic variants for complex diseases. Although SNP-based associations are most common in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), gene-based association analysis has received increasing attention in understanding genetic etiologies for complex diseases. While both methods have been used to analyze the same data, few genome-wide association studies compare the results or observe the connection between them. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the data from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) and compared the results from the SNP-based and gene-based analyses. Our results suggest that the gene-based method complements the individual SNP-based analysis, and conceptually they are closely related. In terms of gene findings, our results validate many genes that were either reported from the analysis of the same dataset or based on animal studies for substance dependence. PMID:23365539

  5. Using Hamming Distance as Information for SNP-Sets Clustering and Testing in Disease Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charlotte; Kao, Wen-Hsin; Hsiao, Chuhsing Kate

    2015-01-01

    The availability of high-throughput genomic data has led to several challenges in recent genetic association studies, including the large number of genetic variants that must be considered and the computational complexity in statistical analyses. Tackling these problems with a marker-set study such as SNP-set analysis can be an efficient solution. To construct SNP-sets, we first propose a clustering algorithm, which employs Hamming distance to measure the similarity between strings of SNP genotypes and evaluates whether the given SNPs or SNP-sets should be clustered. A dendrogram can then be constructed based on such distance measure, and the number of clusters can be determined. With the resulting SNP-sets, we next develop an association test HDAT to examine susceptibility to the disease of interest. This proposed test assesses, based on Hamming distance, whether the similarity between a diseased and a normal individual differs from the similarity between two individuals of the same disease status. In our proposed methodology, only genotype information is needed. No inference of haplotypes is required, and SNPs under consideration do not need to locate in nearby regions. The proposed clustering algorithm and association test are illustrated with applications and simulation studies. As compared with other existing methods, the clustering algorithm is faster and better at identifying sets containing SNPs exerting a similar effect. In addition, the simulation studies demonstrated that the proposed test works well for SNP-sets containing a large proportion of neutral SNPs. Furthermore, employing the clustering algorithm before testing a large set of data improves the knowledge in confining the genetic regions for susceptible genetic markers. PMID:26302001

  6. Association of MDM2 SNP309, age of onset, and gender in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Firoz, Elnaz F.; Warycha, Melanie; Zakrzewski, Jan; Pollens, Danuta; Wang, Guimin; Shapiro, Richard; Berman, Russell; Pavlick, Anna; Manga, Prashiela; Ostrer, Harry; Celebi, Julide Tok; Kamino, Hideko; Darvishian, Farbod; Rolnitzky, Linda; Goldberg, Judith D.; Osman, Iman; Polsky, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In certain cancers, MDM2 SNP309 has been associated with early tumor onset in women. In melanoma, incidence rates are higher in women than in men among individuals less than age 40; however, among those older than age 50, melanoma is more frequent in men than in women. To investigate this difference, we examined the association between MDM2 SNP309, age at diagnosis, and gender among melanoma patients. Experimental Design Prospectively enrolled melanoma patients (N=227) were evaluated for MDM2 SNP309 and the related polymorphism, p53 Arg72Pro. DNA was isolated from patient blood samples and genotypes were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. Associations between MDM2 SNP309, p53 Arg72Pro, age at diagnosis, and clinicopathologic features of melanoma were analyzed. Results The median age at diagnosis was 13 years earlier among women with a SNP309 GG genotype (46 years) compared to women with TG+TT genotypes (59 years; p=0.19). Analyses using age dichotomized at each decade indicated that women with a GG genotype had significantly higher risks of being diagnosed with melanoma at ages less than 50 compared to women 50 and older, but not 60 and older. At ages less than 50, women with a GG genotype had a 3.89 times greater chance of being diagnosed compared to women with TG+TT genotypes (p=0.01). Similar observations were not seen among men. Conclusions Our data suggest that MDM2 may play an important role in the development of melanoma in women. The MDM2 SNP309 genotype may help identify women at risk for developing melanoma at a young age. PMID:19318491

  7. Vitis Phylogenomics: Hybridization Intensities from a SNP Array Outperform Genotype Calls

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Allison J.; Matasci, Naim; Schwaninger, Heidi; Aradhya, Mallikarjuna K.; Prins, Bernard; Zhong, Gan-Yuan; Simon, Charles; Buckler, Edward S.; Myles, Sean

    2013-01-01

    Understanding relationships among species is a fundamental goal of evolutionary biology. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through next generation sequencing and related technologies enable phylogeny reconstruction by providing unprecedented numbers of characters for analysis. One approach to SNP-based phylogeny reconstruction is to identify SNPs in a subset of individuals, and then to compile SNPs on an array that can be used to genotype additional samples at hundreds or thousands of sites simultaneously. Although powerful and efficient, this method is subject to ascertainment bias because applying variation discovered in a representative subset to a larger sample favors identification of SNPs with high minor allele frequencies and introduces bias against rare alleles. Here, we demonstrate that the use of hybridization intensity data, rather than genotype calls, reduces the effects of ascertainment bias. Whereas traditional SNP calls assess known variants based on diversity housed in the discovery panel, hybridization intensity data survey variation in the broader sample pool, regardless of whether those variants are present in the initial SNP discovery process. We apply SNP genotype and hybridization intensity data derived from the Vitis9kSNP array developed for grape to show the effects of ascertainment bias and to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among Vitis species. We demonstrate that phylogenies constructed using hybridization intensities suffer less from the distorting effects of ascertainment bias, and are thus more accurate than phylogenies based on genotype calls. Moreover, we reconstruct the phylogeny of the genus Vitis using hybridization data, show that North American subgenus Vitis species are monophyletic, and resolve several previously poorly known relationships among North American species. This study builds on earlier work that applied the Vitis9kSNP array to evolutionary questions within Vitis vinifera and has general

  8. An Integrated SNP Mining and Utilization (ISMU) Pipeline for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Sarwar; Rathore, Abhishek; Shah, Trushar M.; Telluri, Mohan; Amindala, BhanuPrakash; Ruperao, Pradeep; Katta, Mohan A. V. S. K.; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2014-01-01

    Open source single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery pipelines for next generation sequencing data commonly requires working knowledge of command line interface, massive computational resources and expertise which is a daunting task for biologists. Further, the SNP information generated may not be readily used for downstream processes such as genotyping. Hence, a comprehensive pipeline has been developed by integrating several open source next generation sequencing (NGS) tools along with a graphical user interface called Integrated SNP Mining and Utilization (ISMU) for SNP discovery and their utilization by developing genotyping assays. The pipeline features functionalities such as pre-processing of raw data, integration of open source alignment tools (Bowtie2, BWA, Maq, NovoAlign and SOAP2), SNP prediction (SAMtools/SOAPsnp/CNS2snp and CbCC) methods and interfaces for developing genotyping assays. The pipeline outputs a list of high quality SNPs between all pairwise combinations of genotypes analyzed, in addition to the reference genome/sequence. Visualization tools (Tablet and Flapjack) integrated into the pipeline enable inspection of the alignment and errors, if any. The pipeline also provides a confidence score or polymorphism information content value with flanking sequences for identified SNPs in standard format required for developing marker genotyping (KASP and Golden Gate) assays. The pipeline enables users to process a range of NGS datasets such as whole genome re-sequencing, restriction site associated DNA sequencing and transcriptome sequencing data at a fast speed. The pipeline is very useful for plant genetics and breeding community with no computational expertise in order to discover SNPs and utilize in genomics, genetics and breeding studies. The pipeline has been parallelized to process huge datasets of next generation sequencing. It has been developed in Java language and is available at http://hpc.icrisat.cgiar.org/ISMU as a standalone

  9. k-merSNP discovery: Software for alignment-and reference-free scalable SNP discovery, phylogenetics, and annotation for hundreds of microbial genomes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-11-18

    With the flood of whole genome finished and draft microbial sequences, we need faster, more scalable bioinformatics tools for sequence comparison. An algorithm is described to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in whole genome data. It scales to hundreds of bacterial or viral genomes, and can be used for finished and/or draft genomes available as unassembled contigs or raw, unassembled reads. The method is fast to compute, finding SNPs and building a SNP phylogeny inmore » minutes to hours, depending on the size and diversity of the input sequences. The SNP-based trees that result are consistent with known taxonomy and trees determined in other studies. The approach we describe can handle many gigabases of sequence in a single run. The algorithm is based on k-mer analysis.« less

  10. k-merSNP discovery: Software for alignment-and reference-free scalable SNP discovery, phylogenetics, and annotation for hundreds of microbial genomes

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-18

    With the flood of whole genome finished and draft microbial sequences, we need faster, more scalable bioinformatics tools for sequence comparison. An algorithm is described to find single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in whole genome data. It scales to hundreds of bacterial or viral genomes, and can be used for finished and/or draft genomes available as unassembled contigs or raw, unassembled reads. The method is fast to compute, finding SNPs and building a SNP phylogeny in minutes to hours, depending on the size and diversity of the input sequences. The SNP-based trees that result are consistent with known taxonomy and trees determined in other studies. The approach we describe can handle many gigabases of sequence in a single run. The algorithm is based on k-mer analysis.

  11. A novel SNP in 3' UTR of INS gene: A case report of neonatal diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bogari, Neda M; Rayes, Husni H; Mostafa, Fakri; Abdel-Latif, Azza M; Ramadan, Abeer; Al-Allaf, Faisal A; Taher, Mohiuddin M; Fawzy, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare condition with a prevalence of 1 in 300,000 live births. We have found 3 known SNPs in 5'UTR and a novel SNP in 3' UTR in the INS gene. These SNPs were present in 9-month-old girl from Saudi Arabia and also present in the father and mother. The novel SNP we found is not present in 1000 Genome project or other databases. Further, the newly identified 3' UTR mutation in the INS gene may abolish the polyadenylation signal and result in severe RNA instability. PMID:26212367

  12. Minimal SNP overlap among multiple panels of ancestry informative markers argues for more international collaboration.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Usha; Yun, Libing; Shi, Meisen; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2016-07-01

    The century-old use of genetic markers to determine population relationships has morphed in modern forensics into use of markers to determine the ancestry of an individual from a DNA sample. Researchers have identified sets of SNPs that have frequency differences among populations and many sets of SNPs have been published for the purpose of inferring ancestry. Such inference also requires reference datasets for the particular set of SNPs selected. We have identified 21 largely independent published panels of ancestry informative SNPs (AISNPs) and examined their union of 1397 SNPs. No SNP occurs in more than 6 panels. The 1397 SNPs in 21 panels yield a largely empty matrix that is inhibiting progress on more refined ability to infer ancestry for a forensic sample. The most common set of reference populations is the HGDP set of 52 small population samples totaling a thousand individuals. Only 46 (3%) of the 1397 SNPs occur in three or more panels. We assembled a new dataset for 44 of those SNPs involving 4,559 individuals from 73 populations. Analyses of this dataset provided clear differentiation of only five biogeographic regions: sub-Saharan Africa, Europe and SW Asia, South Asia, East Asia, and the Americas. This is an inadequate level of biogeographic resolution already exceeded by other panels. We conclude that more such AISNP panels are not needed and that the forensic community must collaborate to develop a common set of highly differentiating AISNPs typed on a very large number of population samples. How that can be accomplished will be the subject of future discussion. PMID:26977931

  13. Insertion Sequence Element Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Typing Provides Insights into the Population Structure and Evolution of Mycobacterium ulcerans across Africa

    PubMed Central

    Jordaens, Kurt; Bomans, Pieter; Leirs, Herwig; Durnez, Lies; Affolabi, Dissou; Sopoh, Ghislain; Aguiar, Julia; Phanzu, Delphin Mavinga; Kibadi, Kapay; Eyangoh, Sara; Manou, Louis Bayonne; Phillips, Richard Odame; Adjei, Ohene; Ablordey, Anthony; Rigouts, Leen; Portaels, Françoise; Eddyani, Miriam; de Jong, Bouke C.

    2014-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is an indolent, slowly progressing necrotizing disease of the skin caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. In the present study, we applied a redesigned technique to a vast panel of M. ulcerans disease isolates and clinical samples originating from multiple African disease foci in order to (i) gain fundamental insights into the population structure and evolutionary history of the pathogen and (ii) disentangle the phylogeographic relationships within the genetically conserved cluster of African M. ulcerans. Our analyses identified 23 different African insertion sequence element single nucleotide polymorphism (ISE-SNP) types that dominate in different areas where Buruli ulcer is endemic. These ISE-SNP types appear to be the initial stages of clonal diversification from a common, possibly ancestral ISE-SNP type. ISE-SNP types were found unevenly distributed over the greater West African hydrological drainage basins. Our findings suggest that geographical barriers bordering the basins to some extent prevented bacterial gene flow between basins and that this resulted in independent focal transmission clusters associated with the hydrological drainage areas. Different phylogenetic methods yielded two well-supported sister clades within the African ISE-SNP types. The ISE-SNP types from the “pan-African clade” were found to be widespread throughout Africa, while the ISE-SNP types of the “Gabonese/Cameroonian clade” were much rarer and found in a more restricted area, which suggested that the latter clade evolved more recently. Additionally, the Gabonese/Cameroonian clade was found to form a strongly supported monophyletic group with Papua New Guinean ISE-SNP type 8, which is unrelated to other Southeast Asian ISE-SNP types. PMID:24296504

  14. Genome-wide SNP validation and mantle tissue transcriptome analysis in the silver-lipped pearl oyster, Pinctada maxima.

    PubMed

    Jones, David B; Jerry, Dean R; Forêt, Sylvain; Konovalov, Dmitry A; Zenger, Kyall R

    2013-12-01

    Pearl oysters are not only farmed for their gemstone quality pearls worldwide, but they are also becoming important model organisms for investigating genetic mechanisms of biomineralisation. Despite their economic and scientific significance, limited genomic resources are available for this important group of bivalves, hampering investigations into identifying genes that regulate important pearl quality traits and unique biological characteristics (i.e. biomineralisation). The silver-lipped pearl oyster, Pinctada maxima, is one species where there is interest in understanding genes that regulate commercially important pearl traits, but presently, there is a dearth of genomic information. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a large number of type I genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for P. maxima suitable for high-throughput genotyping. In addition, sequence annotations and Gene Ontology terms were assigned to a large mantle tissue 454 expressed sequence tag assembly (96,794 contigs) and information on known bivalve biomineralisation genes was incorporated into SNP discovery. The SNP discovery effort resulted in the de novo identification of 172,625 SNPs, of which 9,108 were identified as high value [minor allele frequency (MAF)≥ 0.15, read depth  ≥ 8]. Validation of 2,782 of these SNPs using Illumina iSelect Infinium genotyping technology returned some of the highest assay conversion (86.6 %) and validation (59.9 %; mean MAF 0.28) rates observed in aquaculture species to date. Genomic resources presented here will be pivotal to future research investigating the biological mechanisms behind biomineralisation and will form a strong foundation for genetic selective breeding programs in the P. maxima pearling industry. PMID:23715808

  15. Meta-Analysis of High-Density SNP Associations for Beef Cattle Production Traits from Three Countries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    About 50,000 SNP were evaluated for associations with growth, carcass, and meat quality traits in three populations of cattle in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Regression coefficients for each SNP were independently estimated within each country. Coefficients for similar traits were stand...

  16. MDM2 promoter SNP55 (rs2870820) affects risk of colon cancer but not breast-, lung-, or prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Helwa, Reham; Gansmo, Liv B; Romundstad, Pål; Hveem, Kristian; Vatten, Lars; Ryan, Bríd M; Harris, Curtis C; Lønning, Per E; Knappskog, Stian

    2016-01-01

    Two functional SNPs (SNP285G > C; rs117039649 and SNP309T > G; rs2279744) have previously been reported to modulate Sp1 transcription factor binding to the promoter of the proto-oncogene MDM2, and to influence cancer risk. Recently, a third SNP (SNP55C > T; rs2870820) was also reported to affect Sp1 binding and MDM2 transcription. In this large population based case-control study, we genotyped MDM2 SNP55 in 10,779 Caucasian individuals, previously genotyped for SNP309 and SNP285, including cases of colon (n = 1,524), lung (n = 1,323), breast (n = 1,709) and prostate cancer (n = 2,488) and 3,735 non-cancer controls, as well as 299 healthy African-Americans. Applying the dominant model, we found an elevated risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring SNP55TT/CT genotypes compared to the SNP55CC genotype (OR = 1.15; 95% CI = 1.01-1.30). The risk was found to be highest for left-sided colon cancer (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.45) and among females (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.01-1.74). Assessing combined genotypes, we found the highest risk of colon cancer among individuals harbouring the SNP55TT or CT together with the SNP309TG genotype (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.00-1.46). Supporting the conclusions from the risk estimates, we found colon cancer cases carrying the SNP55TT/CT genotypes to be diagnosed at younger age as compared to SNP55CC (p = 0.053), in particular among patients carrying the SNP309TG/TT genotypes (p = 0.009). PMID:27624283

  17. Development and validation of a low-density SNP panel related to prolificacy in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-density SNP panels (e.g., 50,000 and 600,000 markers) have been used in exploratory population genetic studies with commercial and minor breeds of sheep. However, routine genetic diversity evaluations of large numbers of samples with large panels are in general cost-prohibitive for gene banks. ...

  18. SNP discovery in complex allotetraploid genomes (Gossypium spp., Malvaceae) using genotyping by sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dramatic decreases in the cost of DNA sequencing have enabled the development of very large numbers of markers based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for phylogenetic studies, population genetics, linkage mapping, marker-assisted breeding and other applications. Using Illumina next-generatio...

  19. Association mapping of resistance to leaf rust in emmer wheat using high throughput SNP markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emmer wheat (Triticum turgidum L. subsp. dicoccum) is known to be a useful source of genes for many desirable characters for improvement of modern cultivated wheat. Recently, a panel of 181 emmer wheat accessions has been genotyped with wheat 9K SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) markers and exte...

  20. Development of gene-tagged SNP markers for gland morphogenesis in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) plants, including cottonseed, have small, pigmented glands containing gossypol and other terpenoid compounds that are toxic to humans and non-ruminant animals. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers involved in gland morphogenesis are useful for the discovery of candid...

  1. Association of Agronomic Traits with SNP Markers in Durum Wheat (Triticum turgidum L. durum (Desf.))

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Ren, Jing; Ren, Xifeng; Huang, Sisi; Sabiel, Salih A. I.; Luo, Mingcheng; Nevo, Eviatar; Fu, Chunjie; Peng, Junhua; Sun, Dongfa

    2015-01-01

    Association mapping is a powerful approach to detect associations between traits of interest and genetic markers based on linkage disequilibrium (LD) in molecular plant breeding. In this study, 150 accessions of worldwide originated durum wheat germplasm (Triticum turgidum spp. durum) were genotyped using 1,366 SNP markers. The extent of LD on each chromosome was evaluated. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) markers with ten agronomic traits measured in four consecutive years was analyzed under a mix linear model (MLM). Two hundred and one significant association pairs were detected in the four years. Several markers were associated with one trait, and also some markers were associated with multiple traits. Some of the associated markers were in agreement with previous quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses. The function and homology analyses of the corresponding ESTs of some SNP markers could explain many of the associations for plant height, length of main spike, number of spikelets on main spike, grain number per plant, and 1000-grain weight, etc. The SNP associations for the observed traits are generally clustered in specific chromosome regions of the wheat genome, mainly in 2A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 1B, and 6B chromosomes. This study demonstrates that association mapping can complement and enhance previous QTL analyses and provide additional information for marker-assisted selection. PMID:26110423

  2. New tools and methods for direct programmatic access to the dbSNP relational database

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Scott F.; Quan, Jiaxi; Mehta, Gaurang; Bolze, Raphael; Thomas, Prasanth; Deelman, Ewa; Tischfield, Jay A.; Rice, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies often incorporate information from public biological databases in order to provide a biological reference for interpreting the results. The dbSNP database is an extensive source of information on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for many different organisms, including humans. We have developed free software that will download and install a local MySQL implementation of the dbSNP relational database for a specified organism. We have also designed a system for classifying dbSNP tables in terms of common tasks we wish to accomplish using the database. For each task we have designed a small set of custom tables that facilitate task-related queries and provide entity-relationship diagrams for each task composed from the relevant dbSNP tables. In order to expose these concepts and methods to a wider audience we have developed web tools for querying the database and browsing documentation on the tables and columns to clarify the relevant relational structure. All web tools and software are freely available to the public at http://cgsmd.isi.edu/dbsnpq. Resources such as these for programmatically querying biological databases are essential for viably integrating biological information into genetic association experiments on a genome-wide scale. PMID:21037260

  3. High-throughput RAD-SNP genotyping for characterization of sugar beet genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-throughput SNP genotyping provides a rapid way of developing resourceful set of markers for delineating the genetic architecture and for effective species discrimination. In the presented research, we demonstrate a set of 192 SNPs for effective genotyping in sugar beet using high-throughput mar...

  4. Fine mapping of copy number variations on two cattle genome assemblies using high density SNP array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Btau_4.0 and UMD3.1 are two distinct cattle reference genome assemblies. In our previous study using the low density BovineSNP50 array, we reported a copy number variation (CNV) analysis on Btau_4.0 with 521 animals of 21 cattle breeds, yielding 682 CNV regions with a total length of 139.8 megabases...

  5. Development of the catfish 250K SNP array for genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Quantitative traits, such as disease resistance, are most often controlled by a set of genes involving a complex array of regulation. The dissection of genetic basis of quantitative traits requires large numbers of genetic markers with good genome coverage. The application of next-generation sequencing technologies has allowed discovery of over eight million SNPs in catfish, but the challenge remains as to how to efficiently and economically use such SNP resources for genetic analysis. Results In this work, we developed a catfish 250K SNP array using Affymetrix Axiom genotyping technology. The SNPs were obtained from multiple sources including gene-associated SNPs, anonymous genomic SNPs, and inter-specific SNPs. A set of 640K high-quality SNPs obtained following specific requirements of array design were submitted. A panel of 250,113 SNPs was finalized for inclusion on the array. The performance evaluated by genotyping individuals from wild populations and backcross families suggested the good utility of the catfish 250K SNP array. Conclusions This is the first high-density SNP array for catfish. The array should be a valuable resource for genome-wide association studies (GWAS), fine QTL mapping, high-density linkage map construction, haplotype analysis, and whole genome-based selection. PMID:24618043

  6. The use of SNP data for the monitoring of genetic diversity in cattle breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    LD between SNPs contains information about effective population size. In this study, we investigate the use of genome-wide SNP data for marker based estimation of effective population size for two taurine cattle breeds of Africa and two local cattle breeds of Switzerland. Estimated recombination rat...

  7. Application of RAD LongRead sequencing for SNP discovery in sugarcane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sugarcane (hybrid Saccharum spp.) genome presents a difficult challenge for SNP discovery and analysis due to its complex polyploid nature. This is compounded further due to the absence of a reference genome sequence. We report the discovery of SNPs in sugarcane through reductive sequencing and ...

  8. SNP-revealed genetic diversity in wild emmer wheat correlates with ecological factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patterns of genetic diversity between and within natural plant populations and their driving forces are of great interest in evolutionary biology. However, few studies have been performed on the genetic structure and population divergence in wild emmer wheat using a large number of EST-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Results In the present study, twenty-five natural wild emmer wheat populations representing a wide range of ecological conditions in Israel and Turkey were used. Genetic diversity and genetic structure were investigated using over 1,000 SNP markers. A moderate level of genetic diversity was detected due to the biallelic property of SNP markers. Clustering based on Bayesian model showed that grouping pattern is related to the geographical distribution of the wild emmer wheat. However, genetic differentiation between populations was not necessarily dependent on the geographical distances. A total of 33 outlier loci under positive selection were identified using a FST-outlier method. Significant correlations between loci and ecogeographical factors were observed. Conclusions Natural selection appears to play a major role in generating adaptive structures in wild emmer wheat. SNP markers are appropriate for detecting selectively-channeled adaptive genetic diversity in natural populations of wild emmer wheat. This adaptive genetic diversity is significantly associated with ecological factors. PMID:23937410

  9. SNP Discovery in Swine by Reduced Representation and High Throughput Pyrosequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively little information is available for sequence variation in the pig. Because reduced representation reduces the complexity of the genome being sampled by orders of magnitude and samples identical regions dispersed across the genome, it is an ideal strategy for SNP discovery in a species wit...

  10. An integrative segmentation method for detecting germline copy number variations in SNP arrays.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jianxin; Li, Peng

    2012-05-01

    Germline copy number variations (CNVs) are a major source of genetic variation in humans. In large-scale studies of complex diseases, CNVs are usually detected from data generated by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays. In this paper, we develop an integrative segmentation method, SegCNV, for detecting CNVs integrating both log R ratio (LRR) and B allele frequency (BAF). Based on simulation studies, SegCNV had modestly better power to detect deletions and substantially better power to detect duplications compared with circular binary segmentation (CBS) that relies purely on LRRs; and it had better power to detect deletions and a comparable performance to detect duplications compared with PennCNV and QuantiSNP. In two Hapmap subjects with deep sequence data available as a gold standard, SegCNV detected more true short deletions than PennCNV and QuantiSNP. For 21 short duplications validated experimentally in the AGRE dataset, SegCNV, QuantiSNP, and PennCNV detected all of them while CBS detected only three. SegCNV is much faster than the HMM-based (where HMM is hidden Markov model) methods, taking only several seconds to analyze genome-wide data for one subject. PMID:22539397