Science.gov

Sample records for 124i labeled arg-gly-asp

  1. Dual Receptor-Targeting Tc-99m-Labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-Conjugated Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Hybrid Peptides for Human Melanoma Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingli; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker could substantially decrease the non-specific renal uptake of 99mTc-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) hybrid peptides. Methods The RGD motif {Arg-Gly-Asp-DTyr-Asp} was coupled to [Cys3,4,10, D-Phe7, Arg11]α-MSH3–13 via the Aoc or PEG2 linker to generate RGD-Aoc-(Arg11)CCMSH and RGD-PEG-(Arg11)CCMSH. The biodistribution results of 99mTc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg11)CCMSH and 99mTc-RGD-PEG2-(Arg11)CCMSH were examined in M21 human melanoma-xenografted nude mice. Results The substitution of Lys linker with Aoc and PEG2 linker significantly reduced the renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg11)CCMSH and 99mTc-RGD-PEG2-(Arg11)CCMSH by 58% and 63% at 2 h post-injection. The renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg11)CCMSH and 99mTc-RGD-PEG2-(Arg11)CCMSH was 27.93 ± 3.98 and 22.01 ± 9.89% ID/g at 2 h post-injection. 99mTc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg11)CCMSH displayed higher tumor uptake than 99mTc-RGD-PEG2-(Arg11)CCMSH (2.35 ± 0.12 vs. 1.71 ± 0.25% ID/g at 2 h post-injection). The M21 human melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by SPECT/CT using 99mTc-RGD-Aoc-(Arg11)CCMSH as an imaging probe. Conclusions The favorable effect of Aoc and PEG2 linker in reducing the renal uptake provided a new insight into the design of novel dual receptor-targeting radiolabeled peptides. PMID:25577037

  2. Replacement of Lys Linker with Arg Linker Resulting in Improved Melanoma Uptake and Reduced Renal Uptake of Tc-99m-Labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-Conjugated Alpha-Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone Hybrid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianquan; Guo, Haixun; Padilla, R. Steve; Berwick, Marianne; Miao, Yubin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the non-specific renal uptake of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) hybrid peptide through structural modification or L-lysine co-injection. The RGD motif {cyclic(Arg-Gly-Asp-dTyr-Asp)} was coupled to [Cys3,4,10, d-Phe7, Arg11]α-MSH3-13 {(Arg11)CCMSH} through the Arg linker (substituting the Lys linker) to generate a novel RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH hybrid peptide. The melanoma targeting and pharmacokinetic properties of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The effect of L-lysine co-injection on the renal uptake was determined through the co-injection of L-lysine with 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH or 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker exhibited a profound effect in reducing the non-specific renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, as well as increasing the tumor uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH compared to 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited high tumor uptake (21.41 ± 3.74% ID/g at 2 h post-injection) and prolonged tumor retention (6.81 ± 3.71% ID/g at 24 h post-injection) in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. The renal uptake values of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were 40.14-64.08% of those of 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH (p<0.05) at 0.5, 2, 4 and 24 h post-injection. Co-injection of L-lysine was effective in decreasing the renal uptakes of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH by 27.7% and 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH by 52.1% at 2 h post-injection. Substitution of the Lys linker with an Arg linker dramatically improved the melanoma uptake and reduced the renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, warranting the further evaluation of 188Re-labeled RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH as a novel MC1 receptor-targeting therapeutic peptide for melanoma treatment in the future. PMID:20728365

  3. Supramolecular hydrogels formed by the conjugates of nucleobases, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides, and glucosamine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinming; Du, Xuewen; Gao, Yuan; Shi, Junfeng; Kuang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the generation of a novel class of supramolecular hydrogelators based on the integration of nucleobase, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides, and glucosamine in a single molecule. These novel small molecule hydrogelators self-assemble in water to form stable supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels and exhibit useful biostability. This approach provides a new opportunity for systematic exploration of the self-assembly of small biomolecules by varying any individual segment to generate a large array of supramolecular hydrogels for biological functions and for biomedical applications. PMID:22844343

  4. Crystal structure of the extracellular segment of integrin {alpha}V{beta}3 in complex with an Arg-Gly-Asp ligand.

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, J.-P.; Stehle, T.; Zhang, R.; Joachimiak, A.; Goodman, S.; Arnaout, M. A.; Biosciences Division; Massachusetts General Hospital; Harvard Medical School

    2002-04-05

    The structural basis for the divalent cation-dependent binding of heterodimeric alpha beta integrins to their ligands, which contain the prototypical Arg-Gly-Asp sequence, is unknown. Interaction with ligands triggers tertiary and quaternary structural rearrangements in integrins that are needed for cell signaling. Here we report the crystal structure of the extracellular segment of integrin alpha Vbeta 3 in complex with a cyclic peptide presenting the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. The ligand binds at the major interface between the alpha V and beta 3 subunits and makes extensive contacts with both. Both tertiary and quaternary changes are observed in the presence of ligand. The tertiary rearrangements take place in beta A, the ligand-binding domain of beta 3; in the complex, beta A acquires two cations, one of which contacts the ligand Asp directly and the other stabilizes the ligand-binding surface. Ligand binding induces small changes in the orientation of alpha V relative to beta 3.

  5. An Arg-Gly-Asp peptide stimulates Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors through a novel mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K.; Duncan, R.; Hruska, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of a peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence on 45Ca2+ efflux from osteoclast precursors. 45Ca(2+)-loaded osteoclast precursors were treated with GRGDSP (170 microM) for 10 min after 30 min of basal perfusion with a bicarbonate-containing buffer. GRGDSP significantly increased fractional efflux of Ca2+ from treated cells compared with vehicle-treated cells (P < 0.01) or cells treated with up to 200 micrograms/ml of a control peptide containing GRGESP. The effect of RGD was sustained for 15 min after the peptide was removed from the perfusate, but control levels of Ca2+ efflux returned by 1 h. The Ca2+ efflux effect of GRGDSP was most likely due to activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-adenosinetriphosphatase (Ca(2+)-ATPase) pump, as indicated by its inhibition with vanadate and a calmodulin antagonist, N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide, and the absence of an effect of Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition. An inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases, N-[2-(methylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide (0.1 mM), failed to inhibit GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux. However, genistein and herbimycin A, inhibitors of protein-tyrosine kinases, blocked Ca2+ efflux stimulated by GRGDSP. The results indicate that RGD sequences of matrix proteins may stimulate Ca2+ efflux from osteoclasts through activation of protein-tyrosine kinases and suggest that GRGDSP-stimulated Ca2+ efflux is mediated via the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  6. Targeting effect of PEGylated liposomes modified with the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence on gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Feng, Min; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hao; Guan, Wenxian

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the α5β1 integrin-mediated interaction with fibronectin (FN) occurs through the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell-binding sequence in repeat III10. Indocyanine green (ICG) is a near-infrared (NIR) optical dye that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. In the present study, we developed an RGD-modified PEGylated liposome-encapsulated ICG (RGD-PLS-ICG) system mediated by integrin. RGD was conjugated covalently to the distal end of DSPE-PEG2000-NH2 lipid by amide binding. The characteristics and stability of the prepared liposomes were assessed. In vitro, SGC7901 cells with high expression of integrin α5β1 were selected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. To confirm the targeting efficacies to gastric cancer, coumarin-6 was encapsulated as a fluorescent probe for in vitro study, and the targeting effect of RGD was detected by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. In vivo, the bio distribution of RGD-PLS-ICG was studied by an in vivo imaging system in the tumor model. RGD-PLS-ICG and PLS-ICG had a higher UV absorbance spectrum and stability than free-ICG. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated that RGD-PLS-encapsulated coumarin-6 was efficiently associated with the SGC7901 cells, while limited interaction was found for the other groups. Moreover, the in vivo imaging of the liposomes indicated that RGD-PLS-ICG achieved more accumulation in the tumor tissues when compared with PLS-ICG. The significant in vitro and in vivo results suggest that RGD-PLS-ICG may be a promising fluorescent dye delivery system for targeting gastric cancer cell overexpression of integrin. PMID:26238930

  7. Advanced glycation of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) tripeptide motif modulates retinal microvascular endothelial cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Denise M.; Coleman, Gary; Bhatwadekar, Ashay; Gardiner, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Advanced glycation endproduct (AGE) formation on the basement membrane of retinal capillaries has been previously described but the impact of these adducts on capillary endothelial cell function vascular repair remains uncertain. This investigation has evaluated retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) growing on AGE-modified fibronectin (FN) and determined how this has an impact on cell-substrate interactions and downstream oxidative responses and cell survival. Methods RMECs were grown on methylglyoxal-modified FN (AGE-FN) or native FN as a control. RMEC attachment and spreading was quantified. In a separate treatment, the AGE-FN substrate had Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) or scrambled peptide added before seeding. Phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and α5β1 integrin localization was assessed and apoptosis evaluated. In a subset of RMECs that remained attached to the AGE-FN substrate, the production of superoxide (O2-) was assayed using dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence or lucigenin, in the presence or absence of NADPH. The specificity of the O2- assays was confirmed by inhibition in the presence of polyethylene-glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD). AGE-mediated changes to mRNAs encoding key basement membrane proteins and regulatory enzymes were investigated using real-time RT–PCR. Results AGE-FN reduced RMEC attachment and spreading when compared to FN controls (p<0.001). RGDS peptide enhanced cell attachment on AGE-FN (p<0.001), while the scrambled peptide had no effect. FAK phosphorylation in AGE-exposed RMECs was reduced in a time-dependent fashion, while α5β1 integrin-immunoreactivity became focal at the basal membrane. AGE-exposure induced apoptosis, a response significantly prevented by RGDS peptide. AGE-exposure caused a significant increase in basal O2- and NADPH-stimulated production by RMECs (p<0.01), while AGE-FN also increased basement membrane associated mRNA expression (p<0.05). Conclusions AGE substrate modifications

  8. The Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide, rhodostomin, inhibits in vitro cell adhesion to extracellular matrices and platelet aggregation caused by saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, H. S.; Yang, R. S.; Huang, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    Saos-2 cells, derived from a primary human osteosarcoma, caused dose-dependent platelet aggregation in heparinised human platelet-rich plasma. Saos-2 tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) was completely inhibited by hirudin but unaffected by apyrase. The cell suspension shortened the plasma recalcification times of normal, factor VIII-deficient and factor IX-deficient human plasmas in a dose-dependent manner. However, the cell suspension did not affect the recalcification time of factor VII-deficient plasma. Moreover, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against human tissue factor completely abolished TCIPA. Flow cytometric analysis using anti-integrin MAbs as the primary binding ligands demonstrated that the integrin receptors alpha v beta 3, alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 were present of Saos-2 cells, which might mediate tumour cell adhesion to extracellular matrix. Rhodostomin, an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing snake venom peptide which antagonises the binding of fibrinogen to platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, prevented Saos-2 TCIPA as well as tumour cell adhesion to vitronectin, fibronectin and collagen type I. Likewise, the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) showed a similar effect. On a molar basis, rhodostomin was about 18,000 and 1000 times, respectively, more potent than GRGDS in inhibiting TCIPA and tumour cell adhesion. PMID:7841039

  9. The cell attachment and spreading activity of vitronectin is dependent on the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. Analysis by construction of RGD and domain deletion mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Sane, D C

    1993-04-30

    The cell attachment activity of vitronectin has been ascribed to an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence near the amino terminus. To verify the importance of the RGD sequence for cell binding, we created RAD and RGE vitronectin mutants and also deleted either the somatomedin B (delta S-rVN) or heparin (delta H-rVN) binding domains. These mutants were expressed as fusion proteins, purified using Ni+2 affinity chromatography, and assayed for cell attachment. EAhy.926 cells bound equally well to wild-type, delta S-rVN, and to delta H-rVN, but binding to RAD-rVN and RGE-rVN was inhibited by more than 90%. We therefore conclude that the RGD sequence of vitronectin is the most important cell recognition site and that neither the somatomedin B nor heparin domains contribute significantly to the cell adhesive activity of vitronectin. PMID:7683462

  10. Development of pre-implantation porcine embryos cultured within a three-dimensional alginate hydrogel system either conjugated with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide or supplemented with secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many uterine specific factors have been shown to be increased within the uterine milieu as the porcine embryo initiates elongation. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) is increased during this time and contains an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide sequence that has been shown to bind to cell surface integrins ...

  11. In vivo analysis of Arg-Gly-Asp sequence/integrin α5β1-mediated signal involvement in embryonic enchondral ossification by exo utero development system.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Ryuju; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Jahan, Esrat; Rafiq, Ashiq Mahmood; Udagawa, Jun; Hatta, Toshihisa; Otani, Hiroki

    2014-07-01

    Enchondral ossification is a fundamental mechanism for longitudinal bone growth during vertebrate development. In vitro studies suggested that functional blockade with RGD peptides or with an antibody that interferes with integrin α5β1-ligand interactions inhibited pre-hypertrophic chondrocyte differentiation. The purpose of this study is to elucidate in vivo the roles of the integrin α5β1-mediated signal through the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence in the cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction in embryonic enchondral ossification by an exo utero development system. We injected Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) peptides and anti-integrin α5β1 antibody (α5β1 ab) in the upper limbs of mouse embryos at embryonic day (E) 15.5 (RGDS-injected limbs, α5β1 ab-injected limbs), and compared the effects on enchondral ossification with those found in the control limbs (Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser peptide-, mouse IgG-, or vehicle-injected, and no surgery) at E16.5. In the RGDS-injected limbs, the humeri were shorter and there were fewer BrdU-positive cells than in the control limbs. The ratios of cartilage length and area to those of the humerus were higher in the RGDS-injected limbs. The ratios of type X collagen to type 2 collagen mRNA and protein (Coll X/Coll 2) were significantly lower in the RGDS-injected limbs. In those limbs, TUNEL-positive cells were hardly observed, and the ratios of fractin to the Coll X/Coll 2 ratio were lower than in the control limbs. Furthermore, the α5β1 ab-injected limbs showed results similar to those of RGDS-injected limbs. The present in vivo study by exo utero development system showed that RGDS and α5β1 ab injection decreased chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in enchondral ossification, and suggested that the integrin α5β1-mediated ECM signal through the RGD sequence is involved in embryonic enchondral ossification. PMID:24375788

  12. Covalent attachment of cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) to poly(etheretherketone) surface by tailored silanization layers technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yanyan; Xiong, Chengdong; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Lifang

    2014-11-01

    Poly(etheretherketone) (PEEK) is a rigid semicrystalline polymer that combines excellent mechanical properties, broad chemical resistance and bone-like stiffness and is widely used in biomedical fields. However, PEEK is naturally bioinert, leading to limited biomedical applications, especially when a direct bone-implant osteointegration is desired. In this study, a three-step reaction procedure was employed to immobilize the cell-adhesive peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD) on the surface of PEEK sheet by covalent chemical attachment to favor cell adhesion and proliferation. First, hydroxylation-pretreated PEEK surfaces were silanized with 7-Oct-1-enyltrichlorosilane (OETS) in dry cyclohexane, resulting in a silanization layer with terminal ethenyl. Second, the terminal ethylenic double bonds of the silanization layer on PEEK surface were converted to carboxyl groups through acidic potassium manganate oxidation. Finally, GRGD was covalently attached by carbodiimide mediated condensation between the carboxyl on PEEK surface and amine presents in GRGD. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, surface profiler and water contact angle measurements were applied to characterize the modified surfaces. The effect of cells attachment and proliferation on each specimen was investigated. Pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) attachment, spreading and proliferation were improved effectively on GRGD-modified PEEK surface. PEEK modified with GRGD on its surface has potential use in orthopedic or dental implants.

  13. Repetitive Gly-Leu-Lys-Gly-Glu-Asn-Arg-Gly-Asp peptide derived from collagen and fibronectin for improving cell-scaffold interaction.

    PubMed

    Chaisri, Patcharaporn; Chingsungnoen, Artit; Siri, Sineenat

    2015-03-01

    Suitable scaffolds for tissue engineering should provide a microenvironment for cell dwelling and directing cell behavior that resemble the native environment. Three-dimensional geometry of electrospun scaffolds well supports cell deposition, but they often lack biomacromolecules to induce cell responses. In this work, the repetitive collagen and fibronectin motif (rCF) peptide containing multiple repeats of Gly-Leu-Lys-Gly-Glu-Asn-Arg-Gly-Asp sequence derived from the cell adhesion motifs of collagen and fibronectin was produced as the alternative agent to induce cell-scaffold interaction. The DNA fragment encoding rCF peptide was amplified by a polymerase chain reaction using overlap primers without a DNA template, cloned into a protein expression vector, and expressed as a His-tag fusion peptide in Escherichia coli. The purified rCF peptide possessed cell adhesion activity about 1.5-fold of the commercial RGD peptide. The rCF peptide was grafted onto the electrospun PCL scaffold via RF plasma of Ar/O2 discharge and acrylic acid treatment. The immobilized rCF peptide significantly increased surface hydrophilicity and enhanced cell proliferation of the electrospun PCL scaffold. These findings suggest the potential application of rCF peptide for improving the biomimetic functions of polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:25503361

  14. Evaluation of Osteoblast-Like Cell Viability and Differentiation on the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser Peptide Immobilized Titanium Dioxide Nanotube via Chemical Grafting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Hyun; Kim, Il-Shin; Park, Sang-Won; Lee, Kwangmin; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Kim, Hyun-Seung; Oh, Gye-Jeong; Ji, Min-Kyung; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the effect of the immobilization of the Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) peptide on titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube via chemical grafting on osteoblast-like cell (MG-63) viability and differentiation. The specimens were divided into two groups; TiO2 nanotubes and GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes. The surface characteristics of GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes were observed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The morphology of cells on specimens was observed by FE-SEM after 2 hr and 24 hr. The level of cell viability was investigated via a tetrazolium (XTT) assay after 2 and 4 days. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was evaluated to measure the cell differentiation after 4 and 7 days. The presence of nitrogen up-regulation or C==O carbons con- firmed that TiO2 nanotubes were immobilized with GRGDS peptides. Cell adhesion was enhanced on the GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes compared to TiO2 nanotubes. Furthermore, significantly increased cell spreading and proliferation were observed with the cells grown on GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes (P < .05). However, there was no significant difference in ALP activity between GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes and TiO2 nanotubes. These results suggest that the GRGDS-immobilized TiO2 nanotubes might be effective in improving the osseointegration of dental implants. PMID:27433593

  15. Model-free nuclear magnetic resonance study of intermolecular free energy landscapes in liquids with paramagnetic Ln3+ spotlights: Theory and application to Arg-Gly-Asp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Pascal H.

    2012-01-01

    We propose an easily applicable method for investigating the pair distribution function of a lanthanide Ln3+ complex LnL (L = ligand) with respect to any solvent or solute molecule A carrying observable nuclear spins. Let r be the distance of Ln3+ to the observed nuclear spin I. We derive a simple expression of the experimental value of the configurational average of 1/r6 in terms of longitudinal paramagnetic relaxation (rate) enhancements (PREs) of the spin I measured on a standard high-resolution NMR spectrometer and due to well-chosen concentrations of LnL complexes in which Ln3+ is a fast-relaxing paramagnetic lanthanide or the slowly-relaxing gadolinium Gd3+. The derivation is justified in the general case of a molecule A which is by turns in a bound state where it follows the complex and a free state where it moves independently. It rests on the expression of the underlying PRE theory in terms of the angle-dependent pair distribution function of LnL and A. The simplifications of this theory in the high-field regime and under the condition of fast exchange between bound and free states are carefully discussed. We also show that original information on the angle dependence of the molecular pair distribution function can be gained from the measured paramagnetic dipolar shifts induced by complexed fast-relaxing Ln3+ ions. The method is illustrated by the case study of the anionic Lnttha3- = [Ln3+(ttha)]3- (ttha6- = triethylene tetraamine hexacetate) complex interacting with the biologically important tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) which carries peripheral ionic groups. The usefulness of an auxiliary reference outer sphere probe solute is emphasized.

  16. Model-free nuclear magnetic resonance study of intermolecular free energy landscapes in liquids with paramagnetic Ln3+ spotlights: theory and application to Arg-Gly-Asp.

    PubMed

    Fries, Pascal H

    2012-01-28

    We propose an easily applicable method for investigating the pair distribution function of a lanthanide Ln(3+) complex LnL (L = ligand) with respect to any solvent or solute molecule A carrying observable nuclear spins. Let r be the distance of Ln(3+) to the observed nuclear spin I. We derive a simple expression of the experimental value of the configurational average of 1/r(6) in terms of longitudinal paramagnetic relaxation (rate) enhancements (PREs) of the spin I measured on a standard high-resolution NMR spectrometer and due to well-chosen concentrations of LnL complexes in which Ln(3+) is a fast-relaxing paramagnetic lanthanide or the slowly-relaxing gadolinium Gd(3+). The derivation is justified in the general case of a molecule A which is by turns in a bound state where it follows the complex and a free state where it moves independently. It rests on the expression of the underlying PRE theory in terms of the angle-dependent pair distribution function of LnL and A. The simplifications of this theory in the high-field regime and under the condition of fast exchange between bound and free states are carefully discussed. We also show that original information on the angle dependence of the molecular pair distribution function can be gained from the measured paramagnetic dipolar shifts induced by complexed fast-relaxing Ln(3+) ions. The method is illustrated by the case study of the anionic Lnttha(3-) = [Ln(3+)(ttha)](3-) (ttha(6-) = triethylene tetraamine hexacetate) complex interacting with the biologically important tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) which carries peripheral ionic groups. The usefulness of an auxiliary reference outer sphere probe solute is emphasized. PMID:22299888

  17. Inhibition of CD4+ T lymphocyte binding to fibronectin and immune-cell accumulation in inflammatory sites by non-peptidic mimetics of Arg-Gly-Asp.

    PubMed

    Hershkoviz, R; Greenspoon, N; Mekori, Y A; Hadari, R; Alon, R; Kapustina, G; Lider, O

    1994-02-01

    The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion motif has been demonstrated in various studies to play a pivotal role in leucocyte and platelet interactions with plasma and extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins. The recognition of the RGD sequence is mediated by heterodimeric receptors designated integrins of the beta 1 subfamily, expressed on distinct cell types, including T lymphocytes. We have recently shown that flexible non-peptidic mimetics of RGD, in which the two ionic side groups were separated by a linear spacer of 11 atoms, bound specifically to the platelet integrin alpha 11b beta 3, and inhibited T cell-mediated immune responses. The present study was designed to (i) further characterize the structural requirements for RGD interactions with CD4+ T cells, and (ii) examine the mechanisms by which the RGD mimetics interfere with immune cell reactivity in vivo. We now report that freezing the conformational degrees of freedom in the spacer chain, which fixes the relative orientation of the guanidinium and carboxylate side groups in a favourable manner, results in a higher level of inhibition of T cell binding to immobilized fibronectin, an RGD-containing ECM glycoprotein. In vivo, treatment of mice with relatively low doses of the RGD mimetics, but not the RGD peptide, inhibited the elicitation of an adoptively transferred DTH reaction. This inhibition was achieved by direct impairment of the ability of antigen-primed lymph node cells to migrate and accumulate in inflammatory sites. Hence, we suggest that the design and production of non-peptidic mimetics of RGD offers a novel approach to study defined parameters related to the structure-function requirements of small adhesion epitopes. Furthermore, this approach could be used therapeutically to inhibit pathological processes which depend on RGD recognition. PMID:7905794

  18. Bone marrow stromal cells cultured on poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/nano-hydroxyapatite composites with chemical immobilization of Arg-Gly-Asp peptide and preliminary bone regeneration of mandibular defect thereof.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanxia; Ren, Jie; Ren, Tianbin; Gu, Shuying; Tan, Qinggang; Zhang, Lihong; Lv, Kaige; Pan, Kefeng; Jiang, Xinquan

    2010-12-15

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) was used to create active groups on the poly (lactide-co-glycolide)/nano-hydroxyapatite (PLGA/NHA) surface and Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was grafted on the active groups and novel PLGA/NHA 2-D membranes and 3D scaffolds modified with RGD were obtained. X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) results show that sulfur displays only on the modified surface. The RGD-modified PLGA/NHA materials also have much lower static water contact angle and much higher water-absorption ability, which shows that after chemical treatment, the modified materials show better hydrophilic properties. Atomic force microscope (AFM) shows that after surface modification, the surface morphology of PLGA is greatly changed. All these results indicate that RGD peptide has successfully grafted on the surface of PLGA. Rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) were seeded in the 2D membranes and 3D scaffolds materials. The influences of the RGD on the cell attachment, growth and differentiation, and proliferation on the different materials were studied. The modified scaffolds were implanted into rabbits to observe preliminary application in regeneration of mandibular defect. The PLGA/NHA-RGD presents better results in bone regeneration in rabbit mandibular defect. PMID:20872750

  19. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-Modified E1A/E1B Double Mutant Adenovirus Enhances Antitumor Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells In Vitro and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Cai, Zhi-Jian; Xu, Yi-Peng; Zhao, An; Su, Ying; Zhang, Gu; Zhu, Shao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    CAR is a transmembrane protein that is expressed in various epithelial and endothelial cells. CAR mediates adenoviral infection, as well as adenovirus-mediated oncolysis of AxdAdB-3, an E1A/E1B double-restricted oncolytic adenovirus, in prostate cancer cells. This study further assessed the therapeutic efficacy of AxdAdB-3 with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-fiber modification (AxdAdB3-F/RGD), which enables integrin-dependent infection, in prostate cancer. Susceptibility of prostate cancer cells LNCaP, PC3, and DU145 to adenovirus infection was associated with CAR expression. All of the prostate cancer cell lines expressed integrin αvβ3 and αvβ5. AxdAdB-3 was more cytopathic in CAR-positive prostate cancer cells than in CAR-negative cells, whereas AxdAdB3-F/RGD caused potent oncolysis in both CAR-positive and CAR-negative prostate cancer cells. In contrast, AxdAdB3-F/RGD was not cytopathic against normal prostate epithelial cells, RWPE-1. Intratumoral injection of AxdAdB3-F/RGD into CAR-negative prostate cancer cell xenografts in nude mice inhibited tumor growth. The current study demonstrates that E1A/E1B double-restricted oncolytic adenovirus with an RGD-fiber modification enhances infection efficiency and anti-tumor activity in CAR-deficient prostate cancer cells, while sparing normal cells. Future studies will evaluate the therapeutic potential of AxdAdB3-F/RGD in prostate cancer. PMID:26799485

  20. The integrin alpha IIb beta 3 contains distinct and interacting binding sites for snake-venom RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) proteins. Evidence that the receptor-binding characteristics of snake-venom RGD proteins are related to the amino acid environment flanking the sequence RGD.

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, S; Lu, X; Kakkar, V V; Authi, K S

    1995-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated [Lu, Williams, Deadman, Salmon, Kakkar, Wilkinson, Baruch, Authi and Rahman (1994) Biochem. J. 304, 929-936] the preferential antagonism of the interactions of the integrin alpha IIb beta 3 on activated platelets with three immobilized glycoprotein ligands (fibrinogen, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor) by a selected panel of snake-venom RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp)-containing proteins including the disintegrins kistrin and elegantin, and the neurotoxin variant dendroaspin. Kistrin and dendroaspin, although structurally unrelated, contain similar amino acids flanking the tripeptide RGD and behaved as identical antagonists preferentially inhibiting platelet adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen as opposed to fibronectin. In contrast, elegantin, which shares extensive sequence similarity with kistrin but has different amino acids around the tripeptide RGD, preferentially inhibited platelet adhesion to immobilized fibronectin as opposed to fibrinogen. To develop further insights into the mechanisms underlying the preferential antagonism shown by the venom proteins in the adhesion studies, we, in the present study, sought to determine the binding properties of kistrin, elegantin and dendroaspin to the alpha IIb beta 3 complex by radioligand kinetic and competition studies. In direct binding experiments, both kistrin and dendroaspin were observed to bind to a single class of binding site on ADP-activated platelets with apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kdapp) values of 42 +/- 2 nM and 21 +/- 6 nM respectively. In competition studies, dendroaspin blocked the binding of 125I-labelled kistrin to ADP-activated platelets in a simple competitive manner, with an apparent equilibrium inhibition constant (Kiapp) of 143 +/- 14 nM, from which an indirect Kdapp = 22 nM for dendroaspin was determined. This result suggests that kistrin and dendroaspin bind to the same site on the integrin alpha IIb beta 3 consistent with their similar inhibitory

  1. Preferential antagonism of the interactions of the integrin alpha IIb beta 3 with immobilized glycoprotein ligands by snake-venom RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) proteins. Evidence supporting a functional role for the amino acid residues flanking the tripeptide RGD in determining the inhibitory properties of snake-venom RGD proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, X; Williams, J A; Deadman, J J; Salmon, G P; Kakkar, V V; Wilkinson, J M; Baruch, D; Authi, K S; Rahman, S

    1994-01-01

    The inhibitory properties of a panel of snake-venom-derived RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) proteins, including the disintegrins kistrin, elegantin and albolabrin, and the neurotoxin homologue dendroaspin, were investigated in a platelet-adhesion assay using three immobilized ligands of the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (alpha IIb beta 3), namely fibrinogen, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor (vWF). The snake-venom proteins preferentially inhibited the adhesion of ADP-treated platelets to one or more of the immobilized ligands. Kistrin and dendroaspin exhibited similar inhibitory characteristics, abrogating platelet adhesion to fibrinogen and vWF at nanomolar concentrations, but poorly inhibiting adhesion to fibronectin. Kistrin and dendroaspin share little overall amino-acid-sequence identity, but a considerable level of sequence similarity exists around the RGD tripeptide. Synthetic cyclic peptides corresponding to these regions of kistrin and dendroaspin inhibited platelet adhesion to both fibrinogen and fibronectin with approximately equal potency, but were 100-fold weaker antagonists of the interactions of the alpha IIb beta 3 complex with fibrinogen than their parent proteins. The disintegrins elegantin and albolabrin, which share approx. 60% overall amino-acid-sequence similarity with kistrin but have different residues around the RGD tripeptide, exhibited different antagonistic preferences. Elegantin inhibited platelet adhesion to immobilized vWF and fibronectin, but was significantly less effective at disrupting adhesion to fibrinogen. Albolabrin selectively inhibited platelet adhesion to immobilized vWF and was less effective with fibrinogen and fibronectin as adhesive ligands. In contrast with the behaviour of these venom proteins, the adhesion of ADP-treated platelets to immobilized fibrinogen, fibronectin and vWF was inhibited non-selectively by a range of monoclonal antibodies with specificity for the alpha IIb beta 3 complex. These observations, therefore

  2. Extracellular-matrix-based and Arg-Gly-Asp-modified photopolymerizing hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwan D; Heo, Jiseung; Hwang, Yongsung; Kwak, Seon-Yeong; Park, Ok Kyu; Kim, Hyunbum; Varghese, Shyni; Hwang, Nathaniel S

    2015-02-01

    Articular cartilage damage is a persistent and increasing problem with the aging population. Strategies to achieve complete repair or functional restoration remain a challenge. Photopolymerizing-based hydrogels have long received an attention in the cartilage tissue engineering, due to their unique bioactivities, flexible method of synthesis, range of constituents, and desirable physical characteristics. In the present study, we have introduced unique bioactivity within the photopolymerizing-based hydrogels by copolymerizing polyethylene glycol (PEG) macromers with methacrylated extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules (hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate [CS]) and integrin binding peptides (RGD peptide). Results indicate that cellular morphology, as observed by the actin cytoskeleton structures, was strongly dependent on the type of ECM component as well as the presence of integrin binding moieties. Further, CS-based hydrogel with integrin binding RGD moieties increased the lubricin (or known as superficial zone protein [SZP]) gene expression of the encapsulated chondrocytes. Additionally, CS-based hydrogel displayed cell-responsive degradation and resulted in increased DNA, GAG, and collagen accumulation compared with other hydrogels. This study demonstrates that integrin-mediated interactions within CS microenvironment provide an optimal hydrogel scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering application. PMID:25266634

  3. Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptides expose novel collagen receptors on fibroblasts: implications for wound healing.

    PubMed Central

    Agrez, M V; Bates, R C; Boyd, A W; Burns, G F

    1991-01-01

    Integrins are a family of cell-surface receptors intimately involved in the interactions of cells with their extracellular matrix. These receptors comprise an alpha and beta subunit in noncovalent association and many have been shown to recognize and bind an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) sequence contained within their specific extracellular matrix ligand. Fibroblasts express integrin receptors belonging to two major subfamilies. Some of the members within the subfamily defined by beta 1 (VLA) are receptors for collagen but, perhaps surprisingly, the other major subfamily of integrins on fibroblasts--that defined by the alpha chain of the vitronectin receptor, alpha v--all appear to bind primarily vitronectin and/or fibronectin. In the present study we show that RGD-containing peptides expose cryptic binding sites on the alpha v-associated integrins enabling them to function as collagen receptors. The addition of RGD-containing peptides to fibroblasts cultured on type I collagen induced dramatic cell elongation and, when the cells were contained within collagen matrices, the peptides induced marked contraction of the gels. These processes were inhibited by Fab fragments of a monoclonal antibody against an alpha v integrin. Also, alpha v-associated integrins from cell lysates bound to collagen I affinity columns in the presence, but not in the absence, of RGD-containing peptides. These data suggest a novel regulatory control for integrin function. In addition, because the cryptic collagen receptors were shown to be implicated in the contraction of collagen gels, the generation of such binding forces suggests that this may be the major biological role for these integrins in processes such as wound healing. Images PMID:1666304

  4. Comparative Positron-Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging and Phototherapeutic Potential of 124I- Labeled Methyl- 3-(1′-iodobenzyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide-a vs. the Corresponding Glucose- and Galactose-Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Suresh K.; Sajjad, Munawwar; Chen, Yihui; Zheng, Xiang; Yao, Rutao; Missert, Joseph R.; Batt, Carrie; Nabi, Hani A.; Oseroff, Allan R.; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2009-01-01

    In our present study, 3-(1′-m-iodobenzyloxyethyl) pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester 1, 3-(1′-m-iodobenzyloxyethyl)-172-{(2-deoxy)glucose} pyropheophorbide-a 2, and 3-(1′-m-iodo benzyloxyethyl)-172-{(1-deoxy)galactose} pyropheophorbide-a 3 were synthesized and converted into the corresponding 124I- labeled analogs by reacting the intermediate trimethyltin analogs with Na124I. Photosensitizers 1–3 were evaluated for the PDT efficacy in C3H mice bearing RIF tumors at variable doses and showed a significant long-term tumor cure. Among the compounds investigated, the non-carbohydrate analog 1 was most effective. These results were in contrast to the in vitro data, where compared to the parent analog the corresponding galactose-and glucose derivatives showed enhanced cell kill. Among the corresponding 124I-labeled in analogs, excellent tumor images were obtained from compound 1 both tumor models (RIF and Colon-26) and the best tumor contrast was observed at 72 h post injection. Conjugating a glucose moiety to photosensitizer 1 diminished its tumor uptake, whereas with time the corresponding galactose analog showed improved tumor contrast. PMID:19090663

  5. Site specific discrete PEGylation of (124)I-labeled mCC49 Fab' fragments improves tumor MicroPET/CT imaging in mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haiming; Carlton, Michelle M; Povoski, Stephen P; Milum, Keisha; Kumar, Krishan; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Hinkle, George H; Colcher, David; Brody, Rich; Davis, Paul D; Pokora, Alex; Phelps, Mitchell; Martin, Edward W; Tweedle, Michael F

    2013-11-20

    The tumor-associated glycoprotein-72 (TAG-72) antigen is highly overexpressed in various human adenocarcinomas and anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibodies, and fragments are therefore useful as pharmaceutical targeting vectors. In this study, we investigated the effects of site-specific PEGylation with MW 2-4 kDa discrete, branched PEGylation reagents on mCC49 Fab' (MW 50 kDa) via in vitro TAG72 binding, and in vivo blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and mouse tumor microPET/CT imaging. mCC49Fab' (Fab'-NEM) was conjugated at a hinge region cysteine with maleimide-dPEG 12-(dPEG24COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-A), maleimide-dPEG12-(dPEG12COOH)3 acid (Mal-dPEG-B), or maleimide-dPEG12-(m-dPEG24)3 (Mal-dPEG-C), and then radiolabeled with iodine-124 ((124)I) in vitro radioligand binding assays and in vivo studies used TAG-72 expressing LS174T human colon carcinoma cells and xenograft mouse tumors. Conjugation of mCC49Fab' with Mal-dPEG-A (Fab'-A) reduced the binding affinity of the non PEGylated Fab' by 30%; however, in vivo, Fab'-A significantly lengthened the blood retention vs Fab'-NEM (47.5 vs 28.1%/ID at 1 h, 25.1 vs 8.4%/ID at 5 h, p < 0.01), showed excellent tumor to background, better microPET/CT images due to higher tumor accumulation, and increased tumor concentration in excised tissues at 72 h by 130% (5.09 ± 0.83 vs 3.83 ± 1.50%ID/g, p < 0.05). Despite the strong similarity of the three PEGylation reagents, PEGylation with Mal-dPEG-B or -C reduced the in vitro binding affinity of Fab'-NEM by 70%, blood retention, microPET/CT imaging tumor signal intensity, and residual 72 h tumor concentration by 49% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.97 ± 0.29%ID/g, p < 0.05) and 63% (3.83 ± 1.50 vs 1.42 ± 0.35%ID/g, p < 0.05), respectively. We conclude that remarkably subtle changes in the structure of the PEGylation reagent can create significantly altered biologic behavior. Further study is warranted of conjugates of the triple branched, negatively charged Mal-dPEG-A. PMID:24175669

  6. Comparative roles of the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence present in the Bordetella pertussis adhesins pertactin and filamentous hemagglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, E; Ewanowich, C A; Bhargava, A; Peppler, M S; Kenimer, J G; Brennan, M J

    1992-01-01

    Pertactin and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), proteins present on the surface of the gram-negative organism Bordetella pertussis, have been shown to contain the putative cell-binding sequence arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and to promote eukaryotic cell attachment. The attachment of epithelial cells to purified pertactin and the entry of B. pertussis into human HeLa cells are both inhibited by an RGD-containing peptide derived from the pertactin sequence. In contrast, an RGD-containing peptide derived from the FHA sequence has no effect on either the attachment of epithelial cells to purified FHA or the entry of B. pertussis into HeLa cells. Staphylococcus aureus organisms coated with pertactin or FHA, purified from B. pertussis, enter HeLa cells more efficiently than S. aureus cells coated with bovine serum albumin. The pertactin-enhanced entry of S. aureus is inhibited by 75% in the presence of the RGD peptide from pertactin, whereas the RGD peptide derived from FHA has no effect on the increased entry promoted by the pertactin-coated or by the FHA-coated S. aureus. These results indicate that the active uptake of B. pertussis by certain mammalian cells may be mediated by the interaction of the RGD site found in pertactin with eukaryotic cell surface receptors. Images PMID:1587605

  7. Preparation and evaluation of an Arg-Gly-Asp-modified chitosan/hydroxyapatite scaffold for application in bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LIN; LI, BAOLIN; XIAO, XIAO; MENG, QINGGANG; LI, WEI; YU, QIAN; BI, JIAQI; CHENG, YONG; QU, ZHIWEI

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering has become a promising method for the repair of bone defects, and the production of a scaffold with high cell affinity and osseointegrative properties is crucial for successful bone substitute. Chitosan (CS)/hydroxyapatite (HA) composite was prepared by in situ compositing combined with lyophilization, and further modified by arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) via physical adsorption. In order to evaluate the cell adhesion rate, viability, morphology, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, the RGD-CS/HA scaffold was seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The osseointegrative properties of the RGD-CS/HA scaffold were evaluated by in vivo heterotopic ossification and in vivo bone defect repair. After 4 h culture with the RGD-CS/HA scaffold, the adhesion rate of the BMSCs was 80.7%. After 3 days, BMSCs were fusiform in shape and evenly distributed on the RGD-CS/HA scaffold. Formation of extracellular matrix and numerous cell-cell interactions were observed after 48 h of culture, with an ALP content of 0.006±0.0008 U/l/ng. Furthermore, the osseointegrative ability and biomechanical properties of the RGD-CS/HA scaffold were comparable to that of normal bone tissue. The biocompatibility, cytocompatibility, histocompatibility and osseointegrative properties of the RGD-CS/HA scaffold support its use in bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26459053

  8. Preparation and evaluation of an Arg-Gly-Asp-modified chitosan/hydroxyapatite scaffold for application in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Li, Baolin; Xiao, Xiao; Meng, Qinggang; Li, Wei; Yu, Qian; Bi, Jiaqi; Cheng, Yong; Qu, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    Bone tissue engineering has become a promising method for the repair of bone defects, and the production of a scaffold with high cell affinity and osseointegrative properties is crucial for successful bone substitute. Chitosan (CS)/hydroxyapatite (HA) composite was prepared by in situ compositing combined with lyophilization, and further modified by arginine‑glycine‑aspartic acid (RGD) via physical adsorption. In order to evaluate the cell adhesion rate, viability, morphology, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, the RGD‑CS/HA scaffold was seeded with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The osseointegrative properties of the RGD‑CS/HA scaffold were evaluated by in vivo heterotopic ossification and in vivo bone defect repair. After 4 h culture with the RGD‑CS/HA scaffold, the adhesion rate of the BMSCs was 80.7%. After 3 days, BMSCs were fusiform in shape and evenly distributed on the RGD‑CS/HA scaffold. Formation of extracellular matrix and numerous cell‑cell interactions were observed after 48 h of culture, with an ALP content of 0.006 ± 0.0008 U/l/ng. Furthermore, the osseointegrative ability and biomechanical properties of the RGD‑CS/HA scaffold were comparable to that of normal bone tissue. The biocompatibility, cytocompatibility, histocompatibility and osseointegrative properties of the RGD‑CS/HA scaffold support its use in bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:26459053

  9. Tc-99m-labeled RGD-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone hybrid peptides with reduced renal uptake

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianquan; Hu, Chien-An

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the replacement of the positively-charged Lys or Arg linker with a neutral linker could reduce the renal uptake of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) hybrid peptide. The RGD motif {cyclic(Arg-Gly-Asp-dTyr-Asp)} was coupled to [Cys3,4,10, d-Phe7, Arg11]α-MSH3–13 {(Arg11)CCMSH} through the neutral βAla or Ahx {aminohexanoic acid} linker (replacing the Lys or Arg linker) to generate novel RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH and RGD-Ahx-(Arg11)CCMSH hybrid peptides. The receptor binding affinity and cytotoxicity of RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH and RGD-Ahx-(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The melanoma targeting and imaging properties of 99mTc-RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH and 99mTc-RGD-Ahx-(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The replacement of the Lys or Arg linker with the βAla or Ahx linker retained nanomolar receptor binding affinities and remarkable cytotoxicity of RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH and RGD-Ahx-(Arg11)CCMSH. The receptor binding affinities of RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH and RGD-Ahx-(Arg11)CCMSH were 0.8 and 1.3 nM. Three-hour incubation with 0.1 µM of RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH and RGD-Ahx-(Arg11)CCMSH decreased the survival percentages of B16/F1 cells by 71 and 67% as compared to the untreated control cells five days post the treatment. The replacement of the Arg linker with the βAla or Ahx linker reduced the non-specific renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH and 99mTc-RGD-Ahx-(Arg11)CCMSH by 62% and 61% at 2 h post-injection. 99mTc-RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH displayed higher melanoma uptake than 99mTc-RGD-Ahx-(Arg11)CCMSH at 0.5, 2, 4 and 24 h post-injection. Enhanced tumor to kidney uptake ratio of 99mTc-RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH warranted the further evaluation of 188Re-labeled RGD-βAla-(Arg11)CCMSH as a novel MC1 receptor-targeting therapeutic peptide for melanoma treatment in the future. PMID:25557051

  10. Bone Marrow Dosimetry Using 124I-PET

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jazmin; Humm, John L.; Divgi, Chaitanya R.; Larson, Steven M.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow is usually dose-limiting for radioimmunotherapy. In this study, we directly estimated red marrow activity concentration and the self-dose component of absorbed radiation dose to red marrow based on PET/CT of 2 different 124I-labeled antibodies (cG250 and huA33) and compared the results with plasma activity concentration and plasma-based dose estimates. Methods Two groups of patients injected with 124I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (11 patients with renal cancer receiving 124I-cG250 and 5 patients with colorectal cancer receiving 124I- huA33) were imaged by PET or PET/CT on 2 or 3 occasions after infusion. Regions of interest were drawn over several lumbar vertebrae, and red marrow activity concentration was quantified. Plasma activity concentration was also quantified using multiple patient blood samples. The red marrow–to–plasma activity concentration ratio (RMPR) was calculated at the times of imaging. The self-dose component of the absorbed radiation dose to the red marrow was estimated from the images, from the plasma measurements, and using a combination of both sets of measurements. Results RMPR was observed to increase with time for both groups of patients. Mean (±SD) time-dependent RMPR (RMPR(t)) for the cG250 group increased from 0.13 ± 0.06 immediately after infusion to 0.23 ± 0.09 at approximately 6 d after infusion. For the huA33 group, mean RMPR(t) was 0.10 ± 0.04 immediately after infusion, 0.13 ± 0.05 approximately 2 d after infusion, and 0.20 ± 0.09 approximately 7 d after infusion. Plasma-based estimates of red marrow self-dose tended to be greater than image-based values by, on average, 11% and 47% for cG250 and huA33, respectively, but by as much as −73% to 62% for individual patients. The hybrid method combining RMPR(t) and plasma activity concentration provided a closer match to the image-based dose estimates (average discrepancies, −2% and 18% for cG250 and huA33, respectively). Conclusion These results suggest that

  11. The sea anemone actinoporin (Arg-Gly-Asp) conserved motif is involved in maintaining the competent oligomerization state of these pore-forming toxins.

    PubMed

    García-Linares, Sara; Richmond, Ryan; García-Mayoral, María F; Bustamante, Noemí; Bruix, Marta; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-Del-Pozo, Alvaro

    2014-03-01

    Sea anemone actinoporins constitute an optimum model to investigate mechanisms of membrane pore formation. All actinoporins of known structure show a general fold of a β-sandwich motif flanked by two α-helices. The crucial structure for pore formation seems to be the helix located at the N-terminal end. The role of several other protein regions in membrane attachment is also well established. However, not much is known about the protein residues involved in the oligomerization required for pore formation. Previous detailed analysis of the soluble three-dimensional structures of different wild-type and mutant actinoporins from Stychodactyla helianthus suggested residues which could be involved in this oligomerization. One of these stretches contains a conserved sequence compatible with an integrin-binding RGD motif. The results presented now deal with mutants affecting this motif in the well-characterized actinoporin sticholysin II. Small modifications along this three-residue sequence had profound effects on its solubility. Just a single methyl group yielded an RAD mutant version with a highly diminished haemolytic activity and altered oligomerization behaviour. The results obtained are discussed in terms of a key role for the RGD motif in maintaining the actinoporins' pore-competent state of protein oligomerization. PMID:24418371

  12. A fluorescent Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide-naphthalenediimide (NDI) conjugate for imaging integrin α(v)β(3) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiyuan; Arrowsmith, Rory L; Tyson, James A; Mirabello, Vincenzo; Ge, Haobo; Eggleston, Ian M; Botchway, Stanley W; Pantos, G Dan; Pascu, Sofia I

    2015-04-25

    We have developed a fluorescent peptide conjugate (TrpNDIRGDfK) based on the coupling of cyclo(RGDfK) to a new tryptophan-tagged amino acid naphthalenediimide (TrpNDI). Confocal fluorescence microscopy coupled with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) mapping, single and two-photon fluorescence excitation, lifetime components and corresponding decay profiles were used as parameters able to investigate qualitatively the cellular behavior regarding the molecular environment and biolocalisation of TrpNDI and TrpNDI-RGDfK in cancer cells. PMID:25647279

  13. Longitudinal monitoring adipose-derived stem cell survival by PET imaging hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate in rat myocardial infarction model

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min Hwan; Woo, Sang-Keun; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Pandya, Darpan; Park, Noh Won; Nahm, Sang-Soep; Eom, Ki Dong; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Chan Wha; Kang, Joo Hyun; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Lee, Yong Jin

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We developed a safe, simple and appropriate stem cell labeling method with {sup 124}I-HIB. • ADSC survival can be monitored with PET in MI model via direct labeling. • Tracking of ADSC labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB was possible for 3 days in MI model using PET. • ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. • Survival of ADSC in living bodies can be longitudinally tracked with PET imaging. - Abstract: This study aims to monitor how the change of cell survival of transplanted adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) responds to myocardial infarction (MI) via the hexadecyl-4-{sup 124}I-iodobenzoate ({sup 124}I-HIB) mediated direct labeling method in vivo. Stem cells have shown the potential to improve cardiac function after MI. However, monitoring of the fate of transplanted stem cells at target sites is still unclear. Rat ADSCs were labeled with {sup 124}I-HIB, and radiolabeled ADSCs were transplanted into the myocardium of normal and MI model. In the group of {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSC transplantation, in vivo imaging was performed using small-animal positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for 9 days. Twenty-one days post-transplantation, histopathological analysis and apoptosis assay were performed. ADSC viability and differentiation were not affected by {sup 124}I-HIB labeling. In vivo tracking of the {sup 124}I-HIB-labeled ADSCs was possible for 9 and 3 days in normal and MI model, respectively. Apoptosis of transplanted cells increased in the MI model compared than that in normal model. We developed a direct labeling agent, {sup 124}I-HIB, and first tried to longitudinally monitor transplanted stem cell to MI. This approach may provide new insights on the roles of stem cell monitoring in living bodies for stem cell therapy from pre-clinical studies to clinical trials.

  14. Quality analysis of in vivo near-infrared fluorescence and conventional gamma images acquired using a dual-labeled tumor-targeting probe.

    PubMed

    Houston, Jessica P; Ke, Shi; Wang, Wei; Li, Chun; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2005-01-01

    The cyclic peptide, cyclopentapeptide cyclo(lys-Arg-Gly-Asp-phe) (c(KRGDf)), which is known to target alpha(v)beta3 integrin, is dual-labeled with a radiotracer, (111)indium, for gamma scintigraphy as well as with a near-infrared dye, IRDye800, for continuous-wave (cw) imaging of alpha(v)beta3 positive human M21 melanoma in xenografts. Twenty-four hours after administration of the dual-labeled peptide at a dose equivalent to 90 microCi of (111)In and 5 nmol of near-infrared (NIR) dye, whole-body gamma scintigraphy and cw imaging was conducted. Image acquisition time was 15 min for the gamma scintigraphy images and 800 ms for the optical images acquired using an NIR sensitive intensified charge-coupled device. The results show that while the target-to-background ratio (TBR) of nuclear and optical imaging were similar for surface regions of interest and consistent with the origin of gamma and NIR radiation from a common targeted peptide, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was significantly higher for optical than nuclear imaging. Furthermore, an analysis of SNR versus contrast showed greater sensitivity of optical over nuclear imaging for the subcutaneous tumor targets. While tomographic reconstructions are necessary to probe TBR, SNR, and contrast for interior tissues, this work demonstrates for the first time the direct comparison of molecular optical and planar nuclear imaging for surface and subsurface cancers. PMID:16292970

  15. Determination of single gamma photon fraction of 124I PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Ram Yu, A.

    2015-03-01

    124I has a half-life of 4.2 days, which makes it suitable for imaging over several days along uptake and washout phases. However, it has a low positron branching ratio (23%), because high-energy gamma photons (602 to 1,691 keV), which degrade image quality, are emitted in cascade with positrons. In this study, we measured the single gamma photon fraction of 124I on Inveon PET scanner. Methods: to measure the single gamma photon fraction (SGF) of 124I, we measured the sensitivities of 124I and 18F from energy windows. The spill over ratios (SORs) of 124I were measured to assess the effect of single gamma photons fractions. Results: the SGF were 31%, 24%, and 3% in 0350 ~ 75, 0350 ~ 65, and 0350~ 55 keV, respectively. After single gamma corrections the SOR was decreased by 13% point. Conclusion: the proposed method for measuring the single gamma photons fraction of 124I will be useful to correct the single gamma photons from 124I PET. This information would also be useful to quantify the 124I PET.

  16. Simulation of Thermal Responses of 125TeO2 Solid Target to Energetic Proton Bombardment from Cyclotron When Fabricating 124I Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peir, Jinn-Jer; Liang, Jenq-Horng; Duh, Ting-Shieh

    With nuclear medicine receiving greater attention due to its unique characteristics in both diagnostics and therapeutics during recent decades, finding a highly controllable fabrication method becomes more urgent. The radioisotope 124I (T1/2=4.18d Eβ+=2.13MeV Iβ+=25%) has gained plentiful interests in the medical usages such as functioning imaging of cell proliferation in brain tumors using [124I]iododeoxyuridine (IUdR), imaging of immunoreactions in tumors using 124I-labelled monoclonal antibodies, the in-vivo imaging of 124I-labelled tyrosine derivatives, and the classical imaging of thyroid diseases with 124I, among others. Furthermore, it is because that thermal response of target during the fabrication process may affect the production of 124I to some extent and needs thorough investigations. Hence, the compact cyclotron located in the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research was employed in this study to generate 20MeV protons to irradiate TeO2 solid targets in which the radioisotopes 124I were produced through the 125Te(p, 2n)124I nuclear reaction. In addition, the widely-used ANSYS computer code was adopted to theoretically analyze thermal responses of TeO2 to irradiation cases with variations in ion beam current and its thermal conductivity. The results indicate that TeO2 temperature is strongly dependent on its thermal conductivity and ion beam current. In particular, TeO2 surface temperature is extremely sensitive to the air-gap size between TeO2 and target holder. Thus the target holder is suggested to be re-designed in order to prevent TeO2 from melting and a high efficiency production of radioisotopes 124I for nuclear medical diagnostics can be successfully achieved.

  17. Pairwise Comparison of 89Zr- and 124I-labeled cG250 Based on Positron Emission Tomography Imaging and Non-Linear Immunokinetic Modeling: In Vivo Carbonic Anhydrase IX Receptor Binding and Internalization in Mouse Xenografts of Clear Cell Renal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheal, Sarah M.; Punzalan, Blesida; Doran, Michael G.; Evans, Michael J.; Osborne, Joseph R.; Lewis, Jason S.; Zanzonico, Pat; Larson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The positron-emitting tomography (PET) tracer, 124I-cG250, directed against carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) shows promise for pre-surgical diagnosis of clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) [1, 2]. The radiometal zirconium-89 (89Zr), however, may offer advantages as a surrogate PET nuclide over 124I in terms of greater tumor uptake and retention [3]. In the current report, we have developed a non-linear immunokinetic model to facilitate a quantitative comparison of absolute uptake and antibody turnover between 124I-cG250 and 89Zr- cG250 using a human cRCC xenograft tumor model in mice. We believe that his unique model better relates quantitative imaging data to the salient biologic features of tumor antibody-antigen binding and turnover. Methods We conducted experiments with 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250 using a human ccRCC cell line (SK-RC-38) to characterize the binding affinity and internalization kinetics of the two tracers in vitro. Serial-PET imaging was performed in mice bearing sub-cutaneous cRCC tumors to simultaneously detect and quantify time-dependent tumor uptake in vivo. Using the known specific activities of the two tracers, the equilibrium rates of antibody internalization and turnover in the tumor were derived from the PET images using non-linear compartmental modeling. Results The two tracers demonstrate virtually identical tumor-cell binding and internalization but with markedly different retentions in vitro. Superior PET images were obtained using 89Zr-cG250, owing to the more prolonged trapping of the radiolabel in the tumor and simultaneous wash-out from normal tissues. Estimates of cG250-CAIX complex turnover were 1.35–5.51 × 1012 molecules per hour per gram of tumor (20% of receptors internalized per hour), and the ratio of 124I/89Zr atoms released per unit time by tumor was 17.5. Conclusions Pairwise evaluation of 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250 provided the basis for a non-linear immunokinetic model which yielded quantitative information about

  18. Automated production of 124I and 64Cu using IBA Terimo and Pinctada metal electroplating and processing modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poniger, S. S.; Tochon-Danguy, H. J.; Panopoulos, H. P.; O'Keefe, G. J.; Peake, D.; Rasool, R.; Scott, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    There is worldwide growing interest for the production of long-lived positron emitters for molecular imaging and the development of novel immuno-PET techniques for drugs discovery. The desire to produce solid target isotopes in Australia has significantly increased over the years and several research projects for labelling of peptides, proteins and biomolecules, including labelling of recombinant antibodies has been limited due to the availability of suitable isotopes. This has led to the recent installation and commissioning of a new lab dedicated to fully automated solid target isotope production, including 124I, 64Cu, 89Zr and 86Y.

  19. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  20. Determination of impurities in (124)I samples by high resolution gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, M C M; da Silva, R L; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; de Araújo, M T F; Laranjeira, A S; de Veras, E; Braghirolli, A M S; dos Santos, G R; Lopes, R T

    2016-03-01

    (124)I is a radionuclide used in the diagnosis of tumors. The National Health Agency requires identification and activity measurement of impurities. Using gamma spectrometry with an efficiency calibrated high-purity germanium detector, impurities (125)I and (126)I in an (1)(24)I production sample were identified. Activity ratios of (125)I and (126)I to (124)I were approximately 0.5% and 98%, respectively. PMID:26653211

  1. 124I-MIBG: a new promising positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical for the evaluation of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cistaro, Angelina; Quartuccio, Natale; Caobelli, Federico; Piccardo, Arnoldo; Paratore, Rosario; Coppolino, Pietro; Sperandeo, Alessandro; Arnone, Gaspare; Ficola, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in pediatric patients. Despite the established role of 123I-MIBG and 131I-MIBG scintigraphy in this tumor, only limited data are available regarding the use of 124I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). We present our preliminary experience with 124I-MIBG PET/CT: two pediatric patients affected by neuroblastoma, who underwent 124I-MIBG PET/CT for pre-therapy distribution evaluation and restaging purposes. We aimed to evaluate whether 124I-MIBG PET/CT can detect as many or more neuroblastoma lesions than 123I/131I-MIBG imaging. Our cases show promising results, although further validation and standardization of 124I-MIBG PET/CT are required. PMID:26315872

  2. Potential role of 124I-girentuximab in the presurgical diagnosis of clear-cell renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smaldone, Marc C; Chen, David YT; Yu, Jian Q; Plimack, Elizabeth R

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a biologically heterogeneous disease, with many small renal masses (SRMs) exhibiting an indolent natural history, while others progress more rapidly to become life-threatening. Existing multiphase contrast-enhanced imaging methods, such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, cannot definitively distinguish between benign and malignant solid tumors or identify histologic subtype, and early results of molecular imaging studies (positron emission tomography [PET]) in the evaluation of SRMs have not improved on these established modalities. Alternative molecular markers/agents recognizing aberrant cellular pathways of cellular oxidative metabolism, DNA synthesis, and tumor hypoxia tracers are currently under development and investigation for RCC assessment, but to date none are yet clinically applicable or available. In contrast, immuno-PET offers highly selective binding to cancer-specific antigens, and might identify radiographically recognizable and distinct molecular targets. A phase I proof-of-concept study first demonstrated the ability of immuno-PET to discriminate between clear-cell RCC (ccRCC) and non-ccRCC, utilizing a chimeric monoclonal antibody to carbonic anhydrase IX (cG250, girentuximab) labeled with 124I (124I-girentuximab PET); the study examined patients with renal masses who subsequently underwent standard surgical resection. A follow-up phase III multicenter trial confirmed that 124I-cG250-PET can accurately and noninvasively identify ccRCC with high sensitivity (86%), specificity (87%), and positive predictive value (95%). In the challenge to appropriately match treatment of an incidentally identified SRM to its biological potential, this highly accurate and histologically specific molecular imaging modality demonstrates the ability of imaging to provide clinically important preoperative diagnostic information, which can result in optimal and personalized therapy. PMID:23204838

  3. Impact of high 131I-activities on quantitative 124I-PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braad, P. E. N.; Hansen, S. B.; Høilund-Carlsen, P. F.

    2015-07-01

    Peri-therapeutic 124 I-PET/CT is of interest as guidance for radioiodine therapy. Unfortunately, image quality is complicated by dead time effects and increased random coincidence rates from high 131 I-activities. A series of phantom experiments with clinically relevant 124 I/131 I-activities were performed on a clinical PET/CT-system. Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) curves and quantitation accuracy were determined from repeated scans performed over several weeks on a decaying NEMA NU-2 1994 cylinder phantom initially filled with 25 MBq 124 I and 1250 MBq 131 I. Six spherical inserts with diameters 10-37 mm were filled with 124 I (0.45 MBq ml-1 ) and 131 I (22 MBq ml-1 ) and placed inside the background of the NEMA/IEC torso phantom. Contrast recovery, background variability and the accuracy of scatter and attenuation corrections were assessed at sphere-to-background activity ratios of 20, 10 and 5. Results were compared to pure 124 I-acquisitions. The quality of 124 I-PET images in the presence of high 131 I-activities was good and image quantification unaffected except at very high count rates. Quantitation accuracy and contrast recovery were uninfluenced at 131 I-activities below 1000 MBq, whereas image noise was slightly increased. The NECR peaked at 550 MBq of 131 I, where it was 2.8 times lower than without 131 I in the phantom. Quantitative peri-therapeutic 124 I-PET is feasible.

  4. Fibronectin tetrapeptide is target for syphilis spirochete cytadherence

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.D.; Baseman, J.B.; Alderete, J.F.

    1985-11-01

    The syphilis bacterium, Treponema pallidum, parasitizes host cells through recognition of fibronectin (Fn) on cell surfaces. The active site of the Fn molecule has been identified as a four-amino acid sequence, arg-gly-asp-ser (RGDS), located on each monomer of the cell-binding domain. The synthetic heptapeptide gly-arg-gly-asp-ser-pro-cys (GRGDSPC), with the active site sequence RGDS, specifically competed with SVI-labeled cell-binding domain acquisition by T. pallidum. Additionally, the same heptapeptide with the RGDS sequence diminished treponemal attachment to HEp-2 and HT1080 cell monolayers. Related heptapeptides altered in one key amino acid within the RGDS sequence failed to inhibit Fn cell-binding domain acquisition or parasitism of host cells by T. pallidum. The data support the view that T. pallidum cytadherence of host cells is through recognition of the RGDS sequence also important for eukaryotic cell-Fn binding.

  5. 124I-Iodopyridopyrimidinone for PET of Abl Kinase–Expressing Tumors In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Doubrovin, Mikhail; Kochetkova, Tatiana; Santos, Elmer; Veach, Darren R.; Smith-Jones, Peter; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Balatoni, Julius; Bornmann, William; Gelovani, Juri; Larson, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the recent development of an iodopyridopyrimidinone Abl protein kinase inhibitor (PKI), 124I-SKI-212230 (124I-SKI230), we investigated the feasibility of a PET-based molecular imaging method for the direct visualization of Abl kinase expression and PKI treatment. Methods In vitro pharmacokinetic properties, including specific and nonspecific binding of 124I-SKI230 to its Abl kinase target and interaction with other PKIs, were assessed in cell-free medium and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells overexpressing BCR-Abl (K562), in comparison with BT-474 cells that are low in Abl expression. In a xenograft tumor model, we assessed the in vivo pharmacokinetics of 124I-SKI230 using PET and postmortem tissue sampling. We also tested a paradigm of 124I-SKI230 PET after treatment of the animal with a dose of Abl-specific PKI for the monitoring of the tumor response. Results In vitro studies confirmed that SKI230 binds to Abl kinase with nanomolar affinity, that selective uptake occurs in cell lines known to express Abl kinase, that RNAi knock-down supports specificity of cellular uptake due to Abl kinase, and that imatinib, an archetype Abl PKI, completely displaces SKI230. With SKI230, we obtained successful in vivo PET of Abl-expressing human tumors in a nude rat. We were also able to demonstrate evidence of substrate inhibition of in vivo radiotracer uptake in the xenograft tumor after treatment of the animal as a model of PKI treatment monitoring. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that molecular imaging using PET will be useful for the study of in vivo pharmacodynamics of Abl PKI molecular therapy in humans. PMID:20048131

  6. 124I-Epidepride: A PET Radiotracer for Extended Imaging of Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Suresh; Venugopal, Archana; Kant, Ritu; Coleman, Robert; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A new radiotracer, 124I-epidepride, has been developed for the imaging of dopamine D2/3 receptors (D2/3Rs). 124I-epidepride (half-life of 124I = 4.2days) allows imaging over extended periods compared to 18F-fallypride (half-life of 18F = 0.076days) and may maximize visualization of D2/3Rs in the brain and pancreas (allowing clearance from adjacent organs). D2/3Rs are also present in pancreatic islets where they co-localize with insulin to produce granules and may serve as a surrogate marker for imaging diabetes. Methods 124I-Epidepride was synthesized using N-[[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin-2-yl]methyl]-5-tributyltin-2,3-dimethoxybenzamide and 124I-iodide under no carrier added condition. Rats were used for in vitro and in vivo imaging. Brain slices were incubated with 124I-epidepride (0.75μCi/cc) and nonspecific binding measured with 10 μM haloperidol. Autoradiograms were analyzed by OptiQuant. 124I-Epidepride (0.2 to 0.3 mCi, iv) was administered to rats and brain uptake at 3 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours post injection was evaluated. Results 124I-Epidepride was synthesized with 50% radiochemical yield and high radiochemical purity (>95%). 124I-Epidepride localized in the striatum with a striatum to cerebellum ratio of 10. Binding was displaced by dopamine and haloperidol. Brain slices demonstrated localization of 124I-epidepride up until 48 hr in the striatum. However, the extent of binding was reduced significantly. Conclusions 124I-Epidepride is a new radiotracer suitable for extended imaging of dopamine D2/3 receptors and may have applications in imaging of receptors in the brain and monitoring pancreatic islet cell grafting. PMID:24602412

  7. A Recommendation for Revised Dose Calibrator Measurement Procedures for 89Zr and 124I

    PubMed Central

    Beattie, Bradley J.; Pentlow, Keith S.; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Humm, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Because of their chemical properties and multiday half lives, iodine-124 and zirconium-89 are being used in a growing number of PET imaging studies. Some aspects of their quantitation, however, still need attention. For 89Zr the PET images should, in principle, be as quantitatively accurate as similarly reconstructed 18F measurements. We found, however, that images of a 20 cm well calibration phantom containing 89Zr underestimated the activity by approximately 10% relative to a dose calibrator measurement (Capintec CRC-15R) using a published calibration setting number of 465. PET images of 124I, in contrast, are complicated by the contribution of decays in cascade that add spurious coincident events to the PET data. When these cascade coincidences are properly accounted for, quantitatively accurate images should be possible. We found, however, that even with this correction we still encountered what appeared to be a large variability in the accuracy of the PET images when compared to dose calibrator measurements made using the calibration setting number, 570, recommended by Capintec. We derive new calibration setting numbers for 89Zr and 124I based on their 511 keV photon peaks as measured on an HPGe detector. The peaks were calibrated relative to an 18F standard, the activity level of which was precisely measured in a dose calibrator under well-defined measurement conditions. When measuring 89Zr on a Capintec CRC-15R we propose the use of calibration setting number 517. And for 124I, we recommend the use of a copper filter surrounding the sample and the use of calibration setting number 494. The new dose calibrator measurement procedures we propose will result in more consistent and accurate radioactivity measurements of 89Zr and 124I. These and other positron emitting radionuclides can be accurately calibrated relative to 18F based on measurements of their 511 keV peaks and knowledge of their relative positron abundances. PMID:25202987

  8. A fibronectin receptor on Candida albicans mediates adherence of the fungus to extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, S.A.; Smith, R.L. )

    1991-03-01

    Binding of fibronectin, an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein, to Candida albicans was measured, and adherence of the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins, fibronectin, laminin, types I and IV collagen, and subendothelial ECM was studied. 125I-labeled fibronectin was inhibited from binding to the fungus by unlabeled human plasma fibronectin and by Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), Gly-Arg-Gly-Glu-Ser-Pro (GRGESP), and Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr-Pro (GRGDTP), but binding was not inhibited by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. Soluble fibronectin, RGD, GRGESP, and GRGDTP also inhibited fungal adherence to the individual immobilized ECM proteins in a complex pattern, but only soluble fibronectin (10(-7) M) inhibited fungal adherence to subendothelial ECM. Thus, C. albicans possesses at least one type of cell surface receptor for binding soluble fibronectin that can be inhibited with peptides. This receptor apparently is used to bind the fungus to immobilized ECM proteins and to subendothelial ECM and may play a role in the initiation of disseminated disease by bloodborne fungi by providing for adherence of the microorganisms to ECM proteins.

  9. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of ortho-[(124)I]iodohippurate for PET renography in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Pathuri, Gopal; Hedrick, Andria F; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Cowley, Benjamin D; Gali, Hariprasad

    2016-09-01

    Ortho-[(131)I]iodohippurate [(131)I]OIH (marketed as Hippuran I 131), a gold standard for radionuclide renography, and [(123)I]OIH were in clinical use for decades. Here we radiolabeled OIH with (124)I (a positron emitter) to combine the desirable biological properties of OIH and to enable the use of positron emission tomography (PET) for renography. [(124)I]OIH was synthesized with a slight modification to a previously reported method for the kit preparation of [(123)I]OIH based on the Cu(II) catalyzed isotope-exchange reaction. Our method utilized heating at 120°C under sealed condition in a heating block instead of autoclaving. [(124)I]OIH was obtained with a radiochemical purity of >99.3%, radiochemical yield of 94.5%, and specific activity of ~17 MBq/mg. Biodistribution studies in healthy Sprague Dawley rats revealed results comparable to that of [(131)I]OIH as reported in the literature. The PET-derived [(124)I]OIH renograms revealed an average time-to-peak of 2.8±0.4min and the average time-to-half-maximal activity of 11.4±1.5min, which are also comparable to that of [(131)I]OIH as reported in the literature. Results from this study indicate that the synthesis of [(124)I]OIH without using an autoclave and [(124)I]OIH PET renography are feasible. PMID:27434486

  10. Comparison of Imaging Characteristics of 124I PET for Determination of Optimal Energy Window on the Siemens Inveon PET

    PubMed Central

    Yu, A Ram; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Jin Su

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. 124I has a half-life of 4.2 days, which makes it suitable for imaging over several days over its uptake and washout phases. However, it has a low positron branching ratio (23%), because of prompt gamma coincidence due to high-energy γ-photons (602 to 1,691 keV), which are emitted in cascade with positrons. Methods. In this study, we investigated the optimal PET energy window for 124I PET based on image characteristics of reconstructed PET. Image characteristics such as nonuniformities, recovery coefficients (RCs), and the spillover ratios (SORs) of 124I were measured as described in NEMA NU 4-2008 standards. Results. The maximum and minimum prompt gamma coincidence fraction (PGF) were 33% and 2% in 350~800 and 400~590 keV, respectively. The difference between best and worst uniformity in the various energy windows was less than 1%. The lowest SORs of 124I were obtained at 350~750 keV in nonradioactive water compartment. Conclusion. Optimal energy window should be determined based on image characteristics. Our developed correction method would be useful for the correction of high-energy prompt gamma photon in 124I PET. In terms of the image quality of 124I PET, our findings indicate that an energy window of 350~750 keV would be optimal. PMID:27127782

  11. ImmunoPET imaging of B-cell lymphoma using 124I-anti-CD20 scFv dimers (diabodies).

    PubMed

    Olafsen, Tove; Sirk, Shannon J; Betting, David J; Kenanova, Vania E; Bauer, Karl B; Ladno, Waldemar; Raubitschek, Andrew A; Timmerman, John M; Wu, Anna M

    2010-04-01

    Rapid clearing engineered antibody fragments for immunoPET promise high sensitivity at early time points. Here, tumor targeting of anti-CD20 diabodies (scFv dimers) for detection of low-grade B-cell lymphomas were evaluated. In addition, the effect of linker length on oligomerization of the diabody was investigated. Four rituximab scFv variants in the V(L)-V(H) orientation with different linker lengths between the V domains (scFv-1, scFv-3, scFv-5, scFv-8), plus the scFv-5 with a C-terminal cysteine (Cys-Db) for site-specific modification were generated. The scFv-8 and Cys-Db were radioiodinated with (124)I for PET imaging, and biodistribution of (131)I-Cys-Db was carried out at 2, 4 10 and 20 h. The five anti-CD20 scFv variants were expressed as fully functional dimers. Shortening the linker to three or one residue did not produce higher order of multimers. Both (124)I-labeled scFv-8 and Cys-Db exhibited similar tumor targeting at 8 h post injection, with significantly higher uptakes than in control tumors (P < 0.05). At 20 h, less than 1% ID/g of (131)I-labeled Cys-Db was present in tumors and tissues. Specific tumor targeting and high contrast images were achieved with the anti-CD20 diabodies. These agents extend the repertoire of reagents that can potentially be used to improve detection of low-grade lymphomas. PMID:20053640

  12. ImmunoPET imaging of B-cell lymphoma using 124I-anti-CD20 scFv dimers (diabodies)

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Sirk, Shannon J.; Betting, David J.; Kenanova, Vania E.; Bauer, Karl B.; Ladno, Waldemar; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Timmerman, John M.; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid clearing engineered antibody fragments for immunoPET promise high sensitivity at early time points. Here, tumor targeting of anti-CD20 diabodies (scFv dimers) for detection of low-grade B-cell lymphomas were evaluated. In addition, the effect of linker length on oligomerization of the diabody was investigated. Four rituximab scFv variants in the VL–VH orientation with different linker lengths between the V domains (scFv-1, scFv-3, scFv-5, scFv-8), plus the scFv-5 with a C-terminal cysteine (Cys-Db) for site-specific modification were generated. The scFv-8 and Cys-Db were radioiodinated with 124I for PET imaging, and biodistribution of 131I-Cys-Db was carried out at 2, 4 10 and 20 h. The five anti-CD20 scFv variants were expressed as fully functional dimers. Shortening the linker to three or one residue did not produce higher order of multimers. Both 124I-labeled scFv-8 and Cys-Db exhibited similar tumor targeting at 8 h post injection, with significantly higher uptakes than in control tumors (P < 0.05). At 20 h, less than 1% ID/g of 131I-labeled Cys-Db was present in tumors and tissues. Specific tumor targeting and high contrast images were achieved with the anti-CD20 diabodies. These agents extend the repertoire of reagents that can potentially be used to improve detection of low-grade lymphomas. PMID:20053640

  13. An overview of (124)I production at a medical cyclotron by ALICE/ASH, EMPIRE-3.2.2 and TALYS-1.6 codes.

    PubMed

    Azizakram, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Ashtari, Parviz; Zolfagharpour, Farhad

    2016-06-01

    Excitation functions of proton, deuteron and alpha induced nuclear reactions on enriched tellurium and antimony isotopes and also natural antimony were calculated by ALICE/ASH, EMPIRE-3.2.2 and TALYS-1.6 nuclear codes. Therefrom, the production yield of (124)I nuclide and its formed impurities were calculated by using the evaluation results. The calculated cross sections were compared with available experimental values in literatures. According to results, (124)Te(p,n)(124)I reaction is the method of choice due to formation of higher amount of (124)I nuclide and low levels of (125)I as an major concern in (124)I production. PMID:27060194

  14. A RecB-family nuclease motif in the Type I restriction endonuclease EcoR124I

    PubMed Central

    Šišáková, Eva; Stanley, Louise K.; Weiserová, Marie; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The Type I restriction-modification enzyme EcoR124I is an ATP-dependent endonuclease that uses dsDNA translocation to locate and cleave distant non-specific DNA sites. Bioinformatic analysis of the HsdR subunits of EcoR124I and related Type I enzymes showed that in addition to the principal PD-(E/D)xK Motifs, I, II and III, a QxxxY motif is also present that is characteristic of RecB-family nucleases. The QxxxY motif resides immediately C-terminal to Motif III within a region of predicted α-helix. Using mutagenesis, we examined the role of the Q and Y residues in DNA binding, translocation and cleavage. Roles for the QxxxY motif in coordinating the catalytic residues or in stabilizing the nuclease domain on the DNA are discussed. PMID:18511464

  15. Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on Gold Nanoparticles Labeled with (177)Lu and Conjugated to Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Ocampo-García, Blanca E; Santos-Cuevas, Clara L; de María Ramírez, Flor; Azorín-Vega, Erika P; Meléndez-Alafort, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been proposed for a variety of medical applications such as localized heat sources for cancer treatment and drug delivery systems. The conjugation of peptides to AuNPs produces stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Lutetium- 177 ((177)Lu) has been successfully used in peptide radionuclide therapy. Recently, (177)Lu-AuNPs conjugated to different peptides have been proposed as a new class of theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. These radioconjugates may function simultaneously as molecular imaging agents, radiotherapy systems and thermal-ablation systems. This article covers advancements in the design, synthesis, physicochemical characterization, molecular recognition assessment and preclinical therapeutic efficacy of gold nanoparticles radiolabeled with (177)Lu and conjugated to RGD (-Arg-Gly-Asp-), Lys(3)-Bombesin and Tat(49-57) peptides. PMID:25771363

  16. Compared to Purpurinimides, the Pyropheophorbide Containing an Iodobenzyl Group showed Enhanced PDT Efficacy and Tumor Imaging (124I-PET) Ability

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Suresh K.; Sajjad, Munawwar; Chen, Yihui; Pandey, Anupam; Missert, Joseph R.; Batt, Carrie; Yao, Rutao; Nabi, Hani A.; Oseroff, Allan R.; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2009-01-01

    Two positional isomers of purpurinimide; 3-[1’-(3-iodobenzyloxyethyl)] purpurin-18-N-hexylimide methyl ester 4 in which the iodobenzyl group is present at the top half of the molecule (position-3) and a 3-(1’-hexyloxyethy)purpurin-18-N-(3-iodo-benzylimide)] methyl ester 5, where the iodobenzyl group is introduced at the bottom half (N-substitued cyclicimide) of the molecule were derived from chlorophyll-a. The tumor uptake and phototherapeutic abilities of these isomers were compared with the pyropheophorbide analog 1 (lead compound). These compounds were then converted into the corresponding 124I- labeled PET imaging agents with specific activity >1Ci/μmole. Among the positional isomers 4 and 5, purpurinimide 5 showed enhanced imaging and therapeutic potential. However, the lead compound 1 derived from pyropheophorbide-a exhibited the best PET imaging and PDT efficacy. For investigating the overall lipophilicity of the molecule, the 3-O-hexyl ether group presnt at position-3 of purpurinimide 5 was replaced with a methyl ether substituent and the resulting product 10 showed improved tumor uptake, but due to its significantly higher uptake in liver, spleen and other organs, a poor tumor contrast in whole-body tumor imaging was observed. PMID:19191565

  17. Patient-Specific Dosimetry Using Pretherapy [124I]m-iodobenzylguanidine ([124I]mIBG) Dynamic PET/CT Imaging Before [131I]mIBG Targeted Radionuclide Therapy for Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-ying; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik; Van Brocklin, Henry F.; Pampaloni, Miguel H.; Hawkins, Randall A.; Sznewajs, Aimee; DuBois, Steven G.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Seo, Youngho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Iodine-131-m-iodobenzylguanidine ([131I]mIBG) targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) is a standard treatment for recurrent or refractory neuroblastoma with response rates of 30–40%. The aim of this study is to demonstrate patient-specific dosimetry using quantitative [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging with a Geant4-based Monte Carlo method for better treatment planning. Procedures A Monte Carlo dosimetry method was developed using the Geant4 toolkit with voxelized anatomical geometry and source distribution as input. The pre-segmented hybrid computational human phantoms developed by the University of Florida and the National Cancer Institute (UF/NCI) were used as a surrogate to characterize the anatomy of a given patient. S-values for I-131 were estimated by the phantoms coupled with Geant4 and compared with those estimated by OLINDA|EXM and MCNPX for the newborn model. To obtain patient-specific biodistribution of [131I]mIBG, a 10-year-old girl with relapsed neuroblastoma was imaged with [124I]mIBG PET/CT at four time points prior to the planned [131I]mIBG TRT. The organ and tumor absorbed dose of the clinical case were estimated with the Geant4 method using the modified UF/NCI 10-year-old phantom with tumors and the patient-specific residence time. Results For the newborn model, the Geant4 S-values were consistent with the MCNPX S- values. The S-value ratio of the Geant4 method to OLINDA|EXM ranged from 0.08 to 6.5 of all major organs. The [131I]mIBG residence time quantified from the pretherapy [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging of the 10-year-old patient was mostly comparable to those previously reported. Organ absorbed dose for the salivary glands were 98.0 Gy, heart wall, 36.5 Gy, and liver, 34.3 Gy; while tumor absorbed dose ranged from 143.9 Gy to 1641.3 Gy in different sites. Conclusions Patient-specific dosimetry for [131I]mIBG targeted radionuclide therapy was accomplished using pretherapy [124I]mIBG PET/CT imaging and a Geant4-based Monte Carlo dosimetry method

  18. The Interrelationship of Helicase and Nuclease Domains during DNA Translocation by the Molecular Motor EcoR124I

    PubMed Central

    Šišáková, Eva; Weiserová, Marie; Dekker, Cees; Seidel, Ralf; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The type I restriction–modification enzyme EcoR124I comprises three subunits with the stoichiometry HsdR2/HsdM2/HsdS1. The HsdR subunits are archetypical examples of the fusion between nuclease and helicase domains into a single polypeptide, a linkage that is found in a great many other DNA processing enzymes. To explore the interrelationship between these physically linked domains, we examined the DNA translocation properties of EcoR124I complexes in which the HsdR subunits had been mutated in the RecB-like nuclease motif II or III. We found that nuclease mutations can have multiple effects on DNA translocation despite being distinct from the helicase domain. In addition to reductions in DNA cleavage activity, we also observed decreased translocation and ATPase rates, different enzyme populations with different characteristic translocation rates, a tendency to stall during initiation and altered HsdR turnover dynamics. The significance of these observations to our understanding of domain interactions in molecular machines is discussed. PMID:18952104

  19. Measuring motion on DNA by the type I restriction endonuclease EcoR124I using triplex displacement

    PubMed Central

    Firman, Keith; Szczelkun, Mark D.

    2000-01-01

    The type I restriction enzyme EcoR124I cleaves DNA following extensive linear translocation dependent upon ATP hydrolysis. Using protein-directed displacement of a DNA triplex, we have determined the kinetics of one-dimensional motion without the necessity of measuring DNA or ATP hydrolysis. The triplex was pre-formed specifically on linear DNA, 4370 bp from an EcoR124I site, and then incubated with endonuclease. Upon ATP addition, a distinct lag phase was observed before the triplex-forming oligonucleotide was displaced with exponential kinetics. As the distance between type I and triplex sites was shortened, the lag time decreased whilst the displacement reaction remained exponential. This is indicative of processive DNA translocation followed by collision with the triplex and oligonucleotide displacement. A linear relationship between lag duration and inter-site distance gives a translocation velocity of 400 ± 32 bp/s at 20°C. Furthermore, the data can only be explained by bi-directional translocation. An endonuclease with only one of the two HsdR subunits responsible for motion could still catalyse translocation. The reaction is less processive, but can ‘reset’ in either direction whenever the DNA is released. PMID:10790375

  20. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  1. Dynamics of initiation, termination and reinitiation of DNA translocation by the motor protein EcoR124I

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Ralf; Bloom, Joost G P; van Noort, John; Dutta, Christina F; Dekker, Nynke H; Firman, Keith; Szczelkun, Mark D; Dekker, Cees

    2005-01-01

    Type I restriction enzymes use two motors to translocate DNA before carrying out DNA cleavage. The motor function is accomplished by amino-acid motifs typical for superfamily 2 helicases, although DNA unwinding is not observed. Using a combination of extensive single-molecule magnetic tweezers and stopped-flow bulk measurements, we fully characterized the (re)initiation of DNA translocation by EcoR124I. We found that the methyltransferase core unit of the enzyme loads the motor subunits onto adjacent DNA by allowing them to bind and initiate translocation. Termination of translocation occurs owing to dissociation of the motors from the core unit. Reinitiation of translocation requires binding of new motors from solution. The identification and quantification of further initiation steps—ATP binding and extrusion of an initial DNA loop—allowed us to deduce a complete kinetic reinitiation scheme. The dissociation/reassociation of motors during translocation allows dynamic control of the restriction process by the availability of motors. Direct evidence that this control mechanism is relevant in vivo is provided. PMID:16292342

  2. Monte Carlo Calculation of Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-, 177Lu-, 131I-, 124I-, and 188Re-Nanoobjects: Choice of the Best Radionuclide for Solid Tumour Treatment by Using TCP and NTCP Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, S.; Feron, O.; Gallez, B.; Masereel, B.; Michiels, C.; Vander Borght, T.

    2015-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy has shown that the use of monoclonal antibodies combined with a radioisotope like 131I or 90Y still remains ineffective for solid and radioresistant tumour treatment. Previous simulations have revealed that an increase in the number of 90Y labelled to each antibody or nanoobject could be a solution to improve treatment output. It now seems important to assess the treatment output and toxicity when radionuclides such as 90Y, 177Lu, 131I, 124I, and 188Re are used. Tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) curves versus the number of radionuclides per nanoobject were computed with MCNPX to evaluate treatment efficacy for solid tumours and to predict the incidence of surrounding side effects. Analyses were carried out for two solid tumour sizes of 0.5 and 1.0 cm radius and for nanoobject (i.e., a radiolabelled antibody) distributed uniformly or nonuniformly throughout a solid tumour (e.g., Non-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC)). 90Y and 188Re are the best candidates for solid tumour treatment when only one radionuclide is coupled to one carrier. Furthermore, regardless of the radionuclide properties, high values of TCP can be reached without toxicity if the number of radionuclides per nanoobject increases. PMID:26136812

  3. Interaction of the type I methyltransferase M.EcoR124I with modified DNA substrates: sequence discrimination and base flipping.

    PubMed Central

    Mernagh, D R; Taylor, I A; Kneale, G G

    1998-01-01

    We have analysed the DNA-protein contacts made between the type I DNA methyltransferase M.EcoR124I and its recognition sequence. The effects of base modifications have been probed by measuring the affinity of M.EcoR124I for the modified sequences relative to that for the wild-type sequence by using gel-retardation competition assays. These results, along with those from methylation interference footprinting and photo-affinity cross-linking have identified the location of potential DNA contacts within the DNA recognition site. Substitution of 6-thioguanosine for each of the three specific guanines in the recognition sequence leads to a large (10-20-fold) decrease in the strength of DNA binding, indicating the importance of hydrogen-bonding interactions in the major groove of DNA. In contrast, replacement of either (or both) of the adenines at the target site for methylation by the enzyme, to produce either a base pair mismatch or loss of the base, leads to a marked increase in DNA-binding affinity. The results strongly support the proposal that type I methyltransferases employ a base-flipping mechanism to methylate their target base. PMID:9841886

  4. Method of treating tumors

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally J.; Burke, Patricia A.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Goodman, Simon; Matzku, legal representative, Kerstin; Matzku, Siegfried

    2006-04-18

    A method of treating tumors, such as prostate tumors, breast tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the like, includes the sequential steps of administering to the patient at least one dose of an antiangiogenic cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing pentapeptide (cRGD pentapeptide); administering to the patient an anti-tumor effective amount of a radioimmunotherapeutic agent (RIT); and then administering to the patient at least one additional dose of cRGD pentapeptide. The cRGD pentapeptide is preferably cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-[N-Me]-Val), and the RIT is preferably a radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complex in which chelating agent is chemically bonded to a tumor-targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody.

  5. Pre-therapeutic 124I PET(/CT) dosimetry confirms low average absorbed doses per administered 131I activity to the salivary glands in radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robert F.; Stahl, Alexander; Knust, Jochen; Sgouros, George; Bockisch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Salivary gland impairment following high activity radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a severe side effect. Dosimetric calculations using planar gamma camera scintigraphy (GCS) with 131I and ultrasonography (US) provided evidence that the average organ dose per administered 131I activity (ODpA) is too low to account for observed radiation damages to the salivary glands. The objective of this work was to re-estimate the ODpA using 124I PET(/CT) as a more reliable approach than 131I GCS/US. Methods Ten DTC patients underwent a series of six (or seven) PET scans and one PET/CT scan after administration of ~23 MBq 124I-iodide. Volumes of interest (VOIs) drawn on the CT and serial PET images were used to determine the glandular volumes and the imaged 124I activities. To enable identical VOIs to be drawn on serial PET images, each PET was co-registered with the CT image. To correct for partial volume effect and for the artificial bias in the activity concentration due to cascading gamma coincidences occurring in 124I decay, the imaged activity was effectively corrected using isovolume recovery coefficients (RCs) based on recovery phantom measurements. A head-neck phantom, which contained 124I-filled spheres, was manufactured to validate the isovolume recovery correction method with a realistic patient-based phantom geometry and for a range of activity concentration regimes. The mean±standard deviation (range) ODpA projected for 131I was calculated using the absorbed dose fraction method. Results The ODpAs (in Gy/GBq) for the submandibular and parotid glands were 0.32±0.13 (0.18–0.55) and 0.31±0.10 (0.13–0.46), respectively. No significant differences (p>0.2) in the mean ODpA between 124I PET(/CT) and 131I GCS/US dosimetry was found. The validation experiment showed that the percentage deviations between RC-corrected and true activity concentrations were <10%. Conclusion 124I PET(/CT) dosimetry also corroborates the low ODpAs to

  6. Imaging Hypoxia in Orthotopic Rat Liver Tumors with Iodine 124–labeled Iodoazomycin Galactopyranoside PET1

    PubMed Central

    Riedl, Christopher C.; Brader, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Chun, Yun Shin; Woo, Yanghee; Singh, Paramjeet; Carlin, Sean; Wen, Bixiu; Ling, C. Clifton; Hricak, Hedvig; Fong, Yuman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate iodine 124 (124I)-labeled iodoazomycin galactopyranoside (IAZGP) positron emission tomography (PET) in the detection of hypoxia in an orthotopic rat liver tumor model by comparing regions of high 124I-IAZGP uptake with independent measures of hypoxia and to determine the optimal time after injection to depict hypoxia. Materials and Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. Morris hepatoma tumors were established in the livers of 15 rats. Tumor oxygenation was measured in two rats with a fluorescence fiberoptic oxygen probe. 124I-IAZGP was coadministered with the established hypoxia markers pimonidazole and EF5 in nine rats; 12-hour PET data acquisition was performed 24 hours later. Tumor cryosections were analyzed with immunofluorescence and autoradiography. In the four remaining rats, serial 20- and 60-minute PET data acquisition was peformed up to 48 hours after tracer administration. Results: Oxygen probe measurements showed severe hypoxia (<1 mm Hg) distributed evenly throughout tumor tissue. Analysis of cryosections showed diffuse homogeneous uptake of 124I-IAZGP throughout all tumors. The 124I-IAZGP distribution correlated positively with pimonidazole (r = 0.78) and EF5 (r = 0.76) distribution. Tracer uptake in tumors was detectable with PET after 24 hours in seven of nine rats. In rats that underwent serial PET, tumor-to-liver contrast was sufficient to enable detection of hypoxia between 6 and 48 hours after tracer administration. The optimal ratio between signal intensity and tumor-to-liver contrast occurred 6 hours after tracer administration. Conclusion: Regions of high 124I-IAZGP uptake in orthotopic rat liver tumors are consistent with independent measures of hypoxia; visualization of hypoxia with 124I-IAZGP PET is optimal 6 hours after injection. © RSNA, 2008 PMID:18641253

  7. On-resin synthesis of an acylated and fluorescence-labeled cyclic integrin ligand for modification of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Hoffmeister, Peter-Georg; Pagel, Mareen; Hacker, Michael; Schulz-Siegmund, Michaela; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-11-01

    Cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides show remarkable affinity and specificity to integrin receptors and mediate important physiological effects in tumor angiogenesis. Additionally, they are one of the keyplayers in improving the biocompatibility of biomaterials. The fully biodegradable polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is frequently used for biomedical implants and can be applied as nanoparticles for drug delivery. The aim of this work was the generation of a lipidated c[RGDfK] peptide including a second functionality for coating of hydrophobic PLGA. Therefore, we established a general and straightforward strategy for the introduction of two different modifications into the same c[RGDfK] peptide. This allowed the generation of a palmitoylated integrin-binding lipopeptide that shows high affinity to PLGA. Additionally, we coupled 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein to the second site for modification to enable sensitive quantification of the immobilized lipopeptide on PLGA. In conclusion, we present a synthesis protocol that enables the preparation of c[RGDfK] lipopeptides with a strong affinity to PLGA and an additional site for modifications. This will provide the opportunity to introduce a variety of effector molecules site-specifically to the c[RGDfK] lipopeptide, which will enable the introduction of multifunctionality into c[RGDfK]-coated PLGA devices or nanoparticles. PMID:23161641

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of GeoPET experiments: 3D images of tracer distributions (18F, 124I and 58Co) in Opalinus clay, anhydrite and quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Sauerzapf, Sophie; Pietrzyk, Uwe; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2013-08-01

    Understanding conservative fluid flow and reactive tracer transport in soils and rock formations requires quantitative transport visualization methods in 3D+t. After a decade of research and development we established the GeoPET as a non-destructive method with unrivalled sensitivity and selectivity, with due spatial and temporal resolution by applying Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a nuclear medicine imaging method, to dense rock material. Requirements for reaching the physical limit of image resolution of nearly 1 mm are (a) a high-resolution PET-camera, like our ClearPET scanner (Raytest), and (b) appropriate correction methods for scatter and attenuation of 511 keV—photons in the dense geological material. The latter are by far more significant in dense geological material than in human and small animal body tissue (water). Here we present data from Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) reflecting selected GeoPET experiments. The MCS consider all involved nuclear physical processes of the measurement with the ClearPET-system and allow us to quantify the sensitivity of the method and the scatter fractions in geological media as function of material (quartz, Opalinus clay and anhydrite compared to water), PET isotope (18F, 58Co and 124I), and geometric system parameters. The synthetic data sets obtained by MCS are the basis for detailed performance assessment studies allowing for image quality improvements. A scatter correction method is applied exemplarily by subtracting projections of simulated scattered coincidences from experimental data sets prior to image reconstruction with an iterative reconstruction process.

  9. Iodine-125-labeled cRGD-gold nanoparticles as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer and imaging agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ning; Dang, Yajie; Liang, Guangli; Liu, Guizhi

    2015-04-01

    Research interests on radiosensitive property of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are rapidly raised because of the extensively proved in vitro effectiveness and clinical necessity. However, the issue of targeted accumulation of GNPs in tumor tissues hindered the transference to in vivo applications. In this study, hybrid nano-sized cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated GNPs (cRGD-GNPs) integrated with radioactive iodine-125 was fabricated as tumor-targeted radiosensitizer. Therapeutic effects, including acute apoptosis (2 days post treatment) and long-term influence (up to 21 days), were investigated on NCI-H446 tumor-bearing mice via Tc-99 m-Annexin V SPECT and volume measurements, respectively. Apoptosis and volume loss were consistent in showing that tumor growth was effectively suppressed via the treatment of 125I-cRGD-GNP sensitized radiotherapy (RT), a more significantly radiosensitive effect than the treatment of non-targeted GNPs with RT, RT treatment alone, and no treatment. SPECT/CT images showed that the uptake of cRGD-GNPs by tumor tissues reached the peak target/non-target value of 4.76 at around 2 h post injection, and dynamic radioactivity monitoring showed that 125I-cRGD-GNPs maintained about 2.5% of injected dosage at 55 h post injection. For long-term influence, a significant radiosensitized RT-induced volume loss was observed. Hence, cyclic RGD conjugation makes the GNP-based radiosensitizer tumor targeting, offering a new modality for enhancing radiotherapeutic efficacy. Additionally, the introduction of I-125 serves as both a therapeutic factor and a radiotracer for in vivo tracking of GNPs.

  10. Cu(2+)-RGDFRGDS: exploring the mechanism and high efficacy of the nanoparticle in antithrombotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianhui; Wang, Yuji; Wang, Yaonan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Gui, Lin; Zhao, Shurui; Zhu, Haimei; Zhao, Jinghua; Peng, Shiqi

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis disease has been the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the discovery of antithrombotic agents, three complexes of Cu(2+) and repetitive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequences, Cu(II)-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (Cu[II]-4a), Cu(II)-Arg-Gly-Asp-Val-Arg-Gly-Asp-Val (Cu[II]-4b), and Cu(II)-Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe-Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe (Cu[II]-4c), were previously reported, of which Cu(II)-4a and Cu(II)-4c possessed the highest in vitro and in vivo activity, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images visualized that Cu(II)-4a and Cu(II)-4c formed nanoaggregates and nanoparticles, respectively. However, the details of the formation of the nanospecies complexes and of the mechanism for inhibiting thrombosis remain to be clarified. For this purpose, this study designed a novel complex of Cu(II) and the RGD octapeptide, Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDFRGDS), consisting of Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe of Cu(II)-4c and Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser of Cu(II)-4a, to colligate their biological and nanostructural benefits. In contrast with Cu(II)-4a, -4b, and -4c, Cu(II)-RGDFRGDS (Cu(2+)-FS) had high antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities, with the formed nanoparticles having a porous surface. Additionally, this paper evidenced the dimer had the basic structural unit of Cu(2+)-FS in water, theoretically simulated the formation of Cu(2+)-FS nanoparticles, and identified that Cu(2+)-FS activity in decreasing glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and IL-8 was responsible for the antithrombotic action. Finally, adherence onto the surface and entry into the cytoplasm were considered the steps of a two-step model for the blocking of platelet activation by Cu(2+)-FS nanoparticles. Findings indicated that the antiplatelet aggregation activity of Cu(2+)-FS was 10-52 times higher than that of RGDFRGDS, while the effective dose for antithrombotic action was 5,000 times lower than that of RGDFRGDS. PMID:25931819

  11. Cu2+-RGDFRGDS: exploring the mechanism and high efficacy of the nanoparticle in antithrombotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianhui; Wang, Yuji; Wang, Yaonan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Gui, Lin; Zhao, Shurui; Zhu, Haimei; Zhao, Jinghua; Peng, Shiqi

    2015-01-01

    Thrombosis disease has been the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the discovery of antithrombotic agents, three complexes of Cu2+ and repetitive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequences, Cu(II)-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (Cu[II]-4a), Cu(II)-Arg-Gly-Asp-Val-Arg-Gly-Asp-Val (Cu[II]-4b), and Cu(II)-Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe-Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe (Cu[II]-4c), were previously reported, of which Cu(II)-4a and Cu(II)-4c possessed the highest in vitro and in vivo activity, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images visualized that Cu(II)-4a and Cu(II)-4c formed nanoaggregates and nanoparticles, respectively. However, the details of the formation of the nanospecies complexes and of the mechanism for inhibiting thrombosis remain to be clarified. For this purpose, this study designed a novel complex of Cu(II) and the RGD octapeptide, Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDFRGDS), consisting of Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe of Cu(II)-4c and Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser of Cu(II)-4a, to colligate their biological and nanostructural benefits. In contrast with Cu(II)-4a, -4b, and -4c, Cu(II)-RGDFRGDS (Cu2+-FS) had high antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities, with the formed nanoparticles having a porous surface. Additionally, this paper evidenced the dimer had the basic structural unit of Cu2+-FS in water, theoretically simulated the formation of Cu2+-FS nanoparticles, and identified that Cu2+-FS activity in decreasing glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and IL-8 was responsible for the antithrombotic action. Finally, adherence onto the surface and entry into the cytoplasm were considered the steps of a two-step model for the blocking of platelet activation by Cu2+-FS nanoparticles. Findings indicated that the antiplatelet aggregation activity of Cu2+-FS was 10–52 times higher than that of RGDFRGDS, while the effective dose for antithrombotic action was 5,000 times lower than that of RGDFRGDS. PMID:25931819

  12. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-03: Dosimetric Comparison of the Hypoxia Agent Iodoazomycin Arabinoside (IAZA) Labeled with the Radioisotopes I-123, I-131 and I-124

    SciTech Connect

    Jans, H-S; Stypinski, D; Mcquarrie, S; Kumar, P; Mercer, J; McEwan, S; Wiebe, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose to normal organs from the radio-iodinated, hypoxia-binding radiosensitizer iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) for three different isotopes of iodine. Methods: Dosimety studies with normal volunteers had been carried out with [{sup 123}I]IAZA, a drug binding selectively to hypoxic sites. Two other isotopes of iodine, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, offer the opportunity to use IAZA as an agent for radioisotope therapy and as an imaging tracer for Positron Emission Tomography. Radioisotope dosimetry for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I was performed by first deriving from the [{sup 123}I]IAZA studies biological uptake and excretion data. The cumulated activities for {sup 131}I or {sup 124}I where obtained by including their half-lives when integrating the biological data and then extrapolating to infinite time points considering a) physical decay only or b) physical and biological excretion. Doses were calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema (OLINDA1.1 code, Vanderbilt 2007). Results: Compared to {sup 123}I, organ doses were elevated on average by a factor 6 and 9 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if both physical decay and biological excretion were modeled. If only physical decay is considered, doses increase by a factor 18 ({sup 131}I) and 19 ({sup 124}I). Highest organ doses were observed in intestinal walls, urinary bladder and thyroid. Effective doses increased by a factor 11 and 14 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if biological and physical decay are present. Purely physical decay yields a 23-fold increase over {sup 123}I for both, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I. Conclusion: Owing to the significant dose increase, caused by their longer half life and the approximately 10 times larger electronic dose deposited in tissue per nuclear decay, normal tissue doses of IAZA labeled with {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I need to be carefully considered when designing imaging and therapy protocols for clinical

  13. The enhancement of chondrogenesis of ATDC5 cells in RGD-immobilized microcavitary alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongchang; Zeng, Lei; Huang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    In our previous work, we have developed an effective microcavitary alginate hydrogel for proliferation of chondrocytes and maintenance of chondrocytic phenotype. In present work, we investigated whether microcavitary alginate hydrogel could promote the chondrogenesis of progenitor cells. Moreover, we attempted to further optimize this system by incorporating synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp peptide. ATDC5 cells were seeded into microcavitary alginate hydrogel with or without Arg-Gly-Asp immobilization. Cell Counting Kit-8 and live/dead staining were conducted to analyze cell proliferation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), hematoxylin and eosin, and Toluidine blue O staining as well as Western blot assay was performed to evaluate the cartilaginous markers at transcriptional level and at protein level, respectively. The obtained data demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp-immobilized microcavitary alginate hydrogel was preferable to promote the cell proliferation. Also, Arg-Gly-Asp-immobilized microcavitary alginate hydrogel improved the expression of chondrocytic genes including Collagen II and Aggrecan when compared with microcavitary alginate hydrogel. The results suggested that microcavitary alginate hydrogel could promote the chondrogenesis. And Arg-Gly-Asp would be promising to ameliorate this culture system for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:27000189

  14. Angiogenesis Imaging Using (68)Ga-RGD PET/CT: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Eo, Jae Seon; Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-09-01

    Angiogenesis imaging is important for diagnostic and therapeutic treatment of various malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence has been known to bind with the αvβ3 integrin that is expressed on the surface of angiogenic blood vessels or tumor cells. Thus, various radiolabeled derivatives of RGD peptides have been developed for angiogenesis imaging. Among the various radionuclides, (68)Ga was the most widely studied for RGD peptide imaging because of its excellent nuclear physical properties, easy-to-label chemical properties, and cost-effectiveness owing to the availability of a (68)Ge-(68)Ga generator. Thus, various (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives have been developed and applied for preclinical and clinical studies. Clinical trials were performed for both malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Breast cancer, glioma, and lung cancer were malignant, and myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis, and moyamoya disease were nonmalignant among the investigated diseases. Further, these (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives could be applied to assess the effects of antiangiogenic treatment or theragnosis or both, of cancers. In conclusion, the angiogenesis imaging technology using (68)Ga-labeled RGD derivatives might be useful for the development of new therapeutic assessments, and for diagnostic and theragnostic applications. PMID:27553467

  15. A beta 1-integrin receptor for fibronectin in human kidney glomeruli.

    PubMed Central

    Kerjaschki, D.; Ojha, P. P.; Susani, M.; Horvat, R.; Binder, S.; Hovorka, A.; Hillemanns, P.; Pytela, R.

    1989-01-01

    The fibronectin receptor (FNR) is a transmembrane heterodimeric glycoprotein which shares a common beta 1-chain with several other members of the integrin family of adhesion receptors. The authors have prepared a membrane fraction of isolated human glomeruli, from which two proteins (apparent molecular weights 120 kd and 140 kd) bound to a fibronectin-column, and were selectively released by the synthetic peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser. These molecules were labeled in immune overlays by an antibody raised against the FNR from human placenta that recognizes both the FNR-specific a-chain and the group-specific beta 1-integrin chain. In sections of normal human kidneys this antibody labeled predominately the mesangia and the peripheral capillary walls of glomeruli by an immunoperoxidase procedure. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy, using an indirect immunogold procedure, revealed a preferential localization along the cell membranes of mesangial, epithelial, and endothelial cells that face the mesangial matrix or the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). In kidney biopsies from patients with various glomerular diseases (membranous and other forms of glomerulonephritis, minimal change disease) the distribution was similar to that in normal glomeruli. These findings indicate that a beta 1-integrin-related FNR is present in normal and diseased human glomeruli. Images Figure 1-4 Figure 5 Figure 6-10 Figure 11-16 PMID:2521774

  16. Aqueous synthesized near-infrared-emitting quantum dots for RGD-based in vivo active tumour targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yimei; Zhong, Yiling; Wang, Jie; Su, Yuanyuan; Peng, Fei; Zhou, Yanfeng; Jiang, Xiangxu; He, Yao

    2013-04-01

    Over the past two decades, fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) have been highly attractive for a myriad of bioapplications due to their unique optical properties. For bioimaging applications, QD-based in vivo specific tumour targeting is vitally important in the biological and biomedical fields. Aqueous synthesized QDs (aqQDs) exhibit excellent aqueous dispersibility without requiring any post-treatment and have small hydrodynamic diameters (generally <5 nm), which are highly useful for bioimaging applications. We herein present the first example of in vivo active tumour targeting using water-dispersed near-infrared-emitting aqQDs modified with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides. In vitro and in vivo studies (e.g., tumour cell labelling, histological analysis, and active tumour targeting) demonstrate that the prepared RGD-decorated aqQDs exhibit highly bio-specific properties, enabling sensitive and specific targeting of tumour sites in both cells and living animals. Our results suggest that the new class of RGD-decorated aqQDs are highly promising as fluorescent bioprobes for a wide range of biological applications.

  17. Aqueous synthesized near-infrared-emitting quantum dots for RGD-based in vivo active tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yimei; Zhong, Yiling; Wang, Jie; Su, Yuanyuan; Peng, Fei; Zhou, Yanfeng; Jiang, Xiangxu; He, Yao

    2013-04-01

    Over the past two decades, fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) have been highly attractive for a myriad of bioapplications due to their unique optical properties. For bioimaging applications, QD-based in vivo specific tumour targeting is vitally important in the biological and biomedical fields. Aqueous synthesized QDs (aqQDs) exhibit excellent aqueous dispersibility without requiring any post-treatment and have small hydrodynamic diameters (generally <5 nm), which are highly useful for bioimaging applications. We herein present the first example of in vivo active tumour targeting using water-dispersed near-infrared-emitting aqQDs modified with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides. In vitro and in vivo studies (e.g., tumour cell labelling, histological analysis, and active tumour targeting) demonstrate that the prepared RGD-decorated aqQDs exhibit highly bio-specific properties, enabling sensitive and specific targeting of tumour sites in both cells and living animals. Our results suggest that the new class of RGD-decorated aqQDs are highly promising as fluorescent bioprobes for a wide range of biological applications. PMID:23478489

  18. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  19. Genetics and biochemistry of collagen binding-triggered glandular differentiation in a human colon carcinoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatelli, M.; Bodmer, W.F. )

    1988-08-01

    The authors have examined the interaction between collagen binding and epithelial differentiation by using a human colon carcinoma cell line (SW1222) that can differentiate structurally when grown in a three-dimensional collagen gel to form glandular structures. As much as 66% inhibition of glandular differentiation can be achieved by addition to the culture of a synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr (RGDT) sequence, which is a cell recognition site found in collagen. Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr also inhibited the cell attachment to collagen-coated plates. Chromosome 15 was found in all human-mouse hybrid clones that could differentiate in the collagen gel and bind collagen. Both binding to collagen and glandular differentiation of the hybrid cells were also inhibited by Arg-Gly-Asp-Thr as for the parent cell line SW1222. The ability of SW1222 cells to express the differentiated phenotype appears, therefore, to be determined by an Arg-Gly-Asp-directed collagen receptor on the cell surface that is controlled by a gene on chromosome 15.

  20. Examination of soluble integrin resistant mutants of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) initiates infection in vitro via recognition of at least four cell-surface integrin molecules avb1, avb3, avb6 or avb8 through the interaction of a highly conserved Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) amino acid sequence motif located in the GH loop of VP1. In this work, soluble i...

  1. Microfluidic radiolabeling of biomolecules with PET radiometals

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Dexing; Desai, Amit V.; Ranganathan, David; Wheeler, Tobias D.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Reichert, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction A robust, versatile and compact microreactor has been designed, fabricated and tested for the labeling of bifunctional chelate conjugated biomolecules (BFC-BM) with PET radiometals. Methods The developed microreactor was used to radiolabel a chelate, either 1,4,7,10-Tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) or 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) that had been conjugated to cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) peptide, with both 64Cu and 68Ga respectively. The microreactor radiolabeling conditions were optimized by varying temperature, concentration and residence time. Results Direct comparisons between the microreactor approach and conventional methods showed improved labeling yields and increased reproducibility with the microreactor under identical labeling conditions, due to enhanced mass and heat transfer at the microscale. More importantly, over 90% radiolabeling yields (incorporation of radiometal) were achieved with a 1:1 stoichiometry of bifunctional chelate biomolecule conjugate (BFC-BM) to radiometal in the microreactor, which potentially obviates extensive chromatographic purification that is typically required to remove the large excess of unlabeled biomolecule in radioligands prepared using conventional methods. Moreover, higher yields for radiolabeling of DOTA-functionalized BSA protein (Bovine Serum Albumin) were observed with 64Cu/68Ga using the microreactor, which demonstrates the ability to label both small and large molecules. Conclusions A robust, reliable, compact microreactor capable of chelating radiometals with common chelates has been developed and validated. Based on our radiolabeling results, the reported microfluidic approach overall outperforms conventional radiosynthetic methods, and is a promising technology for the radiometal labeling of commonly utilized BFC-BM in aqueous solutions. PMID:23078875

  2. Tunable ultrasmall visible-to-extended near-infrared emitting silver sulfide quantum dots for integrin-targeted cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Xue, Jianpeng; Xu, Baogang; Shen, Duanwen; Sudlow, Gail P; Achilefu, Samuel

    2015-01-27

    The large size of many near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent nanoparticles prevents rapid extravasation from blood vessels and subsequent diffusion to tumors. This confines in vivo uptake to the peritumoral space and results in high liver retention. In this study, we developed a viscosity modulated approach to synthesize ultrasmall silver sulfide quantum dots (QDs) with distinct tunable light emission from 500 to 1200 nm and a QD core diameter between 1.5 and 9 nm. Conjugation of a tumor-avid cyclic pentapeptide (Arg-Gly-Asp-DPhe-Lys) resulted in monodisperse, water-soluble QDs (hydrodynamic diameter < 10 nm) without loss of the peptide's high binding affinity to tumor-associated integrins (KI = 1.8 nM/peptide). Fluorescence and electron microscopy showed that selective integrin-mediated internalization was observed only in cancer cells treated with the peptide-labeled QDs, demonstrating that the unlabeled hydrophilic nanoparticles exhibit characteristics of negatively charged fluorescent dye molecules, which typically do not internalize in cells. The biodistribution profiles of intravenously administered QDs in different mouse models of cancer reveal an exceptionally high tumor-to-liver uptake ratio, suggesting that the small sized QDs evaded conventional opsonization and subsequent high uptake in the liver and spleen. The seamless tunability of the QDs over a wide spectral range with only a small increase in size, as well as the ease of labeling the bright and noncytotoxic QDs with biomolecules, provides a platform for multiplexing information, tracking the trafficking of single molecules in cells, and selectively targeting disease biomarkers in living organisms without premature QD opsonization in circulating blood. PMID:25560768

  3. Improving Tumor-Targeting Capability and Pharmacokinetics of 99mTc-Labeled Cyclic RGD Dimers with PEG4 Linkers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Shi, Jiyun; Kim, Young-Seung; Zhai, Shizhen; Jia, Bing; Zhao, Huiyun; Liu, Zhaofei; Wang, Fan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Shuang

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the synthesis of two cyclic RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) conjugates, HYNIC-2PEG4-dimer (HYNIC = 6-hydrazinonicotinyl; 2PEG4-dimer = E[PEG4-c(RGDfK)]2; and PEG4 = 15-amino-4,7,10,13-tetraoxapentadecanoic acid) and HYNIC-3PEG4-dimer (3PEG4-dimer = PEG4-E[PEG4-c(RGDfK)]2), and evaluation of their 99mTc complexes [99mTc(HYNIC-2PEG4-dimer)(tricine)(TPPTS)] (99mTc-2PEG4-dimer: TPPTS = trisodium triphenylphosphine-3,3′,3″-trisulfonate) and [99mTc(HYNIC-3PEG4-dimer)(tricine)(TPPTS)] (99mTc-3PEG4-dimer) as novel radiotracers for imaging integrin αvβ3 expression in athymic nude mice bearing U87MG glioma and MDA-MB-435 breast cancer xenografts. The integrin αvβ3 binding affinities of RGD peptides were determined by competitive displacement of 125I-c(RGDyK) on U87MG glioma cells. It was found that the two PEG4 linkers between RGD motifs in HYNIC-2PEG4-dimer (IC50 = 2.8 ± 0.5 nM) and HYNIC-3PEG4-dimer (IC50 = 2.4 ± 0.7 nM) are responsible for their higher integrin αvβ3 binding affinity than that of HYNIC-PEG4-dimer (PEG4-dimer = PEG4-E[c(RGDfK)]2; IC50 = 7.5 ± 2.3 nM). Addition of extra PEG4 linker in HYNIC-3PEG4-dimer has little impact on integrin αvβ3 binding affinity. 99mTc-2PEG4-dimer and 99mTc-3PEG4-dimer were prepared in high yield with >95% radiochemical purity and the specific activity of > 10 Ci/μmol. Biodistribution studies clearly demonstrated that PEG4 linkers are particularly useful for improving the tumor uptake and clearance kinetics of 99mTc-2PEG4-dimer and 99mTc-3PEG4-dimer from non-cancerous organs. It was also found that there was a linear relationship between the tumor size and radiotracer tumor uptake expressed as %ID (percentage of the injected dose) in U87MG glioma and MDA-MB-435 breast tumor models. The blocking experiment showed that the tumor uptake of 99mTc-2PEG4-dimer is integrin αvβ3-mediated. In the metabolism study, 99mTc-2PEG4-dimer had high metabolic stability during its excretion from renal and hepatobiliary routes

  4. Bioactive Nanofibers Instruct Cells to Proliferate and Differentiate During Enamel Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhan; Sargeant, Timothy D; Hulvat, James F; Mata, Alvaro; Bringas, Pablo; Koh, Chung-Yan; Stupp, Samuel I; Snead, Malcolm L

    2008-01-01

    During tooth development, ectoderm-derived ameloblast cells create enamel by synthesizing a complex protein mixture serving to control cell to matrix interactions and the habit of hydroxyapatite crystallites. Using an in vitro cell and organ culture system, we studied the effect of artificial bioactive nanostructures on ameloblasts with the long-term goal of developing cell-based strategies for tooth regeneration. We used branched peptide amphiphile molecules containing the peptide motif Arg-Gly-Asp, or “RGD” (abbreviated BRGD-PA), known to self-assemble in physiologic environments into nanofibers that display on their surfaces high densities of this biological signal. Ameloblast-like cells (line LS8) and primary enamel organ epithelial (EOE) cells were cultured within PA hydrogels, and the PA was injected into the enamel organ epithelia of mouse embryonic incisors. The expression of amelogenin, ameloblastin, integrin α5, and integrin α6 was detected by quantitative real-time PCR and immunodetection techniques. We performed cell proliferation assay using BrdU labeling and a biomineralization assay using Alizarin red S staining with quantitative Ca2+ measurements. In the cell culture model, ameloblast-like cells (LS8) and primary EOE cells responded to the BRGD-PA nanostructures with enhanced proliferation and greater amelogenin, ameloblastin, and integrin expression levels. At the site of injection of the BRGD-PA in the organ culture model, we observed EOE cell proliferation with differentiation into ameloblasts as evidenced by their expression of enamel specific proteins. Ultrastructural analysis showed the nanofibers within the forming extracellular matrix, in contact with the EOE cells engaged in enamel formation and regeneration. This study shows that BRGD-PA nanofibers present with enamel proteins participate in integrin-mediated cell binding to the matrix with delivery of instructive signals for enamel formation. PMID:18665793

  5. Multifunctional Quantum Dot Nanoparticles for Effective Differentiation and Long-Term Tracking of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinming; Lee, Wayne Yukwai; Wu, Tianyi; Xu, Jianbin; Zhang, Kunyu; Li, Gang; Xia, Jiang; Bian, Liming

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) hold great potential for regenerative medicine. Efficient induction of hMSC differentiation and better understanding of hMSCs behaviors in vitro and in vivo are essential to the clinical translation of stem cell therapy. Here a quantum dots (QDs)-based multifunctional nanoparticle (RGD-β-CD-QDs) is developed for effective enhancing differentiation and long-term tracking of hMSCs in vitro and in vivo. The RGD-β-CD-QDs are modified with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and Cys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Gly-Asp (CKKRGD) peptide on the surface. The β-CD can harbor hydrophobic osteogenic small molecule dexamethasone (Dex) and the RGD peptide not only facilitates the complexation of siRNA and delivers siRNA into hMSCs but also leads to cellular uptake of nanoparticles by RGD receptor. Co-delivery of Dex and siRNA by RGD-β-CD-QDs nanocarrier significantly expedites and enhances the osteogenesis differentiation of hMSCs in vitro and in vivo by combined effect of small molecule and RNAi. Furthermore, the RGD-β-CD-QDs can be labeled with hMSCs for a long-term tracking (3 weeks) in vivo to observe the behaviors of implanted hMSCs in animal level. These findings demonstrate that the RGD-β-CD-QDs nanocarrier provides a powerful tool to simultaneously enhance differentiation and long-term tracking of hMSCs in vitro and in vivo for regenerative medicine. PMID:26919348

  6. pHluorin-assisted expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data analysis of the C-terminal domain of the HsdR subunit of the Escherichia coli type I restriction-modification system EcoR124I.

    PubMed

    Grinkevich, Pavel; Iermak, Iuliia; Luedtke, Nicholas A; Mesters, Jeroen R; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Ludwig, Jost

    2016-09-01

    The HsdR subunit of the type I restriction-modification system EcoR124I is responsible for the translocation as well as the restriction activity of the whole complex consisting of the HsdR, HsdM and HsdS subunits, and while crystal structures are available for the wild type and several mutants, the C-terminal domain comprising approximately 150 residues was not resolved in any of these structures. Here, three fusion constructs with the GFP variant pHluorin developed to overexpress, purify and crystallize the C-terminal domain of HsdR are reported. The shortest of the three encompassed HsdR residues 887-1038 and yielded crystals that belonged to the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 83.42, b = 176.58, c = 126.03 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00° and two molecules in the asymmetric unit (VM = 2.55 Å(3) Da(-1), solvent content 50.47%). X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.45 Å. PMID:27599856

  7. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  8. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  9. RGD labeled Ru(II) polypyridyl conjugates for platelet integrin αIIbβ3 recognition and as reporters of integrin conformation.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Kellie; Dolan, Ciaran; Moran, Niamh; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2014-05-21

    The ability of two novel ruthenium(II) polypyridyl-Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide conjugates to act as molecular probes for reporting on the presence and conformation of integrin αIIbβ3 in solution and in live cells was described. The compounds are [Ru(bpy)2PIC-RGD](2+), bpy-RGD, and [Ru(dpp)2PIC-RGD](2+), dpp-RGD, where dpp is 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine, and PIC is 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline. Bpy-RGD is hydrophilic, whereas dpp-RGD is comparatively hydrophobic. Both probes exhibited good affinity and high specificity for purified αIIbβ3 in solution. Binding of either complex to the resting integrin resulted in an approximately 8-fold increase of emission intensity from the metal center with dissociation constants (Kd) in the micromolar range for each complex. The Kd for each conjugate/αIIbβ3 assembly were compared following treatment of the integrin with the activating agents, Mn(2+) and dithiothreitol (DTT), which are commonly used to induce active-like conformational changes in the integrin. For bpy-RGD/αIIbβ3 Kd showed relatively little variation with integrin activation, presenting the following trend: denatured αIIbβ3 > resting αIIbβ3 = pretreated DTT = pretreated Mn(2+). Kd for dpp-RGD/ αIIbβ3 showed greater variation with integrin activation and the following trend was followed: denatured αIIbβ3 > resting αIIbβ3 > pretreated Mn(2+) = pretreated DTT. Time resolved luminescence anisotropy was carried out to obtain the rotational correlation time of bpy-RGD and dpp-RGD bound to resting or nominally activated integrin. The rotational correlation times of bpy-RGD and dpp-RGD, too fast to measure unbound, decreased to 1.50 ± 0.03 μs and 2.58 ± 0.04 μs, respectively, when the complexes were bound to resting integrin. Addition of Mn(2+) to bpy-RGD/αIIbβ3 or dpp-RGD/αIIbβ3 reduced the rotational correlation time of the ruthenium center to 1.29 ± 0.03 μs and to 1.72 ± 0.03

  10. Synthesis of novel conjugates of a saccharide, amino acids, nucleobase and the evaluation of their cell compatibility.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dan; Du, Xuewen; Shi, Junfeng; Zhou, Ning; Baoum, Abdulgader Ahmed; Xu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the synthesis of a novel type of conjugate of three fundamental biological build blocks (i.e., saccharide, amino acids, and nucleobase) and their cell compatibility. The facile synthesis starts with the synthesis of nucleobase and saccharide derivatives, then uses solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) to build the peptide segment (Phe-Arg-Gly-Asp or naphthAla-Phe-Arg-Gly-Asp with fully protected groups), and later, an amidation reaction in liquid phase connects these three parts together. The overall yield of these multiple step synthesis is about 34%. Besides exhibiting excellent solubility, these conjugates of saccharide-amino acids-nucleobase (SAN), like the previously reported conjugates of nucleobase-amino acids-saccharide (NAS) and nucleobase-saccharide-amino acids (NSA), are mammalian cell compatible. PMID:25383110

  11. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  12. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  13. A comparison of the fibrinogen receptor distribution on adherent platelets using both soluble fibrinogen and fibrinogen immobilized on gold beads.

    PubMed

    Estry, D W; Mattson, J C; Mahoney, G J; Oesterle, J R

    1991-04-01

    The distribution of fibrinogen receptors was determined on the surface of adherent platelets using both direct labeling with the ligand fibrinogen which was immobilized on gold particles (Fg-Au) and indirect immunogold (Ig-Au) labeling of bound soluble fibrinogen identified with a rabbit polyclonal anti-fibrinogen antibody. Two distinctly different patterns of labeling were obtained and appeared to depend on whether solid phase fibrinogen (Fg-Au) or soluble phase released fibrinogen were bound to the membrane receptor. The membrane-bound Fg-Au reorganized in patterns that closely mimicked the organization of the underlying cytoskeleton. In approximately 18% of the adherent platelets, Fg-Au was seen in channels or vesicle-like structures lying deep to the platelet surface suggesting internalization into the open canalicular system and/or endocytosis. The labeling pattern obtained when identifying the location of membrane-bound soluble released fibrinogen by Ig-Au was diffuse and lacked the organizational patterns characteristic of Fg-Au. Unlike the Fg-Au probe, early dendritic platelets were heavily labeled by the soluble phase fibrinogen using the Ig-Au technique. Although the label covered the entire exposed platelet membrane in fully spread platelets, labeling over the peripheral web was more dense than that over the intermediate or granulomere zone. The diffuse organization and heavier peripheral distributional pattern of the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GP IIb-IIIa) receptor in fixed, adherent platelets, was also seen with the GP IIb-IIIa receptor-specific antibody AP-2. The binding of both the Fg-Au and Ig-Au were inhibited using the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) (93% and 98% inhibition, respectively), AP-2 (98% and 97%, respectively) and platelets from patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (GT) (99% and 98%, respectively). The data presented provides the first report that receptor reorganization, following binding of fibrinogen, appears to be related to

  14. OR Specimen Labeling.

    PubMed

    Zervakis Brent, Mary Ann

    2016-02-01

    Mislabeled surgical specimens jeopardize patient safety and quality care. The purpose of this project was to determine whether labeling surgical specimens with two patient identifiers would result in an 80% reduction in specimen labeling errors within six months and a 100% reduction in errors within 12 months. Our failure mode effects analysis found that the lack of two patient identifiers per label was the most unsafe step in our specimen handling process. We piloted and implemented a new process in the OR using the Plan-Do-Check-Act conceptual framework. The audit process included collecting data and making direct observations to determine the sustainability of the process change; however, the leadership team halted the direct observation audit after four months. The total number of surgical specimen labeling errors was reduced by only 60% within six months and 62% within 12 months; therefore, the goal of the project was not met. However, OR specimen labeling errors were reduced. PMID:26849982

  15. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  16. Nanovehicles based Bioassay Labels

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Lin, Ying-Ying; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we review recent advances of our group in nanoparticle labels based bioassay. Apoferritin and silica nanoparticles have been used as nanovehicles to load large amount of markers for highly sensitive bioassay. Markers loaded apoferritin, apoferritin-templated metallic phosphate nanoparticles, and poly [guanine] coated silica nanoparticles have been prepared, characterized and used as labels for highly sensitive bioassay of protein and DNA. Dissociation and reconstitution characteristics at different pH as well as the special cavity structure of apoferritin nanovehicle provides a simple and convenient route to prepare versatile nanoparticle labels and avoid the complicated and tedious synthesis process of conventional nanoparticle labels. The optical and electrochemical characteristics of the prepared nanoparticle labels are easily controlled by loading different optical or electrochemical markers. Additionally, the use of apoferritin nanovehicle as template for synthesis of metallic phosphate nanoparticle labels offers fast route to prepare uniform-size metallic nanoparticle labels for electrochemical bioassay and avoids the traditional harsh dissolution conditions to dissolve metallic nanoparticle tags (that is, the strong-acid dissolution of quantum dots and gold nanoparticles) during the stripping analysis step. Silica nanoparticle has also been used as nanovehicle to carry thousands of poly [guanine] tracers, which was used to enhance the oxidation current of Ru(bpy)32+, resulting in enhanced sensitivity of electrochemical immunoassay. The new nanovehicle-based labels have been used for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of DNA and protein biomarkers, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a). The high sensitivity and selectivity make these labels a useful addition to the armory of nanoparticle-based bioassay. The new nanovehicles based labels hold great promise for multiplex protein and DNA detection and for enhancing the sensitivity

  17. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version How to Read Drug ... read drug labels How to read a prescription drug label View a text version of this picture. ...

  18. Nutrition Facts: Reading the Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Nutrition Facts: Reading the Label Reading labels can help ... of information on their labels or packaging about nutrition and food safety. Product dates . You might see ...

  19. Noise labeling in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araujo, Marco A. N.; Massarani, Paulo M.; de Azevedo, Jose A. J.; Gerges, Samir N. Y.

    2002-11-01

    The Brazilian Silence Program, created in 1990 by the Brazilian Ministry of Environment, advocates the production and use of equipment with lower noise level. The subcommittee of Noise Labeling of the Brazilian Committee of Certification is composed of INMETRO acoustic specialists to organize and implement the Brazilian Labeling Program. This subcommittee elaborated the label form and test procedure. The noise-labeling program will first concentrate on the following household devices, both manufactured in Brazil or imported from abroad; mixers, blenders, hairdryers, refrigerators, and vacuum cleaners. The label should contain the sound-power level in dBA. INMETRO or other credited laboratories are responsible for the measurements. The ISO 4871, 3740 (1 to 5), ISO 8960, and IEC 704 (1 to 4) and also the equivalent Brazilian standards are used for the measurements, such as ABNT NBR 13910-1. The main objective of the label is to inform the consumer about the emitted noise level. The label offers the noise parameter to be used by the consumer when comparing devices, considering price, performance, and now also noise. No restriction for noise level was established.

  20. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  1. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  2. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  3. The Bioconjugation and Radiosynthesis of 89Zr-DFO-labeled Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zeglis, Brian M.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional affinity, specificity, and selectivity of antibodies make them extraordinarily attractive vectors for tumor-targeted PET radiopharmaceuticals. Due to their multi-day biological half-life, antibodies must be labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides with relatively long physical decay half-lives. Traditionally, the positron-emitting isotopes 124I (t1/2 = 4.18 d), 86Y (t1/2 = 14.7 hr), and 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 hr) have been used to label antibodies for PET imaging. More recently, however, the field has witnessed a dramatic increase in the use of the positron-emitting radiometal 89Zr in antibody-based PET imaging agents. 89Zr is a nearly ideal radioisotope for PET imaging with immunoconjugates, as it possesses a physical half-life (t1/2 = 78.4 hr) that is compatible with the in vivo pharmacokinetics of antibodies and emits a relatively low energy positron that produces high resolution images. Furthermore, antibodies can be straightforwardly labeled with 89Zr using the siderophore-derived chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). In this protocol, the prostate-specific membrane antigen targeting antibody J591 will be used as a model system to illustrate (1) the bioconjugation of the bifunctional chelator DFO-isothiocyanate to an antibody, (2) the radiosynthesis and purification of a 89Zr-DFO-mAb radioimmunoconjugate, and (3) in vivo PET imaging with an 89Zr-DFO-mAb radioimmunoconjugate in a murine model of cancer. PMID:25741890

  4. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off. PMID:21539053

  5. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Off-label Drug Use What is off-label drug use? In the United States new drugs are ... unapproved use of a drug. Is off-label drug use legal? The off-label use of FDA- ...

  6. Spectral Label Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wachinger, Christian; Golland, Polina

    2012-01-01

    We present a new segmentation approach that combines the strengths of label fusion and spectral clustering. The result is an atlas-based segmentation method guided by contour and texture cues in the test image. This offers advantages for datasets with high variability, making the segmentation less prone to registration errors. We achieve the integration by letting the weights of the graph Laplacian depend on image data, as well as atlas-based label priors. The extracted contours are converted to regions, arranged in a hierarchy depending on the strength of the separating boundary. Finally, we construct the segmentation by a region-wise, instead of voxel-wise, voting, increasing the robustness. Our experiments on cardiac MRI show a clear improvement over majority voting and intensity-weighted label fusion. PMID:23286157

  7. Spin labeling EPR.

    PubMed

    Klare, Johann P; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy has emerged as an efficient tool to elucidate the structure and conformational dynamics of biomolecules under native-like conditions. This article summarizes the basics as well as recent progress of site-directed spin labeling. Continuous wave EPR spectra analyses and pulse EPR techniques are reviewed with special emphasis on applications to the sensory rhodopsin-transducer complex mediating the photophobic response of the halophilic archaeum Natronomonas pharaonis and the photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26. PMID:19728138

  8. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  9. Labeling the Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasner, William

    The report describes research on the effects of labeling children from minority groups as retarded and includes a review of a system of multiculturalistic pluralistic assessment (SOMPA), an instrument for evaluating the abilities and potentialities of children based on different aspects of performance. Listed among findings of the Riverside study,…

  10. Labeling lake water with tritium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, B.J.

    1963-01-01

    A method of packaging tritiated water in a manner that facilitates safe handling in environmental labeling operations, and procedures followed in labeling a large body of water with a small volume of tritiated water are described. ?? 1963.

  11. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  12. 99m tc labeled liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.T.; Klipper, R.W.; Timmons, J.H.; Rudolph, A.S.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method of preparing stable gamma-emitting radionuclide-labeled alkyleneamine oxime, the incubating being for a period of time sufficient to form labeled liposome-encapsulated protein.

  13. Echistatin is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption in culture.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Sardana, M K; Grasser, W A; Garsky, V M; Murray, J M; Gould, R J

    1990-10-01

    The venom protein, s-echistatin, originally derived from the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus, was found to be a potent inhibitor of bone resorption by isolated osteoclasts. This Arg24-Gly25-Asp26-(RGD)-containing protein inhibited the excavation of bone slices by rat osteoclasts (IC50 = 0.1 nM). It also inhibited the release of [3H]proline from labeled bone particles by chicken osteoclasts (IC50 = 100 nM). By comparison, the tetrapeptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS) inhibited resorption by rat or chicken osteoclasts with an IC50 of 0.1 mM while ala24-echistatin was inactive. Video microscopy showed that rat osteoclast attachment to substrate was more sensitive to s-echistatin than was the attachment of mononuclear cells or chicken osteoclasts. The difference in sensitivity of rat and chicken osteoclasts to s-echistatin may be due to differences between receptors on rat and chicken osteoclasts for s-echistatin. Antibody localization of echistatin on these cells showed much greater echistatin binding to rat osteoclasts than to chicken osteoclasts. Laser scanning confocal microscopy after immunohistochemical staining showed that s-echistatin binds to osteoclasts, that s-echistatin receptors are most abundant at the osteoclast/glass interface, and that s-echistatin colocalizes with vinculin. Confocal interference reflection microscopy of osteoclasts incubated with s-echistatin, demonstrated colocalization of s-echistatin with the outer edges of clusters of grey contacts at the tips of some lamellipodia. Identification of the echistatin receptor as an integrin was confirmed by colocalization of echistatin fluorescence with staining for an alpha-like subunit. Attachment of bone particles labeled with [3H]proline to chicken osteoclasts confirmed that the mechanism of action of echistatin was to inhibit osteoclast binding to bone presumably by disrupting adhesion structures. These data demonstrate that osteoclasts bind to bone via an RGD-sequence as an obligatory step in bone

  14. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  15. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  16. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  17. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  18. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  19. 16 CFR 460.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....12 Labels. If you are a manufacturer, you must label all packages of your insulation. The labels must...) If installation instructions are included on the label or with the package, add this statement:...

  20. 9 CFR 412.1 - Label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Jan. 6, 2014) § 412.1 Label approval. (a) No final label may be used on any product unless the label... for a corporation may submit only one label application for a product produced in other establishments...) The proposed label would not misrepresent the product; (ii) The use of the label would not present...

  1. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence. PMID:23078494

  2. Supplementing National Menu Labeling

    PubMed Central

    White, Lexi C.

    2012-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration’s forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants’ menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., “heart-healthy” graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence. PMID:23078494

  3. Coupling of antibodies with biotin.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Rosaria P; You, Wendy W

    2008-01-01

    The avidin-biotin bond is the strongest known biological interaction between a ligand and a protein (Kd = 1.3 x 10-15 M at pH 5.0) (1). The affinity is so high that the avidin-biotin complex is extremely resistant to any type of denaturing agent (2). Biotin (see Fig. 1) is a small, hydrophobic molecule that functions as a coenzyme of carboxylases (3). It is present in all living cells. Avidin is a tetrameric glycoprotein of 66,000-68,000 molecular weight, found in egg albumin and in avian tissues. The interaction between avidin and biotin occurs rapidly, and the stability of the complex has prompted its use for in situ attachment of labels in a broad variety of applications, including immunoassays, DNA hybridization (4-6), and localization of antigens in cells and tissues (7). Avidin has an isoelectric point of 10.5. Because of its positively charged residues and its oligosaccharide component, consisting mostly of mannose and glucosamine (8), avidin can interact nonspecifically with negative charges on cell surfaces and nucleic acids, or with membrane sugar receptors. At times, this causes background problems in histochemical and cytochemical applications. Streptavidin, a near-neutral, biotin-binding protein (9) isolated from the culture medium of Streptomyces avidinii, is a tetrameric nonglycosylated analog of avidin with a molecular weight of about 60,000. Like avidin, each molecule of streptavidin binds four molecules of biotin, with a similar dissociation constant. The two proteins have about 33% sequence homology, and tryptophan residues seem to be involved in their biotin-binding sites (10,11). In general, streptavidin gives less background problems than avidin. This protein, however, contains a tripeptide sequence Arg-Tyr-Asp (RYD) that apparently mimics the binding sequence of fibronectin Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), a universal recognition domain of the extracellular matrix that specifically promotes cell adhesion. Consequently, the streptavidin

  4. The thyroid hormone-αvβ3 integrin axis in ovarian cancer: regulation of gene transcription and MAPK-dependent proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shinderman-Maman, E; Cohen, K; Weingarten, C; Nabriski, D; Twito, O; Baraf, L; Hercbergs, A; Davis, P J; Werner, H; Ellis, M; Ashur-Fabian, O

    2016-04-14

    Ovarian carcinoma is the fifth common cause of cancer death in women, despite advanced therapeutic approaches. αvβ3 integrin, a plasma membrane receptor, binds thyroid hormones (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3) and is overexpressed in ovarian cancer. We have demonstrated selective binding of fluorescently labeled hormones to αvβ3-positive ovarian cancer cells but not to integrin-negative cells. Physiologically relevant T3 (1 nM) and T4 (100 nM) concentrations in OVCAR-3 (high αvβ3) and A2780 (low αvβ3) cells promoted αv and β3 transcription in association with basal integrin levels. This transcription was effectively blocked by RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide and neutralizing αvβ3 antibodies, excluding T3-induced β3 messenger RNA, suggesting subspecialization of T3 and T4 binding to the integrin receptor pocket. We have provided support for extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated transcriptional regulation of the αv monomer by T3 and of β3 monomer by both hormones and documented a rapid (30-120 min) and dose-dependent (0.1-1000 nM) ERK activation. OVCAR-3 cells and αvβ3-deficient HEK293 cells treated with αvβ3 blockers confirmed the requirement for an intact thyroid hormone-integrin interaction in ERK activation. In addition, novel data indicated that T4, but not T3, controls integrin's outside-in signaling by phosphorylating tyrosine 759 in the β3 subunit. Both hormones induced cell proliferation (cell counts), survival (Annexin-PI), viability (WST-1) and significantly reduced the expression of genes that inhibit cell cycle (p21, p16), promote mitochondrial apoptosis (Nix, PUMA) and tumor suppression (GDF-15, IGFBP-6), particularly in cells with high integrin expression. At last, we have confirmed that hypothyroid environment attenuated ovarian cancer growth using a novel experimental platform that exploited paired euthyroid and severe hypothyroid serum samples from human subjects. To conclude, our data define a critical

  5. Design of cyclic RGD-conjugated Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptides for targeted delivery of small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Wada, Shun-Ichi; Iwata, Masashi; Ozaki, Yuka; Ozaki, Takashi; Hayashi, Junsuke; Urata, Hidehito

    2016-09-15

    To achieve the targeted delivery of siRNA, five conjugates of Aib-containing amphipathic helical peptides with mono-, di-, and trivalent cRGDfC [cyclo(-Arg-Gly-Asp-d-Phe-Cys-)], which is known to bind to αVβ3 integrin, at several positions of the amphipathic helical peptide were designed and synthesized. Among the five conjugates, the monovalent cRGDfC conjugating at position 20 of the amino acid sequence of the helical peptide through the formation of a disulfide bond (PI) and the divalent cRGDfC conjugating at positions 2 and 14 of the amino acid sequence of the helical peptide through the formation of disulfide bonds (PIII) significantly enhanced the delivery of fluorescence-labeled siRNA into A549 cells as the peptide/siRNA complex formed by electrostatic interaction. The cellular uptake of the PI/siRNA complex was mediated by both endocytic and non-endocytic pathways, whereas that of the PIII/siRNA complex was enabled by endocytosis. Furthermore, the cellular uptake of the PI/siRNA complex might involve specific interactions of the RGD group with the αVβ3 integrin receptor. Next, the RNAi effect of the peptide/siRNA complex on luciferase expression in A549-Luc cells was examined. Luciferase expression was significantly decreased in the presence of the complex at the concentration of 1.0μM PI/10nM siRNA. In contrast, the PIII/siRNA complex did not show the RNAi effect under the same conditions. However, extending the incubation time led to the suppression of the luciferase expression in the presence of the PIII/siRNA complex. Considering that the cellular uptake of the PIII/siRNA complex is mediated by the endocytic pathway, the release of siRNA from the endosome into the cytosol might require a long time. We present herein a useful and unique tool for the delivery of siRNA. PMID:27480031

  6. Multifunctional unimolecular micelles for cancer-targeted drug delivery and positron emission tomography imaging☆

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yuling; Hong, Hao; Javadi, Alireza; Engle, Jonathan W.; Xu, Wenjin; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo; Gong, Shaoqin

    2012-01-01

    A multifunctional unimolecular micelle made of a hyperbranched amphiphilic block copolymer was designed, synthesized, and characterized for cancer-targeted drug delivery and non-invasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in tumor-bearing mice. The hyperbranched amphiphilic block copolymer, Boltorn® H40-poly(L-glutamate-hydrazone-doxorubicin)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (i.e., H40-P(LG-Hyd-DOX)-b-PEG), was conjugated with cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Cys) peptides (cRGD, for integrin αvβ3 targeting) and macrocyclic chelators (1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N, N′, N″-triacetic acid [NOTA], for 64Cu-labeling and PET imaging) (i.e., H40-P(LG-Hyd-DOX)-b-PEG-OCH3/cRGD/NOTA, also referred to as H40-DOX-cRGD). The anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX) was covalently conjugated onto the hydrophobic segments of the amphiphilic block copolymer arms (i.e., PLG) via a pH-labile hydrazone linkage to enable pH-controlled drug release. The unimolecular micelles exhibited a uniform size distribution and pH-sensitive drug release behavior. cRGD-conjugated unimolecular micelles (i.e., H40-DOX-cRGD) exhibited a much higher cellular uptake in U87MG human glioblastoma cells due to integrin αvβ3-mediated endocytosis than non-targeted unimolecular micelles (i.e., H40-DOX), thereby leading to a significantly higher cytotoxicity. In U87MG tumor-bearing mice, H40-DOX-cRGD-64Cu also exhibited a much higher level of tumor accumulation than H40-DOX-64Cu, measured by non-invasive PET imaging and confirmed by biodistribution studies and ex vivo fluorescence imaging. We believe that unimolecular micelles formed by hyperbranched amphiphilic block copolymers that synergistically integrate passive and active tumor-targeting abilities with pH-controlled drug release and PET imaging capabilities provide the basis for future cancer theranostics. PMID:22281424

  7. Label and Label-Free Detection Techniques for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Syahir, Amir; Usui, Kenji; Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has gone through numerous innovative developments in recent decades. In this review, we focus on the development of protein detection methods embedded in the technology. Early microarrays utilized useful chromophores and versatile biochemical techniques dominated by high-throughput illumination. Recently, the realization of label-free techniques has been greatly advanced by the combination of knowledge in material sciences, computational design and nanofabrication. These rapidly advancing techniques aim to provide data without the intervention of label molecules. Here, we present a brief overview of this remarkable innovation from the perspectives of label and label-free techniques in transducing nano-biological events.

  8. Label scrambling during CID of covalently labeled peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Borotto, Nicholas B; Degraan-Weber, Nicholas; Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Covalent labeling along with mass spectrometry is finding more use as a means of studying the higher order structure of proteins and protein complexes. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is an increasingly used reagent for these labeling experiments because it is capable of modifying multiple residues at the same time. Pinpointing DEPC-labeled sites on proteins is typically needed to obtain more resolved structural information, and tandem mass spectrometry after protein proteolysis is often used for this purpose. In this work, we demonstrate that in certain instances, scrambling of the DEPC label from one residue to another can occur during collision-induced dissociation (CID) of labeled peptide ions, resulting in ambiguity in label site identity. From a preliminary study of over 30 labeled peptides, we find that scrambling occurs in about 25% of the peptides and most commonly occurs when histidine residues are labeled. Moreover, this scrambling appears to occur more readily under non-mobile proton conditions, meaning that low charge-state peptide ions are more prone to this reaction. For all peptides, we find that scrambling does not occur during electron transfer dissociation, which suggests that this dissociation technique is a safe alternative to CID for correct label site identification. PMID:25056863

  9. Co-Labeling for Multi-View Weakly Labeled Learning.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinxing; Li, Wen; Xu, Dong; Tsang, Ivor W

    2016-06-01

    It is often expensive and time consuming to collect labeled training samples in many real-world applications. To reduce human effort on annotating training samples, many machine learning techniques (e.g., semi-supervised learning (SSL), multi-instance learning (MIL), etc.) have been studied to exploit weakly labeled training samples. Meanwhile, when the training data is represented with multiple types of features, many multi-view learning methods have shown that classifiers trained on different views can help each other to better utilize the unlabeled training samples for the SSL task. In this paper, we study a new learning problem called multi-view weakly labeled learning, in which we aim to develop a unified approach to learn robust classifiers by effectively utilizing different types of weakly labeled multi-view data from a broad range of tasks including SSL, MIL and relative outlier detection (ROD). We propose an effective approach called co-labeling to solve the multi-view weakly labeled learning problem. Specifically, we model the learning problem on each view as a weakly labeled learning problem, which aims to learn an optimal classifier from a set of pseudo-label vectors generated by using the classifiers trained from other views. Unlike traditional co-training approaches using a single pseudo-label vector for training each classifier, our co-labeling approach explores different strategies to utilize the predictions from different views, biases and iterations for generating the pseudo-label vectors, making our approach more robust for real-world applications. Moreover, to further improve the weakly labeled learning on each view, we also exploit the inherent group structure in the pseudo-label vectors generated from different strategies, which leads to a new multi-layer multiple kernel learning problem. Promising results for text-based image retrieval on the NUS-WIDE dataset as well as news classification and text categorization on several real-world multi

  10. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  11. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  12. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... limited types of labels (e.g., labels for raw, single ingredient meat and poultry products) (48 FR 11410... poultry products will take effect January 1, 2012 (75 FR 82148, Dec. 29, 2010). These mandatory features... Agency. On March 25, 1992, FSIS published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) (57 FR...

  13. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... the Agency (76 FR 75809). FSIS also proposed to combine the regulations that provide for the approval... preamble (76 FR 75814), FSIS wrote: . . . statements on labels that are defined in FSIS's regulations or... ``Product Labeling: Definition of the Term ``Natural'' and related materials (71 FR 70503, Dec. 5, 2006)...

  14. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  15. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Standards and Labels: The Facts Labeling and Marketing Information [ Top of Page ] OVEN PREPARED: Product is fully cooked and ready to eat. [ Top of Page ] YOUNG TURKEY: Turkeys of either sex that are less than 8 months of age according to present regulations. [ Top of Page ] Last ...

  16. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  17. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium labeling. 201.70 Section 201.70 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.70 Calcium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the calcium content...

  18. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  19. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  20. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  1. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  2. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  3. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  4. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  5. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  6. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  7. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling...

  8. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  9. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  10. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  11. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  12. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  13. 27 CFR 19.517 - Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... labels under an exemption from label approval. 19.517 Section 19.517 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... PLANTS Liquor Bottle, Label, and Closure Requirements Labeling Requirements § 19.517 Statements required on labels under an exemption from label approval. If a proprietor bottles spirits for domestic...

  14. Selective chemical labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Wu, Yao-Wen

    2016-06-28

    Over the years, there have been remarkable efforts in the development of selective protein labeling strategies. In this review, we deliver a comprehensive overview of the currently available bioorthogonal and chemoselective reactions. The ability to introduce bioorthogonal handles to proteins is essential to carry out bioorthogonal reactions for protein labeling in living systems. We therefore summarize the techniques that allow for site-specific "installation" of bioorthogonal handles into proteins. We also highlight the biological applications that have been achieved by selective chemical labeling of proteins. PMID:26940577

  15. How to read food labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 serving. You should also pay attention to trans fats on any food label. These fats raise "bad" ... foods and desserts. Many fast food restaurants use trans fats for frying. If a food has these fats, ...

  16. Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Report Error T he Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) is a joint project of the National ... participants in the latest survey in the DSLD database (NHANES): The search options: Quick Search, Browse Dietary ...

  17. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Environment Kids Health Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The ... Pay close attention to serving sizes. Products labeled "light" or "lite" must have 1/3 fewer calories ...

  18. LabeledIn: cataloging labeled indications for human drugs.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ritu; Li, Jiao; Lu, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    Drug-disease treatment relationships, i.e., which drug(s) are indicated to treat which disease(s), are among the most frequently sought information in PubMed®. Such information is useful for feeding the Google Knowledge Graph, designing computational methods to predict novel drug indications, and validating clinical information in EMRs. Given the importance and utility of this information, there have been several efforts to create repositories of drugs and their indications. However, existing resources are incomplete. Furthermore, they neither label indications in a structured way nor differentiate them by drug-specific properties such as dosage form, and thus do not support computer processing or semantic interoperability. More recently, several studies have proposed automatic methods to extract structured indications from drug descriptions; however, their performance is limited by natural language challenges in disease named entity recognition and indication selection. In response, we report LabeledIn: a human-reviewed, machine-readable and source-linked catalog of labeled indications for human drugs. More specifically, we describe our semi-automatic approach to derive LabeledIn from drug descriptions through human annotations with aids from automatic methods. As the data source, we use the drug labels (or package inserts) submitted to the FDA by drug manufacturers and made available in DailyMed. Our machine-assisted human annotation workflow comprises: (i) a grouping method to remove redundancy and identify representative drug labels to be used for human annotation, (ii) an automatic method to recognize and normalize mentions of diseases in drug labels as candidate indications, and (iii) a two-round annotation workflow for human experts to judge the pre-computed candidates and deliver the final gold standard. In this study, we focused on 250 highly accessed drugs in PubMed Health, a newly developed public web resource for consumers and clinicians on prevention

  19. Multi-focus cluster labeling.

    PubMed

    Eikvil, Line; Jenssen, Tor-Kristian; Holden, Marit

    2015-06-01

    Document collections resulting from searches in the biomedical literature, for instance, in PubMed, are often so large that some organization of the returned information is necessary. Clustering is an efficient tool for organizing search results. To help the user to decide how to continue the search for relevant documents, the content of each cluster can be characterized by a set of representative keywords or cluster labels. As different users may have different interests, it can be desirable with solutions that make it possible to produce labels from a selection of different topical categories. We therefore introduce the concept of multi-focus cluster labeling to give users the possibility to get an overview of the contents through labels from multiple viewpoints. The concept for multi-focus cluster labeling has been established and has been demonstrated on three different document collections. We illustrate that multi-focus visualizations can give an overview of clusters along axes that general labels are not able to convey. The approach is generic and should be applicable to any biomedical (or other) domain with any selection of foci where appropriate focus vocabularies can be established. A user evaluation also indicates that such a multi-focus concept is useful. PMID:25869415

  20. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of adipose-derived stem cells in rat myocardial infarction model using hexadecyl-4-[¹²⁴I]iodobenzoate for cell tracking.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang Il; Woo, Sang-Keun; Park, Noh Won; Kim, Byung Il; Eom, Ki Dong; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Chan Wha; Yoo, Jeongsoo; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin

    2016-02-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of (124)I-labeling with hexadecyl-4-iodobenzoate (HIB) on gene expression related to cell cycle, DNA repair, transcription, proliferation and differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). [(124)I]HIB showed high labeling efficiency with ADSCs (51.3±1.3%, 0.3-2.0 Bq/cell) and there is no morphological change of ADSCs. In the microarray analysis of gene expression pattern, differences were not observed between non-labeled and [(124)I]HIB-labeled ADSCs. We demonstrated that (124)I-labeling with HIB did not affect the biological properties of ADSCs. PMID:26720260

  1. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labels. 306.12 Section 306.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS AUTOMOTIVE FUEL RATINGS, CERTIFICATION AND POSTING Label Specifications § 306.12 Labels. All labels must meet the following specifications: (a) Layout—(1) For gasoline...

  2. 16 CFR 306.12 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labels. 306.12 Section 306.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS AUTOMOTIVE FUEL RATINGS, CERTIFICATION AND POSTING Label Specifications § 306.12 Labels. All labels must meet the following specifications: (a) Layout—(1) For gasoline...

  3. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  4. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  5. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  6. 49 CFR 172.426 - OXIDIZER label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.426 OXIDIZER label. (a) Except for size and color, the OXIDIZER label must be as follows: EC02MR91.027 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background color on the OXIDIZER label must be yellow....

  7. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  8. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  9. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  11. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  12. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b) The... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food and...

  13. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  14. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  15. 21 CFR 610.61 - Package label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.61 Package label. The following items shall appear on the label affixed to each package containing a product: (a) The proper name of the product; (b... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Package label. 610.61 Section 610.61 Food...

  16. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  17. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... that contrasts with the background of the label. (iii) The label must include all the following... same engine part. (ii) The label must be lettered in the English language using a color that...

  18. 40 CFR 156.10 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Labeling requirements. 156.10 Section 156.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS LABELING REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES AND DEVICES General Provisions § 156.10 Labeling requirements. (a) General—(1) Contents of the label. Every...

  19. 30 CFR 74.15 - Approval labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval labels. 74.15 Section 74.15 Mineral... DUST SAMPLING DEVICES General Requirements for All Devices § 74.15 Approval labels. (a) Certificate of... reproductions of approval labels and a sketch or description of the position of the labels on each...

  20. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  1. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  2. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  3. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  4. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  5. Nutrition Labeling Using a Computer Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    The 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act mandated nutritional labeling of most foods. As a result, a large portion of food analysis is performed for nutritional labeling purposes. A food labeling guide and links to the complete nutritional labeling regulations are available online at http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/˜dms/flg-toc.html. However, interpretation of these regulations and the appropriate usage of rounding rules, available nutrient content claims, reference amounts, and serving size can be difficult.

  6. Label-free drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Current drug discovery is dominated by label-dependent molecular approaches, which screen drugs in the context of a predefined and target-based hypothesis in vitro. Given that target-based discovery has not transformed the industry, phenotypic screen that identifies drugs based on a specific phenotype of cells, tissues, or animals has gained renewed interest. However, owing to the intrinsic complexity in drug–target interactions, there is often a significant gap between the phenotype screened and the ultimate molecular mechanism of action sought. This paper presents a label-free strategy for early drug discovery. This strategy combines label-free cell phenotypic profiling with computational approaches, and holds promise to bridge the gap by offering a kinetic and holistic representation of the functional consequences of drugs in disease relevant cells that is amenable to mechanistic deconvolution. PMID:24723889

  7. Metrics for Labeled Markov Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desharnais, Josee; Jagadeesan, Radha; Gupta, Vineet; Panangaden, Prakash

    1999-01-01

    Partial Labeled Markov Chains are simultaneously generalizations of process algebra and of traditional Markov chains. They provide a foundation for interacting discrete probabilistic systems, the interaction being synchronization on labels as in process algebra. Existing notions of process equivalence are too sensitive to the exact probabilities of various transitions. This paper addresses contextual reasoning principles for reasoning about more robust notions of "approximate" equivalence between concurrent interacting probabilistic systems. The present results indicate that:We develop a family of metrics between partial labeled Markov chains to formalize the notion of distance between processes. We show that processes at distance zero are bisimilar. We describe a decision procedure to compute the distance between two processes. We show that reasoning about approximate equivalence can be done compositionally by showing that process combinators do not increase distance. We introduce an asymptotic metric to capture asymptotic properties of Markov chains; and show that parallel composition does not increase asymptotic distance.

  8. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  9. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  10. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  11. Labeling: A Dilemma or Solution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perusin, Adriano

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the pros and cons of labeling within the classroom, including the effects on self-concept and peer relationships. Argues that integration can be successful, if implemented by an effective and prepared instructor and that activities which are accommodating may allow integration to be successful. (Author/CR)

  12. When Diagnostic Labels Mask Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foltz, Robert; Dang, Sidney; Daniels, Brian; Doyle, Hillary; McFee, Scott; Quisenberry, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that many seriously troubled children and adolescents are reacting to adverse life experiences. Yet traditional diagnostic labels are based on checklists of surface symptoms. Distracted by disruptive behavior, the common response is to medicate, punish, or exclude rather than respond to needs of youth who have…

  13. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition marketing may influence purchasing behavior and thereby be a factor in the obesity epidemic. Very little peer-reviewed research has been published which investigates the relationship between nutrition marketing on food labels and consumer behavior. The purpose of this paper was to give an ...

  14. The Labelling Approach to Deviance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Prudence M.; Kitsuse, John L.; Duster, Troy; Freidson, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    This reprint of one chapter from the 1975 text, "Issues in the Classification of Children" by Nicholas Hobbs and others, addresses the theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues involved in the "labeling" approach to the sociology of deviance. It examines the social process of classification, the use of classification in social agencies,…

  15. Revisiting Labels: "Hearing" or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Ellen A.

    2010-01-01

    This position paper briefly presents evidence-based findings pertaining to the language of labels for people with hearing loss that relate to stigma, expectation levels, stereotypes, and self-fulfilling prophecies. These constructs are important for auditory-based practitioners, administrators, policymakers, students, families, and persons with…

  16. Psychological effectiveness of carbon labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Geoffrey

    2012-04-01

    Despite the decision by supermarket-giant Tesco to delay its plan to add carbon-footprint information onto all of its 70,000 products, carbon labelling, if carefully designed, could yet change consumer behaviour. However, it requires a new type of thinking about consumers and much additional work.

  17. The labeling debate in the United States.

    PubMed

    Marchant, Gary E; Cardineau, Guy A

    2013-01-01

    The mandatory labeling of genetically modified (GM) food has become the predominant policy issue concerning biotechnology in the United States. The controversy over GM labeling is being debated at several different levels and branches of government. At the federal level, the Food and Drug Administration, which has primary jurisdiction over food safety and labeling, has steadfastly refused to require labeling of GM foods since 1992 based on its conclusion that GM foods as a category present no unique or higher risks than other foods. Proposed legislation has been repeatedly introduced in the US. Congress over the years to mandate GM labeling, but has made very little progress. With federal labeling requirements apparently stalled, the main activity has switched to the state level, where numerous individual states are considering mandatory GM labeling, either through legislation or proposition. The debate over GM labeling, at both the federal and state levels, has focused on five issues: (1) public opinion; (2) the legality of labeling requirements; (3) the risks and benefits of GM foods; (4) the costs and burdens of GM labeling; and (5) consumer choice. While the pro-labeling forces argue that all of these factors weigh in favor of mandatory GM labeling, a more careful evaluation of the evidence finds that all five factors weigh decisively against mandatory GM labeling requirements. PMID:23982076

  18. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  19. 27 CFR 19.704 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containers bear an approved label pursuant to 27 CFR Part 5 and subpart S of this part and the sample is... spirits to be withdrawn under the provisions of § 19.701, the proprietor shall affix a label showing...

  20. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  1. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  2. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  3. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  4. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  5. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  6. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  7. 21 CFR 640.94 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Plasma Protein Fraction (Human) § 640.94 Labeling. In addition... package labels shall contain the following information: (a) The osmotic equivalent in terms of plasma,...

  8. 7 CFR 65.400 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... origin declarations can either be in the form of a placard, sign, label, sticker, band, twist tie, pin... declaration of the country of origin (e.g., placard, sign, label, sticker, band, twist tie, pin tag, or...

  9. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  10. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  11. 40 CFR 1033.135 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... THAT IT IS REMANUFACTURED, EXCEPT AS ALLOWED BY 40 CFR 1033.750.” (3) Label diesel-fueled locomotives... locomotives certified for use with both LSD and ULSD. (c) Engine labels. (1) For engines not...

  12. Ivabradine: A Review of Labeled and Off-Label Uses.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Carrie S; Owens, Ryan E; Bolorunduro, Oluwaseyi B; Jha, Sunil K

    2016-10-01

    Ivabradine is a unique medication recently approved in the USA for the treatment of select heart failure patients. It was first approved for use in several countries around the world over a decade ago as an anti-anginal agent, with subsequent approval for use in heart failure patients. Since ivabradine has selective activity blocking the I f currents in the sinus node, it can reduce heart rate without appreciable effects on blood pressure. Given this heart-rate-specific effect, it has been investigated in many off-label indications as an alternative to traditional heart-rate-reducing medications such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers. We conducted searches of PubMed and Google Scholar for ivabradine, heart failure, HFrEF, HFpEF, angina, coronary artery disease, inappropriate sinus tachycardia, postural orthostatic hypotension, coronary computed tomography angiography and atrial fibrillation. We reviewed and included studies, case reports, and case series published between 1980 and June 2016 if they provided information relevant to the practicing clinician. In many cases, larger clinical trials are needed to solidify the benefit of ivabradine, although studies indicate benefit in most therapeutic areas explored to date. The purpose of this paper is to review the current labeled and off-label uses of ivabradine, with a focus on clinical trial data. PMID:27405864

  13. 99mTc: Labeling Chemistry and Labeled Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R.; Abram, U.

    This chapter reviews the radiopharmaceutical chemistry of technetium related to the synthesis of perfusion agents and to the labeling of receptor-binding biomolecules. To understand the limitations of technetium chemistry imposed by future application of the complexes in nuclear medicine, an introductory section analyzes the compulsory requirements to be considered when facing the incentive of introducing a novel radiopharmaceutical into the market. Requirements from chemistry, routine application, and market are discussed. In a subsequent section, commercially available 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals are treated. It covers the complexes in use for imaging the most important target organs such as heart, brain, or kidney. The commercially available radiopharmaceuticals fulfill the requirements outlined earlier and are discussed with this background. In a following section, the properties and perspectives of the different generations of radiopharmaceuticals are described in a general way, covering characteristics for perfusion agents and for receptor-specific molecules. Technetium chemistry for the synthesis of perfusion agents and the different labeling approaches for target-specific biomolecules are summarized. The review comprises a general introduction to the common approaches currently in use, employing the N x S4-x , [3+1] and 2-hydrazino-nicotinicacid (HYNIC) method as well as more recent strategies such as the carbonyl and the TcN approach. Direct labeling without the need of a bifunctional chelator is briefly reviewed as well. More particularly, recent developments in the labeling of concrete targeting molecules, the second generation of radiopharmaceuticals, is then discussed and prominent examples with antibodies/peptides, neuroreceptor targeting small molecules, myocardial imaging agents, vitamins, thymidine, and complexes relevant to multidrug resistance are given. In addition, a new approach toward peptide drug development is described. The section

  14. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  15. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  16. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  17. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  18. 30 CFR 47.43 - Label alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label alternatives. 47.43 Section 47.43 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.43 Label alternatives. The operator...

  19. China`s environmental labeling program

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, J.; Xia, Q.

    1999-09-01

    China`s environmental labeling program was created because the government wanted to improve environmental management, and some Chinese enterprises expected that labeling would help eliminate non-tariff barriers for their exports and allow them to expand their domestic market shares. The labeling program, which is managed by the Chinese government, is a voluntary third-party certification system based on labeling procedures developed in Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Thus far, China`s labeling program has increased consumer awareness of labeled products and encouraged some enterprises to adopt cleaner technologies in products that have close relationships with consumers` health. However, the effectiveness of the program is very limited because only a small number of product categories are included in the program, consumers` purchasing behavior in China has been influenced by environmental labels for only several types of products, and relatively few enterprises participate in this program. The following measures would improve the effectiveness of the labeling program: enhancing public awareness of environmental labeling and environmental protection, increasing the number of product categories involved in environmental labeling, displaying more information on labels, and integrating the labeling program into China`s efforts to promote cleaner production and to encourage compliance with ISO 14000 standards.

  20. 21 CFR 660.55 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling. 660.55 Section 660.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Anti-Human Globulin § 660.55 Labeling. In addition to the applicable labeling requirements...

  1. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  2. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  3. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  4. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  5. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  6. 27 CFR 19.604 - Caution label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Caution label. 19.604... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Containers and Marks Marks § 19.604 Caution label... denaturer may be printed on such label, but no other extraneous matter will be permitted thereon without...

  7. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  8. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cannot be removed without defacing or destroying them. Product labels shall appear as in paragraph (d)(2... packaging, the label must be attached to the innermost layer adjacent to the product. If the innermost layer... product's innermost layer of product wrapping or packaging, or a label must be attached to the next...

  9. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  10. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  11. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  12. 21 CFR 606.121 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 606.121 Section 606.121 Food and... CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR BLOOD AND BLOOD COMPONENTS Finished Product Control § 606.121 Container label. (a) The container label requirements are designed to facilitate the use of a...

  13. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  14. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  15. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  16. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  17. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  18. 47 CFR 15.19 - Labelling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...), and the resulting product is not separately tested: ER09DE03.001 (2) Label text and information should... label on these products shall be permanently affixed to the product and shall be readily visible to the... label shall be located in a conspicuous location on the device and shall contain the...

  19. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  20. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  1. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  2. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  3. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  4. 27 CFR 18.55 - Label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Operations § 18.55 Label. Each container of concentrate will have affixed thereto, before transfer, a label identifying the product and... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Label. 18.55 Section...

  5. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... following items shall appear on the label affixed to each container of a product capable of bearing a full label: (1) The proper name of the product; (2) The name, address, and license number of manufacturer; (3... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food...

  6. 9 CFR 116.3 - Label records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... Each label shall be identified as to: (1) Name and product code number as it appears on the product... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Label records. 116.3 Section 116.3..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS RECORDS AND REPORTS § 116.3 Label...

  7. 40 CFR 763.171 - Labeling requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cannot be removed without defacing or destroying them. Product labels shall appear as in paragraph (d)(2... packaging, the label must be attached to the innermost layer adjacent to the product. If the innermost layer... product's innermost layer of product wrapping or packaging, or a label must be attached to the next...

  8. 40 CFR 211.105 - Label format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label format. 211.105 Section 211.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.105 Label format. (a) Unless specified otherwise in other...

  9. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...

  10. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Device labeling. 820.120 Section 820.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each...